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Sample records for oncocytic thyroid tumours

  1. Cytomorphological features of oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymphocytic thyroiditis

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    Nivedita Patnaik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytological diagnosis of hurthle cell lesions of thyroid is a diagnostic dilemma. Presence of hurthle cells on fine needle aspiration (FNA leads to a wide range of differential diagnosis including benign and malignant entities. The oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC is one entity of the vast list of differentials of which very few cases have been reported to date. We report a case of oncocytic variant of PTC in a 28-year-old female diagnosed on cytomorphology. The findings of FNA smears of the first aspirate were not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis. Repeat FNA was done to rule out the possibility of autoimmune thyroiditis/thyroid neoplasm. The repeat FNA smears showed oncocytic cells present in papillary and loosely cohesive clusters. Many of the cells displayed nuclear features of PTC and the case was finally diagnosed as PTC; oncocytic variant. Thyroidectomy specimen revealed PTC; oncocytic variant with lymphocytic thyroiditis in the surrounding tissue. Thus, in cytology practice, concurrent autoimmune thyroiditis may pose a problem in diagnosis of PTC; oncocytic variant.

  2. Immunoproteasome overexpression underlies the pathogenesis of thyroid oncocytes and primary hypothyroidism: studies in humans and mice.

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    Hiroaki J Kimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncocytes of the thyroid gland (Hürthle cells are found in tumors and autoimmune diseases. They have a unique appearance characterized by abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nucleus. Their pathogenesis has remained, thus far, unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using transgenic mice chronically expressing IFNgamma in thyroid gland, we showed changes in the thyroid follicular epithelium reminiscent of the human oncocyte. Transcriptome analysis comparing transgenic to wild type thyrocytes revealed increased levels of immunoproteasome subunits like LMP2 in transgenics, suggesting an important role of the immunoproteasome in oncocyte pathogenesis. Pharmacologic blockade of the proteasome, in fact, ameliorated the oncocytic phenotype. Genetic deletion of LMP2 subunit prevented the development of the oncocytic phenotype and primary hypothyroidism. LMP2 was also found expressed in oncocytes from patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and Hürthle cell tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we report that oncocytes are the result of an increased immunoproteasome expression secondary to a chronic inflammatory milieu, and suggest LMP2 as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of oncocytic lesions and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  3. Genome haploidisation with chromosome 7 retention in oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma.

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    Willem E Corver

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (NMTC is a rare disease. We initially characterized 27 recurrent NMTC: 13 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC, 10 oncocytic follicular carcinomas (FTC-OV, and 4 non-oncocytic follicular carcinomas (FTC. A validation cohort composed of benign and malignant (both recurrent and non-recurrent thyroid tumours was subsequently analysed (n = 20. METHODS: Data from genome-wide SNP arrays and flow cytometry were combined to determine the chromosomal dosage (allelic state in these tumours, including mutation analysis of components of PIK3CA/AKT and MAPK pathways. RESULTS: All FTC-OVs showed a very distinct pattern of genomic alterations. Ten out of 10 FTC-OV cases showed near-haploidisation with or without subsequent genome endoreduplication. Near-haploidisation was seen in 5/10 as extensive chromosome-wide monosomy (allelic state [A] with near-haploid DNA indices and retention of especially chromosome 7 (seen as a heterozygous allelic state [AB]. In the remaining 5/10 chromosomal allelic states AA with near diploid DNA indices were seen with allelic state AABB of chromosome 7, suggesting endoreduplication after preceding haploidisation. The latter was supported by the presence of both near-haploid and endoreduplicated tumour fractions in some of the cases. Results were confirmed using FISH analysis. Relatively to FTC-OV limited numbers of genomic alterations were identified in other types of recurrent NMTC studied, except for chromosome 22q which showed alterations in 6 of 13 PTCs. Only two HRAS, but no mutations of EGFR or BRAF were found in FTC-OV. The validation cohort showed two additional tumours with the distinct pattern of genomic alterations (both with oncocytic features and recurrent. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that recurrent FTC-OV is frequently characterised by genome-wide DNA haploidisation, heterozygous retention of chromosome 7, and endoreduplication of a near-haploid genome. Whether normal

  4. Oncocytic follicular nodules of the thyroid with or without chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis: An institutional experience

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    Sule Canberk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Oncocytic follicular (OF cells can be a prominent component of fine needle aspiration (FNA specimens from neoplasms (adenomas and carcinomas and nodules arising in multinodular goiter and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT. Because OF cells can be present in non-neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions it can be challenging to differentiate between these two in FNA specimens. The aims of this study were to determine the risk of malignancy in cases diagnosed as either oncocytic follicular neoplasm (OFN or hyperplastic/adenomatoid nodule with OF on FNA and to identify clinicopathologic features that may help in predicting malignancy in such cases, especially the presence or absence of CLT. Design : We retrospectively searched the computerized laboratory information system at our institution between 1998 and 2009 for thyroid US guided FNA specimens in which the term "oncocytic/oncocytes" was mentioned in the final cytopathologic diagnosis. A total of 340 cases were selected for this study. The following data points were collected: Patient demographics, site of thyroid biopsy, size of lesion, FNA diagnosis, histopathologic follow-up and presence of CLT. Surgical pathology follow-up (SPFU was available in 269 (79% cases. Results : Two hundred and sixty patients were females and 80 males (average age 53 years. The lesion size was <3.0 cm in 241 (71% and ≥ 3.0 cm in 99 (29% cases. Cytologic diagnoses included: Follicular neoplasm with oncocytic features (FNOF 321 and suggestive of FNOF 19 cases; a secondary cytologic diagnosis of CLT was made in 20 cases. SPFU was available in 269 (79% cases; it was benign in 213 (213/267 = 79% and malignant in 56 (56/269 = 21% cases. The background thyroid showed CLT in 67 (25% cases; 24% (48/196 neoplasms occurred with versus 76% (147/196 without CLT. The rate of malignancy was lower in nodules measuring less than 3.0 cm as compared to those equal or greater than 3.0 cm in size (17% vs. 28

  5. Late bone metastasis from an apparently benign oncocytic follicular thyroid tumor

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    Boronat, Mauro; Cabrera, Juan J; Perera, Carmen; Isla, Concepción; Nóvoa, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    A man underwent total thyroidectomy for goiter when he was 62 years old. The pathology report informed on a 5.5 cm oncocytic follicular adenoma and a 3.5 mm papillary microcarcinoma. Due to the papillary tumor, he was treated with ablative radioiodine therapy and suppressive doses of levothyroxine. After uneventful follow-up for 9 years, increased levels of serum thyroglobulin were detected. Further imaging studies including a whole body scan (WBS) after an empirical dose of 200 mCi 131I were negative. Two years later, a 99mTc SestaMIBI WBS and a 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron-emission tomography showed a well-delimited focal uptake in the right femur. A bone biopsy of the lesion demonstrated metastasis of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Retrospective histological reexamination of available material from the primary oncocytic thyroid tumor failed to reveal definitive traits of malignancy. Learning points Oncocytic follicular thyroid tumors are a relatively uncommon variant of follicular thyroid neoplasms mostly composed of distinctive large oxyphilic cells (Hürthle cells).Criteria for the distinction between benign and malignant oncocytic neoplasms are not different from those used in the diagnosis of ordinary follicular tumors.Some cases of apparently benign oncocytic neoplasms have been found to develop malignant behavior.Search to rule out vascular and capsular invasion should be particularly exhaustive in histological assessment of oncocytic thyroid tumors.Even so, long-term surveillance remains appropriate for patients with large apparently benign oncocytic tumors. PMID:24616777

  6. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

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    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysis of a parotid and a thyroid oncocytoma, developed by a BHD and a CS patient, respectively. The BHD lesion was shown to maintain the wild-type allele of FLCN, while losing one PTEN allele. On the other hand, a double heterozygosity for the same two genes was found to be the only detectable tumorigenic hit in the CS oncocytoma. Both conditions occurred in a context of high chromosomal stability, as highlighted by comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. We conclude that, similarly to PTEN, FLCN may not always follow the classical Two Hits model of tumorigenesis and may hence belong to a class of non-canonical tumour suppressor genes. We hence introduce a role of PTEN/FLCN double heterozygosity in syndromic oncocytic tumorigenesis, suggesting this to be an alternative determinant to pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, which are instead the genetic hallmark of sporadic oncocytic tumours. PMID:23386036

  7. LES TUMEURS ONCOCYTAIRES DE LA THYROIDE :

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19 déc. 2007 ... Mots clés : tumeur oncocytaire, tumeur à cellules de Hurthle, cancer ... Key words : oncocytic tumour, Hurthle cells tumor, thyroid carcinoma, thyroidectomy ..... Hürthle cell (oxyphilic) papillary thyroid carcinoma: a variant with.

  8. [Oncocytic tumors of the thyroid. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Report of 17 cases and review of the literature].

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    Gaschignard, N; Letessier, E; Hamy, A; Sagan, C; Cuillière, P; Courant, O; Paineau, J; Visset, J

    1996-07-01

    Histopathologic and clinical follow-up data of 17 patients observed 3-104 months (mean: 38 months) after operation for oncocytic tumors of the thyroid gland are presented. Mean patient age was 50 +/- 15 years. Benign and malignant lesions were respectively 13 and 4. Frozen sections were positive for benign and malignant lesions in respectively 7 and 2 cases. Total thyroidectomy was performed in all cases of malignant lesions and in 7 cases of benign lesion, the latter in order to treat high volume adenomas or associated controlateral lesions. No tumor relapse was observed during the follow-up period (data about 16 patients). A review of the literature indicates that thyroid oncocytic adenoma diagnosis can be trusted and that this tumor is not especially prone to a malignant course with the mode of treatment applied. Thus total thyroidectomy should be recommended for: 1) malignant tumors. 2) and for selected benign adenomas depending on the tumor volume or on associated lesions.

  9. Maltoma of Thyroid: A Rare Thyroid Tumour

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    Navisha Latheef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary thyroid lymphomas constitute up to 5% of all thyroid malignancies and can be divided into non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs of B- and T-cell types, as well as Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphomas are a relatively recently recognized subset of B-cell NHLs, and they are listed as extranodal marginal zone lymphomas according to the revised European-American lymphoma classification. Case Report. We report an uncommon case of a 44-year-old man, who noted a painless, growing mass on right side of his neck of the three-month duration. Thyroid profile was within normal limits. FNAC showed lymphocytic thyroiditis. The patient underwent a right hemithyroidectomy. The histologic examination and the immunohistochemistry showed an extra nodal marginal B-cell type maltoma (malt lymphoma. CHOP chemotherapy with rituximab was given. The clinical course has been favourable in the first year of followup, with no evidence of local or systemic recurrence of the disease. Discussion. Marginal zone lymphoma encompasses a heterogeneous group of B-cell tumours that variously arise within the lymph nodes, spleen, or extranodal tissues. A case of maltoma of thyroid is presented for its rarity and diagnostic dilemmas. Conclusion. Maltomas are slow-growing lymphomas. The optimal treatment and followup of patients with thyroid maltomas remain controversial at present.

  10. Elevated blood Hsp60, its structural similarities and cross-reactivity with thyroid molecules, and its presence on the plasma membrane of oncocytes point to the chaperonin as an immunopathogenic factor in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

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    Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rizzo, Manfredi; Citarrella, Roberto; Rappa, Francesca; Campanella, Claudia; Bucchieri, Fabio; Patti, Angelo; Nikolic, Dragana; Cabibi, Daniela; Amico, Giandomenico; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Montalto, Giuseppe; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The role Hsp60 might play in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases is under investigation, but little information exists pertaining to Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). With the aim to fill this gap, in the present work, we directed our attention to Hsp60 participation in HT pathogenesis. We found Hsp60 levels increased in the blood of HT patients compared to controls. The chaperonin was immunolocalized in thyroid tissue specimens from patients with HT, both in thyrocytes and oncocytes (Hurthle cells) with higher levels compared to controls (goiter). In oncocytes, we found Hsp60 not only in the cytoplasm but also on the plasma membrane, as shown by double immunofluorescence performed on fine needle aspiration cytology. By bioinformatics, we found regions in the Hsp60 molecule with remarkable structural similarity with the thyroglobulin (TG) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) molecules, which supports the notion that autoantibodies against TG and TPO are likely to recognize Hsp60 on the plasma membrane of oncocytes. This was also supported by data obtained by ELISA, showing that anti-TG and anti-TPO antibodies cross-react with human recombinant Hsp60. Antibody-antigen (Hsp60) reaction on the cell surface could very well mediate thyroid cell damage and destruction, perpetuating inflammation. Experiments with recombinant Hsp60 did not show stimulation of cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HT patients. All together, these results led us to hypothesize that Hsp60 may be an active player in HT pathogenesis via an antibody-mediated immune mechanism.

  11. Melanotic oncocytic metaplasia of nasopharynx: a case report with review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan; LU Zhao-hui; L(U) Wei; CHEN Jie

    2010-01-01

    @@ Oncocytic metaplasia is a well-established pathological entity that may occur in many organs; including salivary glands, thyroid, parathyroid and kidney. The occurrence of oncocytic metaplasia in the nasopharynx is uncommon and metaplasia with melanin pigmentation is extremely rare, no more than twenty cases having been reported to date.

  12. Oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis%甲状腺乳头状癌嗜酸细胞变异型伴桥本甲状腺炎临床病理观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋秀平; 宦大为; 王翠芳

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨甲状腺乳头状癌嗜酸细胞变异型伴桥本甲状腺炎的病理形态学特征.方法 对1例甲状腺乳头状癌嗜酸细胞变异型伴桥本甲状腺炎进行病理形态学及免疫组化分析,复习该病变的相关文献并讨论其诊断及鉴别诊断要点.结果 组织学形态主要表现为乳头状癌间质中有大量淋巴细胞、浆细胞浸润,癌细胞嗜酸性变.免疫组化示肿瘤组织CK19、HBME-1、CK、TG、TTF-1和EMA呈弥漫或大部分(+),calcitonin、p53和Ki-67均(-).结论 甲状腺乳头状癌嗜酸细胞变异型伴桥本甲状腺炎具有比较独特的组织学形态,在临床病理诊断中很容易误诊为桥本甲状腺炎伴滤泡上皮嗜酸变等形态结构相近的良、恶性病变.形态学上乳头状癌癌细胞特征性核改变及免疫组化CK19和HBME-1(+)有助于其诊断和鉴别诊断.%Objective To review and discuss the pathological features of oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto 's thyroiditis. Methods One case of oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was investigated with pathological morphology and immunohistochemistry methods. Relevant literatures were reviewed. Discussion was focused on the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MFPTC. Results The histological characteristics of oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis included papillary carcinoma of interstitial infiltration of large number of lymphocytes and plasma cells, eosinophilic cell change. Immunohistochemical staining of CK19, HBME1 , CK, TG, TTF-1 and EMA showed simultaneous expression with diffusely or mostly positive pattern. Calcitonin, P53 and KJ67 were negative. Conclusion Oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis has a relatively unique histological feature. In the clinical setting, this tumor can easily be misdiagnosed as

  13. Tumour suppressive function of HUWE1 in thyroid cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WEIYUAN MA; PENGXIN ZHAO; LEILEI ZANG; KAILI ZHANG; HAIYING LIAO; ZHIGANG HU

    2016-09-01

    HUWE1 (the HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing protein 1) is an ubiquitin E3 ligase which plays animportant role in coordinating diverse cellular processes. It has been found to be dysregulated in various cancer typeand its functions in tumorigenesis remain controversial. The potential tumour suppressive role of HUWE1 in thyroidcancer development was investigated by knocking down HUWE1 in three authentic thyroid cancer cell lines, WRO,FTC133 and BCPAP, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, scratch wound healing andinvasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour suppressive properties of HUWE1.Small-interfering RNA mediated knockdown of HUWE1 promoted cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion inthyroid cancer cells. Overexpression of HUWE1 conferred partial sensitivity to chemo drugs interfering with DNAreplication in these cells. Moreover, HUWE1 was found to be down-regulated in human thyroid cancer tissuescompared with matched normal thyroid tissues. In addition, overexpression of HUWE1 significantly inhibited tumourgrowth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that HUWE1 can regulate p53protein level through its stabilization. HUWE1 functions as a tumour suppressor in thyroid cancer progression, whichmay represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of thyroid cancer.

  14. Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm presenting with Cushing's syndrome: a case report

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    Kabayegit Ozlem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncocytic neoplasms occur in several organs and are most commonly found in the thyroid, kidneys and salivary glands. Oncocytic neoplasms of the adrenal cortex are extremely rare and are usually non-functioning. Case presentation We report the case of an adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm with uncertain malignant potential in a 31-year-old man with Cushing's syndrome. The patient had been operated on following diagnosis of a 7 cm adrenal mass. Following surgery, the Cushing's syndrome resolved. The patient is still alive with no metastases one year after the surgery. Conclusion Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms must be considered in the differential diagnosis of both functioning and non-functioning adrenal masses.

  15. Oncocytic hyperplasia of the larynx.

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    Thawley, S E; Berlin, B P; Berkowitz, W P

    1977-07-01

    Oncocytic hyperplasia of the larynx is rare. The lesion most commonly arises from the false vocal chord. A distinction arises between oncocytomas of the salivary glands which are considered to be neoplasms and extrasalivary oncocytic lesions which are secondary to hyperplasia. Oncocytic lesions of the larynx are benign and treatment is excision. They may be multiple, but recurrences are rare.

  16. Role of Pituitary Tumour Transforming Gene 1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

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    Maria Chiara Zatelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pituitary tumour transforming gene 1 (PTTG1 is over-expressed in a variety of endocrine-related tumours. We aimed at evaluating PTTG1 expression and function in human neoplastic parafollicular C-cells, represented by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC and C-cell hyperplasia (CCH samples and by the TT cell line.

  17. Oncocytic carcinoid of lung: an ultrastructural analysis.

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    Scharifker, D; Marchevsky, A

    1981-02-01

    A 52-year-old man with a typical carcinoid tumor of the lung in which the tumor cells displayed marked oncocytic metaplasia is presented. The clinicopathologic and ultrastructural differences with so-called oncocytic of the lung are discussed. The potential of Kulchitsky cell derivatives to undergo oncocytic metaplasma is documented ultrastructurally.

  18. Oncocytic Adenocarcinoma of the Orbit.

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    Harris, Gerald J; Paul, Sean; Hunt, Bryan C

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of the orbit is a rare tumor, with 1 case of nonlacrimal sac, nonlacrimal gland origin, and a poor outcome previously reported. An 85-year-old man with a 2-month history of left-sided epiphora, enlarging eyelid nodules, and diplopia in left gaze was found on imaging to have a poorly circumscribed, nodular mass of uniform radiodensity in the inferomedial orbit. Incisional biopsy revealed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of oncocytic adenocarcinoma with origin in the caruncle suspected, and CT of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no metastases or remote primary tumor source. Based on multidisciplinary consensus, orbital exenteration with adjuvant radiation therapy was performed, and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor 2 years after treatment.

  19. Thyroid tumours in the senile guppy, Lebistes reticulatus (Peters)

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    Woodhead, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    We have previously described a thyroid growth which had arisen spontaneously in a few senile fish from a laboratory population of guppies, Lebistes (Poecilia) reticulatus. We believed that this growth was neoplastic. Our histological interpretation has been questioned. In view of the problems in distinguishing between neoplastic an goitrous thyroid tissue in teleost fishes, we show photomicrographs of kidney and liver metastases from this tumor to support our earlier diagnosis.

  20. Geographical mapping of a multifocal thyroid tumour using genetic alteration analysis & miRNA profiling

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    Li Jing

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC frequently presents as multiple tumour-foci within a single thyroid gland or pluriform, with synchronous tumours comprising different histological variants, raising questions regarding its clonality. Among the genetic aberrations described in PTC, the BRAF V600E mutation and ret/PTC activation occur most commonly. Several studies have investigated the genetic alteration status of multifocal thyroid tumours, with discordant results. To address the question of clonality this study examined disparate geographical and morphological areas from a single PTC (classic PTC, insular and anaplastic foci, and tumour cells adjacent to vascular invasion and lymphocytic infiltrate for the presence of ret/PTC 1 or BRAF mutations. Moreover, we wanted to investigate the consistency of miRNA signatures within disparate areas of a tumour, and geographical data was further correlated with expression profiles of 330 different miRNAs. Putative miRNA gene targets were predicted for differentially regulated miRNAs and immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue sections in an effort to investigate phenotypic variations in microvascular density (MVD, and cytokeratin and p53 protein expression levels. Results All of the morphological areas proved negative for ret/PTC 1 rearrangement. Two distinct foci with classic morphology harboured the BRAF mutation. All other regions, including the insular and anaplastic areas were negative for the mutation. MiRNA profiles were found to distinguish tumours containing the BRAF mutation from the other tumour types, and to differentiate between the more aggressive insular & anaplastic tumours, and the classic variant. Our data corroborated miRNAs previously discovered in this carcinoma, and additional miRNAs linked to various processes involved in tumour growth and proliferation. Conclusion The initial genetic alteration analysis indicated that pluriform PTC did not necessarily evolve

  1. Thyroid transcription factor-1 immunohistochemistry: diagnostic tool and malignancy marker in canine malignant lung tumours.

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    Bettini, G; Marconato, L; Morini, M; Ferrari, F

    2009-03-01

    Distinguishing primary lung carcinomas (PLCs) from metastases is a challenging task. The diagnostic and prognostic relevance of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), a nuclear protein expressed in follicular cells of the thyroid gland and pneumocytes, was tested in 34 primary and 27 nonprimary canine lung tumours. Normal pneumocytes stained negatively in 14 PLCs because of overfixation or prolonged storage of paraffin blocks and were excluded from the study. Among the 20 immunoreactive PLCs, 17 showed strong nuclear positivity. The three tumours that scored negative were two squamous cell and one papillary carcinoma. Metastatic tumours were always negative. TTF-1 was 100% specific and 85% sensitive for PLCs. There was no significant relationship among the percentage of labelled tumour cells (TTF-1 index) and the considered clinicopathological parameters (age, gender, histological type, tumour grade, TNM stage, node status and MIB-1 index). TTF-1 immunohistochemistry may give useful additional information regarding the origin of canine lung tumours, whereas its prognostic use still needs to be determined.

  2. Leukemia and Thyroid Tumour in an East-Slovakian District after Chernobyl

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    Icso, J.; Szoelloesova, M

    1998-07-01

    The incidence of leukaemia and thyroid gland tumour in the 10 year period after the Chernobyl accident has been investigated in Roznava-district with {gamma}86,000 inhabitants (east Slovakia, 1600 km SW of Chernobyl), and compared with a control period before the accident. A 2.1 times higher cumulative incidence of acute lymphatic leukaemia (median age: 11 y) and 1.3 times higher of thyroid gland tumour (median age: 47 y) was found compared with the same period before the accident. There was no increase in acute myeloid leukaemia, nor in chronic cases. A statistical analysis using the {gamma}{sup 2}-test, however, showed the results were not significant. Most of all the cases were in 1990-95 (45% of all cases), thyroid tumours were cumulating in 1992 and 1994 (53%). Although an association with an exposure to radiation was not proved, the results could support a hypothesis of a positive correlation even in such a relatively distant area of east Slovakia. (author)

  3. Oncocytic lesions of the ophthalmic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jens; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to make a nationwide clinicopathological study of oncocytic lesions in the ophthalmic region and to characterize their cytokeratin (CK) expression. Methods: All histologically diagnosed oncocytic lesions in the ophthalmic region registered in Denmark over a 25-year period...... were collected and re-evaluated using a monoclonal antimitochondrial antibody (MU213-UC). Clinical data were registered. Immunohistochemical characterization was performed with a panel of anti-CK antibodies. Results: A total of 34 oncocytic lesions were identified and reviewed. The incidence...... that required surgical intervention in the Danish population could be approximated to 0.3 lesions per million capita per year. Patient ages ranged from 45 years to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the eighth decade. Female patients were twice as common as male. Lesions were typically described as red...

  4. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

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    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  5. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Iodine I 131 and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-26

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  6. Bile Duct Adenoma with Oncocytic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Johannesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct adenomas are benign bile duct proliferations usually encountered as an incidental finding. Oncocytic bile duct neoplasms are rare and the majority are malignant. A 61-year-old male with a diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma was undergoing surgery when a small white nodule was discovered on the surface of the right lobe of his liver. This lesion was composed of cytologically bland cells arranged in tightly packed glands. These cells were immunopositive for cytokeratin 7, negative for Hep Par 1, contained mucin, and had a Ki67 proliferation index of 8%. The morphology, immunophenotype, presence of mucin, and normal appearing bile ducts, as well as the increased Ki67 proliferation rate, were consistent with a bile duct adenoma with oxyphilic (oncocytic change. Oncocytic tumors in the liver are rare; the first described in 1992. Only two bile duct adenomas with oncocytic change have been reported and neither of them had reported mucin production or the presence of normal appearing bile ducts within the lesion.

  7. Deficiency of respiratory chain complex I in Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Franz A; Neureiter, Daniel; Feichtinger, René G; Trost, Andrea; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic cells (OCs) are characterized by an accumulation of mitochondria and their occurrence in the thyroid gland of patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is well known. However, their properties and functional relevance are poorly understood. We investigated OC lesions (n=212) in the thyroid of 12 HT patients. Loss of complex I protein was observed in oncocytic lesions of each of the patients. In addition to isolated complex I deficiency, 25% of oncocytic lesions showed combined deficiency of complex I and IV. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a defect of respiratory chain complex I in OCs of HT patients.

  8. Primary tumour size is a prognostic parameter in patients suffering from differentiated thyroid carcinoma with extrathyroidal growth: results of the MSDS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Jan Alexander; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Dralle, Henning; Dietlein, Markus; Schicha, Harald; Lerch, Hartmut; Gerss, Joachim; Frankewitsch, Thomas; Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard

    2010-10-01

    The Multicentre Study Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (MSDS) collective represents a well-defined group of patients with thyroid carcinomas with extrathyroidal extension. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship of the primary tumour size with clinicopathological features as well as the outcome of patients with minimum and extensive extrathyroidal growth (pT3b- and pT4a-tumours; UICC 2002/2003, 6th ed). The tumour diameter was available in 324 out of 351 MSDS patients (244 females, 80 males). Mean age of patients was 47.7±12.0 years (range, 20.1-69.8 years), and the median follow-up was 6.2 years. The relationship between primary tumour size and the following clinicopathological data was investigated: age, gender, histological tumour type (papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) versus follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC)) and UICC/AJCC TNM classification. In addition, the correlation between primary tumour size and event-free and overall survival was assessed. The FTC of our series were significantly larger than PTC (3.46 vs 1.84 cm; P2 cm. Furthermore, event-free and overall survival were significantly correlated with increasing tumour size (P2 cm remained independent predictors of survival. In patients suffering from differentiated thyroid carcinoma with extrathyroidal growth (pT3b and pT4a), the tumour size is an independent predictor of event-free and overall survival.

  9. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  10. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas.

  11. TERT promoter mutations: a genetic signature of benign and malignant thyroid tumours occurring in the context of tinea capitis irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Paula; Batista, Rui; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mendes, Adélia; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and molecular characteristics of TERTp mutations in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas occurring in the low-dose radiation exposure tinea capitis setting. Twenty-seven patients with 34 well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas and 28 patients with 29 follicular adenomas diagnosed in a Portuguese tinea capitis cohort were studied. Blood samples were obtained from all the patients. Screening for TERTp mutations was performed by PCR amplification followed by Sanger sequencing. A series of 33 sporadic thyroid adenomas was used as control. TERTp mutations were detected in six of the 28 patients with adenoma (21.4%) and in four of the 27 patients with carcinoma (14.8%). Three tumours (two carcinomas and one adenoma) had the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA (30.0%), whereas the remaining seven had the -124G > A. The 20.7% frequency of TERTp mutations in adenomas contrasts with the absence of mutations in the adenomas from the control group and from most series on record, whereas the one found in carcinomas (11.8%) is similar to those reported in the literature for sporadic carcinomas. TERTp mutations, including the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA not described previously in thyroid tumours, appear to represent a genetic signature for thyroid tumours in patients submitted to low-dose X-ray irradiation. The high frequency of TERTp mutations in the adenomas of our cohort contrasts with their absence in sporadically occurring, as well as in adenomas of the Chernobyl series. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  12. A Rare Case of Concomitant Maxilla and Mandible Brown Tumours, Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, Parathyroid Adenoma, and Osteitis Fibrosa Cystica

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    Thaís Borguezan Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism is a result of a metabolic disorder caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. Report. We described a case of a 37-year-old female patient presenting bimaxillary intraoral lesions and swelling in the neck. Incisional biopsy of the oral lesion was performed and histopathological examination revealed a central giant cell lesion composed by intense haemorrhagic exudate, abundant presence of giant cells, and areas with hemosiderin pigment. The patient also presented high levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone, hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue, bilateral parenchymal nephropathy, and densitometry lower than expected, showing an advanced stage of osteitis fibrosa cystica. Synchronous parathyroid adenoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma were confirmed by imaging exams and histopathologically. Conclusion. The composition of all the clinical, pathological, and imaging findings led to the final diagnosis of brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism. The occurrence of parathyroid adenoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, and brown tumours of hyperparathyroidism in their late stage (osteitis fibrosa cystica associated with oral brown tumours involving the mandible and maxilla is extremely rare.

  13. WARTHIN TUMOR LIKE PAPILLARY CARCINOMA OF THYROID: A RARE OCCURENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Among the thyroid cancers, papillary carcinoma is the most common type. Warthin tumor like papillary carcinoma of thyroid is a rare variant of papillary carcinoma. The distinguishing feature of this rare variant is papillary formations lined by tumor cells with oncocytic cytoplasm with nuclear features of papillary carcinoma and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in the papillary stalks with striking histological resemblance to Warthin’s tumor of salivary glands. A 46 years old female with complaints of painless swelling of the neck for four years and gradually increasing in size, measuring 3x2.5 cm on the right lobe of the thyroid gland. The swelling moved with deglutition, non-tender and firm to hard in consistency. Thyroid function was within normal limits. FNAC suggested a diagnosis of oxyphilic variant of papillary carcinoma of thyroid. It showed syncytial aggregates, sheets of cells and few papillary structures with focal nuclear crowding. The patient underwent bilateral total thyroidectomy and neck dissection. Microscopic examination showed predominantly follicles and small papillary structures lined by cells having eosinophilic cytoplasm and clear nucleus. There was lymphoid stroma in the core of papillae and interfolllicular areas. Hyalinized collagen, dystrophic calcification and follicles without colloid matter infiltrating the hyalinised area were seen. No lymphovascualr tumour embolization were noted. This tumor is found more commonly in women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. The prognosis is favourable as conventional papillary carcinoma. About 8% of Warthin’s tumor are detected in extraparotid locations.

  14. Impact of F DOPA-PET on therapeutic decision in endocrine tumours: digestive tumours, medullary thyroid cancer or pheochromocytoma; Impact de la TEP a la fluoro-(18)-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA) sur l'attitude therapeutique en cas de tumeur endocrine: tumeur digestive, cancer medullaire de la thyroide ou pheochromocytome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montravers, F.; Grahek, D.; Kerrou, K.; Gutman, F.; Beco, V. de; Nataf, V.; Balard, M.; Talbot, J.N. [Paris-6 Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Hopital Tenon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HP, 75 (France)

    2006-07-15

    FDOPA-PET has been proposed for a decade in oncology, in particular in endocrine tumours. To the best of our knowledge, only one impact rate has been reported: 31% in 17 patients with digestive carcinoid tumours. We did a questionnaire survey to evaluate this impact reported by the referring clinician in 87 patients who had FDOPA PET due to digestive carcinoid tumour or another type of digestive endocrine tumour or a medullary thyroid cancer or a pheochromocytoma. The response rate to the survey was 87%. The overall impact of FDOPA PET on patient's management was 36%. Its value was greater for digestive carcinoid tumour and for medullary thyroid cancer; the number of patients with pheochromocytoma is still limited. In the other digestive endocrine tumours, a change in patient management was less frequent and FDOPA PET should be performed when the other examinations are inconclusive. (author)

  15. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. [Thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  17. Medullary and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland occurring as a collision tumour: report of three cases with molecular analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, S; Fugazzola, L; De Pasquale, L; Braidotti, P; Cirello, V; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bosari, S; Bastagli, A

    2005-06-01

    We report the simultaneous occurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), presenting as spatially distinct and well-defined tumour components, in three cases. In the first patient, histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated an MTC in the one nodule and PTC in two additional lesions. Non-neoplastic thyroid parenchyma separated the three nodules. Metastasis from PTC was diagnosed in a regional lymph node. Genetic analysis of both tumour components showed a distinctive mutational pattern: in the MTC a Cys634Arg substitution in exon 11 of the RET gene and in the two PTC foci a Val600Glu substitution in exon 15 of the BRAF gene. The other two patients are members of a large multigenerational family affected with familial MTC due to a germline mutation of the RET gene (Ala891Ser). Both patients harboured, besides medullary cancer and C-cell hyperplasia, distinct foci of papillary thyroid cancer, which was positive for Val600Glu BRAF mutation. Review of the literature disclosed 18 similar lesions reported and allowed the identification of different patterns of clinical presentation and biological behaviour. So far, the pathogenesis of these peculiar cases of thyroid malignancy has been completely unknown, but an underlying common genetic drive has been hypothesised. This is the first report in which two mutations, in the RET and BRAF genes, have been identified in three cases of MTC/PTC collision tumour, thus documenting the different genetic origin of these two coexisting carcinomas.

  18. Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib in Treating Metastatic or Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Columnar Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Follicular Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  19. Thyroid and parathyroid tumours in patients submitted to X-ray scalp epilation during the tinea capitis eradication campaign in the North of Portugal (1950-1963).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Paula; Pereira, Dina; Mendes, Adélia; Teixeira-Gomes, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-10-01

    Tinea capitis attained epidemical proportions in the fifth and sixth decades in Portugal, as in other countries. Before starting the utilization of griseofulvin in 1959, the best approach to treat tinea capitis infection was X-ray scalp epilation combined with topical antimycotic ointments. A long-term side effect of this therapy is thyroid disease, namely thyroid cancer; data on parathyroid lesions (hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma) are scarce. We observed clinically 1,375 individuals irradiated in childhood for tinea capitis treatment in the North of Portugal with the main purpose of evaluating thyroid and parathyroid tumours as possible sequelae of the irradiation treatment. For each individual, a cervical ultrasound and a serum calcium measurement were proposed. Fine needle aspiration cytology was suggested whenever ultrasound thyroid nodules presented suspicious features. We observed a 54 % frequency of thyroid nodules and a 2.8 % frequency of thyroid carcinoma (38/1,375). Nineteen of the 38 (50 %) carcinomas were diagnosed by us, whereas the remaining 19 carcinomas had been diagnosed and treated prior to our observation. The carcinomas were significantly more frequent in women than in men. Benign excised lesions were also significantly more frequent in women and in patients irradiated at younger ages. Seven women, considered asymptomatic until our clinical observation, had laboratory signs of hyperparathyroidism. The data we have obtained, namely high thyroid cancer frequency, corroborate previous data from childhood irradiated cohorts and highlight the need for the close follow-up of these populations in order to identify and treat early undiagnosed head and neck lesions. No evidence of increased parathyroid disease was found in this cohort of head and neck X-irradiated patients.

  20. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  1. Extramammary paget disease of scrotum with oncocytic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneiros-Fernandez, J; Arias-Santiago, S; Husein-ElAhmed, H; Nicolae, Alina; Ravassa, F O'valle; Serrano-Ortega, S; Fernandez, F Nogales; Cachaza, J Aneiros

    2010-10-01

    We report an unusual case of primary scrotal extramammary Paget disease that infiltrated reticular dermis and lymph vessels, with metastasis in inguinal lymph node. The 67-year-old patient died at 14 months due to systemic metastases. The tumor, which was located in epidermis and infiltrated the dermis, comprised cells with wide, granular, and eosinophilic cytoplasm and intense positivity for antimitochondrial antibody. This seems to be the first report of oncocytic changes in extramammary Paget disease.

