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Sample records for omega systems studied

  1. Effect of omega-3 on auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Omega-3 fatty acid have structural and biological roles in the body 's various systems . Numerous studies have tried to research about it. Auditory system is affected a s well. The aim of this article was to review the researches about the effect of omega-3 on auditory system.Methods: We searched Medline , Google Scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SID search engines with the "auditory" and "omega-3" keywords and read textbooks about this subject between 19 70 and 20 13.Conclusion: Both excess and deficient amounts of dietary omega-3 fatty acid can cause harmful effects on fetal and infant growth and development of brain and central nervous system esspesially auditory system. It is important to determine the adequate dosage of omega-3.

  2. Rosuvastatin, lycopene and omega-3 fatty acids: A potential treatment for systemic inflammation in COPD; a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J. Williams

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that rosuvastatin, omega-3 fatty acids and lycopene have some anti-inflammatory effects systemically, but rosuvastatin may increase airway neutrophils, which would be undesirable in COPD patients, warranting further investigation.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids, inflammatory status and biochemical markers of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Mariane Curado; Santos, Fabiana de Miranda Moura Dos; Telles, Rosa Weiss; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius Melo de; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson; Lanna, Cristina Costa Duarte

    2016-09-22

    Studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids reduce the concentrations of eicosanoids, cytokines, chemokines, C-reactive protein (CRP) and other inflammatory mediators. To investigate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on circulating levels of inflammatory mediators and biochemical markers in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Experimental clinical study (clinical trial: NCT02524795); 49 women with SLE (ACR1982/1997) were randomized: 22 to the omega-3 group (daily intake of 1080mg EPA+200mg DHA, for 12 weeks) and 27 to the control group. The inflammatory mediators and biochemical markers at T0 and T1 in omega-3 group were compared using Wilcoxon test. U-Mann-Whitney test was used to compare variations of measured variables [ΔV=pre-treatment (T0) minus post-treatment (T1) concentrations] between groups. p<0.05 was considered significant. The median (interquartile range - IQR) of age was 37 (29-48) years old, of disease duration was 7 (4-13) years, and of SLEDAI-2K was 1 (0-2). The median (IQR) of variation in CRP levels between the two groups showed a decrease in omega-3 group while there was an increase in control group (p=0.008). The serum concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10, leptin and adiponectin did not change after a 12 week treatment. Supplementation with omega-3 had no impact on serum concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, leptin and adiponectin in women with SLE and low disease activity. There was a significant decrease of CRP levels as well as evidence that omega-3 may impact total and LDL-cholesterol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  4. Omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) site distribution in the rat immune system: an autoradiographic study with the photoaffinity ligand (/sup 3/H)PK 14105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, J.; Dubois, A.; Dennis, T.; Hamel, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-04-01

    The anatomical distribution of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) sites in the immune system organs of the rat has been studied autoradiographically at both macroscopic and microscopic levels of resolution using either reversible or irreversible (UV irradiation) labeling with (/sup 3/H)PK 14105. In thymus sections, (/sup 3/H)PK 14105 labeled with high affinity (Kd, derived from saturation experiments = 10.8 nM) a single population of sites which possessed the pharmacological characteristics of omega 3 sites. In the thymus gland, higher omega 3 site densities were detected in the cortex than in the medulla; in these subregions, silver grains were associated to small (10-18 microns diameter) cells. In the spleen, omega 3 sites were more abundant in the white than in the red pulp. In the white pulp, silver grains were denser in the marginal zone than in the vicinity of the central artery and labeling was, as in the thymus, associated to small cytoplasm-poor cells. In the red pulp, omega 3 site associated silver grains were observed mainly in the Bilroth cords. In the lymph nodes, the medullary region showed a higher labeling than the surrounding follicles and paracortex. A significant accumulation of silver grains was observed in the lymph node medullary cords. In the intestine, Peyer patches were particularly enriched in omega 3 sites (especially in the periphery of the follicles). The distribution of omega 3 sites in the immune system organs suggests a preferential labeling of cells of T and monocytic lineages. This is consistent with the proposed immunoregulatory properties of some omega 3 site ligands.

  5. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  6. Study of the decay B0bar -> D*+ omega pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of the decay B0bar -> D*+ omega pi- with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million BBbar decays, we measure the branching fraction BF(B0bar -> D*+ omega pi-) = (2.88 +/- 0.21(stat.) +/- 0.31(syst.)) \\times 10^{-3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the omega pi- system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in tau- -> omega pi- nu_tau. We also measure the polarization of the D*+ as a function of the omega pi- mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*+ to be Gamma_L/Gamma = 0.654 +/- 0.042(stat.) +/- 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as B0bar -> D*+ rho(1450), rho(1450) -> omega pi-.

  7. Study of the decay B0bar -> D* omega pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-24

    We report on a study of the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -} with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million B{bar B} decays, we measure the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.88 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}. We also measure the polarization of the D*{sup +} as a function of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*{sup +} to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda} = 0.654 {+-} 0.042(stat.) {+-} 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{rho}(1450), {rho}(1450) {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}.

  8. A study of the centrally produced $K^{*}(892)\\overline{K}^{*}$ and $\\phi\\omega$ systems in pp interaction at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; Binon, Freddy G; Blick, A M; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Dolgopolov, A V; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Hino, T; Inaba, S; Inyakin, A V; Ishida, T; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Jones, G T; Khaustov, G V; Kinashi, T; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Klempt, W; Kolosov, V N; Kondashov, A A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Maljukov, S; Martinengo, P; Minashvili, I A; Nakagawa, T; Norman, K L; Peigneux, J P; Polovnikov, S A; Polyakov, V A; Romanovsky, V I; Rotscheidt, Herbert; Rumyantsev, V; Rusakovitch, N A; Samoylenko, V D; Semenov, A A; Sené, M; Sené, R; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H M; Singovsky, A V; Sobol, A E; Soloviev, A S; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Sugonyaev, V P; Takamatsu, K; Tchlatchidze, G A; Tsuru, T; Venables, M; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    1998-01-01

    A study of the reactions pp -> pfps(K+K-pi+pi-) and pp -> pfps(K+K-pi+pi-pi0) shows evidence for the K*K* and phi omega channels respectively. The K*K* mass spectrum shows a broad distribution with a maximum near threshold and an angular analysis shows that it is compatible with having JP = 2+. The behaviour of the cross-section as a function of centre of mass energy, and the four momentum transfer dependence, are compatible with what would be expected if the K*K* system was produced via double Pomeron exchange. The dPT behaviour of the phi omega channel is similar to what has been observed for all the undisputed qqbar states. In contrast, the dPT behaviour of the K*K* final state is similar to what has been observed for the phi phi final state and for previously observed glueball candidates.

  9. OMEGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA由路易士·勃兰特始创于1848年,1892年,OMEGA推出全球第一块打簧手表,两年后,生产了举世闻名的OMEGA19令机芯。这一机芯的制造融会了当时革命性的瑞士首屈一指的制表厂商。OMEGA是希腊字母中最后一个,具有完美、成就、美轮美奂和卓越之意。从那时起,OMEGA以其先进科技结合卓越制表艺术,稳占表坛领导地位,创造无数骄人成就。

  10. North Pacific Omega Navigation System Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    based upon comparisons with "Loran-C, radar and visual" whose absolute accuracy as references could not be assessed. Similarly, the M/S Nopal Lane...Mellon ..................................... A-82 A5.1.5 M/S Nopal Lane ................... ......... .... .. A-83 A5.1.6 Submarine Omega Performance...From Omega Log of M/S NOPAL LANE .................... A-84 A5-2 Western Airlines Flights - 1978 .......................... A-85 AA-1 Difference Between

  11. Systematic study of the pp {yields}pp{omega} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Gast, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Jaeger, H.; Kilian, K.; Paul, N.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Sefzick, T.; Wintz, P.; Wuestner, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T.; Dietrich, J.; Dshemuchadse, S.; Freiesleben, H.; Gottwald, J.; Jakob, B.; Jaekel, R.; Karsch, L.; Kuhlmann, E.; Plettner, C.; Reimann, S.; Richter, M.; Schoenmeier, P.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Sun, G.Y.; Ullrich, W.; Wenzel, R. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Kress, J.; Wagner, G.J. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Eyrich, W.; Fritsch, M.; Krapp, M.; Lehmann, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Schroeder, W.; Teufel, A.; Wagner, M. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Filippi, A.; Marcello, S. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Koch, H.; Mauro, S.; Steinke, M.; Wilms, A. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Michel, P.; Moller, K.; Naumann, L.; Schamlott, A. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Morsch, H.P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk/Otwock (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study of the production of {omega}-mesons in proton-proton collisions was carried out in a kinematically complete experiment at three excess energies ({epsilon}=92, 128, 173 MeV). Both protons were detected using the large-acceptance COSY-TOF spectrometer at an external beam line at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Forschungszentrum Juelich. The total cross-section, angular distributions of both {omega}-mesons and protons were measured and presented in various reference frames such as the overall CMS, helicity and Jackson frame. In addition, the orientation of the {omega}-spin and invariant-mass spectra were determined. We observe {omega}-production to take place dominantly in Ss and Sp final states at {epsilon}=92, 128 MeV and, additionally, in Sd at {epsilon}=173 MeV. No obvious indication of resonant {omega}-production via N{sup *}-resonances was found, as proton angular distributions are almost isotropic and invariant-mass spectra are compatible with phase space distributions. A dominant role of {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}S{sub 0} initial partial waves for {omega}-production was concluded from the orientation of the decay plane of the {omega}-meson. Although the Jackson angle distributions in the {omega} p-Jackson frame are anisotropic we argue that this is not an indication of a resonance but rather a kinematical effect reflecting the anisotropy of the {omega} angular distribution. The helicity angle distribution in the {omega} p-helicity frame shows an anisotropy which probably reflects effects of the {omega} angular momenta in the final state; this observable may be, in addition to the orientation of the {omega} decay plane, the most sensitive one to judge the validity of theoretical descriptions of the production process. (orig.)

