WorldWideScience

Sample records for on time performance

  1. Performance Analysis Based on Timing Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Dalsgaard; Kishinevsky, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Determining the cycle time and a critical cycle is a fundamental problem in the analysis of concurrent systems. We solve this problemusing timing simulation of an underlying Signal Graph (an extension of Marked Graphs). For a Signal Graph with n vertices and m arcs our algorithm has the polynomia...... time complexity O(b2m), where b is the number of vertices with initially marked in-arcs (typically b≪n). The algorithm has a clear semantic and a low descriptive complexity. We illustrate the use of the algorithm by applying it to performance analysis of asynchronous circuits.......Determining the cycle time and a critical cycle is a fundamental problem in the analysis of concurrent systems. We solve this problemusing timing simulation of an underlying Signal Graph (an extension of Marked Graphs). For a Signal Graph with n vertices and m arcs our algorithm has the polynomial...

  2. On the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-11-01

    There has been tremendous work done on designing space-time codes for the quasi-static multiple-input multiple output (MIMO) channel. All the coding design up-to-date focuses on either high-performance, high rates, low complexity encoding and decoding, or targeting a combination of these criteria [1]-[9]. In this paper, we analyze in details the performance limits of diagonal lattice space-time codes under lattice decoding. We present both lower and upper bounds on the average decoding error probability. We first derive a new closed-form expression for the lower bound using the so-called sphere lower bound. This bound presents the ultimate performance limit a diagonal lattice space-time code can achieve at any signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The upper bound is then derived using the union-bound which demonstrates how the average error probability can be minimized by maximizing the minimum product distance of the code. Combining both the lower and the upper bounds on the average error probability yields a simple upper bound on the the minimum product distance that any (complex) lattice code can achieve. At high-SNR regime, we discuss the outage performance of such codes and provide the achievable diversity-multiplexing tradeoff under lattice decoding. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. The impact of cognitive load on operatic singers' timing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorlu, Muzaffer; Maes, Pieter-Jan; Muller, Chris; Kochman, Katty; Leman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the results of an empirical study on the effects of cognitive load on operatic singing. The main aim of the study was to investigate to what extent a working memory task affected the timing of operatic singers' performance. Thereby, we focused on singers' tendency to speed up, or slow down their performance of musical phrases and pauses. Twelve professional operatic singers were asked to perform an operatic aria three times; once without an additional working memory task, once with a concurrent working memory task (counting shapes on a computer screen), and once with a relatively more difficult working memory task (more shapes to be counted appearing one after another). The results show that, in general, singers speeded up their performance under heightened cognitive load. Interestingly, this effect was more pronounced in pauses-more in particular longer pauses-compared to musical phrases. We discuss the role of sensorimotor control and feedback processes in musical timing to explain these findings.

  4. The Impact of Cognitive Load on Operatic Singers’ Timing Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer eCorlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we report the results of an empirical study on the effects of cognitive load on operatic singing. The main aim of the study was to investigate to what extent a working memory task affected the timing of operatic singers’ performance. Thereby, we focused on singers’ tendency to speed up, or slow down their performance of musical phrases and pauses. Twelve professional operatic singers were asked to perform an operatic aria three times; once without an additional working memory task, once with a concurrent working memory task (counting shapes on a computer screen, and once with a relatively more difficult working memory task (more shapes to be counted appearing one after another. The results show that, in general, singers speeded up their performance under heightened cognitive load. Interestingly, this effect was more pronounced in pauses – more in particular longer pauses – compared to musical phrases. We discuss the role of sensorimotor control and feedback processes in musical timing to explain these findings.

  5. Performance of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis on short time series

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the multifractal detrended analysis on short time series is evaluated for synthetic samples of several mono- and multifractal models. The reconstruction of the generalized Hurst exponents is used to determine the range of applicability of the method and the precision of its results as a function of the decreasing length of the series. As an application the series of the daily exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the euro is studied.

  6. Quality of E-Learners’ Time and Learning Performance Beyond Quantitative Time-on-Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Romero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAlong with the amount of time spent learning (or time-on-task, the quality of learning time has a real influence on learning performance. Quality of time in online learning depends on students’ time availability and their willingness to devote quality cognitive time to learning activities. However, the quantity and quality of the time spent by adult e-learners on learning activities can be reduced by professional, family, and social commitments. Considering that the main time pattern followed by most adult e-learners is a professional one, it may be beneficial for online education programs to offer a certain degree of flexibility in instructional time that might allow adult learners to adjust their learning times to their professional constraints. However, using the time left over once professional and family requirements have been fulfilled could lead to a reduction in quality time for learning. This paper starts by introducing the concept of quality of learning time from an online student-centred perspective. The impact of students’ time-related variables (working hours, time-on-task engagement, time flexibility, time of day, day of week is then analyzed according to individual and collaborative grades achieved during an online master’s degree program. The data show that both students’ time flexibility (r = .98 and especially their availability to learn in the morning are related to better grades in individual (r = .93 and collaborative activities (r = .46.

  7. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Rietmann, Max

    2016-11-25

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100×). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  8. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmann, Max; Grote, Marcus; Peter, Daniel; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  9. Effect of fatigue on reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact in taekwondo roundhouse kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ana, Jader; Franchini, Emerson; da Silva, Vinicius; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    Reaction time and response time are considered important abilities and can potentially affect combat performance. This study investigated the effect of a specific fatigue protocol on reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact. Seven male athletes reported to the laboratory on two different days. During day one, athletes performed a specific progressive taekwondo test, and on day two, a protocol for determining reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact before and after a time to exhaustion test at an intensity level corresponding to the maximal kick frequency obtained during the specific progressive taekwondo test. Muscle activation from rectus femoris and kick impact of the preferred limb were assessed. No differences were observed for response time and performance time. However, kick impact decreased (43 ± 27 to 13 ± 10 g, p taekwondo training programmes on coordination-based exercises leading to improve response time and to reduce fatigue effects in order to improve technique effectiveness and enhance the possibilities of scoring in a competitive situation.

  10. The effects of caffeinated "energy shots" on time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Matthew Mark; Astorino, Todd Anthony; Azevedo, John Leal

    2013-06-06

    An emerging trend in sports nutrition is the consumption of energy drinks and "energy shots". Energy shots may prove to be a viable pre-competition supplement for runners. Six male runners (mean ± SD age and VO2max: 22.5 ± 1.8 years and 69.1 ± 5.7 mL·kg-1·min-1) completed three trials [placebo (PLA; 0 mg caffeine), Guayakí Yerba Maté Organic Energy Shot™ (YM; 140 mg caffeine), or Red Bull Energy Shot™ (RB; 80 mg caffeine)]. Treatments were ingested following a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Participants ran a five kilometer time trial on a treadmill. No differences (p > 0.05) in performance were detected with RB (17.55 ± 1.01 min) or YM ingestion (17.86 ± 1.59 min) compared to placebo (17.44 ± 1.25 min). Overall, energy shot ingestion did not improve time-trial running performance in trained runners.

  11. Effect of time zone and game time changes on team performance: National Football League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehue, R; Street, D; Huizenga, R

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effect of time zone and game time changes on NFL team performance, win-loss records from 1978-1987 were analyzed. Twenty-seven NFL teams were grouped by time zone and possible anti-jet lag adjustments. Among all intra-time zone rivals, home teams won 56.6%, away teams won 43.8%, for a home vs away winning percentage change of -12.8% (P winning percentage was found to be 0.0% vs West teams, -14.1% vs Central teams (N = 8) (P zone, home vs away team winning percentage changed -23.8% (P winning percentages (75.0% and 68.4%) when playing Central and East teams, respectively, with little or no fall in away winning percentages (67.7% and 68.8%). For day games, a 3-h phase advance may decrease West coast team performance. In one small subset, anti-jet lag adjustments appeared to eliminate the expected decrement in performance. For night games, West coast teams, whether home or away, appear to be at a distinct advantage over East and Central teams.

  12. Effect of injection timing and injection pressure on the performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    single cylinder diesel engine fitted with conventional mechanical fuel ... on Common Rail Direct Injection (CRDI) facilities where the biodiesel can be ... Keywords: Diesel engine, Ester of Honge Oil (EHO), Common Rail Direct ..... emission of EHO was higher than those of the diesel under the same operating conditions.

  13. Improving on-time performance in health care organizations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, S D; Batson, C; McCaskey, S

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a strategy to build a measurement system that helps improve on-time performance in health care organizations. We analyze the measurement system for monitoring the performance of daily start times of first surgeries in a U.S. hospital. Although surgeons appear to be the main cause of delay, efforts to improve their on-time performance alone are not sufficient to improve on-time performance for first surgeries. Therefore, working on the main source of delay to improve performance, as the Pareto principle suggests, does not always work in the health care context. Rather, we found that ameliorating the hospital's overall on-time performance achieves the desired result of improving surgeons' performance through a snowball effect (a self-reinforcing effect) and, consequently, the on-time performance for first surgeries also improves.

  14. Assimilation Time as a Factor of Performance: Impact on a New Generation of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Pitt, Kay C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of whether assimilation time has any bearing on the performance of students. Assimilation time is defined as the number of times during the week that a class meets. This study examined whether students would perform better in a 50-minute class that met three days a week versus a 75-minute class that met just two days…

  15. Keeping time - Performing Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvinge, Anne Christine

    2012-01-01

    Candace Allen’s novel Valaida (2004) illustrates the migratory patterns of early 20th century jazz music and musicians, positing the art form and its performers as “heterotopians”; simultaneously in and outside of the power relations of hegemonic time-space compression, travelling in an alternate...

  16. The Power of "We": Effects of Psychological Collectivism on Team Performance over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierdorff, Erich C.; Bell, Suzanne T.; Belohlav, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influences of different facets of psychological collectivism (Preference, Reliance, Concern, Norm Acceptance, and Goal Priority) on team functioning at 3 different performance depictions: initial team performance, end-state team performance, and team performance change over time. We also tested the extent to which team-member…

  17. The Power of "We": Effects of Psychological Collectivism on Team Performance over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierdorff, Erich C.; Bell, Suzanne T.; Belohlav, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influences of different facets of psychological collectivism (Preference, Reliance, Concern, Norm Acceptance, and Goal Priority) on team functioning at 3 different performance depictions: initial team performance, end-state team performance, and team performance change over time. We also tested the extent to which team-member…

  18. On the link between mind wandering and task performance over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Seli, Paul; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Here we test the hypothesis that fluctuations in subjective reports of mind wandering over time-on-task are associated with fluctuations in performance over time-on-task. In Study 1, we employed a singleton search task and found that performance did not differ prior to on- and off-task reports, nor did individual differences in mind wandering predict differences in performance (so-called standard analytic methods). Importantly however, we find that fluctuations in mind wandering over time are strongly associated with fluctuations in behavior. In Study 2, we provide a replication of the relation between mind wandering and performance over time found in Study 1, using a Flanker interference task. These data indicate (1) a tight coupling between mind wandering and performance over time and (2) that a temporal-analytic approach can reveal effects of mind wandering on performance in tasks where standard analyses fail to do so. The theoretical and methodological implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. The Effect of Quantity, Quality and Timing of Headquarters-Initiated Knowledge Flows on Subsidiary Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Yen; Mahnke, Volker; Ambos, Björn

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops and tests a model that explains how the quality, quantity and timing of knowledge flows from headquarters influence subsidiary performance. It extends recent research on vertical knowledge flows between global headquarters and international subsidiaries. We find a positive...... quality/performance relationship and a curvilinear quantity/performance relationship, indicating that too much knowledge sharing can be detrimental to the receiving subsidiary. Most importantly, we show that the timing of a knowledge flow significantly affects subsidiary sales performance....

  20. Effects of individual aerobic performance on finish time in mountain running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Dieter; Burtscher, Johannes; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-06-01

    It was hypothesized that for each mountain running competition, there is a certain individual performance level below which running times increase dramatically. The running times of 869 finishers of 3 international mountain running competitions have been analysed. A hyperbolic association was demonstrated between finish times in mountain running competitions and individual performance at the anaerobic threshold (VO2AT(Race)). Due to the non-linear association, there is an increasing effect on both the finish time and the change of finish time with decreasing aerobic performance. In all three competitions, the change of finish time is about 7 times more pronounced in mountain runners with the lowest VO2ATL,, compared to those with the highest values of VO2AT(Race). Both athletes and organizers should keep in mind these effects of decreasing aerobic performance on running times and potentially associated risks.

  1. The Stimulating Effect of Bright Light on Physical Performance Depends on Internal Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Forstner, Sebastian; Halle, Martin; Schlangen, Luc; Roenneberg, Till; Schmidt-Trucksaess, Arno

    2012-01-01

    The human circadian clock regulates the daily timing of sleep, alertness and performance and is synchronized to the 24-h day by the environmental light-dark cycle. Bright light exposure has been shown to positively affect sleepiness and alertness, yet little is known about its effects on physical pe

  2. Effect of the switching time on the performance of an adsorption chiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Woo; Chung, Jae Dong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Kyung [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The switching time is an important operating condition that must be correctly anticipated for an effective adsorption cooling system. Before the adsorption (or desorption) process begins, time is required to cool down (or heat up) the bed temperature so that the bed pressure reaches the evaporator pressure (or condenser pressure). During the switching time, the supplied heat is reduced and pressure overload conditions can be avoided. The switching time cannot be estimated early on, and an improper switching time degrades the system performance. Thus, this study provides guideline with which to determine the required time to open this valve, i.e., the switching time, and carefully examines the thermo-physical behavior in the adsorption bed during this period. A two-dimensional numerical method with the composite sorbent of SWS-1L and a water pair is applied to a fin-tube type adsorption chiller. Three cases of no switching time, the optimal switching time and a double the optimal switching time are examined. The results show that no consideration of the switching time overestimates the performance of the adsorption cooling system in terms of the Coefficient of performance (COP) and the Specific cooling power (SCP). On the other hand, if the switching time exceeds the optimal value, the performance of the adsorption cooling system is also reduced compared to that when using the optimal switching time. The dependency of the optimal switching times on various design parameters, such as the fin pitch, fin height and heating temperature, is also examined.

  3. ECAL Timing Performance

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is made of about 75000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals arranged in a barrel and two endcaps. The scintillation light is read out by avalanche photodiodes in the barrel and vacuum phototriodes in the endcaps, at which point the scintillation pulse is amplified and sampled at 40 MHz by the on-detector electronics. The fast signal from the crystal scintillation enables energy as well as timing measurements from the data collected in proton-proton collisions with high energy electrons and photons. The stability of the timing measurement required to maintain the energy resolution is on the order of 1ns. The single-channel time resolution of ECAL measured at beam tests for high energy showers is better than 100 ps. The timing resolution achieved with the data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented.

  4. Effect of time of day on performance, hormonal and metabolic response during a 1000-M cycling time trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lins Fernandes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p0.05, but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p0.05. Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu.

  5. Effect of heat and heat acclimatization on cycling time trial performance and pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, Sebastien; Périard, Julien D; Karlsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of heat-acclimatization on performance and pacing during outdoor cycling time-trials (TT, 43.4km) in the heat. METHODS: Nine cyclists performed 3 TTs in hot ambient conditions (TTH, ∼37ºC) on the first (TTH-1), sixth (TTH-2) and fourteenth (TTH-3) days of trainin...

  6. 14 CFR 234.10 - Voluntary disclosure of on-time performance codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary disclosure of on-time performance codes. 234.10 Section 234.10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.10 Voluntary...

  7. 14 CFR 234.9 - Reporting of on-time performance codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting of on-time performance codes. 234.9 Section 234.9 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.9 Reporting of...

  8. Direction of an approaching stimulus on coincident timing performance of a ballistic striking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Cheryl A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of stimulus direction and velocity on the coincident timing performance of a ballistic striking task. 26 subjects randomly performed 20 trials at each of two stimulus velocities (4 and 8 mph) and two striking variations (moving with an approaching stimulus or in opposition to it). Analysis indicated the direction of an approaching stimulus does not appear to influence the coincident timing of a ballistic striking action.

  9. Timing Constraints Based High Performance Des Design And Implementation On 28nm FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thind, Vandana; Pandey, Sujeet; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2015-01-01

    in this work, we are going to implement DES Algorithm on 28nm Artix-7 FPGA. To achieve high performance design goal, we are using minimum period, maximum frequency, minimum low pulse, minimum high pulse for different cases of worst case slack, maximum delay, setup time, hold time and data skew path...

  10. Effect of Frequency and Vibration Time on Shaker Performance for Mechanized Harvesting of Orange (Thomson cultivar)

    OpenAIRE

    H Ghorbanpour; M.H Khoshtaghaza; M.R Mostofi Sarkari

    2012-01-01

    Manual citrus harvesting is commonly performing hard, expensive and time consuming. In this study, a factorial experiment with a completely randomized design in three replications was performed to find out the effect of frequency (three levels of 5, 7.5 and 10 Hz), vibration time (three levels of 10, 15 and 20 seconds) on harvesting capacity and losses of Thomson cultivar of orange. The results indicated that the effect of frequency and vibration time was significant (P≤0.01) on the harvestin...

  11. Keeping time - Performing Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvinge, Anne Christine

    2012-01-01

    and reactionary and suggests that the way time is employed in a heterotopic space determines its progressive potential. Spaces of accumulative, static, or frozen time refuse to yield any utopian promise, whereas fluid, dynamic, and ephemeral time offers moments of agency. In the case of Valaida, music...

  12. Effect of inhaled terbutaline on substrate utilization and 300-kcal time trial performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders; Hostrup, Morten; Karlsson, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind crossover design, we investigated the effect of the beta2-agonist terbutaline on endurance performance and substrate utilization in nine moderately trained males (maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max): 58.9±3.1 mL min(-1) kg(-1)). Subjects performed 60 min of submaximal...... exercise (65-70% of VO2max) immediately followed by a 300-kcal time trial with inhalation of either terbutaline (TER) or placebo (PLA). Pulmonary gas exchange was measured during the submaximal exercise and muscle biopsies were collected before and after the exercise bouts. Time trial performance...

  13. Sleep deprivation and time-on-task performance decrement in the rat psychomotor vigilance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonk, Marcella; Davis, Christopher J; Krueger, James M; Wisor, Jonathan P; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2015-03-01

    The rat psychomotor vigilance task (rPVT) was developed as a rodent analog of the human psychomotor vigilance task (hPVT). We examined whether rPVT performance displays time-on-task effects similar to those observed on the hPVT. The rPVT requires rats to respond to a randomly presented light stimulus to obtain a water reward. Rats were water deprived for 22 h prior to each 30-min rPVT session to motivate performance. We analyzed rPVT performance over time on task and as a function of the response-stimulus interval, at baseline and after sleep deprivation. The study was conducted in an academic research vivarium. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to respond to a 0.5 sec stimulus light within 3 sec of stimulus onset. Complete data were available for n = 20 rats. Rats performed the rPVT for 30 min at baseline and after 24 h total sleep deprivation by gentle handling. Compared to baseline, sleep deprived rats displayed increased performance lapses and premature responses, similar to hPVT lapses of attention and false starts. However, in contrast to hPVT performance, the time-on-task performance decrement was not significantly enhanced by sleep deprivation. Moreover, following sleep deprivation, rPVT response times were not consistently increased after short response-stimulus intervals. The rPVT manifests similarities to the hPVT in global performance outcomes, but not in post-sleep deprivation effects of time on task and response-stimulus interval. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Time-on-task decrements in "steer clear" performance of patients with sleep apnea and narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, L. J.; Suratt, P. M.; Dinges, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of attention with time-on-task reflects the increasing instability of the waking state during performance in experimentally induced sleepiness. To determine whether patients with disorders of excessive sleepiness also displayed time-on-task decrements indicative of wake state instability, visual sustained attention performance on "Steer Clear," a computerized simple RT driving simulation task, was compared among 31 patients with untreated sleep apnea, 16 patients with narcolepsy, and 14 healthy control subjects. Vigilance decrement functions were generated by analyzing the number of collisions in each of six four-minute periods of Steer Clear task performance in a mixed-model analysis of variance and linear regression equations. As expected, patients had more Steer Clear collisions than control subjects (p=0.006). However, the inter-subject variability in errors among the narcoleptic patients was four-fold that of the apnea patients, and 100-fold that of the controls volunteers; the variance in errors among untreated apnea patients was 27-times that of controls. The results of transformed collision data revealed main effects for group (p=0.006), time-on-task (p=0.001), and a significant interaction (p=0.022). Control subjects showed no clear evidence of increasing collision errors with time-on-task (adjusted R2=0.22), while apnea patients showed a trend toward vigilance decrement (adjusted R2=0.42, p=0.097), and narcolepsy patients evidenced a robust linear vigilance decrement (adjusted R2=0.87, p=0.004). The association of disorders of excessive somnolence with escalating time-on-task decrements makes it imperative that when assessment of neurobehavioral performance is conducted in patients, it involves task durations and analyses that will evaluate the underlying vulnerability of potentially sleepy patients to decrements over time in tasks that require sustained attention and timely responses, both of which are key components in safe driving performance.

  15. Effect of tempering time on the ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Kumar Jena

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The investigation describes and analyses the effect of tempering time on the mechanical and ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel. The steel is subjected to tempering at 300 °C for 2, 24 and 48 h. A marginal variation in strength and hardness is observed with increase in tempering time, whereas ductility and Charpy impact values are found to be decreasing. Ballistic performance of the samples are evaluated by impacting 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm armour piercing projectiles at 0° angle of impact. Results show a small variation in the ballistic performance when impacted with 7.62 mm armour piercing projectile. A decrease in ballistic performance of the material is observed with increasing tempering time when impacted with 12.7 mm armour piercing ammunition.

  16. Strategies of dietary carbohydrate manipulation and their effects on performance in cycling time trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Oliveira, Carlos Rafaell; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Dal'Molin Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between carbohydrate (CHO) availability and exercise performance has been thoroughly discussed. CHO improves performance in both prolonged, low-intensity and short, high-intensity exercises. Most studies have focused on the effects of CHO supplementation on the performance of constant-load, time-to-exhaustion exercises. Nevertheless, in the last 20 years, there has been a consistent increase in research on the effects of different forms of CHO supplementation (e.g., diet manipulation, CHO supplementation before or during exercise) on performance during closed-loop exercises, such as cycling time trials (TTs). A TT is a highly reproducible exercise and reflects a more realistic scenario of competition compared with the time-to-exhaustion test. CHO manipulation has been performed in various time periods, such as days before, minutes before, during a TT or in a matched manner (e.g. before and during a TT). The purpose of this review is to address the possible effects of these different forms of CHO manipulation on the performance during a cycling TT. Previous data suggest that when a high-CHO diet (~70% of CHO) is consumed before a TT (24-72 h before), the mean power output increases and reduces the TT time. When participants are supplemented with CHO (from 45 to 400 g) prior to a TT (from 2 min to 6 h before the TT), mean power output and time seem to improve due to an increase in CHO oxidation. Similarly, this performance also seems to increase when participants ingest CHO during a TT because such consumption maintains plasma glucose levels. A CHO mouth rinse also improves performance by activating several brain areas related to reward and motor control through CHO receptors in the oral cavity. However, some studies reported controversial results concerning the benefits of CHO on TT performance. Methodological issues such as time of supplementation, quantity, concentration and type of CHO ingested, as well as the TT duration and intensity, should be

  17. The culture of time in neuropsychological assessment: exploring the effects of culture-specific time attitudes on timed test performance in Russian and American samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agranovich, Anna V; Panter, A T; Puente, Antonio E; Touradji, Pegah

    2011-07-01

    Cultural differences in time attitudes and their effect on timed neuropsychological test performance were examined in matched non-clinical samples of 100 Russian and American adult volunteers using 8 tests that were previously reported to be relatively free of cultural bias: Color Trails Test (CTT); Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFFT); Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT); and Tower of London-Drexel Edition (ToL(Dx)). A measure of time attitudes, the Culture of Time Inventory (COTI-33) was used to assess time attitudes potentially affecting time-limited testing. Americans significantly outscored Russians on CTT, SDMT, and ToL(Dx) (p,.05) while differences in RFFT scores only approached statistical significance. Group differences also emerged in COTI-33 factor scores, which partially mediated differences in performance on CTT-1, SDMT, and ToL(Dx) initiation time, but did not account for the effect of culture on CTT-2. Significant effect of culture was revealed in ratings of familiarity with testing procedures that was negatively related to CTT, ToL(Dx), and SDMT scores. Current findings indicated that attitudes toward time may influence results of time limited testing and suggested that individuals who lack familiarity with timed testing procedures tend to obtain lower scores on timed tests.

  18. The effects of heart rate and aiming time on performance in Turkish National Archery Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İpek Eroğlu Kolayiş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of aiming time and heart rate on the performance. Three elite female national subject was used in this study. The shooting performance was observed only in 70 m. To evaluate heart rate, Delta Plus CP/I portable, interpreting model ECG, to determine  the releasing time double channel ME 3000 micro-processor, Muscle Tester were used. The results of the study; the shooting heart rate is116,2±7,16 bpm., aiming time is 3,56±0,59 s. And the heart rate of the time between two shooting  is 113,13±9,54 bpm. According to statistical analysis, a significant difference between shooting HR and aiming time of arrows which hit the different point on the target has been observed (p<0,05.The relationships between shooting HR-performance and shooting HR-Aiming time have been observed.While shootings come close to the center of the target (through the 10 point the shooting heart rate and aiming time has decreased and there is no change in the value of the heart rate of the time between two shooting.

  19. The effects of heart rate and aiming time on performance in Turkish National Archery Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İpek Eroğlu Kolayiş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of aiming time and heart rate on the performance. Three elite female national subject was used in this study. The shooting performance was observed only in 70 m. To evaluate heart rate, Delta Plus CP/I portable, interpreting model ECG, to determine the releasing time double channel ME 3000 micro-processor, Muscle Tester were used. The results of the study; the shooting heart rate is116,2±7,16 bpm., aiming time is 3,56±0,59 s. And the heart rate of the time between two shooting is 113,13±9,54 bpm. According to statistical analysis, a significant difference between shooting HR and aiming time of arrows which hit the different point on the target has been observed (p<0,05.The relationships between shooting HR-performance and shooting HR-Aiming time have been observed.While shootings come close to the center of the target (through the 10 point the shooting heart rate and aiming time has decreased and there is no change in the value of the heart rate of the time between two shooting.

  20. 14 CFR 234.4 - Reporting of on-time performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.4 Reporting of on-time... Office of Airline Information on a monthly basis, setting forth the information for each of its reportable flights held out in the Official Airline Guide (OAG), in the computer reservations systems (CRS...

  1. Dissociable effects of histamine H1 antagonists on reaction-time performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokland, A; Scholtissen, B; Vermeeren, A; Ramaekers, J

    2001-01-01

    The most pronounced side effect of antiallergic histaminergic drugs (H1 antagonists) is sedation. These effects have been linked with the effects of histaminergic drugs on central H1 receptors. In the present study, we investigated the dose-response relationship of different antihistamines on the performance in a reaction-time task that has been developed for rats. The dose-response relationship of diphenhydramine, cetirizine and terfenadine were examined for the various behavioural measures in this task (i.e., reaction time, motor time, premature responses and number of trials completed). In addition, the effects of scopolamine were assessed to evaluate the cholinergic profile in this task. Diphenhydramine did not reliably affect the reaction time, but increased the motor time and the proportion of premature responses, and decreased the number of trials completed in a session. A low dose of cetirizine decreased the reaction time, whereas an increase in reaction time was found for the high dose. The motor time was increased after both doses of cetirizine. Terfenadine did not affect the responding of rats in the reaction-time task at the doses tested. The effects of scopolamine were very similar to those of diphenhydramine. The reaction-time task used in this study was able to dissociate different types of antihistamines on aspects of psychomotor function, which were likely to be related to central muscarinic or H1 antagonism. These findings suggest that the reaction-time task may be a sensitive tool for assessing effects of drugs on psychomotor function.

  2. Effect of feeding time on the reproductive performance of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S M; Mady, M E; Cartwright, A L; Sabri, H M; Mobarak, M S

    2003-07-01

    Several feeding regimens are applied to improve performance of fertile egg production during times of heat stress. During a period of heat stress (34 to 36 degrees C), two feeding periods were used to measure the impact of feeding time on reproductive performance of Japanese quail (Coturnix cotunix japonica) between 44 and 60 wk of age. Each feeding time treatment had 25 individually caged male and female pairs. Quail were fed ad libitum between 0600 to 1400 or 1400 to 2200 h daily. Results indicated that feeding between 0600 to 1400 h reduced BW, fertility, hatchability, egg production, and egg specific gravity when compared with the effects of feeding between 1400 to 2200 h. Feeding time had no effect on total embryonic mortality, egg weight, or the period between subsequent ovipositions. The different feeding times affected the distribution curve of oviposition over time. An instrument designed to record oviposition time is described. Results showed that selection of the time of day for application of an 8-h restricted feeding regimen affected BW, fertility, hatchability, egg production, egg specific gravity, and oviposition time in Japanese quail.

  3. Effect of Frequency and Vibration Time on Shaker Performance for Mechanized Harvesting of Orange (Thomson cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ghorbanpour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Manual citrus harvesting is commonly performing hard, expensive and time consuming. In this study, a factorial experiment with a completely randomized design in three replications was performed to find out the effect of frequency (three levels of 5, 7.5 and 10 Hz, vibration time (three levels of 10, 15 and 20 seconds on harvesting capacity and losses of Thomson cultivar of orange. The results indicated that the effect of frequency and vibration time was significant (P≤0.01 on the harvesting capacity and losses, but their interaction effects weren’t significant. The harvesting capacity significantly increased by increasing frequency, and the highest harvesting capacity was 62.8 % at 10 Hz frequency. Although the harvesting capacity increased by increasing the vibration time, but there was no significant difference in vibration times between 15 and 20 seconds at 10 Hz frequency. Also the fruit loss was increased by increasing the vibration time. Due to these reasons, frequency of 10 Hz and vibration time of 15 seconds were selected as the most suitable condition for mechanized harvesting of this cultivar of orange. Finally a linear mathematical model was developed based on the frequency and vibration time for the harvesting capacity and fruit loss of Thomson cultivar of orange.

  4. The Effects of Caffeine on Arousal, Response Time, Accuracy, and Performance in Division I Collegiate Fencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Taylor P; Lutz, Rafer S; Pellegrino, Joseph K; Sanders, David J; Arent, Shawn M

    2016-11-01

    Doyle, TP, Lutz, RS, Pellegrino, JK, Sanders, DJ, and Arent, SM. The effects of caffeine on arousal, response time, accuracy, and performance in Division I collegiate fencers. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3228-3235, 2016-Caffeine has displayed ergogenic effects on aerobic performance. However, sports requiring precision and quick reaction may also be impacted by central nervous system arousal because of caffeine consumption. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of caffeine on arousal, response time (RT), and accuracy during a simulated fencing practice. Using a randomized, within-subjects, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, Division I male and female college fencers (N = 13; 69.1 ± 3.5 kg) were administered caffeine doses of 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, or 7.5 mg·kg during separate testing days. Performance was assessed via RT and accuracy to a 4-choice reaction task. A total of 25 trials were performed each day using a random 2- to 8-s delay between trials. Arousal was assessed using the activation-deactivation adjective check list. Results of repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant dose effect (p = 0.02) on performance. Follow-up analyses indicated this was due to a significant effect for RT (p = 0.03), with the dose-response curve exhibiting a quadratic relationship. Response time was significantly faster (p caffeine dose (p ≤ 0.05). Based on these results, caffeine improves RT and overall performance in fencers, particularly as doses increase up to 4.5-6.0 mg·kg. Above this level, performance begins to deteriorate, consistent with an "inverted-U" model of arousal and performance.

  5. The difference is in the start: impact of timing and start procedure on sprint running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Thomas A; Tønnessen, Espen; Seiler, Stephen K

    2012-02-01

    The difference is in the start: impact of timing and start procedure on sprint running performance. The purpose of this study was to compare different sprint start positions and to generate correction factors between popular timing triggering methods on 40-m/40-yd sprint time. Fourteen female athletes (17 ± 1 years), personal best 100 m: 13.26 (±0.68) seconds and 11 male athletes (20 ± 5 years), personal best 100 m: 11.58 (±0.74) seconds participated. They performed 2 series of 3 40-m sprints in randomized order: (a) start from the block, measured by means of Brower audio sensor (BAS) and Dartfish video timing (DVT), (b) 3-point start, measured by using hand release pod (HR) and DVT, and (c) standing start, triggered by both photocell across starting line (SFC), and foot release (FR) plus DVT. Video analysis was performed by 2 independent observers and averaged. Simultaneous measurements at national athletics competitions demonstrated that DVT and BAS were equivalent to Omega Timing within the limits of precision of video timing (±0.01 seconds). Hand and floor timer triggering showed small but significant biases compared with movement captured from video (0.02-0.04 seconds), presumably because of sensitivity of pressure thresholds. Coefficient of variation for test-retest timing using different starting positions ranged from 0.7 to 1.0%. Compared with block starts reacting to gunfire, HR, SFC, and FR starts yielded 0.17 ± 0.09, 0.27 ± 0.12, and 0.69 ± 0.11 second faster times, respectively, over 40 m (all p sprint performances.

  6. Effect of detector dead time on the performance of optical direct-detection communication links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detection sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulated (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when background noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that of a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on badkground intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  7. Effect of Detector Dead Time on the Performance of Optical Direct-Detection Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detect ion sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulted (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when back- ground noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that o f a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on background intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  8. Mach-Zehnder Modulator Performance on the NIF South Pole Bang Time Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeman, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Chow, R.; Carpenter, A.; Bond, E.; Zayas-Rivera, Z.; Bell, P.; Celeste, J.; Clancy, T.; Miller, E. K.; Edgell, D.; Donaldson, W. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present performance data for Mach-Zehnder optical modulators fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a potential signal path upgrade for the South Pole Bang Time diagnostic. A single channel demonstration system has been deployed utilizing two modulators operating in a 90-degree In phase and Quadrature (I/Q) configuration. X-ray target emission signals are split and fed into two recording systems: a reference CRT based oscilloscope, Greenfield FTD10000, and the dual Mach-Zehnder system. Results of X-ray implosion time (bang time) determination from these two recording systems are compared and presented.

  9. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Explosive Performance and Optimal Individual Postactivation Potentiation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chi Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Creatine plays an important role in muscle energy metabolism. Postactivation potentiation (PAP is a phenomenon that can acutely increase muscle power, but it is an individualized process that is influenced by muscle fatigue. This study examined the effects of creatine supplementation on explosive performance and the optimal individual PAP time during a set of complex training bouts. Thirty explosive athletes performed tests of back squat for one repetition maximum (1RM strength and complex training bouts for determining the individual optimal timing of PAP, height and peak power of a counter movement jump before and after the supplementation. Subjects were assigned to a creatine or placebo group and then consumed 20 g of creatine or carboxymethyl cellulose per day for six days. After the supplementation, the 1RM strength in the creatine group significantly increased (p < 0.05. The optimal individual PAP time in the creatine group was also significant earlier than the pre-supplementation and post-supplementation of the placebo group (p < 0.05. There was no significant difference in jump performance between the groups. This study demonstrates that creatine supplementation improves maximal muscle strength and the optimal individual PAP time of complex training but has no effect on explosive performance.

  10. Investigating the relative effects of sleep deprivation and time of day on fatigue and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ann; Friswell, Rena

    2011-05-01

    Time of day and the time since last sleep are acknowledged causes of fatigue, but comparatively little is known about how they interact. This study examines the relative effects of time of day and sleep deprivation on fatigue and performance. Two independent groups were exposed to 28 h of sleep deprivation beginning at 06:00 h for one group (n = 39) and at 00:00 h for the other (n = 22). By varying the start time for the two groups, but keeping constant the duration of sleep deprivation, the effects of variations in the time of day of testing could be examined. For the 06:00 h start group the longest period without sleep occurred close to the low point of the circadian rhythm. For the 00:00 h start group the circadian low point coincided with only two to six hours of sleep deprivation. Performance was evaluated two-hourly using eight computer-based tests and subjective fatigue ratings. The results showed a clear interaction effect. Both time of day and sleep deprivation affected performance but only in combination; neither had independent effects. These findings have implications for fatigue management. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Timing influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion on muscle soreness and next-day running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Price, Anna; Jones, Brett

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates timing effects of a carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PROT) beverage on indicators of muscle damage and next day running performance. Nine trained subjects completed three trials of a 30 min downhill run, followed by a 1.5 mile treadmill running time trial 24 hr later in a blinded, crossover design. Either a CHO-PROT or noncaloric placebo beverage was given 30 and 5 min prior to, at the 15 min mark during, immediately after, and 30 min after the downhill running protocol. In the first treatment (T1), a total of 360 kilocalories were given 30 and 5 min prior to downhill running, as well as at the 15 min mark, with placebos used at other time points. In the second treatment (T2), an isocaloric amount was given but only immediately after and 30 min after downhill running, with placebos used at other time points. In the placebo treatment, a placebo was given at all time points. There were no significant differences in the 1.5 mile time trial or soreness between trials (p > .05). Regardless of timing, the ingestion of a CHO-PROT beverage had no effect on next day running performance or muscular soreness versus a placebo.

  12. Effect of time-varying humidity on the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noorani, Shamsuddin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn (United States); Shamim, Tariq [Mechanical Engineering, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: tshamim@masdar.ac.ae

    2011-07-01

    In the energy sector, fuel cells constitute a promising solution for the future due to their energy-efficient and environment-friendly characteristics. However, the performance of fuel cells is very much affected by the humidification level of the reactants, particularly in hot regions. The aim of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the effect of driving conditions on the performance of fuel cells. A macroscopic single-fuel-cell-based, one dimensional, isothermal model was used on a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to carry out a computational study of the impact of humidity conditions which vary over time. It was found that the variation of humidity has a significant effect on water distribution but a much lower impact on power and current densities. This paper provided useful information on fuel cells' performance under varying conditions which could be used to improve their design for mobile applications.

  13. Time-on-task as an index of situated language proficiency in academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa van der Walt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Transforming higher education in South Africa involves, among other things, finding ways of enabling a broader group of students to perform successfully in high-stake assessment. This paper recounts work in progress to that end. The focus is on the effect of time constraints on the performance of physiotherapy students whose first language is other than the one in which the classes and the assessments are presented. The concept of working memory is investigated by using C-tests based on physiotherapy material and the results are correlated with students’ home languages and their performance in other academic subjects. The paper concludes by reflecting on C-tests as a trustworthy instrument to measure situated language proficiency and the implications of the results for higher education.

  14. Perceptual feeling and time-of-day effects on high intensity exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIE CLARE MCCORMICK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effect of time of day and perceptual feeling on high intensity cycle ergometry and related performance during ‘normal working hours’. Eleven male participants (22.9 ± 2.6yrs; 182 ± 0.06cm; 80.43 ± 14.39kg were tested over a 12 h period (08:00-20:00 h. Every hour, on the hour, participants performed a 10s maximal leg cycle ergometry test and completed an Exercise-Induced Feeling Inventory (EFI; every hour, on the half hour, they performed a standing broad jump (SBJ, hand grip test (HG and vertical jump (VJ. Participants were instructed that each test required maximum effort. The main results show that there were no significant differences during the 12h experimental period in any of the performance variables (P > 0.05. However, peak power output during the high intensity cycle ergometry and distance and height achieved during the SBJ and VJ test along with positive engagement all peaked at 19:00h. The results show that high intensity cycle ergometry and related physiological measures are not affected by the time of day during ‘normal working hours’. However, the data suggests that maximal performance is moderately affected by motivational levels of participants and therefore when using maximal exercise tests investigators should ensure that participants are highly motivated.

  15. Effects of energy threshold and dead time on Compton camera performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uche, C.Z., E-mail: czu1@waikato.ac.nz [Department of Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105 Hamilton (New Zealand); Round, W.H., E-mail: h.round@waikato.ac.nz [Department of Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105 Hamilton (New Zealand); Cree, M.J., E-mail: cree@waikato.ac.nz [Department of Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105 Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2011-06-11

    We study the effects of energy threshold and dead time on the sensitivity and image resolution of the Compton camera. The simulation model includes the decay times, detection time jitters, energy threshold and detector dead time as well as basic detector parameters such as Doppler broadening, energy resolution and finite detector resolution. The GEANT4 toolkit was used to model the camera geometry and performance for two common nuclear medicine energies that correspond to {sup 99m}Tc (140.5 keV) and {sup 18}F (511 keV) radiotracers. Results without the energy threshold and time effects show good agreement with previous studies. For 140.5 keV, the inclusion of energy threshold improved image resolution from 10.7 to 9.5 mm with a source-to-detector distance of 5 cm, while the inclusion of time effects made no further difference on resolution. The energy threshold reduced the sensitivity by 48%, and subsequent inclusion of time effects further reduced the sensitivity by 17%. At 511 keV, the application of energy threshold reduced the sensitivity by 6%, while the time effects dominated count rate losses with further reduction of 13%. However, the inclusion of the two effects had negligible impact on the resolution.

  16. Effects of energy threshold and dead time on Compton camera performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uche, C. Z.; Round, W. H.; Cree, M. J.

    2011-06-01

    We study the effects of energy threshold and dead time on the sensitivity and image resolution of the Compton camera. The simulation model includes the decay times, detection time jitters, energy threshold and detector dead time as well as basic detector parameters such as Doppler broadening, energy resolution and finite detector resolution. The GEANT4 toolkit was used to model the camera geometry and performance for two common nuclear medicine energies that correspond to 99mTc (140.5 keV) and 18F (511 keV) radiotracers. Results without the energy threshold and time effects show good agreement with previous studies. For 140.5 keV, the inclusion of energy threshold improved image resolution from 10.7 to 9.5 mm with a source-to-detector distance of 5 cm, while the inclusion of time effects made no further difference on resolution. The energy threshold reduced the sensitivity by 48%, and subsequent inclusion of time effects further reduced the sensitivity by 17%. At 511 keV, the application of energy threshold reduced the sensitivity by 6%, while the time effects dominated count rate losses with further reduction of 13%. However, the inclusion of the two effects had negligible impact on the resolution.

  17. The performance of college students on piaget-type tasks dealing with distance, time, and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduska, Ervin; Phillips, Darrell G.

    Research was done to probe and extend Piaget's theory of the conception of speed. Specifically tested was the hypothesis that there is no hierarchical relationship in performance on the following Piaget-type tasks: conservation of distance, asymmetric series of speeds, one-to-many (circular) speeds, symmetric speeds, time, and proportional reasoning. The research also tested the gender-related performance on these six tasks. One hundred freshman and sophomore college students were shown demonstrations of equipment individually for each of the six tasks. A set of open-ended questions based on the demonstrations was administered to each subject in a 45-minute interview. Subjects were scored as pass on a given task if they manipulated objects in certain ways and gave specific types of explanations. A scalogram analysis of the data yielded a z-score of - 3.7 which indicated that subjects passed the task in a certain sequence. The tasks were found to form a unidimensional scale and to be increasingly difficult in the order listed above. A chi-square test for two independent samples showed a significant difference (alpha = 0.05) in performance between males and females on all speed tasks. No significant differences in performance between males and females were found for the distance and time tasks.

  18. Time history and performances of direct-drive implosion on the Omega facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffite, Stephane; Bourgade, Jean-Luc; Caillaud, Tony; Girard, Frederic; Landoas, Olivier; Lemaire, Sebastien; Masse, Laurent; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Philippe, Frank; Reverdin, Charles; Tassin, Veronique; Legay, Guillaume; Delettrez, Jacques; Glebov, Vladimir; Marshall, Frederic; Michel, Tomline; Seka, Wolf; Joshi, Tirtha; Mancini, Roberto; Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    We present direct-drive experiments which were carried out on the Omega facility. Three different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolved measurements of the scattered light. We show that, providing the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the ``bang-time'' and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. On the contrary, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assesses by the comparison of the target performances, between prediction and measure. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measured neutron number is about 80% of the prediction. For the 2-step 2-ns pulse, this ratio falls down to about 20%.

  19. Effects of power variation on cycle performance during simulated hilly time-trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Marc S; Marwood, Simon

    2016-11-01

    It has previously been shown that cyclists are unable to maintain a constant power output during cycle time-trials on hilly courses. The purpose of the present study is therefore to quantify these effects of power variation using a mathematical model of cycling performance. A hypothetical cyclist (body mass: 70 kg, bicycle mass: 10 kg) was studied using a mathematical model of cycling, which included the effects of acceleration. Performance was modelled over three hypothetical 40-km courses, comprising repeated 2.5-km sections of uphill and downhill with gradients of 1%, 3%, and 6%, respectively. Amplitude (5-15%) and distance (0.31-20.00 km) of variation were modelled over a range of mean power outputs (200-600 W) and compared to sustaining a constant power. Power variation was typically detrimental to performance; these effects were augmented as the amplitude of variation and severity of gradient increased. Varying power every 1.25 km was most detrimental to performance; at a mean power of 200 W, performance was impaired by 43.90 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient). However at the steepest gradients, the effect of power variation was relatively independent of the distance of variation. In contrast, varying power in parallel with changes in gradient improved performance by 188.89 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient) at 200 W. The present data demonstrate that during hilly time-trials, power variation that does not occur in parallel with changes in gradient is detrimental to performance, especially at steeper gradients. These adverse effects are substantially larger than those previously observed during flat, windless time-trials.

  20. Effects of time of day and sleep deprivation on motorcycle-driving performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Bougard

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether motorcycle handling capabilities--measured by means of the efficiency of emergency manoeuvres--were dependent on prior sleep deprivation and time of day. Twelve male participants voluntarily took part in four test sessions, starting at 6 a.m., 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 6 p.m., following a night either with or without sleep. Each test session comprised temperature and sleepiness measurements, before three different types of motorcycling tests were initiated: (1 stability in straight ahead riding at low speed (in "slow motion" mode and in "brakes and clutch" mode, (2 emergency braking and (3 crash avoidance tasks performed at 20 kph and 40 kph. The results indicate that motorcycle control at low speed depends on time of day, with an improvement in performance throughout the day. Emergency braking performance is affected at both speeds by time of day, with poorer performance (longer total stopping distance, reaction time and braking distance in the morning, and also by sleep deprivation, from measurements obtained at 40 kph (incorrect initial speed. Except for a tendency observed after the sleepless night to deviate from the initial speed, it seems that crash avoidance capabilities are quite unaffected by the two disturbance factors. Consequently, some motorcycle handling capabilities (stability at low speed and emergency braking change in the same way as the diurnal fluctuation observed in body temperature and sleepiness, whereas for others (crash avoidance the participants were able to maintain their initial performance level despite the high levels of sleepiness recorded after a sleepless night. Motorcycle riders have to be aware that their handling capabilities are limited in the early morning and/or after sleep deprivation. Both these situations can increase the risk of falls and of being involved in a road accident.

  1. The efficacy of a restart break for recycling with optimal performance depends critically on circadian timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A; Belenky, Gregory; Vila, Bryan J

    2011-07-01

    Under simulated shift-work conditions, we investigated the efficacy of a restart break for maintaining neurobehavioral functioning across consecutive duty cycles, as a function of the circadian timing of the duty periods. As part of a 14-day experiment, subjects underwent two cycles of five simulated daytime or nighttime duty days, separated by a 34-hour restart break. Cognitive functioning and high-fidelity driving simulator performance were tested 4 times per day during the two duty cycles. Lapses on a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) served as the primary outcome variable. Selected sleep periods were recorded polysomnographically. The experiment was conducted under standardized, controlled laboratory conditions with continuous monitoring. Twenty-seven healthy adults (13 men, 14 women; aged 22-39 years) participated in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a nighttime duty (experimental) condition or a daytime duty (control) condition. The efficacy of the 34-hour restart break for maintaining neurobehavioral functioning from the pre-restart duty cycle to the post-restart duty cycle was compared between these two conditions. Relative to the daytime duty condition, the nighttime duty condition was associated with reduced amounts of sleep, whereas sleep latencies were shortened and slow-wave sleep appeared to be conserved. Neurobehavioral performance measures ranging from lapses of attention on the PVT to calculated fuel consumption on the driving simulators remained optimal across time of day in the daytime duty schedule, but degraded across time of night in the nighttime duty schedule. The 34-hour restart break was efficacious for maintaining PVT performance and other objective neurobehavioral functioning profiles from one duty cycle to the next in the daytime duty condition, but not in the nighttime duty condition. Subjective sleepiness did not reliably track objective neurobehavioral deficits. The 34-hour restart break was adequate for maintaining

  2. Effect of Various Ignition Timings on Combustion Process and Performance of Gasoline Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Tunka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the effect of the ignition timing on the output parameters of a spark-ignition engine. The main assessed parameters include the output parameters of the engine (engine power and torque, cylinder pressure variation, heat generation and burn rate. However, the article also discusses the effect of the ignition timing on the temperature of exhaust gases, the indicated mean effective pressure, the combustion duration, combustion stability, etc. All measurements were performed in an engine test room in the Department of Technology and Automobile Transport at Mendel University in Brno, on a four-cylinder AUDI engine with a maximum power of 110 kW, as indicated by the manufacturer. To control and change the ignition timing of the engine, a fully programmable Magneti Marelli control unit was used. The experimental measurements were performed on 8 different ignition timings, from 18 °CA to 32 °CA BTDC at wide throttle open and a constant engine speed (2500 rpm, with a stoichiometric mixture fraction. The measurement results showed that as the ignition timing increases, the engine power and torque also increase. The increase in these parameters is a reflection of higher pressure in the cylinder, the maximum value of which is achieved at a higher ignition timing near top dead centre in thepower stroke. In these conditions we can expect higher engine efficiency. It was also found that the combustion is more stable with a higher value of ignition timing. No significant difference was found in the combustion duration.

