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Sample records for onchocerca

  1. Bacterial Endosymbionts of Onchocerca volvulus in the Pathogenesis of Posttreatment Reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul B. Keiser; Stacey M. Reynolds; Kwablah Awadzi; Eric A. Ottesen; Mark J. Taylor; Thomas B. Nutman

    2002-01-01

    .... To investigate the role of the Wolbachia bacterial endosymbiont of Onchocerca volvulus in these reactions, serum samples collected before and after treatment with either anthelmintic were assessed...

  2. Whence river blindness? The domestication of mammals and host-parasite co-evolution in the nematode genus Onchocerca.

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    Lefoulon, Emilie; Giannelli, Alessio; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Townson, Simon; Uni, Shigehiko; Verocai, Guilherme G; Otranto, Domenico; Martin, Coralie

    2017-07-01

    The genus Onchocerca includes 34 described species and represents one of the largest genera of the filarial nematodes within the family Onchocercidae. Representative members of this genus are mainly parasites of ungulates, with some exceptions such as Onchocerca lupi and Onchocerca volvulus, infecting carnivores and/or humans. For a long time, the evolutionary relationships amongst onchocercids remained poorly studied, as the systematics of this genus was impaired by the high morphological variability of species included in the taxon. Although some molecular phylogenies were developed, these studies were mainly focused on bovine Onchocerca spp. and O. volvulus, including assessments of Wolbachia endosymbionts. In the present study, we analysed 13 Onchocerca spp. from a larger host spectrum using a panel of seven different genes. Analysis of the coxI marker supports its usefulness for the identification of species within the genus. The evolutionary history of the genus has been herein revised by multi-gene phylogenies, presenting three strongly supported clades of Onchocerca spp. Analyses of co-evolutionary scenarios between Onchocerca and their vertebrate hosts underline the effect of domestication on Onchocerca speciation. Our study indicates that a host switch event occurred between Bovidae, Canidae and humans. Cophylogenetic analyses between Onchocerca and the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia indicate the strongest co-evolutionary pattern ever registered within the filarial nematodes. Finally, this dataset indicates that the clade composed by O. lupi, Onchocerca gutturosa, Onchocerca lienalis, Onchocerca ochengi and O. volvulus derived from recent speciation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. First description of Onchocerca jakutensis (Nematoda: Filarioidea in red deer (Cervus elaphus in Switzerland

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    Felix Bosch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-seven species of the genus Onchocerca (Nematoda; Filarioidea can cause a vector-borne parasitic disease called onchocercosis. Most Onchocerca species infect wild and domestic ungulates or the dog, and one species causes river blindness in humans mainly in tropical Africa. The European red deer (Cervus e. elaphus is host to four species, which are transmitted by blackflies (simuliids or biting midges (ceratopogonids. Two species, Onchocerca flexuosa and Onchocerca jakutensis, produce subcutaneous nodules, whereas Onchocerca skrjabini and Onchocerca garmsi live free in the hypodermal serous membranes. During the hunting season, September 2013, red deer (n = 25, roe deer (Capreolus c. capreolus, n = 6 and chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra, n = 7, all shot in the Grisons Region (Switzerland were investigated for the presence of subcutaneous nodules which were enzymatically digested, and the contained Onchocerca worms were identified to species by light and scanning electron microscopy as well as by PCR/sequencing. In addition, microfilariae from skin samples were collected and genetically characterized. Neither nodules nor microfilariae were discovered in the roe deer and chamois. Adult worms were found in 24% of red deer, and all of them were identified as O. jakutensis. Two morphologically different microfilariae were obtained from five red deer, and genetic analysis of a skin sample of one red deer indicated the presence of another Onchocerca species. This is the first report of O. jakutensis in Switzerland with a prevalence in red deer similar to that in neighbouring Germany.

  4. The mitogenome of Onchocerca volvulus from the Brazilian Amazonia focus.

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    Crainey, James L; Silva, Túllio R R da; Encinas, Fernando; Marín, Michel A; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete mitochondria genome of Onchocerca volvulus from a focus outside of Africa. An O. volvulus mitogenome from the Brazilian Amazonia focus was obtained using a combination of high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. Comparisons made between this mitochondrial genome and publicly available mitochondrial sequences identified 46 variant nucleotide positions and suggested that our Brazilian mitogenome is more closely related to Cameroon-origin mitochondria than West African-origin mitochondria. As well as providing insights into the origins of Latin American onchocerciasis, the Brazilian Amazonia focus mitogenome may also have value as an epidemiological resource.

  5. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in Northern Venezuela.

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    Convit, Jacinto; Schuler, Harland; Borges, Rafael; Olivero, Vimerca; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Frontado, Hortencia; Grillet, María E

    2013-10-07

    Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and transmitted by Simulium species (black flies). In the Americas, the infection has been previously described in 13 discrete regional foci distributed among six countries (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela) where more than 370,000 people are currently considered at risk. Since 2001, disease control in Venezuela has relied on the mass drug administration to the at-risk communities. This report provides empirical evidence of interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission by Simulium metallicum in 510 endemic communities from two Northern foci of Venezuela, after 10-12 years of 6-monthly Mectizan (ivermectin) treatment to all the eligible residents. In-depth entomologic and epidemiologic surveys were serially conducted from 2001-2012 in selected (sentinel and extra-sentinel) communities from the North-central (NC) and North-east (NE) onchocerciasis foci of Venezuela in order to monitor the impact of ivermectin treatment. From 2007-2009, entomological indicators in both foci confirmed that 0 out of 112,637 S. metallicum females examined by PCR contained L3 infection in insect heads. The upper bound of the 95% confidence intervals of the infective rate of the vector reached values below 1% by 2009 (NC) and 2012 (NE). Additionally, after 14 (NC) and 22 (NE) rounds of treatment, the seasonal transmission potential (±UL CIs) of S. metallicum was under the critical threshold of 20 L3 per person per season. Serological analysis in school children Venezuela.

  6. The genome of Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness

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    Cotton, James A.; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Grote, Alexandra; Harsha, Bhavana; Tracey, Alan; Beech, Robin; Doyle, Stephen R.; Dunn, Matthew; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.; Holroyd, Nancy; Kikuchi, Taisei; Lambert, Olivia; Mhashilkar, Amruta; Mutowo, Prudence; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Stanley, Eleanor; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Tsai, Isheng J.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Voronin, Denis; Parkinson, John; Nutman, Thomas B.; Ghedin, Elodie; Berriman, Matthew; Lustigman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Human onchocerciasis is a serious neglected tropical disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus that can lead to blindness and chronic disability. Control of the disease relies largely on mass administration of a single drug, and the development of new drugs and vaccines depends on a better knowledge of parasite biology. Here, we describe the chromosomes of O. volvulus and its Wolbachia endosymbiont. We provide the highest-quality sequence assembly for any parasitic nematode to date, giving a glimpse into the evolution of filarial parasite chromosomes and proteomes. This resource was used to investigate gene families with key functions that could be potentially exploited as targets for future drugs. Using metabolic reconstruction of the nematode and its endosymbiont, we identified enzymes that are likely to be essential for O. volvulus viability. In addition, we have generated a list of proteins that could be targeted by Federal-Drug-Agency-approved but repurposed drugs, providing starting points for anti-onchocerciasis drug development. PMID:27869790

  7. Canine Infections with Onchocerca lupi Nematodes, United States, 2011–2014

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    Giannelli, Alessio; Latrofa, Maria S.; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Chavkin, Matt; Kennard, Gavin; Eberhard, Mark L.; Bowman, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Onchocerca lupi nematodes are diagnosed sporadically in the United States. We report 8 cases of canine onchocercosis in Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida. Identification of 1 cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene haplotype identical to 1 of 5 from Europe suggests recent introduction of this nematode into the United States. PMID:25897859

  8. Onchocerca takaokai n. sp. (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax): Description and molecular identification of intradermal females.

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    Uni, Shigehiko; Fukuda, Masako; Agatsuma, Takeshi; Bain, Odile; Otsuka, Yasushi; Nakatani, Jun; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Harada, Masashi; Omar, Hasmahzaiti; Ramli, Rosli; Hashim, Rosli; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Takaoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Human zoonotic onchocercosis is caused by Onchocerca dewittei japonica, parasitic in wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) in Japan. Previously, microfilariae longer than those of Onchocerca dewittei japonica were observed in skin snips from wild boars during the study of O. dewittei japonica. Moreover, the third-stage larvae (L3) of these longer microfilariae were obtained from the blackfly Simulium bidentatum after experimental injections. Based on morphometric and molecular studies, similar L3 were found in blackflies during fieldwork in Oita, Japan. However, except for O. dewittei japonica, adult worms of Onchocerca have not been found in wild boars. In this study, we discovered adult females of a novel Onchocerca species in the skin of a wild boar in Oita, and named it Onchocerca takaokai n. sp. Females of this new species had longer microfilariae and differed from O. dewittei japonica in terms of their morphological characteristics and parasitic location. The molecular characteristics of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 12S rRNA genes of the new species were identical to those of the longer microfilariae and L3 previously detected, but they differed from those of O. dewittei japonica at the species level. However, both species indicated a close affinity among their congeners and Onchocerca ramachandrini, parasitic in the warthog in Africa, was basal in the Suidae cluster of the 12S rRNA tree.

  9. Onchocerca Dewittei Japonica N. Subsp., a common parasite from wild in Kyushu Island, Japan

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    Uni S.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe Onchocerca dewittei japonica n. subsp. from the Japanese wild boar, Sus scrofa leucomystax, in Oita, Kyushu Island, where all seven animals examined were found to be infected. This study began with efforts to identify the causative species in a recent case of zoonotic onchocerciasis. Compared with Onchocerca dewittei dewittei from Sus scrofa jubatus in Malaysia, which was reexamined here, our new subspecies has much greater space between the ridges on the females. In addition, its microfilariae (from uteri are shorter (192-210 μm compared with 228-247 μm, and only the posterior third of the microfilarial body is coiled, instead of the entire body. The Onchocerca species parasitic in suids (these two subspecies and O. ramachandrini from the warthog in the Ethiopian region form a group sharing several characters. Among the most unusual characters are the body swellings (a specialized apparatus for mating, known in only a few other genera. In addition, longitudinal cuticular crests were found on males of both subspecies from wild boar and on females of O. ramachandrini.

  10. Human ocular filariasis: further evidence on the zoonotic role of Onchocerca lupi

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    Otranto Domenico

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among ocular vector-borne pathogens, Onchocerca volvulus, the agent of the so-called “river blindness”, affects about 37 million people globally. Other Onchocerca spp. have been sporadically reported as zoonotic agents. Cases of canine onchocerciasis caused by Onchocerca lupi are on the rise in the United States and Europe. Its zoonotic role has been suspected but only recently ascertained in a single case from Turkey. The present study provides further evidence on the occurrence of O. lupi infesting human eyes in two patients from Turkey (case 1 and Tunisia (case 2. The importance of obtaining a correct sample collection and preparation of nematodes infesting human eyes is highlighted. Methods In both cases the parasites were identified with morpho-anatomical characters at the gross examination, histological analysis and anatomical description and also molecularly in case 1. Results The nematode from the first case was obviously O. lupi based on their morphology at the gross examination, histological analysis and anatomical description. In the second case, although the diagnostic cuticular characters were not completely developed, other features were congruent with the identification of O. lupi. Furthermore, the morphological identification was also molecularly confirmed in the Turkish case. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that O. lupi infestation is not an occasional finding but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of other zoonotic helminths causing eye infestation in humans (e.g., D. immitis and Dirofilaria repens. Both cases came from areas where no cases of canine onchocerciasis were previously reported in the literature, suggesting that an in depth appraisal of the infestation in canine populations is necessary. Physicians and ophthalmologists are advised on how to preserve nematode samples recovered surgically, to allow a definitive, correct etiological diagnosis.

  11. A four-antigen mixture for rapid assessment of Onchocerca volvulus infection.

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    Peter D Burbelo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Onchocerciasis, an infection caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major public health concern. Given the debilitating symptoms associated with onchocerciasis and concerns about recrudescence in areas of previous onchocerciasis control, more efficient tools are needed for diagnosis and monitoring of control measures. We investigated whether luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS may be used as a more rapid, specific, and standardized diagnostic assay for Onchocerca volvulus infection. METHODS: Four recombinantly produced Onchocerca volvulus antigens (Ov-FAR-1, Ov-API-1, Ov-MSA-1 and Ov-CPI-1 were tested by LIPS on a large cohort of blinded sera comprised of both uninfected controls and patients with a proven parasitic infection including Onchocerca volvulus (Ov, Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb, Loa loa (Ll, Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss, and with other potentially cross-reactive infections. In addition to testing all four Ov antigens separately, a mixture that tested all four antigens simultaneously was evaluated in the standard 2-hour incubation format as well as in a 15-minute rapid LIPS format. FINDINGS: Antibody responses to the four different Ov antigens allowed for unequivocal differentiation between Ov-infected and uninfected control sera with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Analysis of the antibody titers to each of these four antigens in individual Ov-infected sera revealed that they were markedly different and did not correlate (r(S = -0.11 to 0.58; P = 0.001 to 0.89 to each other. Compared to Ov-infected sera, patients infected with Wb, Ll, Ss, and other conditions had markedly lower geometric mean antibody titers to each of the Ov 4 antigens (P<0.0002 for each antigen. The simplified method of using a mixture of the 4 Ov antigens simultaneously in the standard format or a quick 15-minute format (QLIPS showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in distinguishing the Ov-infected sera from the

  12. Genetic evidence for the presence of two species of Onchocerca from the wild boar in Japan

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    Fukuda M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the genetic differences between Onchocerca dewittei japonica, the causative agent of zoonotic onchocerciasis in Japan and a related undescribed Onchocerca sp., both parasitizing wild boar (Sus scrofa of which the infective larval stages are indistinguishable from each other, we compared the sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 gene region from four infective larvae (recovered from experimentally infected black flies, one microfilaria, and one adult of O. dewittei japonica, and from one infective larva (recovered from an experimentally infected black fly, one microfilaria, and a pool of several microfilariae of O. sp. The length of the CO1 gene region was 649 bp for all samples but there was a difference of 8.8 to 9.4% in the sequences between the two species although there were intraspecific variations of 0 to 0.5%. The CO1 sequences of O. sp. did not correspond to any of those deposited in the databases. Our study provides evidence that O. dewittei japonica and O. sp. are genetically different from each other.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of the filaria genus Onchocerca with special emphasis on Afrotropical human and bovine parasites.

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    Krueger, A; Fischer, P; Morales-Hojas, R

    2007-01-01

    Filarial parasites of the genus Onchocerca are found in a broad spectrum of ungulate hosts. One species, O. volvulus, is a human parasite that can cause severe disease (onchocerciasis or 'river blindness'). The phylogenetic relationships and the bionomics of many of the nearly 30 known species remain dubious. Here, the phylogeny of 11 species representing most major lineages of the genus is investigated by analysing DNA sequences from three mitochondrial genes (ND5, 12S and 16S rRNA) and portions of the intergenic spacer of the nuclear 5s rRNA. Special emphasis is given to a clade containing a yet unassigned specimen from Uganda (O. sp. 'Siisa'), which appears to be intermediate between O. volvulus and O. ochengi. While the latter can be differentiated by the O-150 tandem repeat commonly used for molecular diagnostics, O. volvulus and O. sp.'Siisa' cannot be differentiated by this marker. In addition, a worm specimen from an African bushbuck appears to be closely related to the bovine O. dukei and represents the basal taxon of the human/bovine clade. At the base of the genus, our data suggest O. flexuosa (red deer), O. ramachandrini (warthog) and O. armillata (cow) to be the representatives of ancient lineages. The results provide better insight into the evolution and zoogeography of Onchocerca. They also have epidemiological and taxonomic implications by providing a framework for more accurate molecular diagnosis of filarial larvae in vectors.

  14. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

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    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species.

  15. Histological examination of adult Onchocerca volvulus and comparison with the collagenase technique.

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    Büttner, D W; Albiez, E J; von Essen, J; Erichsen, J

    1988-12-01

    The methods used for the assessment of adult Onchocerca volvulus by histology are described. Based on the results of several studies, mainly in Liberia and Burkina Faso, the morphology of the adult filariae in histological sections is represented as far as it is relevant for the evaluation. Especially are described the morphological alterations due to old age of the worms, to chronic hyperreactivity of the human host (sowda) and effects of the macrofilaricidal suramin and of microfilaricidal drugs. Quantitative results are reported on untreated adult O. volvulus from various countries, the changes of the worm population during 12 years of vector control in Burkina Faso and the effects of suramin, diethylcarbamazine, metrifonate, and ivermectin. The data from the histological examinations are compared with those gained from the examination of worms isolated by the collagenase technique in the same studies.

  16. Induction of histamine release in parasitized individuals by somatic and cuticular antigens from Onchocerca volvulus.

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    González-Muñoz, M; Gárate, T; Puente, S; Subirats, M; Moneo, I

    1999-06-01

    The host immune response in onchocerciasis is believed to contribute to the clinical manifestations of infection. Mazzotti and chronic inflammatory reactions might be mediated by mechanisms involving specific IgE and reactivity of mast cells and basophils to the parasite antigens. In this report, we show that Onchocerca volvulus antigens are capable of inducing histamine release. Three types of extracts were prepared from the parasite: soluble total, surface, and cuticular collagen. Soluble extracts released histamine in all individuals with onchocerciasis at significantly higher levels (P < 0.05) than those found in endemic controls, but similar levels to those found in patients with mansonellosis. However, cuticular collagen induced significantly (P < 0.01) higher histamine release in patients with onchocerciasis than in those with mansonellosis. No reactivity against human type IV collagen was observed. Implications derived from the presence of sensitized basophils in the pathogenesis of onchocerciasis are discussed.

  17. Zoonotic ocular onchocercosis caused by Onchocerca lupi in dogs in Romania.

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    Tudor, Poliana; Turcitu, Mihai; Mateescu, Cosmin; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tudor, Niculae; Bărbuceanu, Florica; Ciuca, Lavinia; Burcoveanu, Ioana; Acatrinei, Dumitru; Rinaldi, Laura; Mateescu, Romanița; Bădicu, Adina; Ionașcu, Iuliana; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    Onchocerca lupi is a filarial nematode, which infects the scleral conjunctival tissue of dogs, wolves and cats. Whilst adult nematodes localize in the conjunctive tissue of sclera or in the retrobulbar, microfilariae are found in the skin, and they are rarely diagnosed in asymptomatic animals. Since the first report of human ocular infection 5 years ago, up to 10 zoonotic cases have been identified in patients worldwide. We report, for the first time in Romania, three cases of canine ocular onchocercosis in dogs. Fragments of the harvested worms were characterized morphologically and molecularly. This article expands knowledge on the distribution of this parasite in Eastern Europe and sounds an alarm bell for ophthalmologists about the possible occurrence of human cases of O. lupi infection.

  18. Filaricidal activities on Onchocerca ochengi and Loa loa, toxicity and phytochemical screening of extracts of Tragia benthami and Piper umbellatum.

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    Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis; Monya, Elvis; Azantsa, Boris K; Manfo, Faustin Pascal T; Babiaka, Smith B; Mbah, James A; Samje, Moses

    2016-08-30

    Onchocerciasis is the world's second leading infectious cause of blindness. Its control is currently hampered by the lack of a macrofilaricidal drug and by severe adverse events observed when the lone recommended microfilaricide, ivermectin is administered to individuals co-infected with Loa loa. Therefore, there is the need for a safe and effective macrofilaricidal drug that will be able to cure the infection and break transmission cycles, or at least, an alternative microfilaricide that does not kill L. loa microfilariae (mf). Fourteen extracts from two medicinal plants, Tragia benthami and Piper umbellatum were screened in vitro against Onchocerca ochengi parasite and L. loa mf. Activities of extracts on male worms and microfilariae were assessed by motility reduction, while MTT/Formazan assay was used to assess biochemically the death of female worms. Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity of active extracts were tested on monkey kidney cells and Balb/c mice, respectively. At 500 μg/mL, all extracts showed 100 % activity on Onchocerca ochengi males and microfilariae, while 9 showed 100 % activity on female worms. The methylene chloride extract of Piper umbellatum leaves was the most active on adult male and female worms (IC50s: 16.63 μg/mL and 35.65 μg/mL, respectively). The three most active extracts on Onchocerca ochengi females were also highly active on Loa loa microfilariae, with IC50s of 35.12 - 13.9 μg/mL. Active extracts were generally more toxic to the worms than to cells and showed no acute toxicity to Balb/c mice. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, steroids, tannins and flavanoids in the promising extracts. These results unfold potential sources of novel anti-Onchocerca lead compounds and validate the traditional use of the plants in onchocerciasis treatment.

  19. Cutaneous distribution and circadian rhythm of Onchocerca lupi microfilariae in dogs.

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    Domenico Otranto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the arthropod-borne nematodes infesting dogs, Onchocerca lupi (Spirurida: Onchocercidae is of increasing zoonotic concern, with new human cases of infection diagnosed in Turkey, Tunisia, Iran and the USA. Knowledge of the biology of this nematode is meagre. This study aimed at assessing the distribution and periodicity of O. lupi microfilariae from different body regions in naturally infested dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Skin samples were collected from six dogs infested with O. lupi but without apparent clinical signs. Two skin samples were collected from 18 anatomical regions of dog 1 at necropsy. In addition, single skin biopsies were performed from the forehead, inter-scapular and lumbar regions of dogs 2-6, in the morning, afternoon, and at night. Two aliquots of the sediment of each sample were microscopically observed, microfilariae counted and morphologically and molecularly identified. Most of the 1,667 microfilariae retrieved from dog 1 were in the right ear (59.6%, nose (26.5%, left ear (6.7%, forehead (3.0%, and inter-scapular (2.9% regions. In dogs 2-6, the overall mean number of microfilariae was larger on the head (n = 122.8, followed by the inter-scapular (n = 119.0 and lumbar (n = 12.8 regions. The overall mean number of microfilariae was larger in the afternoon (153.4, followed by night (75.4 and morning (25.8. CONCLUSIONS: Onchocerca lupi microfilariae were more common in the head (i.e., ears and nose than in the remaining part of the dog's body, indicating they tend to aggregate in specific body regions, which are the best sites to collect skin samples for diagnostic purposes. The periodicity pattern of microfilariae of O. lupi and their concentration in specific body regions is most likely a result of the co-evolution with their as-yet-unknown vector. The detection of skin microfilariae in asymptomatic animals, suggests the potential role of these animals as carriers and reservoirs of O. lupi.

  20. Tolerance to diethylcarbamazine-medicated salt in individuals infected with Onchocerca volvulus.

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    Meyrowitsch, D W; Simonsen, P E; Magnussen, P

    2000-01-01

    The tolerance of Onchocerca volvulus-infected individuals to diethylcarbamazine (DEC)-medicated salt (0.33% w/w) was assessed in 1996 in Tanzania in a double-blind placebo-controlled hospital-based trial involving 4 groups, each of 10 adult males. Groups I and II had O. volvulus microfilariae (mf) only, group III had both O. volvulus and Wuchereria bancrofti mf, and group IV had W. bancrofti mf only. Groups I, III and IV received DEC-medicated salt, whereas group II was a control to group I and received normal cooking salt. Medication was given for 10 days. The most pronounced adverse reactions in groups I and III were mild-to-moderate itching and rash, beginning after 3-4 days and lasting for the remaining medication period. The reactions did not interfere with normal daily activities. By 20 days after the end of medication, adverse reactions had disappeared in all individuals. The low daily dose of DEC had no significant effect on the O. volvulus pre-medication mf geometric mean intensities (GMIs). In contrast, the medication significantly reduced the pre-medication W. bancrofti mf GMIs. The prospects for using DEC-medicated salt for control of bancroftian filariasis in areas where incidental infections with O. volvulus occur are discussed.

  1. Elimination of Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Huehuetenango Focus of Guatemala

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    Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rodrigo J.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Richards, Frank O.; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Dominguez, Alfredo; Oliva, Orlando; Catú, Eduardo; Rizzo, Nidia

    2012-01-01

    In Latin America, onchocerciasis is targeted for elimination by 2012 through twice-yearly mass treatment of the eligible population with ivermectin. In Guatemala, two of the four historical endemic foci have demonstrated elimination of transmission, following World Health Organization guidelines. Using established guidelines ophthalmological, serological, and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2007-8 to determine the transmission status of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus. The prevalence of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 365 residents was 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0–0.8%), the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus in Simulium ochraceum among 8252 flies collected between November 2007 and April 2008 was 0% (95% CI 0–0.02%), and the prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen in 3118 school age children was 0% (95% CI 0–0.1%). These results showed transmission interruption; thus, in 2009 mass treatment was halted and posttreatment surveillance began. To verify for potential recrudescence an entomological evaluation (from December 2010 to April 2011) was conducted during the 2nd and 3rd year of posttreatment surveillance. A total of 4587 S. ochraceum were collected, and the prevalence of infection of O. volvulus was 0% (95% CI 0–0.04%). Transmission of onchocerciasis in the Huehuetenango focus has been eliminated. PMID:22970346

  2. Evidence for suppression of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in the Oaxaca focus in Mexico.

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    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Hassan, Hassan K; Domínguez-Vásquez, Alfredo; Méndez-Galván, Jorge; Lugo-Moreno, Patricia; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Richards, Frank; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    Entomologic and serologic surveys were performed in four sentinel communities in the Oaxaca focus in southern Mexico to assess the level of transmission and exposure incidence to Onchocerca volvulus. All communities have been receiving ivermectin mass treatment twice per year since 1997. In one community, parasite DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 2004 in one pool of 50 vector heads of 170 such pools (8,500 flies) examined, which indicated an estimated transmission potential of 6.7 third-stage larvae/person/year. No evidence for transmission was found in the three other communities in 13,650 flies examined. All persons in a cohort consisting of 117 children in the four communities remained serologically negative for antibodies recognizing a cocktail of recombinant antigens over a four-year period from 2001 to 2004, which indicated an exposure incidence of 0%. Taken together, these data suggest that transmission has been suppressed in the four communities.

  3. The effects of high-dose ivermectin regimens on Onchocerca volvulus in onchocerciasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadzi, K; Attah, S K; Addy, E T; Opoku, N O; Quartey, B T

    1999-01-01

    Ivermectin, at the standard dose of 150 micrograms/kg bodyweight, does not kill the adult worms of Onchocerca volvulus and does not disrupt embryogenesis or spermatogenesis. Repeated standard doses, if maintained, arrest microfilarial production but result in only a mild-to-modest macrofilaricidal effect. We investigated whether high doses would effectively kill the adult worms, and whether cessation of microfilarial production could be reproduced by an equivalent, single, high dose. One hundred men participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial and received increasing doses of ivermectin from 150 micrograms/kg to 1600 micrograms/kg bodyweight. Nodules were excised at day 180 and examined by histopathology. Total doses of ivermectin up to 1600 micrograms/kg were not significantly more effective than 150 micrograms/kg. Moreover, they did not reproduce the marked inhibitory effects of the repeat standard-dose regimens on embryogenesis, nor the modest effect on adult worm viability, at comparable total doses. These effects may be functions of multiplicities of dosages rather than of the total dose. Our findings also suggest that repeated high-dose regimens are unlikely to be more effective than a similar number of 150 micrograms/kg doses. This deficiency of ivermectin requires that the search for macrofilaricides remains a top priority.

  4. Individual exposure to Simulium bites and intensity of Onchocerca volvulus infection

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    Enyong P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of river blindness, is transmitted through the black fly Simulium damnosum s.l., which breeds in turbulent river waters. To date, the number of flies attacking humans has only been determined by standard fly collectors near the river or the village. In our study, we counted the actual number of attacking and successfully feeding S. damnosum s.l. flies landing on individual villagers during their routine day-time activities in two villages of the Sudan-savannah and rainforest of Cameroon. We compared these numbers to the number of flies caught by a standard vector-collector, one positioned near the particular villager during his/her daily activity and the other sitting at the nearest Simulium breeding site. Results Using these data obtained by the two vector-collectors, we were able to calculate the Actual Index of Exposure (AIE. While the AIE in the savannah was on average 6,3%, it was 34% in the rainforest. The Effective Annual Transmission Potential (EATP for individual villagers was about 20 fold higher in the rainforest compared to the savannah. Conclusions Here we show for the first time that it is possible to determine the EATP. Further studies with more subjects are needed in the future. These data are important for the development of future treatment strategies.

  5. Identification and characterization of onchoastacin, an astacin-like metalloproteinase from the filaria Onchocerca volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Nadine; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Wagner, Antje; Fischer, Peter; Stöcker, Walter; Brattig, Norbert W

    2007-04-01

    The tissue-invasive nematode Onchocerca volvulus causes skin and eye pathology in human onchocerciasis. While the adult females reside sessile in subcutaneous nodules, the microfilariae are abundantly released from the nodules, males and juvenile worms migrate through the host tissue. Matrix-degrading metallo- and serine proteinases have been detected in excretory-secretory worm products that may be essential for migration of the mobile stages. In this study, a 1713bp long cDNA encoding for a putative proteinase of O. volvulus has been isolated. The predicted protein sequence includes a signal peptide indicating secretion to the extracellular space, a propeptide, an astacin-like protease domain, an EGF-like and a CUB-domain, thereby identifying the protein as a member of the astacin family of zinc endopeptidases. Onchoastacin, Ov-AST-1, is most closely related to a subfamily comprising nematode astacins including Caenorhabditis and Ancylostoma. Ov-AST-1 was expressed as a recombinant protein in baculovirus-infected insect cells and exhibited enzymatic activity. The exposure of onchoastacin to the host immune system is indicated by demonstration of IgG reacting with the recombinant Ov-AST-1 and with two peptides of the protein. Since a homologous metalloproteinase is part of a promising hookworm vaccine, Ov-AST-1 may be a candidate for intervention strategies in filarial infections.

  6. Successful interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus, Guatemala.

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    Rodrigo J Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elimination of onchocerciasis (river blindness through mass administration of ivermectin in the six countries in Latin America where it is endemic is considered feasible due to the relatively small size and geographic isolation of endemic foci. We evaluated whether transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted in the endemic focus of Escuintla-Guatemala in Guatemala, based on World Health Organization criteria for the certification of elimination of onchocerciasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted evaluations of ocular morbidity and past exposure to Onchocerca volvulus in the human population, while potential vectors (Simulium ochraceum were captured and tested for O. volvulus DNA; all of the evaluations were carried out in potentially endemic communities (PEC; those with a history of actual or suspected transmission or those currently under semiannual mass treatment with ivermectin within the focus. The prevalence of microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 329 individuals (> or =7 years old, resident in the PEC for at least 5 years was 0% (one-sided 95% confidence interval [CI] 0-0.9%. The prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen (Ov-16 in 6,432 school children (aged 6 to 12 years old was 0% (one-sided 95% IC 0-0.05%. Out of a total of 14,099 S. ochraceum tested for O. volvulus DNA, none was positive (95% CI 0-0.01%. The seasonal transmission potential was, therefore, 0 infective stage larvae per person per season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these evaluations, transmission of onchocerciasis in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus has been successfully interrupted. Although this is the second onchocerciasis focus in Latin America to have demonstrated interruption of transmission, it is the first focus with a well-documented history of intense transmission to have eliminated O. volvulus.

  7. Population dynamics of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in human host after six years of drug control

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    K.N. Opara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Mass administration of ivermectin drug was carried out annually between 1995 and 2001 in three villages that were endemic for onchocerciasis in the Lower Cross River Basin, Nigeria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the population dynamics (dispersion patterns, distribution, prevalence and intensity of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in their human host after six years of ivermectin treatment. Methods: A total of 1014 subjects from three rural areas in Etung Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria were screened for skin microfilariae using standard parasitological method of diagnosis. Results: Ivermectin drug intervention had significantly reduced the prevalence of skin microfilariae (PMF from 69.3% pre-control to 39.3% and community microfilarial load (CMFL from 7.11 to 2.31 microfilariae per skin snip. Males (45% were significantly (p 0.05. The correlation between age-dependent parasite prevalence and mean abundance was also not significant (r = 0.42; p >0.05. The degree of dispersion as measured by variance to mean ratio (VMR, coefficient of variation (CV and exponent ‘K’ of the negative binomial model of distribution showed that the parasite aggregated, clumped and overdispersed in their human host. The relative index of potential infection of each age group showed that adults between the age of 21 and 50 yr accounted for 52.7% of microfilariae positive cases. Interpretation & conclusion: Aggregated and overdispersion of O. volvulus observed in this study showed that active transmission could still be going on, because the tendency of the vector, Simulium damnosum ingesting more microfilariae was high due to the aggregated and overdispersed nature of the parasite with its host.

  8. Selective activity of extracts of Margaritaria discoidea and Homalium africanum on Onchocerca ochengi

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    Nyongbela Kennedy D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current treatment of onchocerciasis relies on the use of ivermectin which is only microfilaricidal and for which resistant parasite strains of veterinary importance are increasingly being detected. In the search for novel filaricides and alternative medicines, we investigated the selective activity of crude extracts of Margaritaria discoidea and Homalium africanum on Onchocerca ochengi, a model parasite for O. volvulus. These plants are used to treat the disease in North West Cameroon. Methods Sixteen crude extracts were prepared from various parts of M. discoidea and H. africanum using different organic solvents. The filaricidal activities were determined in vitro. Cytotoxicity of the active extracts was assessed on monkey kidney epithelial cells in vitro and the selectivity indices (SI of the extracts determined. Acute toxicity of the promising extracts was investigated in mice. Results Four out of the 16 extracts showed microfilaricidal activity based on motility reduction, whereas, none showed macrofilaricidal activity based on the MTT/formazan assay. The methylene chloride extract of H. africanum leaves (HLC recorded the lowest IC50 of 31.25 μg/mL and an IC100 of 62.5 μg/mL. The SI for the active extracts ranged from 0.5 - 2.63. No form of acute toxicity was observed in mice. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of anthraquinones, sterols and terpenoids in the promising extracts. Conclusions The non-polar extracts of M. discoidea and H. africanum are potential sources of new microfilaricidal lead compounds, and the results support their use in traditional medicine.