  12. The mothers, Omega-3 and mental health study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazquez Delia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depressive disorder (MDD during pregnancy and postpartum depression are associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity. While antidepressants are readily used in pregnancy, studies have raised concerns regarding neurobehavioral outcomes in exposed infants. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, most frequently from fish oil, has emerged as a possible treatment or prevention strategy for MDD in non-pregnant individuals, and may have beneficial effects in pregnant women. Although published observational studies in the psychiatric literature suggest that maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA deficiency may lead to the development of MDD in pregnancy and postpartum, there are more intervention trials suggesting clinical benefit for supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA in MDD. Methods/Design The Mothers, Omega-3 and Mental Health study is a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to assess whether omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may prevent antenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms among pregnant women at risk for depression. We plan to recruit 126 pregnant women at less than 20 weeks gestation from prenatal clinics at two health systems in Ann Arbor, Michigan and the surrounding communities. We will follow them prospectively over the course of their pregnancies and up to 6 weeks postpartum. Enrolled participants will be randomized to one of three groups: a EPA-rich fish oil supplement (1060 mg EPA plus 274 mg DHA b DHA-rich fish oil supplement (900 mg DHA plus 180 mg EPA; or c a placebo. The primary outcome for this study is the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score at 6 weeks postpartum. We will need to randomize 126 women to have 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in participants' mean BDI scores with EPA or DHA supplementation compared with placebo. We will also gather information on secondary outcome measures which will include: omega-3 fatty acid concentrations in maternal

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Depression in Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Shinto

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic disabling disease in the central nervous system in young to middle aged adults. Depression is common in multiple sclerosis (MS affecting between 50–60% of patients. Pilot studies in unipolar depression report an improvement in depression when omega-3 fatty acids are given with antidepressants. The objective of this study was to investigate whether omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, as an augmentation therapy, improves treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD in people with MS. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of omega-3 fatty acids at six grams per day over three months. The primary outcome was a 50% or greater improvement on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. Thirty-nine participants were randomized and thirty-one completed the 3-month intervention. Improvement on MADRS between groups was not significantly different at the 3-month end point with 47.4% in the omega-3 fatty acid group and 45.5% in the placebo group showing 50% or greater improvement (p = 0.30. Omega-3 fatty acids as an augmentation therapy for treatment-resistant depression in MS was not significantly different than placebo in this pilot trial. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation at the dose given was well-tolerated over 3 months.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00122954.

  14. Systematic study of the pp -> pp omega reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Bary, M; Brinkmann, K -Th; Clement, H; Dietrich, J; Doroshkevich, E; Dshemuchadse, S; Ehrhardt, K; Erhardt, A; Eyrich, W; Filippi, A; Freiesleben, H; Fritsch, M; Gast, W; Gillitzer, A; Gottwald, J; Jäger, H; Jakob, B; Jäkel, R; Karsch, L; Kilian, K; Koch, H; Krapp, M; Kreß, J; Kuhlmann, E; Lehmann, A; Marcello, S; Mauro, S; Michel, P; Möller, K; Morsch, H P; Naumann, L; Paul, N; Pizzolotto, C; Plettner, Ch; Reimann, S; Richter, M; Ritman, J; Roderburg, E; Schamlott, A; Schönmeier, P; Schroeder, W; Schulte-Wissermann, M; Sefzick, T; Steinke, M; Sun, G Y; Teufel, A; Ullrich, W; Wagner, G J; Wagner, M; Wenzel, R; Wilms, A; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Zupranski, P

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study of the production of omega-mesons in proton-proton-collisions was carried out in a kinematically complete experiment at three excess energies(epsilon= 92, 128, 173MeV). Both protons were detected using the large-acceptance COSY-TOF spectrometer at an external beam line at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Forschungszentrum J\\"ulich. The total cross section, angular distributions of both omega-mesons and protons were measured and presented in various reference frames such as the overall CMS, helicity and Jackson frame. In addition, the orientation of the omega-spin and invariant mass spectra were determined. We observe omega-production to take place dominantly in Ss and Sp final states at epsilon = 92, 128 MeV and, additionally, in Sd at epsilon= 173 MeV. No obvious indication of resonant omega-production via N^*-resonances was found, as proton angular distributions are almost isotropic and invariant mass spectra are compatible with phase space distributions. A dominant role of ^3P_1 and ^1S_0 ...

  15. A critical period for omega-3 nutritional supplementation in the development of the rodent visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Velasco, P C; Sandre, P C; Tavares Do Carmo, M G; Faria-Melibeu, A C; Campello-Costa, P; Ferraz, A C; Andrade Da Costa, B L S; Serfaty, C A

    2015-07-30

    Retinocollicular connections form precise topographical maps that are normally completed through the selective elimination of misplaced axons and the stabilization of topographically ordered axon terminals during early development. Omega-3 fatty acids, acquired exclusively through the diet, and its main metabolite, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are involved in brain development and synaptic maturation. We have previously shown that the nutritional restriction of omega-3/DHA results in abnormal retinocollicular topographical fine-tuning. Therefore, we studied the role of omega-3 fatty acids nutritional supplementation and the developmental time windows during which this postnatal supplementation would restore normal topographical maps in the visual system. Female rats and their litters were chronically fed with either control (soy oil) or restricted omega-3 (coconut oil) diets. Fish oil supplementation was introduced between either postnatal day (PND) 7-13, PND7-28 or PND21-42. At PND13, PND28 or PND42, animals received an anterograde eye injection of a neuronal tracer to visualize retinocollicular axons. Confirming previous observations we found that an omega-3/DHA deficiency resulted in an abnormally high innervation density of retinal axons at the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Although a short-term fish oil supplementation between PND7-13 could not restore normal retinocollicular topography, an extended treatment between PND7-28 completely recovered normal innervation densities of retinotectal axons. However, a late onset supplementation protocol, between PND28-42, was no longer effective in the restoration of the abnormal topographical pattern induced by an early omega-3 nutritional malnutrition. The results suggest a critical period for omega3/DHA dietary intake for the proper development of visual topographical maps.

  16. Thermal photon emission from the pi-rho-omega system

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Nathan P M; Rapp, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    We investigate thermal photon emission rates in hot hadronic matter from a system consisting of pi, rho, and omega mesons. The rates are calculated using both relativistic kinetic theory with Born diagrams as well as thermal field theory at the two-loop level. This enables us to cross-check our calculations and to manage a pole contribution that arises in the Born approximation corresponding to the omega -> pi^0 gamma radiative decay. After implementing hadronic form factors to account for finite-size corrections, we find that the resulting photo-emission rates are comparable to existing results from pi rho -> pi gamma processes in the energy regime of 1-3 GeV. We expect that our new sources will provide a non-negligible contribution to the total hadronic rates, thereby enhancing calculated thermal photon spectra from heavy-ion collisions, which could improve the description of current direct-photon data from experiment.

  17. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest, since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in the nearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolar secular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbital elements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention on the lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, where $\\omega$ and $\\Omega$ denote the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris. We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to $56^\\circ$, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  18. Omega Navigation System Course Book. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    GPS) - 0846 6. PCD ASSIGNMENT: None G.2.3 Hawaii 1. LETTER DESIGNATION: "C" 2. LQCATION: a. Geographic: Haiku Valley, Oahu Island, Hawaii, U.S.A. b...systems, 2-25, 12-27 inductively matching, 3-23 Haiku , 2-3, 2-11 2inertial navigation, 4-39HYDROLANT, 2-29 hard-copy coverage diagrams, 2-33 inertial

  19. A study of the $\\omega\\omega$ channel produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Hino, T; Inaba, S; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Khaustov, G V; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Kondashov, A A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Minashvili, I A; Peigneux, J P; Romanovsky, V I; Rusakovitch, N A; Semenov, A A; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H; Singovsky, A V; Sobol, A E; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Takamatsu, K; Tsuru, T; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    2000-01-01

    The reaction pp -> pf (omega omega) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c and a spin analysis of the omega omega channel has been performed for the first time in central production. Evidence is found for the f2(1910) in the JPC = 2++ wave with spin projection JZ = 2. This is the only state observed in central production with spin projection JZ = 2. Its dPT and phi dependencies are similar to those observed for other glueball candidates. In addition, evidence is found for a state with JPC = 4++ consistent with the f4(2300). The f0(2000), previously observed in the rho rho final state, is confirmed.