  3. Effect of advanced injection timing on the performence of natural gas in diesel engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O M I Nwafor

    2000-02-01

    Concern over the environment and/or the increasing demand for conventional fossil fuel has promoted interest in the development of alternative sources of fuel energy for internal combustion (IC) engines. The effect ofadvanced injection timing on the performance of natural gas used as primary fuel in dual-fuel combustion has been examined. Satisfactory diesel engine combustion demands self-ignition of the fuel as it is injected near the top dead centre (TDC) into the hot swirling compressed cylinder gas. Longer delays between injection and ignition lead to unacceptable rates of pressure rise (diesel knock) because too much fuel is ready to burn when combustion eventually occurs. Natural gas has been noted to exhibit longer ignition delays and slower burning rates especially at low load levels hence resulting in late combustion in the expansion stroke. Advanced injection timing is expected to compensate for these effects. The engine has standard injection timing of 30° before TDC (BTDC). The injection was first advanced by 5.5° given injection timing of 35.5° BTDC. The engine ran for about 5 minutes at this timing and stopped. The engine failed to start upon subsequent attempts. The injection was then advanced by 3.5° (i.e. 33.5° BTDC). The engine ran smoothly on this timing butseemed to incur penalty on fuel consumption especially at high load levels.

  4. The impact of circadian phenotype and time since awakening on diurnal performance in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facer-Childs, Elise; Brandstaetter, Roland

    2015-02-16

    Circadian rhythms, among other factors, have been shown to regulate key physiological processes involved in athletic performance. Personal best performance of athletes in the evening was confirmed across different sports. Contrary to this view, we identified peak performance times in athletes to be different between human "larks" and "owls" (also called "morningness/eveningness types" or "chronotypes" and referred to as circadian phenotypes in this paper), i.e., individuals with well-documented genetic and physiological differences that result in disparities between their biological clocks and how they entrain to exogenous cues, such as the environmental light/dark cycle and social factors. We found time since entrained awakening to be the major predictor of peak performance times, rather than time of day, as well as significant individual performance variations as large as 26% in the course of a day. Our novel approach combining the use of an athlete-specific chronometric test, longitudinal circadian analysis, and physical performance tests to characterize relevant sleep/wake and performance parameters in athletes allows a comprehensive analysis of the link between the circadian system and diurnal performance variation. We establish that the evaluation of an athlete's personal best performance requires consideration of circadian phenotype, performance evaluation at different times of day, and analysis of performance as a function of time since entrained awakening.

  5. A comparison of caffeine versus pseudoephedrine on cycling time-trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Angela L; Sim, Marc; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Both caffeine (CAF) and pseudoephedrine (PSE) are proposed to be central nervous system stimulants. However, during competition, CAF is a permitted substance, whereas PSE is a banned substance at urinary levels >150 μg · ml(-1). As a result, this study aimed to compare the effect of CAF versus PSE use on cycling time trial (TT) performance to explore whether the legal stimulant was any less ergogenic than the banned substance. Here, 10 well-trained male cyclists or triathletes were recruited for participation. All athletes were required to attend the laboratory on four separate occasions--including a familiarization trial and three experimental trials, which required participants to complete a simulated 40 km (1,200 kJ) cycling TT after the ingestion of either 200 mg CAF, 180 mg PSE or a nonnutritive placebo (PLA). The results showed that the total time taken and the mean power produced during each TT was not significantly different (p > .05) between trials, despite a 1.3% faster overall time (~57 s) after CAF consumption. Interestingly, the time taken to complete the second half of the TT was significantly faster (p < .05) in CAF as compared with PSE (by 99 s), with magnitude based inferences suggesting a 91% beneficial effect of CAF during the second half of the TT. This investigation further confirms the ergogenic benefits of CAF use during TT performances and further suggests this legal CNS stimulant has a better influence than a supra-therapeutic dose of PSE.

  6. Bearing performance degradation assessment based on time-frequency code features and SOM network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Han, Yan; Deng, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Bearing performance degradation assessment and prognostics are extremely important in supporting maintenance decision and guaranteeing the system’s reliability. To achieve this goal, this paper proposes a novel feature extraction method for the degradation assessment and prognostics of bearings. Features of time-frequency codes (TFCs) are extracted from the time-frequency distribution using a hybrid procedure based on short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) theory. An alternative way to design the health indicator is investigated by quantifying the similarity between feature vectors using a self-organizing map (SOM) network. On the basis of this idea, a new health indicator called time-frequency code quantification error (TFCQE) is proposed to assess the performance degradation of the bearing. This indicator is constructed based on the bearing real-time behavior and the SOM model that is previously trained with only the TFC vectors under the normal condition. Vibration signals collected from the bearing run-to-failure tests are used to validate the developed method. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed TFCQE indicator over many other traditional features in terms of feature quality metrics, incipient degradation identification and achieving accurate prediction. Highlights • Time-frequency codes are extracted to reflect the signals’ characteristics. • SOM network served as a tool to quantify the similarity between feature vectors. • A new health indicator is proposed to demonstrate the whole stage of degradation development. • The method is useful for extracting the degradation features and detecting the incipient degradation. • The superiority of the proposed method is verified using experimental data.

  7. The effect of music on 10-km cycle time-trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Jana; Foster, Carl; Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose; de Koning, Jos J; Mikat, Richard P; Hendrix, Charles R; Porcari, John P

    2013-01-01

    Music is widely used as an ergogenic aid in sport, but there is little evidence of its effectiveness during closed-loop athletic events. In order to determine the effectiveness of music as an ergogenic aid, well-trained and task-habituated cyclists performed 10-km cycle time trials either while listening to self-selected motivational music or with auditory input blocked. There were no statistically significant differences in performance time or physiological or psychological markers related to music (time-trial duration17.75 ± 2.10 vs 17.81 ± 2.06 min, mean power output 222 ± 66 vs 220 ± 65 W, peak heart rate184 ± 9 vs 183 ± 8 beats/min, peak blood lactate12.1 ± 2.6 vs 11.9 ± 2.1 mmol/L, and final rating of perceived exertion 8.4 ± 1.5 vs 8.5 ± 1.6). It is concluded that during exercise at competitive intensity, there is no meaningful effect of music on either performance or physiology.

  8. Silicon photomultiplier timing performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal, Ahmed, E-mail: gamal.ahmed@assoc.oeaw.ac.at [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Al-Azhar University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Paul, Buehler; Johann, Marton; Ken, Suzuki [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-01

    Many characteristics of Silicon Photomultipliers can be tuned with temperature and operation voltage. We present preliminary results of a study of the effect of these two operation parameters on the time resolution of large active area Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) manufactured by Hamamatsu. Measurements at -10, 0, and 10 deg. C at different bias voltages were performed. The time resolution is best at low temperature and high over-voltage. Most significant improvements can be achieved in cases with low number of fired pixels (<10pixels). Between the worst and best case among the considered conditions a factor of five improvement was observed. In cases with large number of fired pixels (>40pixels) the effect of temperature and operation voltage becomes smaller. The timing performance still improves with decreasing temperature ({approx}factor of 2) but it hardly depends on the operation voltage. The study shows that especially in applications where only few photons are available for detection a careful optimization of temperature and operation voltage are advisable to obtain optimum timing results with the MPPC.

  9. The Impact of Time Difference between Satellite Overpass and Ground Observation on Cloud Cover Performance Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jędrzej S. Bojanowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud property data sets derived from passive sensors onboard the polar orbiting satellites (such as the NOAA’s Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer have global coverage and now span a climatological time period. Synoptic surface observations (SYNOP are often used to characterize the accuracy of satellite-based cloud cover. Infrequent overpasses of polar orbiting satellites combined with the 3- or 6-h SYNOP frequency lead to collocation time differences of up to 3 h. The associated collocation error degrades the cloud cover performance statistics such as the Hanssen-Kuiper’s discriminant (HK by up to 45%. Limiting the time difference to 10 min, on the other hand, introduces a sampling error due to a lower number of corresponding satellite and SYNOP observations. This error depends on both the length of the validated time series and the SYNOP frequency. The trade-off between collocation and sampling error call for an optimum collocation time difference. It however depends on cloud cover characteristics and SYNOP frequency, and cannot be generalized. Instead, a method is presented to reconstruct the unbiased (true HK from HK affected by the collocation differences, which significantly (t-test p < 0.01 improves the validation results.

  10. Effects of Time-Release Caffeine Containing Supplement on Metabolic Rate, Glycerol Concentration and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Gonzalez, Jay R. Hoffman, Adam J. Wells, Gerald T. Mangine, Jeremy R. Townsend, Adam R. Jajtner, Ran Wang, Amelia A. Miramonti, Gabriel J. Pruna, Michael B. LaMonica, Jonathan D. Bohner, Mattan W. Hoffman, Leonardo P. Oliveira, David H. Fukuda, Maren S. Fragala, Jeffrey R. Stout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared caffeine pharmacokinetics, glycerol concentrations, metabolic rate, and performance measures following ingestion of a time-release caffeine containing supplement (TR-CAF versus a regular caffeine capsule (CAF and a placebo (PL. Following a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over design, ten males (25.9 ± 3.2 y who regularly consume caffeine ingested capsules containing either TR-CAF, CAF, or PL. Blood draws and performance measures occurred at every hour over an 8-hour period. Plasma caffeine concentrations were significantly greater (p < 0.05 in CAF compared to TR-CAF during hours 2-5 and significantly greater (p = 0.042 in TR-CAF compared to CAF at hour 8. There were no significant differences between trials in glycerol concentrations (p = 0.86 or metabolic measures (p = 0.17-0.91. Physical reaction time was significantly improved for CAF at hour 5 (p=0.01 compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was significantly improved for CAF and TR-CAF during hours 1-4 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively and over the 8-hour period (p = 0.04 and p = 0.001, respectively compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was also significantly improved for TR-CAF compared to PL during hours 5-8 (p = 0.004. TR-CAF and CAF showed distinct pharmacokinetics yielding modest effects on reaction time, yet did not alter glycerol concentration, metabolic measures, or other performance measures.

  11. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    2011-01-01

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The result

  12. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    2011-01-01

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The result

  13. The effects of music on time perception and performance of a driving game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, G G; Macdonald, R A R

    2010-12-01

    There is an established and growing body of evidence highlighting that music can influence behavior across a range of diverse domains (Miell, MacDonald, & Hargreaves 2005). One area of interest is the monitoring of "internal timing mechanisms", with features such as tempo, liking, perceived affective nature and everyday listening contexts implicated as important (North & Hargreaves, 2008). The current study addresses these issues by comparing the effects of self-selected and experimenter-selected music (fast and slow) on actual and perceived performance of a driving game activity. Seventy participants completed three laps of a driving game in seven sound conditions: (1) silence; (2) car sounds; (3) car sounds with self-selected music, and car sounds with experimenter-selected music; (4) high-arousal (70 bpm); (5) high-arousal (130 bpm); (6) low-arousal (70 bpm); and (7) low-arousal (130 bpm) music. Six performance measures (time, accuracy, speed, and retrospective perception of these), and four experience measures (perceived distraction, liking, appropriateness and enjoyment) were taken. Exposure to self-selected music resulted in overestimation of elapsed time and inaccuracy, while benefiting accuracy and experience. In contrast, exposure to experimenter-selected music resulted in poorest performance and experience. Increasing the tempo of experimenter-selected music resulted in faster performance and increased inaccuracy for high-arousal music, but did not impact experience. It is suggested that personal meaning and subjective associations connected to self-selected music promoted increased engagement with the activity, overriding detrimental effects attributed to unfamiliar, less liked and less appropriate experimenter-selected music.

  14. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.

  15. Effects of caffeine on time to exhaustion in exercise performed below and above the anaerobic threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denadai B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversy still exists concerning the potential ergogenic benefit of caffeine (CAF for exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of CAF ingestion on endurance performance during exercise on a bicycle ergometer at two different intensities, i.e., approximately 10% below and 10% above the anaerobic threshold (AT. Eight untrained males, non-regular consumers of CAF, participated in this study. AT, defined as the intensity (watts corresponding to a lactate concentration of 4 mM, was determined during an incremental exercise test from rest to exhaustion on an electrically braked cycle ergometer. On the basis of these measurements, the subjects were asked to cycle until exhaustion at two different intensities, i.e., approximately 10% below and 10% above AT. Each intensity was performed twice in a double-blind randomized order by ingesting either CAF (5 mg/kg or a placebo (PLA 60 min prior to the test. Venous blood was analyzed for free fatty acid, glucose, and lactate, before, during, and immediately after exercise. Rating of perceived exertion and time to exhaustion were also measured during each trial. There were no differences in free fatty acids or lactate levels between CAF and PLA during and immediately after exercise for either intensity. Immediately after exercise glucose increased in the CAF trial at both intensities. Rating of perceived exertion was significantly lower (CAF = 14.1 ± 2.5 vs PLA = 16.6 ± 2.4 and time to exhaustion was significantly higher (CAF = 46.54 ± 8.05 min vs PLA = 32.42 ± 14.81 min during exercise below AT with CAF. However, there was no effect of CAF treatment on rating of perceived exertion (CAF = 18.0 ± 2.7 vs PLA = 17.6 ± 2.3 and time to exhaustion (CAF = 18.45 ± 7.28 min vs PLA = 19.17 ± 4.37 min during exercise above AT. We conclude that in untrained subjects caffeine can improve endurance performance during prolonged exercise performed below AT and that the decrease of

  16. Effect of carbohydrate availability on time to exhaustion in exercise performed at two different intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Lima-Silva

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of pre-exercise carbohydrate availability on the time to exhaustion for moderate and heavy exercise. Seven men participated in a randomized order in two diet and exercise regimens each lasting 3 days with a 1-week interval for washout. The tests were performed at 50% of the difference between the first (LT1 and second (LT2 lactate breakpoint for moderate exercise (below LT2 and at 25% of the difference between the maximal load and LT2 for heavy exercise (above LT2 until exhaustion. Forty-eight hours before each experimental session, subjects performed a 90-min cycling exercise followed by 5-min rest periods and a subsequent 1-min cycling bout at 125% VO2max/1-min rest periods until exhaustion to deplete muscle glycogen. A diet providing 10% (CHOlow or 65% (CHOmod energy as carbohydrates was consumed for 2 days until the day of the experimental test. In the exercise below LT2, time to exhaustion did not differ between the CHOmod and the CHOlow diets (57.22 ± 24.24 vs 57.16 ± 25.24 min. In the exercise above LT2, time to exhaustion decreased significantly from 23.16 ± 8.76 min on the CHOmod diet to 18.30 ± 5.86 min on the CHOlow diet (P < 0.05. The rate of carbohydrate oxidation, respiratory exchange ratio and blood lactate concentration were reduced for CHOlow only during exercise above LT2. These results suggest that muscle glycogen depletion followed by a period of a low carbohydrate diet impairs high-intensity exercise performance.

  17. Maximizing run time performance of deployed data flow graphs on a multiprocessor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Richard J.; Hunt, Peter D.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses a practical solution for supporting the deployment of data flow graphs onto the Loral/Rolm Computer Systems, Inc. vector processing multi-processor architecture. It outlines the support software (both workstation hosted and target system hosted) that is required to design, debug, and maximize deployed data flow graph performance on the multiprocessor architecture. The deployment process guarantees real-time deadlines, minimizes run time scheduling overhead, and minimizes designer partitioning input. It is known that determining effective run time data flow graph node schedules for multi-processor architectures is an NP-complete class of problem not well suited to real-time systems. Loral/Rolm Computer Systems, Inc.'s vector processing toolset recognizes this problem and this paper discusses a prescheduling and pre-assignment approach for partitioning data flow graphs to available hardware resources. In particular the toolset components (which are based upon an enhanced data flow graph language) of workstation pre-assignment, prescheduling, run time gross allocation and local compute element dispatching are discussed in detail.

  18. A Study on the Enhanced Best Performance Algorithm for the Just-in-Time Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivashan Chetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Just-In-Time (JIT scheduling problem is an important subject of study. It essentially constitutes the problem of scheduling critical business resources in an attempt to optimize given business objectives. This problem is NP-Hard in nature, hence requiring efficient solution techniques. To solve the JIT scheduling problem presented in this study, a new local search metaheuristic algorithm, namely, the enhanced Best Performance Algorithm (eBPA, is introduced. This is part of the initial study of the algorithm for scheduling problems. The current problem setting is the allocation of a large number of jobs required to be scheduled on multiple and identical machines which run in parallel. The due date of a job is characterized by a window frame of time, rather than a specific point in time. The performance of the eBPA is compared against Tabu Search (TS and Simulated Annealing (SA. SA and TS are well-known local search metaheuristic algorithms. The results show the potential of the eBPA as a metaheuristic algorithm.

  19. Effects of passive computer use time and non-computer work time on the performance of electronic activity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yeh, Jao-Yu; Liang, Huey-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of passive and non-computer work time on the estimation of computer use times by electronic activity monitoring. A total of 20 subjects with computers were monitored for 3 h. Average relative error for total computer use time estimation was about 4%, given that non-computer work time was 20% of the 3-h monitored period. No significant impact of passive computer use time was found in this study. Non-computer work time of 40% or less is suggested as criteria for the application of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the physical work loading assessment. Statement of Relevance: This research studied the criteria of non-computer work time for the appropriate use of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the assessment of physical work loading. It is suggested that it should be set to 40% or less of the 3-h monitoring period.

  20. The time dependence of the effect of ischemic preconditioning on successive sprint swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbôa, Felipe D; Turnes, Tiago; Cruz, Rogério S O; Raimundo, João A G; Pereira, Gustavo S; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of ischemic preconditioning on performance in three successive 50-m swimming trials and to measure stroke rate, stroke length and blood lactate accumulation. Counterbalanced, repeated-measures cross-over study. On two separate days, eleven competitive male swimmers (20±3 years, 182±5cm, 77±5kg) performed three successive 50-m trials in a 50-m swimming pool, preceded by intermittent bilateral cuff inflation (4× 5-min of blood flow restriction+5-min of cuff deflation) at either 220 for thighs and 180mmHg for arms (ischemic preconditioning) or 20mmHg for both limbs (control-treatment). The 50-m trials were conducted 1-, 2-, and 8-h after the procedure. While no ergogenic effect of ischemic preconditioning was observed for 1-h (0.4%, 95% confidence limits of ±0.6%, p=0.215), there were clear beneficial effects of ischemic preconditioning on 2- and 8-h (1.0% and 1.2%, respectively; 95% confidence limits of ±0.6% in both cases, p≤0.002). Furthermore, ischemic preconditioning increased blood lactate accumulation in 2-(pswimming performance for competitive athletes, with the time window of the beneficial effect starting after about 2-h and lasting for at least 8-h after ischemic preconditioning. This change in performance was accompanied by an increase in blood lactate accumulation and faster strokes in front crawl. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple goals and time constraints: perceived impact on physicians' performance of evidence-based behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Jillian J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioural approaches to knowledge translation inform interventions to improve healthcare. However, such approaches often focus on a single behaviour without considering that health professionals perform multiple behaviours in pursuit of multiple goals in a given clinical context. In resource-limited consultations, performing these other goal-directed behaviours may influence optimal performance of a particular evidence-based behaviour. This study aimed to investigate whether a multiple goal-directed behaviour perspective might inform implementation research beyond single-behaviour approaches. Methods We conducted theory-based semi-structured interviews with 12 general medical practitioners (GPs in Scotland on their views regarding two focal clinical behaviours--providing physical activity (PA advice and prescribing to reduce blood pressure (BP to Results Most GPs reported strong intention to prescribe to reduce BP but expressed reasons why they would not. Intention to provide PA advice was variable. Most GPs reported that time constraints and patient preference detrimentally affected their control over providing PA advice and prescribing to reduce BP, respectively. Most GPs perceived many of their other goal-directed behaviours as interfering with providing PA advice, while fewer GPs reported goal-directed behaviours that interfere with prescribing to reduce BP. Providing PA advice and prescribing to reduce BP were perceived to be facilitated by similar diabetes-related behaviours (e.g., discussing cholesterol. While providing PA advice was perceived to be mainly facilitated by providing other lifestyle-related clinical advice (e.g., talking about weight, BP prescribing was reported as facilitated by pursuing ongoing standard consultation-related goals (e.g., clearly structuring the consultation. Conclusion GPs readily relate their other goal-directed behaviours with having a facilitating and interfering influence on their

  2. Learning Management System Calendar Reminders and Effects on Time Management and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    This research project uses a large research university in the Midwest as a research site to explore the time management skills of international students and analyzes how using the Course Hack, an online Learning Management System (LMS) calendar tool, improves participants' time management skills and positively impacts their academic performance,…

  3. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P camp (-0.89%; P > 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  4. The Effects of Caffeinated “Energy Shots” on Time Trial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Mark Schubert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An emerging trend in sports nutrition is the consumption of energy drinks and “energy shots”. Energy shots may prove to be a viable pre-competition supplement for runners. Six male runners (mean ± SD age and VO2max: 22.5 ± 1.8 years and 69.1 ± 5.7 mL·kg−1·min−1 completed three trials [placebo (PLA; 0 mg caffeine, Guayakí Yerba Maté Organic Energy Shot™ (YM; 140 mg caffeine, or Red Bull Energy Shot™ (RB; 80 mg caffeine]. Treatments were ingested following a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Participants ran a five kilometer time trial on a treadmill. No differences (p > 0.05 in performance were detected with RB (17.55 ± 1.01 min or YM ingestion (17.86 ± 1.59 min compared to placebo (17.44 ± 1.25 min. Overall, energy shot ingestion did not improve time-trial running performance in trained runners.

  5. Relative Performance of Certain Meta Heuristics on Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available —Solving Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP and its variants arise in many real life distribution systems. Classical VRP can be described as the problem of finding minimum cost routes with identical vehicles having fixed capacity which starts from a depot and reaches a number of customers with known demands with the proviso that each route starts and ends at the depot and the demand of each customer does not exceed the vehicle capacity is met. One of the generalizations of standard VRP is Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW with added complexity of serving every customer within a specified time window. Since VRPTW is a NP hard meta heuristics have often been designed for solving it. In this paper we compare the performance of Simulated Annealing (SA, genetic Algorithm (GA and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO for solving VRPTW based on their performance using different parameters taking total travel distance as the objective to be minimized. The results indicate that ACO is in general slightly more efficient then SA and GA.

  6. Effects of Time-Variant WSSUS Channel on the Performance of OFDM Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; SU Ling; ZHANG Ping

    2004-01-01

    The long symbol duration makes Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) robust against frequency-selective fading, and also makes OFDM sensitive to time-selective fading. First, this paper deduces the Inter-subCarrier Interference (ICI) caused by time-selective fading, and then analyzes in detail how time-selective fading affects the performance of OFDM system, e.g. Bit-Error Rate (BER) and the channel capacity of each subcarrier. At last, some simulation figures are given.

  7. Effects of preparation time and trial type probability on performance of anti- and pro-saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jordan E; McDowell, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive control optimizes responses to relevant task conditions by balancing bottom-up stimulus processing with top-down goal pursuit. It can be investigated using the ocular motor system by contrasting basic prosaccades (look toward a stimulus) with complex antisaccades (look away from a stimulus). Furthermore, the amount of time allotted between trials, the need to switch task sets, and the time allowed to prepare for an upcoming saccade all impact performance. In this study the relative probabilities of anti- and pro-saccades were manipulated across five blocks of interleaved trials, while the inter-trial interval and trial type cue duration were varied across subjects. Results indicated that inter-trial interval had no significant effect on error rates or reaction times (RTs), while a shorter trial type cue led to more antisaccade errors and faster overall RTs. Responses following a shorter cue duration also showed a stronger effect of trial type probability, with more antisaccade errors in blocks with a low antisaccade probability and slower RTs for each saccade task when its trial type was unlikely. A longer cue duration yielded fewer errors and slower RTs, with a larger switch cost for errors compared to a short cue duration. Findings demonstrated that when the trial type cue duration was shorter, visual motor responsiveness was faster and subjects relied upon the implicit trial probability context to improve performance. When the cue duration was longer, increased fixation-related activity may have delayed saccade motor preparation and slowed responses, guiding subjects to respond in a controlled manner regardless of trial type probability.

  8. Real-time performance analysis of wireless multimedia networks based on partially observed multivariate point processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2000-07-01

    Third-generation (3G) wireless networks will support integrated multimedia services based on a cellular extension of a packet-switched architecture using variants of the Internet protocol (IP). Services can be categorized as real- time and delay-sensitive, or non-real-time and delay- insensitive. Each call, arriving to or active within the network, carries demand for one or more services in parallel; each service type with a guaranteed quality of service (QoS). Admission of new calls to the wireless IP network (WIN) from the gateway of a wired network or from a mobile subscriber (MS) is allowed by call admission control procedures. Roaming of the MSs among the nodes of the WIN is controlled by handoff procedures between base stations (BSs), or BS controllers, and the MSs. Metrics such as the probabilities of call blocking and dropping, handoff transition time, processing latency of a call, throughput, and capacity are used to evaluate the performance of network control procedures. The metrics are directly related to the network resources required to provide the QoS for the integrated services.

  9. The effect of dehydration on muscle metabolism and time trial performance during prolonged cycling in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan-Sprenger, Heather M; Heigenhauser, George J F; Jones, Graham L; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2015-08-01

    This study combined overnight fluid restriction with lack of fluid intake during prolonged cycling to determine the effects of dehydration on substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle metabolism, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) response, and time trial (TT) performance. Nine males cycled at ~65% VO2peak for 90 min followed by a TT (6 kJ/kg BM) either with fluid (HYD) or without fluid (DEH). Blood samples were taken every 20 min and muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 45, and 90 min of exercise and after the TT. DEH subjects started the trial with a -0.6% BM from overnight fluid restriction and were dehydrated by 1.4% after 45 min, 2.3% after 90 min of exercise, and 3.1% BM after the TT. There were no significant differences in oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, or total sweat loss between the trials. However, physiological parameters (heart rate [HR], rate of perceived exertion, core temperature [Tc], plasma osmolality [Posm], plasma volume [Pvol] loss, and Hsp72), and carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation and muscle glycogen use were greater during 90 min of moderate cycling when subjects progressed from 0.6% to 2.3% dehydration. TT performance was 13% slower when subjects began 2.3% and ended 3.1% dehydrated. Throughout the TT, Tc, Posm, blood and muscle lactate [La], and serum Hsp72 were higher, even while working at a lower power output (PO). The accelerated muscle glycogen use during 90 min of moderate intensity exercise with DEH did not affect subsequent TT performance, rather augmented Tc, RPE and the additional physiological factors were more important in slowing performance when dehydrated.

  10. Single and combined effects of beetroot juice and caffeine supplementation on cycling time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Stephen C; Hawley, John A; Desbrow, Ben; Jones, Andrew M; Blackwell, James R; Ross, Megan L; Zemski, Adam J; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Both caffeine and beetroot juice have ergogenic effects on endurance cycling performance. We investigated whether there is an additive effect of these supplements on the performance of a cycling time trial (TT) simulating the 2012 London Olympic Games course. Twelve male and 12 female competitive cyclists each completed 4 experimental trials in a double-blind Latin square design. Trials were undertaken with a caffeinated gum (CAFF) (3 mg·kg(-1) body mass (BM), 40 min prior to the TT), concentrated beetroot juice supplementation (BJ) (8.4 mmol of nitrate (NO3(-)), 2 h prior to the TT), caffeine plus beetroot juice (CAFF+BJ), or a control (CONT). Subjects completed the TT (females: 29.35 km; males: 43.83 km) on a laboratory cycle ergometer under conditions of best practice nutrition: following a carbohydrate-rich pre-event meal, with the ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink and regular oral carbohydrate contact during the TT. Compared with CONT, power output was significantly enhanced after CAFF+BJ and CAFF (3.0% and 3.9%, respectively, p supplementation when used alone (-0.4%, p = 0.6 compared with CONT) or when combined with caffeine (-0.9%, p = 0.4 compared with CAFF). We conclude that caffeine (3 mg·kg(-1) BM) administered in the form of a caffeinated gum increased cycling TT performance lasting ∼50-60 min by ∼3%-4% in both males and females. Beetroot juice supplementation was not ergogenic under the conditions of this study.

  11. Performance test on PELICAN - a multi-purpose time of flight cold neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard. A.; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Pelican, a direct geometry multi-purpose cold neutron spectrometer has recently been commissioned at the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. The energy resolution and flux at the sample position as a function of neutron wavelength has been evaluated and time focusing at selected energy transfers has also been demonstrated. Several test experiments of quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scatterings have been performed and these have indicated the realisation of the design specifications and performance of the instrument.

  12. Performance test on PELICAN – a multi-purpose time of flight cold neutron spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dehong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelican, a direct geometry multi-purpose cold neutron spectrometer has recently been commissioned at the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. The energy resolution and flux at the sample position as a function of neutron wavelength has been evaluated and time focusing at selected energy transfers has also been demonstrated. Several test experiments of quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scatterings have been performed and these have indicated the realisation of the design specifications and performance of the instrument.

  13. Performance test on PELICAN – a multi-purpose time of flight cold neutron spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Dehong; Mole Richard. A.; Kearley Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Pelican, a direct geometry multi-purpose cold neutron spectrometer has recently been commissioned at the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. The energy resolution and flux at the sample position as a function of neutron wavelength has been evaluated and time focusing at selected energy transfers has also been demonstrated. Several test experiments of quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scatterings have been performed and these have indicated the realisation of the design specifications and performance of...

  14. Effect of cultivated species and retention time on the performance of constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Antover Panazzolo; Borges, Alisson Carraro; de Matos, Antonio Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and cultivated species in vertical-flow constructed wetlands (CW) on the removal of pollutants found in swine wastewater. The applied organic loading per unit area was 20 g m(-2) d(-1) of COD in nine cylindrical CW planted with Cyperus sp., Heliconia rostrata and Hedychium coronarium, and three controls containing only gravel. The HRT tested were 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The following parameters of the CW influent and effluent were analysed: pH, ORP, turbidity, alkalinity, COD, TN, TKN, NH(x), N-NO3(-), TP, K and Na. Statistical analysis was performed at a 1% level of probability according to the Tukey test. It was noted that the greatest reductions were observed when CW were operated at higher HRT. TKN removals were 1.3 times greater than in unplanted CW. The best combination was CW planted with Cyperus sp. operating with a 72 h HRT, presenting the highest average mass removals with values of 69.1% (COD), 56.5% (TKN), 61.7% (NH(x)), 64.3% (TP) and 55.0% (K).

  15. Time Pressure in Scenario-Based Online Construction Safety Quizzes and Its Effect on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Martin; Adair, Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Online quizzes have been shown to be effective learning and assessment approaches. However, if scenario-based online construction safety quizzes do not include time pressure similar to real-world situations, they reflect situations too ideally. The purpose of this paper is to compare engineering students' performance when carrying out an online…

  16. Controlling Energy Performance on the Big Stage - The New York Times Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyre, Kevin [Sustainable IQ, Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Times partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program to develop a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of three EEMs that were implemented during the construction of The Times building between 2004-2006. With aggressive goals to reduce energy use and carbon emissions at a national level, one strategy of the US Department of Energy is looking to exemplary buildings that have already invested in new approaches to achieving the energy performance goals that are now needed at scale. The Times building incorporated a number of innovative technologies, systems and processes that make their project a model for widespread replication in new and existing buildings. The measured results from the post occupancy evaluation study, the tools and processes developed, and continuous improvements in the performance and cost of the systems studied suggest that these savings are scalable and replicable in a wide range of commercial buildings nationwide.

  17. Effects of the length and timing of nighttime naps on task performance and physiological function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidemaro Takeyama

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the length and timing of nighttime naps on performance and physiological functions, an experimental study was carried out under simulated night shift schedules. METHODS: Six students were recruited for this study that was composed of 5 experiments. Each experiment involved 3 consecutive days with one night shift (22:00-8:00 followed by daytime sleep and night sleep. The experiments had 5 conditions in which the length and timing of naps were manipulated: 0:00-1:00 (E60, 0:00-2:00 (E120, 4:00-5:00 (L60, 4:00-6:00 (L120, and no nap (No-nap. During the night shifts, participants underwent performance tests. A questionnaire on subjective fatigue and a critical flicker fusion frequency test were administered after the performance tests. Heart rate variability and rectal temperature were recorded continuously during the experiments. Polysomnography was also recorded during the nap. RESULTS: Sleep latency was shorter and sleep efficiency was higher in the nap in L60 and L120 than that in E60 and E120. Slow wave sleep in the naps in E120 and L120 was longer than that in E60 and L60. The mean reaction time in L60 became longer after the nap, and faster in E60 and E120. Earlier naps serve to counteract the decrement in performance and physiological functions during night shifts. Performance was somewhat improved by taking a 2-hour nap later in the shift, but deteriorated after a one-hour nap. CONCLUSIONS: Naps in the latter half of the night shift were superior to earlier naps in terms of sleep quality. However performance declined after a 1-hour nap taken later in the night shift due to sleep inertia. This study suggests that appropriate timing of a short nap must be carefully considered, such as a 60-min nap during the night shift.OBJETIVO: Para investigar os efeitos da duração e horário de cochilos noturnos sobre o desempenho e as funções fisiológicas foi realizado um estudo experimental por meio do trabalho

  18. Design and Performance Evaluation on Ultra-Wideband Time-Of-Arrival 3D Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Dusl, John

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Time--of-Arrival (TOA) tracking system has been studied at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to provide the tracking capability inside the International Space Station (ISS) modules for various applications. One of applications is to locate and report the location where crew experienced possible high level of carbon-dioxide and felt upset. In order to accurately locate those places in a multipath intensive environment like ISS modules, it requires a robust real-time location system (RTLS) which can provide the required accuracy and update rate. A 3D UWB TOA tracking system with two-way ranging has been proposed and studied. The designed system will be tested in the Wireless Habitat Testbed which simulates the ISS module environment. In this presentation, we discuss the 3D TOA tracking algorithm and the performance evaluation based on different tracking baseline configurations. The simulation results show that two configurations of the tracking baseline are feasible. With 100 picoseconds standard deviation (STD) of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.2392 feet (about 7 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Twisted Rectangle while the average tracking error 0.9183 feet (about 28 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Slightly-Twisted Top Rectangle . The tracking accuracy can be further improved with the improvement of the STD of TOA estimates. With 10 picoseconds STD of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.0239 feet (less than 1 centimeter) can be achieved for configuration "Twisted Rectangle".

  19. The influence of time management skill on the curvilinear relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Adam A; Bachrach, Daniel G; Rapp, Tammy L

    2013-07-01

    In this research we integrate resource allocation and social exchange perspectives to build and test theory focusing on the moderating role of time management skill in the nonmonotonic relationship between organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and task performance. Results from matching survey data collected from 212 employees and 41 supervisors and from task performance metrics collected several months later indicate that the curvilinear association between OCB and task performance is significantly moderated by employees' time management skill. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  20. Effect of Half Time Cooling on Thermoregulatory Responses and Soccer-Specific Performance Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined two active coolings (forearm and hand cooling, and neck cooling during a simulated half-time recovery on thermoregulatory responses and subsequent soccer-specific exercise performance. Following a 45-min treadmill run in the heat, participants (N=7 undertook 15-min recovery with either passive cooling, forearm and hand cooling, or neck cooling in a simulated cooled locker room environment. After the recovery, participants performed a 6×15-m sprint test and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test (YYIR1 in a temperate environment. During the 15-min recovery, rectal temperature fell significantly (p<0.05. Neither active coolings induced further reduction in rectal temperature compared to passive cooling. No effect of active coolings was found in repeated sprint test. However, neck cooling reduced (p<0.05 the thermal sensation (TS compared to passive cooling during the 15-min recovery. Active coolings attenuated (p<0.05 the sweat rate compared to passive cooling: 1.2±0.3 l•h-1 vs. 0.8±0.1 l•h-1 vs. 0.8±0.3 l•h-1, for passive cooling, forearm and hand cooling, and neck cooling, respectively. For passive cooling, elevated sweat rate resulted in higher (p<0.05 dehydration (2.1±0.3% compared to neck cooling (1.5±0.3% and forearm and hand cooling (1.4±0.3%. YYIR1 was improved (p<0.05 following forearm and hand cooling (869±320 m and neck cooling (814±328 m compared to passive cooling (654±311 m. Neck cooling (4.6±0.6 reduced (p=0.03 the session TS compared to passive cooling (5.3±0.5. These results suggest that active coolings effectively improved comfort and sweating response, which delayed exercise-heat induced performance diminish during a second bout of exercise.

  1. Time Conservation: A Comparison of Performance on Piagetian Tasks by Selected Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John Chester, III

    This study investigated the development of time concepts, comparing children of Afro-American and Anglo-American ethnic groups with each other and with results obtained by Piaget. A sample of 120 children aged seven, nine, and eleven years from one school were individually administered four time conservation tests (two on simultaneity and two on…

  2. Effect of manifold dynamics on PCCI timing and performance. A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Heuvel, T.J.

    2009-07-15

    A six cylinder heavy duty diesel engine is adapted to do experiments with premixed charge compression ignition, PCCI, and high levels of exhaust gas recirculation, EGR. The in-cylinder processes can be studied because the test cylinder is made optical accessible. The engine was already simulated in GT-power, a commercial engine simulation tool, but the results were not satisfying. GT-power simulates a whole engine, from intake to exhaust, it is based on one-dimensional gas dynamics and simulates the flow and heat transfer in all components of an engine. The aim of this project was to tune and validate the GT-power model. The experimental data necessary for tuning and validation was already available. Another aim of this project was to couple the GT-power model to a detailed chemistry code and study the effects of wave dynamics on PCCI timing and performance For tuning the general calibration methodology from GT-powers user's manual is followed, so first the intake pressures of the test cylinder are matched, then in this order: the mass flows, the back pressures, the in-cylinder pressures for motored cases, the in-cylinder pressures for fired cases and finally the exhaust temperatures. The tuning resulted in a model valid for cases with and without EGR, for both fired and motored conditions. After tuning and validating the GT-power model for cases with normal combustion, the model is also checked with cases with PCCI combustion. This resulted in worse agreements between the experiments and the simulations. Especially the in-cylinder pressures are modeled worse compared to the cases with normal combustion. GT-power needs as input an imposed combustion profile that is matched with the heat release rate from experiments to simulate the combustion. At the university of Eindhoven a PCCI code is available, this code only simulates one cylinder and its valves and is a multi-zone detailed chemistry code. The PCCI code does not need experimental data to simulate the

  3. Performance impact on nuclear thermal propulsion of piloted Mars missions with short transit times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenheiser, T. J.; Gessner, K. S.; Alexander, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) are examined with respect to a specific mission scenario derived from Stafford Committee recommendations. The recommended mission scenario is a split/sprint opposition mission which includes a piloted vehicle and a cargo vehicle, and the baseline mission is developed from a reference trajectory. Key mision parameters are developed from the baseline mission, including engine-thrust levels, mission opportunity, and engine burn-time requirements. The impact of engine failure is also considered in terms of burn-time requirements, and other mission-performance issues considered include propulsion-technology assumptions, triple-perigee earth-departure burns, and Mars parking-orbit selection. The engine requirements call for a 50-75-klb engine-thrust level, maximum single burn time of 0.6 hours, and a maximum total-mission burn time of 1.7 hours. For a crew of 6, a 475-day total-mission trip with a 90-day stay at Mars is possible.

  4. EFFECT OF IGNITION TIMING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF LPG FUELLED SI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.Dabhadkar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast depletion of fossil fuels and their detrimental effect on the environment is demanding an urgent need of alternative fuels for meeting sustainable energy demand with minimum environmental impact.A lot of research is being carried out throughout the world to evaluate the performance, exhaust emission and combustion characteristics of the existing engines using several alternative fuels such as hydrogen, compressed natural gas, alcohols, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG, biogas, producer gas, bio-diesels developed from vegetable oils, and others (Roy et. al, 2010. LPG and CNG are the alternative fuels to be widely adopted for use in the world. Gaseous fuel mix uniformly with air which burns precisely during combustion than liquid fuels. It has minimum carbon deposition & negligible physical delay. Internal combustion engines running on liquid petroleum gas (LPG are well-proven technologies and work much likegasoline-powered spark-ignition engines. They are normally used as spark-ignition engines for bi-fuelled (gasoline/CH4 cars, but have also been used, for example, in compression-ignition engines for heavy-duty vehicles. Both LPG and NG are not used alone, but always in bi-fuel vehicles, in combination with gasoline. In bi-fuel vehicles two fuels are stored in separate tanks and the engine runs on one fuel at a time. Bi-fuel vehicles have the capability to switch back and forth from gasoline to the other fuel, manually or automatically. As a fuel for spark-ignition engines LPG have some advantages over gasoline, such as a better anti-knock characteristic and reduced CO and unburned HC emissions (Hsieh et al., 2002. Environmental point of view is that there is an increasing interest among the suppliers to investigate LPG as a transportation fuel.It was found that the liquid petroleum gas, roughly a mixture of propane and butane, which gives a benefit in terms of toxic hydrocarbons emissions and ozone formation due to its composition and CO2

  5. Studies on fast timing and high precision tracking performance of Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Han, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC), produced in large scales, are widely used as trigger detectors with O(ns) time resolution in high energy and high intensity experiments. To confront the future high experimental frontiers, such as the super-LHC, RPCs equipped with fine-pitch readout strips were tested with 180GeV/c muon at CERN SPS H8 beam line, to assess the viability of using RPCs for both fast timing and high precision tracking trigger.

  6. Time-Series and Frequency-Spectrum Correlation Analysis of Bridge Performance Based on a Real-Time Strain Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring bridges’ performance is a vital task to ensure their safety and to plan their maintenance operations. Therefore, it is very important to monitor bridges’ behavior and to analyze their measured data. In this study, the time-series and frequency-spectrum correlation analyses are used to study the performance of Fu-Sui Bridge under harsh environmental and traffic loads. It investigates the bridge performance based on a real-time strain monitoring system, and the ambient environmental and traffic loads are studied and discussed. Furthermore, a simplified method based on signal processing is developed and used to estimate the traffic volumes. The results of this study reveal that the traffic loads influence on static strain is obviously lower than that of air temperature and temperature changes of the bridge cross-section; the non-linearity behavior of the bridge during summer time is more than winter time; and the stability of the whole bridge during winter time is more than during summer time. The time-series and vibration analyses also show that the bridge performance in terms of its rigidity and stability is higher during winter time.

  7. The effect of different dosages of caffeine on endurance performance time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Baak, M.A. van; Jeukendrup, A.E.; Haan, A. de

    1995-01-01

    The effect of different dosages of caffeine (0 - 5 - 9 - 13 mg · kg body weight-1) on endurance performance was examined. Nine well-trained cyclists participated in this study (VO2max 65.1 + 2.6 ml · kg-1 · min-1). Caffeine capsules were administered in random order and double-blind. One hour after

  8. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, K.; Koning, J.J. de; Foster, C.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling

  9. The effect of different dosages of caffeine on endurance performance time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Baak, M.A. van; Jeukendrup, A.E.; Haan, A. de

    1995-01-01

    The effect of different dosages of caffeine (0 - 5 - 9 - 13 mg · kg body weight-1) on endurance performance was examined. Nine well-trained cyclists participated in this study (VO2max 65.1 + 2.6 ml · kg-1 · min-1). Caffeine capsules were administered in random order and double-blind. One hour after

  10. Effect of Instruction in Appropriate Rubato Usage on the Onset Timings of Musicians in Performances of Bach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effect of instruction in the use of specific rhythmic nuances on the timings of a musical performance. Forty volunteer upper-division and graduate students performed Johann Sebastian Bach's Suite no. 3 for Violoncello solo, Bouree no. 1, using a computer software program. Discusses the results. (CMK)

  11. Effect of Instruction in Appropriate Rubato Usage on the Onset Timings of Musicians in Performances of Bach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effect of instruction in the use of specific rhythmic nuances on the timings of a musical performance. Forty volunteer upper-division and graduate students performed Johann Sebastian Bach's Suite no. 3 for Violoncello solo, Bouree no. 1, using a computer software program. Discusses the results. (CMK)

  12. Selection of common bean land cultivars based on agronomic performance, cooking time, and mineral concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narielen Moreira de Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of common bean land cultivars with respect to their agronomic performance, cooking time and nutritional quality has scarcely been evaluated in breeding programs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate 19 common bean land cultivars for their agronomic traits, cooking time, and mineral concentration in grains to identify cultivars for potential use by a higher number of farmers or even breeding programs. Two field experiments were conducted in Alegrete and Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil, in the 2012/2013 season. The experimental design consisted of randomized blocks with three replications. A total of 23 cultivars were evaluated; 19 land cultivars were obtained from smallholder farmers from RS, and there were four control cultivars (Carioca, Pérola, Valente, and Guapo Brilhante. The traits evaluated included the cycle, insertion of the first pod, grain yield, cooking time, and concentrations of calcium, iron, zinc, and copper in the grains. The data were subjected to joint variance analysis, Pearson correlation analysis, and the Z index. The common bean cultivars showed differences in the cycle, insertion of the first pod, grain yield, cooking time, calcium, iron, zinc, and copper concentrations in grains, and the Z index. The cultivars Preto Miúdo and Cavalo Rajado had a high grain yield, i.e., greater than 2,900 kg ha-1. The land cultivars were classified as having early and intermediate cycles, and all had cooking times less than 30 min. Palha Roxa, Carioca Vermelho, and Perdiz had high concentrations of calcium, iron, zinc, and copper in the grains, an intermediate cycle, and low grain yield. Positive correlations of moderate magnitude were observed between the calcium and iron (r= 0.597, iron and zinc (r= 0.570, and zinc and copper (r= 0.548 concentrations. Indirect selection for high iron or zinc concentrations in grains will be effective for obtaining common bean cultivars with a higher

  13. Age and education influence the performance of elderly women on the dual-task Timed Up and Go test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele de Cássia Gomes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gait variability is related to functional decline in the elderly. The dual-task Timed Up and Go Test (TUG-DT reflects the performance in daily activities. Objective To evaluate the differences in time to perform the TUG with and without DT in elderly women with different ages and levels of education and physical activity. Method Ninety-two elderly women perfomed the TUG at usual and fast speeds, with and without motor and cognitive DT. Results Increases in the time to perform the TUG-DT were observed at older ages and lower educational levels, but not at different levels of physical activity. More educated women performed the test faster with and without DT at both speeds. When age was considered, significant differences were found only for the TUG-DT at both speeds. Conclusion Younger women with higher education levels demonstrated better performances on the TUG-DT.

  14. Age and education influence the performance of elderly women on the dual-task Timed Up and Go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Gisele de Cássia; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Fonseca, Bruna Espeschit; Freitas, Flávia Alexandra Silveira de; Fonseca, Maria Luísa Morais; Pacheco, Bruna Débora; Gonçalves, Marisa Rocha; Caramelli, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Gait variability is related to functional decline in the elderly. The dual-task Timed Up and Go Test (TUG-DT) reflects the performance in daily activities. Objective To evaluate the differences in time to perform the TUG with and without DT in elderly women with different ages and levels of education and physical activity. Method Ninety-two elderly women perfomed the TUG at usual and fast speeds, with and without motor and cognitive DT. Results Increases in the time to perform the TUG-DT were observed at older ages and lower educational levels, but not at different levels of physical activity. More educated women performed the test faster with and without DT at both speeds. When age was considered, significant differences were found only for the TUG-DT at both speeds. Conclusion Younger women with higher education levels demonstrated better performances on the TUG-DT.

  15. The Effect of Longer Development Times on Product Pipeline Management Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. Figueiredo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the pharmaceutical industry, value is being destroyed through longer product development times. Given that patent lives are (normally fixed at 20 years, the double hit of increasing time to market is evident – higher R&D costs and less time at market before generic competitors are able to be released into the marketplace. The Policy implications are massive: A huge and permanent shift away from internal R&D towards partnerships, licensing deals and acquisitions of more innovative biotechnology companies. In this study, we build a system dynamics model of the product development pipeline for a single company operating in the pharmaceutical market. The study shows that in the presence of loss of value due to longer lead times, it is more advantageous to: (a work faster to reduce the backlog of projects; (b increase the number of projects started whenever it is possible reduce complexity in the pipeline; and also (c the optimal decision on resource allocation is independent of the loss of value due to longer lead times.

  16. Timed Online Tests: Do Students Perform Better with More Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolese, Laura; Krause, Jackie; Bonner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on timed tests and specifically on whether increased time enhances test performance. Three courses during the Winter 2015 term (quizzes n = 573) and three courses over the Spring 2015 term (quizzes n = 600) comprised this sample. Students were given the same tests, but the experimental group (Spring 2015) was given 50% more…

  17. Effect of increase in allotted time on game playing performance: Case study of an online word game

    OpenAIRE

    Putthiwanit, Chutinon; Kincart, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Online game players tend to differ in the duration of time they play. However, no matter whether the time on playing an online game is spent positively or negatively, we may assume that when the duration of each online-game round is increased, players tend to engage in more interaction with their opponents. Though there are a significant number of research studies on time usage in computer games, there is no research exploring the direct effect of time on online game playing performance. As a...

  18. Effects of Annealing Time on the Performance of OTFT on Glass with ZrO2 as Gate Dielectric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper phthalocyanine-based organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs with zirconium oxide (ZrO2 as gate dielectric have been fabricated on glass substrates. The gate dielectric is annealed in N2 at different durations (5, 15, 40, and 60 min to investigate the effects of annealing time on the electrical properties of the OTFTs. Experimental results show that the longer the annealing time for the OTFT, the better the performance. Among the devices studied, OTFTs with gate dielectric annealed at 350°C in N2 for 60 min exhibit the best device performance. They have a small threshold voltage of −0.58 V, a low subthreshold slope of 0.8 V/decade, and a low off-state current of 0.73 nA. These characteristics demonstrate that the fabricated device is suitable for low-voltage and low-power operations. When compared with the TFT samples annealed for 5 min, the ones annealed for 60 min have 20% higher mobility and nearly two times smaller the subthreshold slope and off-state current. The extended annealing can effectively reduce the defects in the high-k film and produces a better insulator/organic interface. This results in lower amount of carrier scattering and larger CuPc grains for carrier transport.

  19. Competition, Time Horizon and Corporate Social Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, J.J.; Smid, H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This paper develops and tests a conceptual framework on the relationships between competition, time horizon and corporate social performance (CSP). We hypothesize that more intense competition discourages CSP by lowering the time horizon of companies. We test the hypothesis on a sample of

  20. Pathophysiological Distortions in Time Perception and Timed Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Melissa J.; Meck, Warren H.