  2. Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma: A rare tumor of the thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray Can

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma is a rare variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with favorable prognosis. The tumor is named “Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma” because of bearing a striking morphological resemblance to Warthin’s tumor occurring in the salivary glands. Thyroid ultrasonography of 65 years old female patient with a history of bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy 30 years ago in another center with unknown histopathological diagnosis revealed a 20 mm isoechoic solid nodule in the left lobe and this nodule was hypoactive in thyroid scintigraphy. Grossly, a grey-tan colored, solid nodule with 1 cm diameter was seen in the left lobe. Histologically, the tumor was composed of papillary structures surrounded by marked lymphocytic stroma and oncocytic cells with papillary carcinoma’s nuclear features were lining the papillae. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was present throughout the thyroid. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells exhibited cytokeratin 19, Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1, Galectin-3, HBME-1(Mesothelioma antibody and thyroglobulin positivity, proliferative index with Ki-67 was low. Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma is a rare variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma and other oncocytic cell lesions especially Hurthle cell carcinoma should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of this neoplasm.

  3. Parasitic thyroid nodule in a patient with Hashimoto's chronic thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Vitorino Modesto dos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of parasitic thyroid nodule is presented. The patient was a non symptomatic 53-year-old white woman, on irregular course of L-thyroxine to treat hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Without a history of thyroid trauma or surgery, she presented a 1.6 x 0.7 x 0.5cm right pre-laryngeal lymph node-like mass which, on ultrasonography, appeared distinct from the gland. TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody serum levels were elevated and T4-free level was normal. Thyroid and total body 99mTc isonitrile scintiscan showed a topic thyroid without radionuclide uptake in the nodule. Fine-needle aspiration of the nodule showed epithelial cells with nuclear atypia and oncocytic changes plus intense lymphoid infiltration and germinative center formation, simulating lymph node metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Conventional biopsy revealed a parasitic thyroid nodule with Hashimoto's chronic thyroiditis. Parasitic thyroid nodule must always be remembered so that unnecessary surgical assessment and undesirable sequels may be avoided.

  4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with perfusion analysis for the identification of malignant and benign tumours of the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, C M; Janke, M; Jung, W; Stroszczysnski, C; Jung, E M

    2015-10-27

    The aim of our study was to evaluate, whether the analysis of time intensity curves (TIC) of contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) could help to differentiate between thyroid adenomas and carcinomas in daily clinical routine.B-mode, Colour Coded Doppler Sonography (CCDS), Power Doppler (PD) and CEUS were applied for 50 patients (27 men, 23 women; mean age 51 years, range 16-81 years).CEUS cine-sequences were analysed using time intensity curves (TIC) and calculating time to peak (TTP) as well as the area under the curve (AUC).All 20 patients with carcinomas presented with a complete wash-out in the late phase of CEUS while this occurred only in three out of the 30 patients with adenomas.Marked differences were observed between adenomas and carcinomas concerning the mean AUC in the surrounding thyroid tissue (p = 0.041). In addition, TTP differed clearly between the centre and the surrounding of the carcinomas (p thyroid nodules and is helpful for the differentiation of benign and malignant nodules.

  5. Warthin-like variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: A diagnosis not to be missed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Reddy Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Warthin-like variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC is a recently described, uncommon variant of PTC. Proper identification of this variant is warranted as it shows good clinical behavior when compared with other oncocytic rich neoplasms of the thyroid. We present a case of Warthin-like variant of PTC in a 40-year-old female patient and describe the clinicopathological features, along with the differential diagnosis of this rare tumor.

  6. Enhanced bilateral somatostatin receptor expression in mediastinal lymph nodes (``chimney sign``) in occult metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a typical site of tumour manifestation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, T.M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany); Gratz, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany); Markus, P.M. [Department of Surgery (General and Endocrine Surgery), Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany); Dunn, R.M. [Garden State Cancer Center at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville (United States); Huefner, M. [Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology), Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany); Becker, H. [Department of Surgery (General and Endocrine Surgery), Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany); Becker, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg-August-University of Goettingen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    In medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), post-surgically elevated plasma calcitonin and/or carcinoembryonic antigen levels frequently indicate persisting metastatic disease, although conventional diagnostic procedures fail to localize the responsible lesions (occult disease). Somatostatin analogues have been used successfully in disease localization, but recently concerns have been raised that increased thoracic uptake of indium-111 pentetreotide in patients with previous external beam irradiation may represent a false-positive finding, caused by post-irradiation pulmonary fibrosis. We recently examined seven patients with metastatic MTC by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (six with occult and one with established disease). In four patients, all of whom had stable or slowly rising tumour marker levels over several years, a chimney-like bilateral mediastinal uptake of indium-111 pentetreotide was found. In two patients with persisting hypercalcitonaemia immediately after primary surgery, supraclavicular lymph node metastases were identified as the responsible lesions. None of these seven patients had prior external beam radiation therapy. In two cases, histological confirmation was obtained. In one patient, disease progression could be shown during follow-up. These data suggest that bilateral mediastinal lymph node involvement is a typical site of disease in slowly progressing occult metastatic MTC; the ``chimney sign`` may represent a typical finding with somatostatin analogues in such cases. Therefore, we believe that even in the case of prior external beam irradiation, mediastinal uptake of octreotide might represent metastatic MTC rather than radiation fibrosis. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Primary Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma of the thyroid with lymphocytic thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Raviprakash, C. S.; Joseph, Cherian; Xavier, Saju; Raj, Girish

    2005-01-01

    Primary Lymphoma of the thyroid is one of the very rare entities accounting to less than 2% of thyroid malignancies. We present a case of primary Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma of the thyroid with lymphocytic thyroiditis in a 60 year old woman. The patient presented with a rapidly growing nodular mass in the thyroid. The histological and immune marker features of the tumour were consistent with Primary Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma of the thyroid with associated thyroiditis.

  8. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm Having Clinical Characteristics of Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm and a Benign Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatomi Oku

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Context An intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumor which was first described by Adsay et al. in 1996. It has been defined as a new subgroup of IPMN. Case report We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who presented with nausea. Imaging studies revealed a cystic mass in the body of the pancreas. She underwent a successful distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and has subsequently remained well. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by columnar epithelium similar to pancreatic duct epithelium, and the nodular projection consisted of arborizing papillary structures, lined by plump cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. These eosinophilic cells were immunohistochemically positively stained with anti-mitochondrial antibody. The cellular atypism was mild and the proliferating index was low, compatible with adenoma of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm. Although no ovarian type stroma was identified, in our case, no communication to main pancreatic duct (located in the pancreatic body and rapid growth by intracystic hemorrhage were clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm, but not IPMN. Conclusion With only 17 cases reported to date, the clinical and pathological details of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm are still unclear. We herein add one case with different characteristics from those of the past reports. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm with the clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.

  9. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Application to human thyroid tumours; Mecanismes de mutagenese dans les cellules de mammifere. Le modele des tumeurs thyroidiennes humaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasin, A.; Bounacer, A.; Lepage, F.; Guillermo Suarez, H. [Institut de Recherches Scientifiques sur le Cancer, 94 - Villejuif (France). Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, UPR 42 CNRS; Schlumberger, M. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France). Service de Medecine Nucleaire

    1999-03-01

    -induced mutations are recessive ones, requiring therefore a second genetic event in order to exhibit any harmful effect and a long latency period before the development of a radiation-induced tumor. The fact that IR essentially induce deletions and chromosomal translocations renders very difficult the use of the p53 gene as a marker for mutation analysis. In agreement with the type of lesions induced by IR, it is interesting to point out that the presence has been observed, in a vast majority of radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), of an activated ret proto-oncogene originated by the fusion of the tyrosine kinase 3' domain of this gene with the 5' domain of four different genes. These ret chimeric genes which are due to intra- or inter-chromosomal translocations, were called RET/ PTC1 to PTC5. The RET/PTC rearrangements were found in PTC from children contaminated by the Chernobyl fall-out as well as in tumours from patients with a history of therapeutic external radiation, with a frequency of 60-84 %. This frequency was only 15 % in 'spontaneous' PTC. The type of ret chimeric gene predominantly originated by the accidental or therapeutic IR was different. Indeed, PTC1 was present in 75 % of the tumours linked to a therapeutic radiation and PTC3 in 75 % of the Chernobyl ones. The other forms of RET/PTC were observed in only a minority of the post-Chernobyl PTC (< 20 %). The difference in the frequency of PTC1 and PTC3 in both types of PTC, is statistically significant (p < 10{sup -5}, Fischer's exact test). In two of the post-therapeutic radiation PTC, RET/PTC1 and PTC3 were simultaneously present. A PTC1 gene was also observed in 45 % of the adenomas appearing after therapeutic radiation. The long period of latency between exposure to IR and the appearance of thyroid tumours is probably due to the conversion ofa heterozygote genotype of IR-induced mutations to a homozygote one. It will be interesting to use this time lag in accidental or

  10. Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeri H

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warthin tumor- like papillary carcinoma of thyroid is a rare variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. It is characterized by distinct papillary structures lined by oncocytic tumor cells with nuclear features of papillary carcinoma and marked lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate in the papillary stalks. This tumor derives its name from its resemblance to Warthin tumor of major salivary glands.Case presentation: We report a 54- year- old man presented with bilateral thyroid masses. Histopathological study showed papillary structures lined by cells with eosinophilic granular cytoplasm and ground- glass nuclei with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stalks.Conclusion: Warthin tumor-like papillary thyroid carcinoma could be mistaken for benign lymphoepithelial lesions such as Hashimoto thyroiditis, Hurthle cell tumors and tall cell variant of papillary carcinoma. Follow- up information on the previously reported cases has suggested that these tumors behave similarly to usual papillary carcinoma.

  11. Silent thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reaction of the thyroid gland. The disorder can cause hyperthyroidism, followed by hypothyroidism. The thyroid gland is located ... lymphocytic thyroiditis; Painless thyroiditis; Postpartum thyroiditis; Thyroiditis - silent; Hyperthyroidism - silent thyroiditis

  12. Warthin’s Tumour: A Case Report and Review on Pathogenesis and its Histological Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A R, Raghu; Bishen, Kundendu Arya; Sagari, Shitalkumar

    2014-01-01

    Warthin’s tumour/ Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum (PCL) constitutes a minority of salivary gland neoplasms and it is a monomorphic adenoma which primarily involves the parotid gland. Warthin’s tumour shows multiple cysts that have numerous papillations covered by bilayered columnar and basaloid oncocytic epithelium. The connective tissue portion shows proliferation of follicle- containing lymphoid tissue which necessitates careful distinction for diagnosis. Although, Warthin’s tumour presents as a clinically benign, slow-growing, usually asymptomatic lesion with low rates of recurrences and malignant transformation, but still this tumour is considered unique because of its histological appearance and unknown origin and pathogenesis. Here, we report a case of Warthin’s tumour of five years duration in a 50-year-old male patient in the right parotid gland and also review and discuss various concepts concerning the development of this tumour along with a comprehensive literature on its clinic-pathologic features. PMID:25386545

  13. Urothelial carcinoma with oncocytic features: an extremely rare case presenting a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing histological variants in urothelial carcinoma (UC) is important because some may be associated with different clinical outcomes and/or therapeutic approaches; being aware of unusual histological variants may also be crucial in preventing diagnostic misinterpretations. Histological variants based on cytoplasmic features, such as clear-cell, plasmacytoid, rhabdoid, and lipoid-rich variants, are described in invasive UC; however, these cytoplasmic features are not formally defined and not usually encountered in non-invasive UC. Oncocytic cytoplasm has not been well described in either invasive or non-invasive UC. Herein, we report an exceedingly rare case of UC with oncocytic features arising in the right renal pelvis, which presented a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology due to the relatively low nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio; however, it could definitively be diagnosed using histological specimens. UC diagnosis is based on the presence of papillary architecture and widespread p53 nuclear accumulation, suggesting malignancy. An oncocytic tumor is generally considered to be not actively dividing, as shown by the low Ki-67 labeling index in this case. In spite of the low proliferative activity, the possibility of intravesicle recurrence (IVR) should be considered since positive preoperative cytology of upper tract UC is a risk factor for IVR after nephroureterectomy.

  14. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas: a case of a second neoplasm in a pancreas cancer survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mrinal S; Schuerle, Theresa; Liu, Yulin; Thakkar, Shyam J

    2015-01-31

    Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  15. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas: A Case of a Second Neoplasm in a Pancreas Cancer Survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal S Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. Case report We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. Conclusion As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  16. Cytologic diagnosis of adrenal oncocytic pheochromocytoma in a lung cancer patient: Report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S Nam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal oncocytic pheochromocytoma is an extremely rare type of pheochromocytoma. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first cytological diagnosis of this variant via fine-needle aspiration in an 81-year-old male patient who was found to have an adrenal mass while undergoing workup of the recently diagnosed lung adenocarcinoma. We describe the cytomorphologic findings in our case and provide a review of the reported cases of adrenal oncocytic pheochromocytoma - all of which appear to be benign, nonfunctional, occur in adults, and have similar morphologic features. The pathologist should be aware of this uncommon diagnostic entity and its potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  17. Immunohistochemical identification of neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, chromogranin and endocrine granule constituent in neuroendocrine tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyberg, M; Horn, T; Francis, D

    1990-01-01

    Immunohistochemical identification of neuroendocrine tumour markers in paraffin embedded material from 22 tumours (5 small cell carcinomas of the lung (SCCL), 12 carcinoids, 2 medullary thyroid carcinomas, 2 pheochromocytomas and one paraganglioma) with electron microscopically verified dense...

  18. Thyroid storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... Thyroid storm occurs due to a major stress such as trauma, heart attack , or infection. In rare ...

  19. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (PSK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  20. Variante oncocítica del carcinoma mucoepidermoide Oncocyte variant of mucoepidermoid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirced Salazar Rodríguez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El carcinoma mucoepidermoide es el más común de todos los tumores malignos de glándulas salivales, constituye el 30 % de ellos. Aproximadamente la mitad de los casos (53 % ocurre en las glándulas salivales mayores. El 45 % predomina en glándula parótida, el 7 % en la submandibular y el 1 % en la glándula sublingual. Este tumor se presenta con más frecuencia en el sexo femenino (3:2 y en la quinta década de la vida. Múltiples variantes, con diferentes rangos de diferenciación han sido descritas, se incluyen: la oncocítica, esclerosante, uniquística, sebácea, de células claras, células globosas de alto grado, células fusocelular y psamomatosa. El carcinoma mucoepidermoide variante oncocítica es un subtipo raro que puede mostrar prominentes cambios oncocíticos. Se reporta un caso de carcinoma mucoepidermoide variante oncocítica de alto grado histológico. El índice de Ki 67 fue del 5 %, el tumor fue negativo para C-erb2 y presentó inmunorreactividad para E-caderina y Syndecan-1.The mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the commonest of all malignant tumors of salivary glands, accounting for the 30 % of them. Approximately the half of cases (53 % occurs in the major salivary glands. The 45 % has predominance in parotid gland, the 7 % in the submandibular one, and the 1 % in the sublingual gland one. This type of tumor is more frequent in female sex (3-2 and at fifth decade of life. Multiple variants with different ranks have been described including the oncocyte, sclerosant, unicystic, sebaceous, of clear cells, high degree spherical cells, fusocellular and psammomatous. The mucoepidermoid carcinoma, oncocyte variant, is an unusual subtype that may to shows significant oncocyte changes. Authors report a case of histological high degree mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The rate of Ki 67 was of 5 %, the negative tumor for C-erb2 and had immunoreaction to E-caderine and Syndecan-1.

  1. Thyroid Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource New Mobile App DOWNLOAD Thyroid Nodules March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Hindi ... Resources Mayo Clinic American Thyroid Association What are thyroid nodules and who is at risk? A thyroid ...

  2. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Thyroid Surgery Leer en Español Thyroid Surgery GENERAL INFORMATION Your doctor may recommend that ... made in conjunction with your endocrinologist and surgeon. Thyroid Surgery FAQs QUESTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS When thyroid surgery ...

  3. Thyroid Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  4. Voluminous Incidental Oncocytic Neoplasm of the Adrenal Gland With Uncertain Malignant Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouene Chakroun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man presented with right flank pain and a palpable mass in the left flank. Blood pressure was normal. Contrastenhanced computed tomography (CT showed a 17 × 16 × 12 cm retroperitoneal mass over the left kidney, solid and heterogeneous. There were also 3 retro aortic lymph nodes and bilateral renal lithiasis. Twenty four-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines were normal. The patient underwent a resection of the mass with left adrenalectomy by a lumbar incision. Histological findings revealed an adrenal oncocytic neoplasm (AON with uncertain malignant potential. Six months after surgery, CT control showed neither local nor distant recurrence.

  5. A case report of adrenocortical carcinosarcoma with oncocytic and primitive neuroectodermal-like features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Sui; Grignon, David J; Ulbright, Thomas M; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2013-09-01

    Adrenocortical carcinosarcomas are rare aggressive neoplasms; only a few have been reported to date, all with dismal prognosis. These were reported as having varying morphology. We have encountered a case of adrenal carcinosarcoma with an undifferentiated component bearing similarities to primitive neuroectodermal tumors and other areas of oncocytic differentiation. The 48-year-old woman patient presented with abdominal pain and unintended, excessive weight loss. Computed tomographic imaging revealed a tumor located adjacent to the liver and kidney necessitating a partial nephrectomy and hepatectomy. Histologically, the tumor exhibited malignant features. Melan-A, inhibin, calretinin, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase were positive immunohistochemically. The patient developed metastasis within 2 months of surgery and is currently alive with disease after chemotherapy. Adrenal carcinosarcoma is a rare highly aggressive malignancy with a wide morphologic spectrum. Recognition of variant morphology and applying correct immunohistochemical studies will aid in reaching an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Oncocytic pleomorphic adenoma of palatal salivary gland with macrophages and giant cells associated with cholesterol crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi S. Sarode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common salivary gland tumor characterized by histo-morphological diversity in the form of myxoid, hyalinized, chondroid, osseous, and squamous areas. In this paper, we report a rare case of predominantly oncocytic variant of PA in a 45-year-old male patient on the posterior palatal region. Microscopic examination showed homogenous eosinophilic cellular mass composed of epithelial components arranged in the form of tubular and solid patterns. The polygonal and oval cells showed abundant dark eosinophilic granular cytoplasm. The cell borders were distinct with a central nucleus showing prominent nucleoli. Interestingly at few places, cholesterol clefts were seen surrounded by macrophages and giant cells. The tumor was surgically excised with no evidence of recurrence after 2 years.

  7. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysi...

  8. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  9. Metastatic thyroid carcinoma of the mandibule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdag, T; Bilgen, C; Ceryan, K

    1999-01-01

    A case of metastatic papillary carcinoma to the mandible is presented. Though relatively rare, metastatic tumours of the mandible should be included in the differential diagnosis of the tumours in the parotid region. For the primary site; being in the cervicofacial region, the thyroid gland must be considered by the head and neck surgeon.

  10. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be an autoimmune disease very similar to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. In fact, these two disorders cannot be ... from one another on pathology specimens. As in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis is associated with the development ...

  11. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  12. FDG-PET Findings of Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kato

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm (IOPN of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor. To date, there have been three case reports of IOPN which showed strong positivity on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, raising the possibility of distinguishing IOPNs from other intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs using FDG-PET. However, all three cases had large tumors, approximately 10 cm in diameter, and there are no case reports of FDG-PET findings of small IOPNs, i.e. tumors the average size of malignant IPMNs (3–5 cm. We report two cases with IOPN of average size with FDG-PET findings. Computed tomography (CT showed a multilocular cystic lesion 4 cm in diameter with a mural nodule 1 cm in diameter (case 1 and a cystic lesion 5 cm in diameter with a papillary mural nodule 4 cm in diameter (case 2. FDG-PET showed abnormal uptake at the same location as the pancreatic tumor revealed by CT in both cases. The maximum standardized uptake values of the lesions were 3.4 and 4.2, respectively. Surgical resection was performed and the tumor was diagnosed as IOPN with carcinoma in situ (case 1 and IOPN with minimal invasion (case 2. FDG-PET may be useful for diagnosing malignancy in IOPN, as it is in IPMN. However, in our two cases, strong accumulation was not observed in the IOPNs, which were within the average size range of malignant IPMNs.

  13. Unusual presentation of Warthin variant of Papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph nodal metastases in a patient of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Arun, B R

    2015-01-01

    Warthin-like Papillary thyroid carcinoma (WPTC) is a rare variant of papillary carcinoma of thyroid, PTC which derives its name by closely resembling Warthin's tumor of salivary gland. Hallmark histological feature of this variant is papillary folding lined by oncocytic neoplastic cells with clear nuclei and nuclear pseudoinclusions, accompanied by prominent lymphocytic infiltrate in the papillary stalks. It is thought to be one of those differentiated thyroid cancers with favorable prognosis. We report a case of Graves' disease with a cold nodule harboring WPTC with initial presentation of lymph nodal metastases. It is important to identify this peculiar variant of PTC as 5 to 10% of them undergo dedifferentiation and 30% have the lymph nodal metastases and extra thyroidal extension.

  14. Warthin-Like Papillary Carcinoma of the Thyroid Gland: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Paliogiannis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma in a 22-year-old woman and a review of the literature on the topic. The patient had the occasional discovery of a hypoechoic thyroid nodule of approximately 18 mm, characterized by irregular margins, hyperechoic spots, rich intra- and perilesional vascularization, and a suspicious enlarged right laterocervical lymph node. Fine-needle aspiration was performed for both lesions and the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma without lymph node involvement was made. The patient underwent thyroidectomy and central neck lymphadenectomy without complications. Histopathological examination suggested a Warthin-like papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland, with all the removed lymph nodes being free of disease. The patient subsequently underwent iodine ablative therapy and she remains free of disease one year after surgery. Warthin-like papillary thyroid carcinoma is a recently described variant of papillary thyroid cancer that is frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis. Morphologically, it resembles Warthin tumors of the salivary glands, with T and B lymphocytes infiltrating the stalks of papillae lined with oncocytic cells. Surgical and postoperative management is identical to that of classic differentiated thyroid cancer, while prognosis seems to be favourable.

  15. Malignant lymphoma and the thyroid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Reiners, C.; Boerner, W.; Mueller, H.A.; Wuensch, P.H.; Schaeffer, R.; Gunzer, U.

    1983-04-01

    Among 4325 goiter patients first examined in the period from February 1980 to April 1982, 5 cases of lymphoma appearing primarily in the thyroid gland were discovered incidentally. During the same period 13 patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were observed. 5 of 23 systematically examined patients who had already known extrahyroidal malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and lymphoma patient examined by chance exhibited a secondary thyroid gland lymphoma, that is, a secondary infiltration of the enlarged thyroid. Altogether, 29 patients with malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Kiel classification) were examined. Of 8 Hodgkin's disease patients none showed clinical or cytological evidence of thyroid infiltration. The clinical symptoms of primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland corresponded to those of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. A positive differential diagnosis of the two tumours succeeded cytologically. The secondary lymphoma of the thyroid also could only be diagnosed cytologically. Patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were always found to be euthyroid. Autoimmunological phenomena (antimicrosomal and antithyreoglobulin autoantibodies) as an indicator of lymphocytic thyroiditis could only be examined among 11 patients. Two patients with secondary lymphoma of the thyroid showed positive titers. A small cell anaplastic thyroid carcinoma could not be diagnosed in any of 37 patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer out of an enlarged patient collective (period under consideration: 1976-1982).

  16. Update on epidemiology classification, and management of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitham Gheriani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer represents approximately 0.5–1% of all human malignancy1. In the UK the incidence of thyroid cancer is 2-3 per 100,000 populations 2. In geographical areas of low iodine intake and in areas exposed to nuclear disasters the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher. Benign thyroid conditions are much more common. In the UK approximately 8 % of the population have nodular thyroid disease2. Nodular thyroid disease increases with age and is also more common in females and in geographical areas of low iodine intake. Primary thyroid malignancy can be broadly divided into 2 groups. The first group, which generally have much better prognosis, are the well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which includes papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma and Hürthle cell tumours. The second group includes the poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma like medullary thyroid carcinoma and the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Other rare tumours such as sarcomas, lymphomas and the extremely rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid should be included in the second group. Secondary or metastatic thyroid cancer can be from breast, lung, colon and kidney malignancies.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  18. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Thyroid Nodules Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Thyroid Disorders The thyroid is a small butterfly-shaped ... consumes less oxygen and produces less body heat. Thyroid Nodules A thyroid nodule is a small lump ...

  19. Somatostatin receptor biology in neuroendocrine and pituitary tumours: part 1 – molecular pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, Mehtap; Dworakowska, Dorota; Grossman, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) may occur at many sites in the body although the majority occur within the gastroenteropancreatic axis. Non-gastroenteropancreatic NETs encompass phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, medullary thyroid carcinoma, anterior pituitary tumour, broncho-pulmonary NETs and parathyroid tumours. Like most endocrine tumours, NETs also express somatostatin (SST) receptors (subtypes 1–5) whose ligand SST is known to inhibit endocrine and exocrine secretions and hav...

  20. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  1. Thyroid Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very accurate for identifying cancerous or “suspicious” nodules. Thyroid ultrasound is used to get an exact picture of ... up may involve a physical exam or a thyroid ultrasound or both. If the nodule gets larger, you ...

  2. Thyroid ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Chaudhary; Shahina Bano

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in th...

  3. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  4. Immunotherapy and gene therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A

    2004-12-01

    Most forms of thyroid cancer have a good prognosis. Some tumours, however, dedifferentiate and may finally develop into highly malignant anaplastic thyroid carcinomas with a low survival time. Due to their dedifferentiation these tumours are inaccessible to classical therapeutic options as radioiodide treatment or thyrotropin-suppression. Radical surgical revision of the tumour masses is the therapy of choice of patients with limited disease stages including patients with medullary thyroid carcinomas. Despite progress in radiation and chemotherapy regimes, many metastatic forms remain, however, incurable by conventional therapies. During the past few years new developments in immunology have revealed increasing information about the molecular basis of tumour-host interactions. The multitude of information resulting from basic science in cellular immunology, together with the availability of biologic reagents in pharmacological amounts, has opened new venues for the development of immunotherapy approaches for patients with different kind of cancers including thyroid malignancies. This review describes some most important developments in cellular immunotherapies e.g. dendritic cells-based protocols and gene therapy. It also provides a brief overview on the role of cytokines and antibodies in the treatment of advanced thyroid malignancies.

  5. [An expert system for differential diagnosis of medullary and oxyphilic cell thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, V A; Emel'ianova, O A; Gladyshev, A O

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the quantitative regularities of pathological changes in the nuclei and aggregates of C and B cells and to build an expert system on their basis for the differential diagnosis of medullary and oxyphilic cell thyroid carcinoma. Puncture smears with histologically verified medullary (C cell) carcinoma and oxyphilic cell (B cell) carcinoma were investigated. The nuclei and aggregates of C cells and B cells (Hürthle cells, oncocytes) were morphometrically examined with a computer color image analyzer on the basis of a light microscope and a digital photo camera. The quantitative regularities of the degree of C and B cell aggregation in medullary and oxyphilic cell thyroid carcinoma were found by morphometry. The threshold values for the aggregates in the comparison groups and their weight coefficients formed the basis for the expert system to differentially diagnose medullary and oxyphilic cell carcinoma at the initial stages of patient examination. The clinical trials showed the high efficiency of the developed expert system.

  6. Thyroid carcinoma associated with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetta, F; Toti, P; Petracci, M; Montalto, G; Disanto, A; Lorè, F; Fusco, A

    1997-09-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is an extracolonic manifestation that is present in about 1% to 2% of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Less than 100 cases have been reported in detail. We have investigated the suggestion that FAP associated thyroid carcinoma is significantly different morphologically from both papillary and follicular types and can be considered as a separate entity. Specimens from three patients with FAP associated thyroid tumours, all but one having single nodules, have been analysed. All three patients belonged to an extended kindred (23 siblings in four generations) who had genetic analysis and intensive screening for thyroid nodules. Seven patients had the same APC mutation at codon 1061. Pathological examination revealed a typical papillary carcinoma, encapsulated variant, in all patients, with follicular areas in one case. All thyroid specimens, in addition to histological and immunohistological examinations, were also specifically studied for activation of the RET-PTC oncogene, that seems to be restricted to papillary thyroid carcinoma. Two of the three patients had RET-PTC activation (PTC1 isoform). The findings suggest that the tumours were certainly papillary, at least in the present kindred. Further studies in different families are required for a better understanding of this peculiar tumour and of its biological behaviour.

  7. MIBI-SPECT in hypofunctioning thyroid nodules for detection of thyroid carcinoma; MIBI-SPECT bei kalten Knoten zur Schilddruesenkarzinomdetektion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Schicha, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2010-12-15

    The clinical usefulness of Tc-99m-MIBI in hypofunctioning thyroid nodules for detection of thyroid carcinoma is presented. Tc-99m-MIBI is a lipophilic cation and a non-specific radiopharmaceutical for tumour imaging. It has become an important imaging technique for the assessment of hypofunctioning thyroid nodules because of its high negative predictive value excluding malignant thyroid tumours. After injection of Tc-99m-MIBI either a single-phase protocol with late planar and SPECT images about 1-2 h post injection or a double-phase protocol with early (about 15-30 min p.i.) and late images (about 2 h p.i.) were reported. Findings include a reduced, an isointense or an increased Tc-99m-MIBI accumulation in the thyroid nodule in comparison to the paranodular thyroid tissue and in comparison to pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy. A 'Match' between pertechnetate and Tc-99m-MIBI scintigraphy is a concordantly decreased uptake in the thyroid nodule in comparison to the normal thyroid gland. This finding has a negative predictive value of >97% to exclude differentiated thyroid cancer. A definite 'Mismatch' means a cold thyroid nodule on pertechnetate scintigraphy and an increased uptake of Tc-99m-MIBI in comparison to the MIBI-uptake of the paranodular thyroid tissue. The positive predictive value of this finding for malignancy varies between studies and is in the range of <10-65% (Cologne data: 19%) depending on the prevalence of malignant thyroid tumours in the patient population studied. An isointense uptake was not associated with thyroid malignancy according to 'Cologne' data. Further studies are desirable for better characterization of the method. (orig.)

  8. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgeon who first described this type of tumour in 1899. Wilms' tumour .... Open biopsy should be avoided at all costs, as it. 'upstages' the tumour. Survival ... surgeon. No laparoscopic surgery should be done, as the whole abdomen has to be.

  9. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid antibodies – to help differentiate different types of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) ... can be detected in Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis . It may be especially helpful in early Hashimoto ...

  10. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevented? Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  13. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease Print A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  14. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Print A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  16. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Want to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Thyroid Disorders KidsHealth > For Kids > Thyroid Disorders Print A ... the world is a thyroid? What Is the Thyroid? The thyroid (say: THYE-royd) is a gland, ...

  17. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease A A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  18. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease A A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  19. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Thyroid Disorders KidsHealth > For Kids > Thyroid Disorders A A ... the world is a thyroid? What Is the Thyroid? The thyroid (say: THYE-royd) is a gland, ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small ... Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type ...

  1. Hyalinising trabecular adenoma of the thyroid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara NINAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyalinising trebecular adenoma (HTA of the thyroid is rare and controversies remain regarding the diagnosis and management. It is an uncommon benign thyroid tumour that can present as a solitary thyroid nodule, a prominent nodule in a multinodular goitre, or as an incidental finding in a thyroidectomy specimen. Some considered HTA a unique entity, while others have proved it to be a variant of papillary carcinoma or have considered it a nonspecific pattern that may be seen with a variety of thyroid lesions. We report the case of a 31-year-old Chinese lady who presented with four years history of right sided goitre that was gradually increasing in size. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed appearances of follicular adenoma. Intra-operative frozen section histology of the excised right thyroid lobe was reported as trabecular adenoma which was confirmed with histopathological examination.

  2. Statins as a new therapeutic approach in dedifferentiated thyroid cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A.; John, P.; Sinzinger, H.; Staudenherz, A. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Univ. Clinic of Nuclear Medicine; Schaffarich, M.P. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics

    2006-07-01

    Generally, primary differentiated tumours are removed surgically followed by adjuvant radioiodine treatment. The effect and outcome of radioiodine ablation depends on the uptake in the thyroid carcinoma cells. But, about one third of patients with local recurrent thyroid carcinomas or distant metastases do not respond to iodine treatment due to loss of differentiation. Prognosis was impaired if tumour cells are losing the capability for radioiodine uptake due to dedifferentiation. However, several trials have been attempted to induce re-differentiation of tumour cells in order to regain their potential for radioiodine uptake. (orig.)

  3. Sonographic and cytopathologic correlation of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Shin, Jung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Oh, Young Lyun; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Ko, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer and constitutes more than 70% of thyroid malignancies. Although TNM staging is the most widely used parameter for determination of therapeutic plans, recent studies have suggested that different histopathologic variants of PTC can also have different clinical courses and patient prognoses. Sonographic criteria for PTC are well established and include a taller-than-wide shape, an irregular margin, microcalcifications, and marked hypoechogenicity. The role of sonography has expanded to enable the characterization of PTC variants based on their sonographic features. Tall cell and diffuse sclerosing variants appear to have more aggressive clinical courses with unfavorable prognoses, whereas the more recently described cribriform-morular and Warthin-like variants have relatively indolent clinical courses. The prognoses of patients with follicular, solid, columnar cell, and oncocytic variants are still controversial and may be similar to the prognosis of conventional PTC. Understanding the sonographic characteristics of PTC variants with clinicopathologic correlation may be helpful for suggesting an appropriate treatment plan.

  4. Thyroid follicular adenoma with accumulation of collagen type IV in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasako, K; Doi, T; Kanno, T; Wako, Y; Hamamura, M; Tsuchitani, M

    2014-01-01

    A thyroid tumour was identified in a 10-year-old male common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The tumour was encapsulated by fibrous connective tissue and compressed the adjacent normal thyroid. The tumour was composed of variably sized and irregularly shaped thyroid follicles lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells. Eosinophilic material at the base of the neoplastic cells stained black with periodic acid-methenamine silver and red with periodic acid-Schiff. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that this eosinophilic material was collagen type IV. Ultrastructurally, highly dense and amorphous material was observed at the base of the neoplastic cells. Small vesicles in the basolateral cytoplasm of the neoplastic cells contained similar material to that at the base of the cells. The tumour was diagnosed as a thyroid follicular adenoma with accumulation of collagen type IV. This is the first description of an endocrine tumour with accumulation of collagen type IV in animals.