  9. Analysis of glutathione-enhanced differentiation by microfilariae of Onchocerca lienalis (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, R J; Lok, J B; Donnelly, J J

    1988-06-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH), but not its oxidized form (GSSG), stimulated development of Onchocerca lienalis microfilariae to the late first-larval stage in vitro. The degree and frequency of development was dose-related with a peak of activity at 15 mM, a concentration that is similar to known intracellular levels of GSH. To determine the mode(s) of action of this multifunctional compound, other reducing agents (L-cysteine, dithiothreitol), cysteine delivery agents (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid), cysteine analogues (S-methyl-L-cysteine, D-glucose-L-cysteine, cysteine ethyl ester), free-component amino acids of GSH (glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine), a specific metabolic inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl synthetase (buthionine sulfoximine), and an inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-glutamyl glutamic acid) were also tested at concentrations of 0.01-50 mM in this system. N-acetyl-L-cysteine at 1-5 mM and D-glucose-L-cysteine at 2.5-10 mM significantly enhanced development. In contrast to those worms maintained in GSH-supplemented medium, microfilariae exposed to GSH for only the first 24 hr showed no enhancement by day 7 in culture. Neither buthionine sulfoximine nor gamma-glutamyl glutamic acid at 0.01-35 mM inhibited the effects of 15 mM GSH or 1 mM N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Results indicate that GSH or other cysteine analogues possessing a free sulfhydryl group must be present in the extranematodal environment to support microfilarial differentiation in vitro.

  10. Molecular identification of infective larvae of three species of Onchocerca found in wild-caught females of Simulium bidentatum in Japan

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    Fukuda M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Wild female black flies attracted to a man or an idling automobile were collected at Oita, Japan where five cases of zoonotic onchocerciasis had occurred. Among the five Simulium species captured, 2% of Simulium bidentatum, the predominant species, were infected with filarial larvae. There were at least two types of infective larvae, types A and B, based on morphometric observation. Moreover, molecular analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 gene revealed that types A and B were represented by a single unknown species of Onchocerca and two species, i.e., Onchocerca dewittei japonica from wild boar, the causative agent of zoonotic onchocerciasis in Japan, and an undescribed Onchocerca sp. from wild boar, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rRNA gene also showed that type A is likely to be an unknown species of Onchocerca. Natural infection of black flies with infective larvae of O. dewittei japonica and O. sp. was demonstrated for the first time. The present study strongly suggests that S. bidentatum plays a role as a vector in the transmission of zoonotic onchocerciasis due to O. dewittei japonica in Japan.

  11. UMF-078: A modified flubendazole with potent macrofilaricidal activity against Onchocerca ochengi in African cattle

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    deC Bronsvoort Barend M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human onchocerciasis or river blindness, caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is currently controlled using the microfilaricidal drug, ivermectin. However, ivermectin does not kill adult O. volvulus, and in areas with less than 65% ivermectin coverage of the population, there is no effect on transmission. Therefore, there is still a need for a macrofilaricidal drug. Using the bovine filarial nematode O. ochengi (found naturally in African cattle, the macrofilaricidal efficacy of the modified flubendazole, UMF-078, was investigated. Methods Groups of 3 cows were treated with one of the following regimens: (a a single dose of UMF-078 at 150 mg/kg intramuscularly (im, (b 50 mg/kg im, (c 150 mg/kg intraabomasally (ia, (d 50 mg/kg ia, or (e not treated (controls. Results After treatment at 150 mg/kg im, nodule diameter, worm motility and worm viability (as measured by metabolic reduction of tetrazolium to formazan declined significantly compared with pre-treatment values and concurrent controls. There was abrogation of embryogenesis and death of all adult worms by 24 weeks post-treatment (pt. Animals treated at 50 mg/kg im showed a decline in nodule diameter together with abrogated reproduction, reduced motility, and lower metabolic activity in isolated worms, culminating in approximately 50% worm mortality by 52 weeks pt. Worms removed from animals treated ia were not killed, but exhibited a temporary embryotoxic effect which had waned by 12 weeks pt in the 50 mg/kg ia group and by 24 weeks pt in the 150 mg/kg ia group. These differences could be explained by the different absorption rates and elimination half-lives for each dose and route of administration. Conclusion Although we did not observe any signs of mammalian toxicity in this trial with a single dose, other studies have raised concerns regarding neuro- and genotoxicity. Consequently, further evaluation of this compound has been suspended. Nonetheless

  12. Use of the recombinant Onchocerca volvulus protein Ov20/OvS1 for the immunodiagnostic differentiation between onchocerciasis and mansonelliasis and for the characterization of hyperreactive onchocerciasis (sowda)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mpagi, J. L; Büttner, D. W; Tischendorf, F. W; Erttmann, K. D; Brattig, N. W

    2000-01-01

    ... of Onchocerca volvulus infection (sowda). The specificity of the IgG4 Western blot was 98% for the differentiation between persons with onchocerciasis and Mansonella microfilariae (mf) carriers (125 persons with M...

  13. Identification of the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 in tissue immune cells of humans infected with the filaria Onchocerca volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattig, Norbert W; Schwohl, Arline; Hoerauf, Achim; Büttner, Dietrich W

    2009-11-01

    Prostaglandins generated by multiple tissue and immune cells exhibit regulatory effects on the vascular and immune systems. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), in particular, affects innate as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. We identified PGE(2) in host immune cells adjacent to Onchocerca volvulus in subcutaneous onchocercomas and the affected skin. Using immunohistology, PGE(2) was predominantly detected in infiltrating macrophages but also in plasma cells. Consecutive sections revealed concomitant presence of PGE(2) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), representing a second immunoregulative mediator in macrophages and plasma cells. TGF-beta was preferentially observed in the infiltrating macrophages in patients with a generalized hyporeactive onchocerciasis and less in patients with the hyperreactive form. The presence of PGE(2) and TGF-beta in adjoining host cells infiltrating in the onchocercoma and dermis may indicate containment of inflammatory responses that could favour survival of the filarial parasite.

  14. Rapid suppression of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in two communities of the Southern Chiapas focus, Mexico, achieved by quarterly treatments with Mectizan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Lutzow-Steiner, Miguel A; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Richards, Frank; Unnasch, Thomas R; Hassan, Hassan K; Hernández-Hernández, Raymundo

    2008-08-01

    The impact of quarterly Mectizan (ivermectin) treatments on transmission, microfiladermia, and ocular lesions was evaluated in two formerly hyperendemic communities (Las Golondrinas and Las Nubes II) located in the main endemic focus for onchocerciasis in Southern Chiapas, Mexico. The data suggest that Onchocerca volvulus transmission has been suppressed after elimination of microfiladermia in these two communities. Increasing the frequency of Mectizan treatment to four times per year appears to have resulted in the rapid suppression of transmission in communities with residual transmission.

  15. Black flies (Diptera : Simuliidae attracted to humans and water buffalos and natural infections with filarial larvae, probably Onchocerca sp., in northern Thailand

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    Takaoka H.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Several Simulium species were investigated as to their biting habits and natural infections with filarial larvae at Ban Pan Fan, Chiang Mai Province, in northern Thailand. Female adults flies landing on or flighting around a human and a water buffalo were collected during the daytime from 06.00 to 19.00 hours on 22 June 2001. As a result, 217 S. nodosum, 86 S. asakoae and two S. nigrogilvum were obtained from a human attractant, and 416 S. nodosum, 25 S. nakhonense, 16 S. asakoae, four 5. fenestratum and two S. nigrogilvum, from a water buffalo. The blood-feeding was confirmed only for S. nodosum and S. nigrogilvum on humans, and for S. nodosum and S. nakhonense on water buffalos. Dissections of these simuliids showed that S. nodosum was naturally infected with developing filarial larvae. Two types of microfilariae were distinguished but only one type of infective larvae. These larvae resembled Onchocerca suzukii, a parasite from a wild Japanese bovid, suggesting that an unknown Onchocerca species from ruminants was transmitted in Thailand. Infection rates with all stages of larvae and third-stage larvae were 2.3 % (14/608 and 1 .0 % (6/608, respectively. This is the first report of natural infections of black flies with Onchocerca larvae in Southeast Asia, and the involved black fly species is shown to be not only anthropophilic but also zoophilic in this region.

  16. Biting on human body parts of Simulium vectors and its implication for the manifestation of Onchocerca nodules along Osun River, southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Monsuru Adebayo; Sam-Wobo, Sammy Olufemi; Akinwale, Olaoluwa Pheabian; Olatunde, Ganiyu Olatunji; Mafiana, Chiedu Felix

    2012-09-01

    The biting preference of Simulium vectors has been known to influence the distribution of Onchocerca nodules and microfilariae in human body. There is, however, variation in biting pattern of Simulium flies in different geographical locations. This study investigates the biting pattern on human parts by Simulium vectors along Osun river system where Simulium soubrense Beffa form has been implicated as the dominant vector and its possible implication on the distribution of Onchocerca nodules on human body along the river. Flies were collected by consented fly capturers on exposed human parts namely head/neck region, arms, upper limb and lower limb in Osun Eleja and Osun Budepo along Osun river in the wet season (August-September) and the dry season (November-December) in 2008. The residents of the communities were also screened for palpable Onchocerca nodules. The results showed that number of flies collected below the ankle region was significantly higher than the number collected on other exposed parts (p parts coupled with the presence of nodules at the head and upper trunk regions showed that Simulium vectors could obtain microfilariae from any part of the body, thus increasing the risk of onchocerciasis transmission.

  17. Neutrophil granule proteins: evidence for the participation in the host reaction to skin microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus after diethylcarbamazine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Peña, E J; Knab, J; Büttner, D W

    1996-10-01

    The participation of neutrophil granulocytes in the cellular reaction to skin microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus was studied by immunohistochemistry. Skin biopsies were obtained from adult Liberian and Ugandan patients with generalized onchocerciasis after exposure to topically applied diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and from untreated patients. After DEC many damaged microfilariae were observed either in dermal infiltrates or in epidermal microabscesses consisting both of neutrophils and eosinophils. Infiltrates and microabscesses contained some intact granulocytes and many neutrophils releasing myeloperoxidase, elastase, lactoferrin, defensin, lysozyme, alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin. Eosinophils discharged peroxidase and cationic proteins. Released granule proteins and remnants of disrupted granulocytes were found on the surface and in close proximity of damaged microfilariae in dermal infiltrates and epidermal microabscesses. In larger microabscesses neutrophils were predominant. These observations show that neutrophils and not only eosinophils recruit, accumulate, localize around and release their helminthotoxic granule proteins such as myeloperoxidase onto or closely around skin microfilariae of O. volvulus after topical DEC administration. The association between these processes and the damage of the microfilariae indicated that neutrophils together with eosinophils attack and damage microfilariae of O. volvulus after DEC treatment in the skin.

  18. Prevalence of antibodies to onchocerca volvulus in residents of Oaxaca, Mexico, treated for 10 years with ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Priego, Alberto; Mendoza, Raymundo; de-la-Rosa, Jorge-Luis

    2005-01-01

    Studies to determine the prevalence of antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus, prior to and after actions carried out to interrupt transmission, are scarce in Mexico. Here we report the prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG4 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against a crude extract of O. volvulus adult worm in serum samples from persons under noninterrupted biannual treatment with ivermectin in areas of onchocercosis endemicity in Mexico. To perform the prevalence studies, the ELISA procedures were first evaluated. Serological studies were performed with serum samples from skin microfilaria carriers from Guatemala and from people microfilariodermic negative living in the same area as the Guatemalan patients. Sensitivity values for IgG or IgG4 detection were 71 and 86%, while specificities were 92 and 100%, respectively. No anti-O. volvulus antibodies were found in samples from nonendemic controls from Mexico, but 3 of 71 samples from residents in the onchocercosis area of Oaxaca, Mexico, and who have been under ivermectin treatment during the last 10 years were only positive to IgG. Notwithstanding that the IgG4 isotype was not detected and a low (4.2%) anti-O. volvulus IgG antibody prevalence was found, a seroepidemiological follow-up must be performed in order to confirm interruption of onchocercosis transmission in the area of Oaxaca, Mexico, in which onchocercosis is endemic.

  19. Is nodding syndrome an Onchocerca volvulus-induced neuroinflammatory disorder? Uganda's story of research in understanding the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Idro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder, mostly affecting children in eastern Africa. An estimated 10 000 children are affected. Uganda, one of the most affected countries, set out to systematically investigate the disease and develop interventions for it. On December 21, 2015, the Ministry of Health held a meeting with community leaders from the affected areas to disseminate the results of the investigations made to date. This article summarizes the presentation and shares the story of studies into this peculiar disease. It also shares the results of preliminary studies on its pathogenesis and puts into perspective an upcoming treatment intervention. Clinical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated nodding syndrome to be a complex epilepsy disorder. A definitive aetiological agent has not been established, but in agreement with other affected countries, a consistent epidemiological association has been demonstrated with infection by Onchocerca volvulus. Preliminary studies of its pathogenesis suggest that nodding syndrome may be a neuroinflammatory disorder, possibly induced by antibodies to O. volvulus cross-reacting with neuron proteins. Histological examination of post-mortem brains has shown some yet to be characterized polarizable material in the majority of specimens. Studies to confirm these observations and a clinical trial are planned for 2016.

  20. Vaccines to combat river blindness: expression, selection and formulation of vaccines against infection with Onchocerca volvulus in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jessica A; Zhan, Bin; Bonne-Année, Sandra; Deckman, Jessica M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Klei, Thomas R; Lustigman, Sara; Abraham, David

    2014-08-01

    Human onchocerciasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Onchocerca volvulus and an important cause of blindness and chronic disability in the developing world. Although mass drug administration of ivermectin has had a profound effect on control of the disease, additional tools are critically needed including the need for a vaccine against onchocerciasis. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) select antigens with known vaccine pedigrees as components of a vaccine; (ii) produce the selected vaccine antigens under controlled conditions, using two expression systems and in one laboratory and (iii) evaluate their vaccine efficacy using a single immunisation protocol in mice. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that joining protective antigens as a fusion protein or in combination, into a multivalent vaccine, would improve the ability of the vaccine to induce protective immunity. Out of eight vaccine candidates tested in this study, Ov-103, Ov-RAL-2 and Ov-CPI-2M were shown to reproducibly induce protective immunity when administered individually, as fusion proteins or in combination. Although there was no increase in the level of protective immunity induced by combining the antigens into one vaccine, these antigens remain strong candidates for inclusion in a vaccine to control onchocerciasis in humans. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stage-Specific Transcriptome and Proteome Analyses of the Filarial Parasite Onchocerca volvulus and Its Wolbachia Endosymbiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Cotton, James A.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Grote, Alexandra; Harsha, Bhavana; Holroyd, Nancy; Mhashilkar, Amruta; Molina, Douglas M.; Randall, Arlo Z.; Shandling, Adam D.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Ghedin, Elodie; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a neglected tropical disease that has been successfully targeted by mass drug treatment programs in the Americas and small parts of Africa. Achieving the long-term goal of elimination of onchocerciasis, however, requires additional tools, including drugs, vaccines, and biomarkers of infection. Here, we describe the transcriptome and proteome profiles of the major vector and the human host stages (L1, L2, L3, molting L3, L4, adult male, and adult female) of Onchocerca volvulus along with the proteome of each parasitic stage and of its Wolbachia endosymbiont (wOv). In so doing, we have identified stage-specific pathways important to the parasite’s adaptation to its human host during its early development. Further, we generated a protein array that, when screened with well-characterized human samples, identified novel diagnostic biomarkers of O. volvulus infection and new potential vaccine candidates. This immunomic approach not only demonstrates the power of this postgenomic discovery platform but also provides additional tools for onchocerciasis control programs. PMID:27881553

  2. Ultrastructure study of the excretory system and the genital primordium of the infective stage of Onchocerca volvulus (Nematoda:Filarioidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strote, G; Bonow, I

    1995-01-01

    The electron microscopic investigation of the anterior part of the infective third-stage juvenile of Onchocerca volvulus provides first insights into the structure of the excretory system of this developmental stage of the parasite. The most anterior part of this system consists of a cell process of the syncytial excretory cells. At this height the excretory cells enclose the cuticle-lined excretory channel. The channel is in the process of elongation in the anterior-posterior direction, indicated by cell division in this region. More posteriad an ampulla-like structure is forming in the cytoplasm of the excretory cells. The inner surface of this ampulla is lined with a small number of single microvilli. In this part of the system the cytoplasm of the excretory cells is rich in Golgi bodies and endocytic vesicles. The ampulla has direct access to the exterior by the excretory duct. The excretory duct is a cuticle-lined structure surrounded by supporting fibres of an additional cell. This duct cell connects the excretory duct to the body-wall cuticle at the excretory pore. Adjacent to the region of the excretory system a cell is found that resembles a gland cell. This cell is in close contact to the ventral nerve cord. The genital primordia of the third-stage juvenile consist of several dividing cells. The female genital primordium is seen at the junction of the muscular with the glandular oesophagus and the male primordium can be found at the junction of the glandular oesophagus with the gut.

  3. Individual host factors associated with Onchocerca volvulus microfilarial densities 15, 80 and 180 days after a first dose of ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pion, Sébastien D S; Grout, Lise; Kamgno, Joseph; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues; Boussinesq, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Reduction in Onchocerca volvulus skin microfilarial densities after treatment with ivermectin shows wide between-host variation. Data from two separate studies conducted in Cameroon on onchocerciasis patients treated for the first time with ivermectin were analyzed to identify host factors associated with microfilarial density at different time-points after treatment. In one site (Nkam valley), the dataset included 103 adult males for whom age, number of palpable onchocercal nodules and microfilarial densities on D0 (pre-treatment), D15, D80 and D180 were available. In the other site (Vina valley), analyses were conducted on 965 individuals of both sexes aged 5 years and over; in this dataset, available information included age, gender, exact dose of ivermectin received, onchocerciasis endemicity level in the village of residence and microfilarial densities on D0 and D180. Negative binomial regression models of microfilarial density at the different intervals post-treatment were fitted, using maximum likelihood, with the available independent variables. Gender and age were found to be associated with microfilarial density on D180. The initial microfilarial density influenced post-treatment densities at all the time-points. All other things being equal, microfilarial densities on D180 were higher in individuals harbouring a higher number of nodules or living in communities with high endemicity levels. This study demonstrates that O. volvulus microfilarial density measured after a first treatment with ivermectin, and thus probably the rate of skin repopulation by microfilariae (mf) varies according to several host factors. Should such factors also influence ivermectin efficacy after repeated treatment, then they should be taken into account to determine whether sub-optimal responses to treatment reported from various areas in Africa are actually due to parasite-related factors, particularly to the emergence of resistant populations.

  4. Onchocerca volvulus. Monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody as antigen signal for the microfilaricidal cytotoxicity of diethylcarbamazine-treated platelets.

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    Cesbron, J Y; Hayasaki, M; Joseph, M; Lutsch, C; Grzych, J M; Capron, A

    1988-07-01

    Over the past 35 yr, diethylcarbamazine (DEC) has been the most widely used agent for the treatment of filarial diseases, particularly in onchocerciasis. The microfilaricidal action of DEC has been recently shown to be mediated by blood platelets with the additional triggering of a filarial excretory Ag (FEA). This FEA could be detected by using mAb in the serum of infected patients. By using one mAb (IA2(23] directed against Onchocerca volvulus and recognizing circulating Ag (Ab1), we purified by affinity chromatography the target molecule of IA2(23) (an O. volvulus glycoprotein recognized by IA2(23) mAb). This compound had a dose-dependent effect on the cytotoxic action of DEC-treated platelets. We subsequently produced an anti-idiotype mAb to Ab1 (Ab2), and considered the possibility of replacing the O. volvulus glycoprotein recognized by IA2(23) mAb by Ab2. Ab2 was selected according to its ability to inhibit the binding of radioiodinated Ab1 to the filarial target Ag. It induced the production of anti-O. volvulus antibodies (Ab3) in rats. At a constant concentration of DEC platelets, the addition of increasing amounts of Ab2 led to a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect against parasite larvae. Experiments performed with Ab2 on detergent solubilized surface proteins of platelets identified four bands of Mr 18, 26, 43.5, and 100 kDa, supporting the idea of the presence of binding sites on the platelets for a FEA required for the microfilaricidal cytotoxicity of DEC-treated platelets.

  5. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Skin Snips by Microscopy and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: Implications for Monitoring and Evaluation Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Cama, Vitaliano A; Lakwo, Thomson; Mekasha, Sindeaw; Abanyie, Francisca; Sleshi, Markos; Kebede, Amha; Cantey, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsies is the monitoring and evaluation (M and E) method currently used by multiple onchocerciasis elimination programs in Africa. However, as repeated mass drug administration suppresses microfilarial loads, the sensitivity and programmatic utility of skin snip microscopy is expected to decrease. Using a pan-filarial real-time polymerase chain reaction with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA), we evaluated 1) the use of a single-step molecular assay for detecting and identifying Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in residual skin snips and 2) the sensitivity of skin snip microscopy relative to qPCR-MCA. Skin snips were collected and examined with routine microscopy in hyperendemic regions of Uganda and Ethiopia (N= 500 each) and "residual" skin snips (tissue remaining after induced microfilarial emergence) were tested with qPCR-MCA. qPCR-MCA detected Onchocerca DNA in 223 residual snips: 139 of 147 microscopy(+) and 84 among microscopy(-) snips, suggesting overall sensitivity of microscopy was 62.3% (139/223) relative to qPCR-MCA (75.6% in Uganda and 28.6% in Ethiopia). These findings demonstrate the insufficient sensitivity of skin snip microscopy for reliable programmatic monitoring. Molecular tools such as qPCR-MCA can augment sensitivity and provide diagnostic confirmation of skin biopsies and will be useful for evaluation or validation of new onchocerciasis M and E tools.

  6. A randomized, single-ascending-dose, ivermectin-controlled, double-blind study of moxidectin in Onchocerca volvulus infection.

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    Kwablah Awadzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Control of onchocerciasis as a public health problem in Africa relies on annual mass ivermectin distribution. New tools are needed to achieve elimination of infection. This study determined in a small number of Onchocerca volvulus infected individuals whether moxidectin, a veterinary anthelminthic, is safe enough to administer it in a future large study to further characterize moxidectin's safety and efficacy. Effects on the parasite were also assessed.Men and women from a forest area in South-eastern Ghana without ivermectin mass distribution received a single oral dose of 2 mg (N = 44, 4 mg (N = 45 or 8 mg (N = 38 moxidectin or 150 µg/kg ivermectin (N = 45 with 18 months follow up. All ivermectin and 97%-100% of moxidectin treated participants had Mazzotti reactions. Statistically significantly higher percentages of participants treated with 8 mg moxidectin than participants treated with ivermectin experienced pruritus (87% vs. 56%, rash (63% vs. 42%, increased pulse rate (61% vs. 36% and decreased mean arterial pressure upon 2 minutes standing still after ≥5 minutes supine relative to pre-treatment (61% vs. 27%. These reactions resolved without treatment. In the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arms, the mean±SD number of microfilariae/mg skin were 22.9±21.1 and 21.2±16.4 pre-treatment and 0.0±0.0 and 1.1±4.2 at nadir reached 1 and 3 months after treatment, respectively. At 6 months, values were 0.0±0.0 and 1.6±4.5, at 12 months 0.4±0.9 and 3.4±4.4 and at 18 months 1.8±3.3 and 4.0±4.8, respectively, in the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arm. The reduction from pre-treatment values was significantly higher after 8 mg moxidectin than after ivermectin treatment throughout follow up (p<0.01.The 8 mg dose of moxidectin was safe enough to initiate the large study. Provided its results confirm those from this study, availability of moxidectin to control programmes could help them achieve onchocerciasis elimination

  7. Nested PCR to detect and distinguish the sympatric filarial species Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardi and Mansonella perstans in the Amazon Region

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    Thuy-Huong Ta Tang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present filaria-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR, which is based on amplification of first internal transcribed spacer rDNA to distinguish three parasitic filarial species (Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardiand Mansonella perstans that can be found in the Amazon Region. Nested PCR-based identifications yielded the same results as those utilizing morphological characters. Nested PCR is highly sensitive and specific and it detects low-level infections in both humans and vectors. No cross-amplifications were observed with various other blood parasites and no false-positive results were obtained with the nested PCR. The method works efficiently with whole-blood, blood-spot and skin biopsy samples. Our method may thus be suitable for assessing the efficacy of filaria control programmes in Amazonia by recording parasite infections in both the human host and the vector. By specifically differentiating the major sympatric species of filaria, this technique could also enhance epidemiological research in the region.

  8. Ongoing Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus after 25 Years of Annual Ivermectin Mass Treatments in the Vina du Nord River Valley, in North Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbarth, Albert; Achukwi, Mbunkah Daniel; Renz, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports of transmission interruption of Onchocerca volvulus, the causing agent of river blindness, in former endemic foci in the Americas, and more recently in West and East Africa, raise the question whether elimination of this debilitating disease is underway after long-term treatment of the population at risk with ivermectin. The situation in Central Africa has not yet been clearly assessed. Methods and findings Entomologic data from two former endemic river basins in North Cameroon were generated over a period of 43 and 48 months to follow-up transmission levels in areas under prolonged ivermectin control. Moreover, epidemiologic parameters of animal-borne Onchocerca spp. transmitted by the same local black fly vectors of the Simulium damnosum complex were recorded and their impact on O. volvulus transmission success evaluated. With mitochondrial DNA markers we unambiguously confirmed the presence of infective O. volvulus larvae in vectors from the Sudan savannah region (mean Annual Transmission Potential 2009–2012: 98, range 47–221), but not from the Adamawa highland region. Transmission rates of O. ochengi, a parasite of Zebu cattle, were high in both foci. Conclusions/significance The high cattle livestock density in conjunction with the high transmission rates of the bovine filaria O. ochengi prevents the transmission of O. volvulus on the Adamawa plateau, whereas transmission in a former hyperendemic focus was markedly reduced, but not completely interrupted after 25 years of ivermectin control. This study may be helpful to gauge the impact of the presence of animal-filariae for O. volvulus transmission in terms of the growing human and livestock populations in sub-Saharan countries. PMID:26926855

  9. Ongoing Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus after 25 Years of Annual Ivermectin Mass Treatments in the Vina du Nord River Valley, in North Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Eisenbarth

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports of transmission interruption of Onchocerca volvulus, the causing agent of river blindness, in former endemic foci in the Americas, and more recently in West and East Africa, raise the question whether elimination of this debilitating disease is underway after long-term treatment of the population at risk with ivermectin. The situation in Central Africa has not yet been clearly assessed.Entomologic data from two former endemic river basins in North Cameroon were generated over a period of 43 and 48 months to follow-up transmission levels in areas under prolonged ivermectin control. Moreover, epidemiologic parameters of animal-borne Onchocerca spp. transmitted by the same local black fly vectors of the Simulium damnosum complex were recorded and their impact on O. volvulus transmission success evaluated. With mitochondrial DNA markers we unambiguously confirmed the presence of infective O. volvulus larvae in vectors from the Sudan savannah region (mean Annual Transmission Potential 2009-2012: 98, range 47-221, but not from the Adamawa highland region. Transmission rates of O. ochengi, a parasite of Zebu cattle, were high in both foci.The high cattle livestock density in conjunction with the high transmission rates of the bovine filaria O. ochengi prevents the transmission of O. volvulus on the Adamawa plateau, whereas transmission in a former hyperendemic focus was markedly reduced, but not completely interrupted after 25 years of ivermectin control. This study may be helpful to gauge the impact of the presence of animal-filariae for O. volvulus transmission in terms of the growing human and livestock populations in sub-Saharan countries.

  10. Defining parasite biodiversity at high latitudes of North America: new host and geographic records for Onchocerca cervipedis (Nematoda: Onchocercidae in moose and caribou

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    Verocai Guilherme G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onchocerca cervipedis is a filarioid nematode of cervids reported from Central America to boreal regions of North America. It is found primarily in subcutaneous tissues of the legs, and is more commonly known as ‘legworm’. Blackflies are intermediate hosts and transmit larvae to ungulates when they blood-feed. In this article we report the first records of O. cervipedis from high latitudes of North America and its occurrence in previously unrecognized host subspecies including the Yukon-Alaska moose (Alces americanus gigas and the Grant’s caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti. Methods We examined the subcutaneous connective tissues of the metacarpi and/or metatarsi of 34 moose and one caribou for parasitic lesions. Samples were collected from animals killed by subsistence hunters or animals found dead in the Northwest Territories (NT, Canada and Alaska (AK, USA from 2005 to 2012. Genomic DNA lysate was prepared from nematode fragments collected from two moose. The nd5 region of the mitochondrial DNA was amplified by PCR and sequenced. Results Subcutaneous nodules were found in 12 moose from the NT and AK, and one caribou from AK. Nematodes dissected from the lesions were identified as Onchocerca cervipedis based on morphology of female and male specimens. Histopathological findings in moose included cavitating lesions with multifocal granulomatous cellulitis containing intralesional microfilariae and adults, often necrotic and partially mineralized. Lesions in the caribou included periosteitis with chronic cellulitis, eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and abundant granulation associated with intralesional adult nematodes and larvae. Sequences of the nd5 region (471bp, the first generated for this species, were deposited with Genbank (JN580791 and JN580792. Representative voucher specimens were deposited in the archives of the United States National Parasite Collection. Conclusions The geographic range of O

  11. Retarded Onchocerca volvulus L1 to L3 larval development in the Simulium damnosum vector after anti-wolbachial treatment of the human host

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    Albers Anna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human parasite Onchocerca volvulus harbours Wolbachia endosymbionts essential for worm embryogenesis, larval development and adult survival. In this study, the development of Wolbachia-depleted microfilariae (first stage larvae to infective third stage larvae (L3 in the insect vector Simulium damnosum was analysed. Methods Infected volunteers in Cameroon were randomly and blindly allocated into doxycycline (200 mg/day for 6 weeks or placebo treatment groups. After treatment, blackflies were allowed to take a blood meal on the volunteers, captured and dissected for larval counting and DNA extraction for quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results PCR results showed a clear reduction in Wolbachia DNA after doxycycline treatment in microfilariae from human skin biopsies with > 50% reduction at one month post-treatment, eventually reaching a reduction of > 80%. Larval stages recovered from the insect vector had similar levels of reduction of endosymbiotic bacteria. Larval recoveries were analysed longitudinally after treatment to follow the kinetics of larval development. Beginning at three months post-treatment, significantly fewer L3 were seen in the blackflies that had fed on doxycycline treated volunteers. Concomitant with this, the proportion of second stage larvae (L2 was significantly increased in this group. Conclusions Doxycycline treatment and the resulting decline of Wolbachia endobacteria from the microfilaria resulted in retarded development of larvae in the insect vector. Thus, anti-wolbachial treatment could have an additive effect for interrupting transmission by reducing the number of L3 that can be transmitted by blackflies.

  12. Macrofilaricidal activity after doxycycline only treatment of Onchocerca volvulus in an area of Loa loa co-endemicity: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Joseph D Turner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of severe adverse events following treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in areas co-endemic with loiasis currently compromises the development of control programmes and the treatment of co-infected individuals. We therefore assessed whether doxycycline treatment could be used without subsequent ivermectin administration to effectively deliver sustained effects on Onchocerca volvulus microfilaridermia and adult viability. Furthermore we assessed the safety of doxycycline treatment prior to ivermectin administration in a subset of onchocerciasis individuals co-infected with low to moderate intensities of Loa loa microfilaraemia. METHODS: A double-blind, randomized, field trial was conducted of 6 weeks of doxycycline (200 mg/day alone, doxycycline in combination with ivermectin (150 microg/kg at +4 months or placebo matching doxycycline + ivermectin at +4 months in 150 individuals infected with Onchocerca volvulus. A further 22 individuals infected with O. volvulus and low to moderate intensities of Loa loa infection were administered with a course of 6 weeks doxycycline with ivermectin at +4 months. Treatment efficacy was determined at 4, 12 and 21 months after the start of doxycycline treatment together with the frequency and severity of adverse events. RESULTS: One hundred and four (60.5% participants completed all treatment allocations and follow up assessments over the 21-month trial period. At 12 months, doxycycline/ivermectin treated individuals had lower levels of microfilaridermia and higher frequency of amicrofilaridermia compared with ivermectin or doxycycline only groups. At 21 months, microfilaridermia in doxycycline/ivermectin and doxycycline only groups was significantly reduced compared to the ivermectin only group. 89% of the doxycycline/ivermectin group and 67% of the doxycycline only group were amicrofilaridermic, compared with 21% in the ivermectin only group. O. volvulus from doxycycline groups were

  13. The ultrastructure of the anterior end of male Onchocerca volvulus: papillae, amphids, nerve ring and first indication of an excretory system in the adult filarial worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strote, G; Bonow, I; Attah, S

    1996-07-01

    A detailed morphological investigation of the anterior sensory organs, the nerve ring and a glomerulus-like structure in male Onchocerca volvulus was performed by means of electron microscopy. The 8 head papillae are arranged in the common 4 + 4 pattern of most filarial worms in circles around the mouth opening. The amphidial openings are found between the circles of inner and outer papillae on both sides of the mouth. Inside, several additional nerve axons are seen in the tissue of the anterior tip not related to one of the identified papillar structures. The inner and outer papillae exhibit a remarkably different fine structure, and are part of a complex system of at least 2 different receptor cell types at the anterior tip of the worm. The amphidial channel contains 8 modified cilia; accessory axons are associated with the cytoplasm of the sheath cell. The anterior nerve ring of male worms is located about 150 micrometers posterior from the outermost tip of the head region. It consists of several fibres coiled around the oesophagus. The comparison of the fine structure of the central nervous system did not show the expected morphological differences associated with the heterogeneous age distribution in the natural worm population. This was in contrast to previous findings with respect to tissues in different parts of the worm. The study also provides the first evidence that suggests the existence of an excretory organ in a filarial worm in the region of the anterior nerve ring. Paired glomerulus-like structures in the lateral chords and a canal formed by a projection of the basal zone of the cuticles were identified.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of ivermectin response by Onchocerca volvulus reveals that genetic drift and soft selective sweeps contribute to loss of drug sensitivity.