  20. Omega Navigation System Course Book. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    antenna must be about 15 percent taller . Figure 3.4-9 is a photograph of a grounded tower antenna systemn at the La Reuinion iransmittingy station. .3...provides the 0-30613 10-2-92 F Indicatec1 Inertial Craft Position + Navigation " Cora ected System Craft Position Position Indicated + Position Error...o0 o0 la Na % ;6 0i0~~oCOC~ H NNa oil r- corA t Cl~𔃺 A0A 9 co HQL (n oHI- HHH~~~~~~~~~~f ClllNMNllll~Nlll(JCi~llA CliC to w N0000000a000& 0’c", 100

  1. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Farahani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14. The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4, and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P0.05.  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL periods (P>0.05; while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  2. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2016-03-02

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  3. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  4. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium-niobium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the as-quenched omega phase morphology shows that the domain size of Zr-15% Nb is on the order of 30 A. No alignment of omega domains along <222>..beta.. directions was observed and samples having undergone thermal cycling in thin foil form, did not develop a long-period structure of alternating ..beta.. and ..omega.. phases below the omega transformation temperature. (FS)

  5. A Study of Production and Decay of Omega_c^0 Baryons in BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-09-28

    Production and decay of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is studied with {approx} 230 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring at SLAC. The {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is reconstructed through its decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} final states. The invariant mass spectra are presented and the signal yields are extracted. Ratios of branching fractions are measured relative to the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mode {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.31 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.), {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 0.30 (90%CL). The momentum spectrum (not corrected for efficiency) of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is extracted from decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, establishing the first observation of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} production from B decays.

  6. A Study of Production and Decay of Omega_c^0 Baryons in BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-09-28

    Production and decay of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is studied with {approx} 230 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring at SLAC. The {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is reconstructed through its decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} final states. The invariant mass spectra are presented and the signal yields are extracted. Ratios of branching fractions are measured relative to the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mode {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.31 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.), {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 0.30 (90%CL). The momentum spectrum (not corrected for efficiency) of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is extracted from decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, establishing the first observation of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} production from B decays.

  7. [Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids and systemic lupus erythematosus: what do we know?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Mariane Curado; Santos, Fabiana de Miranda Moura; Telles, Rosa Weiss; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson; Lanna, Cristina Costa Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on the concentration of C reactive protein (CRP), pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators. Therefore, the supplementation of these types of lipids may represent additional option treatment for chronic systemic diseases, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematous and other rheumatic diseases. The role of these lipids has not been well established, yet. However, it seems there is a direct relationship between its intake and the decrease of the disease clinical manifestations as well as of the inflammatory status of the patients. Thus, the aim of this manuscript is to present a thorough review on the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in patients with SLE. Bibliographic data set as the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) were searched using as key words: systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3, eicosapentanoic acid (EPA), docosahexanoic acid (DHA), antioxidants and diet. Manuscripts published up to September 2013 were included. There were 43 articles related to the topic, however only 15 pertained human studies, with three review articles and 12 clinical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. A Study of Production and Decays of Omega_c0 Baryons at BABAR

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    Production and decay of $\\Omega_c^0$ baryons is studied with $\\sim230 \\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II $e^+e^-$ asymmetric-energy storage ring at SLAC. The $\\Omega_c^0$ is reconstructed through its decays into $\\Omega^-\\pi^+$, $\\Omega^-\\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$, and $\\Xi^-K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ final states. The invariant mass spectra are presented and the signal yields are extracted. Ratios of branching fractions are measured relative to the $\\Omega^-\\pi^+$ mode \\frac{{\\cal B}(\\Xi^-K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+)}{{\\cal B}(\\Omega^-\\pi^+)} &= 0.31 \\pm 0.15\\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 0.04\\mathrm{(syst.)}, \\frac{{\\cal B}(\\Omega^-\\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-)}{{\\cal B}(\\Omega^-\\pi^+)} &< 0.30\\qquad (90%\\mathrm{CL}). The momentum spectrum (not corrected for efficiency) of $\\Omega_c^0$ baryons is extracted from decays into $\\Omega^-\\pi^+$, establishing the first observation of $\\Omega_c^0$ production from B decays.

  9. High-Resolving-Power, Streaked X-Ray Spectroscopy on the OMEGA EP Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, P. M.; Ehrne, F.; Mileham, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Jungquist, R. K.; Taylor, C.; Boni, R.; Hassett, J.; Stillman, C. R.; Ivancic, S. T.; Lonobile, D. J.; Kidder, R. W.; Shoup, M. J., III; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Froula, D. H.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, L.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolving-power, streaked x-ray spectrometer is being developed and tested on the OMEGA EP Laser System to study temperature-equilibration dynamics in rapidly heated solid matter. Temporal spectral shifts of the Cu Kα line in isochorically heated solid targets provide a fairly simple system where the spectrometer performance will be validated. The goal is to achieve a resolving power of several thousand and 2-ps temporal resolution. A time-integrating survey spectrometer has been developed and deployed on OMEGA EP to evaluate the throughput, focusing fidelity, and spectral resolution of two different crystal geometries. The results from these measurements will be presented and used to justify the down-selected time-resolved spectrometer design. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Data on gender and subgroup specific analyses of omega-3 fatty acids in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela E; Lorkowski, Stefan; März, Winfried; von Schacky, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    This paper contains additional data related to the research article "Omega-3 fatty acids and mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography - The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study" (Kleber et al., in press) [1]. The data shows characteristics of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study according to tertiles of omega-3 fatty acids as well as stratified by gender. The association of proportions of omega-3 fatty acids measured in erythrocyte membranes with different causes of death is investigated with a special focus on modeling the association of EPA with mortality in a nonlinear way. Further, the association of omega-3 fatty acids with all-cause mortality adjusted for high-sensitive C-reactive protein as a marker of systemic inflammation is examined as well as the association of EPA with cause-specific death.

  11. Study of the near-threshold omega phi mass enhancement in doubly OZI-suppressed J/psi -> gamma omega phi decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, M.L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J.P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A.Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J.S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X.T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y.P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L.L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y.T.; Liao, G.R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, Cheng; Liu, C.X.; Liu, F.H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C.L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F.E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J.W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J.F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y.J.; Sun, Y.Z.; Sun, Z.J.; Sun, Z.T.; Tang, C.J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z.Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J.B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L.H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S.X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q.J.; Xu, Q.N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhao, S.J.; Zhao, T.C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, Z.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X.R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.H.; Zhu, Stuart; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A 2:25 x 10(8) J/psi event sample accumulated with the BESIII detector is used to study the doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-suppressed decay modes J/psi -> gamma omega phi, omega -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0), phi -> K+K-. A strong deviation (> 30 sigma) from three-body J/psi -> gamma omega phi phase space is observ

  12. A Review of Nanoliposomal Delivery System for Stabilization of Bioactive Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadian, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Currently, bioactive compounds are required in the design and production of functional foods, with the aim of improving the health status of consumers all around the world. Various epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the salutary role of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 22:6 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:5 n-3) in preventing diseases and reducing mortality from cardiovascular diseases. The unsaturated nature of bioactive lipids leads to susceptibility to oxidation under environmental conditions. Oxidative deterioration of omega-3 fatty acids can cause the reduction in their nutritional quality and sensory properties. Encapsulation of these fatty acids could create a barrier against reaction with harmful environmental factors. Currently, fortification of foods containing bioactive omega-3 fatty acids has found great application in the food industries of different countries. Previous studies have suggested that nano-encapsulation has significant effects on the stability of physical and chemical properties of bioactive compounds. Considering the functional role of omega-3 fatty acids, this study has provided a literature review on applications of nanoliposomal delivery systems for encapsulation of these bioactive compounds.

  13. Prevention of lipid oxidation in omega-3 enriched oofds by antioxidants and the use of delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    oxidation products. Efficients strategies to prevent lipid oxidation are therefore required. Such strategies include addition of antioxidants or the use of omega-3 delivery emulsions. However, antioxidant efficacy in complex omega-3 enriched foods are influenced by many factors including the lipophilicity...... of the antioxidants. Selection of the optimal antioxidant system is therefore a major challenge. Likewise, a range of factors can influence the ability of omega-3 delivery systems to protect the omega-3 fatty acids against oxidation after addition to food systems. These challenges will be discussed...... in this presentation and examples from the authors own research on antioxidants and omega-3 delivery systems will be given....

  14. Measurement of temperature and thermal properties of fluid by detecting 1{omega} and 3{omega} components. 1st Report. Experimental study; 1{omega} 3{omega} keisoku ni yoru ryutai no ondo netsu busseichi keisoku. 1. Jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabeppu, O.; Yamamoto, N.; Kinoshita, A.; Hijikata, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-21

    A method of measuring temperature and thermal properties of nonconductive fluids was experimentally studied, where 1{omega} and 3{omega} components of the voltage drop across a thin metal wire probe heated with an AC current of frequency {omega} were measured. The temperature distribution of a weak natural convection plume from a horizontal wire in water was visualized by this method and it was shown that background noise and self-heating of the probe limit the measurement resolution. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed for air, water, ethanol, etc. using a 10 {mu}m-diameter platinum wire, with applied AC frequency ranging from 0.1Hz-10kHz. Since mermaid conductivity is derived from the measured 3{omega} component by comparing with a thermal conduction model, the effect of natural convection from the probe itself was important and a restriction on applicability of the method was obtained in terms of the Rayleigh and Courier numbers. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Study of the reaction $\\pi^{-} Be \\to \\omega \\pi^{-} \\pi^{0} Be$

    CERN Document Server

    IHEP. Protvino

    1998-01-01

    The results of patial wave analysis of the omega pi- pi0 system, produced in the reaction pi- Be --> pi+ 2pi- 2pi0 Be at beam momentum of 37 GeV are presented. An indication of the resonant type structure with mass near 1.74 GeV and JpMetha=0-0+ in the omega rho- system was found. The decay branching ratio of a2(1320)- to omega pi- pi0 was measured. A wave with JpMetha=2+1+ shows a broad bump at M near 1.7 GeV. The decays pi2(1670)- --> omega rho- and a4(2040)- --> omega rho- were observed for the first time. The bump in the b1(1235)pi wave with exotic quantum numbers Jpc=1-+ at M near 1.7 GeV was observed.