    2012-01-01

    Distortions in time perception and timed performance are presented by a number of different neurological and psychiatric conditions (e.g. Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism). As a consequence, the primary focus of this review is on factors that define or produce systematic changes in the…

  1. On the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes for the quasi-static MIMO channel

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-06-01

    There has been tremendous work done on designing space-time codes for the quasi-static multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channel. All the coding design to date focuses on either high-performance, high rates, low complexity encoding and decoding, or targeting a combination of these criteria. In this paper, we analyze in detail the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes under lattice decoding. We present both upper and lower bounds on the average error probability. We derive a new closed form expression of the lower bound using the so-called sphere-packing bound. This bound presents the ultimate performance limit a diagonal lattice space-time code can achieve at any signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The upper bound is simply derived using the union-bound and demonstrates how the average error probability can be minimized by maximizing the minimum product distance of the code. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Influence of Anodization Time on Photovoltaic Performance of DSSCs Based on TiO2 Nanotube Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghua Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNT arrays were fabricated by two-step anodization process. In order to further improve the performance of DSSCs, TNT arrays were optimized by changing the anodization conditions to meet the requirements of high-performance photoanode. The photoelectric conversion properties of DSSCs based on P25/TNT arrays double-layer film with different anodization time were investigated and compared. The results show that the conversion efficiency of 4.20% was achieved in double-layer photoanode at 18 h, with an open-circuit voltage (Voc of 0.65 V and short-circuit current density (Jsc of 9.98 mA cm−2.

  3. Time for Climate Change: Leadership, IT Climate, and their Impact on Organizational Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Nico; Beck, Roman

    2017-01-01

    IT climate in organizations where the need for deep IT and business knowledge is constantly increasing. We shed light on how organizational leaders, both from business and IT, influence a positive organizational IT climate by IT leadership and subsequently, how an organizational IT climate affects strategic......Information systems (IS) have become essential for operating firms successfully. How to align business and information technology (IT) executives to increase organizational output has been widely discussed in literature. This research focusses on pre-requisites and consequences of a positive...... alignment and firm performance. By applying a two steps approach, this study evaluates the results of a survey among 322 IT decision makers in the U.S. working in knowledge intensive and less knowledge intensive industries. Our findings illustrate that IT leadership and IT climate differ between the two...

  4. Effect of destruction of noradrenergic neurones with DSP4 on performance on a free-operant timing schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, S S; Al-Ruwaitea, A S; Ho, M Y; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E

    1998-04-01

    This experiment examined the effect of destroying central noradrenergic neurones, using the selective neurotoxin DSP4 [N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine], on performance in a free-operant timing schedule. Rats received either systemic treatment with DSP4 or vehicle-alone injections. They were trained to press levers for a sucrose reinforcer. Training sessions consisted of 40, 50-s trials in which reinforcers were available on a variable-interval 25-s schedule; in the first 25 s of each trial, reinforcers were only available for responses on lever A, whereas in the last 25 s reinforcers were available only for responses on lever B. Data were collected from probe trials (four per session), in which no reinforcers were delivered, during the last ten of 60 training sessions. Both groups showed decreasing response rates on lever A, and increasing response rates on lever B, as a function of time from the onset of the trial. Quantitative indices of timing behaviour were derived from a two-parameter logistic function fitted to the relative response rates on lever B (response rate on lever B, expressed as a percentage of overall response rate); this function accounted for > 90% of the data variance in each group. The DSP4-treated group showed a significantly lower value of the indifference point (i.e. the time corresponding to 50% responding on lever B) than the control group. The slope of the function and the rate of switching between response alternatives did not differ significantly between the two groups. The concentrations of noradrenaline were markedly reduced in the neocortex and hippocampus of the DSP4-treated group, but the concentrations of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were not significantly altered. It is suggested that results may be consistent with a role of the dorsal ascending noradrenergic pathway in behavioural "arousal".

  5. 14 CFR 234.8 - Calculation of on-time performance codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.8 Calculation... issued by the Director, Office of Airline Information. The calculations shall be performed for each...

  6. Effects of Above Real Time Training (ARTT) On Individual Skills and Contributions to Crew/Team Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia J.; Crane, Peter; Guckenberger, Dutch; Bageon, Kellye

    2001-01-01

    Above Real Time Training (ARTT) is the training acquired on a real time simulator when it is modified to present events at a faster pace than normal. The experiments on training of pilots performed by NASA engineers and others have indicated that real time training (RTT) reinforced with ARTT would offer an effective training strategy for such tasks which require significant effort at time and workload management. A study was conducted to find how ARTT and RTT complement each other for training of novice pilot-navigator teams to fly on a required route. In the experiment, each of the participating pilot-navigator teams was required to conduct simulator flights on a prescribed two-legged ground track while maintaining required air speed and altitude. At any instant in a flight, the distance between the actual spatial point location of the airplane and the required spatial point was used as a measure of deviation from the required route. A smaller deviation represented better performance. Over a segment of flight or over complete flight, an average value of the deviation represented consolidated performance. The deviations were computed from the information on latitude, longitude, and altitude. In the combined ARTT and RTT program, ARTT at intermediate training intervals was beneficial in improving the real time performance of the trainees. It was observed that the team interaction between pilot and navigator resulted in maintaining high motivation and active participation throughout the training program.

  7. Simulator study of the effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot tracking performance with an audio side task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D. R.; Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of time delay was determined in the visual and motion cues in a flight simulator on pilot performance in tracking a target aircraft that was oscillating sinusoidally in altitude only. An audio side task was used to assure the subject was fully occupied at all times. The results indicate that, within the test grid employed, about the same acceptable time delay (250 msec) was obtained for a single aircraft (fighter type) by each of two subjects for both fixed-base and motion-base conditions. Acceptable time delay is defined as the largest amount of delay that can be inserted simultaneously into the visual and motion cues before performance degradation occurs. A statistical analysis of the data was made to establish this value of time delay. Audio side task provided quantitative data that documented the subject's work level.

  8. Time preferences, study effort, and academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Non, J.A.; Tempelaar, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the relation between time preferences, study effort, and academic performance among first-year Business and Economics students. Time preferences are measured by stated preferences for an immediate payment over larger delayed payments. Data on study efforts are derived from an electronic l

  9. Achieving real-time performance in FIESTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, William; Happell, Nadine; Miksell, Steve; Quillin, Robert; Carlisle, Candace

    1988-01-01

    The Fault Isolation Expert System for TDRSS Applications (FIESTA) is targeted for operation in a real-time online environment. Initial stages of the prototype development concentrated on acquisition and representation of the knowledge necessary to isolate faults in the TDRSS Network. Recent efforts focused on achieving real-time performance including: a discussion of the meaning of FIESTA real-time requirements, determination of performance levels (benchmarking) and techniques for optimization. Optimization techniques presented include redesign of critical relations, filtering of redundant data and optimization of patterns used in rules. Results are summarized.

  10. Performance analysis of time triggered communication bus based on network calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiandong; Ma, Lianchuan; Cao, Yuan; Mu, Jiancheng

    2017-03-01

    The time triggered mechanism is the activity of incentive system in the scheduled time. Each node of the time-triggered communication bus knows when the data information can be transmitted, so the behavior of communication nodes is determined and predictable. This feature is very suitable for appling in the industry field of high safety requirement. According to EN50159 standard for railway signal system security related communication, this paper analyzes the reliability of the physical layer of communication bus, and uses the network calculus method to establish the arrival curve model and service curve model which quantitatively calculate the time delay characteristic of time trigger bus to determine the number of retransmissions of data communications. The time-triggered communication bus is proved that it can meet the security requirements of the railway signal transmission system.

  11. Rate effects on timing, key velocity, and finger kinematics in piano performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Dalla Bella

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of rate on finger kinematics in goal-directed actions of pianists. In addition, we evaluated whether movement kinematics can be treated as an indicator of personal identity. Pianists' finger movements were recorded with a motion capture system while they performed melodies from memory at different rates. Pianists' peak finger heights above the keys preceding keystrokes increased as tempo increased, and were attained about one tone before keypress. These rate effects were not simply due to a strategy to increase key velocity (associated with tone intensity of the corresponding keystroke. Greater finger heights may compensate via greater tactile feedback for a speed-accuracy tradeoff that underlies the tendency toward larger temporal variability at faster tempi. This would allow pianists to maintain high temporal accuracy when playing at fast rates. In addition, finger velocity and accelerations as pianists' fingers approached keys were sufficiently unique to allow pianists' identification with a neural-network classifier. Classification success was higher in pianists with more extensive musical training. Pianists' movement "signatures" may reflect unique goal-directed movement kinematic patterns, leading to individualistic sound.

  12. Dietary Chlorella supplementation effect on immune responses and growth performances of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, S; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary Chlorella sp. supplementation on immune response and growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time. Allotted in 36 pens, a total of 180 newly hatched chicks were assigned in a 3 × 2 factorial design...... to improve the immune response and to decrease the abdominal fat content of broilers....

  13. Performing diagnostics, especially blood cultures, on-time for infectious patients reduces length of stay and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, JH; Lo Ten Foe, J. R.; Sinha, B; Nannan Panday, P; Hendrix, R; Postma, MJ; Friedrich, AW

    2015-01-01

    Objectives As an academic center, the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands receives large numbers of patients with (complex) infectious problems. It is imperative that the correct diagnostics are performed on time for these patients in order to correctly diagnose them and treat the

  14. Effects of age and timing of augmented feedback on learning muscle relaxation while performing a gross motor task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objective: To examine the combined effect of age and timing of augmented feedback on learning muscle relaxation. Performing a gross motor task, subjects had to lower their trapezius muscle activity using the electromyographic signal as visual myofeedback. Design: Healthy subjects (16 young adults:

  15. The Effects of Doing Part-Time Jobs on College Student Academic Performance and Social Life in a Chinese Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Kong, Miosi; Shan, Wenjing; Vong, Sou Kuan

    2010-01-01

    Student employment has been treated as a homogeneous category in studying the effects of doing part-time jobs on student academic performance or social life. In the present study, using data collected from a well-known public university in Macau, we treat student employment as a heterogeneous experience and compare the relative importance of…

  16. Young weightlifters' performance across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Ronald; Pierce, Kyle; Rielly, Lee; Brady, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    Prestigious professional organisations have questioned the efficacy of resistive training by children or have often neglected to address weightlifting in their position papers on resistive training for children. The purpose of this paper was to address the deficit in data regarding the efficacy of training children for weightlifting and to report data regarding to safety in this population. Eleven subjects (3 female, 8 male) who had trained at the USA Weightlifting Development Centre in Shreveport Louisiana for a minimum of 22 months (mean = 28.8; SD +/- 4.4) served as subjects for this study. Means for the pool of subjects subjected to t-test to compare data obtained at each subject's initial competition with that obtained at the individual's most recent competition revealed significant positive changes in body weight, snatch weight, clean and jerk weight, and total weight lifted. The latter three were significant both in absolute weight and in weight lifted per kg of body weight. Total weight lifted at competitions plotted separately for boys and for girls across time indicated an apparently steeper slope of improvement for boys. The latter were not tested for significance because of the small sample sizes. The lack of injury in training and in 534 competitive lifts was discussed. None required medical attention or loss of training time. It was concluded that there can be no doubt regarding the efficacy of weightlifting as carried out at the USA Weightlifting Development Centre. The importance of proper application of scientific theory of conditioning in a conservative manner for this population was emphasised.

  17. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  18. Parameter study on performance of building cooling by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    Especially for commercial buildings in moderate climates, night-time ventilation seems to be a simple and energy-efficient approach to improve thermal comfort in summer. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort in buildings with night-time ventilation, architects...

  19. Effects of Removing the Time Limit on First and Second Language Intelligence Test Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Jennifer; McKelvie, Stuart J.

    2001-01-01

    Canadian postsecondary students (n=133) with moderate second-language competence took the Wonderlic Personnel Test with or without the standard time limit in English or French. Findings suggest that time accommodation can be applied to clients who are taking an intelligence test in their second language. (SLD)

  20. Comparison of Sprint and Run Times with Performance on the Wingate Anaerobic Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Gerald D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Male volunteers were studied to examine the relationship between the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) and sprint-run times and to determine the influence of age and weight. Results indicate the WAnT is a moderate predictor of dash and run times but becomes a stronger predictor when adjusted for body weight. (Author/MT)

  1. Timing Variations in Two Balkan Percussion Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Goldberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many songs and dance pieces from the Balkan Peninsula employ aksak meter, in which two categorically different durations, long and short, coexist in the sequence of beats that performers emphasize and listeners move to. This paper analyzes the durations of aksak beats and measures in two recorded percussion performances that use a particular aksak beat sequence, long-short-short. The results suggest that the timing of beats varies in conjunction with factors including melodic grouping and interaction among members of a performing ensemble and audience. Timing variation linked to melodic groups occurs on a solo recording of a Macedonian Romani folk song. The performer, Muzafer Bizlim, taps an ostinato while singing, and the timing of his taps seems to mark some local and large-scale group boundaries. Melodic organization also seems relevant to the timing of beats and measures on a recording of Bulgarian percussionist Mitko Popov playing the tŭpan, a double-headed bass drum, in a small folk music ensemble. In Popov’s performance, however, timing differences might be related to characteristics of the ensemble dynamic, such as the coordination of multiple musical participants. These interpretations generate possibilities for future study of timing variations in relation to rhythm and meter.

  2. Effect of goal difficulty, goal specificity and duration of practice time intervals on muscular endurance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Eli, M; Tenenbaum, G; Pie, J S; Btesh, Y; Almog, A

    1997-04-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the relationships between goal specificity, goal difficulty and performance, and to determine if setting unrealistic goals would produce decreases in performance. The subjects were high school students from 15 schools and an attempt was made to control for the effects of social comparison. The schools were randomly assigned to one of 15 conditions representing five levels of goal conditions-namely, 'do' (no goals), 'do your best', 'improve by 10%' (easy), 'improve by 20%' (difficult/ realistic) and 'improve by 40%' (improbable/unattainable)-and three levels of practice duration (4, 6 and 8 weeks). This design consisted of nesting goal difficulty within practice duration, which enabled an examination of the goal specificity and goal attainability/difficulty hypotheses proposed by Locke and Latham (1985). A 5 x 3 factorial ANCOVA was applied to the post-baseline sit-up gain scores. The results indicated that all specific groups performed better than all non-specific groups. In addition, across practice durations the difficult/realistic group exhibited the greatest increase in performance, followed by the easy group. The performance gains of the improbable/unattainable group were substantially less compared with the difficult/ realistic group after 4 and 6 weeks, but not after 8 weeks of practice. These results are in line with both the goal specificity and goal difficulty hypotheses derived from the application of Locke's goal-setting theory to sport.

  3. Effect of Time Step Size and Turbulence Model on the Open Water Hydrodynamic Performance Prediction of Contra-Rotating Propellers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-zhi; XIONG Ying

    2013-01-01

    A growing interest has been devoted to the contra-rotating propellers (CRPs) due to their high propulsive efficiency,torque balance,low fuel consumption,low cavitations,low noise performance and low hull vibration.Compared with the single-screw system,it is more difficult for the open water performance prediction because forward and aft propellers interact with each other and generate a more complicated flow field around the CRPs system.The current work focuses on the open water performance prediction of contra-rotating propellers by RANS and sliding mesh method considering the effect of computational time step size and turbulence model.The validation study has been performed on two sets of contra-rotating propellers developed by David W Taylor Naval Ship R & D center.Compared with the experimental data,it shows that RANS with sliding mesh method and SST k-ω turbulence model has a good precision in the open water performance prediction of contra-rotating propellers,and small time step size can improve the level of accuracy for CRPs with the same blade number of forward and aft propellers,while a relatively large time step size is a better choice for CRPs with different blade numbers.

  4. Lecture Capture with Real-Time Rearrangement of Visual Elements: Impact on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P.-T.; Wang, B.-Y.; Su, M.-H.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to create and test a lecture-capture system that can rearrange visual elements while recording is still taking place, in such a way that student performance can be positively influenced. The system we have devised is capable of integrating and rearranging multimedia sources, including learning content, the…

  5. Performance Pay and the "Time Squeeze"

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Ortega, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    Earlier studies of the impact of performance pay on individuals’ behavior have primarily been concerned with the effects on their earnings and productivity. The productivity increases associated with the adoption of performance pay practices may, however, come at the expense of quality of life at or outside work. In this paper we study the effect on the employees’ out-of-work activities, testing whether performance pay contracts lead to a “time squeeze” for non-work activities. In doing so, w...

  6. The effects of time pressure and experience on the performance of fall techniques during a fall.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swigchem, R. van; Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Although the practice of fall techniques has been introduced in fall prevention programs, it is not clear whether people can apply acquired techniques during a real-life fall. It would be helpful to know the time it takes to initiate and to successfully execute such techniques, as well as the effect

  7. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B M Drummond

    Full Text Available Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects, whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture. Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  8. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Emily B M; Vellend, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass) clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects), whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture). Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  9. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (ptraining following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone.

  10. The Effects of Differing Oxygen Concentrations on Reaction Time Performance at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection...Lumb, A. B. (2007). Just a little oxygen to breathe as you go off to sleep… is it always a good idea? British Journal of Anesthesia , 99 (6), 769-771...R. (1993). Methods for dealing with reaction time outliers. Psychological Bulletin, 114 (3), 510-532. Van Diest, I., Stegen, K., Van de Woestijne

  11. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Weixi; ZENG Zhengzhong; WANG Liangping; LEI Tianshi; HU Yixiang; HUANG Tao; SUN Tieping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  12. The consequences of heavy-tailed service time distribution on a basic queuing model and its performance indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina M. Rangel Martínez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research showing theoretical generative models for heavy-tailed service time queues and its empirical validation implies the need for a better knowledge of the key performance indicators’ behavior under such assumption. The behavior of the average length of the queue ( and the average waiting-time (Wq were analyzed through simulation, varying system capacity, average service utilization factor ( ρ and the number of servers in the systems as parameters. Comparisons were also made with service times based on Poisson processes. The results showed more sensitive variations of Lq and Wq for heavy-tailed service times than for Poisson-based service times. Systems having a capacity of over 1,000 entities might be considered as being systems having infinity capacity and the number of servers has a greater importance in heavy-tailed ruled processes than in Poisson processes. There was a lack of adequacy of Lq and Wq as key performance indicators for heavy-tailed service times, lea- ding to unexpected and unstable results.

  13. Performance Dependences of Multiplication Layer Thickness for InP/InGaAs Avalanche Photodiodes Based on Time Domain Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yegao; Bhat, Ishwara; Abedin, M. Nurul

    2005-01-01

    InP/InGaAs avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being widely utilized in optical receivers for modern long haul and high bit-rate optical fiber communication systems. The separate absorption, grading, charge, and multiplication (SAGCM) structure is an important design consideration for APDs with high performance characteristics. Time domain modeling techniques have been previously developed to provide better understanding and optimize design issues by saving time and cost for the APD research and development. In this work, performance dependences on multiplication layer thickness have been investigated by time domain modeling. These performance characteristics include breakdown field and breakdown voltage, multiplication gain, excess noise factor, frequency response and bandwidth etc. The simulations are performed versus various multiplication layer thicknesses with certain fixed values for the areal charge sheet density whereas the values for the other structure and material parameters are kept unchanged. The frequency response is obtained from the impulse response by fast Fourier transformation. The modeling results are presented and discussed, and design considerations, especially for high speed operation at 10 Gbit/s, are further analyzed.

  14. Using time-on-task measurements to understand student performance in a physics class: A four-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stewart*

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the variance in test average and in normalized gain on the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism. The details of how students used their out-of-class time explained from 21% to 36% of the variance in test average and 19% to 37% of the variance in normalized gain. The amount of time spent on the course increased as the course was made more difficult, but less than would be expected based on the changes in the course. Students changed their allocation of out-of-class time based on their performance within the course as the course progressed.

  15. High-performance and power-efficient 2${\\times}$2 optical switch on Silicon-on-Insulator

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zheng; Checoury, Xavier; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Boucaud, Philippe; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    A compact (15{\\mu}m${\\times}${\\mu}m) and highly-optimized 2${\\times}$2 optical switch is demonstrated on a CMOS-compatible photonic crystal technology. On-chip insertion loss are below 1dB, static and dynamic contrast are 40dB and >20dB respectively. Owing to efficient thermo-optic design, the power consumption is below 3 mW while the switching time is 1 {\\mu}s.

  16. Providing critical laboratory results on time, every time to help reduce emergency department length of stay: how our laboratory achieved a Six Sigma level of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Kenneth E

    2013-08-01

    To develop a fully automated core laboratory, handling samples on a "first in, first out" real-time basis with Lean/Six Sigma management tools. Our primary goal was to provide services to critical care areas, eliminating turnaround time outlier percentage (TAT-OP) as a factor in patient length of stay (LOS). A secondary goal was to achieve a better laboratory return on investment. In 2011, we reached our primary goal when we calculated the TAT-OP distribution and found we had achieved a Six Sigma level of performance, ensuring that our laboratory service can be essentially eliminated as a factor in emergency department patient LOS. We also measured return on investment, showing a productivity improvement of 35%, keeping pace with our increased testing volume. As a result of our Lean process improvements and Six Sigma initiatives, in part through (1) strategic deployment of point-of-care testing and (2) core laboratory total automation with robotics, middleware, and expert system technology, physicians and nurses at the Oklahoma University Medical Center can more effectively deliver lifesaving health care using evidence-based protocols that depend heavily on "on time, every time" laboratory services.

  17. Timed performance weaknesses on computerized tasks in pediatric brain tumor survivors: A comparison with sibling controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.A. de; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Mourik, R. van; Maurice-Stam, H.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Beek, L.R.; Granzen, B.; Vuurden, D.G. van; Schouten-van Meeteren, A.Y.N.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2017-01-01

    With more children surviving a brain tumor, insight into the late effects of the disease and treatment is of high importance. This study focused on profiling the neurocognitive functions that might be affected after treatment for a pediatric brain tumor, using a broad battery of computerized tests.

  18. The Reliability of Running Performance in a 5 km Time Trial on a Non-motorized Treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C J; Hacene, J; Sculley, D V; Taylor, L; Callister, R; Dascombe, B

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 male runners (age: 32±13 years, height: 177±7 cm, body mass: 71±9 kg, sum of 7 skinfolds: 55±21 mm) performed familiarization then 2 separate maximal 5 km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill. Physiological responses measured included heart rate, oxygen uptake, expired air volume, blood lactate concentration, tissue saturation index and integrated electromyography. Running time (1,522±163 s vs. 1,519±162 s for trials 1 and 2, respectively) demonstrated a low CV of 1.2% and high ICC of 0.99. All physiological variables had CVs of less than 4% and ICCs of >0.92, with the exception of blood lactate concentration (7.0±2 mmol·L(-1) vs. 6.5±1.5 mmol·L(-1) for trials 1 and 2, respectively; CV: 12%, ICC: 0.83) and the electromyography measures (CV: 8-27%, ICC: 0.71-0.91). The data demonstrate that performance time in a 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill is a highly reliable test. Most physiological responses measured across the 5 km run also demonstrated good reliability.

  19. The effects of pay for performance on disparities in stroke, hypertension, and coronary heart disease management: interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a major pay-for-performance programme, was introduced into United Kingdom primary care in April 2004. The impact of this programme on disparities in health care remains unclear. This study examines the following questions: has this pay for performance programme improved the quality of care for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension in white, black and south Asian patients? Has this programme reduced disparities in the quality of care between these ethnic groups? Did general practices with different baseline performance respond differently to this programme? Retrospective cohort study of patients registered with family practices in Wandsworth, London during 2007. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was used to take into account the previous time trend. Primary outcome measures were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Our findings suggest that the implementation of QOF resulted in significant short term improvements in blood pressure control. The magnitude of benefit varied between ethnic groups with a statistically significant short term reduction in systolic BP in white and black but not in south Asian patients with hypertension. Disparities in risk factor control were attenuated only on few measures and largely remained intact at the end of the study period. Pay for performance programmes such as the QOF in the UK should set challenging but achievable targets. Specific targets aimed at reducing ethnic disparities in health care may also be needed.

  20. An Implementation of real-time phased array radar fundamental functions on DSP-focused, high performance embedded computing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xining; Zhang, Yan; Patel, Ankit; Zahrai, Allen; Weber, Mark

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of real-time, multiple channel processing of a digital phased array system backend design, with focus on high-performance embedded computing (HPEC) platforms constructed based on general purpose digital signal processor (DSP). Serial RapidIO (SRIO) is used as inter-chip connection backend protocol to support the inter-core communications and parallelisms. Performance benchmark was obtained based on a SRIO system chassis and emulated configuration similar to a field scale demonstrator of Multi-functional Phased Array Radar (MPAR). An interesting aspect of this work is comparison between "raw and low-level" DSP processing and emerging tools that systematically take advantages of the parallelism and multi-core capability, such as OpenCL and OpenMP. Comparisons with other backend HPEC solutions, such as FPGA and GPU, are also provided through analysis and experiments.

  1. Effect of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and VO2 1 and 8 Days Post Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Cameron P; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E; Guelfi, Kym J

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effect of 6 days of sodium phosphate (SP) (50 mg·kg·FFM(-1)·day(-1)) or placebo (PL) supplementation in trained cyclists on either 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) (~3-4 min) or 250 kJ (59.7 Kcal) (~10-12 min) time trials performances both 1 and 8 days post-supplementation. Trials were performed in a counterbalanced crossover design, with a 28-day washout period between supplementation phases. No significant differences, moderate-large ES (d) or likely (or greater) smallest worthwhile change (SWC) values were recorded for time to completion and mean power output on days 1 and 8 post-supplementation, both within and between SP and PL for either the 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) trials. In the 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) trial (only) first minute VO2 tended to be higher in SP8 than both PL8 (d = 0.60; 88/10/2 SWC) and SP1 (d = 0.47: 82/15/3 SWC), as was mean VO2 (PL8: d = 0.77; 93/6/1 SWC and SP1: d = 0.84; 90/8/3 SWC). No significant differences were found for heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate post-exercise within or between any trials, while serum phosphate values were not different before or after supplementation with SP or PL. In conclusion, this study showed a tendency for increased VO2 in a short duration (100 kJ/ 23.9 Kcal: ~3-4 min) cycling test on day 8 after SP supplementation, but no differences in 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) time trials performances were observed. Key PointsStudies investigating the effects of sodium phosphate loading on shorter duration (ergogenic effect may last.Loading did not improve cycling time trial (~3-4 min and 10-12 min) performance either 1 or 8 days after supplementation.Future studies should investigate the effect of sodium phosphate loading on repeated sprints and simulated cycling road race performance over extended durations (>30 min), where it may be likely to have a more beneficial effect.

  2. The Impact of Hypnotic Suggestions on Reaction Times in Continuous Performance Test in Adults with ADHD and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Hiltunen, Seppo; Mattsson, Markus; Kallio, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Attention is one of the key factors in both hypnotic processes and patients with ADHD. In addition, the brain areas associated with hypnosis and ADHD overlap in many respects. However, the use of hypnosis in ADHD patients has still received only minor attention in research. The main purpose of the present work was to investigate whether hypnosis and hypnotic suggestions influence the performance of adult ADHD (n = 27) and control participants (n = 31) in the continuous performance test (CPT). The hypnotic susceptibility of the participants was measured by the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A) and the attentional task was a three minute long auditory version of the CPT. The CPT task was administered four times: before hypnosis (CPT1), after a hypnotic induction (CPT2), after suggestions about speed and accuracy (CPT3), and after the termination of hypnosis (CPT4). The susceptibility of the groups measured by HGSHS:A did not differ. There was a statistically significant decrease in reaction times in both ADHD and control groups between CPT2 and CPT3. The differences between CPT1 and CPT2, even though non-significant, were different in the two groups: in the ADHD group reaction times decreased whereas in the control group they increased. Both groups made very few errors in the short CPT. This study indicates that hypnotic suggestions have an effect on reaction times in the sustained attention task both in adult ADHD patients and control subjects. The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25962151

  3. The impact of hypnotic suggestions on reaction times in continuous performance test in adults with ADHD and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Hiltunen, Seppo; Mattsson, Markus; Kallio, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Attention is one of the key factors in both hypnotic processes and patients with ADHD. In addition, the brain areas associated with hypnosis and ADHD overlap in many respects. However, the use of hypnosis in ADHD patients has still received only minor attention in research. The main purpose of the present work was to investigate whether hypnosis and hypnotic suggestions influence the performance of adult ADHD (n = 27) and control participants (n = 31) in the continuous performance test (CPT). The hypnotic susceptibility of the participants was measured by the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A) and the attentional task was a three minute long auditory version of the CPT. The CPT task was administered four times: before hypnosis (CPT1), after a hypnotic induction (CPT2), after suggestions about speed and accuracy (CPT3), and after the termination of hypnosis (CPT4). The susceptibility of the groups measured by HGSHS:A did not differ. There was a statistically significant decrease in reaction times in both ADHD and control groups between CPT2 and CPT3. The differences between CPT1 and CPT2, even though non-significant, were different in the two groups: in the ADHD group reaction times decreased whereas in the control group they increased. Both groups made very few errors in the short CPT. This study indicates that hypnotic suggestions have an effect on reaction times in the sustained attention task both in adult ADHD patients and control subjects. The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  4. Detailed Performance and Waiting-Time Predictability Analysis of Scheduling Options in On-Demand Video Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsmirat MohammadA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of on-demand video streams that can be supported concurrently is highly constrained by the stringent requirements of real-time playback and high transfer rates. To address this problem, stream merging techniques utilize the multicast facility to increase resource sharing. The achieved resource sharing depends greatly on how the waiting requests are scheduled for service. We investigate the effectiveness of the recently proposed cost-based scheduling in detail and analyze opportunities for further tunings and enhancements. In particular, we analyze alternative ways to compute the delivery cost. In addition, we propose a new scheduling policy, called Predictive Cost-Based Scheduling (PCS, which applies a prediction algorithm to predict future scheduling decisions and then uses the prediction results to potentially alter its current scheduling decisions. Moreover, we propose an enhancement technique, called Adaptive Regular Stream Triggering (ART, which significantly enhances stream merging behavior by selectively delaying the initiation of full-length video streams. We analyze the effectiveness of the proposed strategies in terms of their performance effectiveness and impacts on waiting-time predictability through extensive simulation. The results show that significant performance benefits as well as better waiting-time predictability can be attained.

  5. Cognitive processes among skilled miniature golf players: effects of instructions on motor performance, concentration time, and perceived difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, L; Molander, B

    1991-01-01

    Highly skilled miniature golf players were examined on a simplified miniature golf task under different instructional conditions. Results indicated that requirements to attend to a variety of technical aspects of the game during preparation impaired motor performance, whereas providing players with those aspects of the game they reported thinking of did not affect motor performance. Data on concentration time and perceived difficulty indicated that increasing cognitive demands were associated with a decline in motor precision. The overall pattern of results was interpreted such that attention directed at technical aspects of the game interfered with the players' normal cognitive activity. Susceptibility to interference is a characteristic feature of controlled cognitive operations. Thus, the present results are consistent with the view that conscious cognitive activity may support motor behavior also at late stages of skill development.

  6. Effects of time-of-day on neuromuscular function in untrained men: Specific responses of high morning performers and high evening performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küüsmaa, Maria; Sedliak, Milan; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-01-01

    It has been clearly established that maximal force varies during the day in human muscles but the exact mechanisms behind the diurnal rhythms are still not fully clarified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the diurnal rhythms in maximal isometric force production in a large group of participants and also by separating the high morning performance types (n = 8) and the high evening performance types (n = 19) from the neutral types (n = 45) based on their actual maximal isometric force levels. Measurements were performed in the morning (7:26 h ± 63 min) and in the evening (17:57 h ± 74 min) for maximal bilateral isometric leg press force (MVCLP) together with myoelectric activity (EMGLP), maximal unilateral isometric knee extension force (MVCKE) and maximal voluntary activation level (VA%) during maximal unilateral isometric knee extension force (MVCVA) together with myoelectric activity (EMGVA). In addition, venous blood samples were drawn four times a day and serum testosterone and cortisol concentrations were analyzed. None of the participants belonged to the extreme morning or evening chronotype according to the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. In the total group of participants, MVCLP and MVCKE were 4.4 ± 12.9% (p variation. The high morning performance types showed lower force values in the evening compared to the morning for MVCLP (10.8 ± 9.1%; p variation was observed for MVCVA and VA%. The high evening performance types showed higher force values in the evening for MVCLP (16.1 ± 15.9%; p variations. EMGLP and EMGVA did not show significant diurnal fluctuations in any group. Serum testosterone and cortisol concentrations showed normal daily rhythms with higher values observed in the morning in all of the groups (p explain the diurnal fluctuations in maximal strength performance, but peripheral mechanisms were also possibly involved.

  7. Effect of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and VO2 1 and 8 Days Post Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron P. Brewer, Brian Dawson, Karen E. Wallman, Kym J. Guelfi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of 6 days of sodium phosphate (SP (50 mg·kg·FFM-1·day-1 or placebo (PL supplementation in trained cyclists on either 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal (~3-4 min or 250 kJ (59.7 Kcal (~10-12 min time trials performances both 1 and 8 days post-supplementation. Trials were performed in a counterbalanced crossover design, with a 28-day washout period between supplementation phases. No significant differences, moderate-large ES (d or likely (or greater smallest worthwhile change (SWC values were recorded for time to completion and mean power output on days 1 and 8 post-supplementation, both within and between SP and PL for either the 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal trials. In the 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal trial (only first minute VO2 tended to be higher in SP8 than both PL8 (d = 0.60; 88/10/2 SWC and SP1 (d = 0.47: 82/15/3 SWC, as was mean VO2 (PL8: d = 0.77; 93/6/1 SWC and SP1: d = 0.84; 90/8/3 SWC. No significant differences were found for heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate post-exercise within or between any trials, while serum phosphate values were not different before or after supplementation with SP or PL. In conclusion, this study showed a tendency for increased VO2 in a short duration (100 kJ/ 23.9 Kcal: ~3-4 min cycling test on day 8 after SP supplementation, but no differences in 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal time trials performances were observed.

  8. The Effect of Injection Timings on Performance and Emissions of Compressed Natural-Gas Direct Injection Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Aljamali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental part investigates the effect of injection timing on performance and emissions of homogenous mixture compressed natural-gas direct injection. The engine of 1.6 L capacity, 4 cylinders, spark ignition, and compression ratio of 14 was used. Performance and emission were recorded under wide-open throttle using an engine control system (Rotronics and the portable exhaust gas analyser (Kane. The engine was tested at speed ranging from 1500 revolutions per minute (RPM to 4000 RPM with 500 RPM increments. The engine control unit (ECU was modified using Motec 800. The injection timings investigated were at the end of injection (EOI 120 bTDC, 180 bTDC, 300 bTDC, and 360 bTDC. Results show high brake power, torque, and BMEP with 120 as compared with the other injection timings. At 4000 RPM the power, torque, and BMEP with 120 were 5% compared to that with 180. Furthermore, it shows low BSFC and high fuel conversion efficiency with 120. With 360, the engine produced less CO and CO2 at higher speeds.

  9. Exploring Data Collection Innovations by Examining the Effects of Relationship Marketing on Performance in Times of Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luís Vieira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific quality, rigour, and impact of a considerable number, if not the vast majority, of marketing studies depend on an effective data collection process. Most of the researchers in these and related areas rely on traditional data collection tools, such as face-to-face, pen-andpaper, or online questionnaires, which are not very effective, both in terms of the time and money required to gather a reasonable number of observations. Bearing in mind that crises should also be an opportunity for researchers and institutions to develop more productive and effective research tools and procedures, the aim of this research is twofold: 1 to test a model that relates relationship marketing (RM efforts with performance; and 2 to explore innovative, more effective, data collection tools to be employed in a marketing research context. To this end, this study proposes and tests a model of the effects of RM antecedents and mediators on objective performance. The empirical work draws on the perceptions of 4,389 firm representatives in terms of their relationships with their counterparts in hotels, collected by using AppGeneration Npolls . Structural equation modelling results suggest that commitment is the strongest determinant of share of business, and fully mediates the impact of relationship quality (with satisfaction and trust as first-order dimensions on objective performance. From an innovative, methodological perspective, this study demonstrates that it is possible to collect a significantly high number of observations in a very short period of time, with considerable advantages when compared to traditional data collection procedures.

  10. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Examining the role of carbonation and temperature on water swallowing performance: a swallowing reaction-time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Emilia; Mastan, Aliya; Ahmed, Saira; Mistry, Satish; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2012-11-01

    Various therapeutic approaches for dysphagia management are based on modifications of bolus properties to change swallowing biomechanics and increase swallowing safety. Limited evidence exists for the effects of carbonation and bolus temperature on swallowing behavior. Here, we investigated the effects of carbonation and temperature on swallowing behavior using a novel automated and complex swallowing reaction time task via pressure signal recordings in the hypopharynx. Healthy participants (n = 39, 27.7±5 years old) were randomized in two different experiments and asked to perform 10 normal-paced swallows, 10 fast-paced swallows, and 10 challenged swallows within a predetermined time-window of carbonated versus still water (experiment 1) and of cold (4 °C) versus hot (45 °C) versus room temperature (21 °C) water (experiment 2). Quantitative measurements of latencies and percentage of successful challenged swallows were collected and analyzed nonparametrically. An increase in successfully performed challenged swallowing task was observed with carbonated water versus still water (P = 0.021), whereas only cold water shortened the latencies of normally paced swallows compared with room (P = 0.001) and hot (P = 0.004) temperatures. Therefore, it appears that chemothermal stimulation with carbonation and cold are most effective at modulating water swallowing, which in part is likely to be driven by central swallowing afferent activity.

  12. FASTING IN ELECTIVE SURGICAL PATIENTS: COMPARISON AMONG THE TIME PRESCRIBED, PERFORMED AND RECOMMENDED ON PERIOPERATIVE CARE PROTOCOLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Saionara Cristina; Batista, Sandra Teixeira; Pena, Geórgia das Graças

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged preoperative fasting may impair nutritional status of the patient and their recovery. In contrast, some studies show that fasting abbreviation can improve the response to trauma and decrease the length of hospital stay. Investigate whether the prescribed perioperative fasting time and practiced by patients is in compliance with current multimodal protocols and identify the main factors associated. Cross-sectional study with 65 patients undergoing elective surgery of the digestive tract or abdominal wall. We investigated the fasting time in the perioperative period, hunger and thirst reports, physical status, diabetes diagnosis, type of surgery and anesthesia. The patients were between 19 and 87 years, mostly female (73.8%). The most performed procedure was cholecystectomy (47.69%) and general anesthesia the most used (89.23%). The most common approach was to start fasting from midnight for liquids and solids, and most of the patients received grade II (64.6%) to the physical state. The real fasting average time was 16 h (9.5-41.58) was higher than prescribed (11 h, 6.58 -26.75). The patients submitted to surgery in the afternoon were in more fasting time than those who did in the morning (pfasting period (p=0.010 and 0.027). The average period of postoperative fasting was 18.25 h (3.33-91.83) and only 23.07% restarted feeding on the same day. Patients were fasted for prolonged time, higher even than the prescribed time and intensity of the signs of discomfort such as hunger and thirst increased over time. To better recovery and the patient's well-being, it is necessary to establish a preoperative fasting abbreviation protocol.

  13. Effect of timing of artificial insemination after synchronization of ovulation on reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayril, Tahir; Yilmaz, Orhan

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of timing of artificial insemination on pregnancy rates, calving rates, abortion rates, twinning rates, and calf gender ratio after synchronization of ovulation with Ovsynch protocol in Holstein dairy cows. The ovulation of 219 lactating Holstein dairy cows was synchronized using the Ovsynch protocol. Therefore, cows received an injection of GnRH followed by an injection of prostaglandin F(2α) 7 days later and a second treatment with GnRH 2 days later. Cows were artificially inseminated at 0, 12, or 24 h after the second injection of GnRH. Reproductive performance did not differ between cows inseminated at 0 h (n = 82), 12 h (n = 66), or 24 h (n = 71) after the last injection of GnRH (pregnancy rate: 0 h 48 %, 12 h 47 %, 24 h 52 %; abortion rate: 0 h 5 %, 12 h 0 %, 24 h 11 %; calving rate: 0 h 43 %, 12 h 47 %, 24 h 41 %; twinning rate: 0 h 2 %, 12 h 0 %, 24 h 0 %; calf gender ratio (F/M): 0 h 61:39 %, 12 h 48:52 %, 24 h 39:61 %; P > 0.05). Pregnancy rates for cows inseminated in postpartum times of 50-75, 76-100, and >100 days within the first and ≥ 3 parities were statistically similar (P > 0.05), but pregnancy rates for cows inseminated at different postpartum times of 50-75, 76-100, and >100 days within the second parity were different (P inseminated at different postpartum times (P artificial insemination at different times after synchronization were similar. These results also indicate that the timing of artificial insemination after synchronization did not influence calf gender ratio. Furthermore, pregnancy rates of Holstein dairy cows inseminated after synchronization were significantly influenced by postpartum time and parity number.

  14. The impact of hypnotic suggestions on reaction times in continuous performance test in adults with ADHD and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Virta

    Full Text Available Attention is one of the key factors in both hypnotic processes and patients with ADHD. In addition, the brain areas associated with hypnosis and ADHD overlap in many respects. However, the use of hypnosis in ADHD patients has still received only minor attention in research. The main purpose of the present work was to investigate whether hypnosis and hypnotic suggestions influence the performance of adult ADHD (n = 27 and control participants (n = 31 in the continuous performance test (CPT. The hypnotic susceptibility of the participants was measured by the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A and the attentional task was a three minute long auditory version of the CPT. The CPT task was administered four times: before hypnosis (CPT1, after a hypnotic induction (CPT2, after suggestions about speed and accuracy (CPT3, and after the termination of hypnosis (CPT4. The susceptibility of the groups measured by HGSHS:A did not differ. There was a statistically significant decrease in reaction times in both ADHD and control groups between CPT2 and CPT3. The differences between CPT1 and CPT2, even though non-significant, were different in the two groups: in the ADHD group reaction times decreased whereas in the control group they increased. Both groups made very few errors in the short CPT. This study indicates that hypnotic suggestions have an effect on reaction times in the sustained attention task both in adult ADHD patients and control subjects. The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  15. Study of growth time and post annealing effect on the performance of ZnO nanorods ultraviolet photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasti, M.; Dariani, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, Zinc Oxide nanorods with different thicknesses are grown on a glass substrate by a hydrothermal method to fabricate an ultraviolet photodetector. The sample is post annealed in an argon environment as an annealing process can have a positive effect on the photodetector performance. The morphology, crystalline structure, and optical properties of ZnO nanorods (NRs) are investigated by SEM, XRD, UV-Visible spectrometer, and PL spectra. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of both growth time and post annealing on enhancement of photoresponse of the ZnO NR photodetector. Measurements indicate that the sample with higher thickness exhibits a higher photocurrent and photoresponsivity. Also, with post annealing, an increase in photocurrent and photoresponsivity is observed due to decreasing defect levels.

  16. Measuring Metacognition and Reaction Time: Further Findings on the Performances of General Education, Low-Achieving, and Institutionally Raised Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Abdullah, Ahmad A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the picture format to examine in depth the metacognitive performances and reaction time in general education, low-achieving, and institutionally raised students. Results revealed that institutionally raised students, unlike low-achieving students, took significantly the longest reaction time to finish the test…

  17. Is delayed ischemic preconditioning as effective on running performance during a 5km time trial as acute IPC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Joost P H; Timmers, Silvie; Ploegmakers, Danique J M; Cable, N Timothy; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2017-02-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) may enhance exercise performance. Cardioprotective effects of IPC are known to re-occur 24h after the stimulus. Whether the delayed effect of IPC has similar effects as IPC on exercise performance is unknown.

  18. Effects of Carrier Frequency Offset, Timing Offset, and Channel Spread Factor on the Performance of Hexagonal Multicarrier Modulation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Kui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hexagonal multicarrier modulation (HMM system is the technique of choice to overcome the impact of time-frequency dispersive transmission channel. This paper examines the effects of insufficient synchronization (carrier frequency offset, timing offset on the amplitude and phase of the demodulated symbol by using a projection receiver in hexagonal multicarrier modulation systems. Furthermore, effects of CFO, TO, and channel spread factor on the performance of signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR in hexagonal multicarrier modulation systems are further discussed. The exact SINR expression versus insufficient synchronization and channel spread factor is derived. Theoretical analysis shows that similar degradation on symbol amplitude and phase caused by insufficient synchronization is incurred as in traditional cyclic prefix orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (CP-OFDM transmission. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed by numerical simulations in a doubly dispersive (DD channel with exponential delay power profile and U-shape Doppler power spectrum, showing that HMM systems outperform traditional CP-OFDM systems with respect to SINR against ISI/ICI caused by insufficient synchronization and doubly dispersive channel.

  19. Effects of Carrier Frequency Offset, Timing Offset, and Channel Spread Factor on the Performance of Hexagonal Multicarrier Modulation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Xu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal multicarrier modulation (HMM system is the technique of choice to overcome the impact of time-frequency dispersive transmission channel. This paper examines the effects of insufficient synchronization (carrier frequency offset, timing offset on the amplitude and phase of the demodulated symbol by using a projection receiver in hexagonal multicarrier modulation systems. Furthermore, effects of CFO, TO, and channel spread factor on the performance of signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR in hexagonal multicarrier modulation systems are further discussed. The exact SINR expression versus insufficient synchronization and channel spread factor is derived. Theoretical analysis shows that similar degradation on symbol amplitude and phase caused by insufficient synchronization is incurred as in traditional cyclic prefix orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (CP-OFDM transmission. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed by numerical simulations in a doubly dispersive (DD channel with exponential delay power profile and U-shape Doppler power spectrum, showing that HMM systems outperform traditional CP-OFDM systems with respect to SINR against ISI/ICI caused by insufficient synchronization and doubly dispersive channel.

  20. Abnormity control design and performance analysis of real-time data exchange software based on Petri net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Weimin

    2005-01-01

    In many spaceflight measure and control software systems, varieties of measure data are exchanged between different software. Qualities of measure and control software systems are influenced by the performances of data exchange software greatly. Many problems that appear during the running process of real-time measure and control software and are difficult to be located are caused by data exchange software. So, it is necessary to analyze the performances of data exchange software while designing measure and control software systems. In this article, the Petri net model of the real-time data exchange software is established first. Then the model is simplified and analyzed. The design of abnormity control for buffer overflow is given. Finally,using the Petri net method, the performances of the real-time data exchange software are analyzed and discussed.

  1. The effect of on/off indicator design on state confusion, preference, and response time performance, executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Manahan, Meera K.

    1991-01-01

    Investigated are five designs of software-based ON/OFF indicators in a hypothetical Space Station Power System monitoring task. The hardware equivalent of the indicators used in the present study is the traditional indicator light that illuminates an ON label or an OFF label. Coding methods used to represent the active state were reverse video, color, frame, check, or reverse video with check. Display background color was also varied. Subjects made judgments concerning the state of indicators that resulted in very low error rates and high percentages of agreement across indicator designs. Response time measures for each of the five indicator designs did not differ significantly, although subjects reported that color was the best communicator. The impact of these results on indicator design is discussed.

  2. Single and Combined Effects of Beetroot Crystals and Sodium Bicarbonate on 4-km Cycling Time Trial Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Marcus J; Parr, Evelyn B; Hawley, John A; Burke, Louise M

    2017-06-01

    When ingested alone, beetroot juice and sodium bicarbonate are ergogenic for high-intensity exercise performance. This study sought to determine the independent and combined effects of these supplements. Eight endurance trained (VO2max 65 mL·kg·min(-1)) male cyclists completed four × 4-km time trials (TT) in a doubleblind Latin square design supplementing with beetroot crystals (BC) for 3 days (15 g·day(-1) + 15 g 1 h before TT, containing 300 mg nitrate per 15 g), bicarbonate (Bi 0.3 g·kg(-1) body mass [BM] in 5 doses every 15 min from 2.5 h before TT); BC+Bi or placebo (PLA). Subjects completed TTs on a Velotron cycle ergometer under standardized laboratory conditions. Plasma nitrite concentrations were significantly elevated only in the BC+Bi trial before the TT (1520 ± 786 nmol·L(-1)) compared with baseline (665 ± 535 nmol·L(-1), p = .02) and the Bi and PLA conditions (Bi: 593 ± 203 nmol·L(-1), p .05). Blood bicarbonate concentrations were increased in the BC+Bi and Bi trials before the TT (BC+Bi: 30.9 ± 2.8 mmol·L(-1); Bi: 31.7 ± 1.1 mmol·L(-1)). There were no differences in mean power output (386-394 W) or the time taken to complete the TT (335.8-338.1 s) between any conditions. Under the conditions of this study, supplementation was not ergogenic for 4-km TT performance.

  3. Does Time Spent Online Have an Influence on Student Performance? Evidence for a Large Business Studies Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkofingas, Con; Macri, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines, using regression modelling, whether a statistically significant relationship exists between the time spent by a student using the course website and the student's assessment performance for a large third year university business forecasting course. We utilise the online tracking system in Blackboard, a web-based software…

  4. Effects of Selection and Training on Unit-Level Performance over Time: A Latent Growth Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Perryman, Alexa A.; Blass, Fred R.; Heetderks, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to…

  5. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, Andrew W.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low–voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, ηp2 = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, ηp2 = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, ηp2 = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m (ηp2 = 0.10) and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m (ηp2 = 0.16), 500-m (ηp2 = 0.15), and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to improve 5-km TT performance. PMID:28223939

  6. The time course of cancer detection performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Clarke, Aileen; Wallis, Matthew; Wheaton, Margot; Duncan, Alison; Gale, Alastair G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure how mammography readers' performance varies with time of day and time spent reading. This was investigated in screening practice and when reading an enriched case set. In screening practice records of time and date that each case was read, along with outcome (whether the woman was recalled for further tests, and biopsy results where performed) was extracted from records from one breast screening centre in UK (4 readers). Patterns of performance with time spent reading was also measured using an enriched test set (160 cases, 41% malignant, read three times by eight radiologists). Recall rates varied with time of day, with different patterns for each reader. Recall rates decreased as the reading session progressed both when reading the enriched test set and in screening practice. Further work is needed to expand this work to a greater number of breast screening centres, and to determine whether these patterns of performance over time can be used to optimize overall performance.