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    Stephen R Doyle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of onchocerciasis using mass ivermectin administration has reduced morbidity and transmission throughout Africa and Central/South America. Mass drug administration is likely to exert selection pressure on parasites, and phenotypic and genetic changes in several Onchocerca volvulus populations from Cameroon and Ghana-exposed to more than a decade of regular ivermectin treatment-have raised concern that sub-optimal responses to ivermectin's anti-fecundity effect are becoming more frequent and may spread.Pooled next generation sequencing (Pool-seq was used to characterise genetic diversity within and between 108 adult female worms differing in ivermectin treatment history and response. Genome-wide analyses revealed genetic variation that significantly differentiated good responder (GR and sub-optimal responder (SOR parasites. These variants were not randomly distributed but clustered in ~31 quantitative trait loci (QTLs, with little overlap in putative QTL position and gene content between the two countries. Published candidate ivermectin SOR genes were largely absent in these regions; QTLs differentiating GR and SOR worms were enriched for genes in molecular pathways associated with neurotransmission, development, and stress responses. Finally, single worm genotyping demonstrated that geographic isolation and genetic change over time (in the presence of drug exposure had a significantly greater role in shaping genetic diversity than the evolution of SOR.This study is one of the first genome-wide association analyses in a parasitic nematode, and provides insight into the genomics of ivermectin response and population structure of O. volvulus. We argue that ivermectin response is a polygenically-determined quantitative trait (QT whereby identical or related molecular pathways but not necessarily individual genes are likely to determine the extent of ivermectin response in different parasite populations. Furthermore, we propose that genetic

  15. The Immunomodulatory Role of Adjuvants in Vaccines Formulated with the Recombinant Antigens Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 against Onchocerca volvulus in Mice.

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    Jessica A Hess

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In some regions in Africa, elimination of onchocerciasis may be possible with mass drug administration, although there is concern based on several factors that onchocerciasis cannot be eliminated solely through this approach. A vaccine against Onchocerca volvulus would provide a critical tool for the ultimate elimination of this infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that immunization of mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, when formulated with alum, induced protective immunity. It was hypothesized that the levels of protective immunity induced with the two recombinant antigens formulated with alum would be improved by formulation with other adjuvants known to enhance different types of antigen-specific immune responses.Immunizing mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with alum, Advax 2 and MF59 induced significant levels of larval killing and host protection. The immune response was biased towards Th2 with all three of the adjuvants, with IgG1 the dominant antibody. Improved larval killing and host protection was observed in mice immunized with co-administered Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with each of the three adjuvants as compared to single immunizations. Antigen-specific antibody titers were significantly increased in mice immunized concurrently with the two antigens. Based on chemokine levels, it appears that neutrophils and eosinophils participate in the protective immune response induced by Ov-103, and macrophages and neutrophils participate in immunity induced by Ov-RAL-2.The mechanism of protective immunity induced by Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, with the adjuvants alum, Advax 2 and MF59, appears to be multifactorial with roles for cytokines, chemokines, antibody and specific effector cells. The vaccines developed in this study have the potential of reducing the morbidity associated with onchocerciasis in humans.

  16. The Immunomodulatory Role of Adjuvants in Vaccines Formulated with the Recombinant Antigens Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 against Onchocerca volvulus in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jessica A; Zhan, Bin; Torigian, April R; Patton, John B; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Zhan, Tingting; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Klei, Thomas R; Lustigman, Sara; Abraham, David

    2016-07-01

    In some regions in Africa, elimination of onchocerciasis may be possible with mass drug administration, although there is concern based on several factors that onchocerciasis cannot be eliminated solely through this approach. A vaccine against Onchocerca volvulus would provide a critical tool for the ultimate elimination of this infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that immunization of mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, when formulated with alum, induced protective immunity. It was hypothesized that the levels of protective immunity induced with the two recombinant antigens formulated with alum would be improved by formulation with other adjuvants known to enhance different types of antigen-specific immune responses. Immunizing mice with Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with alum, Advax 2 and MF59 induced significant levels of larval killing and host protection. The immune response was biased towards Th2 with all three of the adjuvants, with IgG1 the dominant antibody. Improved larval killing and host protection was observed in mice immunized with co-administered Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2 in conjunction with each of the three adjuvants as compared to single immunizations. Antigen-specific antibody titers were significantly increased in mice immunized concurrently with the two antigens. Based on chemokine levels, it appears that neutrophils and eosinophils participate in the protective immune response induced by Ov-103, and macrophages and neutrophils participate in immunity induced by Ov-RAL-2. The mechanism of protective immunity induced by Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, with the adjuvants alum, Advax 2 and MF59, appears to be multifactorial with roles for cytokines, chemokines, antibody and specific effector cells. The vaccines developed in this study have the potential of reducing the morbidity associated with onchocerciasis in humans.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-like molecules derived from Wolbachia endobacteria of the filaria Onchocerca volvulus are candidate mediators in the sequence of inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattig, N W; Rathjens, U; Ernst, M; Geisinger, F; Renz, A; Tischendorf, F W

    2000-08-01

    The majority of Onchocerca volvulus-infected persons show signs of cellular anergy, and long-time survival of adult and larval parasites in subcutaneous tissue is observed. The mechanisms leading to immunological hyporesponsiveness are poorly understood. Monocytes/macrophages represent a link between the innate and acquired immune system and are candidate cells to promote inflammatory and antiinflammatory processes. In the present study we have shown that products of microfilarial (O. volvulus) and adult (O. volvulus and O. ochengi) parasites affect monocytes in vitro. An early production of TNF-alpha by exposed monocytes was followed by the production of IL-10 and a reduced expression of HLA-DR and the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2, while other adhesion receptors remained unaffected. Downregulation of the functional membrane receptors failed to occur after treatment of the cells with anti-IL-10 antibodies. The engagement of CD14, a dominant membrane receptor on monocytes and major binding protein for lipopolysaccharides, was indicated by partial blocking of monocyte modulation by neutralizing antibodies to CD14 and by the antagonistic lipid A analog compound 406. Lipopolysaccharide-like molecules were detected in sterile products of O. volvulus stages which could originate from Wolbachia bacteria related to Gram-negative Rickettsiales, known to be abundant in the hypodermis and the female reproductive organs of O. volvulus. The present results indicate that the monocyte/macrophage may be a major target cell for immunomodulatory parasite-derived and intraparasitic, bacteria-derived molecules, thereby contributing to the host's cellular hyporesponsiveness.

  18. A computational analysis of the binding mode of closantel as inhibitor of the Onchocerca volvulus chitinase: insights on macrofilaricidal drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Guo, Xianwu; Correa-Basurto, José; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness with at least 37 million people infected and more than 120 million people at risk of contracting the disease; most (99%) of this population, threatened by infection, live in Africa. The drug of choice for mass treatment is the microfilaricidal Mectizan® (ivermectin); it does not kill the adult stages of the parasite at the standard dose which is a single annual dose aimed at disease control. However, multiple treatments a year with ivermectin have effects on adult worms. The discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs directed towards the killing of the adult parasites are thus urgently needed. The chitinase of filarial nematodes is a new drug target due to its essential function in the metabolism and molting of the parasite. Closantel is a potent and specific inhibitor of chitinase of Onchocerca volvulus (OvCHT1) and other filarial chitinases. However, the binding mode and specificity of closantel towards OvCHT1 remain unknown. In the absence of a crystallographic structure of OvCHT1, we developed a homology model of OvCHT1 using the currently available X-ray structures of human chitinases as templates. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the model led to a high quality of 3D structure of OvCHIT1. A flexible docking study using closantel as the ligand on the binding site of OvCHIT1 and human chitinases was performed and demonstrated the differences in the closantel binding mode between OvCHIT1 and human chitinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculation were employed to determine and compare the detailed binding mode of closantel with OvCHT1 and the structure of human chitinase. This comparative study allowed identification of structural features and properties responsible for differences in the computationally predicted closantel binding modes. The homology model and the closantel binding mode reported herein might help guide the rational development of

  19. Variabilité génétique d'Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1893) : relations avec les faciès épidémiologiques de l'onchocercose

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    La variabilité génétique d'#Onchocerca volvulus$ a été étudiée sur plusieurs isolats du Cameroun. Cette filaire est la deuxième cause infectieuse de cécité dans le monde et affecte, selon l'OMS, environ 17 millions de personnes en Afrique, en Amérique Centrale et en Amérique du Sud. La complexité de l'épidémiologie de l'onchocercose apparaît liée à l'existence de différentes souches du parasite qui sont à l'origine de taux de cécités très variables selon les régions étudiées. Plusieurs types ...

  20. Induction of protection against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses using a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Shihui; Lin, Yongping; Chen, Min; Kou, Zhihua; He, Yuxian; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Zhou, Yusen

    2010-10-18

    Our previous studies have shown the adjuvanticity of an Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein, Ov-ASP-1 (ASP-1), when administered in an aqueous formulation with bystander vaccine antigens or commercial vaccines. In this study, we reported a novel formulation that took advantage of the protein nature of the ASP-1 adjuvant by creating recombinant fusion protein vaccines linking the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) consensus sequence of H5N1 influenza viruses with the ASP-1 adjuvant. Two recombinant fusion proteins designated M2e-ASP-1 and M2e3-ASP-1 were studied, in which ASP-1 was fused with one or three tandem copies of the M2e antigen. Our results show that these novel recombinant influenza vaccines, particularly M2e3-ASP-1, induced strong anti-M2e-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the established mouse model. Furthermore, M2e3-ASP-1 was able to provide significant cross-clade protection against divergent H5N1 viruses. Consequently, this study has demonstrated a potential novel vaccine formulation that could provide a complementary prophylactic strategy in preventing the threat of future influenza outbreak resulting from rapid evolution of the H5N1 virus and co-circulation of multiple antigenic variants in various regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Onchocerca volvulus: The Road from Basic Biology to a Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustigman, Sara; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Klei, Thomas R; Babayan, Simon A; Hotez, Peter; Abraham, David; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2017-09-22

    Human onchocerciasis - commonly known as river blindness - is one of the most devastating yet neglected tropical diseases, leaving many millions in sub-Saharan Africa blind and/or with chronic disabilities. Attempts to eliminate onchocerciasis, primarily through the mass drug administration of ivermectin, remains challenging and has been heightened by the recent news that drug-resistant parasites are developing in some populations after years of drug treatment. Needed, and needed now, in the fight to eliminate onchocerciasis are new tools, such as preventive and therapeutic vaccines. This review summarizes the progress made to advance the onchocerciasis vaccine from the research laboratory into the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. distribution of simulium species and its infection with onchocerca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A survey of the distribution of Simulium species complex population and its infection rate with ... Statistical analysis using t-test and ANOVA revealed that there was no significant .... B.A. Bissan, Y. (1995): Impact of combined.

  3. Effect of single-dose ivermectin therapy on human Onchocerca volvulus infection with onchocercal ocular involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, H S; White, A T; Greene, B M; D'Anna, S A; Keyvan-Larijani, E; Aziz, M A; Williams, P N; Taylor, H R

    1988-08-01

    Ivermectin has shown promise as a potentially safe and effective microfilaricidal drug for the treatment of onchocerciasis. Several limited studies have shown it to have fewer side effects, especially ocular complications, than the currently available drug, diethylcarbamazine. The detailed ocular findings in 200 moderately to heavily infected Liberians who were enrolled in a safety and dose-finding study are presented. They received either 0, 100, 150, or 200 micrograms/kg of ivermectin and were followed up for 12 months. In clinical studies so far carried out ivermectin in a dose of 100, 150, or 200 micrograms/kg has not been associated with any major adverse reactions nor were there any sight-threatening effects even in the presence of severe ocular disease. Each of these doses significantly reduced the ocular microfilaria load for at least 12 months when compared with either the placebo (p less than 0.05) or pretreatment values (p less than 0.001). However, the 100 and 150 micrograms/kg doses caused fewer minor side effects than the higher dose. These results confirm that ivermectin in a single oral dose may be a safe and effective microfilaricidal drug for the treatment of onchocerciasis and that it appears to be free of major ocular side effects.

  4. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of closantel analogues: structural promiscuity and its impact on Onchocerca volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Amanda L; Gloeckner, Christian; Tricoche, Nancy; Zakhari, Joseph S; Samje, Moses; Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2011-06-09

    Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, is a neglected tropical disease that affects more than 37 million people worldwide, primarily in Africa and Central and South America. We have disclosed evidence that the larval-stage-specific chitinase, OvCHT1, may be a potential biological target for affecting nematode development. On the basis of screening efforts, closantel, a known anthelmintic drug, was discovered as a potent and highly specific OvCHT1 inhibitor. Originally, closantel's anthelmintic mode of action was believed to rely solely on its role as a proton ionophore; thus, the impact of each of its biological activities on O. volvulus L3 molting was investigated. Structure-activity relationship studies on an active closantel fragment are detailed, and remarkably, by use of a simple salicylanilide scaffold, compounds acting only as protonophores or chitinase inhibitors were identified. From these data, unexpected synergistic protonophore and chitinase inhibition activities have also been found to be critical for molting in O. volvulus L3 larvae.

  5. Significant heterogeneity in Wolbachia copy number within and between populations of Onchocerca volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoo, Samuel; Doyle, Stephen R; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Grant, Warwick N

    2017-04-18

    Wolbachia are intracellular bacteria found in arthropods and several filarial nematode species. The filarial Wolbachia have been proposed to be involved in the immunopathology associated with onchocerciasis. Higher Wolbachia-to-nematode ratios have been reported in the savannah-ecotype compared to the forest-ecotype, and have been interpreted as consistent with a correlation between Wolbachia density and disease severity. However, factors such as geographic stratification and ivermectin drug exposure can lead to significant genetic heterogeneity in the nematode host populations, so we investigated whether Wolbachia copy number variation is also associated with these underlying factors. Genomic DNA was prepared from single adult nematodes representing forest and savannah ecotypes sampled from Togo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire and Mali. A qPCR assay was developed to measure the number of Wolbachia genome(s) per nematode genome. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was also used to measure relative Wolbachia copy number, and independently verify the qPCR assay. Significant variation was observed within the forest (range: 0.02 to 452.99; median: 10.58) and savannah (range: 0.01 to 1106.25; median: 9.10) ecotypes, however, no significant difference between ecotypes (P = 0.645) was observed; rather, strongly significant Wolbachia variation was observed within and between the nine study communities analysed (P = 0.021), independent of ecotype. Analysis of ivermectin-treated and untreated nematodes by qPCR showed no correlation (P = 0.869); however, an additional analysis of a subset of the nematodes by qPCR and NGS revealed a correlation between response to ivermectin treatment and Wolbachia copy number (P = 0.020). This study demonstrates that extensive within and between population variation exists in the Wolbachia content of individual adult O. volvulus. The origin and functional significance of such variation (up to ~ 100,000-fold between worms; ~10 to 100-fold between communities) in the context of the proposed mutualistic relationship between the worms and the bacteria, and between the presence of Wolbachia and clinical outcome of infection, remains unclear. These data do not support a correlation between Wolbachia copy number and forest or savannah ecotype, and may have implications for the development of anti-Wolbachia drugs as a macrofilaricidal treatment of onchocerciasis. The biological significance of a correlation between variation in Wolbachia copy number and ivermectin response remains unexplained.

  6. [Problems in the investigation of the control of Onchocerca volvulus in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, M A; Rivas-Alcalá, A R

    1991-01-01

    The treatment and control of onchocerciasis in Mexico has been supported only on the administration of diethylcarbamazine and the removal of adult worms, which are in the onchocercomata. These actions seems to have diminished the prevalence and incidence of blindness in those individuals who are affected by this parasitosis. However, there has not been an important impact on onchocerciasis transmission. The objective of this paper is to critically analyze and discuss subjects related to diagnosis, treatment and control of onchocerciasis transmission in Mexico. Chemical vector control has been successfully achieved in other world regions; however, in Mexico, it has not been fully accepted as part of the integral onchocerciasis control due to several causes. Moreover, there has been few scientific research activities toward the search of new options for vector control. Recently, results of research on ivermectin (a microfilaricide agent) have indicated that this drug is effective and safe for the treatment of onchocerciasis. Additionally, it has been reported that ivermectin has an effect on the onchocerciasis transmission. However, there are several unanswered questions about the efficacy of ivermectin in stopping onchocerciasis transmission. In this report, the main efforts carried out in Mexico against onchocerciasis are analysed and problems related with diagnosis, treatment and control are also discussed. Some parameters for the correct evaluation of onchocerciasis control, with entomological emphasis, are proposed.

  7. Successful interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus, Guatemala

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Rizzo, Nidia; Richards, Jane; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Domínguez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Catú, Eduardo; Oliva, Orlando; Richards, Frank O; Lindblade, Kim A

    2009-01-01

    .... We evaluated whether transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted in the endemic focus of Escuintla-Guatemala in Guatemala, based on World Health Organization criteria for the certification...

  8. UM CASO DE EPISCLERITE NODULAR POR ONCHOCERCA SP. EM CÃO.

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Nuno; Revez, Nuno; Gomes, Patricia; Baker, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Apresentou-se à consulta em Outubro de 2005, um canídeo macho de raça Chow-chow, de 3 anos de idade, residente no concelho de Olhão. O estímulo iatrotrópico relacionava-se com a presença de um nódulo na conjuntiva episcleral do olho direito. Ao exame clínico o animal apresentava uma condição corporal 2 estando as restantes constantes vitais dentro da normalidade. No exame oftalmológico observou-se a presença de entropion bilateral da pálpebra inferior, queratite superficial pigmentar, quemose...

  9. Interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Oaxaca focus, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Unnasch, Thomas R; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Morales-Castro, Alba L; Peña-Flores, Graciela P; Orozco-Algarra, María E; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I; Richards, Frank; Vásquez-Rodríguez, Miguel A; Rendón, Vidal García

    2010-07-01

    All endemic communities of the Oaxaca focus of onchocerciasis in southern Mexico have been treated annually or semi-annually with ivermectin since 1994. In-depth epidemiologic assessments were performed in communities during 2007 and 2008. None of the 52,632 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected in four sentinel communities was found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in an upper bound of the infection rate in the vectors of 0.07/2,000. The prevalence of microfilariae (mf) in the cornea and/or anterior chamber of the eye was also zero (0 of 1,039 residents examined; 95%-UL = 0.35%). Similarly, all 1,164 individuals examined by skin biopsy were mf negative (95%-UL = 0.31%), and sera collected from 3,569 children from 25 communities did not harbor Ov16 IgG4-antibodies (95%-UL = 0.09%). These meet the criteria for absence of morbidity and parasite transmission in the Oaxaca focus. As a result mass treatments with ivermectin were halted in 2009.

  10. Use of P-glycoprotein gene probes to investigate anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus and comparison with Onchocerca volvulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, M.S.G.; Okoli, M.N.; Schulz-Key, H.; Okongkwo, P.O.; Roos, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    A P-glycoprotein gene probe from the sheep parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus was developed and used to analyse restriction fragment length polymorphisms between susceptible isolates and isolates resistant to either benzimidazole; levamisole and benzimidazole; or benzimidazole, ivermectin and

  11. Use of P-glycoprotein gene probes to investigate anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus and comparison with Onchocerca volvulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, M.S.G.; Okoli, M.N.; Schulz-Key, H.; Okongkwo, P.O.; Roos, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    A P-glycoprotein gene probe from the sheep parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus was developed and used to analyse restriction fragment length polymorphisms between susceptible isolates and isolates resistant to either benzimidazole; levamisole and benzimidazole; or benzimidazole, ivermectin and c

  12. Seasonal Variation in Biting Rates of Simulium damnosum sensu lato, Vector of Onchocerca volvulus, in Two Sudanese Foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam M A Zarroug

    Full Text Available The abundance of onchocerciasis vectors affects the epidemiology of disease in Sudan, therefore, studies of vector dynamics are crucial for onchocerciasis control/elimination programs. This study aims to compare the relative abundance, monthly biting-rates (MBR and hourly-based distribution of onchocerciasis vectors in Abu-Hamed and Galabat foci. These seasonally-based factors can be used to structure vector control efforts to reduce fly-biting rates as a component of onchocerciasis elimination programs.A cross-sectional study was conducted in four endemic villages in Abu-Hamed and Galabat foci during two non-consecutive years (2007-2008 and 2009-2010. Both adults and aquatic stages of the potential onchocerciasis vector Simulium damnosum sensu lato were collected following standard procedures during wet and dry seasons. Adult flies were collected using human landing capture for 5 days/month. The data was recorded on handheld data collection sheets to calculate the relative abundance, MBR, and hourly-based distribution associated with climatic factors. The data analysis was carried out using ANOVA and Spearman rank correlation tests.Data on vector surveillance revealed higher relative abundance of S. damnosum s.l. in Abu- Hamed (39,934 flies than Galabat (8,202 flies. In Abu-Hamed, vector populations increased in January-April then declined in June-July until they disappeared in August-October. Highest black fly density and MBR were found in March 2007 (N = 9,444, MBR = 58,552.8 bites/person/month, and March 2010 (N = 2,603, MBR = 16,138.6 bites/person/month while none of flies were collected in August-October (MBR = 0 bites/person/month. In Galabat, vectors increased in September-December, then decreased in February-June. The highest vector density and MBR were recorded in September 2007 (N = 1,138, MBR = 6,828 bites/person/month and September 2010 (N = 1,163, MBR = 6,978 bites/person/month, whereas, none appeared in collection from April to June. There was a significant difference in mean monthly density of S. damnosum s.l. across the two foci in 2007-2008 (df = 3, F = 3.91, P = 0.011. Minimum temperature showed significant correlation with adult flies counts in four areas sampled; the adult counts were increased in Nady village (rs = 0.799 and were decreased in Kalasecal (rs = -0.676, Gumaiza (rs = -0.585, and Hilat Khateir (rs = -0.496. Maximum temperature showed positive correlation with black fly counts only in Galabat focus. Precipitation was significantly correlated with adult flies counts in Nady village, Abu-Hamed, but no significance was found in the rest of the sampled villages in both foci. Hourly-based distribution of black flies showed a unimodal pattern in Abu-Hamed with one peak (10:00-18:00, while a bimodal pattern with two peaks (07:00-10:00 and (14:00-18:00 was exhibited in Galabat.Transmission of onchocerciasis in both foci showed marked differences in seasonality, which may be attributed to ecology, microclimate and proximity of breeding sites to collection sites. The seasonal shifts between the two foci might be related to variations in climate zones. This information on black fly vector seasonality, ecology, distribution and biting activity has obvious implications in monitoring transmission levels to guide the national and regional onchocerciasis elimination programs in Sudan.

  13. Onchocerciasis in Ecuador: changes in prevalence of ocular lesions in Onchocerca volvulus infected individuals over the period 1980-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Cooper

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Trends in prevalence rates of onchocercal ocular lesions were examined over the period 1980 to 1990 using data from two cross-sectional surveys. There was evidence for increasing prevalence of anterior chamber microfilariae, iridocyclitis, optic atrophy, and chorioretinopathy. Large increases in prevalence, in particular, were seen for posterior segment lesions: optic atrophy increased from 2.7% to 6.4% and chorioretinopathy from 8.8% to 35.6%. Greatest increases in these lesions were seen in the Chachi which was attributed to the large increases in prevalence of microfilariae in the anterior chamber particularly in those aged 30 years or greater. The study findings suggest that ocular onchocerciasis is evolving in parallel with the well documented parasitological changes.

  14. [Entomology of onchocerciasis in Soconusco, Chiapas, México. VII. Quantitative variations in the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus (Nematoda: Filaroiidea) according to human activity space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Gutiérrez, M; Ramírez, A; Miranda, R

    1991-01-01

    In this research we tried to demonstrate differences in transmission intensities of onchocerciasis by Simulium ochraceum in the community of Golondrinas, Municipality of Acacoyagua in the Soconusco area of the state of Chiapas. Adult females of this species were captured in the center of the villages, the coffee plantation, and the corn bean planted plots, during 7 to 10 consecutive days of the months of June, August, November and December of 1983, and January, March, and May of 1984. Captures were made from 7:00 to 11:00 h, by two persons (a human bait and a collector) in each of the mentioned areas. Variations in densities of S. ochraceum were not statistically significant among the different areas, although there was a predominance in the center of the villages during all the time periods. There was not a statistical significance in the number of oviparous females, although again the center of 50 villages showed the highest percentages (43.5%), as compared to the coffee plantation (37.8%), and the corn-bean plots (33.8%). Regarding the ratio infection: infectivity, only the infective mosquitoes with L3 showed a statistical significance in the three types of areas, being highest in the center of the villages. Transmission potentials were: center of the village 28.5 L3/human/period; coffee plantation, 73 L3/human/period; corn-bean plot, 5.8 L3/human/period. We discuss the possibility that the differences in densities among the various areas might depend on the variations of the breeding sites, mobility or permanence of the individuals during the hours of greater activity of S. ochraceum, and the wind and light local conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Macrofilaricidal activity after doxycycline only treatment of Onchocerca volvulus in an area of Loa loa co-endemicity: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Joseph D; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Esum, Mathias; Johnston, Kelly L; Langley, R Stuart; Ford, Louise; Faragher, Brian; Specht, Sabine; Mand, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Enyong, Peter; Wanji, Samuel; Taylor, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The risk of severe adverse events following treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in areas co-endemic with loiasis currently compromises the development of control programmes and the treatment...

  16. [Entomology of onchocercosis in Soconusco, Chiapas. 6. Quantitative studies of the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus by 3 species of Simuliidae in a community with high endemicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M; Oliver, M; Ramírez, A

    1992-01-01

    In Guatemala, there is no doubt about the participation of Simulium ochraceum as vector of Onchocerciasis. However, in Mexico practically there are not studies focussed to determine the role of this species in the transmission. The objective of the present investigation was to determine which of the 3 species of Simulium founded in the Soconusco region of Chiapas, is the main, and which were secondary in the transmission of Onchocerciasis in that area. The locality of Morelos, in the Huixtla "municipio" of Chiapas, localized a 1200 meters over the sea level (mosl) were selected to carried out the present study. According to own parasitological studies, this locality is considered as highly endemic (more than 66% prevalence). From March 1979 to March, 1981, we performed captures of Simulium sp caught on human bait. Quantitative studies and of transmission potentials were also performed. The following results were obtained: a) Absolute black flies densities (nulliparous and pariparous) and infected black flies (with L1 and L2 larvae): S. ochraceum, S. metallicum and S. callidum, in that order was the distribution of densities. Infected black flies were obtained in the 3 species. However, in despite of an irregular distribution in all the year, it was possible to identify 2 peaks of maximum infection of S. ochraceum in March, 1979 and March 1981. b) Monthly bite densities and infective bites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Identifying Sub-Optimal Responses to Ivermectin in the Treatment of River Blindness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas S. Churcher; Sébastien D. S. Pion; Mike Y. Osei-Atweneboana; Roger K. Prichard; Kwablah Awadzie; Michel Boussinesq; Richard C. Collins; James A. Whitwort; Maria-Gloria Basanez; David Cox

    2009-01-01

    .... The variability in the rate at which Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae repopulate host's skin following ivermectin treatment is quantified using an individual-based onchocerciasis mathematical model...

  18. New tools and insights to assist with the molecular identification of Simulium guianense s.l., main Onchocerca volvulus vector within the highland areas of the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crainey, James L; Mattos-Glória, Aline; Hamada, Neusa; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2014-03-01

    Following the success of the Onchocerciasis Elimination Programme for the Americas (OEPA), there is now just one Latin American onchocerciasis focus where onchocerciasis transmission is described as 'on-going:' the Amazonia Onchocerciasis focus. In the hyperendemic highland areas of the Amazonia focus, Simulium guianense s.l. Wise are the most important vectors of the disease. Populations of S. guianense s.l. are, however, known to vary in their cytogenetics and in a range of behaviours, including in their biting habits. In the hypoendemic lowland areas of the Amazonia focus, for example, S. guianense s.l. are generally regarded as zoophilic and consequently unimportant to disease transmission. Robust tools, to discriminate among various populations of S. guianense s.l. have, however, not yet been developed. In the work reported here, we have assessed the utility of a ribosomal DNA sequence fragment spanning the nuclear ribosomal ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5.8S sequence regions and a ∼850 nucleotide portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (CO1) for species-level identification and for resolving the within species substructuring. We report here how we have generated 78 CO1 sequences from a rich set of both zoophilic and anthropophilic populations of S. guianense s.l. that were collected from eight sites that are broadly distributed across Brazil. Consistent with previous findings, our analysis supports the genetic isolation of Simulium litobranchium from S. guianense s.l. In contrast with previous findings, however, our results did not provide support for the divergence of the two species prior to the radiation of S. guianense s.l. In our analysis of the S. guianense s.l. ribosomal DNA sequence trace files we generated, we provide clear evidence of multiple within-specimen single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels suggesting that S. guianense s.l. ribosomal DNA is not a good target for conventional DNA barcoding. This is the first report of S. guianense s.l. within individual ribosomal DNA variation and thus the first evidence that the species is not subject to the normal effects of concerted evolution. Collectively, these data illustrate the need for diverse sampling in the development of robust molecular tools for vector identification and suggest that ribosomal DNA might be able to assist with resolving S. guianense s.l. species substructuring that C01 barcoding has hitherto failed to.

  19. Dicty_cDB: SLI750 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nce. 52 3e-04 2 AW355195 |AW355195.1 PFOvAFCB597K Onchocerca volvulus adult female cDNA following ivermect...in (SAW98PF-OvAF) Onchocerca volvulus cDNA clone PFOvAFCB597 5', mRNA sequence. 52

  20. Dicty_cDB: SLI743 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rmectin (SAW98PF-OvAF) Onchocerca volvulus cDNA clone PFOvAFCB597 5', mRNA sequence...sequence. 52 3e-04 2 AW355195 |AW355195.1 PFOvAFCB597K Onchocerca volvulus adult female cDNA following ive

  1. Dicty_cDB: FC-AV02 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rmectin (SAW98PF-OvAF) Onchocerca volvulus cDNA clone PFOvAFCB597 5', mRNA sequence...ne SWOv3MCAM56B08 5', mRNA sequence. 52 3e-04 2 AW355195 |AW355195.1 PFOvAFCB597K Onchocerca volvulus adult female cDNA following ive

  2. Dicty_cDB: VFF227 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ov3MCAM56B08 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-04 2 AW355195 |AW355195.1 PFOvAFCB597K Onchocerca volvulus adult female cDNA following ivermect...in (SAW98PF-OvAF) Onchocerca volvulus cDNA clone PFOvAFCB597 5', mRNA sequence. 54

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0937 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0937 ref|NP_008375.1|ND1_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61617.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008375.1 0.010 25% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-03-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-03-0045 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 1.6 26% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-26-0096 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-26-0096 ref|NP_008368.1|ND2_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61610.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008368.1 2e-08 28% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1960 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1960 ref|NP_008369.1|ND4_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61611.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008369.1 0.070 28% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2609 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2609 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 1e-05 29% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2555 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2555 ref|NP_008368.1|ND2_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61610.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008368.1 0.071 24% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2345 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2345 ref|NP_008369.1|ND4_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61611.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008369.1 0.003 24% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0341 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0341 ref|NP_008369.1|ND4_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61611.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008369.1 7e-04 25% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-01-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-01-0068 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 2.6 38% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0223 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0223 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.60 26% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-20-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-20-0011 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.45 25% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0249 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0249 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 4e-11 29% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0495 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0495 ref|NP_008369.1|ND4_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61611.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008369.1 0.003 23% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1805 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1805 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.014 23% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-1246 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-1246 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.008 24% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-14-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-14-0080 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.008 23% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0047 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0047 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 7e-11 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0181 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0181 ref|NP_008379.1|ND5_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61621.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008379.1 0.004 25% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1062 ref|NP_008368.1|ND2_13186 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus...] gb|AAC61610.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Onchocerca volvulus] NP_008368.1 0.001 27% ...