  16. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium--niobium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-06-01

    An in-situ study of the as-quenched omega phase transformation in Zr--15% Nb was conducted between the temperatures of 77 and 300/sup 0/K using analytical electron microscopy. The domain size of the omega regions observed in this investigation was on the order of 30 A, consistent with previous observations in this system. No alignment of omega domains along <222> directions of the bcc lattice was observed and in-situ thermal cycling experiments failed to produce a long period structure of alternating ..beta.. and ..omega.. phase regions as predicted by one theory of this transformation. Several techniques of microstructural analysis were developed, refined, and standardized. Grouped under the general classification of Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) they provide the experimentalist with a unique tool for the microcharacterization of solids, allowing semiquantitative to quantitative analysis of the morphology, crystallography, elemental composition, and electronic structure of regions as small as 20 A in diameter. These techniques have complications, and it was necessary to study the AEM system used in this work so that instrumental artifacts which invalidate the information produced in the microscope environment might be eliminated. Once these factors had been corrected, it was possible to obtain a wealth of information about the microvolume of material under investigation. The microanalytical techniques employed during this research include: energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy (CTEM, STEM), transmission scanning electron diffraction (TSED), the stationary diffraction pattern technique, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) using a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (DSTEM).

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids in adipose tissue and risk of myocardial infarction: The EURAMIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guallar, E.; Aro, A.; Jiménez, F.J.; Martín-Moreno, J.M.; Salminen, I.; Veer, P. van 't; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Gömez-Aracena, J.; Martin, B.C.; Kohlmeier, L.; Kark, J.D.; Mazaev, V.P.; Ringstad, J.; Guillén, J.; Riemersma, R.A.; Huttunen, J.K.; Thamm, M.; Kok, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have potential antiatherogenic, antithrombotic, and antiarrhythmic properties, but their role in coronary heart disease remains controversial. To evaluate the association of omega-3 fatty acids in adipose tissue with the risk of myocardial infarction in men, a case-control study

  18. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning for Omega-Regular Systems and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sagar; Gurfinkel, Arie

    2010-01-01

    We develop a learning-based automated Assume-Guarantee (AG) reasoning framework for verifying omega-regular properties of concurrent systems. We study the applicability of non-circular (AGNC) and circular (AG-C) AG proof rules in the context of systems with infinite behaviors. In particular, we show that AG-NC is incomplete when assumptions are restricted to strictly infinite behaviors, while AG-C remains complete. We present a general formalization, called LAG, of the learning based automated AG paradigm. We show how existing approaches for automated AG reasoning are special instances of LAG.We develop two learning algorithms for a class of systems, called infinite regular systems, that combine finite and infinite behaviors. We show that for infinity-regular systems, both AG-NC and AG-C are sound and complete. Finally, we show how to instantiate LAG to do automated AG reasoning for infinite regular, and omega-regular, systems using both AG-NC and AG-C as proof rules

  19. A study of tau decays involving eta and omega mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The 132 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1994 have been used to analyze $\\eta$ and $\\omega$ production in $\\tau$ decays. The following branching fractions have been measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} B(\\tau^-\\to\

  20. Study of $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\omega p \\bar{p}$ at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Friedel, P; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Fuks, O; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Lin, D; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y X; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2013-01-01

    The decay $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\omega p \\bar{p}$ has been studied, using $225.3\\times 10^{6}$ $J/\\psi$ events accumulated at BESIII. No significant enhancement near the $p\\bar{p}$ invariant-mass threshold (denoted as $X(p\\bar{p})$) is observed. The upper limit of the branching fraction $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\omega X(p\\bar{p}) \\rightarrow \\omega p \\bar{p})$ is determined to be $4.2\\times10^{-6}$ at the 95% confidence level. The branching fraction of $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\omega p \\bar{p}$ is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\omega p \\bar{p}) =(9.0 \\pm 0.2\\ (\\text{stat.})\\pm 0.9\\ (\\text{syst.})) \\times 10^{-4}$.

  1. Omega-3 chicken egg detection system using a mobile-based image processing segmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Oky Dwi; Kurniawan Teguh, M.; Cintya Amalia, P.

    2017-02-01

    An Omega-3 chicken egg is a chicken egg produced through food engineering technology. It is produced by hen fed with high omega-3 fatty acids. So, it has fifteen times nutrient content of omega-3 higher than Leghorn's. Visually, its shell has the same shape and colour as Leghorn's. Each egg can be distinguished by breaking the egg's shell and testing the egg yolk's nutrient content in a laboratory. But, those methods were proven not effective and efficient. Observing this problem, the purpose of this research is to make an application to detect the type of omega-3 chicken egg by using a mobile-based computer vision. This application was built in OpenCV computer vision library to support Android Operating System. This experiment required some chicken egg images taken using an egg candling box. We used 60 omega-3 chicken and Leghorn eggs as samples. Then, using an Android smartphone, image acquisition of the egg was obtained. After that, we applied several steps using image processing methods such as Grab Cut, convert RGB image to eight bit grayscale, median filter, P-Tile segmentation, and morphology technique in this research. The next steps were feature extraction which was used to extract feature values via mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis from each image. Finally, using digital image measurement, some chicken egg images were classified. The result showed that omega-3 chicken egg and Leghorn egg had different values. This system is able to provide accurate reading around of 91%.

  2. Gastrointestinal bleeding after high intake of omega-3 fatty acids, cortisone and antibiotic therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Papamikos, Vasilios

    2014-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids exert a plethora of physiological actions including triglycerides lowering, reduction of inflammatory indices, immunomodulation, anti- thrombotic effects and possibly promotion of exercise performance. Their use is widespread and for commonly ingested doses their side- effects are minimal. We report a case of a 60 y amateur athlete who consumed about 20 g omega-3 fatty acids daily from supplements and natural sources for a year. After the intake of cortisone and antibiotics he presented duodenum ulcer and bleeding although he had no previous history of gastrointestinal problems. Although several animal data support gastro-protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in the present case they were not able to prevent ulcer generation. The present observation may be explained by (i) the high dose of omega-3 fatty acids and their effect on bleeding, (ii) the fact that cortisone increases their oxidation and may render them proinflammatory, (iii) other antithrombotic microconstituents included in the consumed cod-oil and/or the diet of the subject and (iv) the differences in the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of well- trained subjects. Further studies are needed to substantiate any possible interaction of cortisone and omega-3 fatty acids in wide ranges of intake.

  3. Atomic ordering and systematics of bonding lengths in the Ti-V omega phase: a neutron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites, G.M.; Guillermet, A.F. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina); Aurelio, G. [Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Cuello, G.J.; Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Serrano 123, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    1999-03-04

    A new model describing the structural and bonding properties of the omega ({Omega}) phase in Zr-Nb alloys has recently been presented [12]. This model, which was aimed at explaining the composition dependence of the bonding lengths, predicts that the {Omega} phase is ordered, i.e., that some crystallographic sites are preferentially occupied by Zr atoms. Such feature, which should in principle be observed in other, related {Omega} phases, has not yet been tested against direct measurements. This problem has now been studied in the Ti-V system, which is the analogue of Zr-Nb in the 3d-transition series. Neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in quenched Ti-V alloys with V contents between 14 and 17 at.%. The diffraction spectra have been analysed using the Rietveld method, and a systematic analysis is reported here of the possibility of deviations from the random occupation of the two sublattices which are distinguished in the {Omega} structure. In addition, these new diffraction data are used in an evaluation of the shortest interatomic distances which are relevant for a comparison with the predictions of the model of Grad et al. (orig.) 28 refs.

  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and their Role in Central Nervous System - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysoczański, Tomasz; Sokoła-Wysoczańska, Ewa; Pękala, Jolanta; Lochyński, Stanisław; Czyż, Katarzyna; Bodkowski, Robert; Herbinger, Grzegorz; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bożena; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are crucial for our health and wellbeing; therefore, they have been widely investigated for their roles in maintaining human health and in disease treatment. Most Western diets include significant amount of saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and insufficient quantity of omega-3; however, the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA, in particular, is essential for the formation of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipids to promote health and prevent disease. As our daily diet affects our health, this paper draws attention to unique representatives of the omega-3 fatty acid group: alpha-linolenic acid and its derivatives. Recently, this has been shown to be effective in treating and preventing various diseases. It has been confirmed that omega-3 PUFAs may act as therapeutic agents as well and their significant role against inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, has been described. Some of nutritional factors have been described as a significant modifiers, which can influence brain elasticity and thus, effect on central nervous system functioning. Therefore, appropriate dietary management appears to be a non-invasive and effective approach to counteract neurological and cognitive disorders.