  7. Effect of Training Class Label Noise on Classification Performances for Land Cover Mapping with Satellite Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pelletier

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Supervised classification systems used for land cover mapping require accurate reference databases. These reference data come generally from different sources such as field measurements, thematic maps, or aerial photographs. Due to misregistration, update delay, or land cover complexity, they may contain class label noise, i.e., a wrong label assignment. This study aims at evaluating the impact of mislabeled training data on classification performances for land cover mapping. Particularly, it addresses the random and systematic label noise problem for the classification of high resolution satellite image time series. Experiments are carried out on synthetic and real datasets with two traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM and Random Forests (RF. A synthetic dataset has been designed for this study, simulating vegetation profiles over one year. The real dataset is composed of Landsat-8 and SPOT-4 images acquired during one year in the south of France. The results show that both classifiers are little influenced for low random noise levels up to 25%–30%, but their performances drop down for higher noise levels. Different classification configurations are tested by increasing the number of classes, using different input feature vectors, and changing the number of training instances. Algorithm complexities are also analyzed. The RF classifier achieves high robustness to random and systematic label noise for all the tested configurations; whereas the SVM classifier is more sensitive to the kernel choice and to the input feature vectors. Finally, this work reveals that the cross-validation procedure is impacted by the presence of class label noise.

  8. Is delayed ischemic preconditioning as effective on running performance during a 5km time trial as acute IPC?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeger, J.P.H.; Timmers, S.; Ploegmakers, D.J.; Cable, N.T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) may enhance exercise performance. Cardioprotective effects of IPC are known to re-occur 24h after the stimulus. Whether the delayed effect of IPC has similar effects as IPC on exercise performance is unknown. OBJECTIVES: Examine whether IPC applied 24h (24-IPC) before

  9. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: LITERATURE REVIEW AND TIME EVOLUTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintea Mirela-Oana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation of an economic entity requires approaching several criteria, such as industry and economic entity type, managerial and entrepreneurial strategy, competitive environment, human and material resources available, using a system of appropriate performance indicators for this purpose.The exigencies of communication occurred on the growing number of phenomena that marked the global economy in recent decades (internationalization and relocation of business crises and turmoil in financial markets, demand performance measurement to be made in a comprehensive way by financial and non-financial criteria. Indicators are measures of performance used by management to measure, report and improve performance of the economic entity. The relationship between indicators and management is ensured by the existence of performance measurement systems. Studies to date indicate that economic entities using balanced performance measurement systems as a key management tool registered superior performance compared to entities not using such systems. This study attempts to address the issue of performance evaluation by presenting opinions of different authors concerning the process of performance measurement and to present, after revising the literature, the evolution of the performance evaluation systems. We tried to do this literature review because sustainable development and, therefore, globalization require new standards of performance that exceeds the economic field, both for domestic companies as well as international ones. So, these standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities undertaken by harmonizing the economic, social and environmental objectives. To assess the performance of economic entities it is required that performance evaluation to be done with a balanced multidimensional system, including both financial ratios and non-financial indicators in order to reduce the limits of

  10. Investigating the Effects of Assembly Order on the Performance in Relation to Cognitive and Physical Demands Under Takt Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmed Shaikh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Assembly line operations generally involve physical and cognitive demanding tasks. Simultaneous performance under physical and cognitive demanding tasks may create physical and mental stresses. A within subjects study was carried out to determine the effects of assembly levels (variable assembly and consistent assembly on working conditions. Nine participants participated in a study and performed 8 conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the relation between physical and cognitive demands in a simulated task involving simultaneous performance of physical (fastening nuts and bolts and cognitive (code matching with secondary task of memorizing the code demanding task. Results showed the significant effects of assembly order (consisted of the concurrent performance of physically and cognitively demanding task on the working conditions. Quality of performance was affected by variable assembly order, high mental demand and above shoulder height

  11. Sensitivity and Effect of Ignition Timing on the Performance of a Spark Ignition Engine: An Experimental and Modeling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Kakaee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a spark ignition engine is investigated under different values of ignition advance. A two-zone burnt/unburned model with the fuel burning rate described by a Wiebe function is used for modeling in-cylinder combustion, and then experiments are carried out to validate the calculated data. By varying the ignition timing, the results of some characteristics such as power, torque, thermal efficiency, pressure, and heat release are obtained and compared. The results show that optimal power and torque are achieved at 31°CA before top dead center, and performance is decreased if this ignition timing is changed. It is also shown that the maximum thermal efficiency is accomplished when peak pressure occurs between 5 and 15°CA after top dead center.

  12. Effects of baroreceptor stimulation on performance of the Sternberg short-term memory task: a cardiac cycle time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelhas Martins, Amadeu; McIntyre, David; Ring, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Activation of arterial baroreceptors can affect cortical activity. Cardiac cycle time studies have established that natural variations in baroreceptor activation are associated with changes in basic sensorimotor function whereas few have investigated more complex cognitive function. Aiming to improve our understanding of this phenomenon, this study examined performance on the Sternberg memory task as a function of the phase of the cardiac cycle. In each trial, participants were shown either two or six digits followed by a probe digit that either had or had not been presented previously and were required to press one of two response buttons to indicate a match and mismatch, respectively. Response latency per additional digit was greater for stimuli presented late compared to early in the cardiac cycle whereas the zero intercept was greatest at the start of the cardiac cycle and reduced as the cycle progressed. These findings provide evidence that natural baroreceptor stimulation can affect complex cognitive processes, such as serial-comparison in short-term memory, as well as basic sensorimotor processes.

  13. Structured Reflection Breaks Embedded in an Online Course--Effects on Learning Experience, Time on Task and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to gain an insight into the effects of practicing short, frequent, and structured reflection breaks interspersed with the learning material in a computer-based course. To that end, the study sets up a standardized control trial with two groups of secondary school pupils. The study shows that while performance is not…

  14. Separation of genetic influences on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms and reaction time performance from those on IQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, A. C.; Asherson, P.; van der Meere, J. J.; Kuntsi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) shows a strong phenotypic and genetic association with reaction time (RI) variability, considered to reflect lapses in attention. Yet we know little about whether this aetiological pathway is shared with other affected cognitive processes i

  15. Effects of temperature and hydraulic retention time on acetotrophic pathways and performance in high-rate sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Batstone, Damien

    2014-06-01

    High-rate anaerobic digestion of organic solids requires rapid hydrolysis and enhanced methanogenic growth rates, which can be achieved through elevated temperature (>55 °C) at short hydraulic retention times (HRT). This study assesses the effect of temperatures between 55 °C and 65 °C and HRTs between 2 and 4 days on process performance, microbial community structure, microbial capability, and acetotrophic pathways in thermophilic anaerobic reactors. Increasing the temperature did not enhance volatile solids (VS) destruction above the base value of 37% achieved at 55 °C and 4 days HRT. Stable isotopic signatures (δ13C) revealed that elevated temperature promoted syntrophic acetate oxidation, which accounted for 60% of the methane formation at 55 °C, and increasing substantially to 100% at 65 °C. The acetate consumption capacity dropped with increasing temperature (from 0.69-0.81 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 55 °C to 0.21-0.35 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 65 °C), based on specific activity testing of reactor contents. Community analysis using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of Methanosarcina at 55-60 °C. However, a further increase to 65 °C resulted in loss of Methanosarcina, with an accumulation of organic acids and reduced methane production. Similar issues were observed when reducing the HRT to 2 days, indicating that temperature3 days are critical to operate these systems stably.

  16. Time of day variation in polyp detection rate for colonoscopies performed on a 3-hour shift schedule.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munson, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    Recent research suggests that the colonoscopy polyp detection rate (PDR) varies by time of day, possibly because of endoscopist fatigue. Mayo Clinic Rochester (MCR) schedules colonoscopies on 3-hour shifts, which should minimize fatigue.

  17. Effects of Supplementation Time of L-Carnitine and Garlic Powder on Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khatibjoo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Carnitine has several roles in lipid oxidation, immunomodulation function and enhancing antibody responses. L-carnitine has been found to exhibit immunomodulatory effects. It enhances serum primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC and subsequent humoral immunity using 100 mg L-carnitine/ kg diet compared with control group in Leghorn chickens (Deng et al., 2006. It was reported that only the immediate effects of dietary carnitine on immunocompetence is known while comparing long and short-term effects on early life on the immune system of broiler chickens is unknown. The organic allyl sulfur components in garlic (mainly allicin were implicated to mediate its biological activity. The biological activities of these compounds may be related to their SH modification and antioxidant properties (Prasad et al., 1996. AGE treatment prevented the reduction of the antibody production response in thymectomized mice and improved the thymectomy-induced deterioration of learning behaviors in passive avoidance performance and in a spatial memory task (Zhang et al., 1998. Materials and Methods Four hundred Arian one-day-old broiler chicks were used. This experiment was conducted in order to consider the effects of L-Carnitine and garlic powder on broiler chicken performance, blood metabolites and carcass characteristics in a 2×5 factorial arrangement in randomized complete design with 5 dietary treatments, 4 replicates and 12 birds in each and two periods: short (first 3 weeks and long time (total production period. Dietary treatments were 1 Basal diet (BD: no supplementation, 2 ration having 0.02% flavomycin (positive control, 3 ration having 1.5% garlic powder, 4 ration having 0.025% L-Carnitine and 5 ration having 0.025% L-Carnitine plus 1.5% garlic powder. The birds were kept under conventional conditions for vaccination, temperature, ventilation, and lighting based on Ross catalogue recommendations. Standard management

  18. Effect of grinding time of synthesized gadolinium doped ceria (GDC10 powders on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Aydin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceria-based materials are prospective electrolytes for low and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. In the present work, fully dense CeO2 ceramics doped with 10 mol% gadolinium (Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 were prepared with a sol–gel method and commercially purchased GDC10 electrolyte powders were processed. Particle sizes of synthesized electrolyte powders were minimized by ball-milling method. Grinding of the samples were performed in different times intervals (12 h, 15 h, 18 h, 20 h, 25 h, 30 h, 35 h, 40 h and 45 h. Then, these powders were prepared to obtain of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs. Performances of these cells having an active area of 1 cm2 were tested using a fuel cell test station that measured in different temperatures (650 and 700 °C. In the present study, gadolinium doped ceria (GDC10 synthesiszed powders were investigated by using XRD and SEM images. Performance values of synthesized GDC10's in different temperature were compared to by commercial GDC10. Commercial GDC10's performance at 650 °C were tested, and maximum current density of 0.413 W/cm2 and maximum current density of 0.949 A/cm2 were obtained. Commercial GDC10 at 650 °C has better result. However, synthesized GDC10's performance at 700 °C demonstrated better results than commercial GDC10's. The performance tests of samples which are 20 h mill showed that they have the maximum power density of was obtained as 0.480 W/cm2 and maximum current density of as 1.231 A/cm2.

  19. The Effect of Driver Rise-Time on Pinch Current and its Impact on Plasma Focus Performance and Neutron Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with faster drivers [Decker NIMP 1986]. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP [Schmidt PRL 2012], we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF [Ellsworth 2014], and demonstrate how driver rise time is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. Driver capacitance and voltage are varied to modify the current rise time, and anode length is adjusted so that run-in coincides with the peak current. We observe during run down that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities of the sheath shed blobs of plasma that remain in the inter-electrode gap during run in. This trailing plasma later acts as a low-inductance restrike path that shunts current from the pinch during maximum compression. While the MHD growth rate increases slightly with driver speed, the shorter anode of the fast driver allows fewer e-foldings and hence reduces the trailing mass between electrodes. As a result, the fast driver postpones parasitic restrikes and maintains peak current through the pinch during maximum compression. The fast driver pinch therefore achieves best simultaneity between its ion beam and peak target density, which maximizes neutron production. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Time-response relationship of ractopamine feeding on growth performance, plasma urea nitrogen concentration, and carcass traits of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, V V; Nuñez, A J C; Schinckel, A P; Andrade, C; Balieiro, J C C; Sbardella, M; Miyada, V S

    2013-02-01

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) improves swine production efficiency by redirecting nutrients to favor muscle accretion rather than fat deposition. In the present study, the time-dependent effect of RAC feeding on performance, plasma urea N (PUN) concentrations, and carcass traits of finishing pigs were evaluated. In a 28-d growth study, 80 barrows (average initial BW = 69.4 ± 7.9 kg) were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments in a randomized complete block design with 8 replicate pens per treatment and 2 pigs per pen. The pigs were fed a corn-soybean meal-based diet with no added RAC (control) or 10 mg of RAC/kg fed for 7, 14, 21, or 28 d before slaughter. All diets were formulated to contain 0.88% standardized ileal digestible Lys (1.0% total Lys) and 3.23 Mcal of ME/kg. Individual pig BW and pen feed disappearance were recorded weekly to determine BW changes, ADG, ADFI, and G:F. Anterior vena cava blood samples were taken on d 28 for determination of PUN concentrations. After 28 d on trial, the pigs were slaughtered and carcass measurements made at 24 h postmortem. Overall, providing pigs with different RAC feeding durations did not affect the final BW and ADFI but resulted in a tendency (P = 0.09) for a linear increase in ADG and a linear improvement (P = 0.003) in G:F. No effect of RAC feeding was found for weekly ADFI. Weekly improvements (P < 0.05) in ADG and G:F were observed over the first 21 d of RAC feeding. However, the growth response declined (P < 0.05) in wk 4 of RAC treatment. The concentrations of PUN exhibited a quadratic decrease (P = 0.004) as the RAC feeding duration increased. Although RAC feeding did not affect any backfat measurements and carcass length, increasing the RAC feeding duration linearly increased HCW (P = 0.01), dressing percentage (P = 0.03), LM depth (P = 0.001), LM area (P < 0.001), muscle-to-fat ratio (P = 0.004), and predicted carcass lean percentage (P = 0.02). These results indicate that a greater growth rate was achieved within

  1. Average-Time Games on Timed Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Trivedi, Ashutosh

    2009-01-01

    An average-time game is played on the infinite graph of configurations of a finite timed automaton. The two players, Min and Max, construct an infinite run of the automaton by taking turns to perform a timed transition. Player Min wants to minimise the average time per transition and player Max wants to maximise it. A solution of average-time games is presented using a reduction to average-price game on a finite graph. A direct consequence is an elementary proof of determinacy for average-tim...

  2. Using time-on-task measurements to understand student performance in a physics class: A four-year study

    OpenAIRE

    John Stewart; Gay Stewart†; Jennifer Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the variance in test average and in normalized gain on the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism. The details of how students used their out-of-cla...

  3. Using time-on-task measurements to understand student performance in a physics class: A four-year study

    OpenAIRE

    John Stewart; Gay Stewart†; Jennifer Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the variance in test average and in normalized gain on the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism. The details of how students used their out-of-cla...

  4. Relieving thermal discomfort: Effects of sprayed L-menthol on perception, performance, and time trial cycling in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, M J; Corbett, J; Thomas, K; Twentyman, P

    2015-06-01

    L-menthol stimulates cutaneous thermoreceptors and induces cool sensations improving thermal comfort, but has been linked to heat storage responses; this could increase risk of heat illness during self-paced exercise in the heat. Therefore, L-menthol application could lead to a discrepancy between behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory drivers. Eight male participants volunteered. They were familiarized and then completed two trials in hot conditions (33.5 °C, 33% relative humidity) where their t-shirt was sprayed with CONTROL-SPRAY or MENTHOL-SPRAY after 10 km (i.e., when they were hot and uncomfortable) of a 16.1-km cycling time trial (TT). Thermal perception [thermal sensation (TS) and comfort (TC)], thermal responses [rectal temperature (Trec ), skin temperature (Tskin )], perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate, pacing (power output), and TT completion time were measured. MENTHOL-SPRAY made participants feel cooler and more comfortable and resulted in lower RPE (i.e., less exertion) yet performance was unchanged [TT completion: CONTROL-SPRAY 32.4 (2.9) and MENTHOL-SPRAY 32.7 (3.0) min]. Trec rate of increase was 1.40 (0.60) and 1.45 (0.40) °C/h after CONTROL-SPRAY and MENTHOL-SPRAY application, which were not different. Spraying L-menthol toward the end of self-paced exercise in the heat improved perception, but did not alter performance and did not increase heat illness risk.

  5. Influences of deep learning, need for cognition and preparation time on open- and closed-book test performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The ability to master discipline-specific knowledge is one of the competencies medical students must acquire. In this context, 'mastering' means being able to recall and apply knowledge. A way to assess this competency is to use both open- and closed-book tests. Student performance on bot

  6. Influences of deep learning, need for cognition and preparation time on open- and closed-book test performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Objectives The ability to master discipline-specific knowledge is one of the competencies medical students must acquire. In this context, 'mastering' means being able to recall and apply knowledge. A way to assess this competency is to use both open- and closed-book tests. Student performance on

  7. Influence of simulation time-step (temporal-scale) on optimal parameter estimation and runoff prediction performance in hydrological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, most hydrological catchment models are designed to allow their use for streamflow simulation at different time-scales. While this permits models to be applied for broader purposes, it can also be a source of error in hydrological processes simulation at catchment scale. Those errors seem not to affect significantly simple conceptual models, but this flexibility may lead to large behavior errors in physically based models. Equations used in processes such as those related to soil moisture time-variation are usually representative at certain time-scales but they may not characterize properly water transfer in soil layers at larger scales. This effect is especially relevant as we move from detailed hourly scale to daily time-step, which are common time scales used at catchment streamflow simulation for different research and management practices purposes. This study aims to provide an objective methodology to identify the degree of similarity of optimal parameter values when hydrological catchment model calibration is developed at different time-scales. Thus, providing information for an informed discussion of physical parameter significance on hydrological models. In this research, we analyze the influence of time scale simulation on: 1) the optimal values of six highly sensitive parameters of the TOPLATS model and 2) the streamflow simulation efficiency, while optimization is carried out at different time scales. TOPLATS (TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) has been applied on its lumped version on three catchments of varying size located in northern Spain. The model has its basis on shallow groundwater gradients (related to local topography) that set up spatial patterns of soil moisture and are assumed to control infiltration and runoff during storm events and evaporation and drainage in between storm events. The model calculates the saturated portion of the catchment at each time step based on Topographical Index (TI) intervals. Surface

  8. Performance comparison of various time variant filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwata, M. [JEOL Engineering Co. Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Husimi, K.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the advantage of the trapezoidal filter used in semiconductor detector system comparing with the other time variant filters. The trapezoidal filter is the compose of a rectangular pre-filter and a gated integrator. We indicate that the best performance is obtained by the differential-integral summing type rectangular pre-filter. This filter is not only superior in performance, but also has the useful feature that the rising edge of the output waveform is linear. We introduce an example of this feature used in a high-energy experiment. (author)

  9. The Influence of Injection Timing on Performance Characteristics of Diesel Engine Using Jatropha Biodiesel with and without Partial Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizqon Fajar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research has been conducted to investigate the effects of blend of hydrogenated and unhydrogenated Jatropha biodiesel with diesel fuel in volume ratio of 30:70 (B30 on combustion characteristics (BSFC, thermal efficiency and smoke emission of single cylinder diesel engine. In this experiment, engine speed was kept constant at 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 rpm with maximum engine load at BMEP 5 bar and injection timings were varied. Experimental result showed that at engine speed 1,500 rpm, BSFC of B30 hydrogenated and unhydrogenated Jatropha biodiesel were higher than it of diesel fuel at all injection timings (10° to 18° BTDC. At the same condition, partial hydrogenated Jatropha biodiesel showed higher BSFC than unhydrogenated Jatropha biodiesel. However, the difference in BSFC became smaller for all fuels at engine speed 2,500 rpm and 3,500 rpm at all injection timing. Jatropha biodiesel with and without partial hydrogenation tend to have higher thermal efficiency compared with diesel fuel at all engine speed and injection timing. The best injection timings to operate B30 Jatropha biodiesel with and without hydrogenation were 14°, 18° and 24° BTDC at engine speed 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 rpm respectively. This conclusion was deduced based on the minimum value of BSFC and the maximum value of thermal efficiency. Smoke emissions for all fuels were in the same level for all conditions.

  10. The influence of future time perspective on work engagement and job performance: the role of job crafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; Tims,; Akkermans,

    2017-01-01

    This two-wave study aimed to examine future time perspective (FTP) as an antecedent of job crafting, and in turn job crafting as a mediator in associations between FTP and work outcomes. Based on the lifespan socio-emotional selectivity theory, we expected that open-ended and limited FTP would evoke

  11. The performance of GPS time and frequency transfer: comment on ‘A detailed comparison of two continuous GPS carrier-phase time transfer techniques’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Gérard; Defraigne, Pascale

    2016-06-01

    The paper ‘A detailed comparison of two continuous GPS carrier-phase time transfer techniques’ (Yao et al 2015 Metrologia 52 666) presents the revised RINEX-shift (RRS) method, a technique using ‘classical precise point positioning (PPP)’ solutions on sliding batches and aiming at providing continuous time links. The authors claim the superiority of the RRS technique with respect to ‘classical PPP’ in terms of frequency stability and solving for discontinuities due to data gaps. It is shown here that these conclusions do not rely on physical principles, and are erroneous as they are driven by misinterpreted or corrupted PPP solutions. Using state-of-the-art PPP computation on the same data sets used in Yao et al’s paper (2015 Metrologia 52 666), we show that the stability of RRS is at best similar to that of ‘classical PPP’ (within statistical uncertainties). Furthermore, the RRS method of removing discontinuities in case of data gaps by interpolating the phase data should not be applied systematically as it can cause erroneous clock solutions when the data gaps are associated with a true phase discontinuity.

  12. FRANCHISOR-FRANCHISEE RELATIONSHIP QUALITY: TIME OF RELATIONSHIP AND PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Varotto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Franchise literature disputes how the relationship between franchisors and franchisees develops over time. Traditional lifecycle theory views relationships following an ascendant curve, in which relationship quality and performance strengthen over time. Another perspective better reflects the peculiarities of the franchisor-franchisee relationship, indicating that relationship quality in franchise systems follows a U-shaped curve. There is also limited research on the moderating effect of time on the relationship between relational variables and outcomes. This study sheds light on the influence of relationship duration on relationship quality and financial performance in the franchisee-franchisor relationship. Using a self-report survey from a sample of 342 franchisees, mean and regression analyses are conducted to test relationships. Results confirm the time effect on franchisor-franchisee relationship quality and performance, but the hypothesized shape of relationship phases is only partially confirmed. Moreover, time has a positive moderating effect on the impact of relationship quality on financial performance.

  13. A Natural Experiment on the Effect of Time Given for Quizzes on Veterinary Student Performance in a Required Principles of Anesthesia Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H

    2017-09-08

    Assessments can cause significant distress in veterinary students and are listed as some of the greatest causes of academic stress. The purpose of this natural experiment was to determine if there is a relationship between amount of time given to complete quizzes and the students' score on the quiz. The Principles of Anesthesia course is required of all students. Quizzes are administered at the start of a class period and spaced throughout the course to cover 2-4 lectures per quiz. Once the allotted time has passed (3-6 minutes), students are notified they have 2 minutes to return the quiz to the instructor. To complete the quiz, students had 3 minutes in 2012 and 2013, 4 minutes in 2014, 5 minutes in 2015, and 6 minutes in 2016. The average quiz score was significantly lower with 3 minutes than with 4 or 6 minutes. Students in the bottom quartile scored significantly higher with 4, 5, or 6 minutes than with 3 minutes. Students in the upper quartile scored significantly higher with 4 minutes than with 3 minutes and with 4 minutes than with 5 minutes. The time provided for students to complete a free-response quiz was not associated with student performance once a certain minimum time (4 minutes) was provided. Providing students an appropriate, but not excessive, amount of time to complete assessments will allow for appropriately applied assessments and preserve time dedicated to instruction.

  14. A Revised Pilot Study Examining the Effects of the Timing and Size of Classes on Student Performance in Introductory Accounting Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David E., Sr.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the effects of the timing of classes and class size on student performance in introductory accounting courses. Factors affecting student success are important to all stakeholders in the academic community. Previous studies have shown mixed results regarding the effects of class size on student success…

  15. A quality initiative of postoperative radiographic imaging performed on mastectomy specimens to reduce histology cost and pathology report turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Michael E; Sim, Myung S; Radosavcev, Bryan L; Humphries, Romney M; Ward, Dawn C; Apple, Sophia K

    2015-10-01

    Breast pathology relies on gross dissection for accurate diagnostic work, but challenges can necessitate submission of high tissue volumes resulting in excess labor, laboratory costs, and delays. To address these issues, a quality initiative was created through implementation of the Faxitron PathVision specimen radiography system as part of the breast gross dissection protocol; this report documents its impact on workflow and clinical care. Retrospective data from 459 patients who underwent simple or modified radical mastectomy at our institution between May 2012 and December 2014 were collected. Comparison was made between the mastectomy specimen control group before radiography use (233 patients, 340 breasts) and Faxitron group that underwent postoperative radiography (226 patients, 338 breasts). We observed a statistically significant decrease in mean number of blocks between control and Faxitron groups (47.0 vs 39.7 blocks; Pmastectomy. A statistically significant decrease in pathology report turnaround time was also observed (4.2 vs 3.8days; P=.038). Postoperative mastectomy specimen radiography has increased workflow efficiency and decreased histology costs and pathology report turnaround time. These findings may underestimate actual benefits and highlight the importance of quality improvement projects in anatomical pathology.

  16. Effects of 10min vs. 20min passive rest after warm-up on 100m freestyle time-trial performance: A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Viana, João L; Marinho, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 10min vs. 20min passive rest post warm-up on performance in a 100m freestyle time-trial. Randomized crossover. Eleven competitive male swimmers performed two experimental trials on different days, consisting of 100m freestyle time-trials following 10min or 20min passive rest after a standard 1200m warm-up. Performance (time-trial), biomechanical (stroke length, stroke frequency, stroke index, propelling efficiency), physiological (blood lactate concentrations, heart rate, core and tympanic temperature), and psychophysiological (perceived effort) variables were assessed during both trials. Time-trial performance was faster after 10min as opposed to 20min passive rest (58.41±1.99s vs. 59.06±1.86, prest (89±12bpm vs. 82±13bpm; prest. These data suggest that the 10min post warm-up passive rest enhances 100m freestyle performance when compared to a 20min period. An improvement that appears to be mediated by the combined effects of a shorter post warm-up period on core temperature, heart rate and oxygen uptake. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using Time-on-Task Measurements to Understand Student Performance in a Physics Class: A Four-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay; Taylor, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the…

  18. Using Time-on-Task Measurements to Understand Student Performance in a Physics Class: A Four-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay; Taylor, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the…

  19. Improved VO2max and time trial performance with more high aerobic intensity interval training and reduced training volume: a case study on an elite national cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støren, Øyvind; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Haave, Marius; Helgerud, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated to what extent more high aerobic intensity interval training (HAIT) and reduced training volume would influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and time trial (TT) performance in an elite national cyclist in the preseason period. The cyclist was tested for VO2max, cycling economy (C(c)), and TT performance on an ergometer cycle during 1 year. Training was continuously logged using heart rate monitor during the entire period. Total monthly training volume was reduced in the 2011 preseason compared with the 2010 preseason, and 2 HAIT blocks (14 sessions in 9 days and 15 sessions in 10 days) were performed as running. Between the HAIT blocks, 3 HAIT sessions per week were performed as cycling. From November 2010 to February 2011, the cyclist reduced total average monthly training volume by 18% and cycling training volume by 60%. The amount of training at 90-95% HRpeak increased by 41%. VO2max increased by 10.3% on ergometer cycle. TT performance improved by 14.9%. C(c) did not change. In conclusion, preseason reduced total training volume but increased amount of HAIT improved VO2max and TT performance without any changes in C(c). These improvements on cycling appeared despite that the HAIT blocks were performed as running. Reduced training time, and training transfer from running into improved cycling form, may be beneficial for cyclists living in cold climate areas.

  20. Interpreting Secondary Students' Performance on a Timed, Multiple-Choice Reading Comprehension Assessment: The Prevalence and Impact of Non-Attempted Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Nathan H.; Davis, John L.; Simmons, Leslie E.; Oslund, Eric L.; Simmons, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Standardized measures are often used as an index of students' reading comprehension and scores have important implications, particularly for students who perform below expectations. This study examined secondary-level students' patterns of responding and the prevalence and impact of non-attempted items on a timed, group-administered,…

  1. Evaluation of response to bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 vaccination and timing of weaning on yearling ultrasound body composition, performance, and carcass quality traits in Angus calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are concerns about antagonisms between immunity and animal productivity in livestock production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of antibody levels through a response to vaccination protocol, weaning timing, and their interaction on performance and carcass quality traits...

  2. Effects of amphetamine and methylphenidate on attentional performance and impulsivity in the mouse 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Puntiverio, Maitane; Fitzpatrick, Ciarán Martin; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated the effects of conventional attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication in the mouse 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), and rat studies have yielded inconsistent results. Objective: We aimed to examine the effects of acute...... methylphenidate (MPH) and amphetamine (AMPH) treatment in the mouse 5-CSRTT. Methods: Trained male C57Bl/6J mice were tested in a variable stimulus duration schedule. Effects of AMPH (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg) and MPH (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) on discriminative accuracy, omissions, and premature responses were...... assessed. Saline treatment data determined high- and lowattentive (LA), and high- and low-impulsive (LI) subgroups according to the upper and lower 30th percentiles, respectively. Results: In the LA subgroup accuracy was improved by 0.5 mg/kg AMPH and 2 mg/kg MPH, while no effect was found in the high...

  3. Influence of different processing times on the quality of Polygoni Multiflora Radix by metabolomics based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xie-An; Ge, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Jin; An, Mingrui; Cao, Jun; He, Jun; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Chang, Yan-Xu

    2017-03-20

    A metabolomics method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed to evaluate the influence of processing times on the quality of raw and processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to screen the potential maker metabolites that were contributed to the quality changes. Then these marker metabolites were selected as variables in Fisher's discriminant analysis to establish the models that were used to distinguish the raw and processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix in the markets. Additionally, 36 compounds were identified. 12 raw Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples and 23 processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples were distinguished. The results showed that the 12 raw Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples belonged to the group of processing time of 0 h, and two processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples were part of the group of processing times of 4 h, 12 samples belonged to group of processing times of 8 to 16 h, and nine samples were the group of processing times of 24 to 48 h. The results demonstrated that the method could provide scientific support for the processing standardization of Polygoni Multiflora Radix. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Job performance over time is a function of latent trajectories and previous performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyphur, Michael J; Chaturvedi, Sankalp; Arvey, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature addressing job performance over time notes that past performance can affect future performance and that individuals often have distinct latent performance trajectories. However, no research to date has modeled these 2 aspects of job performance in tandem. Drawing on previous literature, the authors note that current performance may act as performance feedback, influencing future performance directly (i.e., autoregression), and that individuals differ in their performance trajectories due to individual-difference factors (i.e., latent trajectories). The authors demonstrate an autoregressive latent trajectory (ALT) model to show how both autoregressive and latent trajectory parameters may be incorporated in modeling job performance over time. Also discussed are the implications of the ALT model for future studies examining job performance longitudinally.

  5. On the comparison of analog and digital SiPM readout in terms of expected timing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundacker, S., E-mail: stefan.gundacker@cern.ch; Auffray, E.; Jarron, P.; Meyer, T.; Lecoq, P.

    2015-07-01

    In time of flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) and in particular for the EndoTOFPET-US Project (Frisch, 2013 [1]), and other applications for high energy physics, the multi-digital silicon photomultiplier (MD-SiPM) was recently proposed (Mandai and Charbon, 2012 [2]), in which the time of every single photoelectron is being recorded. If such a photodetector is coupled to a scintillator, the largest and most accurate timing information can be extracted from the cascade of the scintillation photons, and the most probable time of positron emission determined. The readout concept of the MD-SiPM is very different from that of the analog SiPM, where the individual photoelectrons are merely summed up and the output signal fed into the readout electronics. We have developed a comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool that describes the timing properties of the photodetector and electronics, the scintillation properties of the crystal and the light transfer within the crystal. In previous studies we have compared MC simulations with coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements and found good agreement within less than 10% for crystals of different lengths (from 3 mm to 20 mm) coupled to SiPMs from Hamamatsu. In this work we will use the developed MC tool to directly compare the highest possible time resolution for both the analog and digital readout of SiPMs with different scintillator lengths. The presented studies reveal that the analog readout of SiPMs with microcell signal pile-up and leading edge discrimination can lead to nearly the same time resolution as compared to the maximum likelihood time estimation applied to MD-SiPMs. Consequently there is no real preference for either a digital or analog SiPM for the sake of achieving highest time resolution. However, the best CTR in the analog SiPM is observed for a rather small range of optimal threshold values, whereas the MD-SiPM provides stable CTR after roughly 20 registered photoelectron timestamps in

  6. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF DWTBASED MULTICARRIER SYSTEM IN TIME VARYING CHANNELS

    OpenAIRE

    Meenu S Kumar; Sandra Prasad; Ramanathan R

    2015-01-01

    With an increase in user mobility, data rate and carrier frequencies we have to consider time variant channels. In order to overcome the impairments of the time varying channel on conventional OFDM system, a wavelet based OFDM system is investigated in place of FFT based system and its BER performance is analyzed for different Doppler frequencies. The results show that DWT based OFDM gives better performance compared to conventional OFDM system.

  7. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF DWTBASED MULTICARRIER SYSTEM IN TIME VARYING CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu S Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With an increase in user mobility, data rate and carrier frequencies we have to consider time variant channels. In order to overcome the impairments of the time varying channel on conventional OFDM system, a wavelet based OFDM system is investigated in place of FFT based system and its BER performance is analyzed for different Doppler frequencies. The results show that DWT based OFDM gives better performance compared to conventional OFDM system.

  8. Performance Analysis of STFT Based Timing Approach to OFDM Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Yu-jun; TENG Yong; YIN Chang-chuan; HAO Jian-jun; YUE Guang-xin

    2003-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on performance analysis of the previously proposed STFT based 2-D timing approach to OFDM systems and presents simulations results of its performance in AWGN and multipath fading environment and its robustness against the duration of Channel Impulse Response (CIR) and frequency offset. Simulation results suggest that a revised version of Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) can be used to greatly reduce computational complexity, especially at higher SNR.

  9. Effects of aging on working memory performance and prefrontal cortex activity:A time-resolved spectroscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Shi; Wenjing Zhou; Tongchao Geng; Huancong Zuo; Masahiro Tanida; Kaoru Sakatani

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aimed to employ time‐resolved spectroscopy (TRS) to explore age‐related differences in prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity while subjects performed a working memory task. Methods:We employed TRS to measure PFC activity in ten healthy younger and ten healthy older subjects while they performed a working memory (WM) task. All subjects performed the Sternberg test (ST) in which the memory‐set size varied between one and six digits. Using TRS, we recorded changes in cerebral blood oxygenation as a measure of changes in PFC activity during the task. In order to identify left/right asymmetry of PFC activity during the working memory task, we calculated the laterality score, i.e.,Δoxy‐Hb (rightΔoxy‐Hb—leftΔoxy‐Hb);positive values indicate greater activity in the right PFC, while negative values indicate greater activity in the left PFC. Results:During the ST, statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the younger and older groups in accuracy for low memory‐load and high memory‐load. In high memory‐load tasks, however, older subjects were slower than younger subjects (P Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults (HAROLD) model;working memory tasks cause asymmetrical PFC activation in younger adults, while older adults tend to show reduced hemispheric lateralization.

  10. Verification and Performance Evaluation of Timed Game Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Fang, Huixing; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand;

    2014-01-01

    Control synthesis techniques, based on timed games, derive strategies to ensure a given control objective, e.g., time-bounded reachability. Model checking verifies correctness properties of systems. Statistical model checking can be used to analyse performance aspects of systems, e.g., energy...

  11. The effect of repeated nicotine administration on the performance of drug-naive rats in a five-choice serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, A; Simon, H; Sanger, D J; Moser, P

    1999-11-01

    Nicotine improves cognitive performance both in animals and in humans, particularly in tests involving attentional processes. The five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is widely used as a model of attentional performance in rats, and previous studies have demonstrated effects of nicotine in this task on measures such as improved reaction time. Using a modified version of this task (in which rats were required to respond to the disappearance of one of five stimulus lights), we evaluated the effects of repeated nicotine administration (0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, on three occasions over 7 days) in drug-naive rats. After the first administration, nicotine increased accuracy and reduced inappropriate responding (anticipatory responses and responses during time-out) compared to performance following vehicle administration on the preceding day. However, with repeated administration the improvement in accuracy disappeared, and other effects became apparent. Thus, after the third administration the main effects of nicotine were to increase inappropriate responding and to reduce reaction times. A fourth administration 1-2 weeks later produced similar results to the third administration, suggesting that the effects of nicotine were now constant. Despite the general increase in inappropriate responding, there was no impairment in accuracy. In contrast to the response to repeated nicotine, the performance of the rats on the 3 vehicle days remained constant. These data demonstrate that the administration of nicotine to drug-naive subjects improves performance in the 5-CSRTT but that with repeated administration this effect disappears and is replaced by a profile in which inappropriate and impulsive responding predominate.

  12. Effect of Storage Time on Bond Strength Performance of Multimode Adhesives to Indirect Resin Composite and Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishi, P; André, C B; Silva, Jp Lyra E; Bacelar-Sá, R; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Giannini, M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the bond strength performance of multimode adhesives (MMAs) to indirect resin composite and lithium disilicate glass ceramic after 24 hours or one year of water storage. Thirty flat and polished plates of indirect resin composite (Epricord) and thirty lithium disilicate glass ceramic plates (IPS e.max Press) were prepared. Surfaces were pretreated using sandblasting (indirect resin composite) or hydrofluoric acid (glass-based ceramic). Specimens were bonded with one of two MMAs (Scotchbond Universal [SBU] or All-Bond Universal [ABU]) or ceramic primer and hydrophobic bonding (RelyX Ceramic Primer and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Bond) as a control (n=10). Resin cement cylinders (0.75 mm in diameter × 0.5 mm in height) were bonded to both substrate surfaces using the respective adhesives. After 24 hours or one year of water storage, bonding performance was measured by microshear bond strength (MSBS) testing. Results were analyzed using three-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). For indirect resin composite, significantly higher MSBS values were found for ABU after 24 hours (ABU > SBU = control); however, no significant difference among the adhesives was observed after one year (p>0.05). For glass-based ceramic, significantly different bond strengths were observed among the adhesives after 24 hours (control = ABU > SBU) and one year (control > SBU = ABU; presin composite after aging, as they showed similar bond performance to that of the control group. However, separate bottles of silane bonding resin showed higher MSBS values and more durable bonding for etched glass-based ceramic.

  13. Time Transfer by Laser Link: : Performances and progresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samain, E.; Weick, J.; Vrancken, P.; Guillemot, Ph.

    2007-07-01

    The idea of transfering time using optical devices has been implemented by OCA^1 and CNES^2 through the T2L2 (Time Transfer by Laser Link) space instrument. Its goal is to permit the synchronization of remote ultra stable clocks and the determination of their performances over intercontinental distances. The principle is derived from laser telemetry technology with dedicated space equipment embarked on the satellite Jason 2. The instrument has recently been integrated on the satellite scheduled to launch in June of 2008. The T2L2 scheme will allow an improvement of one to two orders of magnitude as compared to the performances of existing time transfer systems.

  14. Sex differences on the competitive place task in the water maze: The influence of peripheral pool time on spatial navigation performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Bryan D; Tobin, Elizabeth L; Dunn, Emily N; Magalis, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated sex differences on the competitive place version of the Morris water maze task to determine whether potential strategy differences would emerge during any phase of the study but in particular on the competitive place phase. Previous findings indicate that this version of the task is highly sensitive to measures that disrupt NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus during memory consolidation (McDonald et al., 2005). The present findings revealed significant sex differences during all phases of the study, including Phase I with standard place training to located a hidden platform/goal, Phase II mass training to a new place with the platform/goal relocated to the diagonally opposite quadrant and Phase III, competitive place probe test with the platform removed to measure spatial behaviour directed at either location. The findings showed no sex difference in escape latency and other standard performance measures during the first two phases, initial place acquisition and mass training to a new location. A very subtle male advantage in visiting both Old and New place locations during the third phase place competition test was observed, however, in the time spent swimming in the periphery of the pool, the pool wall (Zone C - outer third radial distance) was increased for females during all phases of the study, suggesting a general effect may have influenced place location search behaviour of the females. Increased peripheral pool time may represent a female preference for approaching the wall, a local cue. Alternatively, the possibility that increased peripheral swimming/thigmotaxis may represent hormonal influences interacting with strategic preferences were discussed, though no definitive conclusions about sex differences in cognitive-spatial performance or memory consolidation were inferred from the present findings. The findings suggest that mixed results reported in the literature by others may be due in part to an

  15. Individual Differences in Time-Sharing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    relative to solitary task performance levels (e.g., North and Gopher, 1975; Parker, 1964; Sterky and Eysenck , 1965). In attempting such an analysis...Sterky, K. and Eysenck , H. J. Pursuit rotor performance as a function of different degrees of distraction. Life Sciences, 1965) 4, 889-897. Trankell, A

  16. Time of Arrival Based on Chirp Pulses as a means to Perform Localization in IEEE 802.15.4a Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAUWELAERS, B.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the technology Time of Arrival (TOA based on chirp pulses (according to IEEE 802.15.4a as a means to perform localization in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN's active at 2.4 GHz. Advantages and disadvantages of the technology are discussed and act as a guideline for improving localization accuracy. Tests concerning TOA are performed by means of the location engine of Nanotron. Adapting this engine leads to improved localization results. It is shown that TOA measurements are susceptible to reflections and dynamic environments.

  17. Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preckshot, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

  18. Dietary Chlorella supplementation effect on immune responses and growth performances of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, S; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary Chlorella sp. supplementation on immune response and growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time. Allotted in 36 pens, a total of 180 newly hatched chicks were assigned in a 3 × 2 factorial design...... supplementation increased (PBirds withheld from feed for 48 hours after hatching had lower (P... of broilers was lowered (Pbirds, the treatment may be useful...

  19. Market Timing on Oslo Stock Exchange: A Two-dimensional Analysis of Long-term Abnormal Stock Price Performance Following Equity Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Holom, Erik Hiller

    2013-01-01

    I analyze the time-variation of long-term risk-adjusted abnormal stock price underperformances following equity issues on Oslo Stock Exchange between 1997 and 2011. Market timing effects are analyzed within a two dimensional framework reflecting both the pre-issue stock market performance and the short-term activity level in the equity capital market. An adjusted version of the Fama-French three-factor model is used for the risk-adjustment of stock returns. The long-term underperformance is h...

  20. Phoenix, a High-Performance UNIX with an Emphasis on Dynamic Modification, Real-Time Response and Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-02

    generated code for the StarLite architecture is extremely space * efficient since it is based on Wirth’s Lilith architecture(41. For example, the...References (1) Whi N., The Persnal Computer Lilith , ETH Zich, Insttut fur Lnormatk Tenical Report 40, (April 1981). (2) Wolfon. 0.. The Overhead of

  1. Real-time optimisation. Intelligent add-on technology helps to upgrade boiler performance; In Echtzeit optimiert. Effizienzsteigerung fuer Grossdampferzeuger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turoni, Francesco; Hlawanka, Alexander; Sadatsakkak, Abas; Lindenscheid, Clemens; Schreiber, Michael [EUtech Scientific Engineering GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Given today's technical, economic and environmental challenges in the field of power generation the utilities are forced to make the most of their available assets. An inexpensive way to optimize operation of coal-fired power plants is the integration of an combustion optimizer based on advanced adaptive model-based control strategies. (orig.)

  2. Phoenix, a High-Performance UNIX with an Emphasis on Dynamic Modification, Real-Time Response and Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-12

    system generator . our research. The first problem is the overhead This section discusses the two components of of procedure calls through multiple layers...project is to create a system generator that could automatically select implementations from a module library based on specified application requirements...with different options, we The long-term goal of the StarLite project is to designed and implemented a UNIX-compatible create an operating system

  3. TiO2 photoanode sensitized with nanocrystalline Bi2S3: the effect of sensitization time and annealing on its photovoltaic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anil N.; Rajendra Prasad, M. B.; Pathan, Habib M.; Patil, Rajendra S.

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the sensitization of the porous TiO2 films of thickness about 4 µm deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide with nanocrystalline Bi2S3 for photovoltaic application. The sensitization was achieved for four different sensitization times employing chemical solution deposition with bismuth nitrate and sodium thiosulphate as precursors for Bi3+ and S2-, respectively. The unsensitized and sensitized photoelectrodes were characterized using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. XRD patterns show the signatures of both anatase TiO2 and orthorhombic Bi2S3 in the sensitized photoanodes. However, crystallinity of Bi2S3 increased with increase in sensitization time from 10 to 40 min. The temporal effect of sensitization and annealing on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells fabricated using four different photoelectrodes was studied using the photocurrent density versus photovoltage curves. Annealing apparently improved the photovoltaic performance of photoanodes. The best performance was obtained for cell fabricated using annealed TiO2/Bi2S3 photoanode after 30 min sensitization time showing V oc ~ 0.37 mV, J sc ~ 0.52 mA/cm2, FF ~ 68 and 0.43 %.

  4. Hypoxia: Exposure Time Until Significant Performance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    questionnaire which confirmed compliance with pre-established alcohol, caffeine , supplement, and medication usage standards given during consent and...the median reaction times and the third quartile reaction times evokes a relatively recent concept that is primarily associated with sleep ...face of increasing physiological demand, but cannot sustain it. For example, when the need for sleep is high, the level of attention will increase to

  5. An Implementation of Real-Time Phased Array Radar Fundamental Functions on a DSP-Focused, High-Performance, Embedded Computing Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xining Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the feasibility of a backend design for real-time, multiple-channel processing digital phased array system, particularly for high-performance embedded computing platforms constructed of general purpose digital signal processors. First, we obtained the lab-scale backend performance benchmark from simulating beamforming, pulse compression, and Doppler filtering based on a Micro Telecom Computing Architecture (MTCA chassis using the Serial RapidIO protocol in backplane communication. Next, a field-scale demonstrator of a multifunctional phased array radar is emulated by using the similar configuration. Interestingly, the performance of a barebones design is compared to that of emerging tools that systematically take advantage of parallelism and multicore capabilities, including the Open Computing Language.

  6. Freight Transport Time Savings and Organizational Performance: A Systemic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Sambracos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of freight transport time savings (FTTS on the performance of transport consuming companies. In the first part existing methods on FTTS valuation are critically discussed and their limitations are identified. Following, a conceptual model is built introducing an alternative approach for the valuation of FTTS that is based on the system perspective of firms, integrating the disciplines of systems thinking, performance measurement, transport and logistics decision making. Evidence from a Systems Dynamics’ simulation experiment on a retailer suggests that the effect of FTTS on performance depends highly on the structure of the firm's transport related processes and decision making process. Through the development and simulation of several scenarios concerning the reaction of the firm to the FTTS, it is concluded that the value of FTTS is sensitive to the type of the reaction and its time profile.

  7. Now's the Time: Implementing Performance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legutko, Lee V.

    2012-01-01

    During the past several years, school systems have implemented a variety of organizational improvement initiatives, such as Six Sigma, Balanced Scorecards, Baldrige Criteria, activity-based costing, and managing for results. Unfortunately, evidence of sustained success is fleeting as school districts remain trapped in a time warp of command,…

  8. Now's the Time: Implementing Performance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legutko, Lee V.

    2012-01-01

    During the past several years, school systems have implemented a variety of organizational improvement initiatives, such as Six Sigma, Balanced Scorecards, Baldrige Criteria, activity-based costing, and managing for results. Unfortunately, evidence of sustained success is fleeting as school districts remain trapped in a time warp of command,…

  9. Beetroot Juice Improves On-Water 500 M Time-Trial Performance, and Laboratory-Based Paddling Economy in National and International-Level Kayak Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Peter; Cox, Gregory R; Bullock, Nicola; Burke, Louise M

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the ingestion of a beetroot juice supplement (BR) on 4-min laboratory-based kayak performance in national level male (n = 6) athletes (Study A), and on 500 m on-water kayak time-trial (TT) performance in international level female (n = 5) athletes (Study B). In Study A, participants completed three laboratory-based sessions on a kayak ergometer, including a 7 × 4 min step test, and two 4 min maximal effort performance trials. Two and a half hours before the warm-up of each 4 min performance trial, athletes received either a 70 ml BR shot containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). The distance covered over the 4 min TT was not different between conditions; however, the average VO2 over the 4 min period was significantly lower in BR (p = .04), resulting in an improved exercise economy (p = .05). In Study B, participants completed two field-based 500 m TTs, separated by 4 days. Two hours before each trial, athletes received either two 70 ml BR shots containing ~9.6 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). BR supplementation significantly enhanced TT performance by 1.7% (p = .01). Our results show that in national-level male kayak athletes, commercially available BR shots (70 ml) containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate improved exercise economy during laboratory-based tasks predominantly reliant on the aerobic energy system. Furthermore, greater volumes of BR (140 ml; ~9.6 mmol nitrate) provided to international-level female kayak athletes resulted in enhancements to TT performance in the field.

  10. Timing performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrocchi, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.morrocchi@pi.infn.it [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Marcatili, Sara; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria G. [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Collazuol, Gianmaria [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova (Italy); Ambrosi, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Perugia, I 06100 Perugia (Italy); Corsi, Francesco; Foresta, Maurizio; Marzocca, Cristoforo; Matarrese, Gianvito [Politecnico di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, I 70100 Bari (Italy); Sportelli, Giancarlo; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Del Guerra, Alberto [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-12-11

    We are investigating the performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET, based on LYSO crystal slabs and 64 channels Silicon Photomultipliers matrices (1.2 cm{sup 2} of active area each). Measurements have been performed to test the timing capability of the detection system (SiPM matices coupled to a LYSO slab and the read-out electronics) with both test signal and radioactive source.