  2. Zoonotic onchocerciasis in Hiroshima, Japan, and molecular analysis of a paraffin section of the agent for a reliable identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Japan is a country of high specific diversity of Onchocerca with eight species, the adults of two not yet known. Onchocerca dewittei japonica, a common filarial parasite of wild boar, had been proved to be the agent of five zoonotic onchocerciasis in Kyushu island with morphological and molecular studies. The sixth case, at Hiroshima in the main island, was identified to the same Onchocerca species, based on adult characters observed on histological sections. To consolidate the identification, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 gene analysis was attempted with the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded parasite specimen. The sequence (196 bp of a CO1 gene fragment of the parasite successfully PCR-amplified agreed well with those of O. dewittei japonica registered in GenBank, confirming the morphological identification. Moreover a comparison with the CO1 gene sequences of six other Onchocerca species in GenBank excluded the possibility that Onchocerca sp. from wild boar and Onchocerca sp. type A from cattle in Japan, were the causative agents in this case. Mitochondrial DNA analysis proved to be a valuable tool to support the morphological method for the discrimination of zoonotic Onchocerca species in a histological specimen.

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 189 ... Vol 3, No 1 (2002), Kinetics of the Acid Hydrolysis of Potassium ... Estimation of Standard Deviation of Logistic Distribution: Theory and Algorithm, Abstract ... Vol 3, No 1 (2002), Molecular Characterization of Onchocerca ...

  4. Zoonotic onchocerciasis caused by a parasite from wild boar in Oita, Japan. A comprehensive analysis of morphological characteristics of the worms for its diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, H; Bain, O; Uni, S; Korenaga, M; Kozek, W J; Shirasaka, C; Aoki, C; Otsuka, Y; Fukuda, M; Eshita, Y; Daa, T

    2004-09-01

    Histological examination of a nodule removed from the back of the hand of a 58-year-old woman from Oita, Kyushu, Japan showed an Onchocerca female sectioned through the posterior region of the worm (ovaries identifiable) and young (thin cuticle). Six Onchocerca species are enzootic in that area: O. gutturosa and O. lienalis in cattle, O. suzukii in serows (Capricornis crispus), O. skrjabini and an Onchocerca sp. in Cervus nippon nippon, and O. dewittei japonica in wild boar (Sus scrofa leucomystax). Diagnostic characters of female Onchocerca species, such as the cuticle and its ridges, change along the body length. Tables of the histologic morphology of the mid- and posterior body-regions of the local species are presented. In addition, it was observed that transverse ridges arose and thickened during the adult stage (examination of fourth stage and juvenile females of O. volvulus). The specimen described in this report, with its prominent and widely spaced ridges, was identified as O. d. japonica. Four of the 10 zoonotic cases of onchocerciasis reported worldwide were from Oita, three of them being caused by O. d. japonica, the prevalence of which in local wild boar was 22 of 24 (92%).

  5. Zoonotic onchocerciasis caused by a parasite from wild boar in Oita, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaoka H.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Histological examination of a nodule removed from the back of the hand of a 58-year-old woman from Oita, Kyushu, Japan showed an Onchocerca female sectioned through the posterior region of the worm (ovaries identifiable and young (thin cuticle. Six Onchocerca species are enzootic in that area: O. gutturosa and O. lienalis in cattle, O. suzukii in serows (Capricornis crispus, O. skrjabini and an Onchocerca sp. in Cervus nippon nippon, and O. dewittei japonica in wild boar (Sus scrofa leucomystax. Diagnostic charactets of female Onchocerca species, such as the cuticle and its ridges, change along the body length. Tables of the histologic morphology of the mid- and posterior body-regions of the local species are presented. In addition, it was observed that transverse ridges arose and thickened during the adult stage (examination of fourth stage and juvenile females of O. volvulus. The specimen described in this report, with its prominent and widely spaced ridges, was identified as O. d. japonica. Four of the 10 zoonotic cases of onchocerciasis reported worldwide were from Oita, three of them being caused by O. d. japonica, the prevalence of which in local wild boar was 22 of 24 (92 %.

  6. Some vector borne parasites in Swedish reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Rehbinder

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available A review presented at the Fifth European Regional Meeting of the Society for Vector Ecology, September 2.-6. 1990, Uppsala, Sweden. The clinical and pathological manifestations as well as some meat hygienic aspects of Megatrypanum trypanosomes, Babesia divergens, Setaria tundrae, Onchocerca tarsicola and Lappnema auris infections in reindeer are reported on.Vektorburna parasiter hos svensk ren.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfatting: En oversikt presenterad vid «the Fifth European Regional Meeting of the Society for Vector Ecology», September 2.-6. 1990, Uppsala, Sverige. Kliniska och patologiska manifestationer liksom i viss utsträckning livsmedelshygieniska aspekter diskuteras med avseende på infektioner med Vektorburna parasiter hos svensk ren. trypanosomer, Babesia divergens, Setaria tundrae, Onchocerca tarsicola och Lappnema auris.

  7. Repurposing auranofin as a lead candidate for treatment of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Bulman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two major human diseases caused by filariid nematodes are onchocerciasis, or river blindness, and lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The drugs ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine (DEC, and albendazole are used in control programs for these diseases, but are mainly effective against the microfilarial stage and have minimal or no effect on adult worms. Adult Onchocerca volvulus and Brugia malayi worms (macrofilariae can live for up to 15 years, reproducing and allowing the infection to persist in a population. Therefore, to support control or elimination of these two diseases, effective macrofilaricidal drugs are necessary, in addition to current drugs. In an effort to identify macrofilaricidal drugs, we screened an FDA-approved library with adult worms of Brugia spp. and Onchocerca ochengi, third-stage larvae (L3s of Onchocerca volvulus, and the microfilariae of both O. ochengi and Loa loa. We found that auranofin, a gold-containing drug used for rheumatoid arthritis, was effective in vitro in killing both Brugia spp. and O. ochengi adult worms and in inhibiting the molting of L3s of O. volvulus with IC50 values in the low micromolar to nanomolar range. Auranofin had an approximately 43-fold higher IC50 against the microfilariae of L. loa compared with the IC50 for adult female O. ochengi, which may be beneficial if used in areas where Onchocerca and Brugia are co-endemic with L. loa, to prevent severe adverse reactions to the drug-induced death of L. loa microfilariae. Further testing indicated that auranofin is also effective in reducing Brugia adult worm burden in infected gerbils and that auranofin may be targeting the thioredoxin reductase in this nematode.

  8. Uncertainty Surrounding Projections of the Long-Term Impact of Ivermectin Treatment on Human Onchocerciasis

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Hugo C.; Churcher, Thomas S.; Martin Walker; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y.; Prichard, Roger K.; María-Gloria Basáñez

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies in Mali, Nigeria, and Senegal have indicated that annual (or biannual) ivermectin distribution may lead to local elimination of human onchocerciasis in certain African foci. Modelling-based projections have been used to estimate the required duration of ivermectin distribution to reach elimination. A crucial assumption has been that microfilarial production by Onchocerca volvulus is reduced irreversibly by 30-35% with each (annual) ivermectin round. However, other m...

  9. Immediate hypersensitivity responses in the immunopathogenesis of human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, E A

    1985-01-01

    It is not clear what role immediate hypersensitivity immune responses have in the pathogenesis of human onchocerciasis, but it is certain that these responses are prominent both in the course of natural infection and during the Mazzotti reactions that follow treatment with diethylcarbamazine. In humans, the levels of total serum IgE associated with onchocerciasis are as high or higher than those associated with almost any helminth infection, although specific IgE antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus appear to be a small and still poorly characterized fraction of the total serum IgE. Evidence about the relationship of these prominent IgE responses in patients with onchocerciasis to the onchocercal skin disease that manifests as pruritus and papular eruptions is conflicting, but in a guinea pig model of ocular pathology induced by onchocerca microfilariae evidence for the pathogenetic importance of IgE and immediate hypersensitivity is much less equivocal. The suggestive findings from this model make it imperative to carry out similar studies of Onchocerca-affected human eyes to determine whether immediate hypersensitivity responses play a similar critical role in the pathogenesis of the ocular lesions in humans.

  10. The further application of MTT-formazan colorimetry to studies on filarial worm viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comley, J C; Townson, S; Rees, M J; Dobinson, A

    1989-09-01

    Experiments have confirmed that MTT-formazan colorimetry in its simplest form (incubation of intact worms with MTT and direct visualisation of any formazan formed) can be readily applied to several species of filariae including Onchocerca volvulus. Data is presented which will assist the development of quantitative MTT reduction viability tests for a selection of the smaller filarial species. Assays of pieces of Onchocerca gutturosa and O. volvulus females have led us to tentatively conclude that the tips of filariae, particularly the anterior ends, may well be metabolically the most active part of the worm. Selective sampling of these regions for Onchocerca might therefore be a useful indicator for the viability of the parasite. An example of how MTT-formazan colorimetry has been applied to yield additional data to support motility observations on the in vitro survival of male O. gutturosa is also given. The in vitro timecourse of worm death caused by 10 microM CGP 20376 on Acanthocheilonema viteae females has been examined by MTT reduction and compared with 6 other non-subjective parameters. The results suggests that the parameters examined could be divided into two groups according to the time taken for CGP 20376 to cause 50% inhibition (t50) of the parameter. Fast response parameters had t50's between 1 and 6 h (motility indices, 14CO2 evolution, adenine uptake and leucine uptake), they are more sensitive measures of viability and indicate possible worm damage which may or may not be reversible. Slow response parameters had t50's between 34 and 48.5 h (lactate output, MTT reduction and adenine leakage), and are probably linked with severe degenerative changes and are indicative of worm death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Onchocerciasis-associated limb swelling in a traveler returning from Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, Khaled; Malvy, Denis; Dhaussy, Ines; Steels, Emmanuelle; Castelein, Carine; De Dobbeler, Gilbert; Heenen, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Travelers to West Central Africa are at risk for infection with Onchocerca volvulus. We describe the case of an adventurous traveler who became infected with O volvulus after a 10-day stay in rural Cameroon. Two years after his return, he was diagnosed with a 3-month history of limb swelling with pruritus and fixed edema of the right arm. He was successfully treated by a single dose of ivermectin, with an additional treatment with doxycycline. The patient was followed-up during 1 year after therapy without relapse. Such travelers experiencing unusual dermatitis syndromes should prompt evaluation for onchocerciasis.

  12. Onchocerciasis control: biological research is still needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussinesq M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Achievements obtained by the onchocerciasis control programmes should not lead to a relaxation in the biological research on Onchocerca volvulus. Issues such as the Loa loa-related postivermectin serious adverse events, the uncertainties as to whether onchocerciasis can be eliminated by ivermectin treatments, and the possible emergence of ivermectin-resistant O. volvulus populations should be addressed proactively. Doxycycline, moxidectin and emodepside appear to be promising as alternative drugs against onchocerciasis but support to researches in immunology and genomics should also be increased to develop new control tools, including both vaccines and macrofilaricidal drugs.

  13. Wildlife reservoirs for vector-borne canine, feline and zoonotic infections in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg G. Duscher

    2015-04-01

    The role of wild ungulates, especially ruminants, as reservoirs for zoonotic disease on the other hand seems to be negligible, although the deer filaroid Onchocerca jakutensis has been described to infect humans. Deer may also harbour certain Anaplasma phagocytophilum strains with so far unclear potential to infect humans. The major role of deer as reservoirs is for ticks, mainly adults, thus maintaining the life cycle of these vectors and their distribution. Wild boar seem to be an exception among the ungulates as, in their interaction with the fox, they can introduce food-borne zoonotic agents such as Trichinella britovi and Alaria alata into the human food chain.

  14. River blindness: An old disease on the brink of elimination and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Winthrop

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, onchocerciasis (or river blindness was one of the most common infectious causes of blindness in the world. Primarily an infection of Africa, with limited distribution in the new world, disease due to the nematode Onchocerca volvulus is rapidly diminishing as a result of large public health campaigns targeting at risk populations in Africa and the Americas. Existing and newly-developed treatment strategies offer the chance to eliminate onchocercal ocular morbidity in some parts of the world. This article reviews these treatment strategies, current clinical and epidemiologic aspects of onchocerciasis, and the next steps toward elimination.

  15. Ecdysteroids and oocyte development in the black fly Simulium vittatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn Henry H

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oocyte development was studied in the autogenous black fly, Simulium vittatum (Diptera, Nematocera, a vector of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of onchocerciasis. Results Oocyte growth was nearly linear between adult eclosion and was complete by 72 hours at 21°C. The oocyte became opaque at 14 hours after eclosion indicating the initiation of protein yolk deposition. The accumulation of vitellogenin was measured using SDS-PAGE. The density of the yolk protein bands at about 200 and 65 kDa increased during the first and second days after eclosion. The amount of protein in the 200 kDa band of vitellogenin, determined using densitometry, rapidly increased between 12 and 25 hours after eclosion. Ecdysteroid levels were measured using a competitive ELISA. Ecdysteroid levels increased rapidly and subsequently declined during the first day after eclosion. Conclusion These data show a correlation between the appearance of vitellogenin in the oocyte, and the rise in ecdysteroids. A possible relationship to molting of the nematode, Onchocerca volvulus, is discussed.

  16. Anatomopatologia de bursite cervical (oncocercose encontrada em bovinos abatidos sob inspeção estadual no estado do Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.O. Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A patologia descritiva das lesões em animais domésticos de açougue permite enriquecer a literatura médica veterinária especializada em inspeção sanitária de carnes, assim como subsidiar tecnicamente os profissionais inspetores. A oncocercose é uma parasitose causada pelo nematódeo Onchocerca sp,, sendo que a espécie O. gutturosa é a que mais acomete bovinos na América do Sul. Foram avaliados, pelo exame anatomopatológico, dois casos de lesões localizadas no ligamento nucal de bovinos abatidos para o consumo. A macroscopia de um caso revelou bursite crônica, representada por grande quantidade de líquido citrino e viscoso e, ainda, muitos corpúsculos livres, elípticos e achatados desprovidos de raiz (arrizo. A microscopia dessas estruturas evidenciou moldes de fibrinas amorfos e eosinofílicos. O segundo caso foi caracterizado por bursite aguda, e a microscopia das lesões ligamentar e periligamentar revelou granulomas epitelioides com reação gigantocitária, centralizados por formações semelhantes ao Onchocerca sp.

  17. Characterization and purification of Parafilaria bovicola antigens by chromatofocusing to enhance specificity in serodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, B; Bech-Nielsen, S; Zakrisson, G

    1989-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine if the purification of Parafilaria bovicola antigens can increase the specificity of serodiagnosis of parafilariasis in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antigens released from adult worms of P. bovicola were separated by chromatofocusing on a polybuffer exchanger of the pH range 7.3-4.0 Polypeptide analysis by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed the presence of four major polypeptides with MWs of 41, 36, 24 and 20 kDa. Additional biochemical characterization identified the 24- and 20-kDa polypeptides as hydrophobic glycoproteins. The chromatofocusing purification procedures were also applied for separation of a whole-worm extract. Again, the 41- and 36-kDa antigens were identified in separate peak fractions. Using ELISA, it was shown that the 41- and 35-kDa antigens were recognized by bovine antibodies specific for P. bovicola, but not by other sera collected from cattle infected by Onchocerca gutturosa, Onchocerca lienalis, Ostertagia ostertagi and Dictyocaulus viviparus. The serological evaluation strongly suggests that the 41- and 36-kDa antigens are P. bovicola specific.

  18. Simuliidae and the transmission and control of human Onchocerciasis in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Shelley

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Factors that affect the propensity of a simuliid species to act as a host to Onchocerca volvulus and to naturally transmit this filarial worm in nature are discussed. Presence or absence of a cibarial armature is believed to be a major factor that has been previously overlooked and this is considered in relation to the choice of control methods currently advocated for onchocerciasis. The current epidemiological studies, transmission dynamics and relevant control measures are discussed for each onchocerciasis focus in Latin America.Neste trabalho são discutidos os fatores que interferem na suscetibilidade de espécies de simulídeos atuarem como hospedeiros do Onchocerca volvulus e de transmitir a filária em condições naturais. Acredita-se que a presença ou não da armadura do cibário pode ser um fator central, que anteriormente foi subestimado. Este aspecto é discutido em relação às opções em voga de métodos de controle na oncocercose. São também discutidos os estudos epidemiológicos correntes, a dinâmica de transmissão e principais medidas de controle para cada foco de oncocercose na América Latina.

  19. Prevalence and pathogenesis of some filarial nematodes infecting donkeys in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, A. M.; Ahmed, N. E.; Elakabawy, L. M.; Ramadan, M. Y.; Elmadawy, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The primary objective of the present study is to determine the commonness of filarial parasites in donkeys in Egypt, identification of the filarial species tainting them and the delivered pathogenic impact connected with the infestation. Materials and Methods: A total of 188 donkeys were examined for filarial infection. The blood samples and scraping of the cutaneous bleeding lesions were collected, stained, and inspected for microfilariae all through the period from March 2011 to October 2013. The adult worms were perceived in tissue samples acquired from skin scraping, testes, eyes, tendons, peritoneal and pleural cavities, and the ligamentum nuchae. Results: On the basis of morphological identification, 163 of 188 donkeys (86.70%) were infected with Onchocerca cervicalis (82.98%), Setaria equina (31.11%), Parafilaria multipapillosa (5.32%), and Onchocerca reticulata (4.26%). There was no significant effect of the sex on the incidence of all the encounteredfilarial worms except for S. equina, where the infection rate prevailed in males versus females (40.82% vs. 35.90%). In addition, age group of 5-15 years old exhibited a fundamentally higher predominance (p15 years old. Conclusion: The preliminary results add to our comprehension of filarial species infecting donkeys in Egypt, their impact on animal execution and production. Accentuation must be taken for avoidance, control of filarial disease, and improvement of the management system of donkeys. PMID:27651679

  20. Filariosis humana en la selva peruana: reporte de tres casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Beltrán

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta tres casos de filariosis de pacientes varones procedentes de la selva peruana (Junín, San Martín y Pucallpa. Un caso presentó filarias en el globo ocular y frotís sanguíneo, que según morfología, serología y biología molecular se determinó como un posible caso de filariosis zoonótica por Onchocerca spp. Los otros dos casos fueron causados por Dirofilaria spp. uno presentó un nódulo en el pómulo y sensación de movilidad en la zona y fue diagnosticado por serología y el último caso se le extrajo una filaria del dedo pulgar de la mano y fue identificado como tal por morfología y biología molecular. Estos casos son los primeros reportes en el Perú por Dirofilaria spp. y Onchocerca spp.

  1. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  2. Evidence for Wolbachia symbiosis in microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti from West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prajna Gayen; Sudipta Maitra; Sutapa Datta; Santi P Sinha Babu

    2010-03-01

    Wolbachia are symbiotic endobacteria that infect the majority of filarial nematodes, including Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Onchocerca volvulus. Recent studies have suggested that Wolbachia are necessary for the reproduction and survival of filarial nematodes and have highlighted the use of antibiotic therapy such as tetracycline/doxycycline as a novel method of treatment for infections caused by these organisms. Before such therapy is conceived and implemented on a large scale, it is necessary to assess the prevalence of the endosymbiont in W. bancrofti from different geographical locations. We present data from molecular and electron microscopic studies to provide evidence for Wolbachia symbiosis in W. bancrofti microfilariae collected from two districts (Bankura and Birbhum) of West Bengal, India.

  3. [The evaluation of endemic onchocerciasis in the Amou prefecture (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogba, P K; Komi, B T

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated the endemicity of the onchocerciasis in two villages of the district of Amou in Togo, Okpahoué et Onglo. We have studied 294 subjects including 136 males and 158 females representing the quarter of the population of the two villages (clinical investigation and exsanguine cutaneous biopsy): 111 persons are parasited by Onchocerca volvulus that means a prevalence rate of 37.7%. We can therefore say that the villages are in a state of "meso-endemicity". We have been able to find nodules by 20 persons among the 111 that give a percentage of 6.8 of the examined persons. Among children of 3 to 9 years old, the prevalence and the average microfilaremia are respectively 8.86 and 3.54%. Among the persons of 50 or older than 50, we found a prevalence rate of 65.95% and an average microfilaremia of 28.37.

  4. Ocular immunopathologic findings of experimental onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, J J; Rockey, J H; Bianco, A E; Soulsby, E J

    1984-04-01

    Ocular immunopathologic responses of inbred guinea pigs infected with Onchocerca microfilariae from domesticated animals were studied as a laboratory model of human ocular onchocerciasis. A single intracorneal infection of normal guinea pigs with microfilariae produced only minimal ocular lesions. In contrast, intracorneal infection of guinea pigs previously immunized by systemic infection with microfilariae produced intense corneal and uveal inflammation. Transfer of splenic lymphocytes from immunized donors to syngeneic normal recipients substituted effectively for the active immunization. Cell recipients produced marked corneal inflammatory reactions when challenged by a single intracorneal infection. Fresh and cryopreserved microfilariae produced identical reactions. The corneal inflammatory infiltrates were composed primarily of eosinophils, neutrophils, and plasma cells and resembled human onchocercal keratitis. Diethylcarbamazine citrate administration after a challenge intracorneal infection increased the severity of the corneal inflammatory response in immunized animals.

  5. Dual protonophore-chitinase inhibitors dramatically affect O. volvulus molting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyit, Major; Tricoche, Nancy; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2014-07-10

    The L3-stage-specific chitinase OvCHT1 has been implicated in the development of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of onchocerciasis. Closantel, a known anthelmintic drug, was previously discovered as a potent and specific OvCHT1 inhibitor. As closantel is also a known protonophore, we performed a simple scaffold modulation to map out the structural features that are relevant for its individual or dual biochemical roles. Furthermore, we present that either OvCHT1 inhibition or protonophoric activity was capable of affecting O. volvulus L3 molting and that the presence of both activities in a single molecule yielded more potent inhibition of the nematode's developmental process.

  6. Dual Protonophore–Chitinase Inhibitors Dramatically Affect O. volvulus Molting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The L3-stage-specific chitinase OvCHT1 has been implicated in the development of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of onchocerciasis. Closantel, a known anthelmintic drug, was previously discovered as a potent and specific OvCHT1 inhibitor. As closantel is also a known protonophore, we performed a simple scaffold modulation to map out the structural features that are relevant for its individual or dual biochemical roles. Furthermore, we present that either OvCHT1 inhibition or protonophoric activity was capable of affecting O. volvulus L3 molting and that the presence of both activities in a single molecule yielded more potent inhibition of the nematode’s developmental process. PMID:24918716

  7. Immunohistological and electron microscopic studies of microfilariae in skin and lymph nodes from onchocerciasis patients after ivermectin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darge, K; Lucius, R; Monson, M H; Behrendsen, J; Büttner, D W

    1991-12-01

    Microfilariae were studied in skin and lymph node biopsies from Liberian patients with generalised onchocerciasis 12-78 hours after administration of a single dose of 150 micrograms/kg body weight using histology, transmission electron microscopy and immunocytological staining with antibodies against an immunodominant antigen of Onchocerca volvulus. Most microfilariae in the skin appeared morphologically intact and beginning signs of degeneration were seen only on the ultrastructural level. The densities of microfilariae in the lymph nodes were about thousandfold higher in ivermectin treated patients. More than 90% of the microfilariae in the lymph nodes showed distinct signs of degeneration. Early changes were seen in the muscle cells. The disintegrating microfilariae in the lymph nodes were always encircled by eosinophils or macrophages or both cells. Immunohistological staining with antifilarial antibodies increased the detection of small and disintegrating pieces of microfilariae considerably.

  8. [Fauna and distribution of nematodes from the suborders spirurata and filariata parasitizing cattle in Dagestan, from the perspective of vertical zoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairova, M M; Ataev, A M

    2010-01-01

    Cattle of Dagestan are infested with several nematode species from the suborders Spirurata and Filariata, and extensiveness of the invasion depends greatly on the altitude above sea level. Level of infestation with Thelazia rhodesi, Th. gulosa, and Th. skrjabini is 38% in plains, 20% in submontane, and 5% in mountain zone. The same tendency is observed for the species Gongylonema pulchrum--45, 22, and 10%, respectively. Infestation with Setaria labiato-papillosa is 27.3% on average. Infestation with Onchocerca gutturosa and O. lienalis is 11% in plains and 3% in mountain and submontane zones; infestation with Stephanofilaria assamensis and S. stilesi in these zones is 18 and 5%, respectively. In mountain localities situated higher than 1000 m a. s. l. only G. pulchrum is occurred.

  9. [Important parasitic nephropathies: update from the recent literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvic, C; Nedelec, G; Debord, T; Herody, M; Didelot, F

    1999-01-01

    Renal involvement in parasitic infections are polymorphic. Plasmodium malariae often leads to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis whereas acute tubular necrosis or post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis are observed with Plasmodium falciparum. Urogenital taxis of Schistosoma haematobium is responsible for frequency of chronic tubular and interstitial nephritis. Without specific treatment, the renal function progressively deteriorates and urological complications appear. Schistosoma mansoni mainly leads to mesangial and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Membranoproliferative and membranous glomerulonephritis are reported with loasis. Onchocerca volvulus also leads to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and lipoid nephrosis. Renal involvement with Wuchereria bancrofti is rare. With leishmaniosis, it is often mild but more serious observations are described: acute glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome or acute interstitial nephritis. Renal hydatic cysts are diagnosed in two or three per cent of cases. Surgery is the only treatment. Immunosuppressive or antimalarial treatments seem to be ineffective in the outcome of chronic glomerulonephritis.

  10. Low positive predictive value of anti-Brugia malayi IgG and IgG4 serology for the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteau, S; Glaziou, P; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Plichart, C; Luquiaud, P; Cartel, J L

    1994-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for anti-Brugia malayi immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgG4 were evaluated on sera from 1561 subjects in French Polynesia for the serodiagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis, compared with the test for Onchocerca gibsoni circulating antigen (Og4C3) as a 'gold standard'. The sensitivity of the ELISA-IgG and ELISA-IgG4 assays was 90.8% and 94.5%, and the specificity was 45.9% and 50.7%. The positive predictive values were 41% and 45% respectively for an antigen prevalence rate of 30%. Thus antibody prevalences exceeded by two-fold the antigen prevalence, which itself exceeded by two-fold the prevalence of microfilaraemia.

  11. Prevalence of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Moyen Chari district, south of Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregani, Enrico Rino; Balzarini, Laura; Mbaïdoum, Narassem; Rovellini, Angelo

    2007-07-01

    Filarial parasites infect an estimated 140 million people worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans are responsible for most filarial infections in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Goundi Sanitary district:167 patients were enrolled (99 men, 68 women). M. perstans microfilariae were isolated in peripheral blood in 164 cases, while Loa loa and Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis were diagnosed in only six and three cases, respectively. The most frequent filariasis observed in our study were due to M. perstans and L. loa, while the few cases of W. bancrofti filariasis seem to have been acquired abroad. No cases of O. volvulus were observed. Microfilarial burden was not related to symptoms, but a correlation between eosinophilia and pruritus was evident. No relationship was observed between eosinophils and symptoms. The prevalence observed in symptomatic patients could reflect the real prevalence of filariasis.

  12. Interactions between parasites and insects vectors

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    Hilary Hurd

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This review stresses the importance of studies that will provide a basic understanding of the pathology of parasite-infected vector insects. This knowledge should be a vital component of the very focussed initiatives currently being funded in the areas of vector control. Vector fecundity reduction is discussed as an example of such pathology. Underlying mechanisms are being investigated in a model system, Hymenolepis diminuta-infected Tenebrio molitor and in Onchocerca-infected blackflies and Plasmodium-infected Anopheles stephensi. In all cases, host vitellogenesis is disrupted by the parasite and, in the tapeworm/beetle model, interaction between the parasite and the endocrine control of the insect's reproductive physiology has been demonstrated.

  13. Ocular changes with oral and transepidermal diethylcarbamazine therapy of onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1981-07-01

    Twenty men with moderate infection of Onchocerca volvulus were studied in a double-masked, controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with topical DEC lotion. Visual acuity and colour vision did not alter during the 6 months of observation, although 2 patients receiving DEC lotion and 3 patients receiving oral DEC developed either visual field constriction or optic atrophy. Fluffy corneal opacities were common in both groups. Intraocular microfilariae also appeared in both groups but to a greater extent in those receiving DEC lotion. New chorioretinal changes developed in 4 men receiving lotion and in only 1 receiving tablets. It is concluded that DEC lotion offers no advantage over tablets in the treatment of ocular onchocerciasis and in fact may be associated with more ocular complications than the conventional oral treatment.

  14. Changes in antibody profile after treatment of human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S J; Francis, H L; Awadzi, K; Ottesen, E A; Nutman, T B

    1990-08-01

    To define the changes in antibody response to Onchocerca volvulus antigens after treatment of patients with onchocerciasis, IgG and IgE antibodies were examined quantitatively and qualitatively in 21 patients and 3 control individuals before and sequentially for 14 days after treatment with diethylcarbamazine. The quantitative levels of IgE and IgG responses (both polyclonal and O. volvulus-specific) remained essentially unchanged for all patients, but 9 of the 21 patients showed intensified responses to one or more parasite-specific antigens, and 8 of 21 developed antibodies to previously undetected antigens. There was a significant correlation between the intensities of infection and the development of newly recognized anti-O. volvulus antibodies. These studies demonstrate that O. volvulus-specific IgE and IgG antibody responses are, at least transiently, enhanced by treatment with diethylcarbamazine and that after treatment, parasites possibly release antigens previously hidden from the host's immune response.

  15. Ivermectin treatment of ocular onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H R

    1990-01-01

    Ivermectin, a recently developed macrocyclic lactone with broad antiparasitic activity, has been shown by a series of clinical trials to be safe and effective in the treatment of human infection with Onchocerca volvulus. Although it is rapidly microfilaricidal, it does not cause a severe reaction as is seen with diethylcarbamazine treatment. In patients with onchocerciasis, a single oral dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/Kg) repeated once a year leads to a marked reduction in skin microfilaria counts and ocular involvement, although ivermectin has no known long-lasting effects on the adult worms. With treatment there is no significant exacerbation of either anterior or posterior segment eye disease even in those with severe ocular disease. Treatment leads to a marked and prolonged improvement in ocular status. Because of its safety and efficacy, ivermectin can be used on a mass scale and promises to revolutionize the treatment of onchocerciasis.

  16. The status of ivermectin in the treatment of human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1989-10-01

    Ivermectin is a macrocyclic lactone that has widespread antiparasitic activity. Numerous clinical trials have shown that ivermectin is safe and effective in the treatment of human infection with Onchocerca volvulus. Although it is rapidly microfilaricidal, it does not cause a severe reaction, as is seen with diethylcarbamazine treatment. The drug temporarily interrupts production of microfilaria but has not known long-lasting effects on the adult worms. In patients with onchocerciasis, a single oral dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) repeated once a year leads to a marked reduction in skin microfilaria counts and ocular involvement. At this dose, ivermectin causes minimal side effects and is sufficiently free of severe reactions to be used on a mass scale. It promises to revolutionize the treatment of onchocerciasis.

  17. Ivermectin treatment of onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H R

    1989-11-01

    Ivermectin is a recently developed macrocyclic lactone that has widespread antiparasitic activity. A series of clinical trials has shown that ivermectin is safe and effective in the treatment of human infection with Onchocerca volvulus. Although it is rapidly microfilaricidal, it does not cause a severe reaction as is seen with diethylcarbamazine treatment. The drug also temporarily interrupts production of microfilaria but has no known long-lasting effects on the adult worms. In patients with onchocerciasis, a single oral dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) repeated once a year leads to a marked reduction in skin microfilaria counts and ocular involvement. At this dose, ivermectin causes minimal side effects and appears to be sufficiently free of severe adverse reactions to be used on a mass scale. Its use promises to revolutionise the treatment of onchocerciasis.

  18. Black fly (Diptera:Simuliidae) salivary secretions: importance in vector competence and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp, E W; Cupp, M S

    1997-03-01

    When blood-feeding, black flies introduce secretions into the feeding lesion that act in a coordinated manner on the 3 arms of the vertebrate hemostatic system (platelet aggregation, coagulation, and vasoconstriction). Apyrase activity inhibits platelet aggregation and is ubiquitous in the saliva of black flies, although activity per gland varies by species and has a positive association with anthropophagy. Anticoagulants target components in the final common pathway of the coagulation cascade, including factors V, Xa, and II (thrombin). The antithrombin salivary protein may exert a redundant effect by inhibiting the role of thrombin in platelet aggregation. Antithrombin presence and activity also varies among black fly species, and exhibits a positive correlation with zoophagy. Vasodilation of capillaries to increase blood supply to the feeding wound appears to be an important requirement for Simulium spp., because substantial erythema-inducing activity, has been demonstrated in salivary glands of all New World species examined. Salivary glands of Simulium ochraceum (Walker), a highly anthropophilic vector of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckhart), contain greater vasodilator activity than several other species, including S. metallicum Bellardi, a secondary zoophagic vector of human onchocerciasis. Simulium vittatum Zetterstedt saliva affects immune cell responses and cytokine production. The ability of the saliva to modulate components of the host immune system provides an opportunity for enhancing transmission of pathogens during bloodfeeding. Thus, the likely possibility that effective pathogen transmission relies on vector saliva may complement present efforts aimed at target epitopes of O. volvulus or identify additional molecules to be investigated as part of a "river blindness" vaccine cocktail. Components in saliva also may enhance the transmission of other microbial agents either by a cofeeding process similar to that observed in ixodid ticks or through rupture

  19. Research for new drugs for elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette C. Kuesel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Onchocerciasis is a parasitic, vector borne disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus. More than 99% of the population at risk of infection live in Africa. Onchocerciasis control was initiated in West Africa in 1974 with vector control, later complemented by ivermectin mass drug administration and in the other African endemic countries in 1995 with annual community directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI. This has significantly reduced infection prevalence. Together with proof-of-concept for onchocerciasis elimination with annual CDTI from foci in Senegal and Mali, this has resulted in targeting onchocerciasis elimination in selected African countries by 2020 and in 80% of African countries by 2025. The challenges for meeting these targets include the number of endemic countries where conflict has delayed or interrupted control programmes, cross-border foci, potential emergence of parasite strains with low susceptibility to ivermectin and co-endemicity of loiasis, another parasitic vector borne disease, which slows down or prohibits CDTI implementation. Some of these challenges could be addressed with new drugs or drug combinations with a higher effect on Onchocerca volvulus than ivermectin. This paper reviews the path from discovery of new compounds to their qualification for large scale use and the support regulatory authorities provide for development of drugs for neglected tropical diseases. The status of research for new drugs or treatment regimens for onchocerciasis along the path to regulatory approval and qualification for large scale use is reviewed. This research includes new regimens and combinations of ivermectin and albendazole, antibiotics targeting the O. volvulus endosymbiont Wolbachia, flubendazole, moxidectin and emodepside and discovery of new compounds.