  5. The OMEGA system for marine bioenergy, wastewater treatment, environmental enhancement, and aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    OMEGA is an acronym for Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. The OMEGA system consists of photobioreactors (PBRs) made of flexible, inexpensive clear plastic tubes attached to floating docks, anchored offshore in naturally or artificially protected bays [1]. The system uses domestic wastewater and CO2 from coastal facilities to provide water, nutrients, and carbon for algae cultivation [2]. The surrounding seawater maintains the temperature inside the PBRs and prevents the cultivated (freshwater) algae from becoming invasive species in the marine environment (i.e., if a PBR module accidentally leaks, the freshwater algae that grow in wastewater cannot survive in the marine environment). The salt gradient between seawater and wastewater is used for forward osmosis (FO) to concentrate nutrients and facilitate algae harvesting [3]. Both the algae and FO clean the wastewater, removing nutrients as well as pharmaceuticals and personal-care products [4]. The offshore infrastructure provides a large surface area for solar-photovoltaic arrays and access to offshore wind or wave generators. The infrastructure can also support shellfish, finfish, or seaweed aquaculture. The economics of the OMEGA system are supported by a combination of biofuels production, wastewater treatment, alternative energy generation, and aquaculture. By using wastewater and operating offshore from coastal cities, OMEGA can be located close to wastewater and CO2 sources and it can avoid competing with agriculture for water, fertilizer, and land [5]. By combining biofuels production with wastewater treatment and aquaculture, the OMEGA system provides both products and services, which increase its economic feasibility. While the offshore location has engineering challenges and concerns about the impact and control of biofouling [6], large OMEGA structure will be floating marine habitats and will create protected 'no-fishing' zones that could increase local biodiversity and fishery

  6. Plasma interpenetration study on the Omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Divol, Laurent; Ross, Steven; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Huser, Gael; Moody, John; MacKinnon, Andy; Meezan, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The Near Vacuum Campaign on the National Ignition Facility has sparked an interest on the nature of the gold/carbon interface at high velocity, high electron temperature, low-electron density. Indeed radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been unable to accurately reproduce the experimental shape of the hot spot resulting from implosion driven in Near Vacuum Holhraum. The experimental data are suggesting that the inner beams are freely propagating to the waist of the hohlraum when simulations predict that a density ridge at the gold/carbon interface blocks the inner beams. The discrepancy between experimental data and simulation might be explained by the fluid description of the plasma interface in a rad-hydro code which is probably not valid in when two plasma at high velocity, high temperature are meeting. To test our assumption, we went to the Omega laser facility to study gold/carbon interface in the relevant regime. Time resolved images of the self-emission as well as Thomson scattering data will be presented. For the first time, a transition from a multifluid to a single fluid is observed as plasmas are interacting. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Study of the process $e^+ e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0 $ with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, A V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2007-01-01

    Using $\\sim$ 600 pb$^{-1}$ collected with the KLOE detector at DA$\\Phi$NE, we have studied the production cross section of $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $\\pi^0\\pi^0\\gamma$ final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at center of mass energies between 1000 and 1030 MeV. By fitting the observed interference pattern around $M_\\phi$ for both final states, we extract a measurement (preliminary) for the ratio $\\Gamma(\\omega\\to\\pi^0\\gamma)/\\Gamma(\\omega\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) = 0.0934\\pm 0.0022$. Since these two final states represent the 98% of the $\\omega$ decay channels, we use unitarity to derive $BR(\\omega\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0)= (89.94\\pm 0.23)%$ and $BR(\\omega\\to\\pi^0\\gamma) = (8.40\\pm 0.19)%$. % Moreover, the parameters describing the \\eeto\\wpc reaction around $M_\\phi$ are used to extract the branching fraction for the OZI and G-parity violating $\\phi\\to\\omega\\pi^0$ decay: $BR(\\phi\\to\\omega\\pi^0) = (5.63\\pm 0.70)\\times 10^{-5}$.

  8. OZI violation in low energy omega and phi production in the pp system in a quark-gluon model

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate OZI violation in near-threshold omega and phi production in the pp system. Assuming ideal omega/phi mixing (corrections are estimated), the energy dependence of the ratio R(omega/phi) is analyzed in a perturbative quark-gluon exchange model up to the third other in the strong coupling constant alpha(s) with the proton represented as a quark - scalar diquark system. We give a very natural explanation of the violation of the OZI rule in omega/phi production and its energy dependence near the production thresholds.

  9. Dietary uptake of omega-3 fatty acids in mouse tissue studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Peter; Rossmeisl, Martin; Hanrieder, Jörg; Kuda, Ondrej; Kopecky, Jan; Bryhn, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with considerable health benefits, including the prevention of metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, incorporation of the main omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at the systemic level has been found to be more efficient when these fatty acids are supplied in the form of marine phospholipids compared to triglycerides. In this work, the uptake of omega-3 fatty acids and their incorporation in specific lipids were studied in adipose, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues of mice given high-fat diets with or without omega-3 supplements in the form of phospholipids or triglycerides using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The results demonstrate significant uptake of EPA and DHA, and the incorporation of these fatty acids in specific lipid molecules, in all three tissue types in response to the dietary omega-3 supplements. Moreover, the results indicate reduced concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA) and depletion of lipids containing AA in tissue samples from mice given supplementary omega-3, as compared to the control mice. The effect on the lipid composition, in particular the DHA uptake and AA depletion, was found to be significantly stronger when the omega-3 supplement was supplied in the form of phospholipids, as compared to triglycerides. TOF-SIMS was found to be a useful technique for screening the lipid composition and simultaneously obtaining the spatial distributions of various lipid classes on tissue surfaces.

  10. Multidimensional Study of High-Adiabat OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Christopherson, A. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Mora, A.; Radha, P. B.; Shang, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Woo, K. M.; Varchas, G.

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in modeling laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, there remains a predictability gap. This is particularly shown by the shortfall in hot-spot pressures inferred from OMEGA cryogenic implosions. To address this, a series of high-adiabat, cryogenic implosions were performed on OMEGA. These shots were performed with and without single-beam smoothing by spectral dispersion, at low and high drive intensities. These shots represent a regime where good agreement with simulation is expected because of the high adiabat. Multidimensional simulations of these shots will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with experimental indicators of departure from spherical symmetry (``1-D-ness''). The roles of short- and long-wavelength perturbations are considered. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Circuit Methods for VLF Antenna Couplers. [for use in Loran or Omega receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The limitations of different E-field antenna coupler or preamplifier circuits are presented. All circuits were evaluated using actual Loran or Omega signals. Electric field whip or wire antennas are the simplest types which can be used for reception of VLF signals in the 10 to 100 kHz range. JFET or MOSFET transistors provide impedance transformation and some voltage gain in simple circuits where the power for operating the preamplifier uses the same coaxial cable that feeds the signal back to the receiver. The circuit techniques provide useful alternative methods for Loran-Omega receiver system designers.

  12. Study of the Production and Decay Properties of using the OMEGA Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to study beauty particles production and decay in a 350~GeV negative pion beam, using a scintillating optical fibre target in conjunction with a silicon microstrip telescope and the Omega spectrometer.\\\\ \\\\ A multiparticle high $p _{T}$ ~trigger together with an impact parameter trigger and muon selection is employed to enrich the $ B \\bar{B} $ ~signal. An automatic system of reconstructing tracks and vertices has been developed to select beauty decay topologies. A 50~day run should yield about 200~ $ B \\bar{B} $ events per nanobarn. \\\\ \\\\ Fast, high resolution micro-tracking has been realized with the scintillating fibre detector, but some technical problems are still under study. \\\\ \\\\ The collaboration is continuing with the R&D programme and at the same time has joined with the WA82 collaboration in a common proposal to study beauty production and decay with the Omega spectrometer using the better-known technique of silicon microstrip (this is approved as WA92).

  13. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  14. Prevention of lipid oxidation in omega-3 enriched oofds by antioxidants and the use of delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Due to the health beneficial effects of marine omega-3 fatty acids there is an increasing interest in developing functional foods containing these healthy fatty acids. However, such foods are very susceptible to lipid oxidation, which will give rise to undesirable off-flavours and unhealthy...... oxidation products. Efficients strategies to prevent lipid oxidation are therefore required. Such strategies include addition of antioxidants or the use of omega-3 delivery emulsions. However, antioxidant efficacy in complex omega-3 enriched foods are influenced by many factors including the lipophilicity...... of the antioxidants. Selection of the optimal antioxidant system is therefore a major challenge. Likewise, a range of factors can influence the ability of omega-3 delivery systems to protect the omega-3 fatty acids against oxidation after addition to food systems. These challenges will be discussed...

  15. Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA: A System for Biofuel Production, Wastewater Treatment, and CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan; Embaye, Tsegereda; Buckwalter, Patrick; Richardson, Tra-My; Kagawa, Hiromi; Reinsch, Sigrid; Martis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    We are developing Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA). OMEGAs are closed photo-bioreactors constructed of flexible, inexpensive, and durable plastic with small sections of semi-permeable membranes for gas exchange and forward osmosis (FO). Each OMEGA modules is filled with municipal wastewater and provided with CO2 from coastal CO2 sources. The OMEGA modules float just below the surface, and the surrounding seawater provides structural support, temperature control, and mixing for the freshwater algae cultures inside. The salinit7 gradient from inside to outside drives forward osmosis through the patches of FO membranes. This concentrates nutrients in the wastewater, which enhances algal growth, and slowly dewaters the algae, which facilitates harvesting. Thy concentrated algal biomass is harvested for producing biofuels and fertilizer. OMEGA system cleans the wastewater released into the surrounding coastal waters and functions as a carbon sequestration system.

  16. Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algai (Omega) System for Biofuel Production, Wastewater Treatment, and CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan; Embaye, Tsegereda; Buckwalter, Patrick; Richardson, Tra-My; Kagawa, Hiromi; Reinsch, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    We are developing Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA). OMEGAs are closed photo-bioreactors constructed of flexible, inexpensive, and durable plastic with small sections of semi-permeable membranes for gas exchange and forward osmosis (FO). Each OMEGA modules is filled with municipal wastewater and provided with CO2 from coastal CO2 sources. The OMEGA modules float just below the surface, and the surrounding seawater provides structural support, temperature control, and mixing for the freshwater algae cultures inside. The salinity gradient from inside to outside drives forward osmosis through the patches of FO membranes. This concentrates nutrients in the wastewater, which enhances algal growth, and slowly dewaters the algae, which facilitates harvesting. The concentrated algal biomass is harvested for producing biofuels and fertilizer. OMEGA system cleans the wastewater released into the surrounding coastal waters and functions as a carbon sequestration system.