  11. Optimizing timing performance of CdTe detectors for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhostin, M.

    2017-10-01

    Despite several attractive properties, the poor timing performance of compound semiconductor detectors such as CdTe and CdZnTe has hindered their use in commercial PET imaging systems. The standard method of pulse timing with such detectors is to employ a constant-fraction discriminator at the output of a timing filter which is fed by the pulses from a charge-sensitive preamplifier. The method has led to a time resolution of about 10 ns at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) with 1 mm thick CdTe detectors. This paper presents a detailed investigation on the parameters limiting the timing performance of Ohmic contact planar CdTe detectors with the standard pulse timing method. The jitter and time-walk errors are studied through simulation and experimental measurements and it is revealed that the best timing results obtained with the standard timing method suffer from a significant loss of coincidence events (~50%). In order to improve the performance of the detectors with full detection efficiency, a new digital pulse timing method based on a simple pattern recognition technique was developed. A time resolution of 3.29  ±  0.10 ns (FWHM) in the energy range of 300–650 keV was achieved with an Ohmic contact planar CdTe detector (5  ×  5  ×  1 mm3). The digital pulse processing method was also used to correct for the charge-trapping effect and an improvement in the energy resolution from 4.83  ±  0.66% to 2.780  ±  0.002% (FWHM) at 511 keV was achieved. Further improvement of time resolution through a moderate cooling of the detector and the application of the method to other detector structures are also discussed.

  12. Effect of combination dope composition and evaporation time on the separation performance of cellulose acetate membrane for demak brackish water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusworo Tutuk Djoko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The coastal areas in Indonesia often have a problem of clean water lack, because the water is classified as brackish water. Therefore, this research investigated the fabrication of CA membranes using phase inversion method for brackish water treatment. Investigation was conducted to study the effect of combination dope composition and evaporation time on separation performance and morphology of the memrbane. Membrane was fabricated by dry-wet phase inversion technique with variation of polymer concentration 17, 18 and 20 wt% in the total solid and evaporation time of 5, 10 and 15 seconds, respectively. The asymmetric membranes were characterized by permeability test through rejection and flux measurements using brackish water as feed. The experimental results from SEM images analysis showed that all the membranes have a thin small porous layer and thicker sub-structure of larger porous layer formed asymmetric membrane. Moreover, the greater polymer concentration is resulting smaller pore size and smaller membrane porosity. The longer evaporation time was also resulted in denser membrane active layer. The best membrane performance was observed at the composition of 20 wt% CA polymer, 1 wt % polyethylene glycol with the solvent evaporation time of 15 seconds.

  13. Effects of thermal barrier coating on gas emissions and performance of a LHR engine with different injection timings and valve adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueyuekkaya, Ekrem [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Esentepe Campus, Sakarya 54187 (Turkey)]. E-mail: ebkaya@sakarya.edu.tr; Engin, Tahsin [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Esentepe Campus, Sakarya 54187 (Turkey); Cerit, Muhammet [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Esentepe Campus, Sakarya 54187 (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Tests were performed on a six cylinder, direct injection, turbocharged Diesel engine whose pistons were coated with a 350 {mu}m thickness of MgZrO{sub 3} over a 150 {mu}m thickness of NiCrAl bond coat. CaZrO{sub 3} was employed as the coating material for the cylinder head and valves. The working conditions for the standard engine (uncovered) and low heat rejection (LHR) engine were kept exactly the same to ensure a realistic comparison between the two configurations of the engine. Comparisons between the standard engine and its LHR version were made based on engine performance, exhaust gas emissions, injection timing and valve adjustment. The results showed that 1-8% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption could be achieved by the combined effect of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) and injection timing. On the other hand, NO {sub x} emissions were obtained below those of the base engine by 11% for 18{sup o} BTDC injection timing.

  14. The effects of caffeine ingestion on the reaction time and short-term maximal performance after 36 h of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souissi, Makram; Chtourou, Hamdi; Abedelmalek, Salma; Ghozlane, Imen Ben; Sahnoun, Zouhair

    2014-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of caffeine ingestion on cognitive and physical performances after 36h of sleep deprivation. In randomized order, thirteen healthy male physical education students (age: 21.1±1.1years, body mass: 77.1±7.2kg, height: 1.77±0.06m) completed four test sessions at 18:00h: after placebo or 5mg·kg(-1) of caffeine ingestion during a baseline night (RN) (bed time: from 22:30h to 07:00h) or a night of 36h of sleep deprivation (TSD). During each test session, participants performed the squat jump (SJ), the reaction time, and the 30-s Wingate tests (i.e., for the measurement of the peak (PP) and mean (MP) powers and the fatigue index (FI)). The results showed that PP and MP decreased and FI increased during the TSD compared to RN in the placebo condition (pcaffeine ingestion improved PP after TSD compared to RN (pcaffeine ingestions (pcaffeine ingestion during RN and TSD (pcaffeine ingestion only during the TSD (pcaffeine is an effective strategy to counteract the effect of 36h of sleep loss on physical and cognitive performances.

  15. A Real-Time Performance Analysis Model for Cryptographic Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Olagunju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several encryption algorithms exist today for securing data in storage and transmission over network systems. The choice of encryption algorithms must weigh performance requirements against the call for protection of sensitive data. This research investigated the processing times of alternative encryption algorithms under specific conditions. The paper presents the architecture of a model multiplatform tool for the evaluation of candidate encryption algorithms based on different data and key sizes. The model software was used to appraise the real-time performance of DES, AES, 3DES, MD5, SHA1, and SHA2 encryption algorithms.

  16. Comparative performance analysis of multi dynamic time quantum Round Robin(MDTQRR) algorithm with arrival time

    CERN Document Server

    Behera, H S; Sahu, Sabyasachi; Bhoi, Sourav Kumar

    2011-01-01

    CPU being considered a primary computer resource, its scheduling is central to operating-system design. A thorough performance evaluation of various scheduling algorithms manifests that Round Robin Algorithm is considered as optimal in time shared environment because the static time is equally shared among the processes. We have proposed an efficient technique in the process scheduling algorithm by using dynamic time quantum in Round Robin. Our approach is based on the calculation of time quantum twice in single round robin cycle. Taking into consideration the arrival time, we implement the algorithm. Experimental analysis shows better performance of this improved algorithm over the Round Robin algorithm and the Shortest Remaining Burst Round Robin algorithm. It minimizes the overall number of context switches, average waiting time and average turn-around time. Consequently the throughput and CPU utilization is better.

  17. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Gardner定时同步环路参数设计及性能分析%Parameters design and performance analysis of the timing recovery loop based on Gardner timing detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付永明; 朱江; 琚瑛珏

    2012-01-01

    In-depth research was carried out into parameters design in the feedback timing recovery loop based on Gardner timing error detector,according to the theory of digital phase-lock loop. MATLAB based simulation was performed for both first-order and second-order loop. Comprehensive analysis of the influence from loop order and noise- equivalent bandwidth on synchronization performance indicates the relationship between synchronization performance and noise-equivalent bandwidth,which provides a theoretic reference for timing recovery loop design.%以数字锁相环理论为依据,对Gardner定时误差检测器反馈定时环路参数的设计进行了深入研究,基于MATLAB对一阶、二阶环路性能进行了仿真,重点分析了环路阶数和等效噪声带宽对系统性能的影响,得到了等效噪声带宽与定时同步环路性能的关系,为定时同步环路的设计提供了理论依据.

  19. Does expressive timing in music performance scale proportionally with tempo?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.; Honing, H.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence is presented that expressive timing in music is not relationally invariant with global tempo. Our results stem from an analysis of repeated performances of Beethoven's variations on a Paisiello theme. Recordings were made of two pianists playing the pieces at three tempi. In contrast with t

  20. Effect of a novel two-desk sit-to-stand workplace (ACTIVE OFFICE) on sitting time, performance and physiological parameters: protocol for a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Bernhard; Kapellusch, Jay M; Schrempf, Andreas; Probst, Kathrin; Haller, Michael; Baca, Arnold

    2016-07-15

    Prolonged sitting is ubiquitous in modern society and linked to several diseases. Height-adjustable desks are being used to decrease worksite based sitting time (ST). Single-desk sit-to-stand workplaces exhibit small ST reduction potential and short-term loss in performance. The aim of this paper is to report the study design and methodology of an ACTIVE OFFICE trial. The study was a 1-year three-arm, randomized controlled trial in 18 healthy Austrian office workers. Allocation was done via a regional health insurance, with data collection during Jan 2014 - March 2015. Participants were allocated to either an intervention or control group. Intervention group subjects were provided with traditional or two-desk sit-to-stand workstations in either the first or the second half of the study, while control subjects did not experience any changes during the whole study duration. Sitting time and physical activity (IPAQ-long), cognitive performance (text editing task, Stroop-test, d2R test of attention), workload perception (NASA-TLX) and physiological parameters (salivary cortisol, heartrate variability and body weight) were measured pre- and post-intervention (23 weeks after baseline) for intervention and control periods. Postural changes and sitting/standing time (software logger) were recorded at the workplace for the whole intervention period. This study evaluates the effects of a novel two-desk sit-to-stand workplace on sitting time, physical parameters and work performance of healthy office based workers. If the intervention proves effective, it has a great potential to be implemented in regular workplaces to reduce diseases related to prolonged sitting. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02825303 , July 2016 (retrospectively registered).

  1. Association Between Performance on Timed Up and Go Subtasks and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Further Insights into the Links Between Cognitive and Motor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Anat; Weiss, Aner; Buchman, Aron S.; Bennett, David A.; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jefferey M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Time to complete the Timed Up and Go (TUG), a test of mobility and fall risk, was recently associated with cognitive function. Objectives To assess whether different TUG subtasks are preferentially affected among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are specific to different cognitive abilities. Design Cross sectional study Setting Community and home setting Participants 347 older adults without dementia (mean 83.6±3.5yrs, 75% females, 19.3% MCI) participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Measurements Subjects wore a small, light-weight sensor that measured acceleration and angular velocity while they performed the instrumented TUG (iTUG). Measures of iTUG were derived from 4 subtasks: walking, turning, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit and compared between participants with no cognitive impairment (NCI) versus MCI. Results NCI and MCI did not differ in age, sex, years of education (p>0.44) or time to complete the TUG (NCI:7.6±3.7sec vs. MCI:8.4±3.7sec;p=0.12). MCI had less walking consistency (p=0.0091), smaller pitch range during transitions (p=0.005), lower angular velocity during turning, and required more time to complete the turn-to-walk (p=0.042). Gait consistency was correlated with perceptual speed (p=0.012) and turning was correlated with perceptual speed (p=0.024) and visual-spatial abilities (p=0.049). Conclusions MCI is associated with impaired performance on iTUG subtasks that cannot be identified when simply measuring overall duration of performance. Distinctive iTUG tasks were related to particular cognitive domains, demonstrating the specificity of motor-cognitive interactions. Using a single body worn sensor for quantify of mobility may facilitate our understanding of late-life gait impairments and their inter-relationship with cognitive decline. PMID:24635699

  2. Structure and performance of a real-time algorithm to detect tsunami or tsunami-like alert conditions based on sea-level records analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bressan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to present an original real-time algorithm devised for detection of tsunami or tsunami-like waves we call TEDA (Tsunami Early Detection Algorithm, and to introduce a methodology to evaluate its performance. TEDA works on the sea level records of a single station and implements two distinct modules running concurrently: one to assess the presence of tsunami waves ("tsunami detection" and the other to identify high-amplitude long waves ("secure detection". Both detection methods are based on continuously updated time functions depending on a number of parameters that can be varied according to the application. In order to select the most adequate parameter setting for a given station, a methodology to evaluate TEDA performance has been devised, that is based on a number of indicators and that is simple to use. In this paper an example of TEDA application is given by using data from a tide gauge located at the Adak Island in Alaska, USA, that resulted in being quite suitable since it recorded several tsunamis in the last years using the sampling rate of 1 min.

  3. Effect of mean cell residence time on transmembrane flux, mixed-liquor characteristics and overall performance of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ruiz, Santiago; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles J

    2017-05-01

    Kinetic control of Mean Cell Residence Time (MCRT) was shown to have a significant impact on membrane flux under steady-state conditions. Two laboratory-scale flat-plate submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors were operated for 245 days on a low-to-intermediate strength substrate with high suspended solids. Transmembrane pressure was maintained at 2.2 kPa throughout four experimental phases, while MCRT in one reactor was progressively reduced. This allowed very accurate measurement of sustainable membrane flux rates at different MCRTs, and hence the degree of membrane fouling. Performance data were gathered on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, and a COD mass balance was constructed accounting for carbon converted into new biomass and that lost in the effluent as dissolved methane. Measurements of growth yield at each MCRT were made, with physical characterisation of each mixed liquor based on capillary suction time. The results showed membrane flux and MLSS filterability was highest at short MCRT, although specific methane production (SMP) was lower since a proportion of COD removal was accounted for by higher biomass yield. There was no advantage in operating at an MCRT <25 days. When considering the most suitable MCRT there is thus a trade-off between membrane performance, SMP and waste sludge yield.

  4. Effect of one or three timed artificial inseminations before natural service on reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows not observed for detection of estrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F S; Bisinotto, R S; Ribeiro, E S; Ayres, H; Greco, L F; Galvão, K N; Risco, C A; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2012-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of one or three timed artificial insemination (AI) before natural service (NS) in lactating dairy cows not observed for detection of estrus on hazard of pregnancy, days nonpregnant, and 21-days cycle pregnancy rate. A total of 1050 lactating Holstein cows were subjected to a double Ovsynch program for their first postpartum AI. On the day of first AI (78 ± 3 days in milk), cows were blocked by parity and randomly assigned to receive either one timed AI (1TAI, n = 533) or three timed AI (3TAI, n = 517) before being exposed to NS. Cows assigned to 1TAI were exposed to bulls 7 days after the first AI. Nonpregnant cows in 3TAI were resynchronized with the Ovsynch protocol supplemented with progesterone twice, with intervals between AI of 42 days, before being exposed to NS 7 days after the third AI. Cows were evaluated for pregnancy 32 days after each timed AI, or every 28 days after being exposed to NS. Pregnant cows were re-examined for pregnancy 28 days later (i.e., 60-day gestation). Exposure to heat stress was categorized based on the first AI being performed during the hot or cool season, according to the temperature-humidity index. Body condition was scored at first AI. All cows were allowed a period of 231 days of breeding, after which nonpregnant cows were censored. Pregnancy to the first AI did not differ between 1TAI and 3TAI on Day 60 after insemination (30.8 vs. 33.5%). Cows receiving 3TAI had a 15% greater hazard of pregnancy and a 17% greater 21-days cycle pregnancy rate than 1TAI and these benefits originated from the first 84 days of breeding. These changes in rate of pregnancy reduced the median and mean days nonpregnant by 9 and 10 d, respectively. Despite the long inter-AI interval in cows subjected to 3TAI, reproductive performance was improved compared with a single timed AI and subsequent exposure to NS. In dairy herds that use a combination of AI and NS, allowing cows additional opportunities to AI

  5. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses' Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Wu, Che-Yu; Pan, Chih-Long; Tian, Zhong; Wen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS) experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs) participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O), critical (NT-C), and noncritical (NT-NC) cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS), fracture fixation (T-F), and general trauma (T-G) cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs' attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P = .016 and .017, resp.). Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h) rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan. PMID:28280734

  6. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses’ Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O, critical (NT-C, and noncritical (NT-NC cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS, fracture fixation (T-F, and general trauma (T-G cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs’ attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P=.016 and .017, resp.. Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan.

  7. A Real-Time High Performance Computation Architecture for Multiple Moving Target Tracking Based on Wide-Area Motion Imagery via Cloud and Graphic Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first attempt at combining Cloud with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs in a complementary manner within the framework of a real-time high performance computation architecture for the application of detecting and tracking multiple moving targets based on Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI. More specifically, the GPU and Cloud Moving Target Tracking (GC-MTT system applied a front-end web based server to perform the interaction with Hadoop and highly parallelized computation functions based on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA©. The introduced multiple moving target detection and tracking method can be extended to other applications such as pedestrian tracking, group tracking, and Patterns of Life (PoL analysis. The cloud and GPUs based computing provides an efficient real-time target recognition and tracking approach as compared to methods when the work flow is applied using only central processing units (CPUs. The simultaneous tracking and recognition results demonstrate that a GC-MTT based approach provides drastically improved tracking with low frame rates over realistic conditions.

  8. A Real-Time High Performance Computation Architecture for Multiple Moving Target Tracking Based on Wide-Area Motion Imagery via Cloud and Graphic Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kui; Wei, Sixiao; Chen, Zhijiang; Jia, Bin; Chen, Genshe; Ling, Haibin; Sheaff, Carolyn; Blasch, Erik

    2017-02-12

    This paper presents the first attempt at combining Cloud with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) in a complementary manner within the framework of a real-time high performance computation architecture for the application of detecting and tracking multiple moving targets based on Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI). More specifically, the GPU and Cloud Moving Target Tracking (GC-MTT) system applied a front-end web based server to perform the interaction with Hadoop and highly parallelized computation functions based on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA©). The introduced multiple moving target detection and tracking method can be extended to other applications such as pedestrian tracking, group tracking, and Patterns of Life (PoL) analysis. The cloud and GPUs based computing provides an efficient real-time target recognition and tracking approach as compared to methods when the work flow is applied using only central processing units (CPUs). The simultaneous tracking and recognition results demonstrate that a GC-MTT based approach provides drastically improved tracking with low frame rates over realistic conditions.

  9. A Real-Time High Performance Computation Architecture for Multiple Moving Target Tracking Based on Wide-Area Motion Imagery via Cloud and Graphic Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kui; Wei, Sixiao; Chen, Zhijiang; Jia, Bin; Chen, Genshe; Ling, Haibin; Sheaff, Carolyn; Blasch, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the first attempt at combining Cloud with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) in a complementary manner within the framework of a real-time high performance computation architecture for the application of detecting and tracking multiple moving targets based on Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI). More specifically, the GPU and Cloud Moving Target Tracking (GC-MTT) system applied a front-end web based server to perform the interaction with Hadoop and highly parallelized computation functions based on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA©). The introduced multiple moving target detection and tracking method can be extended to other applications such as pedestrian tracking, group tracking, and Patterns of Life (PoL) analysis. The cloud and GPUs based computing provides an efficient real-time target recognition and tracking approach as compared to methods when the work flow is applied using only central processing units (CPUs). The simultaneous tracking and recognition results demonstrate that a GC-MTT based approach provides drastically improved tracking with low frame rates over realistic conditions. PMID:28208684

  10. Seasonal and time-of-day variations in acute non-image forming effects of illuminance level on performance, physiology, and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiberts, L M; Smolders, K C H J; De Kort, Y A W

    2017-05-26

    This study investigated seasonal and time-of-day dependent moderations in the strength and direction of acute diurnal non-image forming (NIF) effects of illuminance level on performance, physiology, and subjective well-being. Even though there are indications for temporal variations in NIF-responsiveness to bright light, scientific insights into potential moderations by season are scarce. We employed a 2 (Light: 165 versus 1700 lx at the eye level, within) × 2 (Season: autumn/winter versus spring, between) × 2 (Time of day: morning versus afternoon, between) mixed-model design. During each of the two 90-min experimental sessions, participants (autumn/winter: N = 34; spring: N = 39) completed four measurement blocks (incl. one baseline block of 120 lx at the eye level) each consisting of a Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and a Backwards Digit-Span Task (BDST) including easy trials (4-6 digits) and difficult trials (7-8 digits). Heart rate (HR) and skin conductance level (SCL) were measured continuously. At the end of each lighting condition, subjective sleepiness, vitality, and mood were measured. The results revealed a clear indication for significant Light * Season interaction effects on both subjective sleepiness and vitality, which appeared only during the morning sessions. Participants felt significantly more vital and less sleepy in winter, but not in spring during bright light exposure in the morning. In line with these subjective parameters, participants also showed significantly better PVT performance in the morning in autumn/winter, but not in spring upon bright light exposure. Surprisingly, for difficult working memory performance, the opposite was found, namely worse performance during bright light exposure in winter, but better performance when exposed to bright light in spring. The effects of bright versus regular light exposure on physiology were quite subtle and largely nonsignificant. Overall, it can be concluded that acute illuminance

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis on chemical constituents from Curculigo orchioides using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongjing; Dong, Xin; Jia, Xiaoxuan; Li, Mei; Yuan, Tingting; Xu, Hongtao; Qin, Luping; Han, Ting; Zhang, Qiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    A rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) method was developed for qualitative and quantitative determination of constituents in the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides. Qualitative analysis was performed on a Waters ACQUITY UHPLC @ HSS T3 column (1.8 μm 100 × 2.1mm) using gradient elution with mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis was performed on an Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse plus C18 column (1.7 μm 100 × 2.1mm) using gradient elution with mobile phase of 0.1% acetic acid and acetonitrile for at least 20 min. Quadrupole TOF/MS in either full scan mode or extracted ion mode was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the constituents. According to the mass spectrometric fragmentation mechanism and UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS data, chemical structures of 45 constituents in the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides, including 19 phenols and phenolic glycosides, 16 lignans and lignan glycosides, 8 triterpenoid saponins, one flavone and one sesquiterpene, were identified tentatively on-line without the time-consuming process of isolation. In addition, 8 phenolic glycosides including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), 2-hydroxy-5-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (HPG), anacardoside (ACD), orcinol glucoside (OGD), orcinol-1-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (OAG), 2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (DBA), curculigoside (CUR) and curculigine A (CCL) were quantitated in 11 collected samples and 10 commercial samples from different providers. The results show that UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS is a viable method for analysis and quality evaluation of the constituents from the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Pilot Injection Timing and EGR on Combustion, Performance and Exhaust Emissions in a Common Rail Diesel Engine Fueled with a Canola Oil Biodiesel-Diesel Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cong Ge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel as a clean energy source could reduce environmental pollution compared to fossil fuel, so it is becoming increasingly important. In this study, we investigated the effects of different pilot injection timings from before top dead center (BTDC and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR on combustion, engine performance, and exhaust emission characteristics in a common rail diesel engine fueled with canola oil biodiesel-diesel (BD blend. The pilot injection timing and EGR rate were changed at an engine speed of 2000 rpm fueled with BD20 (20 vol % canola oil and 80 vol % diesel fuel blend. As the injection timing advanced, the combustion pressure, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC, and peak combustion pressure (Pmax changed slightly. Carbon monoxide (CO and particulate matter (PM emissions clearly decreased at BTDC 20° compared with BTDC 5°, but nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions increased slightly. With an increasing EGR rate, the combustion pressure and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP decreased slightly at BTDC 20° compared to other injection timings. However, the Pmax showed a remarkable decrease. The BSFC and PM emissions increased slightly, but the NOx emission decreased considerably.

  13. Timing the arrival at 2340m altitude for aerobic performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuler, B; Thomsen, JJ; Gassmann, M

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and performance increase upon altitude acclimatization at moderate altitude. Eight elite cyclists were studied at sea level, and after 1 (Day 1), 7 (Day 7), 14 (Day 14) and 21 (Day 21) days of exposure to 2340 m. Capillary blood...... samples were taken on these days before performing two consecutive maximal exercise trials. Acclimatization reased hemoglobin concentration and arterial oxygen content. On Day 1, VO2max and time to exhaustion (at 80% of sea-level maximal power output) decreased by 12.8% (P

  14. Effect of timing of challenge following short-term natural exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1b on animal performance and immune response in beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Valdez, L; Wilson, B K; Burciaga-Robles, L O; Step, D L; Holland, B P; Richards, C J; Montelongo, M A; Confer, A W; Fulton, R W; Krehbiel, C R

    2016-11-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common and economically detrimental disease of beef cattle during the postweaning period, causing the majority of morbidity and mortality in feedlots. The pathogenesis of this disease often includes an initial viral infection, which can predispose cattle to a secondary bacterial infection. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of timing of an intratracheal (MH) challenge relative to 72 h of natural exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1b persistently infected (PI) calves on performance, serum antibody production, total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count, rectal temperature, clinical severity score (CS), and haptoglobin (Hp). Steers ( = 24; 276 ± 31 kg initial BW) were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatments (8 steers/treatment) in a randomized complete block design. Treatments were steers not exposed to calves PI with BVDV 1b and not challenged with MH (CON), steers intratracheally challenged with MH 84 h after being exposed to calves PI with BVDV 1b for 72 h (LateCh), and steers intratracheally challenged with MH 12 h after being exposed to calves PI with BVDV 1b for 72 h (EarlyCh). Performance (ADG, DMI, and G:F) was decreased ( marketing channels allow for variation in the timing of respiratory pathogen exposure, understanding the physiological changes in morbid cattle will lead to improved management of BRD.

  15. It is a matter of timing: asynchrony during pollen development and its consequences on pollen performance in angiosperms-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo García, Carolina; Nepi, Massimo; Pacini, Ettore

    2017-01-01

    Functional pollen is needed to successfully complete fertilization. Pollen is formed inside the anthers following a specific sequence of developmental stages, from microsporocyte meiosis to pollen release, that concerns microsporocytes/microspores and anther wall tissues. The processes involved may not be synchronous within a flower, an anther, and even a microsporangium. Asynchrony has been barely analyzed, and its biological consequences have not been yet assessed. In this review, different processes of pollen development and lifetime, stressing on the possible consequences of their differential timing on pollen performance, are summarized. Development is usually synchronized until microsporocyte meiosis I (occasionally until meiosis II). Afterwards, a period of mostly asynchronous events extends up to anther opening as regards: (1) meiosis II (sometimes); (2) microspore vacuolization and later reduction of vacuoles; (3) amylogenesis, amylolysis, and carbohydrate inter-conversion; (4) the first haploid mitosis; and (5) intine formation. Asynchrony would promote metabolic differences among developing microspores and therefore physiologically heterogeneous pollen grains within a single microsporangium. Asynchrony would increase the effect of competition for resources during development and pollen tube growth and also for water during (re)hydration on the stigma. The differences generated by developmental asynchronies may have an adaptive role since more efficient pollen grains would be selected with regard to homeostasis, desiccation tolerance, resilience, speed of (re)hydration, and germination. The performance of each pollen grain which landed onto the stigma will be the result of a series of selective steps determined by its development, physiological state at maturity, and successive environmental constrains.

  16. Time's up! Involvement of metamemory knowledge, executive functions, and time monitoring in children's prospective memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Marie; Lejeune, Caroline; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study examined time-based prospective memory (PM) in children and explored the possible involvement of metamemory knowledge and executive functions in the use of an appropriate time-monitoring strategy depending on the ongoing task's difficulty. Specifically, a sample of 72 typically developing children aged 4, 6, and 9 years old were given an original PM paradigm composed of both an ongoing procedural activity and a PM task. Half of the participants (expert group) were trained in the ongoing activity before the prospective test. As expected, results show that time monitoring had a positive effect on children's PM performance. Furthermore, mediation analyses reveal that strategic time monitoring was predicted by metamemory knowledge in the expert group but only by executive functions in the novice group. Overall, these findings provide interesting avenues to explain how metamemory knowledge, strategy use, and executive functions interact to improve PM performance during childhood.

  17. High Performance Embedded System for Real-Time Pattern Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; The ATLAS collaboration; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Citraro, Saverio; Giannetti, Paola; Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative and high performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching. This system is based on the evolution of hardware and algorithms developed for the field of High Energy Physics (HEP) and more specifically for the execution of extremely fast pattern matching for tracking of particles produced by proton-proton collisions in hadron collider experiments. A miniaturized version of this complex system is being developed for pattern matching in generic image processing applications. The design uses the flexibility of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and the powerful Associative Memory Chip (ASIC) to achieve real-time performance. The system works as a contour identifier able to extract the salient features of an image. It is based on the principles of cognitive image processing, which means that it executes fast pattern matching and data reduction mimicking the operation of the human brain.

  18. Real-time Performance Evaluation of Line Topology Switched Ethernet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Cen; Tao Xing; Ke-Tong Wu

    2008-01-01

    Recently, switched Ethernet has become an active area of research because of its wide uses in industry. However, its uses have various real-time constraints on data communications. This paper analyzes the performance of the line topology switched Ethernet as a data acquisition network. Network calculus theory, which has been successfully applied to assess the real-time performance of packet-switched networks, is used to analyze the networks. To properly describe the activity of switches, a novel approach of modeling data flows into or out of switches is addressed. Based on our model, a concisely analytical expression of the maximal end-to-end delay in line topology switched Ethernet is derived. Finally, the relative simulation results are demonstrated. These results agree well with the analytical results, and thus they validate the data flow modeling techniques.

  19. Effects of boiling duration in processing of White Paeony Root on its overall quality evaluated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry based metabolomics analysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Kong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Huan; Xu, Jin-Di; Li, Xiu-Yang; Lu, Min; Wang, Chun-Ru; Chen, Hu-Biao; Li, Song-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Boiling processing is commonly used in post-harvest handling of White Paeony Root (WPR), in order to whiten the herbal materials and preserve the bright color, since such WPR is empirically considered to possess a higher quality. The present study was designed to investigate whether and how the boiling processing affects overall quality of WPR. First, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was developed to compare the holistic quality of boiled and un-boiled WPR samples. Second, ten major components in WPR samples boiled for different durations were quantitatively determined using high performance liquid chromatography to further explore the effects of boiling time on the holistic quality of WPR, meanwhile the appearance of the processed herbal materials was observed. The results suggested that the boiling processing conspicuously affected the holistic quality of WPR by simultaneously and inconsistently altering the chemical compositions and that short-time boiling processing between 2 and 10 min could both make the WPR bright-colored and improve the contents of major bioactive components, which were not achieved either without boiling or with prolonged boiling. In conclusion, short-term boiling (2-10 min) is recommended for post-harvest handling of WPR.

  20. Performance Evaluation and Market Timing: the Skill Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Roberto Otoni de Brito

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available MERTON (1981 examines the creation of value by fund managers selecting between stocks and fixed income instruments through market timing. HENRIKSON and MERTON (1981 proceed to propose empirical tests of funds and manager performance in market timing. BRITO, BONA and TACIRO (2003 generalize the results of MERTON (1981 and HENRIKSON and MERTON (1981 for actively managed funds with a clearly defined benchmark portfolio. In the generalized context of active portfolio management, this paper proposes a new index – the Skill Index of Brito (SIB – to measure the performance and efficiency in market timing of actively managed funds. The paper proceeds to test the performance and skill of hedge funds in Brazil using the SIB. A representative sample of 32 hedge funds with a window of 90 trading days on October 31, 1999 was obtained. The empirical tests of performance and skill use the interbank borrowing and lending rate as the passive benchmark. The results indicate the significance at the 5% level of the SIB for ten hedge funds in the sample. Among them seven funds also have shown significance at the 1% level. In sum the results indicate a majority of hedge funds with no significant skill in the Brazilian market in the examined period.

  1. Influence of sludge retention time at constant food to microorganisms ratio on membrane bioreactor performances under stable and unstable state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Maud; Marrot, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Food to microorganisms ratio (F/M) and sludge retention time (SRT) are known to affect in different ways biomass growth, bioactivities and foulants characteristics. Thus the aim of this study was to dissociate the effects of SRT from those of F/M ratio on lab-scale membrane bioreactors performances during stable and unstable state. Two acclimations were stabilized at a SRT of either 20 or 50 d with a constant F/M ratio of 0.2 kg(COD)kg(MLVSS)(-1) d(-1). During stable state, a higher N-NH(4)(+) removal rate (78%) was obtained at SRT of 50 d as an easier autotroph development was observed. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release was double at 50 d with a majority of polysaccharides (49% of total SMP). The unstable conditions consisted in F/M ratio changes and operation without air and nutrient. Autotrophs were highly affected by the tested disturbances and SMP retention on membrane surface exhibited consistent changes during the performed stresses.

  2. Sodium Phosphate Supplementation and Time Trial Performance in Female Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Buck

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of three doses of sodium phosphate (SP supplementation on cycling 500 kJ (119.5 Kcal time trial (TT performance in female cyclists. Thirteen cyclists participated in a randomised, Latin-square design study where they completed four separate trials after ingesting either a placebo, or one of three different doses (25, 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 fat free mass: FFM of trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate which was split into four equal doses a day for six days. On the day after the loading phase, the TT was performed on a cycle ergometer. Serum phosphate blood samples were taken at rest both before and after each loading protocol, while a ~21 day washout period separated each loading phase. No significant differences in TT performance were observed between any of the supplementation protocols (p = 0.73 with average completion times for the 25, 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 FFM being, 42:21 ± 07:53, 40:55 ± 07:33 and 40:38 ± 07:20 min respectively, and 40:39 ± 07:51 min for the placebo. Likewise, average and peak power output did not significantly differ between trials (p = 0.06 and p = 0.46, respectively. Consequently, 500 kJ cycling TT performance was not different in any of the supplementation protocols in female cyclists.

  3. Influence of sample return time and ambient temperature on the performance of an immunochemical faecal occult blood test with a new buffer for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancourt, Vincent; Hamza, Samia; Manfredi, Sylvain; Drouillard, Antoine; Bidan, Jeanne-Marie; Faivre, Jean; Lepage, Come

    2016-03-01

    The haemoglobin concentration measured by faecal immunochemical tests (FIT) may be decreased in cases of delayed sample return or high temperature. It is an issue of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sample return time and of season on the performance of an FIT (FOB-Gold) with a new buffer. The study included 20 371 participants involved in the French organized colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme. The probability of a positive screening test, detection rates and positive predictive values for CRC and advanced adenoma were analysed according to sample return time and season of screening. A sample of positive FIT was stored for 7 days in an incubator at 20°C or 30°C. The positivity rate was 4.1% for a sample return time of up to 3 days, 4.1% for 4-5 days and 4.6% for 6-7 days (P=0.25). In multivariate analysis, there was no association between positivity rates, detection rates and positive predictive values for CRC and advanced adenoma and the sample return time or the season of screening. At a constant temperature of 20°C, there was a decrease in the haemoglobin concentration of 5.1% after 7 days. The decrease reached 20.5% at a temperature of 30°C. It was only 4.5% during the first 4 days of storage in the incubator. With the new buffer, delay in sample return or season did not affect the clinical outcome. When temperatures reach 30°C, the faecal sample must be returned promptly.

  4. The effects of modified exponential tapering technique on perceived exertion, heart rate, time trial performance, VO2max and power output among highly trained junior cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Asmadi; Hashim, Hairul A; Krasilshchikov, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a 2-week modified exponential taper on physiological adaptation and time trial performance among junior cyclists. Participants (N.=27) with the mean age of 16.95±0.8 years, height of 165.6±6.1 cm and weight of 54.19±8.1 kg were matched into either modified exponential taper (N.=7), normal exponential taper (N.=7), or control (N.=7) groups using their initial VO2max values. Both experimental groups followed a 12-week progressive endurance training program and subsequently, a 2-week tapering phase. A simulated 20-km time trial performance along with VO2max, power output, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at baseline, pre and post-taper. One way ANOVA was used to analyze the difference between groups before the start of the intervention while mixed factorial ANOVA was used to analyze the difference between groups across measurement sessions. When homogeneity assumption was violated, the Greenhouse-Geisser Value was used for the corrected values of the degrees of freedom for the within subject factor the analysis. Significant interactions between experimental groups and testing sessions were found in VO2max (F=6.67, df=4, P<0.05), power output (F=5.02, df=4, P<0.05), heart rate (F=10.87, df=2.51, P<0.05) rating of perceived exertion (F=13.04, df=4, P<0.05) and 20KM time trial (F=4.64, df=2.63, P<0.05). Post-hoc analysis revealed that both types of taper exhibited positive effects compared to the non-taper condition in the measured performance markers at post-taper while no different were found between the two taper groups. It was concluded that both taper protocols successfully inducing physiological adaptations among the junior cyclists by reducing the volume and maintaining the intensity of training.

  5. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Real-time performance monitoring and management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2007-06-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  7. Finite time exergoeconomic performance optimization of a thermoacoustic heat engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuxian Kan, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun, Feng Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite time exergoeconomic performance optimization of a generalized irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine with heat resistance, heat leakage, thermal relaxation, and internal dissipation is investigated in this paper. Both the real part and the imaginary part of the complex heat transfer exponent change the optimal profit rate versus efficiency relationship quantitatively. The operation of the generalized irreversible thermoacoustic engine is viewed as a production process with exergy as its output. The finite time exergoeconomic performance optimization of the generalized irreversible thermoacoustic engine is performed by taking profit rate as the objective. The analytical formulas about the profit rate and thermal efficiency of the thermoacoustic engine are derived. Furthermore, the comparative analysis of the influences of various factors on the relationship between optimal profit rate and the thermal efficiency of the generalized irreversible thermoacoustic engine is carried out by detailed numerical examples. The optimal zone on the performance of the thermoacoustic heat engine is obtained by numerical analysis. The results obtained herein may be useful for the selection of the operation parameters for real thermoacoustic heat engines.

  8. Effects of hydraulic retention time on anaerobic hydrogenation performance and microbial ecology of bioreactors fed with glucose-peptone and starch-peptone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiue-Lin; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Hsiao, Chia-Jung; Bai, Ming-Der [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Whang, Liang-Ming; Wang, Yung-Fu; Cheng, Sheng-Shung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center (SERC), National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Tseng, I.-Cheng [Sustainable Environment Research Center (SERC), National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Department of Life Science, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China)

    2010-01-15

    This study evaluated anaerobic hydrogenation performance and microbial ecology in bioreactors operated at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) conditions and fed with glucose-peptone (GP) and starch-peptone (SP). The maximum hydrogen production rates for GP- and SP-fed bioreactors were found to be 1247 and 412 mmol-H{sub 2}/L/d at HRT of 2 and 3 h, respectively. At HRT > 8 h, hydrogen consumption due to peptone fermentation could occur and thus reduced hydrogen yield from carbohydrate fermentation. Results of cloning/sequencing and denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium celerecrescens were dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the GP-fed bioreactor, presumably due to their capability on protein hydrolysis. In the SP-fed bioreactor, Lactobacillus plantarum, Propionispira arboris, and Clostridium butyricum were found to be dominant populations, but the presence of P. arboris at HRT > 3 h might be responsible for a lower hydrogen yield from starch fermentation. As a result, optimizing HRT operation for bioreactors was considered an important asset in order to minimize hydrogen-consuming activities and thus maximize net hydrogen production. The limitation of simple parameters such as butyrate to acetate ratio (B/A ratio) in predicting hydrogen production was recognized in this study for bioreactors fed with multiple substrates. It is suggested that microbial ecology analysis, in addition to chemical analysis, should be performed when complex substrates and mixed cultures are used in hydrogen-producing bioreactors. (author)

  9. Impact of pay for performance on prescribing of long-acting reversible contraception in primary care: an interrupted time series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myat E Arrowsmith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, a major pay-for-performance programme in the United Kingdom, on prescribing of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC in primary care. METHODS: Negative binomial interrupted time series analysis using practice level prescribing data from April 2007 to March 2012. The main outcome measure was the prescribing rate of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC, including hormonal and non hormonal intrauterine devices and systems (IUDs and IUSs, injectable contraceptives and hormonal implants. RESULTS: Prescribing rates of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC were stable before the introduction of contraceptive targets to the QOF and increased afterwards by 4% annually (rate ratios  = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.06. The increase in LARC prescribing was mainly driven by increases in injectables (increased by 6% annually, which was the most commonly prescribed LARC method. Of other types of LARC, the QOF indicator was associated with a step increase of 20% in implant prescribing (RR =  1.20, 95% CI =  1.09, 1.32. This change is equivalent to an additional 110 thousand women being prescribed with LARC had QOF points not been introduced. CONCLUSIONS: Pay for performance incentives for contraceptive counselling in primary care with women seeking contraceptive advice has increased uptake of LARC methods.

  10. Reproductive performance of dairy cows managed with a program aimed at increasing insemination of cows in estrus based on increased physical activity and fertility of timed artificial inseminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, J O; Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Chandler, W C; Watters, R D

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows using a treatment (TRT) program for second and subsequent artificial insemination (AI) services aimed at (1) increasing AI upon estrus detection based on increased physical activity (AIAct) and (2) increasing fertility of timed AI (TAI) services for cows not AIAct through presynchronization of the estrous cycle and improved physiological milieu before TAI. Cows in the control (CON) group were managed with a program that combined AIAct and TAI after the Ovsynch protocol. After nonpregnancy diagnosis (NPD) by transrectal ultrasonography at 31 ± 3 d after AI, cows received the following treatments: (1) CON (n=634), AIAct any time after a previous AI and resynchronization with the Ovsynch-56 protocol (GnRH-7d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16 h-TAI) 1d after NPD, or (2) TRT (n = 616): cows with a corpus luteum (CL) ≥ 20 mm (TRT-CL) received a PGF2α injection 1d after NPD, whereas cows with no CL or a CL insemination after NPD were greater for cows in the TRT (17 d) than the CON (10 d) group, which coupled with similar fertility to AIAct, and TAI failed to improve overall reproductive performance. A low proportion of cows with a CL at NPD (65.2%) and a poor response to PGF2α may explain the poor estrus detection efficiency in the TRT group. We concluded that, when compared with a typical estrus detection and TAI program for cows failing to conceive to previous AI services, a program aimed at increasing the proportion of cows AIAct after NPD and fertility of TAI services increased the proportion of cows AIAct but failed to reduce days to pregnancy during lactation because of greater days to AI after NPD.

  11. Performances and recent evolutions of EMSC Real Time Information services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Godey, S.; Bossu, R.

    2009-04-01

    The EMSC (http://www.emsc-csem.org) operates Real Time Earthquake Information services for the public and the scientific community which aim at providing rapid and reliable information on the seismic-ity of the Euro-Mediterranean region and on significant earthquakes worldwide. These services are based on parametric data rapidly provided by 66 seismological networks which are automatically merged and processed at EMSC. A web page which is updated every minute displays a list and a map of the latest earthquakes as well as additional information like location maps, moment tensors solutions or past regional seismicity. Since 2004, the performances and the popularity of these services have dramatically increased. The number of messages received from the contributors and the number of published events have been multiplied by 2 since 2004 and by 1.6 since 2005 respectively. The web traffic and the numbers of users of the Earthquake Notification Service (ENS) have been multiplied by 15 and 7 respectively. In terms of performances of the ENS, the median dissemination time for Euro-Med events is minutes in 2008. In order to further improve its performances and especially the speed and robustness of the reception of real time data, EMSC has recently implemented a software named QWIDS (Quake Watch Information Distribution System) which provides a quick and robust data exchange system through permanent TCP connections. At the difference with emails that can sometimes be delayed or lost, QWIDS is an actual real time communication system that ensures the data delivery. In terms of hardware, EMSC imple-mented a high availability, dynamic load balancing, redundant and scalable web servers infrastructure, composed of two SUN T2000 and one F5 BIG-IP switch. This will allow coping with constantly increas-ing web traffic and the occurrence of huge peaks of traffic after widely felt earthquakes.

  12. Time series analysis performed on nephropathia epidemica in humans of northern Sweden in relation to bank vole population dynamic and the NAO index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, R Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Time series analysis was performed on two data series of human nephropathia epidemica (NE) infections in northern Sweden between the years 1959-1975 and 1985-2006. The analysis confirms that the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), the main reservoir species, shows regular peaks in population density approximately every fourth year. The periodicity in NE cases of the more recent time period (1985-2006) is 2.8-3.3 years and the older period shows a periodicity ranging 3.4-4.2 years, but this is not significantly different from that expected by vole dynamics. A comparison of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index between the two periods reveals higher mean winter NAO index in the period 1985-2006 than in 1959-1975. No difference was found in frequency of the NAO index between the older period (2.8-3.4 years) compared with the recent period (2.4-2.8 years). Cross-correlation revealed a delayed effect by NAO index on vole abundance but a multivariate model showed that NAO index did not explain the variation in NE cases. Vole index was the only factor that contributed significantly to the variation in numbers of NE cases and that no climate effect could be detected. The climate signal from NAO index does not appear to significantly affect the human NE cases and this suggests that the transmission of disease to man is not particularly sensitive to variations in weather factors. The results favour the hypothesis that higher NAO index will not increase the likelihood of virus transmission from voles to man in northern Sweden under present climatic conditions.

  13. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals.

  14. Effect of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS and hydraulic retention time (HRT on the performance of activated sludge process during the biotreatment of real textile wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adequate information is available on colour and organics removal in batch mode using pure microbial cultures from dye contaminated wastewater. There was a need to develop environment friendly and cost effective treatment technique for actual field conditions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with an aim to evaluate the potential of acclimatized mixed microbial consortia for the removal of colour and organics from real textile wastewater. Experiments were performed in laboratory scale activated sludge process (ASP unit under steady state condition, varying mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS (2500, 3500 and 5000 mg/l and hydraulic retention time (HRT (18, 24 and 36 h. The results showed that decolourization and chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increased with increase in MLVSS and HRT. At 18 h HRT, decolourization was found to be 46, 54 and 67%, which increased to 67, 75 and 90% (36 h HRT at 2500, 3500 and 5000 mg/l MLVSS, respectively. COD removal was found to be 62, 73 and 77% (at 18 h HRT which increased to 77, 85 and 91% (36 h HRT at 2000, 3500 and 5000 mg/l MLVSS, respectively. On the basis of the results obtained in this study suitable treatment techniques can be developed for the treatment of wastewater contaminated with variety of dyes in continuous mode of operation. This shall have the advantage of treatment of larger quantity of wastewater in shorter duration.

  15. Effect of feeding time on the performance of a sequencing batch reactor treating a mixture of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dilek, Filiz B

    2007-06-01

    This paper investigated the biodegradation kinetics of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) separately in batch reactors and mixed in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Batch reactor experiments showed that both 4-CP and 2,4-DCP began to inhibit their own degradation at 53 and 25 mg l(-1), respectively, and that the Haldane equation gave a good fit to the experimental data because r(2) values were higher than 0.98. The maximum specific degradation rates (q(m)) were 130.3 and 112.4 mg g(-1) h for 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, respectively. The values of the half saturation (K(s)) and self-inhibition constants (K(i)) were 34.98 and 79.74 mg l(-1) for 4-CP, and 13.77 and 44.46 mg l(-1) for 2,4-DCP, respectively. The SBR was fed with a mixture of 220 mg l(-1) of 4-CP, 110 mg l(-1) of 2,4-DCP, and 300 mg l(-1) of peptone as biogenic substrate at varying feeding periods (0-8h) to evaluate the effect of feeding time on the performance of the SBR. During SBR operation, in addition to self-inhibition, 4-CP degradation was strongly and competitively inhibited by 2,4-DCP. The inhibitory effects were particularly pronounced during short feeding periods because of higher chlorophenol peak concentrations in the reactor. The competitive inhibition constant (K(ii)) of 2,4-DCP on 4-CP degradation was 0.17 mg l(-1) when the reactor was fed instantaneously (0 h feeding). During longer feedings, increased removal/loading rates led to lower chlorophenol peak concentrations at the end of feeding. Therefore, in multi-substrate systems feeding time plus reaction time should be determined based on both degradation kinetics and substrate interaction. During degradation, the meta cleavage of 4-chlorocatechol resulted in accumulation of a yellowish color because of the formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (CHMS), which was further metabolized. Isolation and enrichment of the chlorophenols-degrading culture suggested Pseudomonas sp. and Pseudomonas stutzeri to be the

  16. Time to Move On?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentino, Alfredo; Nell, Phillip; Hotho, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    economic crises influence the effects of the institutional factors in our model. We argue that economic crises have a dual effect on the international configuration of HQ activities. First, during times of crisis, we expect firms to react stronger to coercive, isomorphic, and normative pressures. Second...

  17. Profiling and multivariate statistical analysis of Panax ginseng based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Sun, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Guo, Yingying; Liu, Shuying

    2015-03-25

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) method was developed for the detection and structural analysis of ginsenosides in white ginseng and related processed products (red ginseng). Original neutral, malonyl, and chemically transformed ginsenosides were identified in white and red ginseng samples. The aglycone types of ginsenosides were determined by MS/MS as PPD (m/z 459), PPT (m/z 475), C-24, -25 hydrated-PPD or PPT (m/z 477 or m/z 493), and Δ20(21)-or Δ20(22)-dehydrated-PPD or PPT (m/z 441 or m/z 457). Following the structural determination, the UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS-based chemical profiling coupled with multivariate statistical analysis method was applied for global analysis of white and processed ginseng samples. The chemical markers present between the processed products red ginseng and white ginseng could be assigned. Process-mediated chemical changes were recognized as the hydrolysis of ginsenosides with large molecular weight, chemical transformations of ginsenosides, changes in malonyl-ginsenosides, and generation of 20-(R)-ginsenoside enantiomers. The relative contents of compounds classified as PPD, PPT, malonyl, and transformed ginsenosides were calculated based on peak areas in ginseng before and after processing. This study provides possibility to monitor multiple components for the quality control and global evaluation of ginseng products during processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Best tracking performance for integrator and dead time plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The optimal tracking performance for integrator and dead time plant in the case where plant uncertainty and control energy constraints axe to be considered jointly is inrestigated.Firstly,an average cost function of the tracking error and the plant input energy over a class of stochastic model errors are defined.Then,we obtain an internal model controller design method that minimizes the average performance and further studies optimal tracking performance for integrator and dead time plant in the simultaneous presence of plant uncertainty and control energy constraint.The results can be used to evaluate optimal tracking performance and control energy in practical designs.

  19. On Time chez Dummett

    CERN Document Server

    Butterfield, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    I discuss three connections between Dummett's writings about time and philosophical aspects of physics. The first connection (Section 2) arises from remarks of Dummett's about the different relations of observation to time and to space. The main point is uncontroversial and applies equally to classical and quantum physics. It concerns the fact that perceptual processing is so rapid, compared with the typical time-scale on which macroscopic objects change their observable properties, that it engenders the idea of a 'common now', spread across space. The other two connections are specific to quantum theory, as interpreted along the lines of Everett. So for these two connections, the physics side is controversial, just as the philosophical side is. In Section 3, I connect the subjective uncertainty before an Everettian 'splitting' of the multiverse to Dummett's suggestion, inspired by McTaggart, that a complete, i.e. indexical-free description of a temporal reality is impossible. And in Section 4, I connect Barb...