  20. Cladistic analysis of the Neotropical genera Cerqueirellum Py-Daniel, 1983, Coscaroniellum Py-Daniel, 1983 and Shelleyellum Py-Daniel & Pessoa, 2005 (Diptera: Simuliidae Análise cladística dos gêneros neotropicais Cerqueirellum Py-Daniel, 1983, Coscaroniellum Py-Daniel, 1983 e Shelleyellum Py-Daniel & Pessoa, 2005 (Diptera: Simuliidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Arley Costa Pessoa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Females of simuliid black flies are haematophagous insects and vectors of several pathogenic agents of human diseases such as the filarial worms Mansonella ozzardi and Onchocerca volvulus. The genus Cerqueirellum is one of the most important groups of vectors of mansonellosis and onchocerciasis diseases in South America, and the genera Coscaroniellum and Shelleyellum are phylogenetically close to Cerqueirellum. There is not yet an agreement among authors about the generic classification of the species which compose these three genera, being all lumped by some taxonomists within Psaroniocompsa. A cladistic analysis of all species of Coscaroniellum, Cerqueirellum, and Shelleyellum, based on 41 morphological characters were done. Species closely related to Cerqueirellum were included in the analysis. The genera Cerqueirellum, Coscaroniellum and Shelleyellum were demonstrated as consistent basal entities and well-defined monophyletic clades.As fêmeas de piuns ou borrachudos da família Simuliidae são hematófagas e vetoras de diversos patógenos, destacando-se os vermes filarióides Mansonella ozzardi e Onchocerca volvulus. Dentre os grupos supra-específicos que são vetores de mansonelose e oncocercose na América do Sul, destaca-se o gênero Cerqueirellum. Os gêneros Coscaroniellum e Shelleyellum são filogeneticamente muito próximos a Cerqueirellum. Não existia concordância quanto à validade de Cerqueirellum e Coscaroniellum como clados supra-específicos, sendo ambos os gêneros incluídos, por uma escola taxonômica, como grupos de espécies em Psaroniocompsa. Neste trabalho é feita uma análise filogenética baseada em caracteres morfológicos dos três gêneros.. Os gêneros Cerqueirellum, Coscaroniellum e Shelleyellum. apresentaram-se como entidades basais válidas, consistentes e monofiléticas.

  1. Simuliidae (Diptera, Culicomorpha no Brasil - XII sobre o gênero Thyrsopelma Enderlein, 1934: descrição de T. jeteri Sp.N., considerações sobre o cibário e chave para as pupas Brazilian Simuliidae (Diptera, Culicomorpha - XII about the genus Thyrsopelma Enderlein, 1934: description of the T. jeteri new species, considerations related with cibarium and key for the pupae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor PY-Daniel

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available É acrescentado um novo caráter pupal para a espécie T. hirtipupa (Lutz,1910. É evidenciada a existência de dentes no cibário da fêmea de T. guianense (Wise,1911, principal espécie envolvida na transmissão da filaria Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart,1893 no foco da região amazônica. É proposta uma nova relação para os artículos antenais da larva de T. guianense. É descrita uma nova espécie para o gênero Thyrsopelma Enderlein,1934, T. jeteri sp.n., proveniente da bacia hidrográfica do rio Uruguai, no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. São apresentados os parâmetros físico-químicos do criadouro de onde provem o material tipo. É apresentada uma chave para diferenciação das pupas das espécies constantes neste gênero.A new pupal character is increased for T. hirtipupa (Lutz,1910. The existence of teeth is evidenced in the female cibarium of T. guianense (Wise,1911, main species involved in the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart,1893 in the focus of the Amazonian area. A new relationship is proposed among the antenna articles of the T. guianense larva. A new species is described for the genus Thyrsopelma Enderlein,1934, T. jeteri sp.n., collected in Uruguay basin, State of Rio Grande do Sul. The physico-chemical parameters are presented for the type locality. A key is presented for the pupal differentiation inside of Thyrsopelma.

  2. Research for new drugs for elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuesel, Annette C

    2016-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a parasitic, vector borne disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus. More than 99% of the population at risk of infection live in Africa. Onchocerciasis control was initiated in West Africa in 1974 with vector control, later complemented by ivermectin mass drug administration and in the other African endemic countries in 1995 with annual community directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI.) This has significantly reduced infection prevalence. Together with proof-of-concept for onchocerciasis elimination with annual CDTI from foci in Senegal and Mali, this has resulted in targeting onchocerciasis elimination in selected African countries by 2020 and in 80% of African countries by 2025. The challenges for meeting these targets include the number of endemic countries where conflict has delayed or interrupted control programmes, cross-border foci, potential emergence of parasite strains with low susceptibility to ivermectin and co-endemicity of loiasis, another parasitic vector borne disease, which slows down or prohibits CDTI implementation. Some of these challenges could be addressed with new drugs or drug combinations with a higher effect on Onchocerca volvulus than ivermectin. This paper reviews the path from discovery of new compounds to their qualification for large scale use and the support regulatory authorities provide for development of drugs for neglected tropical diseases. The status of research for new drugs or treatment regimens for onchocerciasis along the path to regulatory approval and qualification for large scale use is reviewed. This research includes new regimens and combinations of ivermectin and albendazole, antibiotics targeting the O. volvulus endosymbiont Wolbachia, flubendazole, moxidectin and emodepside and discovery of new compounds.

  3. Chemotherapy in the treatment, control, and elimination of human onchocerciasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higazi TB

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tarig B Higazi,1 Timothy G Geary,2 Charles D Mackenzie3,41Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University Zanesville, Zanesville, OH, USA; 2Institute of Parasitology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Center for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK; 4Department of Pathobiology & Diagnostic Investigation, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USAAbstract: Onchocerciasis treatment is one of the most positive stories in tropical medicine although major challenges remain to reaching the ultimate goal of disease elimination. Such challenges are to be expected when the therapeutic goal is to kill and safely remove a large multistage, efficient, metazoan infectious agent such as Onchocerca volvulus that has an exceptionally complicated relationship with its host. Successful control of onchocerciasis has often been hampered by host reactions following chemotherapy, that can sometimes cause significant tissue pathology. Presence of other filariae, particularly Loa loa, in endemic onchocerciasis-treatment areas also poses severe problems due to adverse reactions caused by drug-induced death of the coincident microfilariae of this usually clinically benign species. Although ivermectin has been very successful, there is a need to enhance the progress toward elimination of onchocerciasis; new drugs and their efficient use are keys to this. The permanent absence of Onchocerca microfilaridermia, defined as the lack of resurgence of skin microfilarial loads after treatment, is the ultimate characteristic of a useful new chemotherapeutic agent. Several drugs are under investigation to achieve this, including the reassessment of currently available and previously tested agents, such as the antibiotic, doxycycline, which targets the adult parasites through its anti-Wolbachia endosymbiont activity. Flubendazole, a benzimidazole derivative approved for treatment of human gastrointestinal nematodes, is

  4. An improved dosing schedule for ivermectin as a microfilaricidal agent against onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, E N; Okonkwo, P O; Ogbodo, S O

    1997-12-01

    The introduction of ivermectin therapy has proved to be the most important advance in the management and control of onchocerciaisis. By using the standard dosing schedule (150 micrograms/kg) in a mass chemotherapy campaign in Awhum, Nigeria, 128 (14.6%) of 875 eligible subjects used in this study were underdosed while 696 (79.6%) and 51 (5.8%) were overdosed and correctly dosed, respectively. Since underdosing is more serious than overdosing, an improved dosing schedule (300 micrograms/kg) is hereby suggested, bearing in mind that ivermectin is safe at doses well in excess of the standard dose. 824 (94.2%) And 51 (5.8%) of these eligible subjects would be overdosed and correctly dosed respectively, if this improved dosing schedule ( 60 kg, 24 mg (4 tablets)) were to be employed. This dosing schedule is worth adopting and an investigation of the effects of these high single doses of ivermectin on adult Onchocerca volvolus worms is advocated. Furthermore 'non-responders' may be investigated for doses administered.

  5. The chemotherapy of onchocerciasis X. An assessment of four single dose treatment regimes of MK-933 (ivermectin) in human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadzi, K; Dadzie, K Y; Shulz-Key, H; Haddock, D R; Gilles, H M; Aziz, M A

    1985-02-01

    Nineteen patients from an area of vector control in the savanna region of Northern Ghana, all with moderate to heavy infections with Onchocerca volvulus and some with ocular involvement, were treated with 50, 100, 150 or 200 micrograms kg-1 of ivermectin. Detailed monitoring of clinical and ocular reactions and of alterations in skin microfilarial counts and laboratory indices were carried out during the first 28 days. Microfilarial counts in skin snips and detailed ocular examinations were then repeated at intervals over a period of nine months. Ivermectin slowly eliminated microfilariae from the skin and eye without serious adverse clinical or ocular reactions in all treated groups. There was little difference in efficacy between doses of 100, 150 and 200 micrograms kg-1, and these were more effective than the 50 micrograms kg-1 dose. Very low levels of skin microfilariae were maintained for nine months. Microfilariae were not eliminated from the eye for at least three months. The drug was neither macrofilaricidal nor embryotoxic. However, it produced a dose-dependent stimulation of embryogenesis manifest at one month and succeeded by a suppression of embryogenesis at three months after therapy. In areas where transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted, ivermectin may need not be given more often than once a year. The efficacy of the drug on single dosage and the mild adverse reactions produced, if confirmed in subsequent controlled studies, would greatly simplify the treatment of onchocerciasis and would reintroduce new concepts of the role of chemotherapy in the control of onchocerciasis.

  6. New records of Mansonella ozzardi: a parasite that is spreading from the state of Amazonas to previously uninfected areas of the state of Acre in the Purus River region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Yara Leite; Rodrigues, Gabriel; Alves, Marilene Costa; Moraes, Mario Augusto Pinto; Banic, Dalma Maria; Maia-Herzog, Marilza

    2014-02-01

    Mansonella ozzardi infections are common in the riverside communities along the Solimões, Negro and Purus Rivers in the state of Amazonas (AM). However, little is known about the presence of this parasite in communities located in regions bordering AM and the state of Acre. The prevalence rate of M. ozzardi infections was determined in blood samples from volunteers according to the Knott method. A total of 355 volunteers from six riverine communities were enrolled in the study and 65 (18.3%) were found to be infected with M. ozzardi. As expected, most of the infections (25%) occurred in individuals involved in agriculture, cattle rearing and fishing and an age/sex group analysis revealed that the prevalence increased beginning in the 40-50-years-of-age group and reached 33% in both sexes in individuals over 50 years of age. Based on the described symptomatology, articular pain and headache were found to be significantly higher among infected individuals (56 and 65% prevalence, respectively, p < 0.05). Sera from volunteers were subjected to ELISA using a cocktail of recombinant proteins from Onchocerca volvulus to evaluate the specificity of the test in an endemic M. ozzardi region. No cross-reactions between M. ozzardi-infected individuals and recombinant O. volvulus proteins were detected, thus providing information on the secure use of this particular cocktail in areas where these parasites are sympatric.

  7. Diagnosis of brugian filariasis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine B Poole

    Full Text Available In this study we developed and evaluated a Brugia Hha I repeat loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for the rapid detection of Brugia genomic DNA. Amplification was detected using turbidity or fluorescence as readouts. Reactions generated a turbidity threshold value or a clear visual positive within 30 minutes using purified genomic DNA equivalent to one microfilaria. Similar results were obtained using DNA isolated from blood samples containing B. malayi microfilariae. Amplification was specific to B. malayi and B. timori, as no turbidity was observed using DNA from the related filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus or Dirofilaria immitis, or from human or mosquito. Furthermore, the assay was most robust using a new strand-displacing DNA polymerase termed Bst 2.0 compared to wild-type Bst DNA polymerase, large fragment. The results indicate that the Brugia Hha I repeat LAMP assay is rapid, sensitive and Brugia-specific with the potential to be developed further as a field tool for diagnosis and mapping of brugian filariasis.

  8. Shaking the Tree: Multi-locus Sequence Typing Usurps Current Onchocercid (Filarial Nematode) Phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bourret, Jérôme; Junker, Kerstin; Guerrero, Ricardo; Cañizales, Israel; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Satoto, Tri Baskoro T.; Cardenas-Callirgos, Jorge Manuel; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Raccurt, Christian; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years, a number of molecular analyses have been performed to determine the evolutionary relationships of Onchocercidae, a family of filarial nematodes encompassing several species of medical or veterinary importance. However, opportunities for broad taxonomic sampling have been scarce, and analyses were based mainly on 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. While being suitable for species differentiation, these mitochondrial genes cannot be used to infer phylogenetic hypotheses at higher taxonomic levels. In the present study, 48 species, representing seven of eight subfamilies within the Onchocercidae, were sampled and sequences of seven gene loci (nuclear and mitochondrial) analysed, resulting in the hitherto largest molecular phylogenetic investigation into this family. Although our data support the current hypothesis that the Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Icosiellinae subfamilies separated early from the remaining onchocercids, Setariinae was recovered as a well separated clade. Dirofilaria, Loxodontofilaria and Onchocerca constituted a strongly supported clade despite belonging to different subfamilies (Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae). Finally, the separation between Splendidofilariinae, Dirofilariinae and Onchocercinae will have to be reconsidered. PMID:26588229

  9. ACUTE FILARIAL INFECTION PRESENTING WITH FITS AND A LTERED SENSORIUM- RARE PRESENTATION. A CASE REPORT

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    Mona

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Filarial worms are nematodes that live in lymphatic s and subcutaneous tissues. Eight filarial species are known to infect humans out of which most serious filarial infections are caused mostly by four parasites like Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. These parasites ar e transmitted by specific species of mosquitoes or other arthropods. The clinical manife stations of filarial diseases develop relatively slowly, these infections should be consi dered to induce chronic diseases with possible long- term debilitating effects. Characteristically , filarial disease is more acute and intense in newly exposed individuals than in natives of endemic areas. [1] Lymphatic filariasis (LF causes lymphoedema, hydrocele and acute attacks of dermato- lymphangio-adenitis. [2] It represents a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. [3] It is mainly a disease of the adult and older age-classes and appear s to be more prevalent in males. [4] Lymphatic filariasis is a major tropical disease aff ecting approximately 120 million people worldwide. India contributes about 40% of the tota l global burden and accounts for about 50% of the people at the risk of infection. A recent sur vey has shown that out of the 25 States/Union territories in India, 22 are endemic and nine state s (Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat, Kerala, Maharashtra, Orissa, Tamil Nadu, Utter Pradesh and West Bengal contribute to about 95% of total burden. W. bancrofti is the predominant species accounting for about 98% of the national burden. [5

  10. A molecular marker for the identification of Simulium squamosum (Diptera: Simuliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, R; Wilson, M D; Rubio, J M; Post, R J

    2004-03-01

    All except one of the important groups of West African vectors of Onchocerca volvulus that lie within the Simulium damnosum complex can be distinguished from each other using morphological characteristics. The exception is S. squamosum, which overlaps with other species, and this results in significant levels of misidentification. Variation in the untranscribed H3-H4 histone intergenic spacer region of flies of the S. damnosum complex has now been investigated. Although a CAA/CAG microsatellite was found to be hyper-variable and unsuitable for species diagnosis, a 10-bp indel seemed to vary in a species-specific manner. This indel was apparently absent from S. squamosum but present in all of the other species tested (S. damnosum s.s., S. sirbanum, S yahense, S. sanctipauli and S. leonense/konkourense). It should now be possible to identify individual, adult, female S. squamosum from the absence of the indel, using a PCR-based amplification and agarose- or polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, thus removing the major barrier to the routine identification of unknown samples.

  11. Ocular findings in a double-blind study of ivermectin versus diethylcarbamazine versus placebo in the treatment of onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadzie, K Y; Bird, A C; Awadzi, K; Schulz-Key, H; Gilles, H M; Aziz, M A

    1987-01-01

    The effect of ivermectin, a new microfilaricide, was assessed in a double blind trial against diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) and placebo. Fifty-nine adult males with moderate to heavy infection with Onchocerca volvulus and with eye involvement were recruited from an area under Onchocerciasis Control Programme (OCP) vector control in Northern Ghana. They were randomly assigned to an eight-day treatment with ivermectin as a single dose of 12 mg on day 1 followed by placebo for the remaining seven days, or DEC, total dose 1.3 g, or placebo, and ophthalmological review was undertaken over a period of one year. DEC acted quickly to eliminate microfilariae from the eye and was associated with reactive ocular changes and in a few cases functional deficit. Ivermectin eliminated microfilariae slowly from the anterior chamber of the eye over a period of six months. The ocular inflammatory reaction was minimal and no functional deficit occurred. It is postulated that the observed slow action of ivermectin on the eye may be attributed in part to its instability to cross the blood-aqueous humour barrier because of its molecular size as a macrocyclic lactone causing microfilariae to leave the eye gradually along a newly created gradient. Ivermectin is an effective microfilaricide with minimal ocular adverse effect and could therefore be suitable for widespread application without strict supervision. PMID:3548811

  12. Development of a novel trap for the collection of black flies of the Simulium ochraceum complex.

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    Mario A Rodríguez-Pérez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human landing collections are currently the standard method for collecting onchocerciasis vectors in Africa and Latin America. As part of the efforts to develop a trap to replace human landing collections for the monitoring and surveillance of onchocerciasis transmission, comprehensive evaluations of several trap types were conducted to assess their ability to collect Simulium ochraceum sensu lato, one of the principal vectors of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin America. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diverse trap designs with numerous modifications and bait variations were evaluated for their abilities to collect S. Ochraceum s.l. females. These traps targeted mostly host seeking flies. A novel trap dubbed the "Esperanza window trap" showed particular promise over other designs. When baited with CO2 and BG-lure (a synthetic blend of human odor components a pair of Esperanza window traps collected numbers of S. Ochraceum s.l. females similar to those collected by a team of vector collectors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Esperanza window trap, when baited with chemical lures and CO2 can be used to collect epidemiologically significant numbers of Simulium ochraceum s.l., potentially serving as a replacement for human landing collections for evaluation of the transmission of O. volvulus.

  13. Review of zoonotic parasites in medical and veterinary fields in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Heejeong

    2009-10-01

    Zoonotic parasites are animal parasites that can infect humans. The major zoonotic protozoa in the Republic of Korea are Babesia bovis, Chilomastix mesnili, Cryptosporidium parvum, Endolimax nana, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hitolytica, Giardia lamblia, Iodamoeba bütschlii, Pneumocystis carinii, Sarcocystis cruzi, and Toxoplasma gondii. The major zoonotic helminths in Korea include trematodes, cestodes, and nematodes. Trematodes are Clonorchis sinensis, Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma spp., Fasciola hepatica, Heterophyes nocens, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Paragonimus westermani. Cestodes are Diphyllobothrium latum, Dipylidium caninum, Echinococcus granulosus, Hymenolepis nana, Raillietina tetragona, sparganum (Spirometra spp.), Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica. Nematodes are Ancylostoma caninum, Brugia malayi, Capillaria hepatica, Dirofilaria immitis, Gnathostoma dololesi, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Loa loa, Onchocerca gibsoni, Strongyloides stercoralis, Thelazia callipaeda, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus orientalis, Trichuris trichiura, and Trichuris vulpis. The one arthropod is Sarcoptes scabiei. Many of these parasites have disappeared or were in decline after the 1990's. Since the late 1990's, the important zoonotic protozoa have been C. parvum, E. nana, E. coli, E. hitolytica, G. lamblia, I. buetschlii, P. carinii and T. gondii. The important zoonotic helminths have been C. sinensis, H. nocens, M. yokogawai, P. westermani, D. latum, T. asiatica, sparganum, B. malayi, T. orientalis, T. callipaeda and T. spiralis. However, outbreaks of these parasites are only in a few endemic areas. The outbreaks of Enterobius vermicularis and head lice, human parasites, have recently increased in the kindergartens and primary schools in the Republic of Korea.

  14. New observations on ocular onchocerciasis; related pathological methods and the pathogenesis of the various eye lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RODGER, F C

    1957-01-01

    The records of 2000 blind or partially blind persons in the onchocerciasis areas of West Africa provided the background information for this report.The author has grouped his material in three sections. The first of these deals with diagnostic methods, and contains the results of skin and conjunctival biopsies, as well as a description of onchocercomas and an estimate of the life-span of Onchocerca adults.Next, the pathogenesis of ocular lesions is discussed in the light of evidence obtained from a series of animal experiments designed to test two theories-namely, the existence of an allergic state and damage by toxins.In the last section, which is devoted to clinical observations, the author demonstrates the existence of a relationship between the posterior segmental lesion and vitamin A deficiency, and shows that punctate corneal opacities result more often from certain virus diseases and malaria than from onchocerciasis. A description follows of various degenerations due to a local nutritional disorder combined with vitamin A deficiency in onchocercal limbitis and anterior uveitis.

  15. Prevalence of River Epilepsy in the Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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    Robert Colebunders

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased prevalence of epilepsy has been reported in many onchocerciasis endemic areas.To determine the prevalence and distribution of epilepsy in an onchocerciasis endemic region in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC.An epilepsy prevalence study was carried out in 2014, in two localities of the Bas-Uélé district, an onchocerciasis endemic region in the Orientale Province of the DRC. Risk factors for epilepsy were identified using a random effects logistic regression model and the distribution of epilepsy cases was investigated using the Moran's I statistic of spatial auto-correlation.Among the 12,776 individuals of Dingila, 373 (2.9% individuals with epilepsy were identified. In a house-to-house survey in Titule, 68 (2.3% of the 2,908 people who participated in the survey were found to present episodes of epilepsy. Epilepsy showed a marked spatial pattern with clustering of cases occurring within and between adjacent households. Individual risk of epilepsy was found to be associated with living close to the nearest fast flowing river where blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae-the vector of Onchocerca volvulus-oviposit and breed.The prevalence of epilepsy in villages in the Bas-Uélé district in the DRC was higher than in non-onchocerciasis endemic regions in Africa. Living close to a blackflies infested river was found to be a risk factor for epilepsy.

  16. New records of Mansonella ozzardi: a parasite that is spreading from the state of Amazonas to previously uninfected areas of the state of Acre in the Purus River region

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    Yara Leite Adami

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mansonella ozzardi infections are common in the riverside communities along the Solimões, Negro and Purus Rivers in the state of Amazonas (AM. However, little is known about the presence of this parasite in communities located in regions bordering AM and the state of Acre. The prevalence rate of M. ozzardi infections was determined in blood samples from volunteers according to the Knott method. A total of 355 volunteers from six riverine communities were enrolled in the study and 65 (18.3% were found to be infected with M. ozzardi. As expected, most of the infections (25% occurred in individuals involved in agriculture, cattle rearing and fishing and an age/sex group analysis revealed that the prevalence increased beginning in the 40-50-years-of-age group and reached 33% in both sexes in individuals over 50 years of age. Based on the described symptomatology, articular pain and headache were found to be significantly higher among infected individuals (56 and 65% prevalence, respectively, p < 0.05. Sera from volunteers were subjected to ELISA using a cocktail of recombinant proteins from Onchocerca volvulus to evaluate the specificity of the test in an endemic M. ozzardi region. No cross-reactions between M. ozzardi-infected individuals and recombinant O. volvulus proteins were detected, thus providing information on the secure use of this particular cocktail in areas where these parasites are sympatric.

  17. Identifying sub-optimal responses to ivermectin in the treatment of River Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churcher, Thomas S; Pion, Sébastien D S; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Prichard, Roger K; Awadzi, Kwablah; Boussinesq, Michel; Collins, Richard C; Whitworth, James A; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2009-09-29

    Identification of drug resistance before it becomes a public health concern requires a clear distinction between what constitutes a normal and a suboptimal treatment response. A novel method of analyzing drug efficacy studies in human helminthiases is proposed and used to investigate recent claims of atypical responses to ivermectin in the treatment of River Blindness. The variability in the rate at which Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae repopulate host's skin following ivermectin treatment is quantified using an individual-based onchocerciasis mathematical model. The model estimates a single skin repopulation rate for every host sampled, allowing reports of suboptimal responses to be statistically compared with responses from populations with no prior exposure to ivermectin. Statistically faster rates of skin repopulation were observed in 3 Ghanaian villages (treated 12-17 times), despite the wide variability in repopulation rates observed in ivermectin-naïve populations. Another village previously thought to have high rates of skin repopulation was shown to be indistinguishable from the normal treatment response. The model is used to generate testable hypotheses to identify whether atypical rates of skin repopulation by microfilariae could result from low treatment coverage alone or provide evidence of decreased ivermectin efficacy. Further work linking phenotypic poor responses to treatment with parasite molecular genetics markers will be required to confirm drug resistance. Limitations of the skin-snipping method for estimating parasite load indicates that changes in the distribution of microfilarial repopulation rates, rather than their absolute values, maybe a more sensitive indicator of emerging ivermectin resistance.

  18. Development of a Novel Trap for the Collection of Black Flies of the Simulium ochraceum Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Adeleke, Monsuru A.; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Garza-Hernández, Javier A.; Reyes-Villanueva, Filiberto; Cupp, Eddie W.; Toé, Laurent; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Américo D.; Katholi, Charles R.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human landing collections are currently the standard method for collecting onchocerciasis vectors in Africa and Latin America. As part of the efforts to develop a trap to replace human landing collections for the monitoring and surveillance of onchocerciasis transmission, comprehensive evaluations of several trap types were conducted to assess their ability to collect Simulium ochraceum sensu lato, one of the principal vectors of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin America. Methodology/Principal Findings Diverse trap designs with numerous modifications and bait variations were evaluated for their abilities to collect S. Ochraceum s.l. females. These traps targeted mostly host seeking flies. A novel trap dubbed the “Esperanza window trap” showed particular promise over other designs. When baited with CO2 and BG-lure (a synthetic blend of human odor components) a pair of Esperanza window traps collected numbers of S. Ochraceum s.l. females similar to those collected by a team of vector collectors. Conclusions/Significance The Esperanza window trap, when baited with chemical lures and CO2 can be used to collect epidemiologically significant numbers of Simulium ochraceum s.l., potentially serving as a replacement for human landing collections for evaluation of the transmission of O. volvulus. PMID:24116169

  19. [Bursitis with severe tendon and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, K; Räber, M; Sydler, T; Muggli, E; Hässig, M; Guscetti, F

    2011-11-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as «perigonitis», «stable-syndrome» or «bursitis bicipitalis femoris» were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases.

  20. Onchocerciasis in Ecuador: Prevalence of Infection on the Ecuador-Colombia Border in the Province of Esmeraldas

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    Joy R Guderian

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of onchocerciasis infection was determined in communities on 7 rivers located in the northern area of the cantón San Lorenzo, province of Esmeraldas. Diagnosis of the infection was obtained by skin biopsies and recombinant-antigen based-serology. No evidence of infection was detected in 9 communities studied along the Río Mataje, which forms the frontier between Ecuador and Colombia, nor in 10 adjacent communities located on 5 interior rivers. Evidence for Onchocerca volvulus infection was found in 4 communities on the Río Tululví with the following prevalence: La Boca (3.5% by biopsy and 3.9% by serology, Guayabal (9.1% by both biopsy and serology, La Ceiva (51.5% by biopsy and 53% by serology, and Salidero (4% by biopsy and 7.7% by serology. A few individuals in these communities were seropositive for O. volvulus in the absence of detectable dermal microfilariae: these might harbor very light or prepatent infections. No clinical disease attributable to onchocerciasis was found. The infected communities will be included in the ivermectin-based National Control Program for the disease, with no evidence of the infection having extended north of the Ecuadorian-colombian border

  1. Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe

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    Otranto Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH causing diseases. A plethora of intrinsic biological and extrinsic factors affect the relationship among helminths, vectors and animal hosts, in a constantly changing environment. Although canine dirofilarioses by Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens are key examples of the success of VBH spreading into non-endemic areas, another example is represented by Thelazia callipaeda eyeworm, an emergent pathogen of dogs, cats and humans in several regions of Europe. The recent finding of Onchocerca lupi causing canine and human infestation in Europe and overseas renders the picture of VBH even more complicated. Similarly, tick-transmitted filarioids of the genus Cercopithifilaria infesting the skin of dogs were recently shown to be widespread in Europe. Although for most of the VBH above there is an increasing accumulation of research data on their distribution at national level, the overall impact of the diseases they cause in dogs and humans is not fully recognised in many aspects. This review investigates the reasons underlying the increasing trend in distribution of VBH in Europe and discusses the diagnostic and control strategies currently available. In addition, this article provides the authors’ opinion on some topics related to VBH that would deserve further scientific investigation.

  2. Structure and function of the cibarial armature in Simuliidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, G D

    1994-07-01

    Cibarial armature morphology in adult female blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) is described using scanning electron microscopy. Three distinct types of armature are recognized, comprising those with teeth, e.g. Simulium ochraceum, S. ornatum, S. veracruzanum and S. vorax, those with spicules, e.g. Austrosimulium bancrofti, S. damnosum, S. exiguum, S. metallicum and S. neavei; and those lacking these projections, e.g. Prosimulium rufipes and S. lineatum. Whereas the armature is poorly developed in vectors of human onchocerciasis such as S. damnosum, S. exiguum, S. metallicum and S. neavei, the well-developed armature in S. ochraceum, S. veracruzanum and S. vorax does not prevent these species becoming infected with Onchocerca spp. (Nematoda: Onchocercidae). Hence the armature is not primarily a mechanism to counteract microfilaria superinfection. Since cibarial armatures are more developed in the haematophagous females than in the males of certain Families of flies, e.g. Ceratopogonidae, Culicidae, Phlebotominae and Simuliidae in the sub-order Nematocera, evidently the armature has evolved in response to the blood-feeding habit. As the suction of imbibed blood by the cibarial pump may require a valve mechanism to prevent back-flow, it is suggested that the armature is primarily for this purpose. Secondarily, the cibarial armature presents a damaging barrier against ingested microfilariae.

  3. Identification, Characterization, and Structure of Tm16 from Trichuris muris

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    Zhuyun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichuriasis is a disease of poverty for which excretory and secretory (ES products that induce the protective immunity are being investigated as candidate vaccines antigens. In this study, ES products of T. muris and immune sera were produced. The immune sera recognized more than 20 proteins on a 2D-gel of ES products of T. muris adult worms. Tm16 was one of the proteins identified by mass spectrometry. Tm16 shares 57% sequence identity with Ov16, an immunodominant diagnostic antigen from Onchocerca volvulus. Recombinant Tm16 with a carboxyl terminal hexahistidine was produced using Pichia pastoris. Polyclonal antibodies against rTm16 were generated by one-prime and two-boost immunization of three female Balb/c mice with 25 μg of recombinant Tm16 emulsified with ISA720 adjuvant. These polyclonal antibodies confirmed that Tm16 is localized to the ES products and the soluble fraction of the adult worm. Additionally, the high-resolution crystal structure of Tm16 was solved by molecular replacement. Tm16 belongs to the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding-like protein (PEBP1 family and this is the first structure of a PEBP1 from a parasite.

  4. Identification, Characterization, and Structure of Tm16 from Trichuris muris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuyun; Kelleher, Alan; Tabb, Shanii; Wei, Junfei; Pollet, Jeroen; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zhan, Bin; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A

    2017-01-01

    Trichuriasis is a disease of poverty for which excretory and secretory (ES) products that induce the protective immunity are being investigated as candidate vaccines antigens. In this study, ES products of T. muris and immune sera were produced. The immune sera recognized more than 20 proteins on a 2D-gel of ES products of T. muris adult worms. Tm16 was one of the proteins identified by mass spectrometry. Tm16 shares 57% sequence identity with Ov16, an immunodominant diagnostic antigen from Onchocerca volvulus. Recombinant Tm16 with a carboxyl terminal hexahistidine was produced using Pichia pastoris. Polyclonal antibodies against rTm16 were generated by one-prime and two-boost immunization of three female Balb/c mice with 25 μg of recombinant Tm16 emulsified with ISA720 adjuvant. These polyclonal antibodies confirmed that Tm16 is localized to the ES products and the soluble fraction of the adult worm. Additionally, the high-resolution crystal structure of Tm16 was solved by molecular replacement. Tm16 belongs to the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding-like protein (PEBP1) family and this is the first structure of a PEBP1 from a parasite.