  5. ULTRASOUND EVALUATION OF THYROID DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: 1. To differentiate cystic lesions from solid lesions. 2. The possibility to differentiate the intrinsic thyroid lesions from those arising from adjoining structures. 3. To evaluate the neoplasms and to differentiate benign from malignant lesions by USG characteristics and to correlate with FNAC reports. 4. Role of USG in rapidly growing thyroid lesions: To differentiate haemorrhage into the cystic lesions and rapidly growing malignant tumours. 5. Compare the results of our study with similar studies available in the present literature. MATERIALS & METHODS This study included 75 patients who attended outpatient departments of the Endocrinology, Medical and Surgical Units and also those who were inpatients. RESULTS Broadly pathological conditions of thyroid glands can be divided into nodular and diffuse thyroid diseases. Among Nodular Diseases Majority are benign, only few are malignant. Characteristics of benign lesions are: 1. Well-differentiated margins. 2. Thin complete peripheral sonolucent halo. 3. Coarse peripheral calcifications. Characteristics of malignant nodules are: 1. Ill-defined margins. 2. Thick incomplete peripheral halo. 3. Fine punctuate calcifications. Diffuse Thyroid Diseases 1. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: Painless diffuse enlargement of thyroid gland usually in women with coarse echotexture and no normal gland tissue. There may be discrete hypoechoic nodules within it with cervical lymphadenopathy. 2. Goitres: a Simple diffuse goitre: Symmetrical enlargement of gland without tenderness or bruit or lymphadenopathy, T3, T4 and TSH are within normal limits and no thyroid autoantibodies in the serum. a Diffuse Toxic goitre: Diffuse enlargement of gland with increased vascularity on colour Doppler study. b Multinodular goitre: Multiple hypoechoic nodule within normal thyroid parenchyma. c Colloid goitre: Present as single or multiple swellings in the thyroid gland. CONCLUSION USG is the fast and cost effective

  6. Papillary microcarcinoma of the thyroid gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londero, Stefano Christian; Godballe, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Papillary microcarcinomas (PMC) of the thyroid gland are defined according to The WHO Committee as papillary carcinomas measuring 10 mm or less in diameter. A large proportion of these tumours are found coincidentally in the treatment of symptomatic goitre and most cases follow...

  7. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates lactate dehydrogenase activity in thyroid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Mirebeau-Prunier

    Full Text Available Metabolic modifications of tumor cells are hallmarks of cancer. They exhibit an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates in hostile environment outside the cell. In thyroid tumors, the expression of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, a major factor of metabolic adaptation, is closely related to the oxidative metabolism and the proliferative status of the cells. To elucidate the role played by ERRα in the glycolytic adaptation of tumor cells, we focused on the regulation of lactate dehydrogenases A and B (LDHA, LDHB and the LDHA/LDHB ratio. Our study included tissue samples from 10 classical and 10 oncocytic variants of follicular thyroid tumors and 10 normal thyroid tissues, as well as samples from three human thyroid tumor cell lines: FTC-133, XTC.UC1 and RO82W-1. We identified multiple cis-acting promoter elements for ERRα, in both the LDHA and LDHB genes. The interaction between ERRα and LDH promoters was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and in vitro analysis for LDHB. Using knock-in and knock-out cellular models, we found an inverse correlation between ERRα expression and LDH activity. This suggests that thyroid tumor cells may reprogram their metabolic pathways through the up-regulation of ERRα by a process distinct from that proposed by the recently revisited Warburg hypothesis.

  8. Warthin-Like Papillary Carcinoma of the Thyroid: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayça ERŞEN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warthin-like tumor of the thyroid is a recently described rare variant of thyroid papillary carcinoma. The distinguishing histological feature of this variant is papillary foldings lined by oncocytic neoplastic cells with clear nuclei and nuclear pseudoinclusions, accompanied by prominent lymphocytic infiltrate in the papillary stalks. Its prognosis has been reported to be almost similar to conventional papillary carcinoma. In this case series, we report four cases with Warthin-like papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, diagnosed at Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine Department of Pathology in 2008 and 2009. Three patients were female. The mean patient age was 39 years (range, 20-56 and the mean tumor size was 1.7 cm (range, 0.9-2.0 cm. All of the cases had lymphocytic thyroiditis in the background. None of the tumors showed lymphovascular invasion. The patients are free of any recurrence and/or distant metastasis with a mean follow-up of 25 months. This rare variant of thyroid papillary carcinoma with distinct histopathological features should be indicated in pathology reports. Further studies and long-term follow-up of patients are needed to highlight the biological behavior of this variant.

  9. Papillary carcinoma thyroid presenting as a choroidal metastasis. Report of a case and brief review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Usha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient of papillary thyroid carcinoma, who initially presented with a choroidal metastasis and secondary intractable glaucoma is reported. The orange-coloured tumour posed a diagnostic difficulty, until histopathology of the enucleated eye confirmed the metastasis from the thyroid. The initial presentation of distant metastasis in patients with thyroid cancer is rare.

  10. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, W J

    1980-01-01

    Less than 10% of patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma survive 5 years when treated by operation and conventional irradiation, but survivors who are disease-free at 2 years appear to be cured. The administration of a small number of large radiation fractions (350 to 800 rads) failed to eradicate the local disease in 14 patients, all of whom died within 9 months. Hyperfractionation (100 rads qid at 3-hour intervals) caused complete tumour regression of 6 of 14 patients and partial regression in 7 others; the 1 patient whose tumour failed to respond was treated only once daily. However, the cost was high: two patients died of spinal cord necrosis and a third of pneumonitis due to the unexpected increase in radiation toxicity caused by the concurrent administration of Adriamycin. If an effective systemic treatment can be devised for this disease, hyperfractionation may be capable of eradicating the massive local tumour masses so characteristic of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  11. Tumours and tumourous diseases; Tumoren, tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, W. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke) [German] Der vorliegende Band der Reihe Orthopaedie und orthopaedische Chirurgie behandelt das Thema Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen. Der Band teilt sich in zwei Kapitel: 1. Knochentumoren und tumorartige Laesionen und 2. Weichteiltumoren und tumorartige Laesionen. Dargestellt werden Pathologie, Diagnostik, konservative und perioperative Therapie, chirurgische Therapie, Komplikationen nach Resektion, Indikatoren zur Amputation, Nachsorgeempfehlung, Strahlentherapie, Radionuklidtherapie, alternative Therapieverfahren, Therapiekonzepte bei Metastasen, Tissue Engineering und plastisch-chirurgische Massnahmen. (uke)

  12. Leiomyosarcoma metastatic to the thyroid diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenqani, Dalal; Yaqoob, Nausheen; Khoja, Hatem

    2010-04-01

    The thyroid gland is a known but an unusual site for metastatic tumours from various primary sites. Primary smooth muscle tumours of thyroid are rare. Leiomyosarcoma of the thyroid gland whether of primary or metastatic origin should be distinguished from anaplastic carcinoma. Few cases of leiomyosarcoma metastatic to thyroid, diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) have been documented. We are reporting this case to highlight the importance of FNAC as a tool for diagnosing sarcomas and to plan further management accordingly. Ancillary techniques can be applied on FNAC and give comparative results to tissue sections.

  13. Hashimoto's thyroiditis predicts outcome in intrathyroidal papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Vincenzo; Sciammarella, Concetta; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Gambardella, Claudio; Bellevicine, Claudio; Grasso, Marica; Conzo, Giovanni; Docimo, Giovanni; Botti, Gerardo; Losito, Simona; Troncone, Giancarlo; De Palma, Maurizio; Giacomelli, Laura; Pezzullo, Luciano; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2017-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) seems to have favourable prognostic impact on papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), but data were obtained analysing all disease stages. Given that HT-related microenvironment involves solely the thyroid, we aimed to assess the relationship between HT, as detected through pathological assessment, and outcome in intrathyroidal PTC. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including 301 PTC with no evidence of extrathyroidal disease. Primary study endpoint was the rate of clinical remission. Auxiliary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). HT was detected in 42.5% of the cohort and was associated to female gender, smaller tumour size, lower rate of aggressive PTC variants and less frequent post-surgery radio-iodine administration. HT showed relationship with significantly higher rate of clinical remission (P disease outcome at univariate analysis (age at diagnosis, histology, tumour size and multifocality), prognostic effect of HT remained significant (P = 0.006, OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.39-7.72). To verify whether HT could optimise the identification of PTCs with unfavourable outcome, we assessed the accuracy of 'non-HT status' as negative prognostic marker, demonstrating poor capability of identifying patients not maintaining clinical remission until final follow-up (probability of no clinical remission in PTCs without HT: 21.05%, 95% CI 15.20-27.93). In conclusion, our data show that HT represents an independent prognostic parameter in intrathyroidal PTC, but cannot improve prognostic specificity. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Thyroid and Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight) weight loss. As in the treatment with hyperthyroidism, treatment of the abnormal state of hypothyroidism with thyroid ... Goiter Graves’ Disease Graves’ Eye Disease Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Hyperthyroidism ... & Weight Thyroiditis Thyroid ...

  15. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  16. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  17. Targeting tumour Cell Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D. WILLIAMS

    2009-01-01

    @@ Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis, particularly in uro-logical carcinomas (bladder and prostate). Tumour cell plasticity, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a cen-tral theme in Dr Williams' work.

  18. Thyroid gland removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  19. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  20. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. Thyroid inferno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Amit; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    The key to uncovering the etiology of hyperthyroidism lies in a careful history and physical examination. Autoimmune markers provide additive information, but should not solely be used to make a diagnosis. Concern has been raised that the overzealous use of thyroid ultrasound, following abnormal thyroid function tests, diverts attention from the workup of the biochemical abnormality to the workup of an incidentally found thyroid nodule. If further imaging is needed, the use ofathyroidscanhas been suggestedbythe Endocrine Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, in certain scenarios, this may be contraindicated. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with hyperthyroidism, as aplatform to discuss an important clinical sign present on Doppler ultrasound of the thyroid. By recognizing the clinical information gained from a Doppler ultrasound, physicians can avoid additional invasive workup and apply the use of ultrasound where most appropriate.

  2. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you may be eligible to receive a medication (potassium iodide) that blocks the effects of radiation on the ... occur, you and your family could take the potassium iodide tablets to help prevent thyroid cancer. Contact your ...

  3. The prevalence of thyroid cancers in surgically treated patients with nodular goiter in Şırnak city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Sert Bektaş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Iodine deficiency is still considered to be the major etiological factor for endemic goiter. The pathogenesis of the goiter in iodine deficient area caries different characteristics. The aim of this study investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancers and type of thyroid cancers in surgically treated patients with nodular goiter in Şırnak city where is iodine deficiency region.Materials and methods: Thyroid surgical materials which were sent to our department were screened retrospectively from the archives between the years 2009-2010. Thyroid resection was performed on 241 patients with nodular goiter in one year. We evaluated patients who received the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with histhopatological examination.Results: 222 of our patients (92.1% female and 19 (7.9% were male. The youngest patient 16 and the oldest patient was 80 years old and the average age is 40.9 ± 12.8. Histopathological examination of 197 (81.7% cases of nodular goiter, 31 (12.9% cases lymphocytic thyroiditis, 13 (5.4% patients had thyroid tumors. The three tumors on the 2 cases (0.8% benign, 11 (4.6% were malignant. As a type of cancer 1 (0.4% patients, follicular carcinoma-oncocytic variant, 10 (4.2% cases were papillary carcinoma.Conclusions: Iodine deficiency area in the province of Şırnak in patients with nodular goiter who underwent surgery for thyroid cancer rate of 4.6%, and most cancers is seen as a type of thyroid papillary carcinoma.

  4. Thyroglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2015-04-15

    Identification of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is becoming increasingly common. Patients usually have an excellent prognosis. Most undergo total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and treatment with suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Patients require long term follow-up which includes measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Interpretation of serum Tg requires knowledge of the concurrent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration, as secretion is TSH dependant, and an awareness of the limitations of the methods used to measure it. These limitations include the heterogeneity of Tg in serum, the ability of assays to recognise forms of Tg secreted by a tumour, assay biases and not least the potential for interference in immunoassays for Tg from endogenous thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in patient serum. This review considers what the clinician wants to know and how Tg results can be interpreted in light of an awareness of assay limitations.

  5. To treat or not to treat : Developments in the field of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, T. C.; Kapiteijn, E.; Corssmit, E. P.; Oosting, S. F.; van der Horst-Schrivers, A. N. A.; Links, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is the most prevalent endocrine malignancy. Based on the increased understanding of thyroid tumourigenesis, novel therapeutic agents have been identified. However, given the low incidence, the good prognosis of the majority of these tumours and the limited evidence of diff

  6. T-Screen as a tool to identify thyroid hormone receptor active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutleb, A.C.; Meerts, I.A.T.M.; Bergsma, J.H.; Schriks, M.; Murk, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The T-Screen represents an in vitro bioassay based on thyroid hormone dependent cell proliferation of a rat pituitary tumour cell line (GH3) in serum-free medium. It can be used to study interference of compounds with thyroid hormone at the cellular level, thus bridging the gap between limitations o

  7. Association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, Salem I; Tufano, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    The association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer remains an active focus of research and controversy. Since it was first proposed in 1955, numerous studies have explored the epidemiology and etiology of these concurrent disease processes. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently encountered in thyroid glands resected for a neoplasm. The most frequent association is noted with papillary thyroid cancer. Several recent studies performed on patients undergoing thyroidectomy with coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis report an increased prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer, with a favorable disease profile and an improved prognosis, particularly in women. Conversely, some population-based studies using fine-needle aspiration biopsy data report no linkage between serologic Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, yet they are limited by the lack of definitive pathology. On the other hand, the significantly increased incidence of primary thyroid lymphomas in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis strongly suggests a pathogenetic link between this autoimmune disorder and malignant thyroid lymphoma. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancer and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. Nonetheless, a pathogenesis linking these diseases remains unclear. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be well established.

  8. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  9. CYTOLOGICAL PATTERNS OF THYROID LESIONS: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmakanta Kumbhakar

    2016-08-01

    lesions in the study, FNA smears of 05 thyroid lesions were inadequate for cytological reporting either due to inadequate aspirated materials or haemorrhagic smears. Out of remaining 95 thyroid lesions in the study, which had adequate FNA smears for cytological reporting, there were 84 (88.42% non-neoplastic lesions and 11 (11.58% neoplastic lesions with a non-neoplastic and neoplastic ratio of 7.64:1. Colloid goitres were the commonest non-neoplastic thyroid lesions in the study. Out of the 8 thyroid lesions diagnosed as thyroiditis in the study, granulomatous thyroiditis (04 were the commonest. Benign tumours (6.32% were found to be more common than malignant ones (4.21% with a benign and malignant tumours ratio of 1.50:1 in the study. Follicular neoplasms were the commonest benign tumours and papillary thyroid carcinomas were the commonest malignant tumours amongst the studied thyroid lesions. One thyroid lesion of medullary carcinoma was also diagnosed. Among all thyroid lesions in the study, with adequate FNA smears for cytological reporting, 70 (73.68% thyroid lesions were goitres with or without secondary changes, 06 (6.32% thyroid lesions were benign neoplasms, 01 (1.05% thyroid lesion was suspicious and 04 (4.21% thyroid lesions were malignant neoplasms. FNAC studies done only on 15 thyroid lesions in the study group were available for histopathological studies and showed 93.33% diagnostic accuracy. The histopathological findings of that 15 thyroid lesions showed 11 non-neoplastic (73.33% and 04 (26.67% neoplastic lesions. On comparison of FNAC and histopathology study reports of these 15 thyroid lesions, histopathology confirmed all the 11 non-neoplastic lesions (10 were simple colloid goitres and 1 thyroglossal cyst and 3 out of 4 neoplastic lesions diagnosed on FNAC. Out of 3 thyroid lesions diagnosed as follicular neoplasms on FNAC, 2 thyroid lesions confirmed the diagnosis, but one was confirmed as follicular variant of papillary carcinoma on histopathology

  10. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  11. Thyroid function in pregnancy☆

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Iodine is required for the production of thyroid hormones. Normal thyroid function during pregnancy is important for both the mother and developing fetus. This review discusses the changes in thyroid physiology that occur during pregnancy, the significance of thyroid function tests and thyroid antibody titers assessed during pregnancy, and the potential obstetric complications associated with maternal hypothyroidism.

  12. Parapharyngeal space primary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Gianluigi; Suarez, Vanessa; Muñoz, María Gabriela; Costales, María; Llorente, José Luis

    The aim of this study is to present our experience with the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for parapharyngeal space tumours. This study is a retrospective review of 90 patients diagnosed with tumours of the parapharyngeal space and treated surgically between 1984 and 2015. Patients whose tumours were not primary but invaded the parapharyngeal space expanding from another region, tumours originating in the deep lobe of the parotid gland and head and neck metastasis were excluded from this study. 74% percent of the parapharyngeal space neoplasms were benign and 26% were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common neoplasm (27%), followed by paragangliomas (25%), miscellaneous malignant tumours (16%), neurogenic tumours (12%), miscellaneous benign tumours (10%), and malignant salivary gland tumours (10%). The transcervical approach was used in 56 cases, cervical-transparotid approach in 15 cases, type A infratemporal fossa approach in 13 cases, transmandibular approach in 4 cases and transoral approach in 2 cases. The most common complications were those deriving from nervous injuries. Most parapharyngeal space tumours can be removed surgically with a low rate of complications and recurrence. The transcervical approach is the most frequently used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid swellings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rebecca Hatton; Madhukar Patel; Devasenan Devendra

    2009-01-01

    @@ A 48 year old post-menopausal woman presents with a smooth midline sweHing in her neck,which has been present for more than 10 years.On examination.you find that it is consistent with an enlarged thyroid gland.

  14. Thyroid emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2012-03-01

    This review presents current knowledge about the thyroid emergencies known as myxedema coma and thyrotoxic storm. Understanding the pathogenesis of these conditions, appropriate recognition of the clinical signs and symptoms, and their prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment are crucial in optimizing survival.

  15. Thyroid Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are too high Graves’ disease , the most common cause of hyperthyroidism hypothyroidism —when thyroid hormones levels are too low ... disorder such as Graves’ disease —the most common cause of hyperthyroidism—and Hashimoto’s disease —the most common cause of ...

  16. Nuclear Radiation and the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Nuclear Radiation and the Thyroid What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in the ...

  17. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer may be diagnosed after a person ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  18. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  19. Vitamin D in thyroid tumorigenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinckspoor, Isabelle; Verlinden, Lieve; Mathieu, Chantal; Bouillon, Roger; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Decallonne, Brigitte

    2013-08-01

    Besides its classical role in bone and calcium homeostasis, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, has many non-classical effects; antiproliferative, anti-apoptotic and prodifferentiating effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 have been described in several tumour types in preclinical models. This review focuses on the insights gained in the elucidation of the role of 1,25(OH)2D3 in the normal thyroid and in the pathogenesis, progression and treatment of thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine malignancy. An increasing amount of observations points towards a role for impaired 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signalling in the occurrence and progression of thyroid cancer, and a potential for structural analogues in the multimodal treatment of dedifferentiated iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. A role for vitamin D in thyroid-related autoimmunity is less convincing and needs further study. Altered 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signalling does not influence normal thyroid development nor thyrocyte function, but does affect C-cell function, at least in rodents. If these findings also apply to humans deserves further study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of the thyroid gland during laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S X; Polacco, M A; Gosselin, B J; Harrington, L X; Titus, A J; Paydarfar, J A

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to: describe the incidence of thyroid gland involvement in advanced laryngeal cancer, analyse patterns of spread to the thyroid and elucidate predictors of thyroid involvement. A retrospective review was performed on patients who underwent laryngectomy from 1991 to 2015 as a primary or salvage treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, hypopharynx or base of tongue. The incidence of thyroidectomy during total laryngectomy, type of thyroidectomy, incidence of gland involvement, route of spread, and positive predictors of spread were analysed and reported. A total of 188 patients fit the inclusion criteria. Of these, 125 (66 per cent) underwent thyroidectomy. The thyroid was involved in 10 of the 125 patients (8 per cent), 9 by direct extension and 1 by metastasis. Cartilage invasion was a predictor of thyroid gland involvement, with a positive predictive value of 26 per cent. There is a low incidence of thyroid gland involvement in laryngeal carcinoma. Most cases of gland involvement occurred by direct extension. Thyroidectomy during laryngectomy should be considered for advanced stage tumours with cartilage invasion.

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan ... tissues in your body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is usually ...

  2. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type and Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... typically performed on people who have or had thyroid cancer. A physician may perform these imaging tests to: ... such as lumps (nodules) or inflammation determine whether thyroid cancer has spread beyond the thyroid gland evaluate changes ...

  4. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Causes Thyroid Cancer? Thyroid cancer is linked with a number of ... inside a cell, without an outside cause. Papillary thyroid cancer Several DNA mutations (changes) have been found in ...

  5. American Thyroid Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Thyroid Information Find out more information on Thyroid Disease. learn more Meetings ATA meeting dates, information, and education. learn more Publications Thyroid, Clinical Thyroidology and VideoEndocrinology. learn more Guidelines See ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  7. Accuracy of Fine Needle Cytology in Histological Prediction of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Variants: a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolletta Campanile, Anna; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Siciliano, Roberta; Colao, Annamaria; Pezzullo, Luciano; Fulciniti, Franco

    2017-06-21

    Fine needle cytology (FNC) is a crucial procedure in the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid tumors. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), in its classic variant (cPTC), is the most common malignant neoplasm of the thyroid. Several histological variants of PTC have been described, each one with its own characteristics and prognosis. The ability of FNC to identify the variants represents a challenge even for a skilled pathologist. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic cytological accuracy of FNC in PTC and to look for specific features that could predict the different variants. This was a single center prospective study on 128 patients who received a diagnosis of PTC on FNC. The smears were blindly reviewed by two cytopathologists to create a frequency score (0, 1, 2, 3) of the features for each variant. The cytological parameters were divided into three groups: architectural, nucleo-cytoplasmic, and background features. Univariate analysis was performed by chi-square test with Yates correction and Fisher exact test as appropriate. Multiple regression analysis was performed among the variables correlated at the linear correlation. The correlation study between cytology and histology showed an accuracy of FNC in classic, follicular, and oncocytic PTC variants of 63.5, 87.5, and 87% respectively. Familiarity with cytological features may allow an early diagnosis of a given PTC variant on FNC samples. This is fundamental in a preoperative evaluation for the best surgical approach and subsequent treatment.

  8. Biochemistry of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2007-03-01

    Several circulating or urinary tumour markers can be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of functioning and clinically non-functioning neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreatic islet cells and intestinal tract. Among the specific tumour markers are serotonin and its metabolites--e.g. 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)--in carcinoid tumours and the carcinoid syndrome, insulin and its precursors or breakdown products in insulinoma, and gastrin in gastrinoma. Plasma vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) determinations have been used in the diagnosis of VIPoma, plasma glucagon for glucagonoma, and serum somatostatin for somatostatinoma. Among the tumour-non-specific markers are: chromogranins, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), alpha-subunits of the glycoprotein hormones, catecholamines, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), ghrelin and adrenomedullin.

  9. Black Thyroid Associated with Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Kandil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Black thyroid is a rare pigmented change seen almost exclusively in patients upon minocycline ingestion, and the process has previously been thought to be generally benign. There have been 61 reported cases of black thyroid. We are aware of 13 cases previously reported in association with thyroid carcinoma. This paper reports six patients with black thyroid pigmentation in association with thyroid carcinoma. Design. The medical records of six patients who were diagnosed with black thyroid syndrome, all of whom underwent thyroid surgery, were reviewed. Data on age, gender, race, preoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA, thyroid function levels, and pathology reports were collected. Main Outcome. The mean age was 60 years. There were 5 females, 4 of whom were African American. All patients were clinically and biochemically euthyroid. Black pigmentation was not diagnosed in preoperative FNA, and only one patient had a preoperative diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The other patients underwent surgery and were found to have black pigmentation of the thyroid associated with carcinoma. Conclusions. FNA does not diagnose black thyroid, which is associated with thyroid carcinoma. Thyroid glands with black pigmentation deserve thorough pathologic examination, including several sections of each specimen.

  10. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  11. Thyroid and parathyroid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandler, M.P.; Patton, J.A.; Partain, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the numerous modalities currently used in the diagnosis and treatment of both thyroid and parathyroid disorders. Each modality is fully explained and then evaluated in terms of benefits and limitations in the clinical context. Contents: Production and Quality Control of Radiopharmaceutics Used for Diagnosis and Therapy in Thyroid and Parathyroid Disorders. Basic Physics. Nuclear Instrumentation. Radioimmunoassay: Thyroid Function Tests. Quality Control. Embryology, Anatomy, Physiology, and Thyroid Function Studies. Scintigraphic Thyroid Imaging. Neonatal and Pediatric Thyroid Imaging. Radioiodine Thyroid Uptake Measurement. Radioiodine Treatment of Thyroid Disorders. Radiation Dosimetry of Diagnostic Procedures. Radiation Safety Procedures for High-Level I-131 Therapies. X-Ray Fluorescent Scanning. Thyroid Sonography. Computed Tomography in Thyroid Disease. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Thyroid Disease. Parathyroid Imaging.

  12. Thyroid diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scriba, P.C.; Boerner, W.; Emrich, S.; Gutekunst, R.; Herrmann, J.; Horn, K.; Klett, M.; Krueskemper, H.L.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Pickardt, C.R.

    1985-03-01

    None of the in-vitro and in-vivo methods listed permits on unambiguous diagnosis when applied alone, owing to the fact that similar or even identical findings are obtained for various individual parameters in different thyroid diseases. Further, especially the in-vitro tests are also subject to extrathyroidal effects which may mask the typical findings. The limited and varying specificity and sensitivity of the tests applied, as well as the falsification of results caused by the patients' idiosyncracies and the methodology, make it necessary to interpret and evaluate the in-vivo and in-vitro findings only if the clinical situation (anamnesis and physical examination) is known. For maximum diagnostic quality of the tests, the initial probability of the assumed type of thyroid disease must be increased (formulation of the clinical problem). The concepts of exclusion diagnosis and identification must be distinguished as well as the diagnosis of functional disturbances on the one hand and of thyroid diseases on the other. Both of this requires a qualified, specific and detailed anamnesis and examination procedure, and the clinical examination remains the obligatory basis of clinical diagnostics. In case of inexplicable discrepancies between the clinical manifestations and the findings obtained with specific methods, or between the findings obtained with a specific method, the patient should be referred to an expert institution, or the expert institution should be consulted.

  13. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, S; Chakrabarti, S; Mandal, P K; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to be associated with lymphoma, papillary carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasms of thyroid. In contrast, there are only a few reports of co-existence of HT with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. An overall prevalence of medullary carcinoma of only 0.35% has been reported in HT patients. Such a rare combination is being presented here. A 33 year old female presented with history of goiter for one year. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the swelling revealed cytological features suggestive of medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Histopathological examination of total thyroidectomy specimen revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis along with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis can uncommonly co-exist with thyroid neoplasm, its association with medullary carcinoma is extremely rare and hence being presented.

  14. Thyroid disease: thyroid function tests and interpretation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His interests include endocrinology and inherited metabolic disease. Correspondence ... of treatment for thyroid disorders. Measurement of ... sex, ethnicity, iodine intake, body mass index, smoking .... Causes of discordant thyroid function test results. Raised TSH ... normal and thus provides the best guide of thyroid status.

  15. Classification of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer by global RNA profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing worldwide and thyroid nodules are a frequent clinical finding. Diagnosing follicular cell-derived cancers is, however, challenging both histopathologically and especially cytopathologically. The advent of high-throughput molecular technologies has...... profiling of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers....... prompted many researchers to explore the transcriptome and, in recent years, also the miRNome in order to generate new molecular classifiers capable of classifying thyroid tumours more accurately than by conventional cytopathological and histopathological methods. This has led to a number of molecular...

  16. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'psychiatric' indicators of possible brain tumour are sudden ... found to have weakness and/or loss of sensation in the lower extremities. Even when there is no clear weakness or hearing impairment, they may respond poorly, or not at all,.

  17. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  18. Iodide uptake in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells after transfer of the human thyroid peroxidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkom, U. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Altmann, A.; Jiang, S.; Morr, I.; Mahmut, M. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    Human thyroperoxidase (hTPO) is critical for the accumulation of iodide in thyroid tissues. Poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid tumours which lack thyroid-specific gene expression fail to accumulate iodide and, therefore, do not respond to iodine-131 therapy. We consequently investigated whether transfer of the hTPO gene is sufficient to restore the iodide-trapping capacity in undifferentiated thyroid and non-thyroid tumour cells. The human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines C643 and SW1736, the rat Morris hepatoma cell line MH3924A and the rat papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line L2 were used as in vitro model systems. Employing a bicistronic retroviral vector based on the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus for the transfer of the hTPO and the neomycin resistance gene, the C643 cells and SW1736 cells were transfected while the L2 cells and MH3924A cells were infected with retroviral particles. Seven recombinant C643 and seven SW1736 cell lines as well as four recombinant L2 and four MH3924A cell lines were established by neomycin selection. They were studied for hTPO expression using an antibody-based luminescence kit, followed by determination of the enzyme activity in the guaiacol assay and of the iodide uptake capacity in the presence of Na{sup 125}I. Genetically modified cell lines expressed up to 1,800 times more hTPO as compared to wild type tumour cells. The level of hTPO expression varied significantly between individual neomycin-resistant cell lines, suggesting that the recombinant retroviral DNA was integrated at different sites of the cellular genome. The accumulation of iodide, however, was not significantly enhanced in individual recombinant cell lines, irrespective of low or high hTPO expression. Moreover, there was no correlation between hTPO expression and enzyme activity in individual cell lines. The transduction of the hTPO gene per se is not sufficient to restore iodide trapping in non-iodide-concentrating tumour cells. Future

  19. Bilateral Malignant Brenner Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser D Choudhary, S.Manzoor Kadri, Ruby Reshi, S. Besina, Mansoor A. Laharwal, Reyaz tasleem, Qurrat A. Chowdhary

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral malignant Brenner tumour ofovary is extremely rate. A case ofmalignant Brenner tumourinvolving both the ovaries with mctastasis to mesentery in a 48 year femalc is presented. Grosslyo'arian masses were firm with soft areas, encapsulated and having bosselated external surfaces.Cut sections showed yellowish white surface with peripheral cysts (in both tumours. Microscopyrevealed transitional cell carcinoma with squamoid differentiation at places. Metastatic deposits werefound in the mesentery. Endometrium showed cystic glandular hyperplasia.

  20. Genetic alterations in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC).It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer.

  1. Genetic Alterations in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC). It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer. PMID:22654560

  2. THYROID HORMONE PROFILE IN EARLY BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renija Valiya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour in women worldwide. The relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disease is a controversy. Many of the studies showed hypothyroidism as the commonly found thyroid abnormality in breast cancer. [1] There is considerable evidence for an increased risk of thyroid and breast cancer in patients with iodine deficiency. This ability of iodine to reduce the risk of breast cancer is attributed to the ability of iodine and its compounds to induce apoptosis so that appropriate cell death occurs. Instead, in the absence of optimum level of iodine in the body the transformed cells continue to grow and divide resulting in cancer. AIMS 1. To find out the association of thyroid hormones and breast cancer in early breast cancer patients. 2. To find out the association of thyroid peroxidase antibodies in early breast cancer patients. Settings Cases: 82 breast cancer patients in early stage who attended the breast clinic. Controls: 82 age matched controls (Between 25-80 years. Design: Case control study. MATERIALS AND METHOD In this study, investigated for thyroid function test (T3, T4, TSH and thyroid peroxide antibody level in 82 early breast cancer patients. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS SPSS 16. RESULTS Statistically significant low T4 and high TSH in breast cancer patients, along with elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody. CONCLUSION Compared to hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism was found to be clinically significant in breast cancer patients

  3. Thyroiditis: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lori B; Stewart, Christopher; Gaitonde, David Y

    2014-09-15

    Thyroiditis is a general term that encompasses several clinical disorders characterized by inflammation of the thyroid gland. The most common is Hashimoto thyroiditis; patients typically present with a nontender goiter, hypothyroidism, and an elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody level. Treatment with levothyroxine ameliorates the hypothyroidism and may reduce goiter size. Postpartum thyroiditis is transient or persistent thyroid dysfunction that occurs within one year of childbirth, miscarriage, or medical abortion. Release of preformed thyroid hormone into the bloodstream may result in hyperthyroidism. This may be followed by transient or permanent hypothyroidism as a result of depletion of thyroid hormone stores and destruction of thyroid hormone-producing cells. Patients should be monitored for changes in thyroid function. Beta blockers can treat symptoms in the initial hyperthyroid phase; in the subsequent hypothyroid phase, levothyroxine should be considered in women with a serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level greater than 10 mIU per L, or in women with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 4 to 10 mIU per L who are symptomatic or desire fertility. Subacute thyroiditis is a transient thyrotoxic state characterized by anterior neck pain, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone, and low radioactive iodine uptake on thyroid scanning. Many cases of subacute thyroiditis follow an upper respiratory viral illness, which is thought to trigger an inflammatory destruction of thyroid follicles. In most cases, the thyroid gland spontaneously resumes normal thyroid hormone production after several months. Treatment with high-dose acetylsalicylic acid or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is directed toward relief of thyroid pain.

  4. SPECTRUM OF THYROID LESIONS-HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL PATTERNS - EXPERIENCE AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelala Neelaveni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid gland is unique among endocrine organs. Thyroid tumours are the most common endocrine tumours which affect females more frequently at age range of 30-60 years most of which are benign. Malignant neoplasms of thyroid are not uncommon with follicular pattern lesions. Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy is itself not a reliable method to differentiate between benign and malignant follicular tumours. Surgical resection helps in accurate diagnosis of these tumours. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the distribution of lesions according to age, sex and with clinicohistomorphological correlation. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a retrospective and prospective analysis of thyroid swellings received at our tertiary care centre during the period of two and half years between January 2013 and June 2015 in the age range of 6 years to 78 years. A total of 148 specimens received during the period were analysed for clinical and histomorphological features. Immunohistochemistry was done for diagnosis of difficult cases. RESULTS Out of total 148 cases, most common clinical presentation was multinodularity in 67 cases (45%, solitary nodules in 54 (36%. Out of benign lesions-84 (57% were nodular hyperplasias, 5 cases (3% of colloid cyst. Malignant lesions composed 32 cases, PTC constituted 25 cases (18%, 3 (2% cases of medullary carcinoma of thyroid, anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid diagnosed (0.5%. CONCLUSION Our study over a period of two and half years of thyroidectomies showed female preponderance. The most common lesion amongst benign lesions was nodular hyperplasia and papillary carcinoma was commonest in malignancies.

  5. Recurrent Silent Thyroiditis as a Sequela of Postpartum Thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Preaw Hanseree; Vincent Bryan Salvador; Issac Sachmechi; Paul Kim

    2014-01-01

    Thyroiditis encompasses a group of disorders characterized by thyroid inflammation. Though clinically indistinguishable from silent thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis occurs in women within 12 months after delivery. Recurrent postpartum thyroiditis in subsequent pregnancies is common, but recurrent silent thyroiditis is rare. We reported a case of patient with recurrent episodes of thyroiditis, unrelated to pregnancy, after an episode of postpartum thyroiditis. It is of interest that postpar...

  6. Cell-type-specific expression of STAT transcription factors in tissue samples from patients with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Julia; Barth, Peter J; Meyer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Expression of cytokine-regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins was histochemically assessed in patients diagnosed as having Hashimoto's disease or focal lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 10). All surgical specimens showed histological features of lymphocytic thyroiditis, including a diffuse infiltration with mononuclear cells and an incomplete loss of thyroid follicles, resulting in the destruction of glandular tissue architecture. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated differential expression patterns of the various members of the STAT transcription factors examined, indicating that each member of this conserved protein family has its distinct functions in the development of the disease. Using an antibody that specifically recognized the phosphorylated tyrosine residue in position 701, we detected activated STAT1 dimers in numerous germinal macrophages and infiltrating lymphocytes as well as in oncocytes. In contrast, STAT3 expression was restricted to epithelial cells and showed a clear colocalization with the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Moreover, expression of phospho-STAT3 was associated with low levels of stromal fibrosis, suggesting that STAT3 serves as a protective factor in the remodeling of the inflamed thyroid gland. Phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity was detected in numerous infiltrating cells of hematopoietic origin and, additionally, in hyperplastic follicular epithelia. This tissue distribution demonstrated that activated STAT5 molecules participate in both lymphocytopoiesis and possibly also in the buildup of regenerating thyroid follicles. Taken together, the cell-type-specific expression patterns of STAT proteins in human lymphocytic thyroiditis reflect their distinct and partially antagonistic roles in orchestrating the balance between degenerating and regenerating processes within a changing cytokine environment.