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry: investigations on gradient elution and influence of complex matrices on signal intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissmann, Susanne; Buchberger, Wolfgang; Hertsens, Robert; Klampfl, Christian W

    2011-08-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) has been tested for its suitability as a detector for gradient elution HPLC. Thereby a strong dependency of signal intensity on the amount of organic solvent present in the eluent could be observed. Adding a make-up liquid (iso-propanol) post-column to the HPLC effluent greatly enhanced detection limits for early eluting compounds. Limits of detection achieved employing this approach were in the range of 7-27 μg L(-1) for the parabene test mixture and 15-87 μg L(-1) for the pharmaceuticals. In further investigations DART ionization was compared to several other widely used atmospheric pressure ionization methods with respect to signal suppression phenomena occurring in when samples with problematic matrices are analyzed. For this purpose extracts from environmental and waste water samples were selected as model matrices which were subsequently spiked with a set of six substances commonly present in personal care products as well as six pharmaceuticals at concentration levels between 100 μg L(-1) and 500 μg L(-1) corresponding to 100 ng L(-1) and 500 ng L(-1) respectively in the original sample. With ionization suppression of less than 11% for most analytes investigated, DART ionization showed similar to even somewhat superior behavior compared to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) for the Danube river water extract; for the more challenging matrix of the sewage plant effluent extract DART provided better results with ion suppression being less than 11% for 9 out of 12 analytes while values for APCI were lying between 20% and >90%. Electrospray ionization (ESI) was much more affected by suppression effects than DART with values between 26% and 80% for Danube river water; in combination with the sewage plant effluent matrix suppression >50% was observed for all analytes.

  1. High performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, C.-L.; Luciano, P.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Citraro, S.; Giannetti, P.; Dell'Orso, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative and high performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching. This system is based on the evolution of hardware and algorithms developed for the field of High Energy Physics and more specifically for the execution of extremely fast pattern matching for tracking of particles produced by proton-proton collisions in hadron collider experiments. A miniaturized version of this complex system is being developed for pattern matching in generic image processing applications. The system works as a contour identifier able to extract the salient features of an image. It is based on the principles of cognitive image processing, which means that it executes fast pattern matching and data reduction mimicking the operation of the human brain. The pattern matching can be executed by a custom designed Associative Memory chip. The reference patterns are chosen by a complex training algorithm implemented on an FPGA device. Post processing algorithms (e.g. pixel clustering) are also implemented on the FPGA. The pattern matching can be executed on a 2D or 3D space, on black and white or grayscale images, depending on the application and thus increasing exponentially the processing requirements of the system. We present the firmware implementation of the training and pattern matching algorithm, performance and results on a latest generation Xilinx Kintex Ultrascale FPGA device.

  2. Simultaneous quadratic performance stabilization for linear time-delay systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuepeng; Zhou Zude; Liu Huanbin; Zhang Qingling

    2006-01-01

    A newly designed approach of simultaneous stabilization is given for linear discrete time-delay systems. The problem of stabilization for a collection of systems is discussed initially. Adequate condition are obtained in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which are independent of time delays such that the resultant collection of discrete time-delay systems are stable with an upper bound of the quadratic performance index. Subsequently, controllers are designed such that the resultant closed-loop discrete time-delay systems are simultaneously stabilized with the upper bound of the quadratic performance index. Finally,a numerical example is given to illustrate the design method.

  3. An improved pseudotargeted metabolomics approach using multiple ion monitoring with time-staggered ion lists based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Fang; Li, Peng; He, Chengwei; Wang, Ruibing; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo, E-mail: jbwan@umac.mo

    2016-07-13

    Pseudotargeted metabolomics is a novel strategy integrating the advantages of both untargeted and targeted methods. The conventional pseudotargeted metabolomics required two MS instruments, i.e., ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time- of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/Q-TOF MS) and UHPLC/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/QQQ-MS), which makes method transformation inevitable. Furthermore, the picking of ion pairs from thousands of candidates and the swapping of the data between two instruments are the most labor-intensive steps, which greatly limit its application in metabolomic analysis. In the present study, we proposed an improved pseudotargeted metabolomics method that could be achieved on an UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument operated in the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) mode with time-staggered ion lists (tsMIM). Full scan-based untargeted analysis was applied to extract the target ions. After peak alignment and ion fusion, a stepwise ion picking procedure was used to generate the ion lists for subsequent single MIM and tsMIM. The UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted approach exhibited better repeatability and a wider linear range than the UHPLC/Q-TOF MS-based untargeted metabolomics method. Compared to the single MIM mode, the tsMIM significantly increased the coverage of the metabolites detected. The newly developed method was successfully applied to discover plasma biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury in mice, which indicated its practicability and great potential in future metabolomics studies. - Highlights: • An UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted metabolomics was proposed. • Compared to full scan, the improved method exhibits better repeatability and a wider linear range. • The proposed method could achieve pseudotargeted analysis on one UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument. • The developed method was successfully used to discover biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury.

  4. Finite-time performance analysis for genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Finite-time performance of genetic algorithm with elitist operator in finite solution space is studied, and the relationship between evolution generation and the quality of the solution found best so far is analyzed. The estimating formulations of the expectation value as well as upper bound and lower bound for the evolution generation earliest achieving specific performance are provided.

  5. Relocalizing Wrestler: Performing Texts across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Diane R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the textmaking potentials of the popular cultural resources of professional wrestling, including its modes of textual expression, as performed by Kyle, a boy in the middle years of elementary school. Kyle remixed wrestling, and its performative affordances, style and textmaking potentials across time and space. Using a…

  6. High Performance Embedded System for Real-Time Pattern Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; The ATLAS collaboration; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Citraro, Saverio; Giannetti, Paola; Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an innovative and high performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching. This system is based on the evolution of hardware and algorithms developed for the field of High Energy Physics (HEP) and more specifically for the execution of extremely fast pattern matching for tracking of particles produced by proton-proton collisions in hadron collider experiments. A miniaturised version of this complex system is being developed for pattern matching in generic image processing applications. The system works as a contour identifier able to extract the salient features of an image. It is based on the principles of cognitive image processing, which means that it executes fast pattern matching and data reduction mimicking the operation of the human brain. The pattern matching can be executed by a custom designed Associative Memory (AM) chip. The reference patterns are chosen by a complex training algorithm implemented on an FPGA device. Post processing algorithms (e.g. pixel clustering...

  7. Time to Move On?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentino, A.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Hotho, Jasper J.

    Building on prior research, we examine theoretically the institutional factors that push top managers to relocate HQ units overseas. To this end, we first discuss how coercive, isomorphic, and normative pressures may differentially affect HQ relocation decisions. Subsequently, we consider how...... economic crises influence the effects of the institutional factors in our model. We argue that economic crises have a dual effect on the international configuration of HQ activities. First, during times of crisis, we expect firms to react stronger to coercive, isomorphic, and normative pressures. Second...

  8. Time Use on Trains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how travel time is used and how passengers conceptualise travel time in Danish intercity trains and intercity fast trains. The new contribution to the literature this study can offer is in the inclusion of all kinds of passengers in the different compartments to understand train...... travel as a dynamic act of moving with shifts in activities. A mixed-method approach is used with self-completed questionnaires, frequency observations, shadowing observations and interviews. The findings reveal that the train passengers’ acts on the move are framed by both macro- and microstructures....... The passengers create a travel space in which they make dynamic shifts in different kinds of activities: media use, media non-use, social interactions and non-social interactions. Passengers expect the train operator to provide the travel space for different activities (including the possibility of mobile...

  9. Performance analysis of adaptive turbo coded modulation with time delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍守豪; 宋文涛; 罗汉文

    2004-01-01

    The method of data fitting is applied to obtain the BER expression for turbo coded modulation, and a fitting mathematical model is proposed, which resolves the problem that there is no exact BER expression for turbo coded modulation in performance analysis. With the time delay consideration, the performance of BER of adaptive turbo coded modulation is analyzed and simulated. The results show that adaptive turbo coded modulation is very sensitive to time delay. In order to meet the target BER requirement, the total time delay should be less than 0. 001/fD.

  10. New definitions of pointing stability - ac and dc effects. [constant and time-dependent pointing error effects on image sensor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; San Martin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    For most imaging sensors, a constant (dc) pointing error is unimportant (unless large), but time-dependent (ac) errors degrade performance by either distorting or smearing the image. When properly quantified, the separation of the root-mean-square effects of random line-of-sight motions into dc and ac components can be used to obtain the minimum necessary line-of-sight stability specifications. The relation between stability requirements and sensor resolution is discussed, with a view to improving communication between the data analyst and the control systems engineer.

  11. Evidence from a Large Sample on the Effects of Group Size and Decision-Making Time on Performance in a Marketing Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treen, Emily; Atanasova, Christina; Pitt, Leyland; Johnson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Marketing instructors using simulation games as a way of inducing some realism into a marketing course are faced with many dilemmas. Two important quandaries are the optimal size of groups and how much of the students' time should ideally be devoted to the game. Using evidence from a very large sample of teams playing a simulation game, the study…

  12. Effect of a dual task on quantitative Timed Up and Go performance in community-dwelling older adults: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin; Walsh, Lorcan; Doyle, Julie; Greene, Barry; Blake, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The Timed Up and Go test (TUG) is used as a measure of functional ability in older adults; however, the method of measurement does not allow us to determine which aspects of the test deficits occur in. The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of the quantitative TUG (QTUG) to measure performance during the TUG test under three different conditions - single task, motor task and cognitive dual task - and to compare performance between fallers and non-fallers in high-functioning community-dwelling older adults. A total of 37 community-dwelling older adults, 16 with a self-reported falls history in the previous year, were recruited. Participants underwent a falls risk assessment with a physiotherapist including the QTUG under three conditions (single task, motor task, cognitive dual-task). A total of 10 clinical parameters were chosen for analysis using mancova and a series of ancova, with age, sex and body mass index included as covariates. The mancova analysis showed a significant difference across the three task conditions (Wilk's Lambda F20,186  = 3.37, P time in double support. When faller and non-faller differences were explored, cadence and stride velocity was greater, and stride time longer in those with a prior history of falls. In community-dwelling older adults, these preliminary results show that a cognitive dual-task significantly (P time-to-stand observed with a motor task. Although no statistical difference was found between fallers and non-fallers for many of the parameters, cadence, stride time and stride velocity were statistically different (P < 0.05). A larger sample size and more assessment points might lead to more definitive findings. These results highlight the need for further research to examine QTUG performance under dual-task conditions between fallers and non-fallers in this population, and to look at the ability of dual-task QTUG assessment to measure change longitudinally and the effectiveness of therapeutic

  13. Working with Time Management in IT Consulting : Developing a Time Management Strategy by Using Performance Management

    OpenAIRE

    Angermund, Emma; Lindqvist, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Time is in control of our everyday life and work life. Time is a valuable resource of which everyone possesses the same amount. In work life, time is important; it rules the workday and the tasks that are being performed. Time is even more significant within the consultancy industry, where worked time and competence is what is being delivered to the customers. Since time is of great importance for consulting firms, time management systems and time reporting become a crucial part of a consulta...

  14. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  15. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  16. Dedicated clock/timing-circuit theories of time perception and timed performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Hedderik; Gu, Bon-Mi; Meck, Warren H

    2014-01-01

    Scalar Timing Theory (an information-processing version of Scalar Expectancy Theory) and its evolution into the neurobiologically plausible Striatal Beat-Frequency (SBF) theory of interval timing are reviewed. These pacemaker/accumulator or oscillation/coincidence detection models are then

  17. Dedicated clock/timing-circuit theories of time perception and timed performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Hedderik; Gu, Bon-Mi; Meck, Warren H

    2014-01-01

    Scalar Timing Theory (an information-processing version of Scalar Expectancy Theory) and its evolution into the neurobiologically plausible Striatal Beat-Frequency (SBF) theory of interval timing are reviewed. These pacemaker/accumulator or oscillation/coincidence detection models are then integrate

  18. Dedicated clock/timing-circuit theories of time perception and timed performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Hedderik; Gu, Bon-Mi; Meck, Warren H

    2014-01-01

    Scalar Timing Theory (an information-processing version of Scalar Expectancy Theory) and its evolution into the neurobiologically plausible Striatal Beat-Frequency (SBF) theory of interval timing are reviewed. These pacemaker/accumulator or oscillation/coincidence detection models are then integrated with the Adaptive Control of Thought-Rational (ACT-R) cognitive architecture as dedicated timing modules that are able to make use of the memory and decision-making mechanisms contained in ACT-R. The different predictions made by the incorporation of these timing modules into ACT-R are discussed as well as the potential limitations. Novel implementations of the original SBF model that allow it to be incorporated into ACT-R in a more fundamental fashion than the earlier simulations of Scalar Timing Theory are also considered in conjunction with the proposed properties and neural correlates of the "internal clock".

  19. Effect of Mg$^{2+}$ ions co-doping on timing performance and radiation tolerance of Cerium doped Gd$_{3}$Al$_{2}$Ga$_{3}$O$_{12}$ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, M.T.; Bohacek, P.; Gundacker, S.; Kamada, K.; Nikl, M.; Petrosyan, A.; Yoshikawa, A.; Auffray, E.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic scintillators with high density and high light yield are of major interest for applications in medical imaging and high energy physics detectors. In this work, the optical and scintillation properties of Mg co-doped Ce:Gd3Al2Ga3O12 crystals, grown using Czochralski technique, have been investigated and compared with Ce:Gd3Al2Ga3O12 ones prepared with identical technology. Improvements in the timing performance of the Mg co-doped samples with respect to Ce:Gd3Al2Ga3O12 ones have been measured, namely a substantial shortening of the rise time and scintillation decay components and lower afterglow were achieved. In particular, a significantly better coincidence time resolution of 233 ps FWHM, being a fundamental parameter for TOF-PET devices, has been observed in Mg co-doped crystals. The samples have also shown a good radiation tolerance under high doses of γ-rays, making them suitable candidates for applications in harsh radiation environments, such as detectors at future collider experiments.

  20. Level of Bus Performance Based On the Relationship Between Distance and Travel Time of Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM Bus Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetijo Joewono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available UTHM bus service is an important transport mode for most students at Universiti Tun Hussein Onn because it such primary public vehicle to support students movements around the campus, within and outside student apartments. This service is often associated with the quality of service in terms of time, stops and comforts. Therefore, this following study is focused on investigation on several UTHM bas routes which was based on bas operations such as distance and travel time/travel distance that would determine the level of service provided. Primary data were collected mainly to obtain information relate to speed, bas position, time movement/circulations of bus and time headway. These were obtained by installing GPS-Slute Gear i-trail along bus travels. In addition, additional data were collected by exploring previous studies regarding to the bus services such as Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010. The approach used was based on assessment of progress used to determine the level of quest service and such obstacle frequently occurs with results on bus delays, volume of unequal that can be overcome according to the assessments that have been provided.

  1. Designing Process Improvement of Finished Good On Time Release and Performance Indicator Tool in Milk Industry Using Business Process Reengineering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachyar, M.; Christy, E.

    2014-04-01

    To maintain position as a major milk producer, the Indonesian milk industry should do some business development with the purpose of increasing customer service level. One strategy is to create on time release conditions for finished goods which will be distributed to customers and distributors. To achieve this condition, management information systems of finished goods on time release needs to be improved. The focus of this research is to conduct business process improvement using Business Process Reengineering (BPR). The deliverable key of this study is a comprehensive business strategy which is the solution of the root problems. To achieve the goal, evaluation, reengineering, and improvement of the ERP system are conducted. To visualize the predicted implementation, a simulation model is built by Oracle BPM. The output of this simulation showed that the proposed solution could effectively reduce the process lead time and increase the number of quality releases.

  2. Working time autonomy and time adequacy: What if performance is all that counts?

    OpenAIRE

    Lott, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    To be able to combine work with activities and duties outside the workplace successfully, employees need time adequacy. Time adequacy is the fit between working time and all other time demands and can be achieved through working time flexibility and autonomy. However, past research has shown that working time flexibility and autonomy do not necessarily foster employees' time sovereignty. Studies suggest that the benefits of working time arrangements depend on work organization. Analyzing perf...

  3. The NIF Integrated Timing System - Design and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lerche, R A; Lagin, L J; Nyholm, R; Sewall, N R; Stever, R D; Wiedwald, J D; Larkin, J; Stein, S; Martin, R

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will contain the world's most powerful laser. NIF requires more than 1500 precisely timed trigger pulses to control the timing of laser and diagnostic equipment. The Integrated Timing System applies new concepts to generate and deliver triggers at preprogrammed times to equipment throughout the laser and target areas of the facility. Trigger pulses during the last 2 seconds of a shot cycle are required to have a jitter of less than 20 ps (rms) and a wander of less than 100 ps (max). Also, the Timing System allows simultaneous, independent use by multiple clients by partitioning the system hardware into subsets that are controlled via independent software keys. The hardware necessary to implement the Integrated Timing System is commercially available. -- This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Time Reconstruction and Performance of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and the linearity of time measurements made with the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied with samples of data from test beam electrons, cosmic rays, and beam-produced muons. The resulting time resolution measured by lead tungstate crystals is better than 100 ps for energy deposits larger than 10 GeV. Crystal-to-crystal synchronization with a precision of 500 ps is performed using muons produced with the first LHC beams in 2008.

  5. Time Reconstruction and Performance of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and the linearity of time measurements made with the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied with samples of data from test beam electrons, cosmic rays, and beam-produced muons. The resulting time resolution measured by lead tungstate crystals is better than 100 ps for energy deposits larger than 10 GeV. Crystal-to-crystal synchronization with a precision of 500 ps is performed using muons produced with the first LHC beams in 2008.

  6. Design and Implementation of a Real-time Processing System of Full Resolution Quick-look Image of HJ-1 Environmental Satellite C SAR Based on High Performance Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing-shan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the design and implementation of a real-time processing system of full resolution quick-look image of HJ-1 environmental satellite C SAR based on high-performance clusters. The system processes the first quick-look SAR image on December 9, 2012. The results show that the design and implementation of the quick-look processing system satisfies the real-time SAR image processing performance requirements at full resolution. Moreover, this system is the first real-time business system of full-resolution quick-look spaceborne SAR images in China.

  7. Real-time supervision of building HVAC system performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric, Natasa

    2008-07-01

    building maintenance structure and the real hydronic heating system faults. Coupled simulation and optimization programs (EnergyPlus and GenOpt) were utilized for improving the building performances. These tools were used for improving the design and the control strategies in the HVAC systems. Buildings with a hydronic heating system were analyzed for the purpose of improving the design. Since there are issues in using the optimization tool, GenOpt, a few procedures for different practical problems have been suggested. The optimization results show that the choice of the optimization functions influences significantly the design parameters for the hydronic heating system. Since building construction and equipment characteristics are changing over time, there is a need to find new control strategies which can meet the actual building demand. This problem has been also elaborated on by using EnergyPlus and GenOpt. The control strategies in two different HVAC systems were analyzed, including the hydronic heating system and the ventilation system with the recovery wheel. The developed approach for the strategy optimization includes: involving the optimization variables and the objective function and developing information flow for handling the optimization process. The real data obtained from BEMS and the additional measurements have been utilized to explain faults in the hydronic heating system. To couple real data and the simple heat balance model, the procedure for the model calibration by use of an optimization algorithm has been developed. Using this model, three operating faults in the hydronic heating system have been elaborated. Using the simulation tools EnergyPlus and TRNSYS, several fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) rules have been generated. The FDD rules were established in three steps: testing different faults, calculating the performance indices (PI), and classifying the observed PIs. These rules have been established for the air cooling system and the

  8. Performance of the 'material Failure Forecast Method' in real-time situations: A Bayesian approach applied on effusive and explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, A.; Lesage, P.; Cortés, G.; Valette, B.; Reyes-Dávila, G.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Budi-Santoso, A.

    2016-11-01

    Most attempts of deterministic eruption forecasting are based on the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM). This method assumes that a precursory observable, such as the rate of seismic activity, can be described by a simple power law which presents a singularity at a time close to the eruption onset. Until now, this method has been applied only in a small number of cases, generally for forecasts in hindsight. In this paper, a rigorous Bayesian approach of the FFM designed for real-time applications is applied. Using an automatic recognition system, seismo-volcanic events are detected and classified according to their physical mechanism and time series of probability distributions of the rates of events are calculated. At each time of observation, a Bayesian inversion provides estimations of the exponent of the power law and of the time of eruption, together with their probability density functions. Two criteria are defined in order to evaluate the quality and reliability of the forecasts. Our automated procedure has allowed the analysis of long, continuous seismic time series: 13 years from Volcán de Colima, Mexico, 10 years from Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island, France, and several months from Merapi volcano, Java, Indonesia. The new forecasting approach has been applied to 64 pre-eruptive sequences which present various types of dominant seismic activity (volcano-tectonic or long-period events) and patterns of seismicity with different level of complexity. This has allowed us to test the FFM assumptions, to determine in which conditions the method can be applied, and to quantify the success rate of the forecasts. 62% of the precursory sequences analysed are suitable for the application of FFM and half of the total number of eruptions are successfully forecast in hindsight. In real-time, the method allows for the successful forecast of 36% of all the eruptions considered. Nevertheless, real-time forecasts are successful for 83% of the cases that fulfil the

  9. Time Pressure Undermines Performance More Under Avoidance Than Approach Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskes, Marieke; Elliot, Andrew J.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Four experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that performance is particularly undermined by time pressure when people are avoidance motivated. The results supported this hypothesis across three different types of tasks, including those well suited and those ill suited to the type of informa

  10. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  11. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  12. Real-Time Projection-Based Augmented Reality System for Dynamic Objects in the Performing Arts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaewoon Lee; Yeonjin Kim; Myeong-Hyeon Heo; Dongho Kim; Byeong-Seok Shin

    2015-01-01

    ... say real-time projection-based augmented reality system for dynamic objects in performing arts. We installed the sets on a stage for live performance, and rehearsed particular scenes of a musical...

  13. Flexibility of Expressive Timing in Repeated Musical Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pantelis Demos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Performances by soloists in the Western classical tradition are normally highly prepared, yet must sound fresh and spontaneous. How do musicians manage this? We tested the hypothesis that they achieve the necessary spontaneity by varying the musical gestures that express their interpretation of a piece. We examined the tempo arches produced by final slowing at the ends of phrases in performances of J.S. Bach’s No. 6 (Prelude for solo cello (12 performances and the Italian Concerto (Presto for solo piano (8 performances. The performances were given by two experienced concert soloists during a short time period (3½ months for the Prelude, 2 weeks for the Presto after completing their preparations for public performance. We measured the tempo of each bar or half-bar, and the stability of tempo across performances (difference of the tempo of each bar/half bar from each of the other performances. There were phrase arches for both tempo and stability with slower, less stable tempi at beginnings and ends of phrases and faster, more stable tempi mid-phrase. The effects of practice were complex. Tempo decreased overall with practice, while stability increased in some bars and decreased in others. One effect of practice may be to imbue well-learned, automatic motor sequences with freshness and spontaneity through cognitive control at phrase boundaries where slower tempi and decreased stability provide opportunities for slower cognitive processes to modulate rapid automatic motor sequences.

  14. Flexibility of Expressive Timing in Repeated Musical Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Alexander P.; Lisboa, Tânia; Chaffin, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Performances by soloists in the Western classical tradition are normally highly prepared, yet must sound fresh and spontaneous. How do musicians manage this? We tested the hypothesis that they achieve the necessary spontaneity by varying the musical gestures that express their interpretation of a piece. We examined the tempo arches produced by final slowing at the ends of phrases in performances of J. S. Bach’s No. 6 (Prelude) for solo cello (12 performances) and the Italian Concerto (Presto) for solo piano (eight performances). The performances were given by two experienced concert soloists during a short time period (3½ months for the Prelude, 2 weeks for the Presto) after completing their preparations for public performance. We measured the tempo of each bar or half-bar, and the stability of tempo across performances (difference of the tempo of each bar/half bar from each of the other performances). There were phrase arches for both tempo and stability with slower, less stable tempi at beginnings and ends of phrases and faster, more stable tempi mid-phrase. The effects of practice were complex. Tempo decreased overall with practice, while stability increased in some bars and decreased in others. One effect of practice may be to imbue well-learned, automatic motor sequences with freshness and spontaneity through cognitive control at phrase boundaries where slower tempi and decreased stability provide opportunities for slower cognitive processes to modulate rapid automatic motor sequences. PMID:27757089

  15. Timing performance of ZnO:Ga nanopowder composite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtos, Rosana M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Gundacker, Stefan; Lucchini, Marco T.; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Prochazkova, Lenka; Cuba, Vaclav [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Buresova, Hana [Nuvia a.s, Kralupy nad Vltavou (Czech Republic); Mrazek, Jan [Institute of Photonics and Electronics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Nikl, Martin [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    The implementation of nanocrystal-based composite scintillators as a new generation of ultrafast particle detectors is explored using ZnO:Ga nanopowder. Samples are characterized with a spectral-time resolved photon counting system and pulsed X-rays, followed by coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements under 511 keV gamma excitation. Results are comparable to CTR values obtained using bulk inorganic scintillators. Bringing the ZnO:Ga nanocrystal's timing performance to radiation detectors could pave the research path towards sub-20 ps time resolution as shown in this contribution. However, an efficiency boost when placing nanopowders in a transparent host constitutes the main challenge in order to benefit from sub-nanosecond recombination times. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. High performance real-time flight simulation at NASA Langley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1994-01-01

    In order to meet the stringent time-critical requirements for real-time man-in-the-loop flight simulation, computer processing operations must be deterministic and be completed in as short a time as possible. This includes simulation mathematical model computational and data input/output to the simulators. In 1986, in response to increased demands for flight simulation performance, personnel at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC), working with the contractor, developed extensions to a standard input/output system to provide for high bandwidth, low latency data acquisition and distribution. The Computer Automated Measurement and Control technology (IEEE standard 595) was extended to meet the performance requirements for real-time simulation. This technology extension increased the effective bandwidth by a factor of ten and increased the performance of modules necessary for simulator communications. This technology is being used by more than 80 leading technological developers in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Included among the commercial applications of this technology are nuclear process control, power grid analysis, process monitoring, real-time simulation, and radar data acquisition. Personnel at LaRC have completed the development of the use of supercomputers for simulation mathematical model computational to support real-time flight simulation. This includes the development of a real-time operating system and the development of specialized software and hardware for the CAMAC simulator network. This work, coupled with the use of an open systems software architecture, has advanced the state of the art in real time flight simulation. The data acquisition technology innovation and experience with recent developments in this technology are described.

  17. Accessible high performance computing solutions for near real-time image processing for time critical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielski, Conrad; Lemoine, Guido; Syryczynski, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) hardware solutions such as grid computing and General Processing on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) are now accessible to users with general computing needs. Grid computing infrastructures in the form of computing clusters or blades are becoming common place and GPGPU solutions that leverage the processing power of the video card are quickly being integrated into personal workstations. Our interest in these HPC technologies stems from the need to produce near real-time maps from a combination of pre- and post-event satellite imagery in support of post-disaster management. Faster processing provides a twofold gain in this situation: 1. critical information can be provided faster and 2. more elaborate automated processing can be performed prior to providing the critical information. In our particular case, we test the use of the PANTEX index which is based on analysis of image textural measures extracted using anisotropic, rotation-invariant GLCM statistics. The use of this index, applied in a moving window, has been shown to successfully identify built-up areas in remotely sensed imagery. Built-up index image masks are important input to the structuring of damage assessment interpretation because they help optimise the workload. The performance of computing the PANTEX workflow is compared on two different HPC hardware architectures: (1) a blade server with 4 blades, each having dual quad-core CPUs and (2) a CUDA enabled GPU workstation. The reference platform is a dual CPU-quad core workstation and the PANTEX workflow total computing time is measured. Furthermore, as part of a qualitative evaluation, the differences in setting up and configuring various hardware solutions and the related software coding effort is presented.

  18. Comparative evaluation of the performance of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay for measurement of HIV-1 plasma viral load on genetically diverse samples from Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevis Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 is characterized by increased genetic heterogeneity which tends to hinder the reliability of detection and accuracy of HIV-1 RNA quantitation assays. Methods In this study, the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (Abbott RealTime assay was compared to the Roche Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 (Cobas TaqMan and the Siemens Versant HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA 3.0 assays, using clinical samples of various viral load levels and subtypes from Greece, where the recent epidemiology of HIV-1 infection has been characterized by increasing genetic diversity and a marked increase in subtype A genetic strains among newly diagnosed infections. Results A high correlation was observed between the quantitative results obtained by the Abbott RealTime and the Cobas TaqMan assays. Viral load values quantified by the Abbott RealTime were on average lower than those obtained by the Cobas TaqMan, with a mean (SD difference of -0.206 (0.298 log10 copies/ml. The mean differences according to HIV-1 subtypes between the two techniques for samples of subtype A, B, and non-A/non-B were 0.089, -0.262, and -0.298 log10 copies/ml, respectively. Overall, differences were less than 0.5 log10 for 85% of the samples, and >1 log10 in only one subtype B sample. Similarly, Abbott RealTime and bDNA 3.0 assays yielded a very good correlation of quantitative results, whereas viral load values assessed by the Abbott RealTime were on average higher (mean (SD difference: 0.160 (0.287 log10 copies/ml. The mean differences according to HIV-1 subtypes between the two techniques for subtype A, B and non-A/non-B samples were 0.438, 0.105 and 0.191 log10 copies/ml, respectively. Overall, the majority of samples (86% differed by less than 0.5 log10, while none of the samples showed a deviation of more than 1.0 log10. Conclusions In an area of changing HIV-1 subtype pattern, the Abbott RealTime assay showed a high correlation and good agreement of results when compared both to the Cobas TaqMan and bDNA 3

  19. Relationships between Isometric Force-Time Characteristics and Dynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dos’Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP force-time characteristics (peak force and time-specific force vales (100–250 ms and dynamic performance and compare dynamic performance between stronger and weaker athletes. Forty-three athletes from different sports (rowing, soccer, bicycle motocross, and hockey performed three trials of the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, and IMTP, and performed a one repetition maximum power clean (PC. Reactive strength index modified (RSImod was also calculated from the CMJ. Statistically significant large correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics and PC (ρ = 0.569–0.674, p < 0.001, and moderate correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics (excluding force at 100 ms and RSImod (ρ = 0.389–0.449, p = 0.013–0.050 were observed. Only force at 250 ms demonstrated a statistically significant moderate correlation with CMJ height (ρ = 0.346, p = 0.016 and no statistically significant associations were observed between IMTP force-time characteristics and SJ height. Stronger athletes (top 10 demonstrated statistically significantly greater CMJ heights, RSImods, and PCs (p ≤ 0.004, g = 1.32–1.89 compared to weaker (bottom 10 athletes, but no differences in SJ height were observed (p = 0.871, g = 0.06. These findings highlight that the ability to apply rapidly high levels of force in short time intervals is integral for PC, CMJ height, and reactive strength.

  20. Performance of VPIC on Trinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, W. D.; Bergen, B.; Bird, R. F.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W. S.; Guo, F.; Li, H.; Nam, H. A.; Pang, X.; Rust, W. N., III; Wohlbier, J.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    Trinity is a new major DOE computing resource which is going through final acceptance testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Trinity has several new and unique architectural features including two compute partitions, one with dual socket Intel Haswell Xeon compute nodes and one with Intel Knights Landing (KNL) Xeon Phi compute nodes. Additional unique features include use of on package high bandwidth memory (HBM) for the KNL nodes, the ability to configure the KNL nodes with respect to HBM model and on die network topology in a variety of operational modes at run time, and use of solid state storage via burst buffer technology to reduce time required to perform I/O. An effort is in progress to port and optimize VPIC to Trinity and evaluate its performance. Because VPIC was recently released as Open Source, it is being used as part of acceptance testing for Trinity and is participating in the Trinity Open Science Program which has resulted in excellent collaboration activities with both Cray and Intel. Results of this work will be presented on performance of VPIC on both Haswell and KNL partitions for both single node runs and runs at scale. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and supported by the LANL LDRD program.

  1. SPM Real-time Performance Management Strategy Based on WCET%基于WCET的SPM实时性管理策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志刚; 刘基军; 蒋湘涛

    2011-01-01

    提出一种基于最坏情况执行时间(WCET)的SPM静态分配算法,该算法采用额外的WCET分析工具获得任务最坏情况执行路径(WCEP),针对最坏情况执行路径,把程序划分为全局变量、全局堆栈、指令块等节点,用包含节点和节点间关系的CFG描述应用程序,采用考虑节点间关系的算法把选中的节点分配到SPM中.仿真实验结果表明,采用该分配策略管理SPM空间比不采用SPM时的实时性提高54%左右.%This paper proposes a WCET-based static allocation algorithm for Scratch-Pad Memory(SPM), the algorithm obtains the Worst-Case Execution Path(WCEP) through an external Worst-Case Execution Time(WCET) estimation tool. According to the WCETP, the algorithm transforms the application into a directed graph consisting of nodes and relationships of nodes. It applies an algorithm which takes the relationships of nodes into account to solve the problem of SPM memory allocation. Simulation experiments show that the algorithm achieves an improvement of about 54% in the real-time performance, compared to system without SPM.

  2. High performance diagnostics for Time-Of-Flight and X ray measurements in laser produced plasmas, based on fast diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, R.; Consoli, F.; Verona, C.; Di Giorgio, G.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Ingenito, F.; Marinelli, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-12-01

    The paper reports about the use of single-crystal Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamonds as radiation detectors in laser-matter interaction experiments on the ABC laser in ENEA - Frascati. The detectors have been designed and realized by University of Tor Vergata - Rome. The interdigital configuration and the new design of the bias-tee voltage supply units guarantee a fast time response. The detectors are sensitive to soft-X photons and to particles. A remarkable immunity to electromagnetic noise, associated with the laser-target interaction, makes them especially useful for the measurements of the time of flight of fast particles. A novel diamond assembly has been tested in plasmas generated by the ABC laser in the nanosecond regime at intensities I=1013÷ 14 W/cm2, where contributions from X rays, fast electrons and ions could be observed.

  3. Relating movement recurrence and expressive timing patterns in music performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Euler C F; Yehia, Hani C; Loureiro, Mauricio A

    2015-09-01

    In this study the movement patterns of ten expert musicians are quantitatively related to expressive timing patterns and the music structure during performances. The hypothesis is that ancillary gestures recurrently employed are closely related to expressive intentions, and that the expressive content imposed in key musical passages is thus reflected in the patterns of gestural recurrence. A movement and an audio analysis of 30 clarinet performances of a Brahms' excerpt are compared. Results show direct correlations between the recurrence pattern of clarinetists' ancillary movements and expressive bar duration manipulations employed by them, associated with melodic phrasing and harmonic transitions.

  4. Interval timing and Parkinson's disease: heterogeneity in temporal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Luciana, Monica; Hooper, Catalina; Majestic, Stacy; Tuite, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Interval timing deficiencies in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have been a matter of debate. Here we test the possibility of PD heterogeneity as a source for this discrepancy. Temporal performance of PD patients and control subjects was assessed during two interval tapping tasks and during a categorization task of time intervals. These tasks involved temporal processing of intervals in the hundreds of milliseconds range; however, they also covered a wide range of behavioral contexts, differing in their perceptual, decision-making, memory, and execution requirements. The results showed the following significant findings. First, there were two clearly segregated subgroups of PD patients: one with high temporal variability in the three timing tasks, and another with a temporal variability that did not differ substantially from control subjects. In contrast, PD patients with high and low temporal variability showed similar perceptual, decision-making, memory, and execution performance in a set of control tasks. Second, a slope analysis, designed to dissociate time-dependent from time-independent sources of variation, revealed that the increase in variability in this group of PD patients was mainly due to an increment in the variability associated with the timing mechanism. Third, while the control subjects showed significant correlations in performance variability across tasks, PD patients, and particularly those with high temporal variability, did not show such task correlations. Finally, the results showed that dopaminergic treatment restored the correlation effect in PD patients, producing a highly significant correlation between the inter-task variability. Altogether, these results indicate that a subpopulation of PD patients shows a strong disruption in temporal processing in the hundreds of milliseconds range. These findings are discussed in terms of the role of dopamine as a tuning element for the synchronization of temporal processing across different

  5. Primary School Pupils' Performances in Understanding Historical Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Reuvekamp, Marjan; Ros, Anje; van Boxtel, Carla; Oort, Frans

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of the understanding of historical time of pupils in primary school. We present a developmental model with three stages: "emergent," "initial" and "continued" understanding of historical time. Based on this model, we constructed an instrument to measure how pupils aged 6-12…

  6. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q; Choong, W-S; Vu, C; Huber, J S; Janecek, M; Wilson, D; Huesman, R H; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W W

    2015-02-01

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 × 25 mm(2) side of 6.15 × 6.15 × 25 mm(3) LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. The results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.

  7. Effects of hydraulic retention time and nitrobenzene concentration on the performance of sequential upflow anaerobic filter and air lift reactors in treating nitrobenzene-containing wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jinhua; Chen, Guocai; Gu, Jingjing;

    2014-01-01

    Sequential upflow anaerobic filter (UAF)/air lift (ALR) reactors were employed to investigate the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrobenzene (NB) concentration on treatment of NB-containing wastewater. The results showed that NB was effectively reduced to aniline (AN) with glucose...... and the influent NB concentration increased from 400 to 800 mg l super(-1), respectively. The results showed that sequential UAF/ALR system can be operated at low HRTs and high NB concentrations without significantly affecting the removal efficiency of NB in the reactor system. The UAF/ALR system can provide...... an effective yet low cost method for treatment of NB-containing industrial wastewater....

  8. Time to move on?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2017-01-01

    Cosmology and particle physics have long been dominated by theoretical paradigms: Einstein's general theory of relativity in cosmology and the Standard Model of particle physics. The time may have come for paradigm shifts. Does cosmological inflation require a modification of Einstein's gravity? Have experiments at the LHC discovered a new particle beyond the Standard Model? It is premature to answer these questions, but we theorists can dream about the possibilities.

  9. Optimizing the Time Performance of Subcontractors in Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy K.W Ng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The main contractors of Hong Kong building projects tend to subcontract most of their work. However, many of the subcontractors complain that they are not being fully utilized due main contractors’ poor site coordination of temporary works and interfacing works and plant supports etc. A list of critical site coordination problems caused by main contractors that had adversely influence to the time performance of subcontractors was prepared. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data to generate multiple regression equations that explain how the critical site coordination problems affected the time performance of different types of subcontractor. The survey results were validated by neural network analysis. Backward elimination method was adopted to identify the ‘most critical’ site coordination problems that enable main contractors to formulate measures to enhance their site management system.

  10. Optimizing the Time Performance of Subcontractors in Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D.F Price

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available  The main contractors of Hong Kong building projects tend to subcontract most of their work. However, many of the subcontractors complain that they are not being fully utilized due main contractors’ poor site coordination of temporary works and interfacing works and plant supports etc. A list of critical site coordination problems caused by main contractors that had adversely influence to the time performance of subcontractors was prepared. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data to generate multiple regression equations that explain how the critical site coordination problems affected the time performance of different types of subcontractor. The survey results were validated by neural network analysis. Backward elimination method was adopted to identify the ‘most critical’ site coordination problems that enable main contractors to formulate measures to enhance their site management system.

  11. The effect of teamwork training on team performance and clinical outcome in elective orthopaedic surgery: a controlled interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lauren; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter; New, Steve

    2015-04-20

    To evaluate the effectiveness of aviation-style teamwork training in improving operating theatre team performance and clinical outcomes. 3 operating theatres in a UK district general hospital, 1 acting as a control group and the other 2 as the intervention group. 72 operations (37 intervention, 35 control) were observed in full by 2 trained observers during two 3-month observation periods, before and after the intervention period. A 1-day teamwork training course for all staff, followed by 6 weeks of weekly in-service coaching to embed learning. We measured team non-technical skills using Oxford NOTECHS II, (evaluating the whole team and the surgical, anaesthetic and nursing subteams, and evaluated technical performance using the Glitch count. We evaluated compliance with the WHO checklist by recording whether time-out (T/O) and sign-out (S/O) were attempted, and whether T/O was fully complied with. We recorded complications, re-admissions and duration of hospital stay using hospital administrative data. We compared the before-after change in the intervention and control groups using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression modelling. Mean NOTECHS II score increased significantly from 71.6 to 75.4 in the active group but remained static in the control group (p=0.047). Among staff subgroups, the nursing score increased significantly (p=0.006), but the anaesthetic and surgical scores did not. The attempt rate for WHO T/O procedures increased significantly in both active and control groups, but full compliance with T/O improved only in the active group (p=0.003). Mean glitch rate was unchanged in the control group but increased significantly (7.2-10.2/h, p=0.002) in the active group. Teamwork training was associated with improved non-technical skills in theatre teams but also with a rise in operative glitches. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Performance evaluation of the time delay digital tanlock loop architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kharji Al-Ali, Omar; Anani, Nader; Al-Qutayri, Mahmoud; Al-Araji, Saleh; Ponnapalli, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the architectures, theoretical analyses and testing results of modified time delay digital tanlock loop (TDTLs) system. The modifications to the original TDTL architecture were introduced to overcome some of the limitations of the original TDTL and to enhance the overall performance of the particular systems. The limitations addressed in this article include the non-linearity of the phase detector, the restricted width of the locking range and the overall system acquisition speed. Each of the modified architectures was tested by subjecting the system to sudden positive and negative frequency steps and comparing its response with that of the original TDTL. In addition, the performance of all the architectures was evaluated under noise-free as well as noisy environments. The extensive simulation results using MATLAB/SIMULINK demonstrate that the new architectures overcome the limitations they addressed and the overall results confirmed significant improvements in performance compared to the conventional TDTL system.

  13. Genetic parameters and responses of performance and body composition traits in pigs selected for high and low growth rate on a fixed ration over a set time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Nguyen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two lines of Large White pigs of common genetic origin were divergently selected over four years for high and low growth rate during a 6 week post-weaning test period in which all pigs were fed the same total amount of food (80% of estimated ad libitum intake. Genetic parameters and direct and correlated responses in performance and carcass traits were estimated on 2884 pigs with pedigrees comprising a total of 5324 animals, with restricted maximum likelihood and best linear unbiased prediction methods applied to a multi-trait animal model. Estimates of heritability (± SE were 0.19 ± 0.04 for lifetime daily gain (LDG, 0.16 ± 0.03 for test daily gain (TDG, 0.25 ± 0.04 for ultrasound P2 backfat (UBF and 0.16 ± 0.03 for food conversion ratio during test (TFC, and 0.15 ± 0.04 for daily carcass weight gain (CDG, 0.43 ± 0.06 for carcass backfat (CFT and 0.40 ± 0.06 for carcass lean percentage (LEAN. Common litter effects for TDG, UBF and TFC were less than 5% and for LDG, 17% of total phenotypic variance. Genetic correlations between performance and carcass traits were moderately to highly favourable. After four years of divergent selection for growth rate, the selection responses in estimated breeding value (EBV for TDG were 40.14 and -41.11 g (SED 2.95 for the high and low growth lines, respectively. The regressions of EBV on year of birth, indicate that the annual genetic trend for TDG, was 8.73 g/yr in the high and -8.48 g/yr in the low lines (P

  14. Effects of repeated snowboard exercise in virtual reality with time lags of visual scene behind body rotation on head stability and subjective slalom run performance in healthy young subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshiro; Nishiike, Suetaka; Kitahara, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Imai, Takao; Ito, Taeko; Sato, Go; Matsuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    After repeated snowboard exercises in the virtual reality (VR) world with increasing time lags in trials 3-8, it is suggested that the adaptation to repeated visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict in the VR world improved dynamic posture control and motor performance in the real world without the development of motion sickness. The VR technology was used and the effects of repeated snowboard exercise examined in the VR world with time lags between visual scene and body rotation on the head stability and slalom run performance during exercise in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy young subjects participated in the study. After trials 1 and 2 of snowboard exercise in the VR world without time lag, trials 3-8 were conducted with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 s time lags of the visual scene that the computer creates behind board rotation, respectively. Finally, trial 9 was conducted without time lag. Head linear accelerations and subjective slalom run performance were evaluated. The standard deviations of head linear accelerations in inter-aural direction were significantly increased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly decreased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. The subjective scores of slalom run performance were significantly decreased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly increased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. Motion sickness was not induced in any subjects.

  15. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, C K

    2008-01-01

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  16. Student progression on time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    The paper discusses and problematizes the ways, in which recent Danish university reform challenges the ideals of the ‘Nordic model’. The aim of the so-called ‘speed-up’ reform (in Danish ‘studiefremdriftsreformen’) is to cut the time available for students to complete their university studies....... Starting in mid 2014 students will be obliged to sign up for exams for at least 60 ECTS a year. If a student flunks or in other ways gets more than 30 ECTS delayed, the state grants will stop until the student has regained the missing ECTS. Simultaneously, we see a major change in what is meant...... by flexibility. Before the reform, the system was increasingly required to facilitate transfer of credits and make it easier for students to compose more personalized learning portfolios, which can include courses from different institutions and study programmes. The latter is very much in line with the ideas...

  17. Student progression on time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    The paper discusses and problematizes the ways, in which recent Danish university reform challenges the ideals of the ‘Nordic model’. The aim of the so-called ‘speed-up’ reform (in Danish ‘studiefremdriftsreformen’) is to cut the time available for students to complete their university studies...... by flexibility. Before the reform, the system was increasingly required to facilitate transfer of credits and make it easier for students to compose more personalized learning portfolios, which can include courses from different institutions and study programmes. The latter is very much in line with the ideas....... Starting in mid 2014 students will be obliged to sign up for exams for at least 60 ECTS a year. If a student flunks or in other ways gets more than 30 ECTS delayed, the state grants will stop until the student has regained the missing ECTS. Simultaneously, we see a major change in what is meant...

  18. On Time-II: Newton's Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A study of time in Newtonian physics is presented. Newton's laws of motion, falsifiability and physical theories, laws of motion and law of gravitation, and Laplace's demon are discussed. Short bibliographic sketches of Laplace and Karl Popper are included. (KR)

  19. Real-time supervision of building HVAC system performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric, Natasa

    2008-07-01

    building maintenance structure and the real hydronic heating system faults. Coupled simulation and optimization programs (EnergyPlus and GenOpt) were utilized for improving the building performances. These tools were used for improving the design and the control strategies in the HVAC systems. Buildings with a hydronic heating system were analyzed for the purpose of improving the design. Since there are issues in using the optimization tool, GenOpt, a few procedures for different practical problems have been suggested. The optimization results show that the choice of the optimization functions influences significantly the design parameters for the hydronic heating system. Since building construction and equipment characteristics are changing over time, there is a need to find new control strategies which can meet the actual building demand. This problem has been also elaborated on by using EnergyPlus and GenOpt. The control strategies in two different HVAC systems were analyzed, including the hydronic heating system and the ventilation system with the recovery wheel. The developed approach for the strategy optimization includes: involving the optimization variables and the objective function and developing information flow for handling the optimization process. The real data obtained from BEMS and the additional measurements have been utilized to explain faults in the hydronic heating system. To couple real data and the simple heat balance model, the procedure for the model calibration by use of an optimization algorithm has been developed. Using this model, three operating faults in the hydronic heating system have been elaborated. Using the simulation tools EnergyPlus and TRNSYS, several fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) rules have been generated. The FDD rules were established in three steps: testing different faults, calculating the performance indices (PI), and classifying the observed PIs. These rules have been established for the air cooling system and the

  20. Embarking on performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bobbi; Falk, Leslie Hough

    2014-06-01

    Healthcare organizations should approach performance improvement as a program, not a project. The program should be led by a guidance team that identifies goals, prioritizes work, and removes barriers to enable clinical improvement teams and work groups to realize performance improvements. A healthcare enterprise data warehouse can provide the initial foundation for the program analytics. Evidence-based best practices can help achieve improved outcomes and reduced costs.

  1. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify contaminants in water: an insight on environmental forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julian; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2014-06-06

    Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqTOF-MS) acquiring full scan MS data for quantification, and automatic data dependent information product ion spectra (IDA-MS/MS) without any predefinition of the ions by the user was checked for identifying organic contaminants in water samples. The use of a database with more than 2000 compounds achieved high confidence results for a wide number of contaminants based upon retention time, accurate mass, isotopic pattern and MS/MS library searching. More than 20 contaminants, mostly pharmaceuticals, but also mycotoxins and polyphenols were unambiguously identified. Furthermore, the combination of statistical data analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by empirical formula calculation, on-line database searching and MS/MS fragment ion interpretation achieves not only the successful detection of unknown contaminants but also the selection of those relevant to different types of waters. Unknown compounds, such as C₂₀H₃₄O₃, were identified in waste water showing the prospects of this technique. A group of 42 currently used pesticides were selected as target compounds to evaluate the quantitative possibilities. Mean recoveries and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD) were 48-79% (4-20% RSD). The limit of detections ranged from 0.02 to 2 ng L(-1), with a validated limit of quantification of 2 ng L(-1) for water after solid-phase (SPE) isolation and concentration. The quantitative data obtained using UHPLC-QqTOF-MS were compared with those obtained using conventional LC-MS/MS with a triple quadrupole (QqQ).

  2. Time to Move On?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentino, Alfredo; Nell, Phillip; Hotho, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior research, we examine theoretically the institutional factors that push top managers to relocate HQ units overseas. To this end, we first discuss how coercive, isomorphic, and normative pressures may differentially affect HQ relocation decisions. Subsequently, we consider how eco...

  3. An LMI Approach to H∞ Performance Analysis of Continous-Time System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrastawa Ridwan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of H∞ performance analysis for continous–time systems with two additive time-varying delays in the state. Our objective is focused on stability analysis of a continuous system with two time-varying delays with an H∞ disturbance attenuation level γ. By exploiting Lyapunov-Krasovski functional and introducing free weighting matrix variables, LMI stability condition have been derived.