  5. Ocular and systemic complications of diethylcarbamazine therapy for onchocerciasis: association with circulating immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, B M; Taylor, H R; Brown, E J; Humphrey, R L; Lawley, T J

    1983-05-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) therapy for Onchocerca volvulus infection results in frequent ocular and systemic complications, but the pathogenesis of these complications is unclear. Twenty men with O. volvulus infection were treated over a period of six months with DEC given daily for one week and weekly thereafter. Major systemic and ocular complications included proteinuria, severe pruritus, visual field constriction, optic nerve pallor, chorioretinitis, anterior uveitis, and punctate keratitis. Levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) were increased (greater than 11% [125I]C1q binding) in 14 of the 20 men prior to treatment. Persons with pretreatment C1q binding activity of greater than 30% were at increased risk to develop constriction of visual fields (P less than 0.05) and proteinuria (P less than 0.015). Linear regression analysis revealed a striking correlation between pretreatment levels of CICs and the total number of both systemic and ocular complications (P less than 0.001) and ocular complications alone (P less than 0.005). These results suggest that CICs may be important in the pathogenesis of the delayed systemic and ocular complications following DEC therapy for O. volvulus infection.

  6. Parasitological diagnosis of onchocerciasis: comparisons of incubation media and incubation times for skin snips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R C; Brandling-Bennett, A D; Holliman, R B; Campbell, C C; Darsie, R F

    1980-01-01

    Tissue culture fluid NCTC 135 (Hank's base) was compared to water and to saline as incubation media for the detection of microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus in skin snips. NCTC 135 allowed detection of significantly more positive persons than did water (P less than 0.001) or saline (P less than 0.05) when two snips per person were incubated for periods of 0.5 or 24 hours. In addition, snips containing microfilariae were incubated in NCTC 135 or in saline and the number of emerged microfilariae was determined at various intervals of time up to 24 hours. After incubation, snips were either fixed in 10% formalin, serially sectioned, and the microfilariae counted, or they were digested in collagenase solution to free unemerged microfilaire. Of the total number of microfilariae present in the snips, 43.9% +/- 18.5, 80.2% +/- 22.2, 83.0% +/- 19.5, and 85.3% +/- 18.0 had emerged by 0.5, 4, 8, and 24 hours of incubation, respectively. Of the microfilariae that remained in the skin after incubation, most were located deep in the dermis.

  7. Transmission dynamics of Simulium damnosum in rural communities of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

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    K.N. Opara

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Onchocerciasis is endemic in some parts of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. This study describes the entomological parameters of transmission in three rural communities of Akwa Ibom State, prior to ivermectin intervention in 2004. Methods: Blackflies were caught using human bait and 90% of the flies were dissected for parity. All parous flies were further dissected for the presence of filaria larvae. Monthly and annual biting rate, and transmission potential were calculated using standard methods.Results: A total of 4296 adult Simulium damnosum were caught on human bait, 4119 were dissected of which 208 (5.1% were infected with Onchocerca volvulus larvae. Transmission parameters varied significantly (p < 0.05 in the three villages. Annual biting rates, ranged from 9490 to 11,218 bites per person per year. The annual transmission potential ranged from 131 to 189 infective larvae per person per year, monthly biting rate and monthly transmission potential varied significantly (p < 0.05 in the three villages. Transmission was highly seasonal occurring during the peak of rainy season from August to October. There was no transmission during the dry periods — November to March, and the early rainy periods — April to May. The diurnal biting activity of the fly exhibited a bimodal pattern with a morning peak (0900–1000 hrs and a more marked evening peak (1600–1700 hrs. Interpretation & conclusion: The results indicate that there is a temporal and spatial variation in the transmission dynamics of S. damnosum in the study area.

  8. Filaria/Wolbachia activation of dendritic cells and development of Th1-associated responses is dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 in a mouse model of ocular onchocerciasis (river blindness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daehnel, K; Gillette-Ferguson, I; Hise, A G; Diaconu, E; Harling, M J; Heinzel, F P; Pearlman, E

    2007-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate dendritic cell function and activate signals that mediate the nature of the adaptive immune response. The current study examined the role of TLRs in dendritic cell activation and in regulating T cell and antibody responses to antigens from the filarial parasites Onchocerca volvulus and Brugia malayi, which cause river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, respectively. Bone-marrow-derived CD11c(+) cells from C57BL/6 and TLR4(-/-) mice produced high levels of IL-6 and RANTES, and showed elevated surface CD40 expression, whereas CD11c(+) cells from myeloid differentiation factor 88(-/-) (MyD88(-/-)), TLR2(-/-) and TLR2/4(-/-) mice were not activated. Similarly, IFN-gamma production by splenocytes from immunized TLR2(-/-) mice was significantly impaired compared with splenocytes from C57BL/6 and TLR4(-/-) mice. In contrast, there was no difference among these strains in Th2-associated responses including IL-5 production by splenocytes from immunized animals, serum IgE and IgG(1), or eosinophil infiltration into the corneal stroma. Neutrophil recruitment to the cornea and CXC chemokine production was inhibited in immunized TLR2(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 and TLR4(-/-) mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an essential role for TLR2 in filaria-induced dendritic cell activation, IFN-gamma production and neutrophil migration to the cornea, but does not affect filaria-induced Th2-associated responses.

  9. rOv-ASP-1, a recombinant secreted protein of the helminth Onchocercavolvulus, is a potent adjuvant for inducing antibodies to ovalbumin, HIV-1 polypeptide and SARS-CoV peptide antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Angus J; Cao, Long; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Shibo; Lustigman, Sara

    2005-05-16

    We studied the adjuvanticity of recombinant Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (rOv-ASP-1) for ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. After a single immunization and one boost, rOv-ASP-1 exceeded the efficacy of alum or MPL + TDM adjuvants in terms of end-point total IgG or IgG1 and IgG2a anti-OVA titres. Using the helminth-derived adjuvant, IgG isotype responses to OVA were of a mixed Th1/Th2 profile and spleen cell cytokines exclusively Th1-type. The potent adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 was confirmed in mice vaccinated with a 37-mer peptide from the S protein of SARS-CoV and an HIV-1 gp120-CD4 chimeric polypeptide antigen. Unusually for a helminth product, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant augmented not only Th2 but also Th1 responses, the latter property being of potential utility in stimulating anti-viral immune responses.

  10. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential of a soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for the evaluation of filarial viability.

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    Comley, J C; Turner, C H

    1990-04-01

    Using female Acanthocheilonema viteae we have investigated the bioreduction of the tetrazolium reagent XTT (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-sulphonyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide). Unlike the formazan formed by other tetrazolium salts, that derived from XTT readily diffuses out of A. viteae in vitro. Formazan formation can therefore be quantified by direct absorbance reading of the incubation medium, eliminating the need for a DMSO solubilization step. Optimum assay conditions involved a 4 h incubation, in the presence of the electron coupling agent phenazine methosulphate (PMS). Repeat 4 h incubations with XTT-PMS were well tolerated by worms for 5 consecutive days. This confirmed the low toxicity of XTT formazan and its usefulness in the semi-continuous assessment of filarial viability. In comparison to our previously reported MTT (3-(4, 5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide)-reduction assay XTT-PMS reduction showed comparable drug sensitivity and accuracy, however XTT-PMS appears to be at least 10-15 times less efficiently reduced by A. viteae females. A possible application of the XTT assay using female Onchocerca volvulus is discussed.

  12. Ivermectin. A review of its antifilarial activity, pharmacokinetic properties and clinical efficacy in onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goa, K L; McTavish, D; Clissold, S P

    1991-10-01

    Ivermectin, a derivative of avermectin B, is an orally effective microfilaricidal agent. It is the current drug of choice for treating patients infected with the nematode Onchocerca volvulus, which is a major cause of blindness in inhabitants of some tropical areas. Ivermectin is administered orally as a single dose of 150 micrograms/kg given annually. Skin and ocular microfilarial counts are dramatically reduced after the first dose, with some evidence for a resulting decrease in transmission of infection by the blackfly vector. With the exception of rare serious reactions such as severe systemic postural hypotension, ivermectin is generally well tolerated. The drug has the clear advantages of ease of administration and better tolerability compared with diethylcarbamazine and suramin, agents previously used to treat onchocerciasis. Thus, ivermectin is suitable for inclusion in mass treatment programmes and is the best therapeutic option presently available to combat onchocerciasis. As such it provides hope for many thousands of people at risk of becoming blind, and represents a major contribution to tropical medicine.

  13. Sowda--onchocerciasis in north Yemen: a clinicopathologic study of 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, D H; Gibson, D W; Neafie, R C; Merighi, B; Buck, A A

    1983-01-01

    Sowda is an unusual form of onchocerciasis in Yemenites that differs from African onchocerciasis. Clinical and pathological studies were performed on 18 patients in Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen). Biopsies of skin and lymph nodes were taken, and then processed at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C. The most striking clinical features were swollen, darkened, pruritic, papular skin changes that were usually limited to one leg, more rarely to one arm, and large soft regional lymph nodes. Dermal changes were deeper and more diffuse than in African onchocerciasis, with many large fibroblasts and plasma cells. Microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus were much rarer in skin from Yemenites with sowda. When patients were treated with diethylcarbamazine, the dermatitis became suddenly worse as the microfilariae degenerated and provoked acute inflammation. The dermatitis decreased after several days of treatment. Enlarged lymph nodes from sowda have shown follicular hyperplasia, in contrast to follicular atrophy and perivascular fibrosis that are characteristic of lymph nodes from cases of African onchocerciasis. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity may be more active in sowda than in African onchocerciasis.

  14. Double-blind study of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine in African onchocerciasis patients with ocular involvement.

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    Lariviere, M; Vingtain, P; Aziz, M; Beauvais, B; Weimann, D; Derouin, F; Ginoux, J; Schulz-Key, H; Gaxotte, P; Basset, D

    1985-07-27

    In a randomised double-blind study, ivermectin was compared with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and placebo in the treatment of onchocerciasis in 30 male patients from Mali with moderate to heavy Onchocerca volvulus infections and ocular involvement. 10 patients received a single oral dose of ivermectin, 12 mg, 10 received DEC daily for eight days (total dose 1.3 g), and 10 received matching placebo. Patients were examined periodically for twelve months. Punctate keratitis disappeared in 6 of 7 ivermectin patients but increased in DEC patients. Numbers of O volvulus microfilariae (mf) in the anterior chamber decreased slowly and eventually disappeared in most ivermectin patients during the six months following treatment; anterior chamber mf disappeared more rapidly in some patients after DEC, but reappeared within six months of stopping treatment. Both ivermectin and DEC caused a prompt decrease in mean skin mf density; density then increased in both groups over the twelve month observation period, reaching 9% of pretreatment values in ivermectin patients and 45% in the DEC group. Analysis of adult O volvulus from nodules excised at three and twelve months post treatment showed no effect of either drug on viability; however, there was evidence of degeneration of intra-uterine developing mf in the ivermectin group. Side-effects were less frequent and less severe in ivermectin patients than in DEC patients. Ivermectin as a single oral dose appears to be a more effective microfilaricidal drug than DEC in onchocerciasis.

  15. Filariasis: new drugs and new opportunities for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

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    Hoerauf, Achim

    2008-12-01

    Chemotherapy against onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis has been discussed mainly within the framework of mass drug administration with diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin and albendazole. Although strong reductions in infection prevalence were achieved, the regimes for these drugs do not fully cover needs of individual patients who seek treatment because of symptoms. Chemotherapy against filarial Wolbachia endosymbionts with doxycycline showed higher antiparasitic efficacy in onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis and also improved disease. This review details the recent indications for this new treatment, focussing on regimes for individual drug administration. A regimen of 6-week/100 mg doxycycline per day sterilized adult female Onchocerca volvulus. Two hundred milligrams doxycycline per day for 4 or 6 weeks revealed 50 and 60% macrofilaricidal effects, respectively. Reduction of 80-90% of adult worms was observed in bancroftian filariasis with 200 mg/day doxycycline for 4 or 6 weeks. The latter regimen showed reduction of lymph vessel dilation and of hydrocele. Lymphoedema progression was halted and reversed in early stages. Different options for antiwolbachial individual drug administration are summarized here. With improving health systems in endemic countries, individuals will demand best-possible treatment and accelerate a shift from mass drug administration-only approaches to integrated approaches combining both mass drug administration and individual drug administration. Treatment may be further improved by new antibiotics detected in high-throughput settings.

  16. Outstanding insecurities concerning the use of an Ov16-based ELISA in the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa; Crainey, James Lee; Shelley, Anthony John; Rubio, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    In a recent issue of Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, published in Rio de Janeiro in February 2014 (109: 87-92), Adami et al. have published a survey reporting Mansonella parasite prevalence in the Amazon Region. This report makes a useful contribution to the existing knowledge of filarial parasite distribution within the Amazon area, parasite prevalence rates in relation to age and occupation and provides observations on the possible clinical impact of Mansonella ozzardi. Their publication also provides an account of what appears to be a novel ELISA that has recently been used in the Simuliidae and Onchocerciasis Laboratory of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We are concerned that the publication of this ELISA may have created an excessively positive impression of the effectiveness of the onchocerciasis recrudescence serological surveillance tools that are presently available for use in the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus. In this letter we have, thus, sought to highlight some of the limitations of this ELISA and suggest how continuing insecurities concerning the detection of antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus within the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus might be minimised.

  17. Outstanding insecurities concerning the use of an Ov16-based ELISA in the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus

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    Sérgio Luiz Bessa Luz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a recent issue of Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, published in Rio de Janeiro in February 2014 (109: 87-92, Adami et al. have published a survey reporting Mansonella parasite prevalence in the Amazon Region. This report makes a useful contribution to the existing knowledge of filarial parasite distribution within the Amazon area, parasite prevalence rates in relation to age and occupation and provides observations on the possible clinical impact of Mansonella ozzardi. Their publication also provides an account of what appears to be a novel ELISA that has recently been used in the Simuliidae and Onchocerciasis Laboratory of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We are concerned that the publication of this ELISA may have created an excessively positive impression of the effectiveness of the onchocerciasis recrudescence serological surveillance tools that are presently available for use in the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus. In this letter we have, thus, sought to highlight some of the limitations of this ELISA and suggest how continuing insecurities concerning the detection of antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus within the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus might be minimised.

  18. Supergroup C Wolbachia, mutualist symbionts of filarial nematodes, have a distinct genome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandatore, Francesco; Cordaux, Richard; Bandi, Claudio; Blaxter, Mark; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Montagna, Matteo; Sassera, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is possibly the most widespread endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. While all Wolbachia strains have historically been defined as a single species, 16 monophyletic clusters of diversity (called supergroups) have been described. Different supergroups have distinct host ranges and symbiotic relationships, ranging from mutualism to reproductive manipulation. In filarial nematodes, which include parasites responsible for major diseases of humans (such as Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness) and companion animals (Dirofilaria immitis, the dog heartworm), Wolbachia has an obligate mutualist role and is the target of new treatment regimens. Here, we compare the genomes of eight Wolbachia strains, spanning the diversity of the major supergroups (A-F), analysing synteny, transposable element content, GC skew and gene loss or gain. We detected genomic features that differ between Wolbachia supergroups, most notably in the C and D clades from filarial nematodes. In particular, strains from supergroup C (symbionts of O. volvulus and D. immitis) present a pattern of GC skew, conserved synteny and lack of transposable elements, unique in the Wolbachia genus. These features could be the consequence of a distinct symbiotic relationship between C Wolbachia strains and their hosts, highlighting underappreciated differences between the mutualistic supergroups found within filarial nematodes.

  19. Absence of Wolbachia endobacteria in the non-filariid nematodes Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. costaricensis

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    Graeff-Teixeira Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of filarial nematodes harbour Wolbachia endobacteria, including the major pathogenic species in humans, Onchocerca volvulus, Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. These obligate endosymbionts have never been demonstrated unequivocally in any non-filariid nematode. However, a recent report described the detection by PCR of Wolbachia in the metastrongylid nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm, a leading cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans. To address the intriguing possibility of Wolbachia infection in nematode species distinct from the Family Onchocercidae, we used both PCR and immunohistochemistry to screen samples of A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis for the presence of this endosymbiont. We were unable to detect Wolbachia in either species using these methodologies. In addition, bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of the Wolbachia gene sequences reported previously from A. cantonensis indicate that they most likely result from contamination with DNA from arthropods and filarial nematodes. This study demonstrates the need for caution in relying solely on PCR for identification of new endosymbiont strains from invertebrate DNA samples.

  20. Evaluation of immune response elicited by inulin as an adjuvant with filarial antigens in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, N; Aparnaa, R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-10-01

    Filariasis caused by infectious parasitic nematodes has been identified as the second leading source of permanent and long-term disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America. Several vaccine candidates were identified from infective third-stage larvae (L3) which involves in the critical transition from arthropod to human. Hitherto studies of these antigens in combination with alum adjuvant have shown to elicit its characteristic Th2 responses. Inulin is a safe, non-toxic adjuvant that principally stimulates the innate immune response through the alternative complement pathway. In the present study, the immune response elicited by inulin and alum as adjuvants were compared with filarial antigens from different aetiological agents: secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) from Onchocerca volvulus and venom allergen homologue (VAH) from Brugia malayi as single or as cocktail vaccines in mice model. The study revealed that inulin can induce better humoral response against these antigens than alum adjuvant. Antibody isotyping disclosed inulin's ability to elevate the levels of IgG2a and IgG3 antibodies which mediates in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), respectively, in mice. Splenocyte analysis showed that T cells prestimulated with inulin have higher stimulation index (P inulin formulation had induced higher cytotoxicity with filarial antigens (as single P inulin to deplete the levels of Treg and brought a balance in Th1/Th2 arms against filarial antigens in mice.

  1. Human onchocerciasis--an overview of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, B O

    1990-01-01

    The general characteristics of Onchocerca volvulus infection and its transmission are outlined in this overview of human onchocerciasis. The pathogenic role of the microfilariae, producing lesions of the skin, lymphatic system, eye and deep organs, are described, along with the main clinical manifestations of the disease. The global prevalence and distribution of onchocerciasis are given. Best estimates in 1985 gave 86 million persons at risk, 17.8 million infected, 336,400 blind and a like number suffering from severe visual impairment. The vast majority was in Africa. The impact of onchocerciasis on communities in the Sudano-Guinean savanna zone of Africa is outlined, emphasizing the very high blindness rates and the increased mortality among the blind. Communities so affected cannot remain economically viable. They are forced to desert their villages and the fertile land near rivers. The background to the establishment of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) is given and the successful 10-year results of this campaign, which is based on prolonged, regular Simulium larviciding, are outlined. In the context of the future of the OCP and of the control of onchocerciasis elsewhere in the world, the need for improved chemotherapy is discussed. The prospects for large-scale suppressive therapy have greatly improved following the registration of ivermectin in 1988 for use in human onchocerciasis. The potential and possible uses of this drug, as a single-dose, non-toxic microfilaricide, which excites very little Mazzotti reaction and has a prolonged microfilarial suppressant action, are discussed. It is considered that an effective non-toxic macrofilaricide is still a prime need for onchocerciasis control.

  2. Elimination of Onchocerciasis from Mexico.

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    Mario A Rodríguez-Pérez

    Full Text Available Mexico is one of the six countries formerly endemic for onchocerciasis in Latin America. Transmission has been interrupted in the three endemic foci of that country and mass drug distribution has ceased. Three years after mass drug distribution ended, post-treatment surveillance (PTS surveys were undertaken which employed entomological indicators to check for transmission recrudescence.In-depth entomologic assessments were performed in 18 communities in the three endemic foci of Mexico. None of the 108,212 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from the three foci were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA, resulting in a maximum upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.035/2,000 flies examined. This is an order of magnitude below the threshold of a 95%-ULCI of less than one infective fly per 2,000 flies tested, the current entomological criterion for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. The point estimate of seasonal transmission potential (STP was zero, and the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for the STP ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 L3/person/season in the different foci. This value is below all previous estimates for the minimum transmission potential required to maintain the parasite population.The results from the in-depth entomological post treatment surveillance surveys strongly suggest that transmission has not resumed in the three foci of Mexico during the three years since the last distribution of ivermectin occurred; it was concluded that transmission remains undetectable without intervention, and Onchocerca volvulus has been eliminated from Mexico.

  3. Nematocera (Ceratopogonidae, Psychodidae, Simuliidae and Culicidae) and control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Y

    1994-12-01

    The biology, veterinary importance and control of certain Nematocera are described and discussed. Culicoides spp. (family Ceratopogonidae) transmit the arboviruses of bluetongue (BT), African horse sickness (AHS), bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) and Akabane. Some other arboviruses have been isolated from these species, while fowl pox has been transmitted experimentally by Culicoides. These insects are vectors of the parasitic protozoans Leucocytozoon caulleryi and Haemoproteus nettionis, and the parasitic nematodes Onchocerca gutturosa, O. gibsoni and O. cervicalis. They also cause recurrent summer hypersensitivity in horses, ponies, donkeys, cattle and sheep. Farm animals can die as a result of mass attack by Simulium spp., which are also vectors of Leucocytozoon simondi, L. smithi and the filariae O. gutturosa, O. linealis and O. ochengi. Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) have been isolated from simuliids, and vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey strain has been replicated in Simulium vittatum. Simuliids are well known as vectors of O. volvulus, the cause of human onchocercosis (river blindness). The family Psychodidae includes the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia (subfamily Phlebotominae), vectors of Leishmania spp. in humans, dogs and other mammals. Vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana strain has been regularly isolated from phlebotomine sandflies. Mass attack by mosquitoes can also prove fatal to farm animals. Mosquitoes are vectors of the viruses of Akabane, BEF, RVF, Japanese encephalitis, VEE, western equine encephalomyelitis, eastern equine encephalomyelitis and west Nile meningoencephalitis, secondary vectors of AHS and suspected vectors of Israel turkey meningoencephalitis. The viruses of hog cholera, fowl pox and reticuloendotheliosis, the rickettsiae Eperythrozoon ovis and E. suis, and the bacterium Borrelia anserina are mechanically transmitted by mosquitoes. These insects also induce allergic dermatitis in horses. They

  4. Repositioning of an existing drug for the neglected tropical disease Onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckner, Christian; Garner, Amanda L; Mersha, Fana; Oksov, Yelena; Tricoche, Nancy; Eubanks, Lisa M; Lustigman, Sara; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2010-02-23

    Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, is a neglected tropical disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus that affects more than 37 million people, mainly in third world countries. Currently, the only approved drug available for mass treatment is ivermectin, however, drug resistance is beginning to emerge, thus, new therapeutic targets and agents are desperately needed to treat and cure this devastating disease. Chitin metabolism plays a central role in invertebrate biology due to the critical structural function of chitin for the organism. Taken together with its absence in mammals, targeting chitin is an appealing therapeutic avenue. Importantly, the chitinase OvCHT1 from O. volvulus was recently discovered, however, its exact role in the worm's metabolism remains unknown. A screening effort against OvCHT1 was conducted using the Johns Hopkins Clinical Compound Library that contains over 1,500 existing drugs. Closantel, a veterinary anthelmintic with known proton ionophore activities, was identified as a potent and specific inhibitor of filarial chitinases, an activity not previously reported for this compound. Notably, closantel was found also to completely inhibit molting of O. volvulus infective L3 stage larvae. Closantel appears to target two important biochemical processes essential to filarial parasites. To begin to unravel closantel's effects, a retro-fragment-based study was used to define structural elements critical for closantel's chitinase inhibitor function. As resources towards the development of new agents that target neglected tropical diseases are scant, the finding of an existing drug with impact against O. volvulus provides promise in the hunt for new therapies against river blindness.

  5. Identification of human semiochemicals attractive to the major vectors of onchocerciasis.

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    Ryan M Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Entomological indicators are considered key metrics to document the interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus, the etiological agent of human onchocerciasis. Human landing collection is the standard employed for collection of the vectors for this parasite. Recent studies reported the development of traps that have the potential for replacing humans for surveillance of O. volvulus in the vector population. However, the key chemical components of human odor that are attractive to vector black flies have not been identified.Human sweat compounds were analyzed using GC-MS analysis and compounds common to three individuals identified. These common compounds, with others previously identified as attractive to other hematophagous arthropods were evaluated for their ability to stimulate and attract the major onchocerciasis vectors in Africa (Simulium damnosum sensu lato and Latin America (Simulium ochraceum s. l. using electroantennography and a Y tube binary choice assay. Medium chain length carboxylic acids and aldehydes were neurostimulatory for S. damnosum s.l. while S. ochraceum s.l. was stimulated by short chain aliphatic alcohols and aldehydes. Both species were attracted to ammonium bicarbonate and acetophenone. The compounds were shown to be attractive to the relevant vector species in field studies, when incorporated into a formulation that permitted a continuous release of the compound over time and used in concert with previously developed trap platforms.The identification of compounds attractive to the major vectors of O. volvulus will permit the development of optimized traps. Such traps may replace the use of human vector collectors for monitoring the effectiveness of onchocerciasis elimination programs and could find use as a contributing component in an integrated vector control/drug program aimed at eliminating river blindness in Africa.

  6. Interruption of infection transmission in the onchocerciasis focus of Ecuador leading to the cessation of ivermectin distribution.

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    Raquel Lovato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A clinically significant endemic focus of onchocerciasis existing in Esmeraldas Province, coastal Ecuador has been under an ivermectin mass drug administration program since 1991. The main transmitting vector in this area is the voracious blackfly, Simulium exiguum. This paper describes the assessments made that support the decision to cease mass treatment. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Thirty-five rounds of ivermectin treatment occurred between 1991-2009 with 29 of these carrying >85% coverage. Following the guidelines set by WHO for ceasing ivermectin distribution the impact on parasite transmission was measured in the two vector species by an O-150 PCR technique standard for assessing for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus. Up to seven collection sites in three major river systems were tested on four occasions between 1995 and 2008. The infectivity rates of 65.0 (CI 39-101 and 72.7 (CI 42-116 in 1995 dropped to zero at all seven collection sites by 2008. Assessment for the presence of antibodies against O. volvulus was made in 2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008 using standard ELISA assays for detecting anti-Ov16 antibodies. None of total of 1810 children aged 1-15 years (between 82 and 98% of children present in the surveyed villages tested in the above years were found to be carrying antibodies to this antigen. These findings were the basis for the cessation of mass drug treatment with ivermectin in 2009. SIGNIFICANCE: This fulfillment of the criteria for cessation of mass distribution of ivermectin in the only known endemic zone of onchocerciasis in Ecuador moves the country into the surveillance phase of official verification for national elimination of transmission of infection. These findings indicate that ivermectin given twice a year with greater than 85% of the community can move a program to the final stages of verification of transmission interruption.

  7. Interruption of infection transmission in the onchocerciasis focus of Ecuador leading to the cessation of ivermectin distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Raquel; Guevara, Angel; Guderian, Ronald; Proaño, Roberto; Unnasch, Thomas; Criollo, Hipatia; Hassan, Hassan K; Mackenzie, Charles D

    2014-05-01

    A clinically significant endemic focus of onchocerciasis existing in Esmeraldas Province, coastal Ecuador has been under an ivermectin mass drug administration program since 1991. The main transmitting vector in this area is the voracious blackfly, Simulium exiguum. This paper describes the assessments made that support the decision to cease mass treatment. Thirty-five rounds of ivermectin treatment occurred between 1991-2009 with 29 of these carrying >85% coverage. Following the guidelines set by WHO for ceasing ivermectin distribution the impact on parasite transmission was measured in the two vector species by an O-150 PCR technique standard for assessing for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus. Up to seven collection sites in three major river systems were tested on four occasions between 1995 and 2008. The infectivity rates of 65.0 (CI 39-101) and 72.7 (CI 42-116) in 1995 dropped to zero at all seven collection sites by 2008. Assessment for the presence of antibodies against O. volvulus was made in 2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008 using standard ELISA assays for detecting anti-Ov16 antibodies. None of total of 1810 children aged 1-15 years (between 82 and 98% of children present in the surveyed villages) tested in the above years were found to be carrying antibodies to this antigen. These findings were the basis for the cessation of mass drug treatment with ivermectin in 2009. This fulfillment of the criteria for cessation of mass distribution of ivermectin in the only known endemic zone of onchocerciasis in Ecuador moves the country into the surveillance phase of official verification for national elimination of transmission of infection. These findings indicate that ivermectin given twice a year with greater than 85% of the community can move a program to the final stages of verification of transmission interruption.

  8. Psycho-social and Economic Evaluation of Onchocerciasis: A Literature Review

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    Laura Moya Alonso

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Onchocerciasis or river blindness is a chronic parasitic disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca Volvulus. It occurs in 38 countries in the world, including Africa, Latin America and the Arabian Peninsula. The infection predominantly causes visual impairment and blindness and skin disease. Objectives: The aim of this project is to review the literature on the psycho-social and economic consequences of onchocerciasis in endemic areas. Economic evaluation studies on onchocerciasis and its control programmes were also reviewed. Methods: Electronic searches of PUBMED and Google were made. In addition, the Cochrane Library and WHO website were searched. Different types of economic analysis were reviewed to quantify the relationship between the programme costs and impacts. Results: Eighty papers were identified from different sources, most of which are quantitative studies or literature reviews, and only two were clinical trials. Onchocerciasis has severe socio-economic and psychological consequences. The stigma associated with the disease may reduce marital prospects among affected individuals, disrupt social relationships and cause loss of self-confidence. Also among agricultural workers onchocerciasis has been associated with increased time away from work and reduced productivity, leading to lower income. Discussion: Most of the papers analysed were cross-sectional studies based on data collection through questionnaires. Although there is an increasing number of published papers about the importance of the psycho-social and economic perspective of onchocerciasis, further research is still necessary to quantify and control its consequences. Conclusion: Onchocerciasis is still a serious problem in poor countries. Infected people face physical disability and social stigma that can dramatically reduce the quality of life and land productivity. Control programmes, though costly, have been very successful and cost

  9. Rapid Epidemiological Assessment of Onchocerciasis in a Tropical Semi-Urban Community, Enugu State, Nigeria

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    JE Eyo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out in Opi-Agu a tropical semi-urban autonomous community comprising of three villages in Enugu State, Nigeria, between the months of April and June 2010. It was designed to determine the prevalence of Onchocerca volvulus infection and assess the perception of the disease among the inhabitants of this community.Methods: A total number of 305 individuals comprising of 148 males and 157 females were ex­amined for various manifestations of onchocerciasis symptoms using rapid epidemiological assess­ment (REA method.Results: Out of this number, 119 (39.02% individuals were infected. Prevalence of infection among age groups and villages varied. Age group 41 yr and above had the highest (31.00% prevalence, while among the villages, Ogbozalla village ranked higher (45.71% than the other villages. Overall the prevalence of infection among the sexes revealed that males were more infected (43.24% than the females (35.03%. Lichenified onchodermatitis (LOD was the most prevalent (35.29% onchocercia­sis symptom among others identified in the area, while leopard skin (LS had the lowest (20.17% occurrence and blindness (0.00% which is the most devastating effect of O. volvulus infec­tion was not observed. Questionnaire responses from 410 individuals revealed that 34.8% respon­dent from Idi village and 28.1% from Ibeku village believed that O. volvulus infection occurs through poor personal hygiene. Bite of blackfly ranked least (10.6% among the respondent’s knowledge of the causes of onchocerciasis in Opi-Agu community.Conclusion: Opi-Agu community members had poor knowledge of onchocerciasis, the vector and of its etiologic organism. There is need for integration of community health education with mass chemo­therapy

  10. Uncertainty surrounding projections of the long-term impact of ivermectin treatment on human onchocerciasis.

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    Hugo C Turner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies in Mali, Nigeria, and Senegal have indicated that annual (or biannual ivermectin distribution may lead to local elimination of human onchocerciasis in certain African foci. Modelling-based projections have been used to estimate the required duration of ivermectin distribution to reach elimination. A crucial assumption has been that microfilarial production by Onchocerca volvulus is reduced irreversibly by 30-35% with each (annual ivermectin round. However, other modelling-based analyses suggest that ivermectin may not have such a cumulative effect. Uncertainty in this (biological and other (programmatic assumptions would affect projected outcomes of long-term ivermectin treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We modify a deterministic age- and sex-structured onchocerciasis transmission model, parameterised for savannah O. volvulus-Simulium damnosum, to explore the impact of assumptions regarding the effect of ivermectin on worm fertility and the patterns of treatment coverage compliance, and frequency on projections of parasitological outcomes due to long-term, mass ivermectin administration in hyperendemic areas. The projected impact of ivermectin distribution on onchocerciasis and the benefits of switching from annual to biannual distribution are strongly dependent on assumptions regarding the drug's effect on worm fertility and on treatment compliance. If ivermectin does not have a cumulative impact on microfilarial production, elimination of onchocerciasis in hyperendemic areas may not be feasible with annual ivermectin distribution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is substantial (biological and programmatic uncertainty surrounding modelling projections of onchocerciasis elimination. These uncertainties need to be acknowledged for mathematical models to inform control policy reliably. Further research is needed to elucidate the effect of ivermectin on O. volvulus reproductive biology and quantify the patterns of

  11. Evaluation of the physicochemical indices of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae breeding sites in Delta State, Nigeria: Implication for onchocerciasis control

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    Joseph Oghenebukome Onojafe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the ecological parameters affecting the distribution of Simulium damnosum immature stages in some rivers within the endemic areas of Delta State, Nigeria. Methods: Onchocerca larvae were observed and identified for each river. An average sized colander with fine mesh was used to scoop the area to obtain the larvae along with other benthos. Physiochemical characteristics of the water at breeding sites were analyzed for a 12 months period. Correlation analysis was performed to establish the association between the larval densities and physicochemical parameters of blackfly. Results: The seasonal variation in the physical and chemical characteristics of these environments impaired the population dynamics of blackflies. The physicochemical parameters significantly varied among breeding sites (P < 0.05, in which the temperature of surface water ranged between 23.2 °C and 30.3 °C, water flow velocity ranged between 0.4 and 1.3 m/s, dissolved oxygen ranged between 5.1 and 9.0 mg/L and pH ranged between 5.4 and 7.4. The mean collection of Simulium larvae was the highest in River Otor (44.1 and the least in River Namormai (19.1. There was significant difference (P < 0.05 in the number of larvae collected from the sampled rivers. Also, the number of larvae collected significantly correlated with surface water temperature, water flow velocity, dissolved oxygen and pH. Conclusions: This study identified significant correlations between physicochemical parameters and blackfly larvae densities thus providing a precontrol evidence-based data for the control of onchocerciasis in the endemic areas of North Delta.