  17. Study of omega-meson production in pp collisions at ANKE

    CERN Document Server

    Barsov, S; Hartmann, M; Hejny, V; Kacharava, A K; Keshelashvili, I; Khoukaz, A; Koptev, V; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Lehmann, I; Leontyev, V; Macharashvili, G; Maeda, Y; Mersmann, T; Merzliakov, S; Mikirtytchyants, S; Mussgiller, A; Oellers, D; Ohm, H; Rathmann, F; Schleichert, R; Seyfarth, H; Ströher, H; Trusov, S; Valdau, Y; Wüstner, P; Wilkin, C; Yaschenko, S

    2006-01-01

    The production of omega-mesons in the pp->pp omega reaction has been investigated with the COSY-ANKE spectrometer for excess energies of 60 and 92MeV by detecting the two final protons and reconstructing their missing mass. The large multipion background was subtracted using an event-by-event transformation of the proton momenta between the two energies. Differential distributions and total cross sections were obtained after careful studies of possible systematic uncertainties in the overall ANKE acceptance. The results are compared with the predictions of theoretical models. Combined with data on the phi-meson, a more refined estimate is made of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule violation in the phi/omega production ratio.

  18. Study of $J\\psi$ decaying into $\\omega p \\bar p$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Jin Chen; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fanga, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guob, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, J H; Hu, T; Huangc, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, H M; Liue, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Jian Liu; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Maf, L L; Ma, Q M; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wangg, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wangh, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Zheng Wang; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Yiyun Zhang; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhaoi, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2008-01-01

    The decay $J/\\psi \\to \\omega p \\bar p$ is studied using a $5.8 \\times 10^7$ $J/\\psi$ event sample accumulated with the BES II detector at the Beijing electron-positron collider. The decay branching fraction is measured to be $B(J/\\psi \\to \\omega p \\bar p)=(9.8\\pm 0.3\\pm 1.4)\\times 10^{-4}$. No significant enhancement near the $p\\bar p$ mass threshold is observed, and an upper limit of $B(J/\\psi \\to \\omega X(1860))B(X(1860)\\to p\\bar p) <1.5 \\times 10^{-5}$ is determined at the 95% confidence level, where X(1860) designates the near-threshold enhancement seen in the $p\\bar p$ mass spectrum in $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma p \\bar p$ decays.

  19. The pure non-collisional Blue Straggler population in the giant stellar system omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Rood, R T; Origlia, L; Pancino, E; Bellazzini, M

    2006-01-01

    We have used high spatial resolution data from the Hubble Space Telescope and wide-field ground-based observations to search for blue straggler stars (BSS) over the entire radial extent of the large stellar system omega Centauri. We have detected the largest population of BSS ever observed in any stellar system. Even though the sample is restricted to the brightest portion of the BSS sequence, more than 300 candidates have been identified. BSS are thought to be produced by the evolution of binary systems (either formed by stellar collisions or mass exchange in binary stars). Since systems like Galactic globular clusters (GGC) and omega Cen evolve dynamically on time-scales significantly shorter than their ages, binaries should have settled toward the center, showing a more concentrated radial distribution than the ordinary, less massive single stars. Indeed, in all GGCs which have been surveyed for BSS, the BSS distribution is peaked at the center. Conversely, in omega Cen we find that the BSS share the same ...

  20. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biomarkers and coronary heart disease: Pooling project of 19 cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. Most prior longitudinal studies evaluated self-reported consumption rather than biomarkers. This study sought to evaluate biomarkers of seafood-derived eicosapentaenoic acid ...

  1. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Chandra Study of the Galactic Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Davies, Melvyn B

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a ~70 ksec Chandra ACIS-I exposure of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). The ~17 amin x 17 amin field of view fully encompasses three core radii and almost twice the half-mass radius. We detect 180 sources to a limiting flux of ~4.3x10^-16 erg/cm^2/s (Lx = 1.2x10^30 erg/s at 4.9 kpc). After accounting for the number of active galactic nuclei and possible foreground stars, we estimate that 45-70 of the sources are cluster members. Four of the X-ray sources have previously been identified as compact accreting binaries in the cluster--three cataclysmic variables (CVs) and one quiescent neutron star. Correlating the Chandra positions with known variable stars yields eight matches, of which five are probable cluster members that are likely to be binary stars with active coronae. Extrapolating these optical identifications to the remaining unidentified X-ray source population, we estimate that 20-35 of the sources are CVs and a similar number are active binaries. This likely represents most ...

  3. Cryogneic-Target Performance and Implosion Physics Studies on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Hu, S.X.; Knauer, J.P.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, R.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    2009-03-06

    Recent progress in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reviewed. Ignition-relevant areal densities of ~200 mg/cm^2 in cryogenic D2 implosions with peak laser-drive intensities of ~5 x 10^14 W/cm^2 were previously reported [T. C. Sangster et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 185006 (2008)]. The laser intensity is increased to ~10^15 W/cm^2 to demonstrate ignition-relevant implosion velocities of 3–4 x 10^7 cm/ s, providing an understanding of the relevant target physics. Planar-target acceleration experiments show the importance of the nonlocal electron-thermal-transport effects for modeling the laser drive. Nonlocal and hot-electron preheat is observed to stabilize the Rayleigh–Taylor growth at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2. The shell preheat caused by hot electrons generated by two-plasmon-decay instability was reduced by using Si-doped ablators. The measured compressibility of planar plastic targets driven with high-compression shaped pulses agrees well with one-dimensional simulations at these intensities. Shock mistiming has contributed to compression degradation of recent cryogenic implosions driven with continuous pulses. Multiple-picket (shock-wave) target designs make it possible for a more robust tuning of the shock-wave arrival times. Cryogenic implosions driven with double-picket pulses demonstrate somewhat improved compression performance at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2.

  4. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids influence gene expression. Because of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their metabolic pathways, blood levels of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are determined by both endogenous metabolism and dietary intake making the need of balanced dietary intake essential for health and disease prevention. Whether an omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3:1 to 4:1 could prevent the pathogenesis of many diseases induced by today’s Western diets (AFSSA, 2010, a target of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment, and genetics. A target of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment and genetics. A balanced ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is important for health and in the prevention of CHD and possibly other chronic diseases.

  5. Study of isospin violating $\\phi$ excitation in $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    We study reaction $e^+ e^-\\to \\omega\\pi^0$ in the vicinity of $\\phi$ mass region. The isospin-violating $\\phi$ excitation is accounted for by two major mechanisms. One is electromagnetic (EM) transition and the other is strong isospin violations via intermediate hadronic meson loops. We find that the side-band cross sections for $e^+ e^-\\to \\omega\\pi^0$, i.e. cross sections below or above the $\\phi$ excitation, provide a tight constraint on the EM transition of $\\phi\\to\\omega\\pi^0$. The strong isospin violation is described by the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule evading intermediate-meson-exchange loops. A relative phase of $\\sim -90^\\circ$ is favored between the loop transition and I=0 EM amplitudes. By comparing with the recent KLOE data, we succeed in extracting the $\\phi\\to\\omega\\pi^0$ partial decay width. Some crucial insights into the correlation between isospin violation and OZI-rule evading transitions are also learned.

  6. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  7. Universal regular autonomous asynchronous systems: omega-limit sets, invariance and basins of attraction

    CERN Document Server

    Vlad, Serban E

    2010-01-01

    The asynchronous systems are the non-deterministic real time-binary models of the asynchronous circuits from electrical engineering. Autonomy means that the circuits and their models have no input. Regularity means analogies with the dynamical systems, thus such systems may be considered to be the real time dynamical systems with a 'vector field' {\\Phi}:{0,1}^2 \\rightarrow {0,1}^2. Universality refers to the case when the state space of the system is the greatest possible in the sense of the inclusion. The purpose of the paper is that of defining, by analogy with the dynamical systems theory, the {\\omega}-limit sets, the invariance and the basins of attraction of the universal regular autonomous asynchronous systems.

  8. Study of the near-threshold $\\omega\\phi$ mass enhancement in doubly OZI suppressed $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma\\omega\\phi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Friedel, P; Fu, C D; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Lin, D; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; PacettiB, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, R; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q Z; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, Z; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    A 2.25$\\times10^8$ $\\jpsi$ event sample accumulated with the BESIII detector is used to study the doubly OZI suppressed decay modes $\\jpsi\\to\\gamma\\of$, $\\omega\\to\\ppp$, $\\phi\\to\\kk$. A strong deviation ($>$ 30$\\sigma$) from three-body $\\jpsi\\to\\gamma\\omega\\phi$ phase space is observed near the $\\omega\\phi$ mass threshold that is consistent with a previous observation reported by the BESII experiment. A partial wave analysis with a tensor covariant amplitude that assumes that the enhancement is due to the presence of a resonance, the X(1810), is performed, and confirms that the spin-parity of the X(1810) is $0^{++}$. The mass and width of the X(1810) are determined to be $M=1795\\pm7$(stat)$^{+13}_{-5}$(syst)$\\pm$19(mod) MeV/$c^2$ and $\\Gamma=95\\pm10$(stat)$^{+21}_{-34}$(syst)$\\pm$75(mod) MeV/$c^2$, respectively, and the product branching fraction is measured to be ${\\cal B}(\\jpsi\\to\\gamma X(1810))\\times{\\cal B}(X(1810)\\to\\of)=(2.00\\pm0.08$(stat)$^{+0.45}_{-1.00}$(syst)$\\pm$1.30(mod))$\\times10^{-4}$. %where th...