  7. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures ... the Thyroid? What is an Ultrasound of the Thyroid? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  8. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce ... of Ultrasound of the Thyroid? What is an Ultrasound of the Thyroid? Ultrasound is safe and painless, ...

  9. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Screening Research Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thyroid Cancer Go to Health Professional ... usually cannot be felt through the skin. Enlarge Anatomy of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. The thyroid ...

  10. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  11. [Rol of pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG) in the pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez Tejada, Laura; Peiró Cabrera, Gloria; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Arias Mendoza, Nieves; Aranda López, F Ignacio; Picó Alfonso, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pituitary tumours is far to be understood. Pituitary transforming tumour gene (PTTG), a gen that induces aneuploidy, genetic instability, cellular proliferation and to stimulate angiogenesis, has been involved in neoplasic transformation and shown overexpressed in many neoplasm as lung, breast, endometrium, thyroid and colon malignant tumours. On the other hand, PTTG has been inconsistently studied in pituitary tumours. The majority of studies have been performed in animals and there is a great variability in the methods used in its determination. The goal of this review is to resume the role of PTTG in tumourogenesis and critically to revise the studies published in humans in order to advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and to find clinical useful predictors of the behavior of these tumours.

  12. Thyroid disorders in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Li, J

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid disorders include autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer. AITD mainly consist of autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves disease. The common characteristic of thyroid disorders is female preponderance in their prevalence. The female-to-male rate ratio is reported at 4~6:1 for AITD and about 3~4:1 for thyroid nodule. For PTC, it is greatest during reproductive age and drops from five and more in patients aged 20-24, to 3.4 in patients aged 35-44 to one in patients over 80. The effects of female gonadal hormones and X chromosome inactivation on thyroid gland and immune system greatly contribute to the female predilection of AITD. The former mainly include prolactin and estrogen. The direct actions of estrogen on the thyroid tissue contribute to the development of thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer in women.

  13. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early? Many cases of thyroid cancer ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  14. Current Management of Low Risk Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and Papillary Microcarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, V D; Tuttle, R M

    2017-01-10

    Each year, the proportion of thyroid cancer patients presenting with low risk disease is increasing. Moreover, the definition of low risk thyroid cancer is expanding and several histological subtypes beyond papillary microcarcinomas are now classified as low risk disease. This shift in the landscape of thyroid cancer presentation is forcing clinicians to critically re-evaluate whether or not traditional management paradigms that were effective in treating intermediate and high risk disease are applicable to these low risk patients. Here we review the definition of low risk disease, examine the various histological subtypes that are considered low risk in the 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer, and review our current approach to the management of these low risk tumours.

  15. Radiation-induced tumours of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Baris, G.; Gregor, R.T.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-04-01

    In order to study the induction of malignancy in normal tissues due to ionizing radiation, we reviewed the files of 2500 patients with a tumour of the head and neck treated at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis), Amsterdam, from 1977 to 1993. We then checked whether or not these patients had been previously irradiated. Patients with a thyroid carcinoma or skin cancer were excluded from the study, since it is generally known that previous irradiation is a risk factor in these tumours. Eighteen patients were found to have a malignancy within a previous irradiated area (0.70 per cent). The mean interval between radiation and diagnosis of the head and neck tumour was 36.5 years. There were five soft tissue sarcomas, nine squamous cell carcinomas and four salivary gland tumours. Fourteen patients were operated upon whereas four received palliative treatment only. The median survival of the total group was 3.5 years. Particularly in young patients, because of the better cancer therapy and prolonged survival, one must be aware of the increased risk of radiation-induced tumours. (author).

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of the Transcriptional and Mutational Landscape of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Keun Yoo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC and benign follicular adenoma (FA are indistinguishable by preoperative diagnosis due to their similar histological features. Here we report the first RNA sequencing study of these tumors, with data for 30 minimally invasive FTCs (miFTCs and 25 FAs. We also compared 77 classical papillary thyroid carcinomas (cPTCs and 48 follicular variant of PTCs (FVPTCs to observe the differences in their molecular properties. Mutations in H/K/NRAS, DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, and SPOP were identified in miFTC or FA. We identified a low frequency of fusion genes in miFTC (only one, PAX8-PPARG, but a high frequency of that in PTC (17.60%. The frequencies of BRAFV600E and H/K/NRAS mutations were substantially different in miFTC and cPTC, and those of FVPTC were intermediate between miFTC and cPTC. Gene expression analysis demonstrated three molecular subtypes regardless of their histological features, including Non-BRAF-Non-RAS (NBNR, as well as BRAF-like and RAS-like. The novel molecular subtype, NBNR, was associated with DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, SPOP, and PAX8-PPARG. The transcriptome of miFTC or encapsulated FVPTC was indistinguishable from that of FA, providing a molecular explanation for the similarly indolent behavior of these tumors. We identified upregulation of genes that are related to mitochondrial biogenesis including ESRRA and PPARGC1A in oncocytic follicular thyroid neoplasm. Arm-level copy number variations were correlated to histological and molecular characteristics. These results expanded the current molecular understanding of thyroid cancer and may lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the disease.

  17. Comprehensive Analysis of the Transcriptional and Mutational Landscape of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seong-Keun; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Su-Jin; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Kim, Byoung-Ae; Cho, Hyesun; Song, Young Shin; Cho, Sun Wook; Won, Jae-Kyung; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Park, Do Joon; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2016-08-01

    Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and benign follicular adenoma (FA) are indistinguishable by preoperative diagnosis due to their similar histological features. Here we report the first RNA sequencing study of these tumors, with data for 30 minimally invasive FTCs (miFTCs) and 25 FAs. We also compared 77 classical papillary thyroid carcinomas (cPTCs) and 48 follicular variant of PTCs (FVPTCs) to observe the differences in their molecular properties. Mutations in H/K/NRAS, DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, and SPOP were identified in miFTC or FA. We identified a low frequency of fusion genes in miFTC (only one, PAX8-PPARG), but a high frequency of that in PTC (17.60%). The frequencies of BRAFV600E and H/K/NRAS mutations were substantially different in miFTC and cPTC, and those of FVPTC were intermediate between miFTC and cPTC. Gene expression analysis demonstrated three molecular subtypes regardless of their histological features, including Non-BRAF-Non-RAS (NBNR), as well as BRAF-like and RAS-like. The novel molecular subtype, NBNR, was associated with DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, SPOP, and PAX8-PPARG. The transcriptome of miFTC or encapsulated FVPTC was indistinguishable from that of FA, providing a molecular explanation for the similarly indolent behavior of these tumors. We identified upregulation of genes that are related to mitochondrial biogenesis including ESRRA and PPARGC1A in oncocytic follicular thyroid neoplasm. Arm-level copy number variations were correlated to histological and molecular characteristics. These results expanded the current molecular understanding of thyroid cancer and may lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the disease.

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women.

  19. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  20. Maternal Thyroid Dysfunction and Neonatal Thyroid Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Ozdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate obstetric features of pregnant women with thyroid disorders and thyroid function tests of their newborn infants. Methods. Women with hypothyroidism and having anti-thyroglobulin (ATG and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies were assigned as group I, women with hypothyroidism who did not have autoantibodies were assigned as group II, and women without thyroid problems were assigned as group III. Results. Pregnant women with autoimmune hypothyroidism (group I had more preterm delivery and their babies needed more frequent neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admission. In group I, one infant was diagnosed with compensated hypothyroidism and one infant had transient hyperthyrotropinemia. Five infants (23.8% in group II had thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels >20 mIU/mL. Only two of them had TSH level >7 mIU/L at the 3rd postnatal week, and all had normal free T4 (FT4. Median maternal TSH level of these five infants with TSH >20 mIU/mL was 6.6 mIU/mL. In group III, six infants (6.5% had TSH levels above >20 mIU/mL at the 1st postnatal week. Conclusion. Infants of mothers with thyroid problems are more likely to have elevated TSH and higher recall rate on neonatal thyroid screening. Women with thyroid disorders and their newborn infants should be followed closely for both obstetrical problems and for thyroid dysfunction.

  1. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Chien-Chih [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Yang, An-Hang [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ching-Sheng [National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chi, Chin-Wen [National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China); Tseng, Ling-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Tsai, Yi-Fan [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Ho, Jennifer H. [Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Center for Stem Cell Research, Taipei (China); Lee, Chen-Hsen [NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Lee, Oscar K. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Stem Cell Research Center, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 131}I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133{sup +} cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and higher radioresistance. After {gamma}-irradiation of the cells, the CD133{sup +} population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133{sup -} cells. In vivo {sup 131}I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133{sup +} cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133{sup +} cells. (orig.)

  2. Altered Peptidase Activities in Thyroid Neoplasia and Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Larrinaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA, and thyroid nodular hyperplasia (TNH are the most frequent diseases of the thyroid gland. Previous studies described the involvement of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26 in the development of thyroid neoplasia and proposed it as an additional tool in the diagnosis/prognosis of these diseases. However, very little is known about the involvement of other peptidases in neoplastic and hyperplastic processes of this gland. Methods. The catalytic activity of 10 peptidases in a series of 30 PTC, 10 FTA, and 14 TNH was measured fluorimetrically in tumour and nontumour adjacent tissues. Results. The activity of DPPIV/CD26 was markedly higher in PTC than in FTA, TNH, and nontumour tissues. Aspartyl aminopeptidase (AspAP, alanyl aminopeptidase (AlaAP, prolyl endopeptidase, pyroglutamyl peptidase I, and aminopeptidase B activities were significantly increased in thyroid neoplasms when compared to nontumour tissues. AspAP and AlaAP activities were also significantly higher in PTC than in FTA and TNH. Conclusions. These data suggest the involvement of DPPIV/CD26 and some cytosolic peptidases in the neoplastic development of PTC and FTA. Further studies will help to define the possible clinical usefulness of AlaAP and AspAP in the diagnosis/prognosis of thyroid neoplasms.

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  4. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need a different dose of thyroid hormone include birth control pills, estrogen, testosterone, some anti-seizure medications (for ... is no evidence that desiccated thyroid has any advantage over synthetic T4. WHAT ABOUT T3? While most ...

  5. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid malignancies. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in the pediatric population is usually associated with specific inherited genetic conditions, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) Anaplastic : This is the fastest ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  7. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a computer to provide information about your thyroid’s size, shape, position and function that is often unattainable ... The thyroid scan is used to determine the size, shape and position of the thyroid gland. The ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does ... they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate ...

  11. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rise in blood pressure in late pregnancy thyroid storm—a sudden, severe worsening of symptoms miscarriage premature ... rarely Because thyroid hormones are crucial to fetal brain and nervous system development, uncontrolled hypothyroidism—especially during ...

  12. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000331.htm Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma To use the sharing features on ... the lower neck. Causes About 80% of all thyroid cancers diagnosed in the United States are the papillary ...

  13. Child thyroid anatomy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and ... a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. Thyroid disorders are more common in older children and ...

  14. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  15. Thyroid preparation overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid preparations are medicines used to treat thyroid gland disorders. Overdose occurs when someone takes more than the normal or recommended amount of this medicine. This can be by accident or ...

  16. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This is BX rated vs the other name brand LT4s # = This is AB rated only to Unithroid and is considered the only ... American Thyroid Association Announces Prize Lectureship at International Thyroid Congress By ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about your thyroid’s size, shape, position and function that is often unattainable using other imaging procedures. ... thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is ...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does ... they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. ... eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry and other metallic accessories should be left ...

  1. Hyperthyroidism (Overactive Thyroid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plummer's disease (toxic multinodular goiter) and thyroiditis, can cause hyperthyroidism. Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland at ... too much T-4, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Normally, your immune system uses antibodies to help ...

  2. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed.

  3. cell tumours of childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neuron-specific-enolase, vimentin and neurofilament us- .... ated on a 4-point scale based on the number of positive cells: Negative staining (—) = no tumour cell stained. Minimal .... the same laboratory, have been shown previously to be.

  4. [Thyroid and cardiovascular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek

    2004-05-01

    In this study three problems concerning interactions between thyroid and cardiovascular system are discussed. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pleural effusion, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension may be consequences of thyroid disorders leading to inappropriate hormone secretion. During such illnesses as heart failure, myocardial infarction and in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery profound changes may occur in thyroid hormone metabolism known as sick euthyroid syndrome. Treatment with amiodarone may lead to changes in thyroid tests results and to development of hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis.

  5. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  6. The thyroid: medical surveillance of exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgili, M. [Radiation Protection ASL Frosinone (Italy); Strambi, E. [Board for the new Technologies, the Energy and the Environment (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Trenta, G. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2000-05-01

    In this paper the authors, on the basis of a prevalence study of thyroid diseases on a group of 234 radiation workers observed over a ten-years (1989-1999): discuss the issues and suggest an up-to-date approach to diagnosis and management of nodular thyroid diseases in the medical surveillance of radiation protection; identify and discuss, specific clinical situations, which, representing special problems, deserve a more restrictive judgement of fitness; intend to demonstrate that the diagnostic protocol used conciliates with due economy but with the right balance, the real requirements of medical surveillance reducing as far as possible undesirable effects such as damage from excessive protection and patient/physician delay, which is extremely dangerous in the early diagnosis of tumours. (author)

  7. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  9. Thyroid and the Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age monitoring of TSH, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding seg...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  11. Targeting medullary thyroid carcinomas with bispecific antibodies and bivalent haptens. Results and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, E; Gautherot, E; Meyer, P; Barbet, J

    1997-01-01

    The present article reviews the clinical trials that have been performed in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma patients with the Affinity Enhancement System. This technique uses bispecific antibodies to target radiolabelled bivalent haptens to tumour cells. Its sensitivity in the detection of known tumour sites is high (90%) and this technique also achieves good sensitivity (61%) in the detection of occult disease as revealed by abnormal thyrocalcitonin blood levels. Due to its high targeting capacity, this technique is now considered for use as a therapeutic agent in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients.

  12. Molecular characterisation of the poorly differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas using genome-wide approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Pita, Jaime Miguel Gomes, 1985-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Bioquímica (Genética Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATC) are highly malignant tumours composed by dedifferentiated cells, for which current therapeutic options have been ineffective. In the present project, the molecular signatures and genetic alterations associated with these tumours were elucidated, by using genome-wide expression analysis as first assessment. The role ...

  13. Thyroid and the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are some of the most clinically relevant findings that accompany both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. On the basis of the understanding of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and cardiovascular system, it is possible to explain the changes in cardiac output, cardiac contractility, blood pressure and rhythm disturbances that result from thyroid dysfunction. In the present review will integrate what is known about the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany chronic congestive heart failure.

  14. Thyroglossal Duct Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Synchronous Lingual Thyroid Atypia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglossal duct and lingual thyroid ectopic lesions are exceedingly rare synchronous findings. Papillary thyroid carcinoma of these ectopic thyroid sites is well understood but still a rare finding. This case points to some management nuances in regard to ectopic thyroid screening with imaging and also shows the effectiveness of minimally invasive transoral robotic surgery for lingual thyroid.

  15. Somatostatin receptor biology in neuroendocrine and pituitary tumours: part 1--molecular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Mehtap; Dworakowska, Dorota; Grossman, Ashley

    2010-11-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) may occur at many sites in the body although the majority occur within the gastroenteropancreatic axis. Non-gastroenteropancreatic NETs encompass phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, medullary thyroid carcinoma, anterior pituitary tumour, broncho-pulmonary NETs and parathyroid tumours. Like most endocrine tumours, NETs also express somatostatin (SST) receptors (subtypes 1-5) whose ligand SST is known to inhibit endocrine and exocrine secretions and have anti-tumour effects. In the light of this knowledge, the idea of using SST analogues in the treatment of NETs has become increasingly popular and new studies have centred upon the development of new SST analogues. We attempt to review SST receptor (SSTR) biology primarily in neuroendocrine tissues, focusing on pituitary tumours. A full data search was performed through PubMed over the years 2000-2009 with keywords 'somatostatin, molecular biology, somatostatin receptors, somatostatin signalling, NET, pituitary' and all relevant publications have been included, together with selected publications prior to that date. SSTR signalling in non-neuroendocrine solid tumours is beyond the scope of this review. SST is a potent anti-proliferative and anti-secretory agent for some NETs. The successful therapeutic use of SST analogues in the treatment of these tumours depends on a thorough understanding of the diverse effects of SSTR subtypes in different tissues and cell types. Further studies will focus on critical points of SSTR biology such as homo- and heterodimerization of SSTRs and the differences between post-receptor signalling pathways of SSTR subtypes.

  16. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Thyroid and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age, monitoring of thyroid-stimulating hormone, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding segment of our population. A better understanding of the impact of thyroid hormonal status on cardiovascular physiology will enable health care providers to make decisions about thyroid hormone evaluation and therapy in concert with evaluating and treating hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The goal of this review is to access contemporary understanding of the effects of thyroid hormones on normal cardiovascular function and the potential role of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  19. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  20. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  1. [Riedel thyroiditis: two cases report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rongjin; Wang, Junguo

    2014-10-01

    Riedel thyroiditis is a benign disease, which is often self-limited. Examinations, such as CT and histologic diagnosis can distinguish it from malignant neoplasms and hashimoto's thyroiditis. Riedel thyroiditis is an uncommon form of chronic thyroiditis in which the thyroid gland is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can be cured by surgery and medicine.

  2. PET and PET/CT in endocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: robert.dudczak@meduniwien.ac.at; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2010-03-15

    Functional information provided by PET tracers together with the superior image quality and the better data quantification by PET technology had a changing effect on the significance of nuclear medicine in medical issues. Recently introduced hybrid PET/CT systems together with the introduction of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals have contributed to the fact that nuclear medicine has become a growing diagnostic impact on endocrinology. In this review imaging strategies, different radiopharmaceuticals including the basic mechanism of their cell uptake, and the diagnostic value of PET and PET/CT in endocrine tumours except differentiated thyroid carcinomas will be discussed.

  3. Nodular thyroid disease and thyroid malignancy: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodular thyroid disease and thyroid malignancy: Experience at Polokwane Mankweng ... had malignant lesions (7 follicular carcinomas and 3 papillary carcinomas), ... The prevalence of thyroid cancer in our study was 11.1%, and of all 90 ...

  4. New treatment modalities in advanced thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, E.; Schneider, T.C.; Morreau, H.; Gelderblom, H.; Nortier, J.W.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is classified into differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), undifferentiated/anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma. Results of conventional treatment modalities in advanced thyroid cancer have been disappointing a

  5. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer can cause any of the following ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. Living as a Thyroid Cancer Survivor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Working Thyroid Cancer After Treatment Living as a Thyroid Cancer Survivor For many people with thyroid cancer, treatment ... Cancer Treatments Are No Longer Working More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Thyroid metastases from colorectal cancer: the Institut Gustave Roussy experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lièvre, Astrid; Leboulleux, Sophie; Boige, Valérie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Dromain, Clarisse; Elias, Dominique; Ducreux, Michel; Malka, David

    2006-08-01

    The prevalence of thyroid metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. We retrieved the records of all patients with CRC and pathologically proved thyroid metastasis for the period 1993-2004. Among 5,862 consecutive patients with CRC, 6 (0.1%) were diagnosed with thyroid metastases, a median of 61 months after the diagnosis of primary tumour, and a median of 19 months after the last surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation of other metastases (which were present in all cases). Signs and symptoms, when present (n=3), consisted of cervical pain, cervical adenopathy, goitre, dysphagia, and/or dysphonia. In other cases, the diagnosis was made by positron emission tomography scanning. Thyroidectomy was performed in the 5 patients with isolated thyroid metastases, with cervical lymph node dissection being required in all cases. The only patient treated conservatively because of concomitant liver and lung metastases developed life-threatening dyspnoea, which required emergent tracheal stenting. Median overall survival was 77 months, 58 months, and 12 months after the diagnosis of primary CRC, initial metastases, and thyroid metastasis, respectively. It is concluded that thyroid metastases are rare and occur late in the course of CRC. Thyroidectomy (with cervical lymph node dissection) may result in prevention or improvement of life-threatening symptoms and prolonged survival.

  8. Genetic alterations in thyroid tumors from patients irradiated in childhood for tinea capitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Paula; Pereira, Dina; Celestino, Ricardo; Mendes, Adélia; Nakasawa, Tadao; Teixeira-Gomes, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation at young age is the strongest risk factor for the occurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). RET/PTC rearrangements are the most frequent genetic alterations associated with radiation-induced PTC, whereas BRAF and RAS mutations and PAX8-PPARG rearrangement have been associated with sporadic PTC. We decided to search for such genetic alterations in PTCs of patients subjected in childhood to scalp irradiation. We studied 67 thyroid tumors from 49 individuals irradiated in childhood for tinea capitis scalp epilation: 36 malignant (12 cases of conventional PTC (cPTC), two cPTC metastases, 20 cases of follicular variant PTC (FVPTC), one oncocytic variant of PTC and one follicular carcinoma) and 31 follicular thyroid adenomas. The lesions were screened for the BRAF(V600E) and NRAS mutations and for RET/PTC and PAX8-PPARG rearrangements. BRAF(V600E) mutation was detected in seven of 14 (50%) cPTC and two of 20 FVPTC (10%) (P=0.019). NRAS mutation was present in one case of FVPTC (5%). RET/PTC1 rearrangement was found, by RT-PCR, in one of 17 cases (5.9%) and by fluorescence in situ hybridization in two of six cases (33%). PAX8-PPARG rearrangement was not detected in any carcinoma. None of the follicular adenomas presented any of the aforementioned genetic alterations. The prevalence of BRAF(V600E) mutation in our series is the highest reported in series of PTCs arising in radiation-exposed individuals. The prevalence of RET/PTC1 rearrangement fits with the values recently described in a similar setting.

  9. Sciatica as a presenting feature of thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma in a 79-year-old woman.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of metastatic thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma presenting with sciatica in a 79-year-old woman. The primary thyroid tumour was undiagnosed until this clinical presentation. The patient gave a short history of back pain and right-sided sciatica, which was progressive and nocturnal in nature. Neuroimaging revealed an enhancing intradural mass lesion, which was completely excised through a right L1-L3 hemilaminectomy. Histopathological examination of the excised tissue revealed a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Subsequent metastatic investigation revealed a heterogeneously attenuating mixed solid cystic mass in a retrosternal thyroid gland, with multiple solid pulmonary nodules suggestive of metastatic disease. She opted for palliative radiotherapy for the primary thyroid cancer and made remarkable postoperative improvement. The authors conclude that surgical treatment of solitary metastatic lesion may produce good symptomatic relief irrespective of patient\\'s age and primary pathology, while emphasising the need for detailed clinical evaluation of patients with \\'red flag\\' symptoms.

  10. Sciatica as a presenting feature of thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma in a 79-year-old woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbodo, Elisha; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Keohane, Catherine; Bermingham, Niamh; Kaar, George

    2011-12-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of metastatic thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma presenting with sciatica in a 79-year-old woman. The primary thyroid tumour was undiagnosed until this clinical presentation. The patient gave a short history of back pain and right-sided sciatica, which was progressive and nocturnal in nature. Neuroimaging revealed an enhancing intradural mass lesion, which was completely excised through a right L1-L3 hemilaminectomy. Histopathological examination of the excised tissue revealed a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Subsequent metastatic investigation revealed a heterogeneously attenuating mixed solid cystic mass in a retrosternal thyroid gland, with multiple solid pulmonary nodules suggestive of metastatic disease. She opted for palliative radiotherapy for the primary thyroid cancer and made remarkable postoperative improvement. The authors conclude that surgical treatment of solitary metastatic lesion may produce good symptomatic relief irrespective of patient's age and primary pathology, while emphasising the need for detailed clinical evaluation of patients with 'red flag' symptoms.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Hashimoto thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hashimoto thyroiditis is a condition that affects the function of ...

  12. Ectopic goitrous submandibular thyroid with goitrous orthotopic thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Avinash Kumar; Mani, Vinayaga; Dixit, Rashmi; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly with lingual thyroid accounting for majority of the cases. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue lateral to the midline is very rare, and very few cases located in the submandibular region have been reported. The simultaneous finding of submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue and a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is even rarer. In the differential diagnosis of an ectopic submandibular thyroid, it is fundamental to exclude a metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer, even when primary thyroid carcinoma is not demonstrable.

  13. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  14. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  15. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  16. Pediatric Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which originates from thyroid parafollicular C cells, accounts for 3 to 5% of thyroid malignancies. MTC occurs either sporadically or in an inherited autosomal dominant manner. Hereditary MTC occurs as a familial MTC or as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and B syndromes. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed between hereditary MTC and germ-line ?gain of function? mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Most cases of pedi...

  17. Thyroid and the Heart

    OpenAIRE

    A Karas; Obrezan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cardiovascular signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are some of the most clinically relevant findings that accompany both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. On the basis of the understanding of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and cardiovascular system, it is possible to explain the changes in cardiac output, cardiac contractility, blood pressure and rhythm disturbances that result from thyroid dysfunction. In the present review will integrate what is known about th...

  18. Lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, M; Hirokawa, M.; T. Manabe; Shimozuma, K; Sonoo, H; Harada, T.

    1997-01-01

    A case of autoimmune thyroiditis after long term treatment with lithium is described in a 29 year old Japanese woman with manic depression. Positive serum antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, diffuse goitre, and microscopic chronic thyroiditis, as well as the clinical history of long term lithium treatment were suggestive of lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis. Microscopically, there was a mild degree of interstitial fibrosis and a moderate degree of lymphocytic infiltration...

  19. Epigenetics modifications and therapeutic prospects in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graziella eCatalano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available At present no successful treatment is available for advanced thyroid cancer, which comprises poorly differentiated, anaplastic, and metastatic or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer not responding to radioiodine. In the last few years, biologically targeted therapies for advanced thyroid carcinomas have been proposed on the basis of the recognition of key oncogenic mutations. Although the results of several phase II trials look promising, none of the patients treated had a complete response, and only a minority of them had a partial response, suggesting that the treatment is, at best, effective in stabilizing patients with progressive disease. Epigenetic refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without any alteration in the primary DNA sequence. The epigenetic processes establish and maintain the global and local chroma¬tin states that determine gene expression. Epigenetic abnormalities are present in almost all cancers and, together with genetic changes, drive tumour progression. Various genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and invasion (p16INK4A, RASSF1A,PTEN, Rap1GAP, TIMP3, DAPK, RARβ2, E-cadherin, and CITED1 as well as genes specific of thyroid differentiation (Na+/I- symport, TSH receptor, pendrin, SL5A8, and TTF-1 present aberrant methylation in thyroid cancer.This review deals with the most frequent epigenetic alterations in thyroid cancer and focuses on epigenetic therapy, whose goal is to target the chromatin in rapidly dividing tumour cells and potentially restore normal cell functions. Experimental data and clinical trials, especially using deacetylase inhibitors and demethylating agents, are discussed.

  20. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research into thyroid cancer ... in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues in patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essen, Martijn van; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion De; Valkema, Roelf; Kwekkeboom, Dik J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus MC, ' s Gravendijkwal 230, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-08-15

    Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising treatment option for patients with inoperable or metastasised neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with all of the various {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y, or {sup 177}Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used. Since tumour size reduction was seldom achieved with {sup 111}Indium labelled somatostatin analogues, radiolabelled somatostatin analogues with beta-emitting isotopes like {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu were developed. Reported anti-tumour effects of [{sup 90}Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide vary considerably between various studies: Tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 9 to 33% (mean 22%). With [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate treatments, tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 28% of patients and tumour regression of 25 to 50% in 19% of patients, stable disease was demonstrated in 35% and progressive disease in 18%. Predictive factors for tumour remission were high tumour uptake on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and limited amount of liver metastases. The side-effects of PRRT are few and mostly mild, certainly when using renal protective agents: Serious side-effects like myelodysplastic syndrome or renal failure are rare. The median duration of the therapy response for [{sup 90}Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide and [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate is 30 months and more than 36 months respectively. Lastly, quality of life improves significantly after treatment with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate. These data compare favourably with the limited number of alternative treatment approaches, like chemotherapy. If more widespread use of PRRT is possible, such therapy might become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasised or inoperable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Also the role in somatostatin receptor expressing non-GEP tumours, like metastasised paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and non

  2. Silent somatotroph tumour revisited from a study of 80 patients with and without acromegaly and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinezu, Laura; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lapoirie, Marion; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2017-02-01

    Silent somatotroph tumours are growth hormone (GH) immunoreactive (IR) pituitary tumours without clinical and biological signs of acromegaly. Their better characterisation is required to improve the diagnosis. Twenty-one silent somatotroph tumours were compared to 59 somatotroph tumours with acromegaly. Tumours in each group were classified into GH and plurihormonal (GH/prolactin (PRL)/±thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)) and into densely granulated (DG) and sparsely granulated (SG) types. The two groups were then compared with regards to proliferation (Ki-67, p53 indexes and mitotic count), differentiation (expression of somatostatin receptors SSTR2A-SSTR5 and transcription factor Pit-1) and secretory activity (% of GH- and PRL-IR cells). The silent somatotroph tumours represented 2% of all tested pituitary tumours combined. They were more frequent in women than in men (P = 0.002), more frequently plurihormonal and SG (P acromegaly. They all expressed SSTR2A, SSTR5 and Pit-1. The plurihormonal (GH/PRL/±TSH) tumours were mostly observed in women (sex ratio: 3/1) and in patients who were generally younger than those with acromegaly (P acromegaly. A low secretory activity of these tumours might explain the normal plasma values for GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and the absence of clinical signs of acromegaly. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedbæk, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    The commonly used tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is designed to predict death and not recurrence. Based on this, patients with thyroid cancer are grouped into risk categories at the time of initial treatment. However, recent guidelines proposed a novel staging system focusing...

  4. Progressive metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma : first- and second-line strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, Thera P.; Verbeek, Hans H. G.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Plukker, John Th M.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment for metastasised medullary thyroid cancer is still a topic of discussion. One of the main challenges remains to find effective adjuvant and palliative options for patients with metastatic disease. The diagnostic and treatment strategies for this tumour are discussed and possible new de

  5. Detection of bone metastases in thyroid cancer patients : Bone scintigraphy or F-18-DG PET?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, Ha T. T.; Jager, Pieter L.; Plukker, John T. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Links, Thera P.

    2007-01-01

    Background Similar to the situation in other tumour types, it is currently unclear whether fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is adequate in the detection of bone metastases of thyroid cancer. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the performance of bone sc

  6. Primary thyroid lymphoma: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Han, Moon Hee E-mail: hanmh@radcom.snu.ac.kr; Kim, Keon Ha; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chang, Kee-Hyun

    2003-06-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the computed tomographic (CT) findings of primary thyroid lymphoma. Methods and material: The clinicopathological data and CT images of nine patients with primary thyroid lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. The CT appearances were classified into three types: type 1, a solitary nodule surrounded by normal thyroid tissue; type 2, multiple nodules in the thyroid, and type 3, a homogeneously enlarged both thyroid glands with a reduced attenuation with or without peripheral thin hyperattenuating thyroid tissue. Results: All patients had a rapidly enlarging thyroid mass and coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis. One patient showed type 1 pattern, three type 2, and five type 3. Six patients had homogeneous tumor isoattenuating to surrounding muscles. The tumors had a strong tendency to compress normal remnant thyroid and the surrounding structure without invasion. Conclusion: Primary thyroid lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis when old female had a homogeneous thyroidal mass isoattenuating to muscles, which does not invade surrounding structures.

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  8. Tumours in the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel tumours are rare and originate from a wide variety of benign and malignant entities. Adenocarcinomas are the most frequent primary malignant small bowel tumours. Submucosal tumours like gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST or neuroendocrine tumours (NET may show a central umbilication, pathologic vessels, bridging folds or an ulceration of the overlying mucosa. These signs help to differentiate them from harmless bulges caused by impression from outside, e.g. from other intestinal loops. Sarcomas of the small bowel are rare neoplasias with mesenchymal origin, sometimes presenting as protruding masses. Benign tumours like lipoma, fibrolipoma, fibroma, myoma, and heterotopias typically present as submucosal masses. They cannot be differentiated endoscopically from those with malignant potential as GIST or NET. Neuroendocrine carcinomas may present with diffuse infiltration, which may resemble other malignant tumours. The endoscopic appearance of small bowel lymphomas has a great variation from mass lesions to diffuse infiltrative changes. Melanoma metastases are the most frequent metastases to the small bowel. They may be hard to distinguish from other tumours when originating from an amelanotic melanoma.

  9. Thyroid ultrasonography in congenital isolated thyroid stimulating hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamoto, H; Miyazaki, M.; Tatsumi, K; Amino, N

    1995-01-01

    The effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiency on thyroid development was examined using ultrasonography in a child with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Ultrasound revealed the thyroid gland was one sixth normal volume, suggesting that TSH plays an important part in thyroid growth, but not a critical role in differentiation.

  10. Unusual tumours of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E S; Pike, E; Couves, C M

    1983-09-01

    Unusual lung tumors are not simply pathological curiosities. They demonstrate features of major significance in diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Six of these tumours are discussed: (1) Carcinosarcoma is rarely found in the lung. The histogenis of the lesion is unclear and the prognosis is poor. (2) Only three cases of pleomorphic adenoma have previously been described. Differentiation from other "mixed tumours" of the lung is essential. (3) A rare case of bronchial adenoma producing ectopic ACTH is described. Early recognition of these polypeptide hormone-secreting tumours is stressed. (4) Oat cell carcinoma with the myasthenic (Eaton-Lambert) syndrome shows the clinical features which should permit early tumour diagnosis. The hazards of muscle relaxants must be recognized. (5) Prostatic carcinoma with endobronchial metastases is is discussed. The importance of localization of the primary tumour is emphasized. (6) An example of double primary carcinoma is presented. The rarity of this finding may be related to the poor prognosis of patients with bronchogenesis carcinoma.

  11. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  12. Laryngeal carcinoma presented with thyroid mass symptoms: The importance of early onset hoarseness and absent of laryngeal crepitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuen Shiun Chew

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of stridor with a marked anterior neck swelling is always presumed as thyroid mass compressing on the airway. However, a history of progressive hoarseness prior to the stridor should be taken into consideration as the airway obstruction might be due to intraluminal airway compression. We report an atypical presentation of laryngeal cancer with anterior neck swelling, which moved with swallowing, mimicking a thyroid tumour which cause delay of the management.

  13. Eponym : de Quervain thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland. It is an uncommon disease in adults and very rare in children. Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon, who was an authority on thyroid disease, described the unique pathology of this disease. Granulomatous changes with giant cells in thyroid tissue are the pathological findings. Viral infection in genetically predisposed individuals has been proposed as the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical hallmarks for the diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein as well as decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. In addition, thyrotoxicosis is present in about 50% of cases in early phase of the disease. Serum thyroglobulin level is usually elevated. Only symptomatic treatment with analgesics is usually required for pain relief. Glucocorticoid therapy may be used in severely ill patients. de Quervain thyroiditis is generally completely resolved without complications in 6-12 months. However, permanent hypothyroidism and recurrent disease have been reported in some patients.

  14. Thyroid Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and T3 can exist. This is because the estrogens increase the level of the binding proteins. In these situations, it is better to ask both for TSH and free T4 for thyroid evaluation. THYROID ANTIBODY TESTS The immune system of ...