  12. Long term impact of large scale community-directed delivery of doxycycline for the treatment of onchocerciasis

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    Tamarozzi Francesca

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-Wolbachia treatment with doxycycline is effective in sterilising and killing adult Onchocerca volvulus nematodes, proving superior to ivermectin and of great potential as an alternative approach for the treatment and control of onchocerciasis, particularly in areas of Loa loa co-endemicity. Nevertheless, the length of the required treatment poses potential logistical problems and risk of poor compliance, raising a barrier to the use of doxycycline in Mass Drug Administration (MDA strategies. In 2007 and 2008 a feasibility trial of community-directed treatment with doxycycline was carried out in two health districts in Cameroon, co-endemic for O. volvulus and L. loa. With 17,519 eligible subjects, the therapeutic coverage was 73.8% with 97.5% compliance, encouraging the feasibility of using doxycycline community-directed delivery in restricted populations of this size. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of this community-directed delivery of doxycycline four years after delivery. Findings Infection with O. volvulus was evaluated by skin biopsy and nodule palpation. Of the 507 subjects recruited, 375 had completed the treatment with doxycycline followed by one or two rounds of annual ivermectin MDA and 132 received one or two rounds of annual ivermectin MDA alone. Statistically significant lower microfilarial prevalence (17.0% [doxycycline plus ivermectin group], 27.0% [ivermectin only group], p = 0.014 and load (p = 0.012 were found in people that had received doxycycline followed by ivermectin compared to those who received ivermectin only. Conclusions This study demonstrates the long-term effectiveness of doxycycline treatment delivered with a community-directed strategy even when evaluated four years after delivery in an area of ongoing transmission. This finding shows that a multi-week course of treatment is not a barrier to community-delivery of MDA in restricted populations of this size and supports its

  13. Identification of Human Semiochemicals Attractive to the Major Vectors of Onchocerciasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan M.; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; McGaha, Tommy W.; Rodriguez-Perez, Mario A.; Toé, Laurent D.; Adeleke, Monsuru A.; Sanfo, Moussa; Soungalo, Traore; Katholi, Charles R.; Noblet, Raymond; Fadamiro, Henry; Torres-Estrada, Jose L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.; Baker, Bill; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Cupp, Eddie W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Entomological indicators are considered key metrics to document the interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus, the etiological agent of human onchocerciasis. Human landing collection is the standard employed for collection of the vectors for this parasite. Recent studies reported the development of traps that have the potential for replacing humans for surveillance of O. volvulus in the vector population. However, the key chemical components of human odor that are attractive to vector black flies have not been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings Human sweat compounds were analyzed using GC-MS analysis and compounds common to three individuals identified. These common compounds, with others previously identified as attractive to other hematophagous arthropods were evaluated for their ability to stimulate and attract the major onchocerciasis vectors in Africa (Simulium damnosum sensu lato) and Latin America (Simulium ochraceum s. l.) using electroantennography and a Y tube binary choice assay. Medium chain length carboxylic acids and aldehydes were neurostimulatory for S. damnosum s.l. while S. ochraceum s.l. was stimulated by short chain aliphatic alcohols and aldehydes. Both species were attracted to ammonium bicarbonate and acetophenone. The compounds were shown to be attractive to the relevant vector species in field studies, when incorporated into a formulation that permitted a continuous release of the compound over time and used in concert with previously developed trap platforms. Conclusions/Significance The identification of compounds attractive to the major vectors of O. volvulus will permit the development of optimized traps. Such traps may replace the use of human vector collectors for monitoring the effectiveness of onchocerciasis elimination programs and could find use as a contributing component in an integrated vector control/drug program aimed at eliminating river blindness in Africa. PMID:25569240

  14. Multiple filarial species microfilaraemia: a comparative study of areas with endemic and sporadic onchocerciasis

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    Emmanuel Uttah & Dominic C. Ibeh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The study was aimed at determining the pattern of co-occurrence of species ofmicrofilaraemia between onchocerciasis endemic and sporadic populations.Methods: From every consenting person of one year and above, 50 μl of day and night blood samples werecollected and processed respectively with Haemotoxylin and Giemsa as vital stains. Two skin snips (one eachfrom the waist and the shoulder were also taken from these individuals and processed.Results: Results showed single species microfilaraemia (86.4 and 82.3%, double species microfilaraemia (12.2and 16.9% and triple species microfilaraemia (1.4 and 0.7% for endemic and sporadic populations respectively.All the species had single species microfilaraemia mostly, but Mansonella perstans and Loa loa showed greatestt endency towa rds doubl e and t r ipl e spe c i e s mi c rof i l a r a emi a . The pr eva l enc e of Wuche re r ia banc rof t imicrofilaraemia among those positive for Onchocerca volvulus was significantly lower than the overall prevalenceof Wuchereria bancrofti. Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemia was most common among those who had L. loamicrofilaraemia. Wuchereria bancrofti microfilarial intensity was higher among those with M. perstansmicrofilaraemia than among those positive for any of the other filarial species. Similarly, the intensity of M.perstans microfilaraemia among those positive for W. bancrofti exceeded the overall intensity of M. perstans.Conclusion: It is concluded that there was no definite pattern in mf densities discernible from co-occurrenceinfections either in the onchocerciasis endemic or sporadic population. There could be varied outcomes ofonchocerciasis infection attributable to positive or negative regulatory effects of other pathogens harbored bythe victims.

  15. Transmission of pathogens by Stomoxys flies (Diptera, Muscidae): a review.

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    Baldacchino, Frédéric; Muenworn, Vithee; Desquesnes, Marc; Desoli, Florian; Charoenviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Duvallet, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Stomoxys flies are mechanical vectors of pathogens present in the blood and skin of their animal hosts, especially livestock, but occasionally humans. In livestock, their direct effects are disturbance, skin lesions, reduction of food intake, stress, blood loss, and a global immunosuppressive effect. They also induce the gathering of animals for mutual protection; meanwhile they favor development of pathogens in the hosts and their transmission. Their indirect effect is the mechanical transmission of pathogens. In case of interrupted feeding, Stomoxys can re-start their blood meal on another host. When injecting saliva prior to blood-sucking, they can inoculate some infected blood remaining on their mouthparts. Beside this immediate transmission, it was observed that Stomoxys may keep some blood in their crop, which offers a friendly environment for pathogens that could be regurgitated during the next blood meal; thus a delayed transmission by Stomoxys seems possible. Such a mechanism has a considerable epidemiological impact since it allows inter-herd transmission of pathogens. Equine infectious anemia, African swine fever, West Nile, and Rift Valley viruses are known to be transmitted by Stomoxys, while others are suspected. Rickettsia (Anaplasma, Coxiella), other bacteria and parasites (Trypanosoma spp., Besnoitia spp.) are also transmitted by Stomoxys. Finally, Stomoxys was also found to act as an intermediate host of the helminth Habronema microstoma and may be involved in the transmission of some Onchocerca and Dirofilaria species. Being cosmopolite, Stomoxys calcitrans might have a worldwide and greater impact than previously thought on animal and human pathogen transmission. © F. Baldacchino et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2013.

  16. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

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    Lucienne Tritten

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream.

  17. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream.

  18. Identification and Validation of Loa loa Microfilaria-Specific Biomarkers: a Rational Design Approach Using Proteomics and Novel Immunoassays

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    Papa M. Drame

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunoassays are currently needed to quantify Loa loa microfilariae (mf. To address this need, we have conducted proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of proteins present in the urine of a Loa mf-infected patient and used this information to identify putative biomarkers produced by L. loa mf. In total, 70 of the 15,444 described putative L. loa proteins were identified. Of these 70, 18 were L. loa mf specific, and 2 of these 18 (LOAG_16297 and LOAG_17808 were biologically immunogenic. We developed novel reverse luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS immunoassays to quantify these 2 proteins in individual plasma samples. Levels of these 2 proteins in microfilaremic L. loa-infected patients were positively correlated to mf densities in the corresponding blood samples (r = 0.71 and P < 0.0001 for LOAG_16297 and r = 0.61 and P = 0.0002 for LOAG_17808. For LOAG_16297, the levels in plasma were significantly higher in Loa-infected (geometric mean [GM], 0.045 µg/ml than in uninfected (P < 0.0001, Wuchereria bancrofti-infected (P = 0.0005, and Onchocerca volvulus-infected (P < 0.0001 individuals, whereas for LOAG_17808 protein, they were not significantly different between Loa-infected (GM, 0.123 µg/ml and uninfected (P = 0.06 and W. bancrofti-infected (P = 0.32 individuals. Moreover, only LOAG_16297 showed clear discriminative ability between L. loa and the other potentially coendemic filariae. Indeed, the specificity of the LOAG_16297 reverse LIPS assay was 96% (with a sensitivity of 77%. Thus, LOAG_16297 is a very promising biomarker that will be exploited in a quantitative point-of-care immunoassay for determination of L. loa mf densities.

  19. Evaluation of the physicochemical indices of blacklfies (Diptera:Simuliidae) breeding sites in Delta State, Nigeria:Implication for onchocerciasis control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Oghenebukome Onojafe; Andy Ogochukwu Egwunyenga; Jephtha Christopher Nmor

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the ecological parameters affecting the distribution ofSimulium damnosum immature stages in some rivers within the endemic areas of Delta State, Nigeria. Methods:Onchocerca larvae were observed and identified for each river. An average sized colander with fine mesh was used to scoop the area to obtain the larvae along with other benthos. Physiochemical characteristics of the water at breeding sites were analyzed for a 12 months period. Correlation analysis was performed to establish the association between the larval densities and physicochemical parameters of blackfly. Results:The seasonal variation in the physical and chemical characteristics of these environments impaired the population dynamics of blackflies. The physicochemical parameters significantly varied among breeding sites (P < 0.05), in which the temperature of surface water ranged between 23.2°C and 30.3°C, water flow velocity ranged between 0.4 and 1.3 m/s, dissolved oxygen ranged between 5.1 and 9.0 mg/L and pH ranged between 5.4 and 7.4. The mean collection ofSimulium larvae was the highest in River Otor (44.1) and the least in River Namormai (19.1). There was significant difference (P < 0.05) in the number of larvae collected from the sampled rivers. Also, the number of larvae collected significantly correlated with surface water temperature, water flow velocity, dissolved oxygen and pH. Conclusions: This study identified significant correlations between physicochemical parameters and blackfly larvae densities thus providing a precontrol evidence-based data for the control of onchocerciasis in the endemic areas of North Delta.

  20. Characterization of the Ca2+-gated and voltage-dependent K+-channel Slo-1 of nematodes and its interaction with emodepside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Daniel; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Miltsch, Sandra M; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B; Ballesteros, Cristina; Geary, Timothy G; Keiser, Jennifer; Townson, Simon; Harder, Achim; Krücken, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    The cyclooctadepsipeptide emodepside and its parent compound PF1022A are broad-spectrum nematicidal drugs which are able to eliminate nematodes resistant to other anthelmintics. The mode of action of cyclooctadepsipeptides is only partially understood, but involves the latrophilin Lat-1 receptor and the voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel Slo-1. Genetic evidence suggests that emodepside exerts its anthelmintic activity predominantly through Slo-1. Indeed, slo-1 deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strains are completely emodepside resistant. However, direct effects of emodepside on Slo-1 have not been reported and these channels have only been characterized for C. elegans and related Strongylida. Molecular and bioinformatic analyses identified full-length Slo-1 cDNAs of Ascaris suum, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca gutturosa and Strongyloides ratti. Two paralogs were identified in the trichocephalids Trichuris muris, Trichuris suis and Trichinella spiralis. Several splice variants encoding truncated channels were identified in Trichuris spp. Slo-1 channels of trichocephalids form a monophyletic group, showing that duplication occurred after the divergence of Enoplea and Chromadorea. To explore the function of a representative protein, C. elegans Slo-1a was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied in electrophysiological (voltage-clamp) experiments. Incubation of oocytes with 1-10 µM emodepside caused significantly increased currents over a wide range of step potentials in the absence of experimentally increased intracellular Ca2+, suggesting that emodepside directly opens C. elegans Slo-1a. Emodepside wash-out did not reverse the effect and the Slo-1 inhibitor verruculogen was only effective when applied before, but not after, emodepside. The identification of several splice variants and paralogs in some parasitic nematodes suggests that there are substantial differences in channel properties among

  1. Characterization of the Ca2+-gated and voltage-dependent K+-channel Slo-1 of nematodes and its interaction with emodepside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kulke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyclooctadepsipeptide emodepside and its parent compound PF1022A are broad-spectrum nematicidal drugs which are able to eliminate nematodes resistant to other anthelmintics. The mode of action of cyclooctadepsipeptides is only partially understood, but involves the latrophilin Lat-1 receptor and the voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel Slo-1. Genetic evidence suggests that emodepside exerts its anthelmintic activity predominantly through Slo-1. Indeed, slo-1 deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strains are completely emodepside resistant. However, direct effects of emodepside on Slo-1 have not been reported and these channels have only been characterized for C. elegans and related Strongylida. Molecular and bioinformatic analyses identified full-length Slo-1 cDNAs of Ascaris suum, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca gutturosa and Strongyloides ratti. Two paralogs were identified in the trichocephalids Trichuris muris, Trichuris suis and Trichinella spiralis. Several splice variants encoding truncated channels were identified in Trichuris spp. Slo-1 channels of trichocephalids form a monophyletic group, showing that duplication occurred after the divergence of Enoplea and Chromadorea. To explore the function of a representative protein, C. elegans Slo-1a was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied in electrophysiological (voltage-clamp experiments. Incubation of oocytes with 1-10 µM emodepside caused significantly increased currents over a wide range of step potentials in the absence of experimentally increased intracellular Ca2+, suggesting that emodepside directly opens C. elegans Slo-1a. Emodepside wash-out did not reverse the effect and the Slo-1 inhibitor verruculogen was only effective when applied before, but not after, emodepside. The identification of several splice variants and paralogs in some parasitic nematodes suggests that there are substantial differences in

  2. Rate of elimination of Wolbachia pipientis by doxycycline in vitro increases following drug withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makepeace, Benjamin L; Rodgers, Lisa; Trees, Alexander J

    2006-03-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is an obligate intracellular bacterium within the family Anaplasmataceae that infects many terrestrial arthropods and arthropod-transmitted nematodes (filariae). Several filarial species are major human pathogens, and antibiotics with activity against Wolbachia offer a promising new therapeutic approach, since the adult worms are relatively refractory to conventional anthelmintics but depend on Wolbachia for reproduction and viability. In a natural filarial parasite of cattle, Onchocerca ochengi, intermittent chemotherapy is adulticidal whereas the equivalent dose administered as a continuous treatment is not. To investigate this further and to aid the design of efficacious regimens for human therapy, we used Wolbachia-infected Aedes albopictus mosquito cells in vitro. Here, we describe for the first time the accelerated depletion of bacteria after antibiotic withdrawal relative to the rate of elimination in the continuous presence of the drug. Mosquito cells were incubated with doxycycline while changes in 16S (bacterial) and 18S (host) rRNA and rRNA genes were determined by quantitative PCR assays. In cultures treated for 7 or 14 days followed by 7 days of drug withdrawal, the Wolbachia-to-Aedes rRNA ratio declined by approximately 6 log, whereas immediately after 14 or 21 days of continuous treatment, the reduction was only approximately 4 log (P < 0.05). However, low levels of 16S rRNA remained after 21 days of treatment, irrespective of whether doxycycline was withdrawn. Application of similar methodology to related intracellular bacteria may reveal that this posttreatment effect is not restricted to Wolbachia and could have wider implications for the design of intermittent regimens for antibiotic chemotherapy.

  3. Detection of filaria-specific IgG4 antibodies and filarial DNA, for the screening of blood spots for Brugia timori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P; Bonow, I; Supali, T; Rückert, P; Rahmah, N

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of simple, sensitive and specific tools for the diagnosis of brugian lymphatic filariasis is a prerequisite for a successful intervention to control the disease. In the simple and rapid Brugia Rapid (BR) test, an immunochromatographic dipstick is used to detect IgG(4) antibodies that are reactive with a recombinant Brugia malayi antigen. When sera from 109 individuals with Brugia microfilaraemias (12 with B. malayi and 97 with B. timori) were investigated using the BR test, all were found positive. In contrast, all of the 150 sera from individuals with Onchocerca volvulus or Mansonella infections investigated were found negative in BR tests. Some unwelcome cross-reactions were observed, however, with sera from individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti (three of 12 test-positive) and Dirofilaria (one of nine test-positive). In an attempt to facilitate sample collection and detect any cross-reactions, the BR dipstick was used to screen blood spots, that had been allowed to dry on filter paper, for B. timori microfilariae, before the dipstick-positive samples were tested with a PCR-based assay. Of the 66 individuals so tested, 37 (56%) were found positive by the BR test used on dry blood spots and eight (22%) by the filtration of fresh blood samples. Only nine of the 37 dipstick-positive samples were found PCR-positive. The combined use of BR tests and PCR-based assays, for testing blood spots in areas where brugian filariasis is endemic, appears to be a promising method not only for post-treatment monitoring but also for the certification activities planned within the framework of the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis.

  4. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of a Wolbachia-free filarial parasite provide evidence of trans-kingdom horizontal gene transfer.

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    Samantha N McNulty

    Full Text Available Most filarial parasites in the subfamilies Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae depend on Wolbachia endobacteria to successfully carry out their life cycle. Recently published data indicate that the few Wolbachia-free species in these subfamilies were infected in the distant past and have subsequently shed their endosymbionts. We used an integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of Onchocerca flexuosa to explore the molecular mechanisms that allow worms of this species to survive without a bacterial partner. Roche/454 sequencing of the adult transcriptome produced 16,814 isogroup and 47,252 singleton sequences that are estimated to represent approximately 41% of the complete gene set. Sequences similar to 97 Wolbachia genes were identified from the transcriptome, some of which appear on the same transcripts as sequences similar to nematode genes. Computationally predicted peptides, including those with similarity to Wolbachia proteins, were classified at the domain and pathway levels in order to assess the metabolic capabilities of O. flexuosa and compare against the Wolbachia-dependent model filaria, Brugia malayi. Transcript data further facilitated a shotgun proteomic analysis of O. flexuosa adult worm lysate, resulting in the identification of 1,803 proteins. Three of the peptides detected by mass spectroscopy map to two ABC transport-related proteins from Wolbachia. Antibodies raised to one of the Wolbachia-like peptides labeled a single 38 kDa band on Western blots of O. flexuosa lysate and stained specific worm tissues by immunohistology. Future studies will be required to determine the exact functions of Wolbachia-like peptides and proteins in O. flexuosa and to assess their roles in worm biology.

  5. New features on the moults and morphogenesis of the human filaria Loa loa by using rodent hosts consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, O; Wanji, S; Enyong, P; Petit, G; Noireau, F; Eberhard, M I; Wahl, G

    1998-03-01

    The development of the human filaria Loa loa (Dirofilariinae, Onchocercidae), previously studied in monkeys, was studied using the non permissive hosts-mice and jirds. The development proved to be rapid: moult 3 occurred on day 8 post-inoculation, the adult stage was reached on day 25 and measured at that time 3-3.5 mm in length. As in the other filarioids, the female genital apparatus developed during the fourth stage. A critical analysis of the studies on the development of Onchocercid species was made. The optimal duration of the stages (i.g. the shortest time) was chosen for the comparison. It appeared that the duration of the stage 3 was a constant character in a given species whatever the experimental conditions, whereas moult 4 might be retarded in a non susceptible host. Comparison between the 18 developmental cycles of Onchocercidae in the vertebrate host was made. Two biological types could be distinguished: either the moult 3 occurred on day 2-3 and was followed apparently by a late moult 4 (> or = 50 days), or the moult 3 occurred after about one week of development and it was associated with a less long stage 4 (20-40 days). The first group includes Dirofilaria and Onchocerca, the second group brings together mainly Loa and the Onchocercinae of the Dipetalonema line and related genera (Acanthocheilonema, Brugia, Litomosoides, etc.). The groups thus formed suggest real relationships as they fit with the morphology of the infective stage and the results of a recent molecular analysis of the 5S DNA.

  6. Sequence conservation in the Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) from hookworm infected individuals in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungcharoensuk, Charoenchai; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Pattanawong, Urassaya; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2012-12-01

    The Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) was one of the promising vaccine candidates against the most prevalent human hookworm species as adverse vaccine reaction has compromised further human vaccine trials. To elucidate the gene structure and the extent of sequence diversity, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the Na-asp-2 gene of individual larvae from 32 infected subjects living in 3 different endemic areas of Thailand. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encoding Na-ASP-2 comprised 8 exons. Of 3 nucleotide substitutions in these exons, only one causes an amino acid change from leucine to methionine. A consensus conserved GT and AG at the 5' and the 3' boundaries of each intron was observed akin to those found in other eukaryotic genes. Introns of Na-asp-2 contained 23 nucleotide substitutions and 0-18 indels. The mean number of nucleotide substitutions per site (d) in introns was not significantly different from the mean number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (d(S)) in exons whereas d in introns was significantly exceeded d(N) (the mean number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site) in exons (pASP-2. A recombination site was identified in an intron near the 3' portion of the gene. The positions of introns and the intron phases in the Na-asp-2 gene comparing with those in other pathogenesis-related-1 proteins of Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Heterodera glycines, Caenorhabditis elegans and human were relatively conserved, suggesting evolutionary conservation of these genes. Sequence conservation in Na-ASP-2 may not compromise further vaccine design if adverse vaccine effects could be resolved whereas microheterogeneity in introns of this locus may be useful for population genetics analysis of N. americanus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced humoral response to influenza vaccine in aged mice with a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M; Concannon, Mark; Lustigman, Sara; Shen, Hao; Murasko, Donna M

    2016-02-10

    Immunization is the best way to prevent seasonal epidemics and pandemics of influenza. There are two kinds of influenza vaccines available in the United States: an inactivated vaccine (TIV) and an attenuated vaccine; however, only TIV is approved for immunization of the elderly population. While the aged population has the highest rate of influenza vaccination, the protective efficacy is low as evidenced by elderly individuals having the highest mortality associated with influenza. Recently, we reported that an adjuvant derived from the helminth parasite Onchocerca volvulus, named O. volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1), can significantly enhance the protective efficacy of an inactivated vaccine (TIV) in young adult mice. In the current study, we examined whether this recombinant Ov-ASP-1 (rOv-ASP-1) can enhance the efficacy of TIV in aged mice as well. While primary immunization with TIV alone produced only a low level of influenza-specific antibodies (total IgG, IgG1, and IgG2c) in aged mice, the antibody levels were significantly increased after immunization with TIV+rOv-ASP-1. More importantly, the level of the total IgG in aged mice administered TIV+rOv-ASP-1 was comparable to that of young adult mice immunized with TIV alone. Co-administration of rOv-ASP-1 induced a low level of cross-reactive antibody and enhanced the protective efficacy of TIV in aged mice, reflected by significantly increased survival after challenge with a heterologous influenza virus. rOv-ASP-1 was also superior to the conventional adjuvant alum in inducing specific IgG after TIV immunization in aged mice, and in conferring protection after challenge. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 may serve as a potential adjuvant for influenza vaccine to improve the efficacy of protection in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does Increasing Treatment Frequency Address Suboptimal Responses to Ivermectin for the Control and Elimination of River Blindness?

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    Frempong, Kwadwo K.; Walker, Martin; Cheke, Robert A.; Tetevi, Edward Jenner; Gyan, Ernest Tawiah; Owusu, Ebenezer O.; Wilson, Michael D.; Boakye, Daniel A.; Taylor, Mark J.; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several African countries have adopted a biannual ivermectin distribution strategy in some foci to control and eliminate onchocerciasis. In 2010, the Ghana Health Service started biannual distribution to combat transmission hotspots and suboptimal responses to treatment. We assessed the epidemiological impact of the first 3 years of this strategy and quantified responses to ivermectin over 2 consecutive rounds of treatment in 10 sentinel communities. Methods. We evaluated Onchocerca volvulus community microfilarial intensity and prevalence in persons aged ≥20 years before the first, second, and fifth (or sixth) biannual treatment rounds using skin snip data from 956 participants. We used longitudinal regression modeling to estimate rates of microfilarial repopulation of the skin in a cohort of 217 participants who were followed up over the first 2 rounds of biannual treatment. Results. Biannual treatment has had a positive impact, with substantial reductions in infection intensity after 4 or 5 rounds in most communities. We identified 3 communities—all having been previously recognized as responding suboptimally to ivermectin—with statistically significantly high microfilarial repopulation rates. We did not find any clear association between microfilarial repopulation rate and the number of years of prior intervention, coverage, or the community level of infection. Conclusions. The strategy of biannual ivermectin treatment in Ghana has reduced O. volvulus microfilarial intensity and prevalence, but suboptimal responses to treatment remain evident in a number of previously and consistently implicated communities. Whether increasing the frequency of treatment will be sufficient to meet the World Health Organization's 2020 elimination goals remains uncertain. PMID:27001801

  9. A double-blind comparison of the efficacy and safety of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine in a placebo controlled study of Senegalese patients with onchocerciasis.

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    Diallo, S; Aziz, M A; Lariviere, M; Diallo, J S; Diop-Mar, I; N'Dir, O; Badiane, S; Py, D; Schulz-Key, H; Gaxotte, P

    1986-01-01

    Ivermectin (MK-933) has been compared with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and placebo in a double-blind study in 30 adult male Senegalese patients with Onchocerca volvulus infection. 10 patients were randomly assigned to each treatment group. Ivermectin was administered as a single oral dose of 12 mg and DEC as 50 mg daily for two days and 100 mg twice daily for the following six days, total 1.3 g in eight days. Skin O. volvulus microfilaria densities remained near pre-study values in the placebo patients, but decreased rapidly with both active drugs to mean values about 2% of pretreatment (Day 8) and then increased slowly, reaching in 12 months about 4% of pre-treatment (ivermectin) and 18% (DEC). This difference is statistically significant. Clinical adverse reactions were recorded in four ivermectin, ten DEC and three placebo patients. One ivermectin and six DEC patients received steroid treatment for relief of these reactions. Serious adverse ocular changes were not seen in any patients, possibly because of the steroid therapy in the DEC patients. Adult O. volvulus from onchocercal nodules one and six months after treatment showed no effect of either drug on viability. Intra-uterine developing forms of the microfilariae appeared normal in all three treatment groups at the one month examination but deformed and degenerated forms were evident at six months in the ivermectin group but not in the DEC and placebo patients. Ivermectin as a single oral dose appears to be a safer and more effective microfilaricidal drug in human onchocerciasis than DEC in the standard multi-dose regimen.

  10. Inflammatory reactions in onchocerciasis: a report on current knowledge and recommendations for further study*

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    Henson, P. M.; Mackenzie, C. D.; Spector, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    This report concerns the host's reactions to the presence of the parasite both in the course of the natural disease and during drug treatment. The various stages of Onchocerca volvulus are discussed in terms of the type of tissue reaction seen. The discussion then turns to basic hypotheses concerning the etiology of these reactions, emphasis being placed on the fact that while pathological changes are considerable in some locations there is a remarkable lack of reaction in others. Some of the mechanisms possibly involved in this apparent absence of host response are discussed, including anti-complement factors, poor antigenicity, acquisition of host antigen, immune tolerance, and blocking antibodies. In any study of the inflammatory response it is recommended that critical evaluations be made of histological material, haematological studies, the definition of the antigenic nature of O. volvulus, characterization of immunological reactivity of patients, and the definition of the migratory pathways of the parasite. The marked host reactions seen following chemotherapy, especially those related to the interaction of the drug diethylcarbamazine with microfilariae, are discussed at some length. The etiology of these reactions is considered and recommendations are made for the experimental elucidation of the mechanisms involved. Emphasis is placed on the necessity for detailed sequential histopathological and immunopathological studies in the definition of the tissue lesions found in onchocerciasis. Characterization of these lesions will assist greatly the approach to control of the adverse reactions seen during treatment. The use of anti-inflammatory agents in clinical trials is discussed and comments are made concerning the most suitable clinical situations for testing drugs and the types of drug that should be tested. PMID:396050

  11. Inflammatory reactions in onchocerciasis: a report on current knowledge and recommendations for further study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, P M; Mackenzie, C D; Spector, W G

    1979-01-01

    This report concerns the host's reactions to the presence of the parasite both in the course of the natural disease and during drug treatment. The various stages of Onchocerca volvulus are discussed in terms of the type of tissue reaction seen. The discussion then turns to basic hypotheses concerning the etiology of these reactions, emphasis being placed on the fact that while pathological changes are considerable in some locations there is a remarkable lack of reaction in others. Some of the mechanisms possibly involved in this apparent absence of host response are discussed, including anti-complement factors, poor antigenicity, acquisition of host antigen, immune tolerance, and blocking antibodies. In any study of the inflammatory response it is recommended that critical evaluations be made of histological material, haematological studies, the definition of the antigenic nature of O. volvulus, characterization of immunological reactivity of patients, and the definition of the migratory pathways of the parasite.The marked host reactions seen following chemotherapy, especially those related to the interaction of the drug diethylcarbamazine with microfilariae, are discussed at some length. The etiology of these reactions is considered and recommendations are made for the experimental elucidation of the mechanisms involved. Emphasis is placed on the necessity for detailed sequential histopathological and immunopathological studies in the definition of the tissue lesions found in onchocerciasis. Characterization of these lesions will assist greatly the approach to control of the adverse reactions seen during treatment.The use of anti-inflammatory agents in clinical trials is discussed and comments are made concerning the most suitable clinical situations for testing drugs and the types of drug that should be tested.

  12. Importance of ivermectin to human onchocerciasis: past, present, and the future

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    Cupp EW

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ed W Cupp1, Charles D Mackenzie2, Thomas R Unnasch31Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; 2Department of Pathobiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; 3Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Ivermectin (registered for human use as Mectizan® was donated by Merck & Co Inc in 1987 for the treatment and control of human onchocerciasis ("river blindness". This philanthropic gesture has had a remarkable effect in reducing the incidence and prevalence of this serious ocular and dermatological disease, while changing health system support for millions of people worldwide. Over 800 million doses have been given to more than 80 million people for onchocerciasis during the past 23 years. As a result, onchocerciasis has been significantly reduced in more than 25 countries, transmission has been interrupted in foci in at least 10 countries, and the disease is no longer seen in children in many formerly endemic foci. Recent communications have suggested that the drug's efficacy as the major therapeutic agent for these control and elimination programs may be threatened, but alternative interpretations for suboptimal response/resistance suggest otherwise. Current research needs and control methods by which the public health community in endemic countries may respond to resistance, should it occur in their area, are discussed, along with the continuing importance of this anthelmintic as the mainstay in onchocerciasis control programs.Keywords: Ivermectin, Onchocerca volvulus, river blindness, resistance, African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control, Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas

  13. Glucose and Glycogen Metabolism in Brugia malayi Is Associated with Wolbachia Symbiont Fitness.

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    Voronin, Denis; Bachu, Saheed; Shlossman, Michael; Unnasch, Thomas R; Ghedin, Elodie; Lustigman, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria found in the majority of arthropods and filarial nematodes of medical and veterinary importance. They have evolved a wide range of symbiotic associations. In filarial nematodes that cause human lymphatic filariasis (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi) or onchocerciasis (Onchocerca volvulus), Wolbachia are important for parasite development, reproduction and survival. The symbiotic bacteria rely in part on nutrients and energy sources provided by the host. Genomic analyses suggest that the strain of Wolbachia found in B. malayi (wBm) lacks the genes for two glycolytic enzymes--6-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase--and is thus potentially unable to convert glucose into pyruvate, an important substrate for energy generation. The Wolbachia surface protein, wBm00432, is complexed to six B. malayi glycolytic enzymes, including aldolase. In this study we characterized two B. malayi aldolase isozymes and found that their expression is dependent on Wolbachia fitness and number. We confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy that aldolase is associated with the Wolbachia surface. RNAi experiments suggested that aldolase-2 plays a significant role in both Wolbachia survival and embryogenesis in B. malayi. Treatment with doxycycline reduced Wolbachia fitness and increased the amount of both glucose and glycogen detected in the filarial parasite, indicating that glucose metabolism and glycogen storage in B. malayi are associated with Wolbachia fitness. This metabolic co-dependency between Wolbachia and its filarial nematode indicates that glycolysis could be a shared metabolic pathway between the bacteria and B. malayi, and thus a potential new target for anti-filarial therapy.