  9. OMEGA 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masihtinggi Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 6, secara alami terdapat pada minyak biji-bijian, minyakjagung dan kacang kedelai. Omega 6 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat terutama untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan kecerdasan balita. Tulisan ini membahas tentang defenisi omega 6, sumber, klasifikasi, manfaat dan kerugian bila mengkonsumsi omega 6. Disarankan untuk melakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 6 dengan tumbuh-kembang anak, selain itu bagi ibu-ibu disarankan untuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 6 guna pengoptimalan tumbuh-kembang anak. Hal ini jika terlaksana dapat memberikan dukungan terhadap program pemerintah di bidang promosi kesehatan.

  10. Damage in fused-silica spatial-filter lenses on the OMEGA laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Amy L.; Smith, Douglas J.; Schmid, Ansgar W.; Papernov, Semyon; Kelly, John H.

    1999-04-01

    Vacuum surface damage to fused-silica, spatial-filter lenses is the most prevalent laser-damage problem occurring on the OMEGA laser system. Approximately one-half of the stage C- input and output, D-input, E-input, and F-input spatial- filter lenses are currently damaged with millimeter-scale fracture sites. With the establishment of safe operational damage criteria, laser operation has not been impeded. These sol-gel-coated lenses see an average fluence of 2 to 4 J/cm2 at 1053 nm/1 ns. Sol-gel coatings on fused-silica glass have small-spot damage thresholds at least a factor of 2 higher than this peak operational fluence. It is now known that the vacuum surface of OMEGA's spatial-filter lenses are contaminated with vacuum pump oils and machine oils used in the manufacture of the tubes; however, development-phase damage tests were conducted on uncontaminated witness samples. Possible explanations for the damage include absorbing defects originating form ablated pinhole materials, contamination nucleated at surface defects on the coating, or subsurface defects from the polishing process. The damage does not correlate with hot spots in the beam, and the possibility of damage from ghost reflections has been eliminated. Experiments have been initiated to investigate the long-term benefits of ion etching to remove subsurface damage and to replace sol-gel layers by dielectric oxide coatings, which do not degrade with oil contamination.

  11. B Meson Decays to mega K*, omega rho, omega omega, omega phi, and omega f0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams,; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego

    2006-07-28

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K*, {omega}p, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi} with 233 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They also search for the vector-scalar B decay to {omega}f{sub 0}.

  12. TRIGLYCERIDES, ATHEROSCLEROSIS, AND CARDIOVASCULAR OUTCOME STUDIES: FOCUS ON OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Yehuda; Shapiro, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    To provide an overview of the roles of triglycerides and triglyceride-lowering agents in atherosclerosis in the context of cardiovascular outcomes studies. We reviewed the published literature as well as ClinicalTrials.gov entries for ongoing studies. Despite improved atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes with statin therapy, residual risk remains. Epidemiologic data and recent genetic insights provide compelling evidence that triglycerides are in the causal pathway for the development of atherosclerosis, thereby renewing interest in targeting triglycerides to improve ASCVD outcomes. Fibrates, niacin, and omega-3 fatty acids (OM3FAs) are three classes of triglyceride-lowering drugs. Outcome studies with triglyceride-lowering agents have been inconsistent. With regard to OM3FAs, the JELIS study showed that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) significantly reduced major coronary events in statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients. Regarding other agents, extended-release niacin and fenofibrate are no longer recommended as statin add-on therapy (by some guidelines, though not all) because of the lack of convincing evidence from outcome studies. Notably, subgroup analyses from the outcome studies have generated the hypothesis that triglyceride lowering may provide benefit in statin-treated patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia. Two ongoing OM3FA outcome studies (REDUCE-IT and STRENGTH) are testing this hypothesis in high-risk, statin-treated patients with triglyceride levels of 200 to 500 mg/dL. There is consistent evidence that triglycerides are in the causal pathway of atherosclerosis but inconsistent evidence from cardiovascular outcomes studies as to whether triglyceride-lowering agents reduce cardiovascular risk. Ongoing outcomes studies will determine the role of triglyceride lowering in statin-treated patients with high-dose prescription OM3FAs in terms of improved ASCVD outcomes. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

  13. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  14. Retina and Omega-3

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Querques; Raimondo Forte; Souied, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several epidemiological studies based on food frequency questionnaires suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could have a protective role in reducing the onset and progression of retinal diseases. The retina has a high concentration of omega-3, particularly DHA, which optimizes fluidity of photoreceptor membranes, retinal integrity, and visual function. Furthermore, many studies demonstrated that DHA has a protective, for example antiapoptotic, role in the ret...

  15. Analysis of epidermal lipids in normal and atopic dogs, before and after administration of an oral omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid feed supplement. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Iuliana; Pin, Didier; Remoué, Noëlle; Remoué, Nathalie; Osta, Bilal; Callejon, Sylvie; Videmont, Emilie; Gatto, Hugues; Portoukalian, Jacques; Haftek, Marek

    2011-12-01

    Alterations of the lipid expression in the skin of human and canine atopic subjects may be one of the key factors in the disease development. We have analyzed the ultrastructure of the clinically uninvolved skin of atopic dogs and compared it with the lipid composition of their tape-stripped stratum corneum (SC). The effect of a 2 month treatment of atopic dogs by food supplementation with a mixture of essential fatty acids was evaluated on skin samples taken before and after the treatment period. Electron microscopy revealed that the non-lesional skin of atopic dogs exhibited an abnormal and largely incomplete structure of the lamellar lipids with little cohesion between the corneocyte strata. The SC of atopic dogs was characterized by a significant decrease in the lipid content when compared to the healthy controls. Following oral supplementation with the mixture of essential fatty acids, the overall lipid content of the SC markedly increased. This feature was observed both with the free and, most importantly, with the protein-bound lipids (cholesterol, fatty acids and ceramides), the latter constituting the corneocyte-bound scaffold for ordinate organisation of the extracellular lipid bi-layers. Indeed, the semi-quantitative electron microscopy study revealed that the treatment resulted in a significantly improved organization of the lamellar lipids in the lower SC, comparable to that of the healthy dogs. Our results indicate the potential interest of long-term alimentary supplementation with omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids in canine atopic dermatitis.

  16. A study of the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} p at 18 GeV/c: The D and S decay amplitudes for b{sub 1}(1235) {yields} {omega}{pi}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mina Nozar; Gary Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; John Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S.P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; Paul Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; David Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; Joachim Kuhn; V.V. Lipaev; John Losecco; M. Lu; Joseph Manak; James Napolitano; C. Olchanski; Alexander Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A.V. Popov; D.I. Ryabchikov; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; Xiaoyan Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; J.S. Suh; S.A. Taegar; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; Dennis Weygand; D.B. White; H.J. Willutzki; M. Witkowski; A.A. Yershov

    2002-08-08

    The reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} p, {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} has been studied at 18 GeV/c. The {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass spectrum is found to be dominated by the b{sub 1}(1235). Partial Wave Analysis shows that b{sub 1} production is dominated by natural parity exchange. The S-wave and D-wave amplitudes for b{sub 1}(1235) {yields} {omega}{pi} have been determined, and it is found that the amplitude ratio, |D/S| = 0.269 {+-} (0.009){sub stat} {+-} (0.01){sub sys} and the phase difference, {phi}(D-S) = 10.54{sup o} {+-} (2.4{sup o}){sub stat} {+-} (3.9){sub sys}.

  17. B Meson Decays to mega K*, omega rho, omega omega, omega phi, and omega f0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Yu K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Doll, D; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z

    2006-01-01

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states omega K*, omega rho, omega omega, and omega phi with 233 times 10^{6} BB pairs produced in e+e- annihilation at sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV. We also search for the vector-scalar B decay to omega f_0. We measure the following branching fractions in units of 10^{-6}: BR(B0 --> omega K*0) = 2.4 +/- 1.1 +/- 0.7 ( omega K*+) = 0.6 {+1.4}_{-1.2} {+1.1}_{-0.9} ( omega rho0) = -0.6 +/- 0.7 {+0.8}_{-0.3} ( omega rho+) = 10.6 +/- 2.1 {+1.6}_{-1.0}, BR(B0 --> omega omega) = 1.8 {+1.3}_{-0.9} +/- 0.4 ( omega phi) = 0.1 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.1 ( omega f_0) = 0.9 +/- 0.4 {+0.2}_{-0.1} ( omega rho+ decays we also measure the longitudinal spin component f_L=0.82 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.02 and the charge asymmetry A_CP=0.04 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.02.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids incorporated colloidal systems for the delivery of Angelica gigas Nakai extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Jun; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae Young; Lee, Song Yi; Yoon, In-Soo; Kang, Wie-Soo; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fish oil-enriched colloidal systems were developed for the oral delivery of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) extract (ext). By constructing a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, the composition of oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsion (ME) systems based on ω-3 (oil), Labrasol (surfactant), and water was determined. AGN ext was dissolved into the ME system and d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was added to the ME formulation in order to enhance the mucosal absorption of the pharmacologically active ingredients in the AGN ext. The droplet size of AGN-loaded MEs was 205-277 nm and their morphology was spherical. The release of major components of AGN, decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA), from ME formulations in pH 1.2 and 6.8 buffers was significantly greater (PAGN suspension group. The pharmacokinetic properties of AGN-loaded MEs in rats were evaluated by measuring decursinol (DOH) concentrations in plasma after oral administration. TPGS-included ME (F2) resulted in significantly greater (PAGN ext+TPGS, and AGN in suspension. Severe toxicity of F1 and F2 on the intestinal epithelium was not observed by histological staining. The colloidal carriers described herein are promising delivery systems for oral administration of AGN ext.