  15. Flavonoids and thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der D.; Kastelijn, J.; Schroder-van der Elst, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The most potent natural plant-derived compounds that can affect thyroid function, thyroid hormone secretion and availability to tissues is the group of flavonoids, i.e. plant pigments. They are present in our daily food, such as vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, wine, and tea. Epidemiological studie

  16. [Ultrasound of the Thyroid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active vs. inactive nodes, and in particular benign vs. malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also showpromising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  17. [Thyroid and radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S; Namba, H; Nagataki, S

    1993-11-20

    The topic "Thyroid and Radiation" is both an old and a new area to be solved by human beings. The thyroid is an organ that is usually susceptible to exposure to ionizing radiation, both by virtue of its ability to concentrate radioiodine (internal radiation) and by routine medical examination: Chest X-ray, Dental X-ray, X-irradiation of cervical lymphnodes etc. (external radiation). Iodine-131 is widely used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancers, of which the disadvantage is radiation-induced hypothyroidism but not complications of thyroid tumor. The thyroid gland is comparatively radioresistant, however, the data obtained from Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Marshall islands indicates a high incidence of external radiation-induced thyroid tumors as well as hypothyroidism. The different biological effects of internal and external radiation remains to be further clarified. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrate the increased number of thyroid cancer in children around Chernobyl in Belarus. In this review, we would like to introduce the effect of radiation on the thyroid gland at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Furthermore the clinical usefulness of iodine-131, including the safety-control for radiation exposure will be discussed.

  18. The potential value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, U.; Bihl, H. (Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Frank-Raue, K.; Raue, F. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine); Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Buhr, H.J. (Staedt. Klinikum, Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine); Guzman, G. (Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine Inst. de Neurocirugia, Investigationes Cerebrales ' Dr Asenjo' Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Medicina Nuclear)

    1993-06-01

    In a prospective study, ten patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (markedly elevated calcitonin levels) were investigated by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with [sup 111]In-pentetreotide. Scintigraphically, 30 sites of pathological uptake were found, mostly located in the neck and upper mediastinum. So far, 18 suspected tumour sites underwent histological examination and 14 of them could be verified as metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The remaining four putative tumour lesions turned out to be false positive scintigraphic findings caused by chronic inflammation and somatostatin receptor positive tumours other than MTC. We conclude that SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence and may thus make a contribution to better management of this patient group. (Author).

  19. PREGNANCY AND THYROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Gaberšček

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In conditions with appropriate iodine intake, thyroid gland adapts to changes during pregnancy without any consequences. Fetal need for thyroid hormones in the first trimester is directly connected with transplacental transport of thyroid hormones. Fetal synthesis of thyroid hormones depends on availability of iodine in the feto-placental unit. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism during pregnancy are risk factors for pregnant woman and for normal development of fetus and child.Conclusions. Pregnant women with appropriately treated thyroid diseases have the same outcome of pregnancy as healthy women, and neuroendocrinological development of children is not impaired. If the disease is unrecognized or untreated, complications of pregnancy and delivery occur more frequently. Therefore, timely recognition and treatment of the diseases with appropriate drugs during pregnancy and, also, after delivery is very important.

  20. Thyroid Cancer Staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The current prevalence of thyroid cancer in women is high. Likewise, other cancers and thyroid cancer have been based on the TNM classification system. Staging of thyroid cancer has an important role in determining the extent of surgical excision and lymph node dissection, planning the adjuvant therapy after surgery and predicting the recurrence rate and the prognosis of patients. Ultrasonography is the basic imaging modality to identify the tumor size and the extent of lymph node metastasis. More recently, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography provide additional help for the staging of thyroid cancer. So, this article describes the 7th edition of the TNM staging of thyroid cancer, as proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and the details of radiologic evaluation of the T, N and M stages

  1. Cardiovascular effects of thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Jodi K; Panciera, David L; Abbott, Jonathan A

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have many effects on cardiovascular function, and deficiency or excess of thyroid hormones can result in cardiac dysfunction. Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are often identified during examination of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients. This article addresses the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system and the clinical relevance of the cardiovascular response to thyroid dysfunction. In addition, treatment recommendations are presented.

  2. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, MingHua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyro...

  3. Thyroid diseases and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grandi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid diseases and diabetes mellitus are the most common endocrine diseases during pregnancy. Internal Medicine doctors could be involved in the management of pregnant women affected by thyroid diseases, in particular if an Endocrine Unit lacks in the hospital; it is mandatory that they have the skills to cope with these diseases. METHODS In this work authors describe the most common thyroid abnormalities that can occur during pregnancy: hypothyroidism (clinical and subclinical, hyperthyroidism (clinical and sub-clinical, autoimmune thyroiditis (in particular the so called post-partum thyroiditis, nodular diseases and cancer. They discuss moreover the peculiar pathophysiologic mechanisms by which these diseases appear, the diagnostic tools and the therapies, according to their own experience and the more recent international guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS It is important to evaluate thyroid function tests before and during pregnancy, at 16th and 28th gestational week; it is mandatory to cure also the “sub-clinical” hypothyroidism during pregnancy, when TSH level are higher than 5 μIU/mL; the optimal dose of levo-thyroxine during pregnancy is, average, 30-50% higher than that used before pregnancy; it is not correct to treat mild or sub-clinical hyperthyroidism; propylthyouracil is the best drug to treat hyperthyroidism during pregnancy; the post-partum thyroiditis is generally transient, so that a careful monitoring of thyroid function is advisable, in particular after 9-12 months of therapy; thyroid cancer, if discovered during pregnancy, generally has no negative effects on the outcome of the pregnancy; it would be better to treat surgically thyroid cancer during the last trimester of the pregnancy.

  4. [Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirta, Jarosław S; Barczyński, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery is rare, but if it occurs it is a life-threatening condition necessitating emergency surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and risk factors of haemorrhage after thyroid surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in a group of 8931 consecutive patients with various thyroid diseases treated in 2004-2013 at our institution. Potential risk factors for postoperative haemorrhage after thyroid surgery were analysed using logistic regression model. Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgery occurred in 40 (0.45%) of 8931 patients. None of the patients died within the perioperative period. Bleeding occurred within first 24 hours following surgery in 38 (95%) patients, and in the remaining 2 (5%) patients in more than 24 hours after initial surgery. The following risk factors for bleeding after thyroid operation were identified: male sex (OR 3.618; 1.762-7.430; p or = 70 years (OR 3.052; 1.275-7.304; p = 0.012), surgery for hyperthyroidism (OR 2.873; 1.511-5.462; p = 0.001), smoking (OR 2.855; 1.502-5.428; p = 0.001), subtotal thyroidectomy in contrast to total thyroidectomy or lobectomy (OR 2.853; 1.356-6.004; p=0.006), and thyroid operation undertaken by resident in training in general surgery (OR 2.596; 1.393-4.837; p = 0.003). Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgical intervention occurs most frequently within first 24 hour following surgery. Hence, for safety reasons a minimum of 24-hour hospital stay is recommended in all patients with risk factors for postoperative bleeding after thyroid operation. Quality monitoring of thyroid surgery should include also risk factors for postoperative bleeding.

  5. Ultrasound examination of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaenepoel, L.; Demeester-Mirkine, N.; Sacre, R.; Jockheer, M.H.; van Geertruyden, J.

    1982-07-01

    Ultrasound examination of the thyroid offers an accurate morphological picture and the possibility of comparing objectively the size of lobes and lesions over long periods. Cysts and calcifications, mostly benign, are readily recognized. Neoplastic lesions in our series were all less reflective than normal thyroid tissue. But so were the majority of benign nodules. In hyperthyroidism, subacute thyroiditis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the thyroid tissue is much less echogenic than in the normal gland.

  6. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  7. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  8. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  9. The Heidelberg classification of renal cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, G; Akhtar, M; Beckwith, BJ; Bugert, P; Cooper, CS; Delahunt, B; Eble, JN; Fleming, S; Ljungberg, B; Medeiros, LJ; Moch, H; Reuter, VE; Ritz, E; Roos, G; Schmidt, D; Srigley, [No Value; Storkel, S; VandenBerg, E; Zbar, B

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a workshop entitled 'Impact of Molecular Genetics on the Classification of Renal Cell Tumours', which was held in Heidelberg in October 1996, The focus on 'renal cell tumours' excludes any discussion of Wilms' tumour and its variants, or of tumours metastatic t

  10. Soft tissue tumours: imaging strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J. [Institute Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Orbach, Daniel [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Klijanienko, Jerzy [Institute Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Vascular tumours and malformations, fibrous and fibrohistiocytic tumours and pseudotumours are the most common benign soft-tissue masses observed in children, and can be treated conservatively. Rhabdomyosarcomas are the most frequent malignant tumours, accounting for about half of soft tissue sarcomas. A child referred for a soft-tissue mass should ideally be managed by a multidisciplinary team and primary excision should be proscribed until a definite diagnosis has been established. Clinical examination, conventional radiography and US with Doppler represent the first-line examinations and are sometimes sufficient to make a diagnosis. In all other situations, MRI is mandatory to establish the aggressiveness and extension of the tumour. This technique provides the relevant data to guide the decision regarding tissue sampling. (orig.)

  11. Differences in superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery blood flow spectrum parameters in subacute thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Bo Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the differences in superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery blood flow spectrum parameters in subacute thyroiditis. Methods:A Total of 40 cases of patients with subacute thyroiditis and 40 cases of healthy volunteers were selected for study and enrolled in pathology group and control group respectively, color Doppler ultrasonography was conducted to detect peak blood flow velocities (Vmax) of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery as well as resistance index (RI), and serum was collected to detect thyroid hormone contents, infection indexes and oxidative stress indexes. Results:Peak blood flow velocities Vmax of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery of pathology group were significantly higher than those of control group, and resistance index RI was not different from that of control group;FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, ESR, CRP, PCT and MDA of pathology group were significantly higher than those of control group, and SOD and TAOC were significantly lower than those of control group;Vmax of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery were positively correlated with FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, ESR, CRP, PCT and MDA, and negatively correlated with SOD and TAOC. Conclusion:Peak blood flow velocities (Vmax) of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery in subacute thyroiditis are significantly accelerated, Vmax has good consistency with thyroid hormone contents, infection indexes and oxidative stress indexes, and it can accurately assess the severity of the disease.

  12. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  13. Aspergillus thyroiditis in a renal transplant recipient mimicking subacute thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Nar, A; Ozbek, O; Turkmen, K; Erekul, S; Turk, S

    2011-04-01

    Fungal pathogens are increasingly encountered after renal transplantation. Aspergillus causes significant morbidity and mortality in transplant patients. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence owing to unique features of the thyroid gland. Most cases are caused by Aspergillus species and have been described in immunocompromised patients. Presentation may be identical with that of subacute thyroiditis, in which hyperthyroidism features and painful thyroid are the prominent findings. Diagnosis can be ascertained by fine-needle aspiration of thyroid showing branching hyphae of Aspergillus. We describe a renal transplant patient who developed Aspergillus thyroiditis as part of a disseminated infection successfully treated with voriconazole.

  14. Development of the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mikael; Fagman, Henrik

    2017-06-15

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for organismal development and homeostasis. In humans, untreated congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid agenesis inevitably leads to cretinism, which comprises irreversible brain dysfunction and dwarfism. Elucidating how the thyroid gland - the only source of thyroid hormones in the body - develops is thus key for understanding and treating thyroid dysgenesis, and for generating thyroid cells in vitro that might be used for cell-based therapies. Here, we review the principal mechanisms involved in thyroid organogenesis and functional differentiation, highlighting how the thyroid forerunner evolved from the endostyle in protochordates to the endocrine gland found in vertebrates. New findings on the specification and fate decisions of thyroid progenitors, and the morphogenesis of precursor cells into hormone-producing follicular units, are also discussed. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Tumour markers in gastrointestinal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamerz, R.

    1988-02-01

    For non-endocrine gastrointestinal tumours the following tumour markers are of clinical interest: For esophageal cancer CEA (sensitivity, s: 40-60%) and SCC (squamous cell carcinoma antigen, x: 20-50%); for gastric cancer CEA (s: 30-40%) as well as CA 19-9 (s: 30-40%) because of complementary results (additive s: 50-60); for hepatocellular cancer AFP (first choice, s: 70-90%; second choice CA 19-9, s: 50-70%); for cholangiocellular cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%); for secondary liver cancer in general CEA; for biliary tract cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%) as well as for excretory pancreatic cancer (s: 70-90%); for colorectal cancer CEA (s: 40-70%) as a first choice marker, and CA 19-9 (s: 20-60%) as a second choice marker, and for anal cancer SCC. The frequency of tumour marker determinations depends on follow-up care recommendations for different tumour diseases (e.g. 1-3 monthly during the 1st and 2nd postoperative year, following chemotherapy courses, on change of therapy, on restaging and at unclear alteration of the clinical state). Tumour markers are only valuable adjuncts to the medical care of tumour patients and therefore useless as solitary findings or on missing therapeutic consequence.

  16. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.]|[Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China); Wang, C.C.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  17. The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedbæk, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer The commonly used tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is designed to predict death and not recurrence. Based on this, patients with thyroid cancer are grouped into risk categories at the time of initial treatment. However, recent...... guidelines proposed a novel staging system focusing on microscopic invasion into the perithyroidal tissues, neck lymph node involvement and 131I uptake outside the thyroid bed following treatment. This risk re-assessment improves the prediction of recurrent/persistent disease. The cornerstone in the follow......-up is measurement of plasma-thyroglobulin concentration and ultrasound of the neck focusing on the thyroid bed and classification of lymph nodes according to their location and high risk signs....

  18. Metastasis of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma to the Thyroid: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Goatman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We present a rare case of colorectal metastasis to the thyroid five years following primary colonic resection. This case highlights the need to be cognisant of unusual sites of metastasis from colorectal neoplasms. Case Report. An 82-year-old male patient had a panproctocolectomy for synchronous colorectal tumours. Five years later he was found to have lung and thyroid metastases found incidentally on imaging for an acute presentation with small bowel obstruction. Conclusion. Metastases to the thyroid should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the thyroid lesion with any history of malignancy, particularly with increasing patient age and when renal cell carcinoma or lung, colon, or breast primaries are involved.

  19. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is taken by mouth, in either liquid or capsule form, it is typically swallowed up to 24 ... I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake will begin ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other ... performed on people who have or had thyroid cancer. A physician may perform these imaging tests to: ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other ... performed on people who have or had thyroid cancer. A physician may perform these imaging tests to: ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine ... you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? Special camera or imaging devices ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as an overactive thyroid gland, a condition called hyperthyroidism , cancer or other growths assess the nature of ... an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the last two ...

  5. MEDULLARY THYROID CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid carcinoma belongs to orphan diseases affecting a small part of the population. Multicenter trials are required to elaborate a diagnostic algorithm, to define treatment policy, and to predict an outcome.

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time for the imaging to begin, you will sit in a chair facing a stationary probe positioned ... counter used for thyroid uptake exams. The patient sits with the camera directed at the neck for ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor of any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies, medications you’re taking and whether you’ve had ... thyroid gland evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine ... you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera and imaging ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as an overactive thyroid gland, a condition called hyperthyroidism , cancer or other growths assess the nature of ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an ...

  10. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to both pregnancy and thyroid disorders. Hyperthyroidism What causes hyperthyroidism in pregnancy? Hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is usually caused ... is believed to be an autoimmune condition and causes mild hyperthyroidism that usually lasts 1 to 2 months. Many ...

  11. Papillary thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, C; Asschenfeldt, P; Sørensen, J A;

    1994-01-01

    The age influence on the prognosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma was analyzed in a group of 67 patients. A marked decline in cause-specific survival was found for patients older than 60 years of age at the time of diagnosis. In order to find a tumor-biological explanation of the prognostic...... invasion and distant metastases. The results indicate that 60 years of age the time of diagnosis may be the "prognostic break-point" for papillary thyroid carcinoma....

  12. LINGUAL THYROID IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Mujumdar; Sanjeev; Siddaling; Ahmed Abdu

    2012-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is a rare embryological anomaly, th e incidence being 1/100000 population, that originates from failure of the thyroid gland to descend from the foramen caecum to its normal prelaryngeal site. The ectopic gland, located at the base of the tongue is often asymptomatic, but may cause local sy mptoms such as dysphagia, dysphonia, stomatologia, upper airway obstruction and haemorrh age, often with hypothyroidism. This infrequent congenital anomaly is ...

  13. Thyroid and male reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproduction is governed by the classical hypothalamo-hypophyseal testicular axis: Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH, pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and the gonadal steroid, principally, testosterone. Thyroid hormones have been shown to exert a modulatory influence on this axis and consequently the sexual and spermatogenic function of man. This review will examine the modulatory influence of thyroid hormones on male reproduction.

  14. Achalasia and thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami; Mostafa Raisi; Jaleh Amini; Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate some possible etiologies of achalasia by screening patients with achalasia for some autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease.METHODS: We examined 30 known cases of achalasia (20 females, 10 males). Their age ranged 15-70 years.All of them were referred to our institute for treatment.Their sera were evaluated to detect some possible associations with rheumatoid disease, thyroid disease,inflammatory process, anemia, etc.RESULTS: Seven out of 30 patients (23%) had thyroid disease including four patients with hypothyroidism (13.3%), two patients with hyperthyroidism (6.6%),and one had only thyroid nodule but was in euthyroid state (3.3%). Two of these hypothyroid patients had no related clinical symptoms (subclinical) and two had clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism. There were no correlations between the intensity of thyroid diseases and the severity of achalasia symptoms.CONCLUSION: The etiology of achalasia is unknown although autoimmunity has been implicated and is supported by several studies. Thyroid disease presents concomitantly with achalasia in about one fourth of our patients who may have a common etiology.

  15. Thyroid Carcinoma Showing Thymic-Like Differentiation Causing Fracture of the Trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Marini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid carcinoma showing thymic-like differentiation (CASTLE comprises a rare neoplasm of the thyroid gland which arises from ectopic thymic tissue or remnants of brachial pouches. CASTLE is regarded as an indolent neoplasm with a favorable prognosis, irrespective of its metastatic potential. Diagnosis is difficult as clinicopathological features have not been yet well-defined. Radiological findings are not specific and only immunohistochemical positivity for CD5 and CD117 staining is highly suggestive of CASTLE. Despite lack of universally accepted treatment recommendations, the mainstay treatment includes thyroidectomy and systematic lymph node dissection. We report a case of CASTLE tumour with very uncommon characteristics developed in a 76-year-old man, who presented with rapidly deteriorating dyspnea and severe cough, resulting in respiratory failure. At surgery, a suspicious looking tumour arising from the upper pole of the right lobe of the thyroid gland, surrounding the trachea and displacing the right common carotid artery, was identified. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the tumour with the thyroid gland and regional lymph node dissection. This is the first reported case of CASTLE causing tracheal ring fracture.

  16. Somatostatin receptor biology in neuroendocrine and pituitary tumours: part 1 – molecular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Mehtap; Dworakowska, Dorota; Grossman, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) may occur at many sites in the body although the majority occur within the gastroenteropancreatic axis. Non-gastroenteropancreatic NETs encompass phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, medullary thyroid carcinoma, anterior pituitary tumour, broncho-pulmonary NETs and parathyroid tumours. Like most endocrine tumours, NETs also express somatostatin (SST) receptors (subtypes 1–5) whose ligand SST is known to inhibit endocrine and exocrine secretions and have anti-tumour effects. In the light of this knowledge, the idea of using SST analogues in the treatment of NETs has become increasingly popular and new studies have centred upon the development of new SST analogues. We attempt to review SST receptor (SSTR) biology primarily in neuroendocrine tissues, focusing on pituitary tumours. A full data search was performed through PubMed over the years 2000–2009 with keywords ‘somatostatin, molecular biology, somatostatin receptors, somatostatin signalling, NET, pituitary’ and all relevant publications have been included, together with selected publications prior to that date. SSTR signalling in non-neuroendocrine solid tumours is beyond the scope of this review. SST is a potent anti-proliferative and anti-secretory agent for some NETs. The successful therapeutic use of SST analogues in the treatment of these tumours depends on a thorough understanding of the diverse effects of SSTR subtypes in different tissues and cell types. Further studies will focus on critical points of SSTR biology such as homo- and heterodimerization of SSTRs and the differences between post-receptor signalling pathways of SSTR subtypes. PMID:20629989

  17. The association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Dalal M

    2002-04-01

    An association between lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid papillary carcinoma is still controversial. To assess the relationship, a histopathologic analysis of surgically resected thyroid tumors together with the frequency and severity of chronic lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid among patients with follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma was performed. The prevalence of lymphocytic infiltrate, which is indicative of autoimmune thyroiditis, was significantly higher in patients with papillary carcinoma (58%) than in patients with follicular carcinoma (20%) or follicular adenoma (14%). The lymphocytic infiltration within the tumor compared with the severity of thyroiditis in the nontumorous tissue. Therefore, the association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma was confirmed. The possibility that an immunologic mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of papillary carcinoma stimulates lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid tissue through an autoimmune mechanism is suggested.

  18. WILMS’ TUMOUR IN YOUNG ADULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilvel Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilms’ tumour also called as nephroblastoma is a malignant renal neoplasm of childhood that arises from remnant of immature kidney. About 80% of Wilms’ tumour cases occur before age 5 with a median age of 3.5 years. But adult Wilms’ tumour can occur at any age from 16 to 70 years, the median age in young adult is around 24. CASE REPORT A 16-year-old girl came with history of mass right abdomen, which she noticed for 1 week duration; no urinary symptoms. Her recent blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg. Per abdomen a 10 x 9 cm mass palpable in the right lumbar region, surface smooth, firmto-hard in consistency, non-tender, well defined, no bruit. Urine routine examination was normal; urine culture was sterile; renal and liver function tests were within normal limits; Sr. calcium 9.5 mg/dL. CT abdomen plain and contrast showed a 10 x 9 cm heterodense lesion equivocal with renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma. MR angiogram was done. It showed well-defined encapsulated heterointense mass of size 12 x 8 x 7cm, IVC and bilateral renal vein normal. Since findings were inconclusive, we did a CT-guided biopsy and report came as feature positive for small round cell tumour. Hence, proceeded with right radical nephrectomy. The final histopathology report came as Wilms’ tumour spindle cell variant. Margins clear and ureter not involved. She was then started on adjuvant chemotherapy Inj. Vincristine 2 mg weekly for 27 weeks. She is on regular followup now. CONCLUSION Wilms’ tumour should be considered in a patient who presents with a renal mass with or without loin pain, haematuria especially in young adults. Every attempt should be made to differentiate it from renal cell carcinoma. The outcome for adult Wilms’ tumour is steadily improving with current multimodality treatment approach.

  19. Clonality analysis of multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma by using genetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheming; Sheng, Jindong; Zhang, Yujie; Deng, Jianhua; Li, Yong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Juan; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Min; Xiong, Zikai; Yan, Hai; Diplas, Bill H; Lu, Youyong; Liu, Baoguo

    2016-05-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common adult thyroid malignancy and often presents with multiple anatomically distinct foci within the thyroid, known as multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma (MPTC). The widespread application of the next-generation sequencing technologies in cancer genomics research provides novel insights into determining the clonal relationship between multiple tumours within the same thyroid gland. For eight MPTC patients, we performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted region sequencing to identify the non-synonymous point mutations and gene rearrangements of distinct and spatially separated tumour foci. Among these eight MPTCs, completely discordant mutational spectra were observed in the distinct cancerous nodules of patients MPTC1 and 5, suggesting that these nodules originated from independent precursors. In another three cases (MPTC2, 6, and 8), the distinct MPTC foci of these patients had no other shared mutations except BRAF V600E, also indicating likely independent origins. Two patients (MPTC3 and 4) shared almost identical mutational spectra amongst their separate tumour nodules, suggesting a common clonal origin. MPTC patient 7 had seven cancer foci, of which two foci shared 66.7% of mutations, while the remaining cancer foci displayed no common non-synonymous mutations, indicating that MPTC7 has multiple independent origins accompanied by intraglandular disease dissemination. In this study, we found that 75% of MPTC cases arose as independent tumours, which supports the field cancerization hypothesis describing multiple malignant lesions. MPTC may also arise from intrathyroidal metastases from a single malignant clone, as well as multiple independent origins accompanied by intrathyroidal metastasis.

  20. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepczynski, Rafal; Parisella, Maria Gemma; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Mikolajczak, Renata; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Gryczynska, Maria; Sowinski, Jerzy; Signore, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Several new somatostatin analogues have been developed for the diagnosis and therapy of different tumours. Since somatostatin receptors are often over-expressed in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of scintigraphy with the somatostatin

  1. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepczynski, Rafal; Parisella, Maria Gemma; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Mikolajczak, Renata; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Gryczynska, Maria; Sowinski, Jerzy; Signore, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Several new somatostatin analogues have been developed for the diagnosis and therapy of different tumours. Since somatostatin receptors are often over-expressed in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of scintigraphy with the somatostatin analog

  2. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule is smaller than 10 mm in diameter, USS guided FNAC is not recommended unless clinically suspicious lymph nodes on USS are also present. (R) • Cytological analysis and categorisation should be reported according to the current British Thyroid Association Guidance. (R) • Ultrasound scanning assessment of cervical nodes should be done in FNAC-proven cancer. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) should be done in suspected cases of retrosternal extension, fixed tumours (local invasion with or without vocal cord paralysis) or when haemoptysis is reported. When CT with contrast is used pre-operatively, there should be a two-month delay between the use of iodinated contrast media and subsequent radioactive iodine (I131) therapy. (R) • Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is not recommended for routine evaluation. (G) • In patients with thyroid cancer, assessment of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node disease in the central and lateral neck compartments should be undertaken pre-operatively by USS and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) if indicated. (R) • For patients with Thy 3f or Thy 4 FNAC a diagnostic hemithyroidectomy is recommended. (R) • Total thyroidectomy is recommended for patients with tumours greater than 4 cm in diameter or tumours of any size in association with any of the following characteristics: multifocal disease, bilateral disease, extrathyroidal

  3. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  4. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  5. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  6. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  7. [Characteristics of postpartum thyroid dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argatska, A; Nonchev, B; Obretsova, M; Pehlivanov, B

    2015-01-01

    The risk factors and mechanisms for the development of postpartum thyroid dysfunction have been widely discussed. However data on patients suffered spontaneous or induced abortion during early pregnancy are scarce. To reveal the characteristics of thyroid dysfunction in women after an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy. A total of 28 women (18 euthyroid, 10 with thyroid dysfunction), mean age 30.46 ± 1.01 years following abortion in the first trimester have been included in the study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodthyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyreoglobulin antibodies (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured and ultrasound assessment of the thyroid was performed 3 and 9 months after the interruption of pregnancy. Hypothyroidism was found in 6 of the women with thyroid dysfunction and thyrotoxicosis--in 4. Clinical features of thyroid dysfunction were observed in 3 patients while in the remaining 7 cases, diagnosis was made on the basis of hormonal levels. Positive titers of thyroid autoantibodies were detected in the majority of the cases with functional disordes. In 6 patients thyroid dysfunction was transient and in 4 hormonal abnormalities persisted on by the 9th month after the abortion. The comparative analysis showed that the volume of the thyroid gland and the degree of hypoehogenicity were significantly higher in patients with thyroid dysfunction compared to euthyroid women. Thyroid dysfunction after abortion in the first trimester is mainly of autoimmune pathogenesis and its characteristics do not differ from those of postpartum thyroiditis. In the majority of patients these disorders are subclinical and may remain unrecognized. A close active follow up of patients at increased risk of functional thyroid disorders after an abortion is required in order to prevent morbidity and identify the cases developing permanent thyroid dysfunction.

  8. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  9. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  10. Follicular thyroid carcinoma mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnalatha Buandasan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC is a well-differentiated tumor which resembles the normal microscopic pattern of the thyroid. Although intracranial metastasis to the brain is frequent in adults, metastasis from FTC is very rare. Dural metastases mimicking meningioma have been documented in the literature now and then. However, cases arising from a FTC are again very rare. We report the case of a middle-aged lady who presented with progressive, painless left eye proptosis. She was noted to have a non-axial proptosis with dystopia, compressive optic neuropathy and exposure keratitis. She also had a painless swelling over the occipital region. She was initially misdiagnosed to have multiple foci of meningioma based on magnetic resonance imaging findings. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed presence of FTC. She was euthyroid but was found to have multiple small thyroid nodules by ultrasonography. Hence, the definite diagnosis of all dural masses must be histological wherever possible and thyroid carcinoma should be considered as a potential primary tumour in such presentations.

  11. Preoperative shunts in thalamic tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one patients with thalamic glioma underwent a pre-tumour resection shunt surgery. The procedure was uneventful in 23 patients with relief from symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. Eight patients worsened after the procedure. The level of sensorium worsened from excessively drowsy state to unconsciousness in seven patients. Three patients developed hemiparesis, 4 developed paresis of extra-ocular muscles and altered pupillary reflexes, and 1 developed incontinence of urine and persistent vomiting. Alteration in the delicately balanced intracranial pressure and movements in the tumour and vital adjacent brain areas could be the probable cause of the worsening in the neurological state in these 8 patients. On the basis of these observations and on review of literature, it is postulated that the ventricular dilatation following an obstruction in the path of the cerebrospinal fluid flow by a tumour could be a natural defense phenomenon of the brain.

  12. Environmental chemicals and thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Main, Katharina M; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To overview the effects of endocrine disrupters on thyroid function. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies in recent years have revealed thyroid-disrupting properties of many environmentally abundant chemicals. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid...

  13. Thyroid disease in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2011-09-01

    Several changes in thyroid hormone secretion, metabolism, and action occur with the increase in age. Aging is often associated with a decrease in serum thyroid stimulating hormone and T3 levels, whereas serum free T4 levels usually remain unchanged. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is higher in the elderly as compared to the younger population. In elderly individuals the non-specific clinical manifestations of thyroid hormone excess or deprivation can cause confusion in the clinical setup; while some of the symptoms of thyroid disease are similar to those in younger patients, it is not uncommon for both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism to be manifested in subtle ways in older patients, often mimicking symptoms of aging or masquerading as diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or nervous system. In addition, diagnosis of thyroid disorders is commonly complicated, due to chronic, non-thyroidal illness or medication therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment of overt thyroid disorders is crucial, since these disorders are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly, usually due to common coexistent diseases such as diminished cardiovascular reserve. Treatment of subclinical thyroid disease should also be considered, based on a combination of age, symptoms and risk factors in the individual patients. In addition, both prevalence and aggressiveness of thyroid cancer increase with age. This review summarizes the changes of thyroid function, as well as the clinical manifestations and treatment of thyroid disorders with advancing age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Case presentation – thyroid lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkisa Izić

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors of the thyroid gland account for about 1% of thenewly diagnosed malignant tumors each year, and their incidence inwomen is twice the incidence in men. According to the WHO classification (2004 thyroid tumors are divided into: carcinoma of the thyroid, adenoma and similar tumors, and other thyroid tumors which include: teratomas, angiosarcomas, paragangliomas and others, as well as primary lymphomas and plasmacytomas. Primary thyroid lymphomasare defined as lymphomas which originate in the thyroid gland. This study presents the case of a 68-year-old patient with a thyroid lymphoma, which caused compression of the airways. In the patientpresented there was reduced activity of the thyroid gland. The dominant symptoms were: breathing difficulties, hoarse voice and the enlargement of the thyroid. An ultrasound examination was performedbefore surgery on the neck, which showed a multinodular thyroid,with compromised and compressed trachea to the right and rear. Anemergency surgical procedure was performed to reduce the tumor.Pathohistological diagnosis confirmed diffuse large B cell lymphoma.The aim of the study was to present a patient with a thyroid lymphoma, who had previously not had any immunological changes to the gland,that is, she had not had any chronic lymphocyte thyroiditis, but due to the compressive syndrome it was necessary to perform an emergencysurgical procedure to reduce the tumor.

  15. Thyroid disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becks, G P; Burrow, G N

    1991-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in younger women and may be a factor in reproductive dysfunction. This probably only applies to severe cases of hyper- or hypothyroidism. Once adequately treated, neither of these disorders significantly impacts on fertility. The key is to recognize and to treat thyroid disorders in the reproductive-age woman before conception. Thyroxine therapy and even antithyroid drug therapy should be continued during pregnancy as necessary. Pregnancy is a euthyroid state that is normally maintained by complex changes in thyroid physiology. The fetal and neonatal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system develops independently, but it may be influenced by thyroid disease in the mother. Early pregnancy is characterized by an increase in maternal T4 secretion stimulated by hCG and an increase in TBG, resulting in the elevated total serum T4 in pregnancy. The debate continues as to whether maternal T4 is important in early or late fetal brain development. If so, the physiologic changes in thyroid hormone secretion and transport in early pregnancy would help to ensure that a sufficient amount of thyroid hormone was available. There is new evidence in human subjects that substantial maternal T4 can cross the placenta during pregnancy, and this may be particularly important when fetal thyroid function is compromised as a result of congenital hypothyroidism. Maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes in pregnancy are adversely affected if severe hypothyroidism is undiagnosed or inadequately treated. Thyroid function tests should be obtained during gestation in women taking T4 and appropriate dose adjustments should be made for TSH levels outside a normal range. The TSH-receptor blocking antibodies from the mother are a recognized cause of congenital hypothyroidism in the fetus and neonate that can be permanent or transient. If neonatal hypothyroidism is detected through neonatal screening programs, and prompt and adequate T4 replacement therapy is instituted as soon as

  16. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  17. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  18. Three cases of thyroid cancer following the diagnosis of testicular cancer: treatment-related complication or genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Bowers, Sarah Pauline; Gibson, Sarah; White, Jeff; Reed, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that the incidence of second primary thyroid cancer in subjects diagnosed and treated for testicular cancer is raised. This finding is strongly associated to treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy and it is explained by their mutagenic effect. On the other hand, inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes inducing both testicular and thyroid cancers denote that these tumours might share common genomic aberrations. We herein present our experience with three cases of metachronous development of thyroid cancer after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer in our tertiary cancer centre. Our case report contributes to the limited available literature on such findings and aims to raise awareness of the cancer physicians treating these particular tumour types. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in a thyroid pyramidal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Kwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Ha Kyoung; Jung, Soo Jin [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We report an extremely rare case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) in the thyroid pyramidal lobe (TPL). A 48-year-old woman underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for a small thyroid nodule in the right lobe in local clinic, and it revealed a malignant cytology. On preoperative ultrasonography for tumor staging in our hospital, another small suspiciously malignant hypoechoic nodule was detected in the left TPL. Total thyroidectomy and central nodal dissection were performed. Histopathology confirmed PTMCs in the left TPL and both thyroid lobes. Ultrasonography for TPL should be required for complete evaluation of possible multifocality of thyroid malignancy.

  1. Cardiac tumours in intrauterine life.

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, A.M.; Fagg, N. L.; Cook, A C; Allan, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1980, 11 examples of cardiac tumour have been detected in the fetus out of a total of 794 congenital cardiac malformations. Patients were referred because of fetal hydrops in two, a family history of tuberous sclerosis in two, and because of the detection of a tumour mass during a scan at the local hospital in seven. The gestational age range at presentation was from 20-34 weeks. Of eight fetuses where death occurred, the histological type was rhabdomyoma in seven and teratoma in one. I...

  2. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  3. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and (99m)TcO4 (-) thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC.

  4. [Thyroid gland and fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, P

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the thyroid hormones are associated with a number of aspects of the human reproduction. Both states, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, have significant effect on the estrogen and androgen metabolism, the menstrual function and on fertility. The role of thyroid hormones (TH) during infertility has been little exploited. Interesting facts are that TH deficiency is more common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and in certain cases with unexplained infertility. There are very few studies on the effect and paracrine regulation of TH and its receptors in the female reproductive tract. This report provides an overview of the most common thyroid disorders and their impact on ovarian function and reproductive performance in women as well as in cases with infertility and the implementation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

  5. Follicular infundibulum tumour presenting as cutaneous horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraman M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour of follicular infundibulum is an organoid tumour with a plate like growth attached to the epidermis with connection from the follicular epithelium. We are reporting such a case unusually presenting as cutaneous horn.