  4. Keeping fat on time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ninel Hansen, Stine; Peics, Julia; Gerhart-Hines, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks harmonize processes ranging from intracellular biochemistry to whole-body physiology in accordance with the Earth's 24h rotation. These intrinsic oscillators are based on an interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loop comprised from a set of core clock factors....... In addition to maintaining rhythmicity in nearly every cell of the body, these clock factors also mediate tissue specific metabolic functions. In this review, we will explore how the molecular clock shapes the unique features of different adipose depots....

  5. Staffing of Time-Varying Queues to Achieve Time-Stable Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zohar Feldman; Avishai Mandelbaum; William A. Massey; Ward Whitt

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops methods to determine appropriate staffing levels in call centers and other many-server queueing systems with time-varying arrival rates. The goal is to achieve targeted time-stable performance, even in the presence of significant time variation in the arrival rates. The main contribution is a flexible simulation-based iterative-staffing algorithm (ISA) for the M t /G/s t + G model--with nonhomogeneous Poisson arrival process (the M t ) and customer abandonment (the + G). F...

  6. Continuous-time performance limitations for overshoot and resulted tracking measures

    CERN Document Server

    wenczel, rob

    2011-01-01

    A dual formulation for the problem of determining absolute performance limitations on overshoot, undershoot, maximum amplitude and fluctuation minimization for continuous-time feedback systems is constructed. Determining, for example, the minimum possible overshoot attainable by all possible stabilizing controllers is an optimization task that cannot be expressed as a minimum-norm problem. It is this fact, coupled with the continuous-time rather than discrete-time formulation, that makes these problems challenging. We extend previous results to include more general reference functions, and derive new results (in continuous time) on the influence of pole/zero locations on achievable time-domain performance.

  7. Effect of sludge retention time on the biological performance of anaerobic membrane bioreactors treating corn-to-ethanol thin stillage with high lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, Recep Kaan; van der Zee, Frank P; Heffernan, Barry; Grelot, Aurelie; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-02-01

    The potential of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) for the treatment of lipid rich corn-to-ethanol thin stillage was investigated at three different sludge retention times (SRT), i.e. 20, 30 and 50 days. The membrane assisted biomass retention in AnMBRs provided an excellent solution to sludge washout problems reported for the treatment of lipid rich wastewaters by granular sludge bed reactors. The AnMBRs achieved high COD removal efficiencies up to 99% and excellent effluent quality. Although higher organic loading rates (OLRs) up to 8.0 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) could be applied to the reactors operated at shorter SRTs, better biological degradation efficiencies, i.e. up to 83%, was achieved at increased SRTs. Severe long chain fatty acid (LCFA) inhibition was observed at 50 days SRT, possibly caused by the extensive dissolution of LCFA in the reactor broth, inhibiting the methanogenic biomass. Physicochemical mechanisms such as precipitation with divalent cations and adsorption on the sludge played an important role in the occurrence of LCFA removal, conversion, and inhibition.

  8. Evaluating the effect of three-dimensional visualization on force application and performance time during robotics-assisted mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Maria E; Trejos, Ana Luisa; Rayman, Reiza; Chu, Michael W A; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry; Kiaii, Bob B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3D) binocular, stereoscopic, and two-dimensional (2D) monocular visualization on robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty versus conventional techniques in an ex vivo animal model. In addition, we sought to determine whether these effects were consistent between novices and experts in robotics-assisted cardiac surgery. A cardiac surgery test-bed was constructed to measure forces applied during mitral valve annuloplasty. Sutures were passed through the porcine mitral valve annulus by the participants with different levels of experience in robotics-assisted surgery and tied in place using both robotics-assisted and conventional surgery techniques. The mean time for both the experts and the novices using 3D visualization was significantly less than that required using 2D vision (P robotic system with either 2D or 3D vision (P robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty than during conventional open mitral valve annuloplasty. This finding suggests that 3D visualization does not fully compensate for the absence of haptic feedback in robotics-assisted cardiac surgery.

  9. Jensen's Functionals on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider Jensen’s functionals on time scales and discuss its properties and applications. Further, we define weighted generalized and power means on time scales. By applying the properties of Jensen’s functionals on these means, we obtain several refinements and converses of Hölder’s inequality on time scales.

  10. Effect of Notched Strings on Tennis Racket Spin Performance: Ultrahigh-Speed Video Analysis of Spin Rate, Contact Time, and Post-Impact Ball Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Masamichi

    While some tennis racket strings have more grip than others do, this does not guarantee that they will impart more spin to a tennis ball. Experiments with hand-held rackets are required to determine the longstanding question of how players can discern that different strings behave differently when laboratory tests indicate that they should play the same. In a previous study, we clarified the top-spin mechanism of a tennis racket by using high-speed video analysis on a tennis court for the first time. Furthermore, we improved it by using lubricated notched nylon strings. These experiments revealed that the more the main strings stretch and bend laterally, the more spin is imparted to the ball. This is due to the restoring force being parallel to the string face when the main strings spring back and the ball is released from the strings. Notched strings reduce the spin rate, but this can be effectively counteracted by employing lubricants. Furthermore, we found that imparting more spin reduces shock vibrations on the wrist during impact. The present study revealed that a ball has a 40% lower spin rate when hit with a racket with notched strings than with one with unnotched strings in the case of nylon (it had to be determined whether new strings or lubricated used strings give more spin). The experiments also showed that 30% more spin is imparted to a ball when the string intersections are lubricated by oil than when notched used nylon strings are used. Furthermore, we found that used natural gut notched strings reduced the spin rate by 70% compared to when new natural gut unnotched strings are used. We also investigated different top-spin behaviors obtained when professional and amateur tennis players hit a ball.

  11. Term-Time Employment and the Academic Performance of Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Michael; Yu, Wei-Choun

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines a framework for evaluating the decision of undergraduate students to engage in term-time employment as a method of financing higher education. We then examine the impact of work on academic achievement and find that employment has modest negative effects on student grades, with a grade point average (GPA) falling by 0.007…

  12. Effective time management for high performance in an organization Case: Lasaco Assurance PLC

    OpenAIRE

    Adeojo, Adeyinka

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to determine the effect of time management on high organizational performance using LASACO ASSURANCE Plc. as a case company. In this thesis, the employees working with the company were sent questionnaires. Their responses were critically analyzed and thus related to the theories. A quantitative approach was used as the methodology. According to the theory, time management is a method for managers to increase work performance effectiveness. Time man...

  13. ISCCS Thermal Performance Based on Real-time Dynamic Simulation Model%基于动态仿真模型的ISCCS热力特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马士英; 崔凝; 刘洋; 吴铭棉

    2016-01-01

    The direct steam generation in parabolic trough collectors systems (DSG-PTC) with different capacities and working-medium flow path were designed. The integration schemes for the integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) taking DSG-PTC as the auxiliary heat source were put forward. The real-time dynamic simulation models for the ISCCS were studied based on the previous research achievements. With these dynamic simulation models, the operating characteristics of ISCCS were analyzed, the matching principle of the working-medium flow and energy flow between two energy systems were indicated, the control strategy improving suggestions in ISCCS are put forward, the dynamic response characteristics of the ISCCS are researched, the thermal economy of the ISCCS in different integration schemes are calculated, and the optimal integration scheme is proposed.%设计了6套不同容量和流程的直接产生蒸汽型槽式聚光集热系统(direct steam generation in parabolic trough collectors,DSG-PTC);提出以DSG-PTC为辅助热源的整体太阳能联合循环发电系统(integrated solar combined cycle system,ISCCS)的6种集成方案;基于已取得的研究成果,研究 ISCCS 系统实时动态仿真模型.利用模型从系统层面分析了ISCCS系统的运行特性,反映了2个能源系统间工质流和能量流的匹配规律;揭示控制系统在 ISCCS 中的适用性并提出了控制策略的改进建议;研究 ISCCS 系统动态响应特性,提出 ISCCS 系统改进措施;从热力学的角度计算分析不同集成方式的 ISCCS 系统热经济性,给出了最佳集成方案.

  14. DIFFERENCES IN EXERCISE PERFORMANCE AND LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN OLDER MEN AND WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew W. Gardner; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2008-01-01

    Purposes: (a) To compare exercise performance and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) between older men and women, (b) to assess the relationship between exercise performance and LTPA, and (c) to determine whether group differences in exercise performance persist after controlling for LTPA.Methods: A total of 105 women and 155 men who were 65 years of age and older participated in this study. Subjects were characterized on exercise performance by a 6-minute walk test, and by a short physi...

  15. Irreversible and endoreversible behaviors of the LD-model for heat devices: the role of the time constraints and symmetries on the performance at maximum χ figure of merit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Calvo Hernández, A.; Roco, J. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The main unified energetic properties of low dissipation heat engines and refrigerator engines allow for both endoreversible or irreversible configurations. This is accomplished by means of the constraints imposed on the characteristic global operation time or the contact times between the working system with the external heat baths and modulated by the dissipation symmetries. A suited unified figure of merit (which becomes power output for heat engines) is analyzed and the influence of the symmetries on the optimum performance discussed. The obtained results, independent on any heat transfer law, are faced with those obtained from Carnot-like heat models where specific heat transfer laws are needed. Thus, it is shown that only the inverse phenomenological law, often used in linear irreversible thermodynamics, correctly reproduces all optimized values for both the efficiency and coefficient of performance values.

  16. Market timing and selectivity performance of mutual funds in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Musah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in mutual funds in Ghana has been tremendous over the last decade as evidenced by the continuous increases in number and total funds under management. However, no empirical work has been done on the selectivity and timing ability of the mutual fund managers. Using monthly returns data hand-collected from the reports of the mutual fund managers for the period January 2007-December 2012, this paper examines the market timing and selectivity ability of mutual fund managers in Ghana using the classic Treynor-Mazuy (1966 model and Henriksson- Merton (1981 model. The results suggest that, in general mutual fund managers in Ghana are not able to effectively select stocks and also are not able to predict both the magnitude and direction of future market returns. More specifically, all of the sample mutual fund managers attain significant negative selectivity coefficients and also most of them attain insignificant negative timing coefficients.

  17. 配气相位和压缩比对CNG发动机性能影响的模拟研究%A Simulation Study on Influence of Valve Timing and Compression Ratio on CNG Engine Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    斯海林; 姜在先; 王志洪; 何义团

    2013-01-01

    The authors analyze the regulation of valve timing and compression ratio on the CNG engine performance by establishing a CNG engine simulation model based on BOOST. It is found that the CNG engine can achieve the same power of the original engine and can effectively prevent backfire when the compression ratio is 12:1 and the valve overlap is 0°.%  利用BOOST建立CNG发动机仿真模型,研究配气相位和压缩比对发动机性能影响规律。研究表明,压缩比等于12:1、气门重叠角等于0°时,CNG发动机能够达到原发动机的功率水平,且能有效防止回火现象的发生。

  18. Influence of dye loading time and electrolytes ratio on the performance spin coated ZnO photoanode based dye sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrik Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ZnO photoanode for dye sensitized solar cell sythesized by sol-gel spin coating method. XRD pattern confirmed the film is crystalline in nature and crystallite size calculated was 45.8 nm. The grain size from SEM image of ZnO is 66.3nm. Trnsmission of ZnO thin film was observed 75-92% in wavelength range from 400-800nm. The effieciency for for dye loaded 6 and 12 hours time were 0.38 and 0.44 respectively. In case of electrolytes ratio the maximum effieciency and fill factor were 0.44 and 0.49 respectively.

  19. Effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time on performance of a prototype single-stage anaerobic digester for conversion of food wastes to biogas and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanatamskul, Chavalit; Saleart, Tawinan

    2016-04-01

    Food wastes have been recognized as the largest waste stream and accounts for 39.25 % of total municipal solid waste in Thailand. Chulalongkorn University has participated in the program of in situ energy recovery from food wastes under the Ministry of Energy (MOE), Thailand. This research aims to develop a prototype single-stage anaerobic digestion system for biogas production and energy recovery from food wastes inside Chulalongkorn University. Here, the effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time were investigated as the main key parameters for the system design and operation. From the results obtained in this study, it was found that the sludge recirculation rate of 100 % and the mixing time of 60 min per day were the most suitable design parameters to achieve high efficiencies in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total solids (TS), and total volatile solid (TVS) removal and also biogas production by this prototype anaerobic digester. The obtained biogas production was found to be 0.71 m(3)/kg COD and the composition of methane was 61.6 %. Moreover, the efficiencies of COD removal were as high as 82.9 % and TVS removal could reach 83.9 % at the optimal condition. Therefore, the developed prototype single-stage anaerobic digester can be highly promising for university canteen application to recover energy from food wastes via biogas production.

  20. Real-time performance modeling of (3G) UMTS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinath, R.; Mitra, Abhijit; Sinha, Nishant; Mukherjee, Niloy

    2001-11-01

    Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) wireless technologies is a proposed standardization as a part of 3GPP solutions to satisfy IMT-2000 requirements. It is based on wideband CDMA technology. It will provide full coverage and mobility for 144 Kb/s, preferably 384 Kb/s and limited coverage and mobility for 2 Mb/s. It proposes high spectrum efficiency compared to existing systems, handling of different QOS profiles and high flexibility to introduce new service. In this paper, we present our work on modeling of the access stratum (AS) on the User Equipment/Mobile Termination (UE/MT) side of the radio (Uu) interface in accordance with 3GPP UMTS standards. The AS has the following sub-layers: Medium Access Control/Radio Link Control (MAC/RLC), Broadcast Multicast Control (BMC), Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP) and Radio Resource Control (RRC). We have assumed the number of transport channels interfacing the AS MAC sub layer and the physical layer to be eight. The data rates have been assumed to be 384 Kb/s per transport channel both in uplink and downlink. Processing in each sub-layer with corresponding delays and interaction between adjacent sublayers having timing restrictions or rate restrictions have been analyzed. Interaction of the upper sub-layers with the non-access stratum (NAS) and interaction between peer AS sub-layers in the UE and the UTRAN have also been incorporated. A real time priority based scheduler process has been specified to honor the time restrictions e.g. the Transmission Time Intervals (TTI) of the channels. The system has been simulated on Virtual Silicon, a C based SDL tool and evaluated on CR16C architecture family using CR16C debugger, both developed by National Semi Conductor Corp., U.S.A.

  1. Which laboratory variable is related with time trial performance time in the Tour de France?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, A; Hoyos, J; Perez, M; Santalla, A; Earnest, C; Chicharro, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between several physiological variables that can be easily obtained during cycle ergometer gradual testing (for example, peak power output (Wpeak), VO2max, or ventilatory threshold (VT)) and actual (>50 km) time trials (TT) time performance during the Tour de France. Methods: We collected data in professional cyclists from the first TT of the 1998 Tour de France (TT1, 58 km distance; n = 6 cyclists) and the first (TT2, 56.5 km; n = 5) and second TT of the 1999 Tour de France (TT3, 57 km; n = 5). Results: A negative relationship was found between power output (W) at VT (VTWatt) and TT final time (s) in TT1 (r = –0.864; p = 0.026; standard error of estimate (SEE) of 73 s; and 95% confidence limits (95% CL) –0.98; –0.18), TT2 (r = –0.77; p = 0.27; SEE of 139 s; and 95% CL –0.98; 0.35), and TT3 (r = –0.923; p = 0.025; SEE of 94 s; and 95% CL –1.00; –0.22). Conclusions: Actual performance in long TT during the Tour de France (>50 km distance, performed after at least 1–2 weeks of continuous competition), in which some cumulative fatigue inevitably occurs, is related, at least in part, to the power output that elicits the VT. No other routine physiological variable (for example, VO2max or Wpeak) is related to performance in this type of event. PMID:15388555

  2. Setting time limits on tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time limit on a test can be set to control the probability of a test taker running out of time before completing it. The probability is derived from the item parameters in the lognormal model for response times. Examples of curves representing the probability of running out of ti

  3. Influence of Gold Coating and Interplate Voltage on the Performance of Chevron Micro-Channel Plates for the Time and Space Resolved Single Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hoendervanger, Lynn; Aspect, Alain; Westbrook, Christoph I; Dowek, Danielle; PICARD, Yan; Boiron, Denis

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of two sets of Micro-Channel Plates used for time and space resolved single particle detection. We investigate the effects of the gold layer and that of introducing an interplate voltage between the two chevron plates for the detection of single particles. We find that the gold layer increases the count rate of the detector and the pulse amplitude as previously reported for non-spatially resolved setups. The interplate voltage also increases count rates. In addition, we find that the interplate voltage leads to better spatial accuracy in determining the arrival position of incoming single particles (by 20%) while the gold layer has a negative effect (by 30%).

  4. Effect of hydraulic retention time on up-flow anaerobic stage reactor performance at constant loading in the presence of antibiotic tylosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chelliapan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed at determining the impact of the macrolide antibiotic Tylosin in reduced HRT at constant organic loading rate (OLR by varying feed substrate concentration in an up-flow anaerobic stage reactor (UASR. The antibiotic concentration was maintained at 200 mg.L-1, at constant OLR of 1.88 kg COD.m-3.d-1, by varying feed substrate concentration to the UASR and the HRT was decreased gradually from 4 to 1 d. Throughout the operation period, brewery wastewater was used as simple feed substrate to elevate the concentration of easily biodegradable carbon in comparison with the concentrations of more recalcitrant Tylosin substrate. The reactor alkalinity was controlled in all the stages of UASR by adding 1000 - 2000 mg.L-1 CaCO3. Results showed the total COD removal efficiency at 4 d HRT was around 92%, after which point there was a slight decrease at 3 and 2 d HRT (average 82%, and this was reduced further (average 77% at a HRT of 1 d. The UASR showed stable operation with effluent volatile fatty acid (VFA less than 300 mg.L-1 throughout the experimental period (HRT 4 - 1 d. Moreover, the average methane yield (CH4.kg CODr-1 showed a relatively constant profile and was largely unaffected by HRT in all the stages of UASR. These results show that bacteria were readily adapted to wastewater containing Tylosin at lower HRTs and did not affect the reactor performance substantially.

  5. An Approach to Integrate a Space-Time GIS Data Model with High Performance Computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dali [ORNL; Zhao, Ziliang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shaw, Shih-Lung [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to integrate a Space-Time GIS data model on a high performance computing platform. The Space-Time GIS data model has been developed on a desktop computing environment. We use the Space-Time GIS data model to generate GIS module, which organizes a series of remote sensing data. We are in the process of porting the GIS module into an HPC environment, in which the GIS modules handle large dataset directly via parallel file system. Although it is an ongoing project, authors hope this effort can inspire further discussions on the integration of GIS on high performance computing platforms.

  6. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: employees' start times influence supervisor performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Kai Chi; Fehr, Ryan; Barnes, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we draw from the stereotyping literature to suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are affected by employees' start times-the time of day they first arrive at work. Even when accounting for total work hours, objective job performance, and employees' self-ratings of conscientiousness, we find that a later start time leads supervisors to perceive employees as less conscientious. These perceptions in turn cause supervisors to rate employees as lower performers. In addition, we show that supervisor chronotype acts as a boundary condition of the mediated model. Supervisors who prefer eveningness (i.e., owls) are less likely to hold negative stereotypes of employees with late start times than supervisors who prefer morningness (i.e., larks). Taken together, our results suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are susceptible to stereotypic beliefs based on employees' start times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Night time aircraft noise exposure and children's cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Hygge, Staffan; Clark, Charlotte; Alfred, Tamuno

    2010-01-01

    Chronic aircraft noise exposure in children is associated with impairment of reading and long-term memory. Most studies have not differentiated between day or nighttime noise exposure. It has been hypothesized that sleep disturbance might mediate the association of aircraft noise exposure and cognitive impairment in children. This study involves secondary analysis of data from the Munich Study and the UK Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH) Study sample to test this. In the Munich study, 330 children were assessed on cognitive measures in three measurement waves a year apart, before and after the switchover of airports. Self-reports of sleep quality were analyzed across airports, aircraft noise exposure and measurement wave to test whether changes in nighttime noise exposure had any effect on reported sleep quality, and whether this showed the same pattern as for changes in cognitive performance. For the UK sample of the RANCH study, night noise contour information was linked to the children's home and related to sleep disturbance and cognitive performance. In the Munich study, analysis of sleep quality questions showed no consistent interactions between airport, noise, and measurement wave, suggesting that poor sleep quality does not mediate the association between noise exposure and cognition. Daytime and nighttime aircraft noise exposure was highly correlated in the RANCH study. Although night noise exposure was significantly associated with impaired reading and recognition memory, once home night noise exposure was centered on daytime school noise exposure, night noise had no additional effect to daytime noise exposure. These analyses took advantage of secondary data available from two studies of aircraft noise and cognition. They were not initially designed to examine sleep disturbance and cognition, and thus, there are methodological limitations which make it less than ideal in giving definitive answers to these

  8. The impact of professional isolation on teleworker job performance and turnover intentions: does time spent teleworking, interacting face-to-face, or having access to communication-enhancing technology matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Dino, Richard N

    2008-11-01

    Although the teleworking literature continues to raise concerns regarding the adverse consequences of professional isolation, researchers have not examined its impact on work outcomes. Consequently, the authors first examine professional isolation's direct impact on job performance and turnover intentions among teleworkers and then investigate the contingent role of 3 salient work-mode-related factors. Survey data from a matched sample of 261 professional-level teleworkers and their managers revealed that professional isolation negatively impacts job performance and, contrary to expectations, reduces turnover intentions. Moreover, professional isolation's impact on these work outcomes is increased by the amount of time spent teleworking, whereas more face-to-face interactions and access to communication-enhancing technology tend to decrease its impact. On the basis of these findings, an agenda for future research on professional isolation is offered that takes into account telework's growing popularity as a work modality.

  9. Effects of U.S. Navy Diver Training on Physiological Parameters, Time of Useful Consciousness and Cognitive Performance During Periods of Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    for SpO2 levels as one input for a physiological based definition of TUC. Future research should focus on developing a model that incorporates a 60...SpO2 cut-point, as well as changes in HR and blood pressure data that are based on the subject’s individualized normative data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS... neuromuscular control (e.g., partial paralysis of a limb) as well as hypoxia-induced loss of consciousness.1 Resistance to the detrimental effects of

  10. System Performance, Error Rates, and Training Time for Recent FAA Academy Nonradar Graduates, Community Persons, and Handicapped Persons on the Radar Training Facility Pilot Position,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    acceptable limits. Feedback gives this knowledge. Negative reinforcement may have some useful purpose in training. On the other hand, it is doubtful that...it can serve usefully as the only means of shaping behavior. If negative reinforcement is used, it should be used in conjunction with opportunities

  11. On the nature of time

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The paper puts forward a conceptual framework in which the phenomenon of time can be presented and discussed in a proper way. We argue that change is ontologically and epistemologically a more basic phenomenon than time. Time is an abstract entity created by the human mind on the basis of the experience of change. Physical reality is a process of ceaseless becoming and vanishing; time is not a part of that process. Time is the abstract bank in relation to which we measure the intensity and am...

  12. Systematically Controlling for the Influence of Age, Sex, Hertz and Time Post-Whole-Body Vibration Exposure on Four Measures of Physical Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Cross-Over Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold L. Merriman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Though popular, there is little agreement on what whole-body vibration (WBV parameters will optimize performance. This study aimed to clarify the effects of age, sex, hertz and time on four physical function indicators in community-dwelling older adults (=32. Participants were exposed to 2 min WBV per session at either 2 Hz or 26 Hz and outcome measures were recorded at 2, 20 and 40 min post-WBV. Timed get up-and-go and chair sit-and-reach performances improved post-WBV for both sexes, were significantly different between 2 Hz and 26 Hz treatments (≤0.05 and showed statistically significant interactions between age and gender (≤0.01. Counter movement jump and timed one-legged stance performances showed a similar but non-significant response to 2 Hz and 26 Hz treatments, though male subjects showed a distinct trended response. Age and gender should be statistically controlled and both 2 Hz and 26 Hz exert a treatment effect.

  13. A High Performance Digital Time Interval Spectrometer: An Embedded, FPGA-Based System With Reduced Dead Time Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkani Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fast 32-bit one-million-channel time interval spectrometer is proposed based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. The time resolution is adjustable down to 3.33 ns (= T, the digitization/discretization period based on a prototype system hardware. The system is capable to collect billions of time interval data arranged in one million timing channels. This huge number of channels makes it an ideal measuring tool for very short to very long time intervals of nuclear particle detection systems. The data are stored and updated in a built-in SRAM memory during the measuring process, and then transferred to the computer. Two time-to-digital converters (TDCs working in parallel are implemented in the design to immune the system against loss of the first short time interval events (namely below 10 ns considering the tests performed on the prototype hardware platform of the system. Additionally, the theory of multiple count loss effect is investigated analytically. Using the Monte Carlo method, losses of counts up to 100 million events per second (Meps are calculated and the effective system dead time is estimated by curve fitting of a non-extendable dead time model to the results (τNE = 2.26 ns. An important dead time effect on a measured random process is the distortion on the time spectrum; using the Monte Carlo method this effect is also studied. The uncertainty of the system is analysed experimentally. The standard deviation of the system is estimated as ± 36.6 × T (T = 3.33 ns for a one-second time interval test signal (300 million T in the time interval.

  14. Performance Support in Internet Time: The State of the Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gery, Gloria; Malcolm, Stan; Cichelli, Janet; Christensen, Hal; Raybould, Barry; Rosenberg, Marc J.

    2000-01-01

    Relates a discussion held via teleconference that addressed trends relating to performance support. Topics include computer-based training versus performance support; knowledge management; Internet and Web-based applications; dynamics and human activities; enterprise application integration; intrinsic performance support; and future possibilities.…

  15. Stability over Time of Different Methods of Estimating School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay, Xavier; Coe, Rob; Anumendem, Dickson Nkafu

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate how stability varies with the approach used in estimating school performance in a large sample of English primary schools. The results show that (a) raw performance is considerably more stable than adjusted performance, which in turn is slightly more stable than growth model estimates; (b) schools' performance…

  16. Relationship between time management in construction industry and project management performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Najuwa; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, construction industry particularly in Malaysia struggle in achieving status of eminent time management for construction project. Project managers have a great responsibility to keep the project success under time of project completion. However, studies shows that delays especially in Malaysian construction industry still unresolved due to weakness in managing the project. In addition, quality of time management on construction projects is generally poor. Due to the progressively extended delays issue, time performance becomes an important subject to be explored to investigate delay factors. The method of this study is review of literature towards issues in construction industry which affecting time performance of project in general by focusing towards process involved for project management. Based on study, it was found that knowledge, commitment, cooperation are the main criteria as an overall to manage the project into a smooth process during project execution until completion. It can be concluded that, the strength between project manager and team members in these main criteria while conducting the project towards good time performance is highly needed. However, there is lack of establishment towards factors of poor time performance which strongly related with project management. Hence, this study has been conducted to establish factors of poor time performance and its relations with project management.

  17. Vis-A-Plan /visualize a plan/ management technique provides performance-time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranck, N. H.

    1967-01-01

    Vis-A-Plan is a bar-charting technique for representing and evaluating project activities on a performance-time basis. This rectilinear method presents the logic diagram of a project as a series of horizontal time bars. It may be used supplementary to PERT or independently.

  18. Modelling and Comparative Performance Analysis of a Time-Reversed UWB System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovski K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of multipath propagation lead to a significant decrease in system performance in most of the proposed ultra-wideband communication systems. A time-reversed system utilises the multipath channel impulse response to decrease receiver complexity, through a prefiltering at the transmitter. This paper discusses the modelling and comparative performance of a UWB system utilising time-reversed communications. System equations are presented, together with a semianalytical formulation on the level of intersymbol interference and multiuser interference. The standardised IEEE 802.15.3a channel model is applied, and the estimated error performance is compared through simulation with the performance of both time-hopped time-reversed and RAKE-based UWB systems.

  19. On the Geologic Time Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradstein, F.M.; Ogg, J.G.; Hilgen, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the international divisions and ages in the Geologic Time Scale, published in 2012 (GTS2012). Since 2004, when GTS2004 was detailed, major developments have taken place that directly bear and have considerable impact on the intricate science of geologic time scaling. Precam br

  20. Performance Evaluation of AODV & DSR with Varying Pause Time & Speed Time Over TCP & CBR Connections in VANET

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bijan; Bikas, Md Abu Naser

    2012-01-01

    VANET (Vehicular Ad-hoc Network) is a new technology which has taken enormous attention in the recent years. Vehicular ad hoc network is formed by cars which are called nodes; allow them to communicate with one another without using any fixed road side unit. It has some unique characteristics which make it different from other ad hoc network as well as difficult to define any exact mobility model and routing protocols because of their high mobility and changing mobility pattern. Hence performance of routing protocols can vary with the various parameters such as speed, pause time, node density and traffic scenarios. In this research paper, the performance of two on-demand routing protocols AODV & DSR has been analyzed by means of packet delivery ratio, loss packet ratio & average end-to-end delay with varying pause time, speed time and node density under TCP & CBR connection.

  1. Performance Evaluation of AODV and DSR with Varying Pause Time and Speed Time Over TCP and CBR Connections in VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available VANET (Vehicular Ad-hoc Network is a new technology which has taken enormous attention in the recent years. Vehicular ad hoc network is formed by cars which are called nodes; allow them to communicate with one another without using any fixed road side unit. It has some unique characteristics which make it different from other ad-hoc network as well as difficult to define any exact mobility model and routing protocols because of their high mobility and changing mobility pattern. Hence performance of routing protocols can vary with the various parameters such as speed, pause time, node density and traffic scenarios. In this research paper, the performance of two on-demand routing protocols AODV and DSR has been analyzed by means of packet delivery ratio, loss packet ratio average end-to-end delay with varying pause time, speed time and node density under TCP and CBR connection.

  2. Dissociable effects of AMPA-induced lesions of the vertical limb diagonal band of Broca on performance of the 5-choice serial reaction time task and on acquisition of a conditional visual discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J L; Bussey, T J; Everitt, B J; Robbins, T W

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the cholinergic innervation of the cingulate cortex in visual attentional function and acquisition of a visual conditional discrimination task. Following AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) lesions of the vertical limb diagonal band of Broca (VDB) which provides the main cholinergic projection to cingulate cortex, animals were not significantly impaired on the 5-choice serial reaction time task. This task, which provides a continuous performance test of visual attention, has previously been shown to be sensitive to AMPA lesions of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nbM). In contrast to the results obtained for visual attentional function, lesions of the VDB did significantly affect the acquisition of a visual conditional discrimination. While showing a significant facilitation in the early learning stage of acquiring this task animals with lesions of the VDB were significantly impaired during the late stages of learning this task. This late learning deficit was not the result of the animals being unable to learn the task due to the presence of the lesion throughout task acquisition as the results of a second experiment revealed that when animals were pre-trained to 70% accuracy on the task and then lesioned, the impairment in late learning was still apparent. In light of the results presented in the accompanying paper (Bussey et al., Behav. Brain Res., 1996), these results suggest that the early learning effects may be due to cholinergic denervation of the anterior cingulate cortex while the late learning effects may be due to denervation of the posterior cingulate cortex. Taken together with previous work indicating a role for the nbM cholinergic system in visual attentional function, these results suggest a role for the cholinergic innervation of the cingulate cortex in conditional learning but not for continuous attentional performance.

  3. Impact of Paving Waiting Time on Performance of Epoxy Asphalt Mixture%摊铺等待时间对环氧沥青混合料性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄明; 黄卫东

    2012-01-01

    A large number of laboratory tests were carried out, which took high temperature, fatigue and moisture resistance as main test items. The research not only evaluated the impact of waiting time for paving on the performance of epoxy asphalt from three aspects, but also integrated these items and put forward suggestions on the value of waiting time for paving by the grey relationship analysis methods. The results indicate that if the waiting time for paving is less than 30 min, the performance of epoxy asphalt will remain unchanged; however, when the grey connection performance declines to 80%, it will take the longest waiting time for paving, which can be as long as 80 min. This method can be applied to the researches and developments of epoxy asphalt as well as the evaluation of engineering practice.%通过大量室内试验,以高温、疲劳和抗水损害性能作为主要检测项目,分别从3个方面评价环氧沥青混合料摊铺等待时间对其性能的影响,并通过灰关联分析法给出了环氧沥青混合料的最佳摊铺等待时间推荐值.结果表明:当摊铺等待时间小于30 min时,环氧沥青混合料性能无变化;当灰关联综合性能下降至80%时,其摊铺等待时间最长,可达80 min.这种方法可用于环氧沥青的研发和工程实践的评判.

  4. Time-to-positivity, type of culture media and oxidase test performed on positive blood culture vials to predict Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with Gram-negative bacilli bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Triguero, N; Zboromyrska, Y; Morata, L; Alejo, I; De La Calle, C; Vergara, A; Cardozo, C; Arcas, M P; Soriano, A; Marco, F; Mensa, J; Almela, M; Martínez, J A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of oxidase test and time-to-positivity (TTP) in aerobic and anaerobic blood culture vials to detect the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) bacteraemia. TTP was recorded for each aerobic and anaerobic blood culture vial of monomicrobial bacteraemia due to GNB. Oxidase test was performed in a pellet of the centrifuged content of the positive blood culture. An algorithm was developed in order to perform the oxidase test efficiently taking into account TTP and type of vial. A total of 341 episodes of GNB bacteraemia were analysed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the oxidase test performed on positive vials with GNB to predict P. aeruginosa were 95%, 99%, 91%, and 99%, respectively. When growth was first or exclusively detected in anaerobic vials, P. aeruginosa was never identified hence the performance of the oxidase test could be avoided. When growth was only or first detected in aerobic vials, a TTP≥8h predicted P. aeruginosa in 37% or cases (63 of 169), therefore oxidase test is highly recommended. Oxidase test performed onto positive blood culture vials previously selected by TTP and type of vials is an easy and inexpensive way to predict P. aeruginosa. In most cases, this can lead to optimization of treatment in less than 24 hours.

  5. Performance Analysis of Message-driven Component Based on Discrete Time Vacation Queue%基于休假排队的消息驱动组件性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田志斌; 田乃硕; 金顺福

    2011-01-01

    To acquire performance assessment of the magnet-driven component,based on discrete time vacation queue Geom/G/1,a life cycle performance model of service threads is created by analyzing embedded Markov chain and distributions of message response time and length of message queue are inferred.A simulation algorithm that is characterized by single thread schedule and multi-status shift is developed.Based on the algorithm,a performance simulator for message-driven component that support multiple service threads is designed.%为获得消息组件性能评价指标,基于离散时间休假排队模型Geom/G/1,建立了服务线程生命周期性能模型;采用嵌入Markov链方法,推导出具有单服务线程的消息驱动组件消息队列长度与响应时间概率分布;基于单线程循环调度与多态转移算法,实现了对多服务线程消息驱动组件的性能仿真.

  6. High-Performance Timing-Driven Rank Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Szántó

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an FPGA implementation of a high-performance rank filter for video and image processing. The architecture exploits the features of current FPGAs and offers tradeoffs between complexity and performance. By maximizing the operating frequency, the complexity of the filter structure can be considerably reduced compared to previous 2D architectures.

  7. Expert Performance and Time Pressure: Implications for Automation Failures in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    automation failure and intuitively react with an optimal response while under time pressure . The present results suggest that either the automation must be...Performance and Time Pressure : Implications for Automation Failures in Aviation 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...previously disengaged human pilot to react immediately to counter a dangerous situation. In other words, automation failure can inflict time pressure on

  8. Evaluating performance over time: Is improving better than being consistently good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Monica; Buehler, Roger

    2017-06-21

    In many decision contexts, people evaluate others based on intertemporal performance records and commonly face a choice between two distinct profiles: performance that is consistently high versus performance that improves over time to that high level. We proposed that these two profiles could be appealing for different reasons, and thus evaluators' preferences will differ across decision contexts. In three studies, participants were presented with candidates (e.g., students, employees) displaying the two profiles, and evaluated each candidate in terms of performance, future expectations, and deservingness. The consistent candidate was rated higher on performance, but lower on future expectations, than the improved candidate. Consequently, in achievement-based decisions (e.g., selecting a student for a scholarship), the consistent candidate was viewed as most deserving, whereas in potential-based decisions (e.g., selecting an employee for promotion), the improved candidate was preferred. These effects were mediated by the relative weight that evaluators placed on performance and future expectations.

  9. Only time will tell: the changing relationships between LMX, job performance, and justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghee; Sturman, Michael C; Vanderpool, Chelsea; Chan, Elisa

    2015-05-01

    Although it has been argued that leader-member exchange (LMX) is a phenomenon that develops over time, the existing LMX literature is largely cross-sectional in nature. Yet, there is a great need for unraveling how LMX develops over time. To address this issue in the LMX literature, we examine the relationships of LMX with 2 variables known for changing over time: job performance and justice perceptions. On the basis of current empirical findings, a simulation deductively shows that LMX develops over time, but differently in early stages versus more mature stages. Our findings also indicate that performance and justice trends affect LMX. Implications for LMX theory and for longitudinal research on LMX, performance, and justice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. On the Flow of Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, George F R

    2008-01-01

    Current theoretical physics suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible nature of decoherence and the quantum measurement process, as well as macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block universe view of spacetime is best replaced by an evolving block universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; spacetime itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in spacetime; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines. Th...

  11. Timing effects on first marriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Robert; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Recent substantial declines in first marriage in Western countries have been accompanied by increases in the average age at first marriage. Since the period proportion ever marrying, PEM, is sensitive to cohort tempo changes, the recent fall in the PEM may simply reflect cohort delays in marriage....... The importance of timing factors is examined in the light of twentieth-century experience of first marriage in England and Wales and the USA. Using a variant of the Timing Index developed in research on fertility, we measure cohort timing effects for marriage and calculate an adjusted PEM. After examining...

  12. Research on the Relationships among Time Pressure, Reflexivity and Performance in NPD Teams%新产品开发团队时间压力、自省性与创新绩效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马永远

    2015-01-01

    The innovation performance of NPD teams is directly related to whether a firm can achieve and keep competitive advantage in the market. Drawing on 'psychological perception-behavior-result' perspective, we explore how time pressure and team reflexivity influence innovation performance. In addition, we also examine what a role environment uncertainty plays in the team reflexivity-team performance link. Through examining the data of 98 NPD teams, research results show that time pressure has an inverse-U relationship with innovation perfor-mance. Team reflexivity has a positive effect on innovation performance, and environment uncertainty moderates the relationship between team reflexivity and innovation performance. This research has certain practical implica-tions for the improvement of performance in NPD teams.%新产品开发团队创新绩效的高低直接关系到企业能否在激烈的市场竞争中取得优势地位。基于“心理感知—行为—结果”视角,检验了新产品开发团队中时间压力与创新绩效之间的关系,探讨了团队自省性对创新绩效所起的作用,并研究了环境不确定性在团队自省性与创新绩效关系中的作用。通过对98个新产品开发团队的数据进行实证分析,研究结果表明,新产品开发团队的时间压力与团队创新绩效之间存在倒U型相关关系,过高的时间压力对创新绩效会产生不利的影响,团队自省性能够提高团队的创新绩效,环境不确定性调节了团队自省性与创新绩效的关系。

  13. Investigation of the Effect of Rice Wine on the Metabolites of the Main Components of Herbal Medicine in Rat Urine by Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study on Cornus officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of the effect of rice wine on the metabolites of the main components of herbal medicine in rat urine. Using Cornus officinalis as a model of herbal medicine, the metabolite profiles of crude and processed (steaming the crude drug presteeped in rice wine Cornus officinalis extracts in rat urine were investigated. The metabolites of Cornus officinalis were identified by using dynamic adjustment of the fragmentor voltage to produce structure-relevant fragment ions. In this work, we identified the parent compounds and metabolites of crude and processed Cornus officinalis in rats. In total, three parent compounds and seventeen new metabolites of Cornus officinalis were found in rats. The contents of the parent compounds and metabolites in vivo varied significantly after intragastric (i.g. administration of aqueous extracts of crude and processed Cornus officinalis. Data from this study suggests that UPLC-QTOF/MS could be used as a potential tool for uncovering the effects of excipients found in the metabolites of the main components of herbal medicine, in vivo, to predict and discover the processing mechanisms of herbal medicine.

  14. Linking melodic expectation to expressive performance timing and perceived musical tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Pearce, Marcus T; Goodchild, Meghan; Dean, Roger T; Wiggins, Geraint; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    This research explored the relations between the predictability of musical structure, expressive timing in performance, and listeners' perceived musical tension. Studies analyzing the influence of expressive timing on listeners' affective responses have been constrained by the fact that, in most pieces, the notated durations limit performers' interpretive freedom. To circumvent this issue, we focused on the unmeasured prelude, a semi-improvisatory genre without notated durations. In Experiment 1, 12 professional harpsichordists recorded an unmeasured prelude on a harpsichord equipped with a MIDI console. Melodic expectation was assessed using a probabilistic model (IDyOM [Information Dynamics of Music]) whose expectations have been previously shown to match closely those of human listeners. Performance timing information was extracted from the MIDI data using a score-performance matching algorithm. Time-series analyses showed that, in a piece with unspecified note durations, the predictability of melodic structure measurably influenced tempo fluctuations in performance. In Experiment 2, another 10 harpsichordists, 20 nonharpsichordist musicians, and 20 nonmusicians listened to the recordings from Experiment 1 and rated the perceived tension continuously. Granger causality analyses were conducted to investigate predictive relations among melodic expectation, expressive timing, and perceived tension. Although melodic expectation, as modeled by IDyOM, modestly predicted perceived tension for all participant groups, neither of its components, information content or entropy, was Granger causal. In contrast, expressive timing was a strong predictor and was Granger causal. However, because melodic expectation was also predictive of expressive timing, our results outline a complete chain of influence from predictability of melodic structure via expressive performance timing to perceived musical tension. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lilian A. Y. Fernandes; Fátima A. Caromano; Assis,Silvana M. B.; Hukuda,Michele E.; Mariana C. Voos; CARVALHO, Eduardo V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA) of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). M...

  16. Integrable Equations on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Gurses, Metin; Guseinov, Gusein Sh.; Silindir, Burcu

    2005-01-01

    Integrable systems are usually given in terms of functions of continuous variables (on ${\\mathbb R}$), functions of discrete variables (on ${\\mathbb Z}$) and recently in terms of functions of $q$-variables (on ${\\mathbb K}_{q}$). We formulate the Gel'fand-Dikii (GD) formalism on time scales by using the delta differentiation operator and find more general integrable nonlinear evolutionary equations. In particular they yield integrable equations over integers (difference equations) and over $q...

  17. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: 4 Times Square, New York City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-11-01

    4 Times Square is a 48-story environmentally responsible building in New York City and is the first project of its size to adopt standards for energy efficiency, indoor ecology, sustainable materials.

  18. The cortisol awakening response is associated with performance of a serial sequence reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Schneider, Luke; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Clow, Angela; Ridding, Michael C; Pitcher, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    There is emerging evidence of a relationship between the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CAR is associated with acquisition, retention and overnight consolidation or improvement of a serial sequence reaction time task. Salivary samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 45 min after awakening in 39 healthy adults on 2 consecutive days. The serial sequence reaction time task was repeated each afternoon. Participants completed the perceived stress scale and provided salivary samples prior to testing for cortisol assessment. While the magnitude of the CAR (Z score) was not associated with either baseline performance or the timed improvement during task acquisition of the serial sequence task, a positive correlation was observed with reaction times during the stable performance phase on day 1 (r=0.373, p=0.019). Residuals derived from the relationship between baseline and stable phase reaction times on day 1 were used as a surrogate for the degree of learning: these residuals were also correlated with the CAR mean increase on day 1 (r=0.357, p=0.048). Task performance on day 2 was not associated with the CAR obtained on this same day. No association was observed between the perceived stress score, cortisol at testing or task performance. These data indicate that a smaller CAR in healthy adults is associated with a greater degree of learning and faster performance of a serial sequence reaction time task. These results support recognition of the CAR as an important factor contributing to cognitive performance throughout the day.

  19. Human Performance in Time-Shared Verbal and Tracking Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    performance of both a one-dimensional compensatory tracking task and a continuous absoluzte difference digit- proceseing task. As mentioned above, the... parts : 1) What combination of input and output (I/O) channels for the discrete information processing task provides optimum information transmission

  20. Integral equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of integral equations on time scales. It also contains elegant analytical and numerical methods. This book is primarily intended for senior undergraduate students and beginning graduate students of engineering and science courses. The students in mathematical and physical sciences will find many sections of direct relevance. The book contains nine chapters and each chapter is pedagogically organized. This book is specially designed for those who wish to understand integral equations on time scales without having extensive mathematical background.

  1. On clustering fMRI time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Toft, Peter Aundal; Rostrup, E.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do...

  2. A high performance real-time plasma control and event detection DSP based VME system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A.P. E-mail: pinto@ci.uc.pt; Correia, Carlos; Varandas, Carlos

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the digital signal processors module of a high performance system, specially designed for real-time plasma control and event detection on the next generation fusion experiments with long duration discharges. The system is composed of a commercial CPU board and several on-site developed intelligent modules inserted in the same VME crate.

  3. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the detector alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment constants, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows us to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  4. On the Nature of Time

    CERN Document Server

    Radovan, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The paper puts forward a conceptual framework in which the phenomenon of time can be presented and discussed in a proper way. We argue that change is ontologically and epistemologically a more basic phenomenon than time. Time is an abstract entity created by the human mind on the basis of the experience of change. Physical reality is a process of ceaseless becoming and vanishing; time is not a part of that process. Time is the abstract bank in relation to which we measure the intensity and amount of the flow (change) of physical reality. We must differentiate physical reality from abstract entities (language) by means of which we speak about this reality. It is necessary to differentiate a formal description (formulas) from its interpretation: a correct formal description can be interpreted in a logically inconsistent and factually wrong way. We argue that the discourse about the relativity of time joins (mixes) physical reality and language, and gives an inconsistent interpretation of correct formulas. Regar...

  5. Gait parameters predicted by Timed Up and Go performance in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Pradon, Didier; Zory, Raphael; Bensmail, Djamel; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Timed Up and Go (TUG) is a test of functional mobility which is routinely used in the assessment of hemiparetic patients. This easy and rapid to perform test includes motor tasks which occur frequently in daily life (stand up, walk, turn, sit down). Correlations between TUG performance and kinematic and kinetic gait parameters have never been studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether kinematic and kinetic gait parameters would be more related to TUG performance than spatio-temporal parameters in stroke patients. Sixty hemiparetic patients able to walk alone performed the TUG test and underwent 3D gait analysis and a clinical evaluation. A stepwise regression analysis was used to select the gait variables that best explained the variability in TUG performance. The percentage of the gait cycle spent in single support phase on the paretic limb was the factor which was the most predictive and correlated with TUG performance, explaining 67% of the variance. No kinematic or kinetic gait parameters explained TUG performance. The results also suggested that TUG performance is mainly related to paretic lower limb motor function. TUG performance in hemiparetic patients mainly depends on the motor ability of the paretic lower limb, particularly the single support phase on the paretic side. Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters do not predict the TUG performance in stroke patients.

  6. Encoding Performance of Orthogonal Space-Time Coded Continuous Phase Modulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Shen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The orthogonal space-time coded continuous phase modulation (OST-CPM system shows attractive performance over fading MIMO channels. In this paper, the Chernoff bound on pair-wise error probability (PWEP is studied for two transmit antennas over spatially correlated quasi-static Rayleigh-fading channel. The maximum likelihood sequence detection (MLSD algorithm is applied to the OST-CPM system. Approximate bound for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is derived to evaluate the encoding performance in correlated channel. The effects of correlation coefficient matrices on the coding performance are simulated. Both analytical and simulation results show that the coding performance of this system decreases as the fading coefficients between the antennas increases. And the penalty on the coding performance increases a lot in fully correlated channel.

  7. Guaranteed control performance robust LQG regulator for discrete-time Markovian jump systems with uncertain noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jin; Xi Hongsheng; Xiao Xiaobo; Ji Haibo

    2007-01-01

    Robust LQG problems of discrete-time Markovian jump systems with uncertain noises are investigated.The problem addressed is the construction of perturbation upper bounds on the uncertain noise covariances so as to guarantee that the deviation of the control performance remains within the precision prescribed in actual problems.Furthermore, this regulator is capable of minimizing the worst performance in an uncertain case. A numerical example is exploited to show the validity of the method.

  8. Research on Relation between Reaction Time and Performance of Sprint and Hurdle%田径短跨项目起跑反应时与运动成绩关联的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜宏斌

    2016-01-01

    反应时作为生理学、心理学及训练学等学科领域的专业术语,受各自学科理论依据与实践实验条件的影响,导致概念界定歧义与数据测量迥异。借助过往经典文献的研究思路与理论架构,取样第15届世界田径锦标赛短跨项目运动员的反应时及运动成绩数据,描述与推断不同性别、轮次、等级水平、项目距离等因素对反应时的影响、反应时与运动成绩的关联及反应时的稳定性。研究表明:1)男女100 m、100 m栏与110 m栏起跑反应时分别存在非常显著性差异与显著性差异,除去男女100 m与100 m栏、110 m栏外,其他不同运动项目间均存在不同程度的显著性差异;2)除去女子200 m预复决赛各轮次反应时存在显著性差异外,其他项目未见差异;3)男女100 m、200 m起跑反应与运动成绩存在显著性相关;4)优秀运动员能够持有较低水平的反应时。科学认识反应时的运行原理及作用、改善运动技术、提高力量素质、积极心理干预等训练参数及手段是提高田径短跨项目运动成绩的根本途径。%As a technical term in the fields of physiology ,psychology and training theory ,the reaction time is influenced by the theoretical basis and the experimental conditions of each subject ,which lead to the concept of ambiguity and data measurement difference .By means of classical literature in the past research ideas and theoretical framework ,sampling the reaction time and performance data of sprinters and hur‐dlers in the 15th World Athletics Championships ,this paper describes and infers the influence of different gender ,rounds ,the grade level ,the event distance on the reaction time ,relation of reaction time with per‐formance ,and stability of reaction time .The result shows that 1) there is very significant difference and significant difference between male and female 100m ,100m and 110m hurdles’ reaction time

  9. Implementing Discretionary Access Control with Time Character in Linux and Performance Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Liang; ZHOU Ming-Tian

    2006-01-01

    DAC (Discretionary Access Control Policy) is access control based on ownership relations between subject and object, the subject can discretionarily decide on that who, by what methods, can access his owns object. In this paper, the system time is looked as a basic secure element. The DAC_T (Discretionary Access Control Policy with Time Character) is presented and formalized. The DAC_T resolves that the subject can discretionarily decide that who, on when, can access his owns objects. And then the DAC_T is implemented on Linux based on GFAC (General Framework for Access Control), and the algorithm is put forward. Finally, the performance analysis for the DAC_T_Linux is carried out. It is proved that the DAC_T_Linux not only can realize time constraints between subject and object but also can still be accepted by us though its performance have been decreased.