  14. Ivermectin-facilitated immunity in onchocerciasis. Reversal of lymphocytopenia, cellular anergy and deficient cytokine production after single treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboslay, P T; Dreweck, C M; Hoffmann, W H; Lüder, C G; Heuschkel, C; Görgen, H; Banla, M; Schulz-Key, H

    1992-09-01

    A longitudinal investigation has been conducted into the cell-mediated immune responses of onchocerciasis patients after a single-dose treatment with ivermectin. Untreated patients tested for delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity (DCH) to seven recall antigens showed lower responses than infection-free control individuals (P less than 0.01), but 6 and 14 months after treatment DCH reactions increased to similar levels to those seen in the controls. The in vitro cellular reactivity to Onchocerca volvulus-derived antigen (OvAg) was reduced in untreated patients as compared with controls, and the lymphocyte blastogenic responses to OvAg and streptolysin-O clearly improved up to 14 months after treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from untreated patients produced IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 in response to mitogenic stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), only low levels of IL-1 beta, IL-2 and TNF-alpha in response to OvAg, but higher amounts of IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in response to OvAg than control individuals. After ivermectin treatment, the OvAg-induced production of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha increased significantly 1 and 14 months after treatment. The PHA-induced production of IL-2 and IL-4 increased 1 month after treatment and remained significantly elevated until 14 months after treatment, whereas the OvAg-specific secretion of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma did not change after ivermectin treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte-subsets in the peripheral blood of untreated patients revealed a relative and absolute (P less than 0.01) diminution of CD4+ cells and a significantly smaller CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio as compared with controls. By 4 weeks after treatment and thereafter, CD4+ T cells increased relatively and absolutely (P less than 0.01); likewise there was an absolute increase in T-helper-inducer cells (CD4+CD45RO+) and a temporarily improved CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio (P = 0.001). The expression of

  15. Chemokines in onchocerciasis patients after a single dose of ivermectin.

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    Fendt, J; Hamm, D M; Banla, M; Schulz-Key, H; Wolf, H; Helling-Giese, G; Heuschkel, C; Soboslay, P T

    2005-11-01

    Ivermectin treatment will effectively diminish microfilariae (Mf) of Onchocerca volvulus in the skin of patients, but therapy is associated with adverse host inflammatory responses. To investigate the association of proinflammatory chemokines with the intensity of infection and clinical adverse reactions, chemokine serum levels were measured in patients following ivermectin treatment (100 microg/kg, 150 microg/kg or 200 microg/kg) or placebo. The density of O. volvulus Mf per mg skin decreased by 85%, 97%, 97% and 90% at day 3, at month 3, month 6 and at 1 year post-ivermectin. The cutaneous T cell-attracting chemokine (CTACK/CCL27) was found highly elevated in onchocerciasis patients compared to infection-free European controls (P = 0.0004) and it did not change following ivermectin or placebo to 1 year post-therapy. The chemokine RANTES/CCL5 (regulated on activated and normally T cell-expressed) was similarly high in onchocerciasis patients and infection-free European controls; the RANTES/CCL5 levels did not change following treatment until 6 months post-therapy but were slightly elevated at 1 year post-therapy (P ivermectin (P ivermectin treatment, but following clearance of microfilariae of O. volvulus their levels increased from 6 months post-therapy onwards (for both at 12 months post-therapy, P dose of ivermectin or with the serum levels of MIP-1alpha/CCL3, MIP-1beta/CCL4, TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22 and CTACK/CCL27. Our observations suggest that following ivermectin, macrophages as well as memory Th2-type lymphocytes and B cells, attracted and activated by MDC/CCL22, TARC/CCL17 and CTACK/CCL27, may contribute to dermal immune responses and O. volvulus Mf killing and clearance. The transient changes of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 were not associated with clinical adverse responses, and the later rise of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and MIP-1beta/CCL4 showed a reactivation of Type 1 immune responses associated with persistent low levels of O. volvulus microfilariae and an expiring

  16. [The use of ivermectin in the control of onchocerciasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippaux, J P; Boussinesq, M; Prod'hon, J

    1995-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is an infection with the nematode Onchocerca volvulus. The main clinical symptoms are caused by the microfilariae. They include ocular lesions leading to blindness. Onchocerciasis is widely distributed in Africa from the Sahara to the southern tip, and is also found in some areas of South and Central America. Ivermectin was shown to be an effective treatment in the early 1980's, and is safe and better tolerated than diethylcarbamazine. We report the results of ivermectin treatment of onchocerciasis, and various features of the control obtained by large-scale ivermectin treatment programs. In large-scale programs, ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) is administered once a year. This dose paralyses the microfilariae, such that they are carried away by the lymph to the lymph nodes where they are destroyed. This dose thereby reduces the load of microfilaria by 90%. The effects of a dose of ivermectin last about two or three years, and the lesions in the anterior segment of the eye can be cured or substantially reduced. Regular treatment prevents severe lesions of the posterior segment of the eye. The effects of repeated treatment on lesions of the retina are currently under investigation. Frequent doses of ivermectin prevent the development of embryo parasites in the females, and reduces the number of adults by attrition. Large-scale treatment programs reduce the transmission of the parasite by its vectors. There are several problems impeding large-scale treatment programs. Choosing patients for priority treatment requires expensive and sometimes aggressive methods of diagnosis. Thus new techniques for the identification of communities in which onchocerciasis is a serious public health problem are required. The choice of strategies for distribution, to optimize the cost, benefit ratio and feasibility, remain controversial. Wide distribution by mobile teams is effective, but expensive. Active distribution by trained community distributors is a cheaper

  17. Modelling Anti-Ov16 IgG4 Antibody Prevalence as an Indicator for Evaluation and Decision Making in Onchocerciasis Elimination Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lont, Yvonne L; Coffeng, Luc E; de Vlas, Sake J; Golden, Allison; de Los Santos, Tala; Domingo, Gonzalo J; Stolk, Wilma A

    2017-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is targeted for elimination in Africa through annual or biannual ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA). An immunodiagnostic test, based on the detection of human IgG4 antibodies in the blood to the Onchocerca volvulus-specific antigen Ov16, is one of the recommended tools for determining whether transmission is interrupted and mass treatment can stop. For different transmission settings, the relationship between post-MDA Ov16 antibody prevalence in children (measured 1 year after the last round of MDA) and the duration and coverage of MDA, the mf prevalence in the population, and the probability that onchocerciasis is eventually eliminated is explored through mathematical modelling. The ONCHOSIM model was extended with new output on the Ov16 antibody serostatus of individuals. Seroconversion was assumed to be triggered by the first worm establishing in the host, with seroconversion occurring either before maturation, after maturation or only after the start of mf production. We are mainly interested in seroconversion rates in children, and for now ignore the possibility of seroreversion to simplify the model. Yearly repeated MDA leads to a strong reduction in the parasite acquisition rate in humans. This reduces the seroconversion rate in newborns and young children, while those who seroconverted before the start of control remain antibody positive. Both the microfiladermia prevalence in the population aged 5 years and above and the Ov16 antibody prevalence in children under 10 declined with increasing duration of MDA. The association between either of these indicators and the model-predicted probability of elimination was not influenced much by the assumed treatment coverage levels, but was found to depend on baseline endemicity levels, assumptions regarding the trigger of seroconversion, and diagnostic test characteristics (sensitivity and specificity). Better understanding of the dynamics of Ov16 antibody responses is required for accurate

  18. O-5S quantitative real-time PCR: a new diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Solomon A; Beissner, Marcus; Saar, Malkin; Ali, Solomon; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Tesfaye, Kassahun; Adbaru, Mulatu G; Battke, Florian; Poppert, Sven; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz

    2017-10-02

    Onchocerciasis is a parasitic disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus. In endemic areas, the diagnosis is commonly confirmed by microscopic examination of skin snip samples, though this technique is considered to have low sensitivity. The available melting-curve based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using degenerated primers targeting the O-150 repeat of O. volvulus was considered insufficient for confirming the individual diagnosis, especially in elimination studies. This study aimed to improve detection of O. volvulus DNA in clinical samples through the development of a highly sensitive qPCR assay. A novel hydrolysis probe based qPCR assay was designed targeting the specific sequence of the O. volvulus O-5S rRNA gene. A total of 200 clinically suspected onchocerciasis cases were included from Goma district in South-west Ethiopia, from October 2012 through May 2013. Skin snip samples were collected and subjected to microscopy, O-150 qPCR, and the novel O-5S qPCR. Among the 200 individuals, 133 patients tested positive (positivity rate of 66.5%) and 67 negative by O-5S qPCR, 74 tested positive by microscopy (37.0%) and 78 tested positive by O-150 qPCR (39.0%). Among the 133 O-5S qPCR positive individuals, microscopy and O-150 qPCR detected 55.6 and 59.4% patients, respectively, implying a higher sensitivity of O-5S qPCR than microscopy and O-150 qPCR. None of the 67 individuals who tested negative by O-5S qPCR tested positive by microscopy or O-150 qPCR, implying 100% specificity of the newly designed O-5S qPCR assay. The novel O-5S qPCR assay is more sensitive than both microscopic examination and the existing O-150 qPCR for the detection of O. volvulus from skin snip samples. The newly designed assay is an important step towards appropriate individual diagnosis and control of onchocerciasis.

  19. Feasibility of onchocerciasis elimination with ivermectin treatment in endemic foci in Africa: first evidence from studies in Mali and Senegal.

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    Lamine Diawara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass treatment with ivermectin is a proven strategy for controlling onchocerciasis as a public health problem, but it is not known if it can also interrupt transmission and eliminate the parasite in endemic foci in Africa where vectors are highly efficient. A longitudinal study was undertaken in three hyperendemic foci in Mali and Senegal with 15 to 17 years of annual or six-monthly ivermectin treatment in order to assess residual levels of infection and transmission and test whether ivermectin treatment could be safely stopped in the study areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Skin snip surveys were undertaken in 126 villages, and 17,801 people were examined. The prevalence of microfilaridermia was <1% in all three foci. A total of 157,500 blackflies were collected and analyzed for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus larvae using a specific DNA probe, and vector infectivity rates were all below 0.5 infective flies per 1,000 flies. Except for a subsection of one focus, all infection and transmission indicators were below postulated thresholds for elimination. Treatment was therefore stopped in test areas of 5 to 8 villages in each focus. Evaluations 16 to 22 months after the last treatment in the test areas involved examination of 2,283 people using the skin snip method and a DEC patch test, and analysis of 123,000 black flies. No infected persons and no infected blackflies were detected in the test areas, and vector infectivity rates in other catching points were <0.2 infective flies per 1,000. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study has provided the first empirical evidence that elimination of onchocerciasis with ivermectin treatment is feasible in some endemic foci in Africa. Although further studies are needed to determine to what extent these findings can be extrapolated to other endemic areas in Africa, the principle of elimination has been established. The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control has adopted an additional

  20. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

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    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  1. Large extracellular loop of tetraspanin as a potential vaccine candidate for filariasis.

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    Gajalakshmi Dakshinamoorthy

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis affects nearly 120 million people worldwide and mass preventive chemotherapy is currently used as a strategy to control this infection. This has substantially reduced the incidence of the infection in several parts of the world. However, a prophylactic vaccine would be more effective in preventing future infections and will supplement the mass chemotherapy efforts. Unfortunately, there is no licensed vaccine available currently to prevent this infection. Molecules expressed on the surface of the parasite are potential candidates for vaccine development as they are exposed to the host immune system. In this study we show that the large extracellular loop of tetraspanin (TSP LEL, a protein expressed on the cuticle of Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti is a potential vaccine candidate. Our results showed that BmTSP LEL is expressed on the surface of B. malayi infective third stage larvae (L3 and sera from human subjects who are putatively immune to lymphatic filariasis carry high titer of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against BmTSP LEL and WbTSP LEL. We also showed that these antibodies in the sera of human subjects can participate in the killing of B. malayi L3 in an antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mechanism. Vaccination trials in mice showed that close to 64% protection were achieved against challenge infections with B. malayi L3. Immunized animals showed high titer of anti-WbTSP LEL IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies in the sera and IFN-γ secreting cells in the spleen. Onchocerca volvulus another filarial parasite also expresses TSP LEL. Cross-reactivity studies showed that IgG1 antibody in the sera of endemic normal subjects, recognize OvTSP LEL. Similarly, anti-OvTSP LEL antibodies in the sera of subjects who are immune to O. volvulus were also shown to cross-react with rWbTSP LEL and rBmTSP LEL. These findings thus suggested that rTSP LEL can be developed as a potential vaccine candidate against multiple

  2. Vaccination of Gerbils with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 Concurrently or as a Fusion Protein Confers Consistent and Improved Protection against Brugia malayi Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Abraham, David; Bell, Aaron; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Lustigman, Sara; Klei, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    The Brugia malayi Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 proteins are orthologous to Onchocerca volvulus Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, and which were selected as the best candidates for the development of an O. volvulus vaccine. The B. malayi gerbil model was used to confirm the efficacy of these Ov vaccine candidates on adult worms and to determine whether their combination is more efficacious. Vaccine efficacy of recombinant Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 administered individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein were tested in gerbils using alum as adjuvant. Vaccination with Bm-103 resulted in worm reductions of 39%, 34% and 22% on 42, 120 and 150 days post infection (dpi), respectively, and vaccination with Bm-RAL-2 resulted in worm reductions of 42%, 22% and 46% on 42, 120 and 150 dpi, respectively. Vaccination with a fusion protein comprised of Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 resulted in improved efficacy with significant reduction of worm burden of 51% and 49% at 90 dpi, as did the concurrent vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2, with worm reduction of 61% and 56% at 90 dpi. Vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 as a fusion protein or concurrently not only induced a significant worm reduction of 61% and 42%, respectively, at 150 dpi, but also significantly reduced the fecundity of female worms as determined by embryograms. Elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG were observed in all vaccinated gerbils. Serum from gerbils vaccinated with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein killed third stage larvae in vitro when combined with peritoneal exudate cells. Although vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually conferred protection against B. malayi infection in gerbils, a more consistent and enhanced protection was induced by vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 fusion protein and when they were used concurrently. Further characterization and optimization of these filarial vaccines are warranted.

  3. Vaccination of Gerbils with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 Concurrently or as a Fusion Protein Confers Consistent and Improved Protection against Brugia malayi Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Arumugam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Brugia malayi Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 proteins are orthologous to Onchocerca volvulus Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, and which were selected as the best candidates for the development of an O. volvulus vaccine. The B. malayi gerbil model was used to confirm the efficacy of these Ov vaccine candidates on adult worms and to determine whether their combination is more efficacious.Vaccine efficacy of recombinant Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 administered individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein were tested in gerbils using alum as adjuvant. Vaccination with Bm-103 resulted in worm reductions of 39%, 34% and 22% on 42, 120 and 150 days post infection (dpi, respectively, and vaccination with Bm-RAL-2 resulted in worm reductions of 42%, 22% and 46% on 42, 120 and 150 dpi, respectively. Vaccination with a fusion protein comprised of Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 resulted in improved efficacy with significant reduction of worm burden of 51% and 49% at 90 dpi, as did the concurrent vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2, with worm reduction of 61% and 56% at 90 dpi. Vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 as a fusion protein or concurrently not only induced a significant worm reduction of 61% and 42%, respectively, at 150 dpi, but also significantly reduced the fecundity of female worms as determined by embryograms. Elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG were observed in all vaccinated gerbils. Serum from gerbils vaccinated with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein killed third stage larvae in vitro when combined with peritoneal exudate cells.Although vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually conferred protection against B. malayi infection in gerbils, a more consistent and enhanced protection was induced by vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 fusion protein and when they were used concurrently. Further characterization and optimization of these filarial vaccines are warranted.

  4. Serious reactions after mass treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in an area endemic for Loa loa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardon, J; Gardon-Wendel, N; Demanga-Ngangue; Kamgno, J; Chippaux, J P; Boussinesq, M

    1997-07-05

    In 1995, the World Bank launched an African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control to eliminate Onchocerca volvulus disease from 19 African countries by means of community-based ivermectin treatment (CBIT). Several cases of encephalopathy have been reported after ivermectin in people heavily infected with microfilariae of Loa loa (loiasis). We assessed the incidence of serious events in an area where onchocerciasis and loiasis are both endemic. Ivermectin (at 150 micrograms/kg) was given to 17877 people living in the Lékié area of Cameroon. 50 microL samples of capillary blood were taken during the daytime before treatment from all adults (aged > or = 15 years), and the numbers of L loa and Mansonella perstans microfilariae in them were counted. Patients were monitored for 7 days after treatment. Adverse reactions were classified as mild, marked, or serious. Serious reactions were defined as those associated with a functional impairment that required at least a week of full-time assistance to undertake normal activities. We calculated the relative risk of developing marked or serious reactions for increasing L loa microfilarial loads. Risk factors for serious reactions were identified and assessed with a logistic regression model. 20 patients (0-11%) developed serious reactions without neurological signs but associated with a functional impairment lasting more than a week. Two other patients were in coma for 2-3 days, associated with L loa microfilariae in cerebrospinal fluid. Occurrence of serious reactions was related to the intensity of pretreatment L loa microfilaraemia. The relative risk of developing marked or serious reactions was significantly higher when the L loa load exceeded 8000 microfilariae/mL; for serious reactions, the risk is very high (odds ratio > 1000) for loads above 50000 microfilariae/mL. Epidemiological surveys aimed at assessing the intensity of infection with L loa microfilariae should be done before ivermectin is distributed for

  5. The adjuvanticity of an O. volvulus-derived rOv-ASP-1 protein in mice using sequential vaccinations and in non-human primates.

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    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Adjuvants potentiate antigen-specific protective immune responses and can be key elements promoting vaccine effectiveness. We previously reported that the Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein rOv-ASP-1 can induce activation and maturation of naïve human DCs and therefore could be used as an innate adjuvant to promote balanced Th1 and Th2 responses to bystander vaccine antigens in mice. With a few vaccine antigens, it also promoted a Th1-biased response based on pronounced induction of Th1-associated IgG2a and IgG2b antibody responses and the upregulated production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6. However, because it is a protein, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant may also induce anti-self-antibodies. Therefore, it was important to verify that the host responses to self will not affect the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 when it is used in subsequent vaccinations with the same or different vaccine antigens. In this study, we have established rOv-ASP-1's adjuvanticity in mice during the course of two sequential vaccinations using two vaccine model systems: the receptor-binding domain (RBD of SARS-CoV spike protein and a commercial influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA vaccine comprised of three virus strains. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 was retained with an efficacy similar to that obtained when it was used for a first vaccination, even though a high level of anti-rOv-ASP-1 antibodies was present in the sera of mice before the administration of the second vaccine. To further demonstrate its utility as an adjuvant for human use, we also immunized non-human primates (NHPs with RBD plus rOv-ASP-1 and showed that rOv-ASP-1 could induce high titres of functional and protective anti-RBD antibody responses in NHPs. Notably, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant did not induce high titer antibodies against self in NHPs. Thus, the present study provided a sound scientific foundation for future strategies in the development of this novel protein

  6. Treatment of co-infection with bancroftian filariasis and onchocerciasis: a safety and efficacy study of albendazole with ivermectin compared to treatment of single infection with bancroftian filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunde, William H; Kamugisha, Leo M; Massaga, Julius J; Makunde, Rachel W; Savael, Zakana X; Akida, Juma; Salum, Fred M; Taylor, Mark J

    2003-01-01

    Background In order to use a combination of ivermectin and albendazole for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis, it is important to assess the potential risk of increased adverse events in individuals infected with both lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. We compared the safety and efficacy of albendazole (400 mg) in combination with ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg), for the treatment of co-infections of Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus with single infection of W. bancrofti. Methods The safety study on co-infections was a crossover, double blind design, while for the single infection of bancroftian filariasis an open design comparing two treatments was used. For co-infection, one group was allocated a single dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) plus albendazole (400 mg) (Group A). The other group received placebo (Group B). Five days later the treatment regime was reversed, with the Group A receiving placebo and Group B receiving treatment. For the single bancroftian filariasis infection, one group received a single dose of albendazole (400 mg) plus ivermectin (150 μg/kg) (Group C) while the other group received a single dose of albendazole (400 mg) alone (Group D). Blood and skin specimens were collected on admission day, day 0, and on days 2, 3, and 7 to assess drug safety and efficacy. Thereafter, blood and skin specimens were collected during the 12 months follow up for the assessment of drug efficacy. Study individuals were clinically monitored every six hours during the first 48 hours following treatment, and routine clinical examinations were performed during the hospitalisation period and follow-up. Results In individuals co-infected with bancroftian filariasis and onchocerciasis, treatment with ivermectin and albendazole was safe and tolerable. Physiological indices showed no differences between groups with co-infection (W. bancrofti and O. volvulus) or single infection (W. bancrofti). The frequency of adverse events in co

  7. The adjuvanticity of an O. volvulus-derived rOv-ASP-1 protein in mice using sequential vaccinations and in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Tricoche, Nancy; Du, Lanying; Hunter, Meredith; Zhan, Bin; Goud, Gaddam; Didier, Elizabeth S; Liu, Jing; Lu, Lu; Marx, Preston A; Jiang, Shibo; Lustigman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvants potentiate antigen-specific protective immune responses and can be key elements promoting vaccine effectiveness. We previously reported that the Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein rOv-ASP-1 can induce activation and maturation of naïve human DCs and therefore could be used as an innate adjuvant to promote balanced Th1 and Th2 responses to bystander vaccine antigens in mice. With a few vaccine antigens, it also promoted a Th1-biased response based on pronounced induction of Th1-associated IgG2a and IgG2b antibody responses and the upregulated production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6. However, because it is a protein, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant may also induce anti-self-antibodies. Therefore, it was important to verify that the host responses to self will not affect the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 when it is used in subsequent vaccinations with the same or different vaccine antigens. In this study, we have established rOv-ASP-1's adjuvanticity in mice during the course of two sequential vaccinations using two vaccine model systems: the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein and a commercial influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine comprised of three virus strains. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 was retained with an efficacy similar to that obtained when it was used for a first vaccination, even though a high level of anti-rOv-ASP-1 antibodies was present in the sera of mice before the administration of the second vaccine. To further demonstrate its utility as an adjuvant for human use, we also immunized non-human primates (NHPs) with RBD plus rOv-ASP-1 and showed that rOv-ASP-1 could induce high titres of functional and protective anti-RBD antibody responses in NHPs. Notably, the rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant did not induce high titer antibodies against self in NHPs. Thus, the present study provided a sound scientific foundation for future strategies in the development of this novel protein adjuvant.

  8. Seasonal and diurnal biting activities and zoonotic filarial infections of two Simulium species (Diptera: Simuliidae in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Y.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and daily biting activity patterns, and natural filarial infections of adult black flies attracted to human bait were investigated at Ban Pang Faen, a rural area in Chiang Mai Province in northern Thailand. Collections were carried out twice a month from 06-00 to 18-00 hours from January 2005 to February 2006. Among ten Simulium species collected, S. nodosum and S. asakoae were predominant occupying 57.3% and 37.2% of the total 16, 553 females, respectively. These two predominant species showed different patterns in seasonal abundance: majority of S. nodosum (86.7% were collected in hot season (from mid February to mid May, while most of S. asakoae (74.5% were collected in rainy season (from mid May to mid October. For the daily biting activity, S. nodosum had two patterns: the main one was unimodal with a peak from 17-00 to 18-00, and the other was bimodal and had the major peak from 16-00 to 18-00 and the minor one from 07-00 to 09-00. The pattern of S. asakoae was mostly unimodal with a peak from 06-00 to 10-00. The filarial larvae found in S. nodosum and S. asakoae were morphologically different from each other. The short and thick infective larvae found in S. asakoae differed from all known filarial larvae; it is suggested that they might be a bird parasite, Splendidofilariinae or Lemdaninae. The infection of the mammophilic S. nodosum with large Onchocerca type infective larvae was confirmed in this area. Natural filarial infections were found in each month (except December in either S. nodosum or S. asakoae or in both. Monthly infection rates with all stages of larvae were 0.6-5.0% for S. nodosum, and 1.0-4.0% for S. asakoae. It is suggested that people in this village are exposed to the risk of infection with zoonotic filariae throughout the year.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genomes for three Toxocara species of human and animal health significance

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    Wu Xiang-Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mitochondrial (mt genomics has important implications for various fundamental areas, including mt biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology. In addition, mt genome sequences have provided useful markers for investigating population genetic structures, systematics and phylogenetics of organisms. Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara malaysiensis cause significant health problems in animals and humans. Although they are of importance in human and animal health, no information on the mt genomes for any of Toxocara species is available. Results The sizes of the entire mt genome are 14,322 bp for T. canis, 14029 bp for T. cati and 14266 bp for T. malaysiensis, respectively. These circular genomes are amongst the largest reported to date for all secernentean nematodes. Their relatively large sizes relate mainly to an increased length in the AT-rich region. The mt genomes of the three Toxocara species all encode 12 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes, but lack the ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene, which is consistent with all other species of Nematode studied to date, with the exception of Trichinella spiralis. All genes are transcribed in the same direction and have a nucleotide composition high in A and T, but low in G and C. The contents of A+T of the complete genomes are 68.57% for T. canis, 69.95% for T. cati and 68.86% for T. malaysiensis, among which the A+T for T. canis is the lowest among all nematodes studied to date. The AT bias had a significant effect on both the codon usage pattern and amino acid composition of proteins. The mt genome structures for three Toxocara species, including genes and non-coding regions, are in the same order as for Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex, but differ from Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and Caenorhabditis elegans only in the location of the AT-rich region, whereas there are substantial differences when compared with Onchocerca volvulus

  10. Sustainable control of onchocerciasis: ocular pathology in onchocerciasis patients treated annually with ivermectin for 23 years: a cohort study.

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    Méba Banla

    Full Text Available The evolution and persistence of ocular pathology was assessed in a cohort of Onchocerca volvulus infected patients treated annually with ivermectin for 23 years. Patients were resident in rural Central and Kara Region of Togo and ocular examinations included testing of visual acuity, slit lamp examination of the anterior eye segment and the eye fundus by ophthalmoscopy. Before ivermectin treatment, vivid O.volvulus microfilariae (MF were observed in the right and left anterior eye chamber in 52% and 42% of patients (n = 82, and dead MF were seen in the right and left cornea in 24% and 15% of cases, respectively. At 23 years post initial treatment (PIT, none of the patients (n = 82 presented with MF in the anterior chamber and cornea. A complete resolution of punctate keratitis (PK lesions without observable corneal scars was present at 23 years PIT (p<0.0001, and sclerosing keratitits (SK lessened by half, but mainly in patients with lesions at early stage of evolution. Early-stage iridocyclitis diminished from 42%(rE and 40%(lE to 13% (rE+lE(p<0.0001, but advanced iridocyclitis augmented (p<0.001 at 23 years PIT compared to before ivermectin. Advanced-stage papillitis and chorioretinitis did not regress, while early-stage papillitis present in 28%(rE and 27%(lE of patients at before ivermectin regressed to 17%(rE and 18%(lE, and early-stage chorioretinitis present in 51%(rE+lE of cases at before ivermectin was observed in 12%(rE and 13%(lE at 23 years PIT (p<0.0001. Thus, regular annual ivermectin treatment eliminated and prevented the migration of O. volvulus microfilariae into the anterior eye chamber and cornea; keratitis punctata lesions resolved completely and early-stage sclerosing keratitits and iridocyclitis regressed, whilst advanced lesions of the anterior and posterior eye segment remained progressive. In conclusion, annual ivermectin treatments may prevent the emergence of ocular pathology in those populations still exposed

  11. New molecular identifiers for Simulium limbatum and Simulium incrustatum s.l. and the detection of genetic substructure with potential implications for onchocerciasis epidemiology in the Amazonia focus of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Priscila A; Crainey, James L; Almeida, Tatiana P; Shelley, Anthony J; Luz, Sergio L B

    2013-08-01

    still remains unanswered as the data presented here also suggest that S. limbatum found in the savannahs adjacent to, but outside the Amazonia focus (and which represent the only S. limbatum population to be unambiguously incriminated as a host of Onchocerca volvulus), are genetically distinct from those living inside the focus. These findings highlight the need for a clearer picture of the vector taxonomy inside the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus.

  12. Localization of a filarial phosphate permease that is up-regulated in response to depletion of essential Wolbachia endobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Hoerauf, Achim; Pfarr, Kenneth M

    2014-03-01

    Wolbachia of filarial nematodes are essential, obligate endobacteria. When depleted by doxycycline worm embryogenesis, larval development and worm survival are inhibited. The molecular basis governing the endosymbiosis between Wolbachia and their filarial host is still being deciphered. In rodent filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis, a nematode encoded phosphate permease gene (Ls-ppe-1) was up-regulated at the mRNA level in response to Wolbachia depletion and this gene promises to have an important role in Wolbachia-nematode endosymbiosis. To further characterize this gene, the regulation of phosphate permease during Wolbachia depletion was studied at the protein level in L. sigmodontis and in the human filaria Onchocerca volvulus. And the localization of phosphate permease (PPE) and Wolbachia in L. sigmodontis and O. volvulus was investigated in untreated and antibiotic treated worms. Depletion of Wolbachia by tetracycline (Tet) resulted in up-regulation of Ls-ppe-1 in L. sigmodontis. On day 36 of Tet treatment, compared to controls (Con), >98% of Wolbachia were depleted with a 3-fold increase in mRNA levels of Ls-ppe-1. Anti-Ls-PPE serum used in Western blots showed up-regulation of Ls-PPE at the protein level in Tet worms on day 15 and 36 of treatment. Immunohistology revealed the localization of Wolbachia and Ls-PPE in the embryos, microfilariae and hypodermis of L. sigmodontis female worms and up-regulation of Ls-PPE in response to Wolbachia depletion. Expression of O. volvulus phosphate permease (Ov-PPE) studied using anti-Ov-PPE serum, showed up-regulation of Ov-PPE at the protein level in doxycycline treated Wolbachia depleted O. volvulus worms and immunohistology revealed localization of Ov-PPE and Wolbachia and up-regulation of Ov-PPE in the hypodermis and embryos of doxycycline treated worms. Ls-PPE and Ov-PPE are upregulated upon Wolbachia depletion in same tissues and regions where Wolbachia are located in untreated worms, reinforcing a link

  13. Assessment and monitoring of onchocerciasis in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Unnasch, Thomas R; Real-Najarro, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Onchocerciasis has historically been one of the leading causes of infectious blindness worldwide. It is endemic to tropical regions both in Africa and Latin America and in the Yemen. In Latin America, it is found in 13 foci located in 6 different countries. The epidemiologically most important focus of onchocerciasis in the Americas is located in a region spanning the border between Guatemala and Mexico. However, the Amazonian focus straddling the border of Venezuela and Brazil is larger in overall area because the Yanomami populations are scattered over a very large geographical region. Onchocerciasis is caused by infection with the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus. The infection is spread through the bites of an insect vector, black flies of the genus Simulium. In Africa, the major vectors are members of the S. damnosum complex, while numerous species serve as vectors of the parasite in Latin America. Latin America has had a long history of attempts to control onchocerciasis, stretching back almost 100 years. The earliest programmes used a strategy of surgical removal of the adult parasites from affected individuals. However, because many of the adult parasites lodge in undetectable and inaccessible areas of the body, the overall effect of this strategy on the prevalence of infection was relatively minor. In 1988, a new drug, ivermectin, was introduced that effectively killed the larval stage (microfilaria) of the parasite in infected humans. As the microfilaria is both the stage that is transmitted by the vector fly and the cause of most of the pathologies associated with the infection, ivermectin opened up a new strategy for the control of onchocerciasis. Concurrent with the use of ivermectin for the treatment of onchocerciasis, a number of sensitive new diagnostic tools were developed (both serological and nucleic acid based) that provided the efficiency, sensitivity and specificity necessary to monitor the decline and eventual elimination of

  14. 半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂的系统发生分析%Phylogenetic Analysis of Cystatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凤梅; 盖雪梅

    2010-01-01

    [目的]对已知半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂基因编码蛋白的分子量、等电点、信号肽、结构域等进行分析.[方法]在NCBI中检索半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂基因,下载相应的氨基酸序列.采用SMART软件预测结构域,用SingalP程序查找信号肽,用TMHMM程序搜寻预测跨膜区.多序列比对采用CLUSTAL W程序.运用MEGA3.1软件,采用Neighbor-joining 法构建进化树.[结果]半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制A(Homo sapiens)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制M(H. sapiens)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制F(H. sapiens)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制(Mus musculus)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制C(M. musculus)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制F(Rattus norvegicus)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制C(R. norvegicus)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制S(R. norvegicus)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制I(Zea mays)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制(Brugia malayi)、半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制(Onchocerca volvulus)和半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制(Acanthocheilonema viteae)有信号肽,其余的半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制基因没有信号肽,TMHMM程序搜寻结果显示,这些半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制都没有跨膜区,均为胞外蛋白.SMART软件分析结果表明它们均含有1个高度保守的半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂结构域.多序列比对结果表明半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂基因存在高度保守的QxVxG基序,意味着该基序可能对半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂的抑制活性具有重要意义.系统进化分析可预示半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制半胱氨酸蛋白酶活性在进化过程中可能也是保守的.[结论]该研究可为半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂抑制半胱氨酸蛋白酶的功能研究方面提供理论参考.