  6. Emerging therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine malignancy. Its incidence is currently rising worldwide. The discovery of genetic mutations associated with the development of thyroid cancer, such as BRAF and RET, has lead to the development of new drugs which target the pathways which they influence. Despite recent advances, the prognosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is still unfavourable. In this review we look at emerging novel therapies for the treatment of well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and advances and future directions in the management of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  7. Thyroid Dysfunction and its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Agnihotri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the present review article is on thyroid dysfunctions which can be hypo or hyper thyroidism. Along with the ongoing allopathic treatment options, one can go for the alternative therapies or natural cures. Various nutritional supplements including iodine, botanicals like guggul and many more play an effective role in the management of thyroid dysfunction apart from the pharmaceuticals like synthetic T3 and T4 hormones and procaine thyroid. Along with these, homeopathy and yoga are equally important. The discussion suggests and emphasizes the importance of improving the lifestyle and nutritional diet; and further providing spiritual support along with natural thyroid medication.

  8. Biochemical testing of thyroid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G; Hay, I D

    1997-12-01

    Various published guidelines recommending serum thyrotropin (TSH)-first thyroid testing are outlined. The entities called "subclinical hypothyroidism" and "subclinical hyperthyroidism" are defined on the basis of abnormal TSH concentrations and normal values of other biochemical thyroid tests. The controversies about follow-up and treatment of these disorders are discussed. The laboratory experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in using TSH-first thyroid testing and the subsequent implementation of a thyroid test ordering cascade are presented. Finally, recommendations are given for further optimizing laboratory testing for thyroid disorders.

  9. [Non thyroidal illnesses (NTIS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, F; Goichot, B; Brue, T

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities in the circulating levels of thyroid hormones, without evidence of coexisting thyroid or pituitary gland disease can be observed in all general diseases. These nonthyroidal illnesses (NTIS) are the result of complex mechanisms that combine the effect of some drugs, cytokines, nutritional and endocrine factors at all levels of the thyrotropic axis, from the hypothalamus to the cellular transporters and nuclear receptors of thyroid hormones. The patterns of NTIS depend on the underlying disease and its severity. Thirtyfive years after the initial description, the pathophysiological significance of these anomalies remains controversial. One of the dilemma of NTIS is whether the hormone responses represent an adaptive and normal, physiologic response to conserve energy and protect against hypercatabolism in case of aggression, or whether it is a maladaptive response contributing to a worsening of the disease. This debate is not just a theoretical question, because in the first case the process must be respected, in the other case a vigorous treatment to restore circulating thyroid hormone levels is justified. There have been very few clinical studies designed to address whether the substitution with thyroid hormone is advantageous, and there is at current time no permissive evidence for the use of thyroid hormone replacement in patients with NTIS. But the clinical context, the choice of the molecule or of the dose and the way of administration were not necessarily the most relevant. Theoretically, stimulation of thyreotrope axis used a continuous infusion of TRH seems to provide clinical benefit. With the expectation that randomized clinical trials will provide demonstration of NTIS treatment efficiency, the question might remain unanswered for several more years.

  10. Thyroid and parathyroid gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008268 Effects of iodine excess on TPO and NIS genes mRNA expression in rats. XIAO Jianying(肖建英), et al. Dept Biochem, Liaoning Med Coll, Jinzhou 121001. Chin J Endemiol 2008;27(2):145-148.Objective To observe the effects of iodine excess on thyroid morphology,the expression of thyroid peroxidase and sodium iodide symporter mRNA and to explore their mechanisms.Methods One-month SD rats were divided into three groups:control iodine(CI),high iodine I

  11. Robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbas, Haytham; Bu Ali, Daniah

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with thyroid cancer or nodules suspicious for cancer. Open conventional approach is the standard surgical approach. However, a visible neck incision could be a concern for most young female patients, especially for patients with a history of healing with keloid or hypertrophic scars. Robotic remote access approaches have evolved into a safe and feasible approach in selected patients, providing a hidden scar with good patient satisfaction. This review will focus on the performance and safety of robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery. PMID:28149806

  12. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  13. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  14. Intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Hille, JJ; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of an intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour of the dorsum of the tongue in a 73-year-old Caucasian male is reported. This case describes the oldest patient with this pathology to date. Immunoperoxidase staining for neuronspecific enolase (NSE) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression d

  15. Intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Hille, JJ; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of an intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour of the dorsum of the tongue in a 73-year-old Caucasian male is reported. This case describes the oldest patient with this pathology to date. Immunoperoxidase staining for neuronspecific enolase (NSE) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression d

  16. PET imaging in endocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Lloyd, C; Szyszko, T; Win, Z; Rubello, D; Al-Nahhas, A

    2008-06-01

    The role of PET in the assessment of endocrine tumours has been, until recently, restricted to the use of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). Being a marker of metabolically active lesions that show high grading and low differentiation, FDG is not ideal for this purpose since the majority of endocrine tumours are slow growing and highly differentiated. It is however useful when dedifferentiation takes place and provides excellent prognostic information. A number of hormone precursors and amino acids are labelled with (11)C and used successfully in the management of parathyroid, adrenal and pituitary tumours. However, the short half-life of (11)C radiopharmaceuticals restricts their use to centres with access to an on-site cyclotron, while the high cost of production may limit their use to research purposes. A promising new positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer is Gallium-68 obtained by elution from a long shelf-life generator that makes it economic and cyclotron-independent. Its short half-life and flexible labelling ability to a wide range of peptides and antibodies makes it ideal for PET imaging. In addition to imaging GEP-NETs and phaeochromocytoma, it has the potential to be used in a wider range of endocrine tumours.

  17. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  18. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorhan, C.; Soto-Ares, G.; Pruvo, J.P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille, Lille (France); Ruchoux, M.M. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Blond, S. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France)

    2001-11-01

    We describe CT and MR findings in a 23-month-old infant with a melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal gland. The tumour has been stereotactically biopsied and surgically resected. The pathological diagnosis was made on the resected piece. Embryology of the pineal gland and the histology of melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy are discussed. (orig.)

  19. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierckx, Rudi Andre; de Wiele, Christophe Van

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceutic

  20. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, T.J.M.; Jong, K.P. de; Ijzermans, J.N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  1. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, TJM; de Jong, KP; Ijzermans, JNM

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  2. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes.

  3. Imaging of salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.Y.P.; Wong, K.T.; King, A.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: aniltahuja@cuhk.edu.hk

    2008-06-15

    Salivary gland neoplasms account for <3% of all tumors. Most of them are benign and parotid gland is the commonest site. As a general rule, the smaller the involved salivary gland, the higher is the possibility of the tumor being malignant. The role of imaging in assessment of salivary gland tumour is to define intra-glandular vs. extra-glandular location, detect malignant features, assess local extension and invasion, detect nodal metastases and systemic involvement. Image guided fine needle aspiration cytology provides a safe means to obtain cytological confirmation. For lesions in the superficial parotid and submandibular gland, ultrasound is an ideal tool for initial assessment. These are superficial structures accessible by high resolution ultrasound and FNAC which provides excellent resolution and tissue characterization without a radiation hazard. Nodal involvement can also be assessed. If deep tissue extension is suspected or malignancy confirmed on cytology, an MRI or CT is mandatory to evaluate tumour extent, local invasion and perineural spread. For all tumours in the sublingual gland, MRI should be performed as the risk of malignancy is high. For lesions of the deep lobe of parotid gland and the minor salivary glands, MRI and CT are the modalities of choice. Ultrasound has limited visualization of the deep lobe of parotid gland which is obscured by the mandible. Minor salivary gland lesions in the mucosa of oral cavity, pharynx and tracheo-bronchial tree, are also not accessible by conventional ultrasound. Recent study suggests that MR spectroscopy may differentiate malignant and benign salivary gland tumours as well as distinguishing Warthin's tumor from pleomorphic adenoma. However, its role in clinical practice is not well established. Similarly, the role of nuclear medicine and PET scan, in imaging of parotid masses is limited. Sialography is used to delineate the salivary ductal system and has limited role in assessment of tumour extent.

  4. IMMUNOLOGICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL PREDICTORS OF CLINICAL HETEROGENEITY OF PATIENTS WITH GRAVES' DISEASE (BASED ON RESEARCH OF THE THYROID GLAND OPERATIONAL MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Saprina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little research is devoted to the study of communication systemic immunological changes and local immunological changes in the tissue of the thyroid in autoimmune thyrophaties. The goal of the research was to establish immunologic and morphologic predictors of clinical course and functional outcomes of Graves’s disease (GD.Material and methods. We examined 45 patients with GD (14 men and 31 women aged 18–55 years (47.0 (35.0–53.0 years, matching the following criteria: a verified diagnosis GD, accommodation in Tomsk oblast and the Tomsk not less than 10 years, the patient's consent for the study. The control group included 30 people, with an average age of (45.3 ± 5.6 years and was comparable by age and sex with GD patients. The study included: definition of the standard for GD hormonal and serological profile (free T4, free T3, and TSH, antibodies to TPO, antibodies to the TSH receptor, the cultivation of mononuclear leukocytes in complete culture medium within 24 hours with subsequent determination of interleukins concentrations (IL-2, IL-4, TNF-alpha in culture medium using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, determination of the number of blood cells carrying membrane-bound receptors to IL-2, IL-4, TNF-R1 by flow laser cytometry on cytometer BD FACS Canto tmΙΙ (USA using labeled monoclonal antibody, the standard postoperative histological examination of thyroid gland tissue samples and immunohistochemical detection in samples of thyroid tissue receptors to IL-2, IL-4, TNF-alpha.Results. On the basis of the received results it is possible to allocate 2 clinical-immunologic and morphologic cluster of autoimmune hyperthyroidism syndrome in patients with clinical diagnosis of GD. The first includes the formation of 1 and 2 histological options GD (minimally expressed monocytes infiltration, lack of oncocytic transformation of thyroid epithelium, with some clinical characteristics (persistent and pronounced hyperthyroidism, the large

  5. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Halle (Germany); Katzer, Michaela [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Urology, Halle (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Halle (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Photograph of a typical probe counter used for thyroid uptake exams. The patient sits with the camera directed at the neck for five minutes, and then the leg for ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... extended. The gamma camera will then take a series of images, capturing images of the thyroid gland from three different angles. You will need to remain still for brief periods of time while the camera is taking pictures. When the ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... minutes prior to the test. When it is time for the imaging to begin, you will lie down on a moveable examination table with your head tipped backward and neck extended. The gamma camera will then take a series of images, capturing images of the thyroid gland ...

  9. [Postpartum thyroiditis. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Hernández, Z; Segura-Domínguez, A

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a transient thyroid dysfunction of autoimmune origin that can occur in the first year postpartum in women who have not been previously diagnosed with thyroid disease. It may start with clinical thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism and the subsequent recovery of thyroid function, or may just appear as isolated thyrotoxicosis or hypothyroidism. PPT recurs in high percentage of patients after subsequent pregnancies. Many women develop permanent hypothyroidism sometime during the 3 to 10 year period after an episode of PPT. It is important for family physicians to be familiar with this disease, due to its high prevalence in order to make a correct diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Family doctors also play a crucial role in the monitoring of these patients, given the negative implications of established hypothyroidism on reproduction in the female population during their reproductive years. This article reviews the principle characteristics of PPT along with its diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Thyroid and parathyroid gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008029 Diagnostic value of serum thyroglobulin autoantibody on recurrence and/or metastasis following surgery in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. FAN Qun(范群), et al. Dept Nucl Med, West China Hosp, Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Endocrinol Metab 2007;23(6):494-497. Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of serum thyrog

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant or ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. ...

  13. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  14. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. ...

  16. Total {sup 18}F-dopa PET tumour uptake reflects metabolic endocrine tumour activity in patients with a carcinoid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Walenkamp, Annemiek M.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Brouwers, Adrienne H. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim; Links, Thera P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Endocrinology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-dopa) has an excellent sensitivity to detect carcinoid tumour lesions. {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake and the levels of biochemical tumour markers are mediated by tumour endocrine metabolic activity. We evaluated whether total {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake on PET, defined as whole-body metabolic tumour burden (WBMTB), reflects tumour load per patient, as measured with tumour markers. Seventy-seven consecutive carcinoid patients who underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET scan in two previously published studies were analysed. For all tumour lesions mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) at 40% of the maximal SUV and tumour volume on {sup 18}F-dopa PET were determined and multiplied to calculate a metabolic burden per lesion. WBMTB was the sum of the metabolic burden of all individual lesions per patient. The 24-h urinary serotonin, urine and plasma 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), catecholamines (nor)epinephrine, dopamine and their metabolites, measured in urine and plasma, and serum chromogranin A served as tumour markers. All but 1 were evaluable for WBMTB; 74 patients had metastatic disease. {sup 18}F-dopa PET detected 979 lesions. SUV{sub max} on {sup 18}F-dopa PET varied up to 29-fold between individual lesions within the same patients. WBMTB correlated with urinary serotonin (r = 0.51) and urinary and plasma 5-HIAA (r = 0.78 and 0.66). WBMTB also correlated with urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and plasma dopamine, but not with serum chromogranin A. Tumour load per patient measured with {sup 18}F-dopa PET correlates with tumour markers of the serotonin and catecholamine pathway in urine and plasma in carcinoid patients, reflecting metabolic tumour activity. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Papillary Microcarcinoma in Terms of Clinical Features and Prognostic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Korkmaz; Umut Elboğa; Ersin Akarsu; Mehmet Metin Sevim; Mesut Özkaya; Suzan Tabur; Suna Erkılıç; Avni Gökalp; Mustafa Araz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we compared papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) in terms of the clinical features and prognostic factors. For the choice of appropriate treatment method, we researched differences between PTC and PMC retrospectively. Material and Method: A total 714 patients 486 with PTC (68%) and 228 with PMC (32%) who were followed in our hospital were enrolled into the study. Age, sex, background, tumour variants, pathologic features, surgical pro...

  18. Pattern of nodal involvement in papillary thyroid cancer: a challenge of quantitative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fama, Fausto; Cicciù, Marco; Giudice, Giuseppe Lo; Sindoni, Alessandro; Palella, Jessica; Piquard, Arnaud; Saint-Marc, Olivier; Benvenga, Salvatore; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Florio, Maria Gioffre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Backgrounds of this study were to examine and analyse the relationship among the number of lymph nodes with metastases harvested in central and lateral compartments, the characteristics of tumours and patients, and the recurrences rate. Methods: A retrospective review of 118 patients treated for a papillary thyroid cancer and underwent to neck dissection, including in all cases both central and lateral compartment, was realised. A quantitative analysis, on this homogeneous cohor...

  19. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  20. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement of thyroid autoantibodies may aid in the diagnosis of certain thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto's disease (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's...

  1. Actual Incidence and Clinical Behaviour of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma: An Institutional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela De Crea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid carcinoma classically accounts for 10–32% of thyroid malignancies. We determined the incidence and the behaviour of follicular thyroid carcinoma in an endemic goitre area. A comparative analysis between minimally invasive and widely invasive follicular thyroid carcinoma was performed. The medical records of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from October 1998 to April 2012 for thyroid malignancies were reviewed. Those who had a histological diagnosis of follicular carcinoma were included. Among 5203 patients, 130 (2.5% were included. Distant metastases at presentation were observed in four patients. Sixty-six patients had a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma and 64 a widely invasive follicular carcinoma. In 63 patients an oxyphilic variant was registered. Minimally/widely invasive ratio was 41/26 for usual follicular carcinoma and 25/38 for oxyphilic variant (P<0.05. Patients with widely invasive tumors had larger tumors (P<0.001 and more frequently oxyphilic variant (P<0.05 than those with minimally invasive tumours. No significant difference was found between widely invasive and minimally invasive tumors and between usual follicular carcinoma and oxyphilic variant regarding the recurrence rate (P=NS. The incidence of follicular thyroid carcinoma is much lower than classically retained. Aggressive treatment, including total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation, should be proposed to all patients.

  2. Clinical pathological impacts of microRNAs in papillary thyroid carcinoma: A crucial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruścik, Anna; Lam, Alfred King-yin

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) deregulation is an important event in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The alternations of miRNAs could be measured at the cancer tissue or serum so that the clinical impacts of them in papillary thyroid carcinoma could be studied. Using the approach, miRNA deregulation was reported to be associated with pathological stages in papillary thyroid carcinoma as reflected by the differences in extent of extra-thyroidal invasion, size of the tumour as well as presence of lymph nodes metastases. The most common miRNAs involved in these processes are miRNA-146, miRNA-222 and miRNA-221. Also, miRNA-222 and miRNA-146b deregulation are commonly associated with cancer recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Additionally, miRNA-146, miRNA-222, and miRNA-221 are the top-regulated miRNAs involved in the pathogenesis confirmed by deep-sequencing and have their function studied in vitro. Targeting these subsets of miRNAs may be useful in management of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Thyroid cancer in Egypt: histopathological criteria, correlation with survival and oestrogen receptor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rehab Allah; Aboelnaga, Engy M

    2015-07-01

    Thyroid cancer represents approximately 1% of new cancer and oestrogen may play a role in the pathogenesis of thyroid neoplasm. We aimed to study the clinicopathological criteria and ER expression of thyroid cancer in Mansoura University (Egypt), and to correlate the survival to these clinicopathological data and ER expression. This retrospective study reviewed 644 patients with histologically proven thyroid carcinoma during the period from 2003 to 2011. 152 cases during the period between 2008 and 2011 were retrieved from the archive and examined by immunohistochemistry for oestrogen receptor-α (ER) expression. ER-α expression is significantly associated with the female sex, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, extrathyroid extension, multifocality disease and recurrence and in the whole series (p gender of the patient. Tumour type, extrathyroid extension and ER expression were the independent prognostic factors of DFS, while in PTC, only ER expression was the independent one. The histological type was the only independent prognostic factor for OAS in the series were studied for ER expression, while extrathyroid extension was the only one that affected OAS of PTC. There was significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and ER expression in whole patient and PTC cases. No difference in survival between the low and high ranges of positive oestrogen expression. The prognosis of thyroid carcinoma in Egypt is similar to that occurs worldwide. ER-α expression was a significant prognostic marker for DFS in thyroid cancer and can be used as a predictive factor of lymph node metastasis.

  4. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  6. Etiopathogenesis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Makazlieva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thyroid malignomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm consisting of most frequent differentiated encountered carcinomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma, then medullary thyroid carcinoma originating from neuroendocrine calcitonin-producing C-cells and rare forms of thyroid lymphomas arising from intrathyroidal lymphatic tissue, thyroid sarcomas and poorly differentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. There are increasing numbers of epidemiological studies and publications that have suggested increased incidence rate of thyroid carcinomas. We have read, analysed and compare available reviews and original articles investigating different etiological factors in the development of thyroid carcinomas through Google Scholar and PubMed Database. DISCUSSION: Aetiology involved in the development of thyroid carcinomas is multifactorial and includes external influences, as well as constitutional predispositions and genetic etiological factors. The actual effect of environmental and constitutional factors is on promoting genetic and epigenetic alterations which result in cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Until now are identified numerous genetic alterations, assumed to have an important role in oncogenesis, with MAPK and PI3K-AKT as crucial signalling networks regulating growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell survival/apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This new molecular insight could have a crucial impact on diagnosis and also on improving and selecting an appropriate treatment to the patients with thyroid malignancies.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotiroti Domenicoantonio

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of effective systemic antineoplastic drugs against anaplastic thyroid carcinomas has particularly important implications. In fact, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents presently used in these tumours, is strongly limited by their low therapeutic index. Methods In this study gemcitabine was entrapped within a pegylated liposomal delivery system to improve the drug antitumoral activity, thus exploiting the possibility to reduce doses to be administered in cancer therapy. The cytotoxic effects of free or liposome-entrapped gemcitabine was evaluated against a human thyroid tumour cell line. ARO cells, derived from a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma, were exposed to different concentrations of the drug. Liposomes formulations were made up of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/cholesterol/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-MPEG (8:3:1 molar ratio. Cell viability was assessed by both trypan bleu dye exclusion assay and fluorimetric analysis of cell DNA content. Results A cytotoxic effect of free gemcitabine was present only after 72 h incubation (ARO cell mortality increased of approximately 4 fold over control at 1 μM, 7 fold at 100 μM. When gemcitabine was encapsulated in liposomes, a significant effect was observed by using lower concentrations of the drug (increased cell mortality of 2.4 fold vs. control at 0.3 μM and earlier exposure time (24 h. Conclusion These findings show that, in vitro against human thyroid cancer cells, the gemcitabine incorporation within liposomes enhances the drug cytotoxic effect with respect to free gemcitabine, thus suggesting a more effective drug uptake inside the cells. This may allow the use of new formulations with lower dosages (side effect free for the treatment of anaplastic human thyroid tumours.

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  9. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Nazarpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective, case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly

  10. The challenge of extraabdominal desmoid tumour management in patients with Gardner's syndrome: radiofrequency ablation, a promising option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Ravetta, Valentina; Viera, Francesca Torello; Filisetti, Claudia; Siri, Barbara; Segalini, Edoardo; Maestri, Marcello; Dominioni, Tommaso; Alessiani, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Dionigi, Paolo

    2014-11-27

    Desmoid tumours are benign, myofibroblastic stromal neoplasms common in Gardner's syndrome, which is a subtype of familial adenomatous polyposis characterized by colonic polyps, osteomas, thyroid cancer, epidermoid cysts, fibromas and sebaceous cysts. The primary treatment is surgery, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, but the local recurrence rate is high, and wide resection can result in debilitating loss of function. We report the case of a 39-year-old man with Gardner's syndrome who had already undergone a total prophylactic colectomy. He developed desmoid tumours localized in the mesenteric root, abdominal wall and dorsal region, which were treated from 2003 through 2013 with several surgical procedures and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. In 2008 and 2013, RFA was applied under ultrasonographic guidance to two desmoid tumours localized in the dorsal thoracic wall. The outcomes were low-grade pain and one case of superficial skin necrosis, but so far there has been no recurrence of desmoid tumours in these locations. Surgical resection remains the first-line therapy for patients with desmoid tumours, but wide resection may lead to a poor quality of life. Radiofrequency ablation is less invasive and expensive and is a possible therapeutic option for desmoid tumours in patients with Gardner's syndrome.

  11. In vivo imaging of chromogranin A-positive endocrine tumours by three-step monoclonal antibody targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, A.G. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Paganelli, G. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Pontiroli, A.E. [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Pelagi, M. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Magnani, P. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Viale, G. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Faglia, G. [Istituto di Scienze Endocrine, Universita di Milano (Italy); Fazio, F. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy)

    1996-11-01

    The detection of chromogranins (Cg) by immunohistochemistry and serology represents a new in vitro diagnostic tool for endocrine tumours. We have recently reported on the feasibility of targeting chromogranin A (CgA) for in vivo detection of pituitary adenomas by immunoscintigraphy (ISG). The scintigraphic procedure, based on an anti-CgA monoclonal antibody and on the avidin-biotin three-step method (Cg-3S-ISG), was evaluated on a group of 29 consecutive patients with known or suspected endocrine tumours other than pituitary adenomas, i.e. medullary thyroid carcinoma, carcinoid, insulinoma and parathormone- or ACTH-producing tumours. Primary tumours (10) and recurrences (16) were visualised in 26 patients, whereas conventional imaging techniques (planar radiography, computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography) failed to detect the tumour sites in ten of the same (Cg-3S-ISG-positive) patients. Therefore, these preliminary results indicate that Cg-3S-ISG, the first immunological method able to detect endocrine tumours in vivo, has a higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional imaging techniques (93.1% compared with 65.5%). (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in thyroid cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L; Rogan, Eleanor G; Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2013-01-01

    .... Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age‐matched controls. Thirty...

  13. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  14. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  15. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  16. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshingkar S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT is a biologically controversial entity that was originally described as non-neoplastic lesion in the lungs and designated initially as inflammatory pseudotumour. The lesion has recently been recognized to occur at various sites but rarely affects head and neck region. Controversies still exist regarding its reactive versus neoplastic nature. The lesion has a potential for recurrence, persistent local growth, progression to frank sarcoma and metastasis. Hence IMT can best be regarded as a low-grade sarcoma. A case of a 30-year-old female with swelling in the right maxilla and associated ophthalmic manifestations is discussed here. Contribution of immunohistochemistry for diagnosis of IMT is emphasized. Additional cytogenetic studies of this highly enigmatic and minimally studied tumour are warranted.

  17. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and thyroid antibodies in Iranian patients with vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Sedighe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, and the pathogenesis is unknown. An increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid diseases has been described in these patients. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and hypoparathyroidism in patients with vitiligo. Materials and Methods: One hundred and nine patients (38 males and 71 females with vitiligo were enrolled. Thyroid physical examination was carried out. Thyroid function tests, thyroid antibodies, calcium and phosphorus were assessed. The collected data were analysed by SPSS version 11. Results: Thyromegaly was found in 30.1% of patients. Hypothyroidism was found in 16 (15.7% out of 109 cases. Two of them had clinical and 14 had subclinical hypothyroidism. One patient had Grave′s disease. Antibody positivity was the most common disorder (anti-TPO and anti-tg were positive in 36.7 and 32.1%, respectively. No patient had hypoparathyroidism. Conclusion: According to our study, thyroid dysfunction, particulary hypothyroidism and thyroid antibodies increase in patients with vitiligo. We recommend thyroid antibodies assessment and thyroid function evaluation in these patients.

  19. Reconstructive options in pelvic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayilvahanan N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pelvic tumours present a complex problem. It is difficult to choose between limb salvage and hemipelvectomy. Method: Forty three patients of tumours of pelvis underwent limb salvage resection with reconstruction in 32 patients. The majority were chondrosarcomas (20 cases followed by Ewing sarcoma. Stage II B was the most common stage in malignant lesions and all the seven benign lesions were aggressive (B3. Surgical margins achieved were wide in 31 and marginal in 12 cases. Ilium was involved in 51% of cases and periacetabular involvement was seen in 12 patients. The resections done were mostly of types I &II of Enneking′s classification of pelvic resection. Arthrodesis was attempted in 24 patients. Customized Saddle prosthesis was used in seven patients and no reconstruction in 12 patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to all high-grade malignant tumours, combined with radiotherapy in 7 patients. Results: With a mean follow up of 48.5 months and one patient lost to follow up, the recurrence rate among the evaluated cases was 16.6%. Oncologically, 30 patients were continuously disease free with 7 local recurrences and 4 deaths due to disseminated disease and 2 patients died of other causes. During the initial years, satisfactory functional results were achieved with prosthetic replacement. Long-term functional result of 36 patients who were alive at the time of latest follow up was satisfactory in 75% who underwent arthrodesis and in those where no reconstruction was used. We also describe a method of new classification of pelvic resections that clarifies certain shortcomings of the previous systems of classification. Conclusion: Selection of a procedure depends largely on the patient factors, the tumour grade, the resultant defect and the tissue factors. Resection with proper margins gives better functional and oncological results

  20. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, T.H.L. [North District Hospital, Fanling, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Radiology Department; Ong, K.L. [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Accident and Emergency Department; Au, Y.M.C. [Princess Margarete Hospital, Kowloon, (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology

    1998-11-01

    The present report describes a rare case of primary desmoplastic small cell tumour of the recto-sigmoid colon with hepatic metastases and lymphadenopathy. There are no pathognomonic radiological features and often their features overlap with other diseases including lymphoma. Histology is necessary to confirm this diagnosis. Unfortunately despite aggressive therapy, the prognosis for this disease is poor. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 8 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Expression of tenascin in lymphocytic autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Back, W; Heubner, C; Winter, J.; Bleyl, U

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To study the distribution of tenascin by immunocytochemistry in autoimmune diseases of the thyroid. METHODS: Thyroids from patients with inflammatory lesions of the thyroid (lymphocytic thyroiditis Hashimoto, Grave's disease, thyroiditis DeQuervain) were studied by immunocytochemistry using antibodies against tenascin, collagen III, and collagen IV. RESULTS: In autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis Hashimoto there was a characteristic corona-like staining pattern of tenascin around all act...

  2. ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IN THYROID DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Janani Parkkunam; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography has established itself has a useful tool in evaluating and managing thyroid disorders. This article provides an overview of basic principles of ultrasound, how it is used in different thyroid disorders, different sonographic pattern of thyroid disorders, comparative features of malignant and benign nodule, ultrasound features of diffuse thyroid disorders and congenital thyroid disorders, ultrasound guided FNAC, advanced techniques of ultrasound in thyroid imaging.

  3. [Comparative rate of regional metastasis of high differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, N N; Evmenova, T D; Drozdova, D É

    2014-01-01

    The rate of metastasis of high differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid glands to the neck lymph nodes was studied in people of Kemerovo Region. The metastatic lesions of pretracheal lymph nodes (VI group) were detected in 49.5% patients with papillary carcinoma and 21.0% of patients with follicular cancer. Metastases in jungular lymph nodes were revealed in 37.3% patients with papillary carcinoma. It was noted that an extension of metastatic lesions of regional lymph nodes was observed in the case of primary tumour foci spread beyond borders of the capsula glandularis in patients with papillary carcinoma. There wasn't such a relation in a case of follicular cancer. Metastases in regional lymph nodes were detected more often (67.6%) in the case of papillary carcinoma in uncontaminated zone of the thyroid gland compared with other thyroid pathology (31.7%).

  4. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  5. Increased expression of PIN1 gene in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewiński Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (Pin1, encoded by PIN1 gene with locus in chromosome 19p13, is an enzyme that catalytically induces conformational changes in proteins after phosphorylation on serine or threonine residues preceding proline (pSer/Thr-Pro motifs; in this way, it has an influence on protein interactions and intracellular localizations of proteins. The aim of the study were: 1 an assessment of PIN1 gene expression level in benign and malignant thyroid lesions; 2 the evaluation of possible correlations between gene expression and histopathological variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC or tumour size, classified according to TNM classification of primary tumours (in case of PTC only; 3 the estimation of possible relationships between expression of the gene in question and patients' sex or age. Methods Seventy (70 tissue samples were analyzed: 32 cases of PTC, 7 cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC, 7 cases of follicular adenoma (FA, and 24 cases of nodular goitre (NG. In real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, two-step RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in an ABI PRISM 7500 Sequence Detection System was employed. The PIN1 gene expression level was assessed, calculating the mean relative quantification rate (RQ rate increase for each sample. Results The level of PIN1 gene expression (compared to that in macroscopically unchanged thyroid tissue was higher in PTC group than those in FA, MTC and/or NG groups, but the statistical significance was noted for difference between PTC and NG groups only. On the other hand, the differences of RQ rate value between different PTC variants were statistically insignificant. No correlations were found between RQ values and tumour size, as well as between RQ values and patients' sex or age in PTC group. Conclusions The PIN1 gene expression may have - in future - an important meaning in the diagnostics of PTC and in understanding its

  6. IL-14 and IL-16 are expressed in the thyroid of patients with either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Elizabeth Helen; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Metcalfe, Russell A; Watson, Philip F; Weetman, Anthony P

    2015-11-01

    Cytokines have an important role in orchestrating the pathophysiology in autoimmune thyroid disease. The aim of the current study was to analyse the expression of interleukin (IL)-14 and IL-16 in the thyroid tissue of patients with Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) or multinodular goitre (MNG) and in that of normal individuals, in patients' intrathyroidal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and in patient and normal cultured thyroid follicular cells. The expression of IL-14 and IL-16 mRNA and protein was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification, and Western blotting and ELISAs, respectively. IL-14 mRNA expression was detected in thyroid tissue from 8/9 GD, 3/4 HT and 3/13 MNG patients and 1/6 normal individuals, and IL-16 mRNA expression in thyroid tissue from 9/9 GD, 4/4 HT and 9/13 MNG patients and 4/6 normal individuals. IL-14 mRNA expression was detected in intrathyroidal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from 2/2 GD and 2/2 HT patients, while IL-16 mRNA was detected in samples from 1/2 HT patients but not in those from either patient with GD. IL-14 and IL-16 mRNA expression was found in thyroid follicular cells derived from 2/2 patient with GD and 1/1 normal individual. IL-14 protein was detected in thyroid tissue from 6/6 GD, 1/1 HT and 0/6 MNG patients and 0/6 normal individuals, and IL-16 protein in thyroid tissue from 6/6 GD, 1/1 HT and 1/6 MNG patients and 0/6 normal individuals. Expression of IL-14 protein was stimulated in thyroid follicular cells derived from two patients with GD and one normal individual by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-conditioned medium. Treatment of thyrocytes from two patients with GD and one normal individual with PBMC-conditioned medium and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated IL-16 protein expression. In normal thyrocytes, IL-16 protein synthesis was induced also by IL-1β, IL-17A, IL-4 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The data provide evidence that the

  7. Thyroid disorders in India: An epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Gopalakrishnan Unnikrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are common worldwide. In India too, there is a significant burden of thyroid diseases. According to a projection from various studies on thyroid disease, it has been estimated that about 42 million people in India suffer from thyroid diseases. This review will focus on the epidemiology of five common thyroid diseases in India: (1 hypothyroidism, (2 hyperthyroidism, (3 goiter and iodine deficiency disorders, (4 Hashimoto′s thyroiditis, and (5 thyroid cancer. This review will also briefly cover the exciting work that is in progress to ascertain the normal reference range of thyroid hormones in India, especially in pregnancy and children.

  8. Risk factors for thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Y E; Fagin, J A

    1997-01-01

    The potential risk factors for thyroid carcinoma development include genetic predisposition, exposure to therapeutic or environmental ionizing radiation, residence in areas of iodine deficiency or excess, history of preexisting benign thyroid disease, as well as hormonal and reproductive factors. In this review, we analyze some of the epidemiological data, as well as the possible molecular mechanisms by which certain environmental and genetic factors might predispose to thyroid tumorigenesis. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:20-25).

  9. Enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenmakers, Christian

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThyroid honnone plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism in vertebrates. These actions are initiated by binding to the nuclear thyroid honnone receptor that has been identified as the translation product of the proto-oncogene c-erbA, the cellular counterpart of the viral oncogene v-erbA. Binding of thyroid honnone to its receptor changes the interaction with cis-acting regulatory elements, that modulate the expression of responsive t...

  10. Subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis after lobectomy in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi Young Sik; Han You Jin; Yeo Go Eun; Kwon Su Kyoung; Kim Bu Kyung; Park Yo-Han; Kim Sung Won; Chun Bong Kwon; Kong Eun Hee; Kim Jeong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis is anautoimmune thyroid disease presenting with transient thyrotoxicosis as well as transient hypothyroidism. Several factors have been thought to be the initiating event in subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis. However, subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis that develops after thyroid lobectomy has not yet been reported in the literature. We report a case of subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis after lobectomy in a patient with papillary thyroid carc...

  11. Thyroid nodules in Graves′ disease: implications in an endemically iodine deficient area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra A

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The presence of thyroid nodules with Graves′ disease raises concern about co-existent thyroid malignancy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the risk of thyroid carcinoma and the need for surgical intervention in, patients with Graves′ disease with co-existent nodules in an endemically iodine deficient area (IDA. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Retrospective study of 130 surgically managed patients of Graves′ disease (1990-1999. Out of these 35 (26.9% cases had palpable nodules. No patient had history of previous head and neck irradiation or radioiodine therapy. The clinico-pathological findings and follow-up of these cases were noted. RESULTS: Mean age of patients with nodules was 40.2 +/- 9.5 years and male to female ratio was 1:2.2. The overall incidence of thyroid carcinoma in Graves′ disease was 6.2% (8/130 cases, while the incidence, in cases having nodule with Graves′ disease was 17.1% (6/35 cases. The median age of patients with carcinoma was 45 years (5 women and 1 man. Besides laboratory investigations for hyperthyroidism, preoperative investigations included fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and thyroid scintigraphy in 29 and 25 cases respectively. Incidence of malignancy in palpable cold nodules was 20%. FNAC could not predict malignancy with certainty in any of these cases. Five patients had papillary thyroid carcinoma while one had follicular carcinoma. Median tumour diameter was 10 mm. Tumour was multi-centric in two cases while one case had metastases to cervical lymph node. In follow-up (median =5.5 years one patient died of unrelated cause, while rest are alive with no evidence of disease. CONCLUSIONS: Nodules are frequently associated with Graves′ disease in IDA. Incidence of carcinoma is high in palpable cold nodule. We recommend early thyroidectomy in these cases.