  10. Gombrich on image and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristóf Nyíri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a very close, indeed intrinsic, connection between the notions of image and time. Images are incomplete unless they are moving ones – unless, that is, they happen in time. On the other hand, time cannot be conceptualized except by metaphors, and so ultimately by images, of movement in space. That only the moving image is a full-fledged one is a fact that was fully recognized and articulated by Ernst Gombrich. Also, Gombrich entertained, and argued for, a rich and well-balanced view of the relationships between pictorial and verbal representation. An antidote to the unholy influence of Goodman, Gombrich deserves to be rediscovered as the figure whose work is ideally suited to providing a founding paradigm for a truly successful philosophy of images.

  11. On the nature of time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muraskin

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available We study how the notion of time can affect the motion of particles within the No Integrability Aesthetic Field Theory. We show that the Minkowski hypothesis of treating x4 as pure imaginary as well as the fourth component of vectors as pure imaginary, does not lead to different solutions provided we alter the sign of dx4 and certain origin point field components. We next show that it is possible to introduce time in the situation where all fields are real so that: (1 The field equations treat all coordinates the same way; (2 The “flow” concept is associated with time but not with space; (3 Data is prescribed at a single point rather than on a hypersurface as in hyperbolic theories. We study the lattice solution in the approximation that ignores zig-zag paths. This enables us to investigate the effect of a non-trivial superposition principle in the simplest way. We find that such a system, combined with our new approach to time, gives rise to an apparent infinite particle system in which particles can be looked at as not having well defined trajectories. This result is similar to what we obtained when we treated time in the same manner as the space variables in our previous work.

  12. The Relationship between Cellular Phone Use, Performance, and Reaction Time among College Students: Implications for Cellular Phone Use while Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfman, Adam; Wanner, Gregory; Spencer, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on…

  13. Real-Time Shop-Floor Production Performance Analysis Method for the Internet of Manufacturing Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Typical challenges that manufacturing enterprises are facing now are compounded by lack of timely, accurate, and consistent information of manufacturing resources. As a result, it is difficult to analyze the real-time production performance for the shop-floor. In this paper, the definition and overall architecture of the internet of manufacturing things is presented to provide a new paradigm by extending the techniques of internet of things (IoT to manufacturing field. Under this architecture, the real-time primitive events which occurred at different manufacturing things such as operators, machines, pallets, key materials, and so forth can be easily sensed. Based on these distributed primitive events, a critical event model is established to automatically analyze the real-time production performance. Here, the up-level production performance analysis is regarded as a series of critical events, and the real-time value of each critical event can be easily calculated according to the logical and sequence relationships among these multilevel events. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate how to apply the designed methods to analyze the real-time production performance.

  14. Augmenting performance feedback does not affect 4 km cycling time-trials in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Mark; Villerius, Vincent; Murphy, Aron

    2015-01-01

    We compared the effects of (1) accurate and (2) surreptitiously augmented performance feedback on power output and physiological responses to a 4000 m time-trial in the heat. Nine cyclists completed a baseline (BaseL) 4000 m time-trial in ambient temperatures of 30°C, followed by two further 4000 m time-trials at the same temperature, randomly assigning the participants to an accurate (ACC; accurate feedback of baseline) or deceived (DEC; 2% increase above baseline) feedback group. The total power output (PO) and aerobic (Paer) and anaerobic (Pan) contributions were determined at 0.4 km stages during the time-trials, alongside measurements of rectal (Trec) and skin (Tskin) temperatures. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in any of the variables between BaseL, ACC and DEC, despite increases (P 0.05) between feedback condition and time-trial stage. Providing surreptitiously augmented performance feedback to well-trained cyclists did not alter their performance or physiological responses to a 4000 m time-trial in a hot environment. The assumed influence of augmented performance feedback was nullified in the heat, perhaps reflecting a central down-regulation of exercise intensity in response to an increased body temperature.

  15. Meaningful Real-Time Graphics Workstation Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    B.I Module Structure For maino and evento ....................................... 90 Figure B.2 Module Structure For event-drivingo...Event() does not return to main( until the user selects an option to exit the simulation at which time the function exit-simulatorO is called. EventO ...Module Structure For main() and evento 90 A netor s~cob~~s do-drivigun upscume sempupavin I pdte..ehc~~jid updateWok..pos ftslayjiav diayndbox dmwmgn

  16. High-performance TDM demultiplexing of coherent Nyquist pulses using time-domain orthogonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harako, Koudai; Otuya, David Odeke; Kasai, Keisuke; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    We propose a simple and high-performance scheme for demultiplexing coherent Nyquist TDM signals by photo-mixing on a photo-detector with Nyquist LO pulses. This scheme takes advantage of the time-domain orthogonality of Nyquist pulses, which enables high-SNR demultiplexing and homodyne detection simultaneously in spite of a strong overlap with adjacent pulses in the time domain. The feasibility of this scheme is demonstrated through a demultiplexing experiment employing 80 Gbaud, 64 QAM Nyquist pulse OTDM signals. This scheme exhibits excellent demultiplexing performance with a much simpler configuration than a conventional ultrafast all-optical sampling scheme.

  17. Occurrence of discontinuities in the performance of finite-time quantum Otto cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjian; Hänggi, Peter; Poletti, Dario

    2016-07-01

    We study a quantum Otto cycle in which the strokes are performed in finite time. The cycle involves energy measurements at the end of each stroke to allow for the respective determination of work. We then optimize for the work and efficiency of the cycle by varying the time spent in the different strokes and find that the optimal value of the ratio of time spent on each stroke goes through sudden changes as the parameters of this cycle vary continuously. The position of these discontinuities depends on the optimized quantity under consideration such as the net work output or the efficiency.

  18. Postural stability, clicker reaction time and bow draw force predict performance in elite recurve archery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratford, Wayne; Campbell, Rhiannon

    2017-02-14

    Recurve archery is an Olympic sport that requires extreme precision, upper body strength and endurance. The purpose of this research was to quantify how postural stability variables both pre- and post-arrow release, draw force, flight time, arrow length and clicker reaction time, collectively, impacted on the performance or scoring outcomes in elite recurve archery athletes. Thirty-nine elite-level recurve archers (23 male and 16 female; mean age = 24.7 ± 7.3 years) from four different countries volunteered to participate in this study prior to competing at a World Cup event. An AMTI force platform (1000Hz) was used to obtain centre of pressure (COP) measurements 1s prior to arrow release and 0.5s post-arrow release. High-speed footage (200Hz) allowed for calculation of arrow flight time and score. Results identified clicker reaction time, draw force and maximum sway speed as the variables that best predicted shot performance. Specifically, reduced clicker reaction time, greater bow draw force and reduced postural sway speed post-arrow release were predictors of higher scoring shots. It is suggested that future research should focus on investigating shoulder muscle tremors at full draw in relation to clicker reaction time, and the effect of upper body strength interventions (specifically targeting the musculature around the shoulder girdle) on performance in recurve archers.

  19. A time performance comparison of particle swarm optimization in mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Luis Antonio Beltrán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the comparison of three implementations of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, which is a powerful algorithm utilized for optimization purposes. Xamarin, a cross-platform development software, was used to build a single C# application capable of being executed on three different mobile operating systems (OS devices, namely Android, iOS, and Windows Mobile 10, with native level performance. Seven thousand tests comprising PSO evaluations of seven benchmark functions were carried out per mobile OS. A statistical evaluation of time performance of the test set running on three similar devices –each running a different mobile OS– is presented and discussed. Our findings show that PSO running on Windows Mobile 10 and iOS devices have a better performance in computation time than in Android.

  20. 基于灰色Verhulst和EVM模型的项目进度-成本绩效预测研究%Project Time-cost Performance Prediction Based on Grey Verhulst and EVM Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳红祥; 李欣; 陈伟伟

    2013-01-01

      传统挣值管理以进度和成本绩效指数为基础进行完工成本预测,在项目实施的早期其预测值与实际数据会存在较大偏差。因此,项目实施的早期,项目管理团队应侧重对进度和成本绩效趋势进行短期预测。在介绍挣值管理和灰色Verhulst模型的基础上,提出采用Verhulst模型对项目的实际成本和挣值进行预测,并计算进度和成本偏差,通过比较借此发现进度和成本绩效的发展趋势。最后结合具体案例详细介绍了建立灰色Verhulst模型以及利用此模型进行预测的步骤。案例表明该方法是可行和有效的。%  The traditional Earned Value Management is used to forecast the project complete cost based on the duration and cost performance indexes,and there could be large variance between the predicted value and the actual. This paper puts forward that in early stage of project implementation,project management team should focus on making a short-term prediction about the trend of time and cost performance. On the basis of introducing the principle of Earned Value Management and grey Verhulst model,the method of Verhulst model is proposed to predict the actual cost and earned value. So the variance between time and cost could be calculated. And then the developing trend of time and cost performance can be got. In the last section,combined with the specific case,the establishment of grey Verhulst model and the steps for forecasting are both introduced detailed. The case finally shows that the method is feasible and effective.

  1. Can Management Practices Make a Difference? Nonprofit Organization Financial Performance during Times of Economic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The economic crisis presented unprecedented challenges to nonprofit organizations to sustain their services. In this study, we examined both financial and management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations during times of economic stress. In particular, we investigated whether strategic planning and plan implementation, revenue diversification, and board involvement help nonprofit organizations deal with financial uncertainty and strengthen financial performance. Despite the negative impacts that the economic downturn had on nonprofit organizations, we found that the implementation of strategic plans can help nonprofit organizations reduce financial vulnerability. Our findings call attention to key management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations.

  2. Can Management Practices Make a Difference? Nonprofit Organization Financial Performance during Times of Economic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian HU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic crisis presented unprecedented challenges to nonprofit organizations to sustain their services. In this study, we examined both financial and management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations during times of economic stress. In particular, we investigated whether strategic planning and plan implementation, revenue diversification, and board involvement help nonprofit organizations deal with financial uncertainty and strengthen financial performance. Despite the negative impacts that the economic downturn had on nonprofit organizations, we found that the implementation of strategic plans can help nonprofit organizations reduce financial vulnerability. Our findings call attention to key management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations.

  3. Do Diligent Students Perform Better? Complex Relations between Student and Course Characteristics, Study Time, and Academic Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Chris; Broeckmans, Jan; Doumen, Sarah; Groenen, Anne; Molenberghs, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Research has reported equivocal results regarding the relationship between study time investment and academic performance in higher education. In the setting of the active, assignment-based teaching approach at Hasselt University (Belgium), the present study aimed (a) to further clarify the role of study time in academic performance, while taking…

  4. Attention and time constraints in perceptual-motor learning and performance: Instruction, analogy, and skill level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijker, J.M.; Poolton, J.M.; Maxwell, J.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.; Beek, P.J.; Masters, R.S.W.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to gain more insight into the effects of attention focus and time constraints on skill learning and performance in novices and experts by means of two complementary experiments using a table tennis paradigm. Experiment 1 showed that skill-focus conditions and slowed ball frequency

  5. CyNC - towards a General Tool for Performance Analysis of Complex Distributed Real Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Jessen, Jan Jakob; Nielsen, Jens F. Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    The paper addresses the current state and the ongoing activities of a tool for performance analysis of complex real time systems. The tool named CyNC is based on network calculus allowing for the computation of backlogs and delays in a system from specified lower and upper bounds of external...

  6. Caffeine Reduces Reaction Time and Improves Performance in Simulated-Contest of Taekwondo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor G. F. Santos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on reaction time during a specific taekwondo task and athletic performance during a simulated taekwondo contest. Ten taekwondo athletes ingested either 5 mg·kg−1 body mass caffeine or placebo and performed two combats (spaced apart by 20 min. The reaction-time test (five kicks “Bandal Tchagui” was performed immediately prior to the first combat and immediately after the first and second combats. Caffeine improved reaction time (from 0.42 ± 0.05 to 0.37 ± 0.07 s only prior to the first combat (P = 0.004. During the first combat, break times during the first two rounds were shorter in caffeine ingestion, followed by higher plasma lactate concentrations compared with placebo (P = 0.029 and 0.014, respectively. During the second combat, skipping-time was reduced, and relative attack times and attack/skipping ratio was increased following ingestion of caffeine during the first two rounds (all P < 0.05. Caffeine resulted in no change in combat intensity parameters between the first and second combat (all P > 0.05, but combat intensity was decreased following placebo (all P < 0.05. In conclusion, caffeine reduced reaction time in non-fatigued conditions and delayed fatigue during successive taekwondo combats.

  7. Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luden, Nicholas D.; Saunders, Michael J.; D’Lugos, Andrew C.; Pataky, Mark W.; Baur, Daniel A.; Vining, Caitlin B.; Schroer, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate (CHO) solutions can enhance endurance performance (≥30 min). The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of ‘metabolic strain’. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse (PRO) on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% Wmax) followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided. Following 15 min of muscle function assessment, 10 min of constant-load cycling (3 min at 35% Wmax, 7 min at 55% Wmax) was performed. This was immediately followed by a 2 km time trial. Subjects rinsed with 25 mL of CHO, PRO, or placebo (PLA) at min 5:00 and 14:30 of the 15 min muscle function phase, and min 8:00 of the 10-min constant-load cycling. Magnitude-based inferential statistics were used to analyze the effects of the mouth rinse on 2-km time trial performance and the following physiological parameters: Maximum Voluntary Contract (MVC), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), Heart Rate (HR), and blood glucose levels. The primary finding was that CHO ‘likely’ enhanced performance vs. PLA (3.8%), whereas differences between PRO and PLA were unclear (0.4%). These data demonstrate that late-race performance is enhanced by a CHO rinse, but not PRO, under challenging metabolic conditions. More data should be acquired before this strategy is recommended for the later stages of cycling competition under more practical conditions, such as when carbohydrates are supplemented throughout the preceding minutes/hours of exercise. PMID:27657117

  8. Comparison of Taxi Time Prediction Performance Using Different Taxi Speed Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2017-01-01

    In the STBO modeler and tactical surface scheduler for ATD-2 project, taxi speed decision trees are used to calculate the unimpeded taxi times of flights taxiing on the airport surface. The initial taxi speed values in these decision trees did not show good prediction accuracy of taxi times. Using the more recent, reliable surveillance data, new taxi speed values in ramp area and movement area were computed. Before integrating these values into the STBO system, we performed test runs using live data from Charlotte airport, with different taxi speed settings: 1) initial taxi speed values and 2) new ones. Taxi time prediction performance was evaluated by comparing various metrics. The results show that the new taxi speed decision trees can calculate the unimpeded taxi-out times more accurately.

  9. 挣时管理:一种基于挣值的项目进度绩效评价方法%Earned time:a new optimal method of project schedule performance evaluation based on earned value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文静; 周晓宏

    2014-01-01

    The Earned Value Management methodology is a very important and systematic technique that evaluates project performance.This paper studies the disadvantages and limitations of traditional earned value method while evaluating the project Schedule Performance from the application point of view based on the introduction of the traditional earned value management method,and puts forward a performance evaluation method called Earned Time method.It corrects the deviation from traditional earned value method when evaluating the project Schedule Performance,and all the information needed comes form the traditional earned value management.%挣值管理方法是现代项目管理中评价项目绩效的一个非常重要的系统方法。本文在对传统挣值管理方法简要介绍基础上,从实际应用角度就传统挣值管理方法在项目进度绩效评价方面存在的不足和局限进行分析,提出了一种基于时间进度的进度绩效评价方法-挣时分析法。该方法能够改进传统挣值法在进度评价方面的偏差,而且该方法所有信息都来自传统挣值分析,不需要增加额外的信息。

  10. Intraindividual variability in basic reaction time predicts middle-aged and older pilots' flight simulator performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Heraldez, Daniel; Noda, Art; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Yesavage, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40-69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%-12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance.

  11. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  12. The Value of Time Limits on Internet Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothen, Thomas; Wambach, Cathrine

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated 15-min time limits on 10-item multiple-choice quizzes delivered over the Internet. Students in a computer-assisted course in human development spent less time on quizzes and performed better on exams when they had time limits on their quizzes. We conclude that time limits are associated with better learning and exam…

  13. Flat and uphill climb time trial performance prediction in elite amateur cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M M; Izquierdo, M; Ibáñez, J; Asiain, X; Mendiguchía, J; Gorostiaga, E M

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine physiological, anthropometric, biomechanical and hormonal variables related to road flat and uphill climb performance. Eighteen elite level amateur road cyclists (21.1 +/- 3.8 yrs), homogeneous with regard to time trial performance (coefficient of variation: 2.9-5.2 %), were measured for frontal area (FA), maximal strength, power, cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris muscle and basal serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT) and cortisol (C). Maximal (W (max)) and submaximal workload were measured during a progressive discontinuous maximal cycling laboratory test, and two all-out time trial performance tests (duration range: 1049-1251 s) were also conducted outdoors on two separate days: a 14-km flat road (average gradient of 0.2 %) and a 6.7-km uphill climb (average gradient of 6 %). Significant negative correlations (p climb trial performance time correlated significantly (p climb time trial performance is associated with maximal workload normalized to body mass, as well as with an increased anabolic-androgenic activity.

  14. Analysis of electrochemical noise data in both time and frequency domains to evaluate the effect of ZnO nanopowder addition on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ashassi-Sorkhabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy–ZnO nanocomposite coatings have been developed for corrosion protection of steel. Structural characterization of the prepared nanocomposites was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The anti-corrosive properties of the coatings were evaluated by electrochemical noise (EN. On the basis of the EN results in both time and frequency domains, the nanocomposite material with low ZnO concentration (0.1% wt.% was found to be much superior in corrosion protection when tested in aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Finally, EIS measurements were carried out and the data fitted with suitable equivalent circuit. Resistance parameters obtained by both techniques were found to be in relatively good agreement.

  15. Effect of PGF2α and GnRH on the reproductive performance of postpartum dairy cows subjected to synchronization of ovulation and timed artificial insemination during the warm or cold periods of the year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarabadi, M Afsari; Shabankareh, H Karami; Abdolmohammadi, A; Shahsavari, M H

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows (Holstein Friesian) after the injection of PGF2α analogue on Day 15 postpartum, and GnRH analogue on Day 23 after artificial insemination (AI) with Presynch (two injections of PGF2α, administered 14 days apart starting at 30-35 days postpartum) + Ovsynch-based (GnRH-7 days-PGF2α-2 days-GnRH-16-20 hours-timed artificial insemination) treatments, during the warm and cold periods of the year. All the cows (n = 313) were assigned to one of the four groups including: M1 (n = 72) in which the cows were treated with PGF2α on Day 15 postpartum + Presynch-Ovsynch + GnRH on Day 23 post-AI; M2 (n = 41) in which the cows received PGF2α on Day 15 postpartum + Presynch-Ovsynch; M3 (n = 100) including the cows that got Presynch-Ovsynch; and control group (n = 100) including the cows that were not treated and were inseminated at natural estrus. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed 28 to 35 days post-insemination by means of ultrasound. The results showed that treatment with PGF2α on Day 15 postpartum significantly decreased the days to conception and the number of services per conception (P 0.05). In contrast, administration of GnRH on Day 23 post-AI increased the days to conception and the number of service per conception (P artificial insemination after Presynch-Ovsynch protocol but also reduced that.

  16. Time course for the recovery of physical performance, blood hemoglobin, and ferritin content after blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Andreas K; Grand, Johannes; Stangerup, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that blood donation negatively affects endurance performance, but data on physical recovery after a standard blood donation are scarce. This study aimed to elucidate the temporary impact of blood donation on endurance performance, measured as peak oxygen uptake (VO......2peak ) and time trial (TT) performance. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: VO2peak , TT performance, blood, iron, and anthropometric variables were determined before (baseline) and 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after blood donation in 19 healthy men. RESULTS: VO2peak was reduced by 6.5% from 49.7 ± 2 m......L/kg/min at baseline to 46.3 ± 2 mL/kg/min on Day 3 (p blood donation. Blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration declined 7.9% from 9.3 ± 0.11 mmol...

  17. APPLICATION OF TRAVEL TIME RELIABILITY FOR PERFORMANCE ORIENTED OPERATIONAL PLANNING OF EXPRESSWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehran, Babak; Nakamura, Hideki

    Evaluation of impacts of congestion improvement scheme s on travel time reliability is very significant for road authorities since travel time reliability repr esents operational performance of expressway segments. In this paper, a methodology is presented to estimate travel tim e reliability prior to implementation of congestion relief schemes based on travel time variation modeling as a function of demand, capacity, weather conditions and road accident s. For subject expressway segmen ts, traffic conditions are modeled over a whole year considering demand and capacity as random variables. Patterns of demand and capacity are generated for each five minute interval by appl ying Monte-Carlo simulation technique, and accidents are randomly generated based on a model that links acci dent rate to traffic conditions. A whole year analysis is performed by comparing de mand and available capacity for each scenario and queue length is estimated through shockwave analysis for each time in terval. Travel times are estimated from refined speed-flow relationships developed for intercity expressways and buffer time index is estimated consequently as a measure of travel time reliability. For validation, estimated reliability indices are compared with measured values from empirical data, and it is shown that the proposed method is suitable for operational evaluation and planning purposes.

  18. Real-time 3D Eye Performance Reconstruction for RGBD Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Quan; Xu, Feng; Yong, Jun-Hai

    2016-12-19

    This paper proposes a real-time method for 3D eye performance reconstruction using a single RGBD sensor. Combined with facial surface tracking, our method generates more pleasing facial performance with vivid eye motions. In our method, a novel scheme is proposed to estimate eyeball motions by minimizing the differences between a rendered eyeball and the recorded image. Our method considers and handles different appearances of human irises, lighting variations and highlights on images via the proposed eyeball model and the L0-based optimization. Robustness and real-time optimization are achieved through the novel 3D Taylor expansion-based linearization. Furthermore, we propose an online bidirectional regression method to handle occlusions and other tracking failures on either of the two eyes from the information of the opposite eye. Experiments demonstrate that our technique achieves robust and accurate eye performance reconstruction for different iris appearances, with various head/face/eye motions, and under different lighting conditions.

  19. Performance Characterization Method of Partial Discharge UHF Sensor Based on Time Domain Parameters%基于时域参数的局部放电特高频传感器性能表征方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈孝信; 钱勇; 盛戈; 江秀臣

    2015-01-01

    特高频(ultra-high frequency,UHF)传感器的时域输出信号对局部放电宽带检测系统的检测和定位结果具有显著影响,因此评估传感器检测性能时,若能从其时域输出特性出发,将更贴近于宽带检测系统的工程需求。现有的有效高度表征体系不适用于具有非平坦群时延的特高频传感器,在描述传感器时域输出特性时具有局限性。提出了一种基于时域参数的特高频传感器的性能表征方法,通过构造解析脉冲响应函数,从中提取包络峰值、包络宽度和振荡时间三种时域参数,用于描述传感器在局部放电脉冲信号下时域输出波形的峰峰值、上升时间和振荡。设计了有效高度幅频特性与相频特性的测试系统并给出时域参数的测试方法。通过比较两种传感器的时域参数测试结果和实际检测结果对该表征方法进行了检验。研究结果表明:该表征方法能有效地反映UHF传感器的时域输出特性,弥补了现有方法的不足。%For wide-band partial discharge (PD) detection systems, the time domain output signals of an ultra-high frequency (UHF) sensor significantly affect the results of PD detection and location. Therefore it would be more practical for wide-band PD detection systems if the performance of a UHF sensor is evaluated in terms of its time domain output characteristics. The effective height characterization system currently used has its limitation when the sensor has a non-flat group delay. A performance characterization method of UHF sensors based on time domain parameters is therefore proposed. Three time domain parameters extracted from the analytic impulse response, i.e. the peak value of the envelope, the envelope width and the ringing duration, are applied to describe the peak-peak value, the rise time and the oscillation of the output signal of a UHF sensor detecting PD. A measurement system of the sensor effective height, as

  20. Paid part-time employment and academic performance of undergraduate nursing students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rochford, Ceire

    2012-02-01

    Nursing students are increasingly undertaking paid term-time employment to finance their living expenses and studies. However the type and duration of this part-time work is unknown; furthermore there is a limited evidence on the extent to which this part-time employment is impacting on academic performance and the student\\'s experience of higher education. To address this shortfall this study undertook a cross-sectional survey of undergraduate nursing students to explore the incidence of student involvement in term-time employment and to develop an understanding of the relationship of employment on student\\'s academic and clinical achievement, and on their experience of higher education. The results found that the vast majority of the sample were working in part-time employment during term-time. The average number of hours worked per week was sixteen. The number of hours worked per week was found to be a predictor of course performance, the student\\'s experience of college and grades achieved. Students who worked greater hours reported negative outcomes in each of these three domains. The findings also support the contention that it is not working per se that has a detrimental effect on student outcomes but the numbers of hours\\' students are actually working while attending college. Therefore policy makers, educationalists and health service providers need to be aware of the burden that nursing students may have to contend with in combining work with their academic studies.

  1. Study of timing performance of Silicon Photomultiplier and application for a Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, G S M; Marton, J; Suzuki, K

    2010-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are very versatile photo detectors due to their high photon detection efficiency, fast response, single photon counting capability, high amplification, and their insensitivity to magnetic fields. At our institute we are studying the performance of these photo detectors at various operating conditions. On the basis of the experience in the laboratory we built a prototype of a timing Cherenkov detector consisting of a quartz radiator with two $3\\times 3$ mm$^2$ MPPCs S10362-33-100C from Hamamatsu Photonics as photodetectors. The MPPC sensors were operated with Peltier cooling to minimize thermal noise and to avoid gain drifts. The test measurements at the DA$\\Phi$NE Beam-Test Facility (BTF) at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) with pulsed 490 MeV electrons and the results on timing performance with Cherenkov photons are presented.

  2. Study on the method of measuring the Time & Frequency performance of Satellite Navigation Systems%卫星导航系统时间频率性能测度方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海涛; 李孝辉; 华宇; 任晓乾

    2011-01-01

    It's a very complex job to evaluate the Time & Frequency performance of Satellite Navigation Systems. Almost all of the available methods for Time & Frequency performance measurement are designed for the single equipment or the discrete part. But it is rarely considered to measuring the performance of Time & Frequency System as a whole. In this paper, two ways of the performance chain standard range and Time & Frequency differentiable degree are given to analyze and evaluate the performance of Time & Frequency. Time & Frequency performance chain standard is used for analyzing the reason and the consistency of Time & Frequency technical index decomposition. Time & Frequency differentiable degree is named for evaluating the stationarity of the time signals and data. By Time & Frequency differentiable degree analysis, we evaluate the effectiveness of the method and technology for data updating, parameter modeling, forecast model and redundancy switch, signals controlling. Here, the two concepts are presented and used. We designed the method for measuring and evaluating the Time & Frequency of Satellite Navigation Systems.%对导航系统中的时间频率性能进行评估较为复杂.目前已知的时间频率测试主要是针对单机和分离部件,就时间频率体系整体来研究测试评估方法还较少.通过对导航系统中的时间频率体系的分析,提出从时间频率链性能带限和时间频率的可微度两个方面进行整体性能的分析和测评.时间频率性能带限主要用于分析评估时间频率技术指标分解的合理性、各关联内容技术指标的协调性和一致性.时间频率可微度主要用于分析评估时间频率信号和数据的平稳性.通过可微度分析计算,来评估数据更新、参数建模、模型预报,以及冗余切换、信号控制和保持驾驭的策略和技术的有效性.本文提出并使用这两个概念,研究了对卫星导航系统中的时间频率的一种测试评估方法.

  3. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  4. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  5. Real-Time Embedded High Performance Computing: Communications Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    big disadvantage of STDM in our context is that it does not attempt to make use of the distributed nature of the network, it may be unacceptably...are attained. We are motivated by situations where most messages are relatively long and are sent broken up into many packets of size Adata . There...may be different packet sizes for different messages, but we start by assuming that Adata is fixed. On the other hand, the optimal value for Adata is

  6. Conductive and evaporative precooling lowers mean skin temperature and improves time trial performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, S H; Hupperets, M; Hodder, S G; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    Self-paced endurance performance is compromised by moderate-to-high ambient temperatures that are evident in many competitive settings. It has become common place to implement precooling prior to competition in an attempt to alleviate perceived thermal load and performance decline. The present study aimed to investigate precooling incorporating different cooling avenues via either evaporative cooling alone or in combination with conductive cooling on cycling time trial performance. Ten trained male cyclists completed a time trial on three occasions in hot (35 °C) ambient conditions with the cooling garment prepared by (a) immersion in water (COOL, evaporative); (b) immersion in water and frozen (COLD, evaporative and conductive); or (c) no precooling (CONT). COLD improved time trial performance by 5.8% and 2.6% vs CONT and COOL, respectively (both P COLD vs CONT (P COLD compared with COOL and CONT (both P COLD. The combination of evaporative and conductive cooling (COLD) had the greatest benefit to performance, which is suggested to be driven by reduced skin temperature following cooling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Caffeine reduces reaction time and improves performance in simulated-contest of taekwondo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Victor G F; Santos, Vander R F; Felippe, Leandro J C; Almeida, Jose W; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Kiss, Maria A P D M; Lima-Silva, Adriano E

    2014-02-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on reaction time during a specific taekwondo task and athletic performance during a simulated taekwondo contest. Ten taekwondo athletes ingested either 5 mg·kg⁻¹ body mass caffeine or placebo and performed two combats (spaced apart by 20 min). The reaction-time test (five kicks "Bandal Tchagui") was performed immediately prior to the first combat and immediately after the first and second combats. Caffeine improved reaction time (from 0.42 ± 0.05 to 0.37 ± 0.07 s) only prior to the first combat (P = 0.004). During the first combat, break times during the first two rounds were shorter in caffeine ingestion, followed by higher plasma lactate concentrations compared with placebo (P = 0.029 and 0.014, respectively). During the second combat, skipping-time was reduced, and relative attack times and attack/skipping ratio was increased following ingestion of caffeine during the first two rounds (all P 0.05), but combat intensity was decreased following placebo (all P taekwondo combats.

  8. Clinical and biomechanical factors which predict timed up and down stairs test performance in hemiparetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Zory, Raphael; Pradon, Didier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    The ability to ascend and descend a flight of stairs is considered as one of the best predictors of free-living activity and is correlated with domestic extrinsic activity in hemiparetic patients. However, the relationship between timed-stair performance and clinical and biomechanical parameters has never been studied this population. The aim of this study was to determine if performance on the Timed Up and Down Stairs (TUDS) test was related to clinical variables (maximal gait speed, strength and spasticity) and to biomechanical gait parameters (spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic gait parameters) in hemiparetic patients. Sixty hemiparetic patients performed the TUDS test, underwent 3D gait-analysis and a clinical assessment. Pearson's correlations and two stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were carried out to identify the parameters which were the most highly correlated with TUDS test performance among the clinical variables and gait parameters on the paretic side. Maximal walking speed on the 10-m walk test and strength of the ankle dorsiflexors were the clinical variables that were the most related to TUDS test performance (63% of variance explained). The percentage of single support phase on the paretic side was the biomechanical gait parameter which was the most related to TUDS test performance (58% of variance explained). The results of this study identified three parameters which predicted the performance to ascend and descend a flight of stairs as fast as possible in hemiparetic patients. Rehabilitation programs which aim to improve stair performance and independence in daily life activities should focus on these three parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. On clustering fMRI time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, C; Toft, P; Rostrup, E

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do not indi......Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do...... between the activation stimulus and the fMRI signal. We present two different clustering algorithms and use them to identify regions of similar activations in an fMRI experiment involving a visual stimulus....

  10. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian A. Y. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. METHOD: A bank of movies featuring 30 boys with DMD performing functional activities was evaluated. Compensatory movements were assessed using the climbing up and going down stairs domain of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD; age in years; functional classification using the Vignos Scale (VS, and TA using a timer. Statistical analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation test. RESULTS: There is a moderate relationship between the climbing up stairs domain of the FES-DMD and age (r=0.53, p=0.004 and strong relationships with VS (r=0.72, p=0.001 and TA for this task (r=0.83, p<0.001. There were weak relationships between the going down stairs domain of the FES-DMD-going down stairs with age (r=0.40, p=0.032, VS (r=0.65, p=0.002 and TA for this task (r=0.40, p=0.034. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the evaluation of compensatory movements used when climbing up stairs can provide more relevant information about the evolution of the disease, although the activity of going down stairs should be investigated, with the aim of enriching guidance and strengthening accident prevention. Data from the FES-DMD, age, VS and TA can be used in a complementary way to formulate functional diagnoses. Longitudinal studies and with broader age groups may supplement this information.

  11. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lilian A Y; Caromano, Fátima A; Assis, Silvana M B; Hukuda, Michele E; Voos, Mariana C; Carvalho, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA) of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A bank of movies featuring 30 boys with DMD performing functional activities was evaluated. Compensatory movements were assessed using the climbing up and going down stairs domain of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD); age in years; functional classification using the Vignos Scale (VS), and TA using a timer. Statistical analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation test. There is a moderate relationship between the climbing up stairs domain of the FES-DMD and age (r=0.53, p=0.004) and strong relationships with VS (r=0.72, p=0.001) and TA for this task (r=0.83, pstairs domain of the FES-DMD-going down stairs with age (r=0.40, p=0.032), VS (r=0.65, p=0.002) and TA for this task (r=0.40, p=0.034). These findings indicate that the evaluation of compensatory movements used when climbing up stairs can provide more relevant information about the evolution of the disease, although the activity of going down stairs should be investigated, with the aim of enriching guidance and strengthening accident prevention. Data from the FES-DMD, age, VS and TA can be used in a complementary way to formulate functional diagnoses. Longitudinal studies and with broader age groups may supplement this information.

  12. Soybean performance as affected by desiccation time of Urochloa ruziziensis and grazing pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cezar Franchini

    Full Text Available Integrated crop-livestock farming system have demonstrated various economic and environmental advantages. However, there is lack of information on the effects of different desiccation times of Urochloa ruziziensis and grazing pressures on the soybean performance. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of three soybean cultivars, sown after different desiccation times of U. ruziziensis grazed at three heights during the 2012/13 growing season, in southern Brazil. The U. ruziziensis were continuously grazed for 6 months by 6, 4 and 2 animal units (AU per hectare, leading to average pasture heights of 15; 35; and 50 cm, respectively. Each pasture height constituted a different experiment. The experiments were laid out using randomized complete block design (RCBD with split-plot arrangement in four replications. The treatments consisted of four desiccation times (35; 28; 20; and 8 days before the soybean sowing, allocated in the main plots, and three soybean cultivars (Vmax RR; BMX Potência RR; and NA 5909 RR, distributed in the subplots. Increased interval between U. ruziziensis desiccation and soybean sowing resulted in higher soybean plant density and height, but the effects on soybean grain yields were not significant. The highest soybean grain yield was obtained when the pasture height was maintained in 35 cm, regardless of soybean cultivars. The performance of the three soybean cultivars was not influenced by the interaction between desiccation time and the pasture residue mass on the soil at soybean sowing, defined by the pasture height.

  13. Performance of Object-Oriented Real-Time Control and Acquisition Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The dead-time of the Object-oriented Real-time Control and Aqcuisition data acquisition software, orca, was quantitatively determined for a VME-based system utilizing a single, peak-sensing CAEN 785N analog-to-digital converter and two scaler modules. A single board computer in the VME crate controls rapid read-out of the modules and the data is then transferred via TCP/IP to the orca control program, running on MacOSX, where the data can be filtered based on desired criteria, saved in an open format, and displayed on-line in histograms. A graphical interface allows the system to be configured via ``drag and drop'' method. The performance tests were performed on orca and two other data acquisition systems used at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, coda and SpecTcl, to compare the systems' data collection capabilities and determine whether the new system is a worthy competitor of the existing systems.

  14. Study of the timing performance of the SKIROC2-CMS for the CMS HGCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Huiberts, Simon Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity phase of the LHC (starting operation in 2025) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity, with 25 ns bunch crossing intervals and up to 140 pileup events. In this context, the High Granularity Calorimeter will provide electromagnetic and hadronic energy measurement in the forward direction of the upgraded CMS. The test beam campaign of the first HGCal modules, started in Summer 2016 at CERN with 8 fully equipped layers of the EE section, will continue in Summer 2017 aiming at the test of a full prototype including the electronic and the hadronic parts. The assessment of the calorimeter performance on a beam test bench is a fundamental phase for the development of a new detector, allowing to test the mechanical structure and electronic chain, characterize the modules performance and measure the shower developments for electrons and hadrons. The aim of the work was to determine the timing performance and the timing characteristics of the single module tested in May 2...

  15. A perturbative approach for enhancing the performance of time series forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos Neto, Paulo S G; Ferreira, Tiago A E; Lima, Aranildo R; Vasconcelos, Germano C; Cavalcanti, George D C

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes a method to perform time series prediction based on perturbation theory. The approach is based on continuously adjusting an initial forecasting model to asymptotically approximate a desired time series model. First, a predictive model generates an initial forecasting for a time series. Second, a residual time series is calculated as the difference between the original time series and the initial forecasting. If that residual series is not white noise, then it can be used to improve the accuracy of the initial model and a new predictive model is adjusted using residual series. The whole process is repeated until convergence or the residual series becomes white noise. The output of the method is then given by summing up the outputs of all trained predictive models in a perturbative sense. To test the method, an experimental investigation was conducted on six real world time series. A comparison was made with six other methods experimented and ten other results found in the literature. Results show that not only the performance of the initial model is significantly improved but also the proposed method outperforms the other results previously published.

  16. Real-time performance modelling of a Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larue, Grégoire S; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2010-10-01

    Vigilance declines when exposed to highly predictable and uneventful tasks. Monotonous tasks provide little cognitive and motor stimulation and contribute to human errors. This paper aims to model and detect vigilance decline in real time through participants' reaction times during a monotonous task. A laboratory-based experiment adapting the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is conducted to quantify the effect of monotony on overall performance. Relevant parameters are then used to build a model detecting hypovigilance throughout the experiment. The accuracy of different mathematical models is compared to detect in real time - minute by minute - the lapses in vigilance during the task. It is shown that monotonous tasks can lead to an average decline in performance of 45%. Furthermore, vigilance modelling enables the detection of vigilance decline through reaction times with an accuracy of 72% and a 29% false alarm rate. Bayesian models are identified as a better model to detect lapses in vigilance as compared with neural networks and generalised linear mixed models. This modelling could be used as a framework to detect vigilance decline of any human performing monotonous tasks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Existing research on monotony is largely entangled with endogenous factors such as sleep deprivation, fatigue and circadian rhythm. This paper uses a Bayesian model to assess the effects of a monotonous task on vigilance in real time. It is shown that the negative effects of monotony on the ability to sustain attention can be mathematically modelled and predicted in real time using surrogate measures, such as reaction times. This allows the modelling of vigilance fluctuations.

  17. Time-varying Performance Prediction and System Identification of Internal Combustion Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-hui; DAI Xu-dong; XIE You-bai

    2009-01-01

    Design for life-time performance and proper maintenance measures are usually needed to prolong the mean-time-between-failures of complex equipments such as internal combustion engines. To reach this, it is important to obtain the information of time-varying system performance in design stage and to identify the structural change at each moment. So a multidisciplinary model based method is studied in this paper to unify the time-varying performance(TVP) prediction and system identification(SI) of equipments. The related multi-disciplinary model in this paper should be not only precise to give simulation results but also sensitive to the variation of system parameters. So the varying history of system performance along with the structural change can be obtained from the model. Then the value of system parameters can be identified by seeking roots with given detected responding data and relationship between system responding data and system parameters. A case study on a low power gasoline engine shows that the method presented in this paper can provide useful information for the development and maintenance of complex equipments.

  18. 基于PXI设备的自动测试系统实时性能分析%Analysis to the Real Time Performance of A TS Based on PXl Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信朝阳; 刘亚斌; 周强

    2012-01-01

    为了测试常用自动测试系统Windows和RTX的实时性能,选取最为典型的两项性能指标进行实验研究,分别采用硬件时钟计数法和交替获取释放信号量的方法,对中断响应时间和上下文切换时间进行了测试,测试过程中对自动测试系统施加渐变负荷,得出负荷严重影响实时性能的结论,同时对实验数据进行了计算和比较分析,得出Windows具有弱实时性响应时间在毫秒级,而RTX具有强实时性响应时间在微秒级的结论,并提出了两种自动测试系统的应用环境。%In order to evaluate the performance of common ATS, Wiridows and RTX, we choose two most typical functional parame ters to have an experiment. The interrupt response time and the context switching time are measured in the way of counting the number of hardware clock and getting and releasing the semaphore continuously. Through adding different burden, we get the conclu sion that the performance is influenced seriously by the level of burden. At the same time, the data are calculated and analyzed, we get another important conclusion that Windows has weak real time performance and the response time is in the level of millisecond, while RTX has strong real time performance and the response time is in the level of microsecond. At last, we have a recommenda tion about the suitable application.

  19. Time domain measurement representation in computer system diagnostics and performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Wideł

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Time analysis is a common approach for testing and detecting methods for the performance analysis of computer systems. In the article it is shown, that measuring and identifying performances based on a benchmark is not sufficient for the proper analysis of the computer systems behavior. The response time of the process is often composed of the execution of many subprocesses or many paths of execution. Under this assumption, it is presented, that both convolution and deconvolution methods can be helpful in obtaining time distributions and modeling of complex processes. In such a modeling the analysis of measurement errors is very important and was taken into consideration. The example of using the methods in buffering process is also discussed.

  20. Timing of Fatherhood: Is "On-Time" Optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Teresa M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed fathers (n=307) from nationally representative sample to explore relationship between timing of fatherhood and men's parenting behavior and paternal affect. Differences were found on multidimensional typology of paternal behavior and affect. Compared to "on-time" fathers, "late" fathers were more likely to be…

  1. Real-Time Projection-Based Augmented Reality System for Dynamic Objects in the Performing Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoon Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the case study of applying projection-based augmented reality, especially for dynamic objects in live performing shows, such as plays, dancing, or musicals. Our study aims to project imagery correctly inside the silhouettes of flexible objects, in other words, live actors or the surface of actor’s costumes; the silhouette transforms its own shape frequently. To realize this work, we implemented a special projection system based on the real-time masking technique, that is to say real-time projection-based augmented reality system for dynamic objects in performing arts. We installed the sets on a stage for live performance, and rehearsed particular scenes of a musical. In live performance, using projection-based augmented reality technology enhances technical and theatrical aspects which were not possible with existing video projection techniques. The projected images on the surfaces of actor’s costume could not only express the particular scene of a performance more effectively, but also lead the audience to an extraordinary visual experience.

  2. Performance samples on academic tasks : improving prediction of academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanilon, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development and validation of a performance-based test, labeled as Performance Samples on academic tasks in Education and Child Studies (PSEd). PSEd is designed to identify students who are most able to perform the academic tasks involved in an Education and Child Studies br

  3. Caffeine enhances memory performance in young adults during their non-optimal time of day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Sherman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many college students struggle to perform well on exams in the early morning. Although students drink caffeinated beverages to feel more awake, it is unclear whether these actually improve performance. After consuming coffee (caffeinated or decaffeinated, college-age adults completed implicit and explicit memory tasks in the early morning and late afternoon (Experiment 1. During the morning, participants ingesting caffeine demonstrated a striking improvement in explicit memory, but not implicit memory. Caffeine did not alter memory performance in the afternoon. In Experiment 2, participants engaged in cardiovascular exercise in order to examine whether increases in physiological arousal similarly improved memory. Despite clear increases in arousal, exercise did not improve memory performance compared to a stretching control condition. These results suggest that caffeine has a specific benefit for memory during students’ non-optimal time of day – early morning. These findings have real-world implications for students taking morning exams.

  4. Conflict Detection Performance Analysis for Function Allocation Using Time-Shifted Recorded Traffic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Butler, Ricky W.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hagen, George E.; Lewis, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the conflict detection function in a separation assurance system is dependent on the content and quality of the data available to perform that function. Specifically, data quality and data content available to the conflict detection function have a direct impact on the accuracy of the prediction of an aircraft's future state or trajectory, which, in turn, impacts the ability to successfully anticipate potential losses of separation (detect future conflicts). Consequently, other separation assurance functions that rely on the conflict detection function - namely, conflict resolution - are prone to negative performance impacts. The many possible allocations and implementations of the conflict detection function between centralized and distributed systems drive the need to understand the key relationships that impact conflict detection performance, with respect to differences in data available. This paper presents the preliminary results of an analysis technique developed to investigate the impacts of data quality and data content on conflict detection performance. Flight track data recorded from a day of the National Airspace System is time-shifted to create conflicts not present in the un-shifted data. A methodology is used to smooth and filter the recorded data to eliminate sensor fusion noise, data drop-outs and other anomalies in the data. The metrics used to characterize conflict detection performance are presented and a set of preliminary results is discussed.

  5. Is There Time Enough? Temporal Resources and Service Performance in the Danish Home Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    approaches of analysis. A central focus of analysis is the concept of “additional care services.” The use of the concept reflects different understandings of care. Relying on the logic of standardization, managers articulate additional services as definite items, which could (and should) be left out...... constitutes a challenge to care workers’ own sense and valuation of their work. The article is informed by two theoretical perspectives: standardization of care services and performance of care work in private homes. Empirically, the article examines how care workers perceive the relations between...... of the performance of care work. Care workers do, however, not accept this notion. Relying on their experience of work, they perceive additional services as an ambiguous concept, which recognizes the multiple character of care work. Conclusions are that time scarcity constitutes a pressure on work performance...

  6. On Performance Skill Representation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Koichi; Shimizu, Satoshi; Yoshinaga, Saori

    In this paper, we propose a framework for representing performance skill. Firstly, we notice the importance of performance skill representation. We introduce five different representation targets: performance tasks, performance rules, pre-shaping actions, dynamic integrity constraints, and performance states. Performance task description consists of a sequence of performance tasks and expressions. It acts as a goal description in planning. Performance rules describe model performance methods for given tasks including how to shape body parts and how to use various muscles. Pre-shaping action rules are similar to performance rules. Its role is to pre-shape in between consecutive tasks to prepare for the next task. Dynamic integrity constraints specify constraints to be satisfied during performance. They provide such general rules as prohibiting simultaneous strong activations of agonist and antagonist. Performance states are for describing real performance done by players including professionals and amateurs. The aim of the framework is to provide a uniform scheme for representing model performance methods given performance score such as music score. The representation framework will define targets of inducing formal skill rules as well as describing performance states automatically from biomechanical performance data. It also is related to a fundamental research issue of attributes finding/selection in discovering useful rules for skillful performance. We conclude our paper by stating future research direction.

  7. Impaired driving performance associated with effect of time duration in patients with primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Joy; Bertran, Françoise; Marie, Sullivan; Couque, Colette; Bulla, Jan; Denise, Pierre; Bocca, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate driving performance and psychomotor vigilance in patients with primary insomnia. After 1 night of polysomnography, participants performed a 1-h simulated monotonous driving task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). Self-ratings of sleepiness, mood, and driving performance were completed. This study was conducted at the CHU of Caen Sleep Unit and the University of Caen. Twenty-one primary insomnia patients and 16 good sleepers. Not applicable. Results revealed a larger standard deviation of lateral position (P = 0.023) and more lane crossings (P = 0.03) in insomnia patients than in good sleepers. Analyses of effect of time on task performance showed that the impairment in patients occurred after 20 min of driving, which was not the case for good sleepers. No difference between groups was found for the PVT, neither for the mean reaction time (RT) (P = 0.43) nor the number of lapses (P = 0.21) and the mean slowest 10% 1/RT (P = 0.81). Patients rated their sleepiness level higher (P = 0.06) and their alertness level lower (P = 0.007) than did good sleepers (P = 0.007). The self-evaluation of the driving performance was not different between groups (P = 0.15). These findings revealed that primary insomnia is associated with a performance decrement during a simulated monotonous driving task. We also showed that patients are able to drive safely only for a short time. It appears advisable for clinicians to warn patients about their impaired driving performance that could lead to an increased risk of driving accidents. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  9. ACTS Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, R.; Wright, D.; Mitchell, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) launched in September 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The MBA with fixed and rapidly reconfigurable spot beams serves users equipped with small aperture terminals within the coverage area. The antenna produces spot beams with approximately 0.3 degrees beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dBi. A number of MBA performance evaluations have been performed since the ACTS launch. These evaluations were designed to assess MBA performance (e.g., beam pointing stability, beam shape, gain, etc.) in the space environment. The on-orbit measurements found systematic environmental perturbation to the MBA beam pointing. These perturbations were found to be imposed by satellite attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, on-orbit thermal effects, etc. As a result, the footprint coverage of the MBA may not exactly cover the intended service area at all times. This report describes the space environment effects on the ACTS MBA performance as a function of time of the day and time of the year and compensation approaches for these effects.

  10. A High Performance On_Timer Circuit applicable to Constant On-Time Mode Control%一种适用于恒定导通时间控制的高性能定时器电路

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建刚; 吴杰; 谢海武; 周泽坤; 明鑫; 张波

    2012-01-01

    A kind of on timer circuit applicable to constant on-time mode control was put forward in this paper.ln the circuit the current that proportional to the input voltage charge the capacitance,so as to realize the timing of time is inversely proportional to the input voltage,which can solve the working frequency change with input voltage in the traditional constant on-time