  12. The clinician and the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-09-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.).

  13. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hober Didier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40 in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment.

  14. Environmental chemicals and thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2006-01-01

    also indicate thyroid-disruptive properties of phthalates, but the effect of certain phthalates seems to be stimulative on TH production, contrary to most other groups of chemicals. Thyroid disruption may be caused by a variety of mechanisms, as different chemicals interfere with the hypothalamic......-pituitary-thyroid axis at different levels. Mechanisms of action may involve the sodium-iodide symporter, thyroid peroxidase enzyme, receptors for THs or TSH, transport proteins or cellular uptake mechanisms. The peripheral metabolism of the THs can be affected through effects on iodothyronine deiodinases or hepatic...

  15. Thyroid scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Gregory B; Neelis, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid scintigraphy is performed in cats and dogs and has been used to a limited degree in other species such as the horse. Thyroid scintigraphy is most commonly used to aid in the diagnosis and treatment management of feline hyperthyroidism but is also used in the evaluation of canine hypothyroidism and canine thyroid carcinoma. This article reviews the normal scintigraphic appearance of the thyroid in the cat, the dog, and the horse and the principles of interpretation of abnormal scan results in the cat and the dog. Radioiodine is the treatment of choice for feline hyperthyroidism, and the principles of its use in the cat are reviewed.

  16. Radiolabelled peptides for tumour therapy: current status and future directions. Plenary lecture at the EANM 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, L2, Erasmus MC, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    On their plasma membranes, cells express receptor proteins with high affinity for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin. Changes in the density of these receptors during disease, e.g. overexpression in many tumours, provide the basis for new imaging methods. The first peptide analogues successfully applied for visualisation of receptor-positive tumours were radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The next step was to label these analogues with therapeutic radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Results from preclinical and clinical multicentre studies have already shown an effective therapeutic response when using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues to treat receptor-positive tumours. Infusion of positively charged amino acids reduces kidney uptake, enlarging the therapeutic window. For PRRT of CCK-B receptor-positive tumours, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, radiolabelled minigastrin analogues are currently being successfully applied. The combination of different therapy modalities holds interest as a means of improving the clinical therapeutic effects of radiolabelled peptides. The combination of different radionuclides, such as {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-labelled somatostatin analogues, to reach a wider tumour region of high curability, has been described. A variety of other peptide-based radioligands, such as bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues, receptors for which are expressed on common cancers such as prostate and breast cancer, are currently under development and in different phases of (pre)clinical investigation. Multi-receptor tumour targeting using the combination of bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues is promising for scintigraphy and PRRT of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  17. Dental x-rays and the risk of thyroid cancer: A case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memon, Anjum (Div. of Primary Care and Public Health, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (United Kingdom)), E-mail: a.memon@bsms.ac.uk; Godward, Sara (Dept. of Public Health and Primary Care, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Williams, Dillwyn (Thyroid Carcinogenesis Research Group, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Siddique, Iqbal (Dept. of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait)); Al-Saleh, Khalid (Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, Ministry of Health (Kuwait))

    2010-05-15

    The thyroid gland is highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis and exposure to high-dose ionising radiation is the only established cause of thyroid cancer. Dental radiography, a common source of low-dose diagnostic radiation exposure in the general population, is often overlooked as a radiation hazard to the gland and may be associated with the risk of thyroid cancer. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has been reported in dentists, dental assistants, and x-ray workers; and exposure to dental x-rays has been associated with an increased risk of meningiomas and salivary tumours. Methods. To examine whether exposure to dental x-rays was associated with the risk of thyroid cancer, we conducted a population-based case-control interview study among 313 patients with thyroid cancer and a similar number of individually matched (year of birth +- three years, gender, nationality, district of residence) control subjects in Kuwait. Results. Conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for other upper-body x-rays, showed that exposure to dental x-rays was significantly associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 3.1) (p=0.001) with a dose-response pattern (p for trend <0.0001). The association did not vary appreciably by age, gender, nationality, level of education, or parity. Discussion. These findings, based on self-report by cases/controls, provide some support to the hypothesis that exposure to dental x-rays, particularly multiple exposures, may be associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer; and warrant further study in settings where historical dental x-ray records may be available.

  18. Anticonvulsants and thyroid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, P P; Bates, D; Howe, J G; Ratcliffe, W A; Schardt, C W; Heath, A; Evered, D C

    1978-01-01

    Serum total and free thyroid hormone concentrations were estimated in 42 patients with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbitone, and carbamazepine either singly or in combination). There was a significant reduction in total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) in the treated group compared with controls. Free hormone concentrations were lower than total hormone concentrations, suggesting that increased clearance of thyroid hormones occurs in patients receiving anticonvulsants. Detailed analysis indicated that phenytoin had a significant depressant effect on TT4, FT4, FT3, and reverse T3 (rT3). Phenobarbitone and carbamazepine had no significant main effects, but there were significant interactions between phenytoin and carbamazepine for TT4 and FT4. phenobarbitone and carbamazepine for FT3, and phenytoin and phenobarbitone for rT3. PMID:656820

  19. Ultrasonographic Findings of Papillary Thyroid Cancer with or without Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae Hyun; Park, Dong Hee [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study was designed to compare the ultrasonographic features of papillary thyroid carcinoma with and without Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This retrospective study included 190 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma which was proven by neck surgery. The difference in the ultrasonographic findings between papillary thyroid carcinoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma without Hashimoto's thyroiditis were calculated statistically. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 61 of 190 patients following neck surgery. The incidence of coexisting papillary thyroid carcinoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was significantly higher in women (p=0.0026). In addition, the frequency of macrocalcification in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was also significantly higher (p=0.0009). Conversely,other ultrasonographic findings including the shape, margin, echogenicity and calcifications, for patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma without Hashimoto's thyroiditis, were not statistically significant. We also found that patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis who showed no calcification on ultrasonography tended not to detect the papillary carcinoma at a higher frequency. On ultrasonography, macrocalcifications occurred more frequently in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis than those without Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Malignant thyroid nodules without calcifications in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis more often could not be detected. Therefore, it is important carefully examine patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

  20. Thyroid associated orbitopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Maheshwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid associated orbitopathy, also known as Graves′ orbitopathy, is typically a self-limiting autoimmune process associated with dysthyroid states. The clinical presentation may vary from very mild disease to severe irreversible sight-threatening complications. Despite ongoing basic science and clinical research, the pathogenesis and highly effective therapeutic strategies remain elusive. The present article reviews the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of this common, yet poorly understood disease, which remains a challenge to the ophthalmologist.

  1. Lithium and Thyroid Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lut Tamam; Emel Kulan; Nurgul Ozpoyraz

    2003-01-01

    Lithium is a mood stabilizator drug which has been used in the treatment of many mental disorders including bipolar disorders, cyclothymia, recurrent depression, and schizoaffective disorder for the last 50 years. Clinical and experimental studies have shown that patients under lithium treatment could develop thyroid disorders in a range from single disorder in TSH response to severe mxyedema. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(2.000): 99-114

  2. Lithium and Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Lithium is a mood stabilizator drug which has been used in the treatment of many mental disorders including bipolar disorders, cyclothymia, recurrent depression, and schizoaffective disorder for the last 50 years. Clinical and experimental studies have shown that patients under lithium treatment could develop thyroid disorders in a range from single disorder in TSH response to severe mxyedema. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(2.000: 99-114

  3. Pediatric Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which originates from thyroid parafollicular C cells, accounts for 3 to 5% of thyroid malignancies. MTC occurs either sporadically or in an inherited autosomal dominant manner. Hereditary MTC occurs as a familial MTC or as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and B syndromes. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed between hereditary MTC and germ-line "gain of function" mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Most cases of pediatric MTC are hereditary whereas sporadic MTC is rare in children and is usually diagnosed in adults. Therefore, MTC in children is most often diagnosed in the course of a familial genetic investigation. The standard treatment of MTC mainly requires surgery involving total thyroidectomy and central neck node dissection before extrathyroidal extension occurs. To prevent MTC development in hereditary syndromes, prophylactic thyroidectomy is performed in presymptomatic patients. An appropriate age at which the surgery should take place is determined based upon the data from genotyping, serum calcitonin measurements, and ultrasonography. For the treatment of advanced MTC cases, the broad spectrum receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors vandetanib and cabozantinib, which also inhibit RET, are used although they are not always effective.

  4. Thyroid disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaka Ramprasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid disorders are common in pregnancy and the most common disorder is subclinical hypothyroidism. Due to the complex hormonal changes during pregnancy, it is important to remember that thyroxine requirements are higher in pregnancy. According to recent American Thyroid Association (ATA guidelines, the recommended reference ranges for TSH are 0.1 to 2.5 mIU/L in the first trimester, 0.2 to 3.0 mIU/L in the second trimester, and 0.3 to 3.0 mIU/L in the third trimester. Maternal hypothyroidism is an easily treatable condition that has been associated with increased risk of low birth weight, fetal distress, and impaired neuropsychological development. Hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is less common as conception is a problem. Majority of them are due to Graves′ disease, though gestational hyperthyroidism is to be excluded. Preferred drug is propylthiouracil (PTU with the target to maintain free T4 in upper normal range. Doses can be reduced in third trimester due to the immune-suppressant effects of pregnancy. Early and effective treatment of thyroid disorder ensures a safe pregnancy with minimal maternal and neonatal complications.

  5. Substernal Thyroid Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A.H. Regal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A thyroid mass, most often a non toxic colloid goiter or occasionally an adenoma, is not an unusual finding below the level of the thoracic inlet.1 In 1992 Creswell and Wells estimated that these tumors comprise 5.8% of all mediastinal lesions.1 There is no standard definition for thyroid glands extending below the thoracic inlet, but such masses descend from their original cervical location for more than 2 or 3 cm below the thoracic inlet, and are not truly primary tumors of the mediastinum. They preserve the connection between the thoracic and cervical portion and receive their blood supply from the neck.2,3 In 1940, the seminal report of Wakeley and Mulvany divided intrathoracic thyroid masses into 3 types; (1”Small substernal extension” of a mainly cervical mass, (2 “Partial” intrathoracic, in which the major portion of the mass is situated within the thorax, and (3”Complete” in which all of the mass lies within the thoracic cavity.

  6. Expression and function of the novel proto-oncogene PBF in thyroid cancer: a new target for augmenting radioiodine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG)-binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) was initially identified through its interaction with the human securin, PTTG. Like PTTG, PBF is upregulated in multiple endocrine tumours including thyroid cancer. PBF is believed to induce the translocation of PTTG into the cell nucleus where it can drive tumourigenesis via a number of different mechanisms. However, an independent transforming ability has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that PBF is itself a proto-oncogene. Studied in only a limited number of publications to date, PBF is emerging as a protein with a growing repertoire of roles. Recent data suggest that PBF possesses a complex multifunctionality in an increasing number of tumour settings. For example, PBF is upregulated by oestrogen and mediates oestrogen-stimulated cell invasion in breast cancer cells. In addition to a possible role in the induction of thyroid tumourigenesis, PBF overexpression in thyroid cancers inhibits iodide uptake. PBF has been shown to repress sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity by transcriptional regulation of NIS expression through the human NIS upstream enhancer and further inhibits iodide uptake via a post-translational mechanism of NIS governing subcellular localisation. This review discusses the current data describing PBF expression and function in thyroid cancer and highlights PBF as a novel target for improving radioiodine uptake and thus prognosis in thyroid cancer.

  7. BRAF(V600E) mutation is highly prevalent in thyroid carcinomas in the young population in Fukushima: a different oncogenic profile from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Norisato; Fukushima, Toshihiko; Matsuse, Michiko; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Saenko, Vladimir; Uchino, Shinya; Ito, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Shinichi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-11-20

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the thyroid ultrasound screening program for children aged 0-18 at the time of the accident was started from October 2011. The prevalence of thyroid carcinomas in that population has appeared to be very high (84 cases per 296,253). To clarify the pathogenesis, we investigated the presence of driver mutations in these tumours. 61 classic papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), two follicular variant PTCs, four cribriform-morular variant PTCs and one poorly-differentiated thyroid carcinoma were analysed. We detected BRAF(V600E) in 43 cases (63.2%), RET/PTC1 in six (8.8%), RET/PTC3 in one (1.5%) and ETV6/NTRK3 in four (5.9%). Among classic and follicular variant PTCs, BRAF(V600E) was significantly associated with the smaller size. The genetic pattern was completely different from post-Chernobyl PTCs, suggesting non-radiogenic etiology of these cancers. This is the first study demonstrating the oncogene profile in the thyroid cancers discovered by large mass screening, which probably reflects genetic status of all sporadic and latent tumours in the young Japanese population. It is assumed that BRAF(V600E) may not confer growth advantage on paediatric PTCs, and many of these cases grow slowly, suggesting that additional factors may be important for tumour progression in paediatric PTCs.

  8. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  9. [Hashimoto's thyroiditis(chronic thyroiditis), IgG4-related thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2012-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis emerges in patients who have genetic preponderance such as SNPs of CTLA-4 and risk factors such as excess intake of iodine, pregnancy or postpartum period, and smoking. Such risk factors also affect the entire clinical course. One of the major outcomes in Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be increased in cardio-vascular risks through subclinical hypothyroidism and concomitant metabolic syndrome, but in most cases, treatment with L-T4 has little effects on cardio-vascular benefit or quality of life. The pregnant women also have risks for obstetric complications and postpartum thyroid dysfunction. The women who have anti-TPO antibodies, type 1 diabetes, or previous history of post-partum thyroid dysfunction are recommended to be measured their TSH. It is noteworthy that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is sometimes complicated with encephalopathy, papillary carcinoma, or IgG4-related thyroiditis. IgG4-related thyroiditis is partly similar but partly discerned from a variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The pathogenetic roles of this variant on autoimmune-based thyroiditis remain unclear.

  10. Movement disorders caused by brain tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are uncommon presenting features of brain tumours. Early recognition of such lesions is important to arrest further deficit. We treated seven patients with movement disorders secondary to brain tumours over a period of seven years. Only two of these were intrinsic thalamic tumours (astrocytomas while the rest were extrinsic tumours. The intrinsic tumours were accompanied by hemichorea. Among the extrinsic tumours, there was one pituitary macroadenoma with hemiballismus and four meningiomas with parkinsonism. Symptoms were unilateral in all patients except one with anterior third falcine meningioma who had bilateral rest tremors. There was relief in movement disorders observed after surgery. Imaging by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is mandatory in the evaluation of movement disorders, especially if the presentation is atypical, unilateral and/or accompanied by long tract signs.

  11. Malignant tumours of the kidney: imaging strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, Anne M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology G1, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kraker, Jan de [Paediatric Oncology-Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Primitive malignant renal tumours comprise 6% of all childhood cancers. Wilms tumour (WT) or nephroblastoma is the most frequent type accounting for more than 90%. Imaging alone cannot differentiate between these tumours with certainty but it plays an important role in screening, diagnostic workup, assessment of therapy response, preoperative evaluation and follow-up. The outcome of WT after therapy is excellent with an overall survival around 90%. In tumours such as those where the outcome is extremely good, focus can be shifted to a risk-based stratification to maintain excellent outcome in children with low risk tumours while improving quality of life and decreasing toxicity and costs. This review will discuss the imaging issues for WT from the European perspective and briefly discuss the characteristics of other malignant renal tumours occurring in children and new imaging techniques with potential in this matter. (orig.)

  12. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina [British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver (Canada)

    2001-12-01

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined.

  13. DNA Methylation in Thyroid Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, Josena K., E-mail: jstephe2@hfhs.org [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Chitale, Dhananjay [Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Narra, Vinod [Essex Surgical Associates, PC, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Chen, Kang Mei; Sawhney, Raja; Worsham, Maria J. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer with 1,690 deaths each year. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90% followed by medullary cancers with 3% to 5% and anaplastic carcinomas making up <3%. Epigenetic events of DNA hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular targets for cancer detection. Our immediate and long term goal is to identify DNA methylation markers for early detection of thyroid cancer. This pilot study comprised of 21 patients to include 11 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 2 follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 5 normal thyroid cases, and 3 hyperthyroid cases. Aberrant promoter methylation was examined in 24 tumor suppressor genes using the methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) assay and in the NIS gene using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The frequently methylated genes were CASP8 (17/21), RASSF1 (16/21) and NIS (9/21). In the normal samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 5/5, 4/5 and 1/5 respectively. In the hyperthyroid samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 3/3, 2/3 and 1/3 respectively. In the thyroid cancers, CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS were methylated in 9/13, 10/13, and 7/13 respectively. CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were also methylated in concurrently present normal thyroid tissue in 3/11, 4/11 and 3/11 matched thyroid cancer cases (matched for presence of both normal thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer), respectively. Our data suggests that aberrant methylation of CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS maybe an early change in thyroid tumorigenesis regardless of cell type.

  14. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  15. An unusual presentation of a glomus tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-02-01

    Glomus tumours are benign, soft tissue tumours, usually of fingertips. Classically they present with severe pain, temperature sensitivity and localised tenderness. The diagnosis is often delayed due to sometimes non-specific symptoms and rarity of the disorder. While usually a clinical diagnosis, imaging may be necessary for diagnosis and localisation. We present a case of glomus tumour of the fingertip with an unusual history.

  16. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  17. A Case of Painful Hashimoto Thyroiditis that Mimicked Subacute Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hye Mi; Kim, Miyeon; Bae, Jaeseok; Kim, Jo-Heon; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Sang Ah; Koh, Gwanpyo; Lee, Dae Ho

    2012-04-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune thyroid disorder that usually presents as a diffuse, nontender goiter, whereas subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is an uncommon disease that is characterized by tender thyroid enlargement, transient thyrotoxicosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Very rarely, patients with HT can present with painful, tender goiter or fever, a mimic of SAT. We report a case of painful HT in a 68-year-old woman who presented with pain and tenderness in a chronic goiter. Her ESR was definitely elevated and her thyroid laboratory tests suggested subclinical hypothyroidism of autoimmune origin. (99m)Tc pertechnetate uptake was markedly decreased. Fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed reactive and polymorphous lymphoid cells and occasional epithelial cells with Hürthle cell changes. Her clinical symptoms showed a dramatic response to glucocorticoid treatment. She became hypothyroid finally and is now on levothyroxine therapy.

  18. The thyroid-brain interaction in thyroid disorders and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Goetz, T; Glenn, T; Whybrow, P C

    2008-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the metabolic activity of the adult brain, and neuropsychiatric manifestations of thyroid disease have long been recognised. However, it is only recently that methodology such as functional neuroimaging has been available to facilitate investigation of thyroid hormone metabolism. Although the role of thyroid hormones in the adult brain is not yet specified, it is clear that without optimal thyroid function, mood disturbance, cognitive impairment and other psychiatric symptoms can emerge. Additionally, laboratory measurements of peripheral thyroid function may not adequately characterise central thyroid metabolism. Here, we review the relationship between thyroid hormone and neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with primary thyroid disease and primary mood disorders.

  19. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  20. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  1. A case report of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid gland developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Cuevas, S.; Baena Ocampo, L. [Hospital de Oncologia (Mexico). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1995-12-01

    This a report on a 19-year-old female who developed a low grade T2 N0 M0 mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the right parotid gland 3 years and 5 months after the post-operative treatment of 100 mCi of radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The parotid tumour appeared during the patient`s pregnancy. There are few reports of salivary gland cancer developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma and it is hoped that this report may stimulate others to investigate this association further in order to clarify the risk of secondary malignancies after radioiodine therapy. (author).

  2. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  3. Prognosis of Brain Tumours with Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The prognosis of 560 patients with a clinical and CT diagnosis of intrinsic supratentorial brain tumour was examined retrospectively at the Department of Neurosciences, Walton Hospital, Liverpool, England.

  4. Subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis after lobectomy in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Young Sik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis is anautoimmune thyroid disease presenting with transient thyrotoxicosis as well as transient hypothyroidism. Several factors have been thought to be the initiating event in subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis. However, subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis that develops after thyroid lobectomy has not yet been reported in the literature. We report a case of subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis after lobectomy in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 30-year-old Korean woman was referred to our center for thyroid tumor operation. She was diagnosed with suspicious papillary thyroid carcinoma by fine needle aspiration at a local medical clinic. The thyroid ultrasonography demonstrated a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland with a 0.4×0.3cm sized hypoechoic nodule in the left lobe. Left thyroid lobectomy by endoscopic thyroidectomy was performed via a transaxillary approach, and the nodule was confirmed to be a papillary thyroid carcinoma. On postoperative day 1, a thyroid function test revealed hyperthyroidism, and on postoperative day 8, a thyroid function test again revealed hyperthyroidism with decreased radioactive iodine uptake. Thyroid function tests showed euthyroid on postoperative day 48 and hypothyroidism on postoperative day 86. She was treated with levothyroxine. Conclusion Subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis can develop after thyroid lobectomy. Thyroid autoantigen released during thyroid lobectomy may cause the onset or exacerbation of the destructive process.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, So Lyung [Seoul St. Marys Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Radiofrequency ablation is a new non-surgical treatment modality for patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers using radiofrequency ablation. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus

  6. The thyroid, iodine and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Mooij (Petra)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAn excessive dietary iodine intake has also been described to lead to thyroid autoimmune reactivity: a. in individuals with a preexisting thyroid abnormality, such as an iodine deficient goitre, an excessive dietary iodine intake results in a proportion of the individuals in the developm

  7. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Boelen, Anita; Bisschop, Peter H; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, Eric

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is a key driver of metabolism in mammals. Plasma concentrations of TH are kept within a narrow range by negative feedback regulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Plasma TH concentrations are an important determinant of metabolic processes in liver and brown

  8. Enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.H. Schoenmakers (Christian)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThyroid honnone plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism in vertebrates. These actions are initiated by binding to the nuclear thyroid honnone receptor that has been identified as the translation product of the proto-oncogene c-erbA, the

  9. Diagnostic utility of Wilms′ tumour-1 protein (WT-1 immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms′ tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms′ tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis.

  10. Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis: a rare sellar tumour with specific radiological and operative features.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Symptomatic granular cell tumours of the neurohypophysis are rare sellar lesions. Preoperative prediction of the diagnosis on the basis of radiological appearance is useful as these tumours carry specific surgical difficulties. This is possible when the tumour arises from the pituitary stalk, rostral to a normal pituitary gland. This has not been emphasized previously.

  11. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter [Clinic and Policlinic for Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. {sup 131}I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guihua; Zou, Dazhong; Cai, Haiyun; Liu, Yajun

    2016-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a type of autoimmune thyroid disease with an increasing prevalence in past decades. Its diagnosisis mostly based on ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is a useful and essential tool to make this diagnosis based on the characteristics of the disease. In the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy is an effective method to distinguish Hashimoto's thyroiditis from other thyroid disorders. One exciting and recent advance is that non-invasive ultrasound-based methods have supplemented fine-needle aspiration to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis under more complex conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent advantages of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  13. Thyroid carcinoma presenting as a dural metastasis mimicking a meningioma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mehdi Tazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Follicular thyroid cancer rarely manifests itself as a distant metastatic lesion. Case Report: We report a case of a 41-year old man presented with a solid mass located in the left temporo-occipital region. The 3D computed tomography showed a large solid mass with high vascularity, skull erosion and supra-infratentorial epidural mass effect. After magnetic resonance imaging (MRI a suspect diagnosis of meningioma was made. The patient underwent surgery where a soft mass with transverse sinus invasion was encountered; the tumour was successfully resected employing microsurgical techniques. Histological examination revealed a thyroid follicular neoplasm with positive staining for follicular carcinoma in immunohistochemical analysis. Postoperatively levels of thyroid hormones were normal. Treatment was planned for the thyroid gland, patient receiving 6 courses of chemotherapy including paclitaxel. Conclusions: The present case emphasizes that although they are uncommon, dural metastasis can be mistaken for meningiomas. The definitive diagnosis of a meningioma should be established only after the histopathological analysis. Thyroid follicular carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis in cases of extrinsic tumoral lesions.

  14. Thyroid cancer causing obstruction of the great veins in the neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Masud

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims To report our experience and review the literature of thyroid cancer obstructing the great veins in the neck, highlighting clinical aspects and response to treatment. Methods Clinical data were collected from the thyroid cancer register and from follow-up clinic visits of patients referred to the Thyroid Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital. A Medline literature search was conducted between 1980 and 2007. Results Of 1448 patients with thyroid cancer on our cancer register and treated in our unit over the last 60 years, we identified five patients, four women and one man, aged 43 – 81 years with a median follow up of 28 (24–78 months in whom tumour had occluded the great veins in the neck. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and all subsequently received ablative 131I with the exception of patient 3 whose post-operative isotope scan shown no significant 131I uptake. External beam radiotherapy to the neck and upper mediastinum was used for residual disease control in the 5 patients. The median survival was 28 months and the disease-free survival was 24 months. One patient remains asymptomatic but with disease 53 months after initial presentation. Survival in this small series is significantly better than that previously reported for this condition. Conclusion A multimodality therapeutic approach comprising surgery, radioiodine and external beam radiotherapy may give the best results for patients in whom thyroid cancer is occluding the great veins.

  15. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  16. Etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in melasma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Nimet; Kılıç, Arzu; Koparal, Suha; Artüz, Ferda; Çakmak, Atıl; Köse, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melasma is a common chronic, acquired pigmentation disorder with a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Aim To investigate the etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with melasma. Material and methods Forty-five women with melasma and 45 age-matched healthy women were included in the study group. A detailed history was taken from the patients including triggering factors of melasma. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin (AbTG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (Ab-TPO) were measured and thyroid ultrasonography was performed for each subject. Results In 26.7% of patients, pregnancy, in 17.8%, oral contraceptive use and in 13.3%, intense sunlight exposure were the triggering factors. 17.8% of patients had a family history of melasma. FT4, TSH and AbTG levels were significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusions The results suggest that a combination of factors including pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, sunlight and genetic factors often trigger melasma. Thyroid hormones and thyroid autoimmunity may also play a role in the pathogenesis which needs to be proven by further studies. PMID:26759539

  17. [Thyroid hormone treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, R

    2013-07-01

    The autoimmune thyroiditis with overt or subclinical primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis of hypothyroidism is not difficult, the question when a replacement therapy in subclinical hypothyroidism should be initiated is still under discussion. In patients with overt hypothyroidism defined as low FT4 and elevated TSH or TSH > 10 mU/L a replacement with levothyroxine is clearly indicated. In patients with subclinical hypothyroidism defined as a TSH between 4 and 10 mU/L and normal FT4, the treatment with Levothyroxine depends on the underlying disease and symptoms. Levothyroxine is a prohormone with is activated by deiodination in the organs to triiodothyronine. Therefore, levothyroxine for replacement therapy is mainly used. Some patients, however, do not feel well with this treatment and therefore studies with a combination therapy of levothyroxine and triiodothyronine had been performed and it could be shown that this might be related to a polymorphism in type 2 deiodinase in some patients, with the consequence of lower intracellular triodothyronine formation. In women on levothyroxine replacement therapy getting pregnant, the demand of levothyroxine increases up to 25-50 µg, especially in the early weeks of pregnancy. It also has to be considered that the resorption of levothyroxine depends on normal stomach acid and therefore patients on acid blockers or atrophic gastritis require higher dosages of levothyroxine. Only patients after thyroidectomy because of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with higher grad of malignancy need a TSH suppressive therapy, those with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma the TSH should be within the low normal range. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and choleduocholithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Khansari, Mohammad Reza; Sohrabi, Masoud Reza; Hemasi, Gholam Reza; Shamspour, Najmeh; Abdolahi, Nafiseh; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-07-01

    Disturbances in lipid metabolism which occur during hypothyroidism leadto the formation of gallstones. This study aims to evaluate the thyroid functionpattern in patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones. This case-control study recruited 151 patients with preliminary diagnosesof CBD stone who underwent ERCP (cases). The control group comprisedhealthy people who met the study criteria in the same hospital. The controlgroup underwent ultrasonography to exclude any asymptomatic bile duct lithiasis.A questionnaire that included demographic and anthropometrics datawere completed by an assigned physician. Morning blood samples that followed12 hours of fasting were taken from all participants for measurements ofserum total thyroxin (T4), serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), fastingblood sugar (FBS), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein(LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). The mean TSH in patients (2.59 ± 4.86mg/dl) was higher than the controlgroup (2.53± 4.13 9mg/dl). In subclinical hypothyroidism, serum TSH levelshigher than 5 MU/L were found in 30.6% of cases compared with 22.5% ofcontrols [OR: 1.53; 95 % confidence interval (95% CI): 0.968-2.438). Hypothyroidismwas detected in 10.8% of the control group and in 11.3% of cases(OR: 1.87; 95% CI: 0.578-2.043). The mean total cholesterol levels in caseswas higher than the control group (p=0.61).The levels of TG (p=0.05), HDL(73.35 vs. 46.41; pstones. Thyroid testing in patients with gallstone and bile duct stones isrecommended because hypothyroidism may be a predisposing factor for stonepassage from the gallbladder.

  19. Thyroid differentiated carcinomas survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speich, P.V.; Couturier, M.; Mollet, E.; Bidet, R. (C.H.U., Besancon (France))

    1982-01-01

    We have adopted for the follow up of the differentiated thyroid carcinomas in adult cases, a protocol of control which is at the same time strict and not very constraining for the patient and which is based on two types of investigations. Most of your patients have been, at first, submitted for a total thyroidectomy which is followed with one or many therapeutic doses of 3700 MBq (100 mCi) of 131-Iodine and that to destroy thewhole of the thyroid tissue. The patients are then reexamined every six months and are submitted for a T4 opotherapeutic treatment the balance of a general check-up which includes a delicate clinic control, radiologic exam and biological exam, a general control of thyroid hormones, of the T.S.H. and the thyroglobulin and the antithyroglobulin antibodies. In case of any doubt, the balance sheet must be stopped and the patient which is suspected of having Iodine desaturation is submitted for a new general clinic and biologic check-up, which is accompanied with a total scanning after oral administration of 185 mBq (5 mCi) 131-Iodine. If this general check-up shows any active nodul, another therapeutic decision is taken which is often based on an new carcinologic dose of 131-Iodine. This treatment is always followed with a post therapeutic scanning 2 and 5 days later and than another new general check-up three months later to judge the efficiency of the treatment, and during this time the patient is compensed with a LT3.

  20. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR...

  1. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Medici (Marco); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G. Pistis (Giorgio); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.J. Brown (Stephen); R.A. Jensen (Richard); R. Rawal (R.); G.L. Roef (Greet); T.S. Plantinga (Theo S.); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Lahti (Jari); M.C. Simmonds (Mark); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); R.M. Freathy (Rachel); B.M. Shields (Beverley); D. Pietzner (Diana); R. Nagy (Rebecca); L. Broer (Linda); L. Chaker (Layal); T.I.M. Korevaar (Tim); M.G. Plia (Maria Grazia); C. Sala (Cinzia); U. Völker (Uwe); J.B. Richards (Brent); F.C. Sweep (Fred); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Kajantie (Eero); L. Thuesen (Leif); Y.E. Taes (Youri); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); J. Kratzsch (Jürgen); A. Hamilton (Amy); W. Li (Wei); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Lobina (Monia); S. Mariotti (Stefano); N. Soranzo (Nicole); M. Cocca (Massimiliano); M. Nauck (Matthias); C. Spielhagen (Christin); H.A. Ross (Alec); A.M. Arnold (Alice); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); S. Liyanarachchi (Sandya); M. Heier (Margit); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); C. Masciullo (Corrado); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); E.M. Lim (Ee Mun); G. Reischl (Gunilla); P.J. Leedman (Peter); S. Lai (Sandra); A. Delitala (Alessandro); A. Bremner (Alexandra); D.I.W. Philips (David I.); J.P. Beilby (John); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Vocale (Matteo); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T. Forsen (Tom); A. James (Alan); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Hui (Jennie); H. Prokisch (Holger); E.E. Rietzschel (Ernst); A. Palotie (Aarno); W. Feddema (Wouter); S.J. Fletcher (Stephen); K. Schramm (Katharina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); A. Kluttig (Alexander); D. Radke (Dörte); M. Traglia (Michela); G. Surdulescu (Gabriela); H. He (Hao); J.A. Franklyn (Jayne); D. Tiller (Daniel); B. Vaidya (Bijay); T. Meyer (Thorsten); T. Jorgensen (Torben); K. Hagen (Knut); P.C. O'Leary (Peter); E. Wichmann (Eric); A.R. Hermus (Ad); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); T. Ittermann (Till); A. Hofman (Albert); E. Bosi (Emanuele); D. Schlessinger (David); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N. Pirastu (Nicola); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. de la Chapelle (Albert); R.T. Netea-Maier (Romana ); J.E. Gough (Julie); H. Meyer zu Schwabedissen (Henriette); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); J.-M. Kaufman (Jean-Marc); A. Linneberg (Allan); K. Räikkönen (Katri); J.W.A. Smit (Jan); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.P. Walsh (John); C. Meisinger (Christa); M. den Heijer (Martin); T.J. Visser (Theo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); S.G. Wilson (Scott); H. Völzke (Henry); A.R. Cappola (Anne); D. Toniolo (Daniela); S. Sanna (Serena); S. Naitza (Silvia); R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease)

  2. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medici, M.; Porcu, E.; Pistis, G.; Teumer, A.; Brown, S.J.; Jensen, R.A.; Rawal, R.; Roef, G.L.; Plantinga, T.S.; Vermeulen, S.; Lahti, J.; Simmonds, M.J.; Husemoen, L.L.; Freathy, R.M.; Shields, B.M.; Pietzner, D.; Nagy, R.; Broer, L.; Chaker, L.; Korevaar, T.I.; Plia, M.G.; Sala, C.; Volker, U.; Richards, J.B.; Sweep, F.C.; Gieger, C.; Corre, T.; Kajantie, E.; Thuesen, B.; Taes, Y.E.; Visser, W.E.; Hattersley, A.T.; Kratzsch, J.; Hamilton, A.; Li, W.; Homuth, G.; Lobina, M.; Mariotti, S.; Soranzo, N.; Cocca, M.; Nauck, M.; Spielhagen, C.; Ross, A.; Arnold, A.; Bunt, M. van de; Liyanarachchi, S.; Heier, M.; Grabe, H.J.; Masciullo, C.; Galesloot, T.E.; Lim, E.M.; Reischl, E.; Leedman, P.J.; Lai, S.; Delitala, A.; Bremner, A.P.; Philips, D.I.; Beilby, J.P.; Mulas, A.; Vocale, M.; Abecasis, G.; Forsen, T.; James, A.; Widen, E.; Hui, J.; Prokisch, H.; Rietzschel, E.E.; Palotie, A.; Feddema, P.; Fletcher, S.J.; Schramm, K.; Rotter, J.I.; Kluttig, A.; Radke, D.; Traglia, M.; Surdulescu, G.L.; He, H.; Franklyn, J.A.; Tiller, D.; Vaidya, B.; Meyer, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; O'Leary, P.C.; Wichmann, E.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Psaty, B.M.; Ittermann, T.; Hofman, A.; Bosi, E.; Schlessinger, D.; Wallaschofski, H.; Pirastu, N.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Chapelle, A. dela; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Gough, S.C.; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, H.; Frayling, T.M.; Kaufman, J.M.; Smit, J.W.; Kiemeney, B.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the pos

  3. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the ...

  4. Thyroid diseases and Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Raza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the month of Ramadan, patients with thyroid diseases, most of the time, do not need treatment adjustments and can fast safely without any health hazards. Patients with hypothyroidism taking thyroxine can take their tablets on an empty stomach at bedtime instead of half an hour before Sehr. Patients with hyperthyroidism, on methimazole/carbimazole can continue their dose in once or twice daily regimes, while those on propylthiouracil need to be switched. Hyperthyroid patients with severe symptoms should start treatment immediately and can avoid fast for few days after a consultation with their religious scholar.

  5. Thyroid and parathyroid gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950261 Humoral autoimmunity in endocrine ophthal-mopathy.TANG Zhengyi(汤正义),et al.Shanghai En-docrinol Res Instit,Shanghai 2nd Med Univ,Shang-hai,200025.Chin J Endorinol & Metabol 1994;10(5)151-153.The crude antigens of the cell membrane and cyto-plasm of the thyroid,eye muscles and periobital con-nective tissues and cell membrane crude antigens of theskeletal muscle,and liver were subjected to SDS-PAGE,then immunoblotting with the sera of the pa-

  6. Tormenta tiroidea Thyroid storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Leal Curí

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La tormenta tiroidea es una de las situaciones más críticas entre las emergencias endocrinas y tiene una significativa mortalidad. La etiología más común de tirotoxicosis es la enfermedad de Graves y el factor precipitante que predomina es la infección. Clínicamente se caracteriza por la disfunción de varios sistemas (termorregulador, nervioso central, gastrointestinal y cardiovascular, con niveles de hormonas tiroideas libres o totales por encima de los valores normales. El tratamiento debe tener un enfoque multidisciplinario, e incluye medidas de soporte en unidades de cuidados intensivos, normalización de la temperatura corporal, reducción de la producción y liberación de hormonas tiroideas, con antitiroideos de síntesis y yodo respectivamente, bloqueo de los efectos periféricos mediante la administración de beta-bloqueadores, y corrección del factor desencadenante. Una vez que el paciente se encuentra estable es necesario planificar una terapia definitiva que impida la recurrencia futura de la crisis tirotóxica.The thyroid storm is one of the most critical situations in the endocrine emergencies and exhibits a significant mortality rate. The most common etiology of thyrotoxicosis is Graves' disease and the predominant precipitating factor is infection. The clinical characteristics are dysfunction of several systems (heat-regulator, central nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular, and levels of total or free thyroid hormones that exceed the normal values. The treatment must be multidisciplinary and include support measures in intensive care units, normalization of body temperature, reduction of the production and the release of thyroid hormones by using synthesis and iodine anti-thyroid products respectively, blockade of the peripheral effects through administration of Beta-blockers and correction of the unleashing factor. Once the patients are stabilized, it is necessary to plan the final therapy that will prevent the

  7. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  8. Percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, G.F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund

    2013-01-01

    A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications.......A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications....

  9. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  10. Thermal resistance in a spontaneous murine tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, J; Urano, M; Rice, L; Suit, H D

    1981-12-01

    Resistance to subsequent hyperthermia as a result of prior heating was investigated using a spontaneous murine tumour implanted into the feet of C3H/Sed mice. Tumours were treated by immersing the tumour-bearing foot into a constant-temperature hot water bath set at 45.5 degrees C and were given single and split doses of heat. Response was assessed using a tumour-growth time assay. Three aspects of thermally-induced resistance were particularly considered: the time course of development and decay; the importance of the magnitude of the priming dose and the influence of the size of the tumour at the time of treatment. Substantial resistance was induced in this tumour by short priming doses at 45.5 degrees C, rising rapidly 1-2 days after the first treatment and then starting to decay. There was no significant difference in the kinetics of thermal resistance induced in tumours treated at 4mm and those treated at 8 mm in size, although the large tumours were more sensitive to single doses of heat. Increasing the magnitude of the priming dose of heat resulted in an increase in the magnitude of resistance to the second dose. The results of this study are compared with results of similar studies in this and other laboratories using murine normal tissues and cells in culture. Possible clinical implications are considered.

  11. Resistance to Thyroid Hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2015.07.007 Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, ...

  12. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  13. Activation of tumor cell proliferation by thyroid hormone in a mouse model of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancy of the endocrine system in humans. To understand the molecular genetic events underlying thyroid carcinogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that spontaneously develops follicular thyroid carcinoma similar to human thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PV mouse). This mutant mouse harbors a dominantnegative mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted PV). The PV mutation was identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (TH). ThrbPV/PV mice exh...

  14. Increased Prevalence of Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis in Korean Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Mo Oh; Sohee Park; Joo Young Lee; Young-Joo Won; Aesun Shin; Hyun-Joo Kong; Kui-Sun Choi; You Jin Lee; Ki-Wook Chung; Kyu-Won Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, some reports have suggested that papillary thyroid cancers are more frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study investigated a potential increase in the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods We used national epidemiological survey data on thyroid cancer patients diagnosed in 1999, 2005, and 2008. A retrospective medical record survey was conducted by...

  15. Role of prophylactic central neck dissection in cN0 papillary thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, S; Giugliano, G; Santoro, L; Ywata De Carvalho, A; Massaro, MA; Gibelli, B; De Fiori, E; Grosso, E; Ansarin, M; Calabrese, L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prophylactic central neck dissection in papillary thyroid cancer is controversial. In this retrospective cohort study, the aim was to assess possible advantages of prophylactic central neck dissection with total thyroidectomy in cN0 papillary thyroid cancer. A total of 244 consecutive patients with papillary thyroid cancer, without clinical and ultrasound nodal metastases (cN0), were evaluated out of 1373 patients operated for a thyroid disease at the Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan, Italy from 1994 to 2006. Of these 244 patients, 126 (Group A) underwent thyroidectomy with central neck dissection, while 118 (Group B) underwent thyroidectomy alone. Demographic, clinical and pathological features were analysed. Overall recurrence rate was 6.3% (8/126) in Group A and 7.7% (9/118) in Group B, with a mean follow-up of 47 (Group A) and 64 (Group B) months. In Group A patients, 47% were pN1a and all patients with recurrence had nodal involvement (p = 0.002). Survival rate did not differ in the two groups. Nine patients were lost to follow-up. Group A patients were older and their tumours were larger in size; according to the pT distribution, a higher extra-capsular invasion rate was observed. The two groups were equivalent as far as concerns histological high risk variants and multifocality. Nodal metastases correlated with stage: pT1-2 vs. pT3-T4a, p = 0.0036. A lower risk of nodal metastases was related to thyroiditis (p = 0.0034). In conclusion, central neck metastases were predictive of recurrence without influencing prognosis. From data obtained, possible greatest efficacy of central neck dissection in pT3-4 papillary thyroid cancer without thyroiditis is suggested. PMID:20111614

  16. Large benign retroperitoneal tumour in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczi, Csaba; Osvath, Peter; Flasko, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old female was in the 13th week of pregnancy when an abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large retroperitoneal tumour. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out and the imaging described a 10-cm mass in diameter extending from the right kidney. Given that the patient was in her first trimester and that there was a suspicion of malignancy, further surgical exploration of the tumour was warranted. During the operation, the tumour was removed, but nephrectomy was not necessary. Histologic analysis of the resected tumour showed a mucinous cystic adenoma, and no signs of malignancy were present. Following the surgery, the pregnancy was otherwise uneventful and further complications did not occur. This case illustrates that surgery is recommended in patients with a retroperitoneal tumour early during a pregnancy, when a malignancy cannot be excluded.

  17. [Morbidity of the tumours of the sphere head and neck in Bamako].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, M; Kampo, M I; Timbo, S K; Traoré, C B; Diallo, M; Doumbia-Singaré, K; Ag Mohamed, A

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the results of one year (November 2004-October 2005) descriptive study of tumours located in the head and neck areas in the ENT department of the University-Hospital of Gabriel Toure in Bamako. Were included in the study patients whose files showed epidemiology data: age, sex, profession, residence and period of the medical checking, and exposition factors: anatomic location, results of histology and image data of the tumours. Where excluded from the study the patients whose file were not completed and those that have had eye and brain tumours From the data base of the department, a total of 60 cases of tumours were monitored and 25 others cases were excluded according to the criteria. Among the 60 cases, 24 tumours (40%) were malign and 36 were benign. Goiter was the most found benign tumor according to the results of the hystology analysis. In most cases (15 out of 36, 41.67%) the histology analysis showed an colloid adenoma Other rare tumors like rhinoscleroma (5 cases out of 36, 13.89%), nose invertus papilloma (2 cases out of 36, 5.55%) where found. These were easily diagnosed and treated. In the group of malign tumors, the pharyngolaryngeal cancer was the most found (11 cases out of 24) and the most predominant histology of these cancers was the epidermoid carcinoma. Two of these cancers were found in patients below fifteen years of age, but no other risk factors like expositions was noted in the files of these two patients. Other malign tumors have been found: nose and sinusal cancers and thyroid carcinoma. In most cases these tumors were diagnosed at an advanced stage.

  18. Hashimoto thyroiditis: a century later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rania; Al-Shaikh, Safa; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2012-05-01

    More than a century has passed since the first description of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) as a clinicopathologic entity. HT is an autoimmune disease in which a breakdown of immune tolerance is caused by interplay of a variety of immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors. Thyrocyte injury resulting from environmental factors results in expression of new or hidden epitopes that leads to proliferation of autoreactive T and B cells. Infiltration of thyroid by these cells results in HT. In addition to the usual type of HT, several variants such as the fibrous type and Riedal thyroiditis are also recognized. The most recently recognized variant is immunoglobulin G4(+) HT, which may occur as isolated thyroid limited disease or as part of a generalized Ig4-related sclerosing disease. The relationship between HT and Riedel thyroiditis remains unclear; however, recent evidence seems to suggest that it may also be part of the spectrum of Ig4-related sclerosing disease. HT is frequently associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and HT on the other hand appears well established.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  20. Coexistence of papillary thyroid cancer and Hashimoto thyroiditis in children: report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koibuchi, Harumi; Omoto, Kiyoka; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Toyotsuji, Tomonori; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Mikihiko

    2014-07-01

    This report documents 3 pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma cases with associated Hashimoto thyroiditis. In all 3 cases, hypoechoic nodules accompanied by multiple echogenic spots were noted on sonography of the thyroid. Hashimoto thyroiditis was suspected on the basis of positive thyroid autoantibody test results and pathologic examinations of thyroidectomy specimens, which revealed chronic thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration as the background of papillary thyroid carcinoma development. The potential for papillary carcinoma development warrants close follow-up, and meticulous sonographic examinations must be performed in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  1. The ‘Pantie' Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silada Kanokrungsee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of radiation-associated angiosarcoma. A 67-year-old Thai woman was diagnosed with endometrium carcinoma stage IC and was treated with surgery and radiations. Ten years later, she presented with a gradually enlarging mass on the pubic area, in the shape of a pair of panties. Skin biopsy of lesions confirmed angiosarcoma. The diagnosis was radiation-associated angiosarcoma. She was treated with chemotherapy due to unresectable tumour. The chemotherapy was started with paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 every 2 weeks. After completing the fifth cycle of paclitaxel, the lesion was markedly decreased in size and the symptoms previously described were also completely resolved.

  2. Array CGH demonstrates characteristic aberration signatures in human papillary thyroid carcinomas governed by RET/PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, K; Malisch, E; Thomas, G; Braselmann, H; Walch, A; Jackl, G; Lewis, P; Lengfelder, E; Bogdanova, T; Wienberg, J; Zitzelsberger, H

    2008-07-31

    The aim of this study is to investigate additional genetic alterations in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) with known RET/PTC rearrangements. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to 33 PTC (20 PTC from adults, 13 post-Chernobyl PTC from children) with known RET/PTC status. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis identified cases with similar aberration patterns. Significant deviations between tumour-groups were obtained by statistical testing (Fisher's exact test in combination with Benjamini-Hochberg FDR-controlling procedure). FISH analysis on FFPE sections was applied to validate the array CGH data. Deletions were found more frequently in RET/PTC-positive and RET/PTC-negative tumours than amplifications. Specific aberration signatures were identified that discriminated between RET/PTC-positive and RET/PTC-negative cases (aberrations on chromosomes 1p, 3q, 4p, 7p, 9p/q, 10q, 12q, 13q and 21q). In addition, childhood and adult RET/PTC-positive cases differ significantly for a deletion on the distal part of chromosome 1p. There are additional alterations in RET/PTC-positive tumours, which may act as modifiers of RET activation. In contrast, alterations in RET/PTC-negative tumours indicate alternative routes of tumour development. The data presented serve as a starting point for further studies on gene expression and function of genes identified in this study.

  3. Phosphorylated Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (p-mTOR) and Noncoding RNA Expression in Follicular and Hürthle Cell Thyroid Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covach, Adam; Patel, Sanjay; Hardin, Heather; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2017-06-28

    Oncocytic (Hürthle cell) and follicular neoplasms are related thyroid tumors with distinct molecular profiles. Diagnostic criteria separating adenomas and carcinomas for these two types of neoplasms are similar, but there may be some differences in the biological behavior of Hürthle cell and follicular carcinomas. Recent studies have shown that noncoding RNAs may have diagnostic and prognostic utility in separating benign and malignant Hürthle cell and follicular neoplasms. In this study, we examined expression of various noncoding RNAs including metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) and miR-RNA-885-5p (miR-885) in distinguishing between benign and malignant neoplasms. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated mechanistic receptor of rapamycin (p-mTOR) was also analyzed in these two groups of tumors. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) with archived tissue samples were analyzed using in situ hybridization (ISH) for MALAT1 and miR-885 and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for p-mTOR. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was also performed on a subset of the cases.MALAT1 and miR-885 were increased in all neoplastic groups compared to the normal thyroid tissues (p p = 0.06). MiR-885 was expressed at similar levels in FTCs and HCCs. P-mTOR protein was more highly expressed in FTCs than in HCCs (pP-mTOR was most highly expressed in FTC but was also increased in HCC, suggesting that drugs targeting this pathway may be useful for treatment of tumors unresponsive to conventional therapies.

  4. Use of Ultrasound in the Management of Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, John I.; Solorzano, Carmen C.

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the utility of ultrasound in evaluating thyroid nodules, staging thyroid cancer, determining the extent of surgery needed in thyroid cancer patients, and the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer.

  5. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE ( ... medicine Vodun/Expiritism Ayurvedic medicine REASONS PATIENTS WITH THYROID CANCER/THYROID DISEASE CHOOSE CAM There are few ...

  6. Thyroid Tubercle of Zuckerkandl: importance in thyroid surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheahan, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Tubercle of Zuckerkandl (TZ), which is the remant of the lateral thyroid process, is an important anatomic structure that serves as a reliable landmark for the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery. Furthermore, removal of the TZ is critical for the adequate performance of a total thyroidectomy. However, there is little mention of the TZ in surgical textbooks or papers. METHODS: Prospective observational study of 138 consecutive thyroid surgeries. The presence of the TZ, its size, and relationship to the recurrent laryngeal nerve, were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 211 thyroid lobes were included in the study. The TZ was identified in 61.1% of all thyroid lobes. The median size was 8 mm (range = 3-40 mm). A TZ was more commonly identified on the right (69.6%) than on the left side (53.2%) (P = .02). The recurrent laryngeal nerve was found deep to the TZ in 98.4% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: A TZ is present in the majority of thyroid lobes. Awareness of the TZ is critical in performing an adequate total thyroidectomy, and is very useful as a landmark for the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

  7. [Risk factors and pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknys, Gintaras; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its pathogenesis and to introduce the readers to the basic concept of autoimmune thyroid disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease are different expressions of a basically similar autoimmune process, and the clinical appearance reflects the spectrum of the immune response in a particular patient. During this response, cytotoxic autoantibodies, stimulatory autoantibodies, blocking autoantibodies, or cell-mediated autoimmunity may be observed. Persons with classic Hashimoto's thyroiditis have serum antibodies reacting with thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. These antibodies (particularly antibodies against thyroid peroxidase) are complement-fixing immunoglobulins and may be cytotoxic. In addition, many patients have cell-mediated immunity directed against thyroid antigens. Cell mediated-immunity is also a feature of experimental thyroiditis induced in animals by injection of thyroid antigen with adjuvants. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is predominantly the clinical expression of cell-mediated immunity leading to destruction of thyroid cells, which in its severest form causes thyroid failure. The significance of genetic component and nongenetic risk factors (pregnancy, drugs, age, sex, infection, and irradiation) in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also reviewed. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the genetic component is important in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, although the pattern of inheritance is non-Mendelian and is likely to be influenced by subtle variations in the functions of multiple genes. Nongenetic risk factors (environmental factors) are also etiologically important, because the concordance rate in monozygotic twins is below 1.

  8. IL-1β a potential factor for discriminating between thyroid carcinoma and atrophic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Mnif, Mouna; Bougacha, Fadia; Charffedine, Ilhem; Rebuffat, Sandra; Rebai, Ahmed; Glasson, Emilie; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between cytokines and others soluble factors (hormones, antibodies...) can play an important role in the development of thyroid pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible correlation between serum cytokine concentrations, thyroid hormones (FT4 and TSH) and auto-antibodies (Tg and TPO), and their usefulness in discriminating between different thyroid conditions. In this study, we investigated serum from 115 patients affected with a variety of thyroid conditions (44 Graves' disease, 17 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 11 atrophic thyroiditis, 28 thyroid nodular goitre and 15 papillary thyroid cancer), and 30 controls. Levels of 17 cytokines in serum samples were measured simultaneously using a multiplexed human cytokine assay. Thyroid hormones and auto-antibodies were measured using ELISA. Our study showed that IL-1β serum concentrations allow the discrimination between atrophic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer groups (p = 0.027).

  9. A case of hemiagenesis of thyroid with double ectopic thyroid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaravel Velayutham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental abnormalities of the thyroid gland are very rare. The most common abnormalities include ectopic thyroid tissues that are commonly seen in lingual or sublingual location, agenesis, and hemiagenesis of the thyroid gland. These developmental defects may or may not be associated with thyroid dysfunction. Our case is an 18-year-old male who presented with swelling in the neck of 4-year duration. Clinical examination revealed an oval-shape swelling in the left side of the thyroid gland. The ultrasound and the nuclear scan report revealed the presence of thyroid hemiagenesis of the right lobe with isthmus along with double ectopic thyroid tissue at suprahyoid and infrahyoid region. His thyroid function test showed elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and normal free T4. We report a very rare case of thyroid hemiagenesis with double ectopic thyroid tissue; and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the world literature.

  10. MRI of pineal region tumours: relationship between tumours and adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, H. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Uozumi, T. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Arita, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sumida, M. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    A variety of tumours may arise in the pineal region; accurate diagnosis is important in the selection of treatment and prognosis. A retrospective analysis of the MRI studies of 25 patients with pathologically proven pineal region tumours was performed, focused on the relationship between the tumour and neighbouring structures. Compression of the tectal plate was classified as expansive or invasive, and compression of the corpus callosum as inferior, anterior or posterior. In 10 of the 14 patients (71 %) with germ cell tumours tectal compression was of the invasive type; 8 patients (57 %) had multiple tumours and in 13 (93 %) the tumour margins were irregular. Teratomas were readily diagnosed because of characteristic heterogeneous signal intensity. Pineal cell tumours were differentiated from germ cell tumours by their rounded shape, solid nature, sharp margins, and expansive type of tectal compression. Meningiomas were characterised by their falcotentorial attachments, posterior callosal compression, and a low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images. Gd-DTPA injection enabled clear demonstration of the site and extent of tumour spread and was useful in differentiating cystic and solid components. The appearances described, while not pathognomonic, are helpful in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumours, and valuable in planning appropriate treatment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinó P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic neoplasms are an uncommon aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a rare subgroup of pancreatic neoplasms. CASE REPORT: We report on three patients having acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, one of them with severe pancreatitis, and review the published cases up to now. Only 22 patients with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been reported (including the present cases. Most of these cases were of non-functioning neoplasms and the course of the pancreatitis tended to be mild. In the most recent reports and in the present cases, the initial diagnostic method was CT scan. Less than half had metastases when the tumour was diagnosed and mortality from these neoplasms reached approximately 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can cause acute pancreatitis even in patients under 50 years of age. On many occasions, the tumours are non-functioning; therefore, acute pancreatitis may be the first clinical symptom. Consequently, faced with acute pancreatitis of unknown origin, a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumour should be ruled out.

  12. Mechanisms of tumour escape from immune surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecka Urszula

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive growth and spread of tumour cells in the form of metastases requires an interaction of healthy host cells, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and other cells of mesenchymal origin with immune cells taking part in innate and adaptive responses within the tumour lesion and entire body. The host cells interact with tumour cells to create a dynamic tumour microenvironment, in which healthy cells can both positively and negatively influence the growth and spread of the tumour. The balance of cellular homeostasis and the effect of substances they secrete on the tumour microenvironment determine whether the tumour has a tendency to grow or disappear, and whether the cells remain within the lesion or are capable of metastasis to other regions of the body. Intercellular interactions also determine the tumour’s susceptibility to radiation or other types of cancer treatment. They may also be a rational explanation for differences in treatment outcomes, in which some metastases regress and others progress in response to the same treatment method.

  13. Increased prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in Korean patients with papillary thyroid cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Mo Oh

    Full Text Available In recent years, some reports have suggested that papillary thyroid cancers are more frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study investigated a potential increase in the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients.We used national epidemiological survey data on thyroid cancer patients diagnosed in 1999, 2005, and 2008. A retrospective medical record survey was conducted by representative sampling of a national cancer incidence database. The analysis included 5,378 papillary thyroid cancer patients aged 20-79 years. We calculated the age-standardized prevalence and age-adjusted prevalence ratios using a binomial regression model with a log link for the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients by sex for each year.The prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients was 4.0% and 12.8% for men and women in 1999, 6.5% and 24.6% in 2005, and 10.7% and 27.6% in 2008, respectively. Between 1999 and 2008, the age-standardized prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis increased 4.1-fold in male patients and 2.0-fold in female patients with papillary thyroid cancer. The prevalence of other thyroid diseases, however, did not increase in either gender.Among Korean papillary thyroid cancer patients, the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis increased between 1999 and 2008, whereas the prevalence of other thyroid disorders did not change.

  14. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  15. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  16. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  17. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  18. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-02

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents.

  19. Carcinoid tumour of the middle ear

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baig, Salman

    2012-09-01

    A case of middle ear mass in a young female from Ireland is described, who presented with left ear hearing loss and intermittent bloody discharge from the same ear. Examination under microscope revealed occlusive polyp in the left ear and a biopsy had been taken under general anaesthesia. Histopathology report described an adenoma \\/ carcinoid tumour of the middle ear confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining. CT temporal bones revealed the extension of the disease. The patient underwent left tympanotomy and excision of the tumour. In general, these tumours are regarded as benign but may be mistaken for adenocarcinomas because of their histological heterogenecity.

  20. Pulmonary tumour microembolism clinically mimicking alveolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A W I; Tse, G M K; Chu, W C W; Chan, A B W

    2003-01-01

    A 56 year old man with previously unsuspected recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus presented with dyspnoea. Bronchoscopy and computed tomography suggested bronchopneumonic changes with an infectious cause. He suffered a rapidly deteriorating course and died despite active treatment, including antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. Necropsy revealed a florid pulmonary tumour microembolism mimicking alveolitis. No bronchopneumonia was seen. The emboli arose from loosely attached tumour vegetations in the tricuspid valve. In a patient with known malignancy, tumour microembolism should be considered as an uncommon cause of rapid respiratory failure, refractory to antibiotic treatment. PMID:14600135

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  2. Incidence of Breast, Prostate, Testicular, and Thyroid Cancer in Italian Contaminated Sites with Presence of Substances with Endocrine Disrupting Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benedetti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of breast (females, prostate, testicular, and thyroid cancer in the Italian National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs, served by cancer registries, where the presence of endocrine disruptors (EDs, reported to be linked to these tumours, was documented. Evidence of carcinogenicity of EDs present in NPCSs was assessed based on evaluation by international scientific institutions and committees. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs were computed for each NPCS and cancer site between 1996 and 2005. Excess incidence of one or more cancer site studied was found in twelve out of fourteen NPCSs. Significantly increased SIRs were found for breast cancer in eight NPCSs, for prostate cancer in six, for thyroid cancer (both gender in four, and for testicular cancer in two. Non-significantly increased SIRs were found in five NPCSs for testicular cancer and in two for thyroid cancer (males. In a small number of instances a significant deficit was reported, mainly for thyroid and prostate cancer. Although increased incidence of one or more cancer sites studied were found in several NPCSs, the ecological study design and the multifactorial aetiology of the considered tumours do not permit concluding causal links with environmental contamination. Regarding the observation of some excesses in SIRs, continuing epidemiological surveillance is warranted.

  3. Incidence of Breast, Prostate, Testicular, and Thyroid Cancer in Italian Contaminated Sites with Presence of Substances with Endocrine Disrupting Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marta; Zona, Amerigo; Beccaloni, Eleonora; Carere, Mario; Comba, Pietro

    2017-03-29

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of breast (females), prostate, testicular, and thyroid cancer in the Italian National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs), served by cancer registries, where the presence of endocrine disruptors (EDs), reported to be linked to these tumours, was documented. Evidence of carcinogenicity of EDs present in NPCSs was assessed based on evaluation by international scientific institutions and committees. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) were computed for each NPCS and cancer site between 1996 and 2005. Excess incidence of one or more cancer site studied was found in twelve out of fourteen NPCSs. Significantly increased SIRs were found for breast cancer in eight NPCSs, for prostate cancer in six, for thyroid cancer (both gender) in four, and for testicular cancer in two. Non-significantly increased SIRs were found in five NPCSs for testicular cancer and in two for thyroid cancer (males). In a small number of instances a significant deficit was reported, mainly for thyroid and prostate cancer. Although increased incidence of one or more cancer sites studied were found in several NPCSs, the ecological study design and the multifactorial aetiology of the considered tumours do not permit concluding causal links with environmental contamination. Regarding the observation of some excesses in SIRs, continuing epidemiological surveillance is warranted.

  4. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  5. Profile of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Sri Lankans: Is There an Increased Risk of Ancillary Pathologies in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?

    OpenAIRE

    Eranga Himalee Siriweera; Neelakanthi Vajira Illangakoon Ratnatunga

    2010-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been reported to be associated with many neoplastic and nonneoplastic thyroid pathologies. This retrospective study aims to determine the demographic profile of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Sri Lankans, document ancillary pathologies in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and determine whether there is an increased risk of occurrence of malignancies, benign neoplasms, and nonneoplastic benign lesions in Hashimoto's thyroiditis by comparing with thyroids showing multinodular goi...

  6. The association between hypoechogenicity or irregular echo pattern at thyroid ultrasonography and thyroid function in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejbjerg, Pernille; Knudsen, Nils; Perrild, Hans;

    2006-01-01

    cchogenicity (P hypoechogenicity at thyroid US and higher levels of serum TSH even in subjects without overt thyroid disease, suggesting decreased echogenicity as an early sign...... of thyroid dysfunction. irregular echo pattern, whether accompanied by hypoechogenicity or not, was another possible marker of thyroid failure. This indicates a possible use of thyroid US in detecting early and subclinical thyroid dysfunction....

  7. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Computed Tomographic Differentiation from Other Thyroid Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Won; Yoon, Dae Young; Choi, Chul Soon; Chang, Suk Ki; Yun, Eun Joo; Seo, Young Lan; Rho, Young-Soo; Jin Cho, Sung; Kim, Keon Ha (Depts. of Radiology, Otorhinolaryngology, and Pathology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-04-15

    Background: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is rare but is one of the most aggressive malignancies. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is important in order to provide appropriate therapy. Purpose: To establish useful computed tomographic (CT) criteria for differentiating anaplastic carcinoma from other thyroid masses. Material and Methods: The CT scans of nine patients with anaplastic carcinomas were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those of 32 patients with papillary carcinomas (n = 12) or benign lesions (n = 20) exceeding a maximum diameter of 2.0 cm. Image analysis was performed according to the following CT parameters: size, margin (well defined or ill defined), composition (cystic, mixed, or solid), mean attenuation value, ratio of attenuation of the mass to that of the adjacent muscle (M/m attenuation ratio), necrosis (present or absent), and calcification (stippled, nodular, or absent) of the thyroid mass; and tumor-spreading patterns including the presence of surrounding normal thyroid tissue in the involved lobe, involvement of the contralateral thyroid lobe, extension into the adjacent structures, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Results: Anaplastic carcinomas appeared as large (average 4.6 cm), solid (100%), and ill-defined (88.9%) masses accompanied by necrosis (100%), nodular calcification (44.4%), direct invasion into the adjacent organs (55.6%), and cervical lymph node involvement (77.8%). Tumor necrosis was the most valuable parameter in differentiating anaplastic carcinomas from other thyroid masses. Patient age (>70 years) and low attenuation value on postcontrast scan (attenuation value <100 HU, or M/m attenuation ratio <1.3) are also helpful predictors for anaplastic carcinoma. Conclusion: If a patient is older than 70 years of age and has a large necrotic thyroid mass of low attenuation, anaplastic carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis

  8. Incidence Patterns and Trends of non-Central Nervous System Solid Tumours in Children and Adolescents. A Collaborative Study of the Spanish Population Based Cancer Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Nerea; Sanchez, Mª José; Ardanaz, Eva; Felipe, Saray; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Ramos, María; Carulla, Marià; Chirlaque, Mª Dolores; Argüelles, Marcial V.; Martos, Carmen; Mateo, Antonio; Peris-Bonet, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe incidence patterns and trends in children (0-14 years) and adolescents (15-19 age-range) with solid tumours, except those of central nervous system (CNS), in Spain. Methods: Cases were drawn from eleven Spanish population-based cancer registries. Incidence was estimated for the period 1983-2007 and trends were evaluated using Joinpoint regression analysis. Results: The studied tumour groups accounted for 36% of total childhood cancers and 47.6% of those diagnosed in adolescence with annual rates per million of 53.5 and 89.3 respectively. In children 0 to 14 years of age, Neuroblastoma (NB) was the commonest (7.8%) followed by Soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) (6.3%), bone tumours (BT) (6.2%) and renal tumours (RT) (4.5%). NB was the most frequently diagnosed tumour before the 5th birthday, while STS and BT were the commonest at 5-9 years of age, and BT and Carcinoma and other epithelial tumours (COET) at 10-14. COET presented the highest incidence in adolescents, followed by germ-cell tumours (GCT), BT and STS. These four diagnostic groups accounted for 94% of total non-CNS solid tumours, in adolescents. Overall incidence rates increased significantly in children up to 1996 with an annual percentage change (APC) of 2.6% (95%CI: 1.7; 3.6). NB and COET showed significant time trend (APCs: 1.4% and 3.8% respectively) while other tumour groups such as RT, STS, BT or GCT had no significant changes over time. A significant increase was present in NB under the age of 5 and in BT and STS in children aged 10-14 years. In adolescents there were significant increases for all tumours combined (APC=2.7; 95%CI: 1.8-3.6) and for STS, GCT and COET (APCs: 3.2%, 4.4% and 3.5% respectively), while other tumour groups such as hepatic tumours, BT or thyroid carcinomas showed a decreasing trend or no increase. Conclusions: Overall, the incidence of the studied cancers in children increased along the period 1983-1996 with no posterior significant rise, while the incidence

  9. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  10. Symptoms and time to diagnosis in children with brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Nielsen, Rine; Illum, Niels Ove;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy.......Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy....

  11. Interactions of human monocytes with TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jarosław; Szatanek, Rafał; Mytar, Bożenna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2013-02-01

    The tumour microenvironment represents a dynamic complex milieu, which includes tumour cells, cells of the immune system and other (cellular and non-cellular) components. The role of these particular 'puzzle pieces' may change substantially due to their mutual interactions. The present review concerns different opinions on interactions that occur between monocytes, tumour cells and TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

  12. ANTI-THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODY LEVEL IN THYROID NODULES: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THYROID NEOPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bera Swati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-TPO antibody level was evaluated in 86 patients, along with 25 healthy controls to detect its change in various forms of thyroid nodules particularly in thyroid malignancy when compared with healthy controls. The study revealed that Anti-TPO antibody level was increased in Benign & toxic form of Multi nodular goiter and papillary carcinoma but there is no elevation of Anti- TPO antibody level in follicular adenoma or follicular carcinoma.

  13. ANTI-THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODY LEVEL IN THYROID NODULES: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THYROID NEOPLASIA

    OpenAIRE

    Bera Swati; Gupta Soma; Dutta Sumanta K; Chowdhury Kanika M; Bhattacharyya Swati; Saha (Das) Mita

    2013-01-01

    Anti-TPO antibody level was evaluated in 86 patients, along with 25 healthy controls to detect its change in various forms of thyroid nodules particularly in thyroid malignancy when compared with healthy controls. The study revealed that Anti-TPO antibody level was increased in Benign & toxic form of Multi nodular goiter and papillary carcinoma but there is no elevation of Anti- TPO antibody level in follicular adenoma or follicular carcinoma.

  14. Neutron kerma coefficient: Reference tissue for tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L., E-mail: lydia.paredes@inin.gob.m [National Institute of Nuclear Research (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Basic Sciences Division, Autonomous Metropolitan University (Mexico); Balcazar, M. [National Institute of Nuclear Research (Mexico); Francois, J.L. [Engineering Faculty, Autonomous National University of Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    Neutron kerma coefficients were calculated in different media: 4 malignant tumours, 5 normal tissues and 3 tissue substitute in the range 11 eV-29 MeV. The objective was to identify which is the material that better reproduces the behavior of these tumours and tissues. These tissues have clinical interest in interstitial brachytherapy applications with fast neutron source (Cf-252). The small differences of elemental composition among these tissues produce variation in the neutron kerma coefficients. The results show that the neutron kerma coefficients for malignant tumours are smaller than soft tissue from 6% to 9%. Also, the muscle is the tissue that best represents the dosimetric behavior for the tumours and tissues analyzed in this paper for neutron energies >1 keV, where this coefficients show minor variation.

  15. Thyroid lymphoma on a background of Hashimoto's thyroiditis: PET/CT appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Mayuresh; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shi, Min; Shinagare, Atul B; Fisher, David C

    2014-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma is a rare thyroid tumor accounting for only 5% of all thyroid malignancies. It is more common in patients with a background history of chronic thyroiditis. PET/CT is helpful in the initial staging and for follow up to assess treatment response.

  16. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  17. Thyroid morphology in lethal non-thyroidal illness: a post-mortem study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. de Jongh (Felix); A.C. Jobsis; J.W.F. Elte (Jan Willem)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Non-thyroidal illness (NTI) is associated with alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism. Whether morphological changes of the thyroid gland accompany NTI is unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe thyroid morphology in patients with

  18. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours.

  19. Pineal anlage tumour - a rare entity with divergent histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Sharma, B S; Garg, Ajay

    2011-06-01

    Pineal anlage tumour is a rare tumour of the pineal gland that is not listed in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Pineal anlage has been defined as a primary pineal tumour with both neuroepithelial and ectomesenchymal differentiation but without endodermal differentiation. We report a pineal anlage tumour in a 4-month-old boy, the youngest patient reported with this rare tumour, with a brief review of the literature. Clinicians and neuropathologists should be aware of this entity as it is likely to be misdiagnosed as a teratoma or a melanocytic tumour of the central nervous system.

  20. 'Pseudo-Alzheimer's' and primary brain tumour.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mahony, D; Walsh, J. B.; Coakley, D.

    1992-01-01

    Primary brain tumour may present in the elderly purely as a dementing illness before the onset or detection of sensorimotor neurological symptoms or signs. Although neurological examination may indicate no definite signs, close attention to accepted DSM-IIIR and NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for primary degenerative dementia and 'probable' Alzheimer's disease respectively will suggest a process other than a degenerative one. This was the case in two patients with primary brain tumour prese...