  19. Accretion Shocks in the Laboratory: Using the OMEGA Laser to Study Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Li, C. K.; Hartigan, P.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Ross, J. S.; Chang, P. Y.; Klein, S.; Zylstra, A.; Sio, H. W.; Liao, A.; Barnak, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present an on-going series of experiments using the OMEGA laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) to study star formation. Spectra of young stars show evidence of hotspots created when streams of accreting material impact at the surface of the star to create accretion shocks. These accretion shocks are poorly understood, as the surfaces of young stars cannot be spatially resolved. Our experiment series creates a scaled ``accretion shock'' on the OMEGA laser by driving a plasma jet (the ``accretion stream'') into a solid block (the ``stellar surface''), in the presence of a parallel magnetic field analogous to the star's local field. Thus far, visible image data from this experimental series either shows very thin accretion shocks forming or does not show them forming at all. We intend to present this data, provide possible explanations for why shocks may not have formed, and discuss potential improvements to the experimental design. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002719.

  20. Microencapsulated foods as a functional delivery vehicle for omega-3 fatty acids: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well established that the ingestion of the omega-3 (N3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA positively benefit a variety of health indices. Despite these benefits the actual intake of fish derived N3 is relatively small in the United States. The primary aim of our study was to examine a technology capable of delivering omega-3 fatty acids in common foods via microencapsulation (MicroN3 in young, healthy, active participants who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, we randomized 20 participants (25.4 ± 6.2 y; 73.4 ± 5.1 kg to receive the double blind delivery of a placebo-matched breakfast meal (~2093 kJ containing MicroN3 (450–550 mg EPA/DHA during a 2-week pilot trial. Overall, we observed no differences in overall dietary macronutrient intake other than the N3 delivery during our treatment regimen. Post-test ANOVA analysis showed a significant elevation in mean (SE plasma DHA (91.18 ± 9.3 vs. 125.58 ± 11.3 umol/L; P

  1. EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 AND PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION ON NUTRITIONAL AND INFLAMMATORY INDICES IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS – A PILOT STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuan Mat Daud Zulfitri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intervention to correct malnutrition and chronic inflammation in dialysis patients is often impeded by poor compliance due to medical and socioeconomic barriers. Therefore we performed a pilot study to investigate the technical feasibility of “directly observed treatment” of nutritional supplementation (protein and omega-3 fatty acids and its effects on nutritional and inflammatory markers in low socio-economic status hemodialysis population. Sixty-three eligible patients agreed to participate. Two intervention groups received 30 mL of a liquid protein supplement plus either 2.4 gm omega-3 (1.8 gm eicosapentaenoic acid + 0.6 gm docosahexaenoic acid or a placebo, three times per week after their routine dialysis session for 6 months. Serum albumin, plasma lipids, and other indicators of nutritional and inflammatory status were measured. Statistical differences after treatment and between groups were determined using paired t-test and independent t-test, respectively. Directly observed nutritional supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in the LDLC/HDLC ratio in the omega-3 group as compared to the placebo group (P = 0.043. For the omega-3 group, serum albumin was also marginally higher after 6 months as compared to baseline (P = 0.07. Other nutritional and inflammatory markers were unaffected by intervention. In conclusion, “Directly observed treatment” is technically feasible with an omega-3 based supplement (as opposed to a pure protein supplement showed beneficial effects on the lipid profile.

  2. Composition and quality of marine Omega-3 supplements on the Russian and Norwegian markets: a comparative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaytseva, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    The possible health effects of the long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA; 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic (DHA; 22:6 n-3) have been studied for the last 40 years. The outcome of these studies has shown that intake of these Omega-3 may reduce risk of death from cardiovascular disease and possibly also have anticancer effects, improve brain development, reduce depression and delay the beginning of Alzheimer’s disease. The reference daily intake for EPA+DHA is 500 mg and it is advi...

  3. OMEGA 3

    OpenAIRE

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-01-01

    Di Indonesia terjadi masalah gizi ganda yaitu gizi kurang pada balita dan gizi lebih terjadi pada orang dewasa. Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi ganda di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kelebihan dan kekurangan konsumsi makanan sumber omega 3, EPA, DHA yang secara alami terdapat pada ASI, ikan dan minyak ikan. Omega 3 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat dintaranya dapat mencegah CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) dan untuk optimal tumbuh-kembang anak jika ...

  4. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Investigating the Effects of Omega-3 Supplementation in Children Aged 8-10 Years from a Mainstream School Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A.; Woodward, A.; Jackson, S.; Wang, Y.; Crawford, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increased interest in the effects of omega-3 supplementation on childrens' learning and behaviour, there are a lack of controlled studies of this kind that have utilised a typically developing population. This study investigated the effects of omega-3 supplementation in 450 children aged 8-10 years old from a mainstream school…

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids modify human cortical visual processing--a double-blind, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Isabelle; Crewther, David P; Pipingas, Andrew; Rowsell, Renee; Cockerell, Robyn; Crewther, Sheila G

    2011-01-01

    While cardiovascular and mood benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are manifest, direct neurophysiological evidence of their effects on cortical activity is still limited. Hence we chose to examine the effects of two proprietary fish oil products with different EPA:DHA ratios (EPA-rich, high EPA:DHA; DHA-rich) on mental processing speed and visual evoked brain activity. We proposed that nonlinear multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) would be sensitive to any alteration of the neural function induced by omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, because the higher order kernel responses directly measure the degree of recovery of the neural system as a function of time following stimulation. Twenty-two healthy participants aged 18-34, with no known neurological or psychiatric disorder and not currently taking any nutritional supplementation, were recruited. A double-blind, crossover design was utilized, including a 30-day washout period, between two 30-day supplementation periods of the EPA-rich and DHA-rich diets (with order of diet randomized). Psychophysical choice reaction times and multi-focal nonlinear visual evoked potential (VEP) testing were performed at baseline (No Diet), and after each supplementation period. Following the EPA-rich supplementation, for stimulation at high luminance contrast, a significant reduction in the amplitude of the first slice of the second order VEP kernel response, previously related to activation in the magnocellular pathway, was observed. The correlations between the amplitude changes of short latency second and first order components were significantly different for the two supplementations. Significantly faster choice reaction times were observed psychophysically (compared with baseline performance) under the EPA-rich (but not DHA-rich) supplementation, while simple reaction times were not affected. The reduced nonlinearities observed under the EPA

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids modify human cortical visual processing--a double-blind, crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bauer

    Full Text Available While cardiovascular and mood benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are manifest, direct neurophysiological evidence of their effects on cortical activity is still limited. Hence we chose to examine the effects of two proprietary fish oil products with different EPA:DHA ratios (EPA-rich, high EPA:DHA; DHA-rich on mental processing speed and visual evoked brain activity. We proposed that nonlinear multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP would be sensitive to any alteration of the neural function induced by omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, because the higher order kernel responses directly measure the degree of recovery of the neural system as a function of time following stimulation. Twenty-two healthy participants aged 18-34, with no known neurological or psychiatric disorder and not currently taking any nutritional supplementation, were recruited. A double-blind, crossover design was utilized, including a 30-day washout period, between two 30-day supplementation periods of the EPA-rich and DHA-rich diets (with order of diet randomized. Psychophysical choice reaction times and multi-focal nonlinear visual evoked potential (VEP testing were performed at baseline (No Diet, and after each supplementation period. Following the EPA-rich supplementation, for stimulation at high luminance contrast, a significant reduction in the amplitude of the first slice of the second order VEP kernel response, previously related to activation in the magnocellular pathway, was observed. The correlations between the amplitude changes of short latency second and first order components were significantly different for the two supplementations. Significantly faster choice reaction times were observed psychophysically (compared with baseline performance under the EPA-rich (but not DHA-rich supplementation, while simple reaction times were not affected. The reduced nonlinearities observed under the

  7. The OmegaCAM 16K x 16K CCD detector system for the ESO VLT Survey Telescope (VST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iwert, Olaf; Baade, D.; Balestra, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Bortolussi, A.; Christen, F.; Cumani, C.; Deiries, S.; Downing, M.; Geimer, C.; Hess, G.; Hess, J.; Kuijken, K.; Lizon, J.; Muschielok, B.; Nicklas, H.; Reiss, R.; Reyes, J.; Silber, A.; Thillerup, J.; Valentijn, E.; Dorn, David A.; Holland, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    A 16K x 16K, 1 degree x 1 degree field, detector system was developed by ESO for the OmegaCAM instrument for use on the purpose built ESO VLT Survey Telescope (VST). The focal plane consists of an 8 x 4 mosaic of 2K x 4K 15um pixel e2v CCDs and four 2K x 4K CCDs on the periphery for the opto-mechani

  8. Grocery store podcast about omega-3 fatty acids influences shopping behaviors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Deepika; Palmer-Keenan, Debra M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether listening to a podcast about omega-3 fatty acids (n-3s) while grocery shopping increased shoppers' awareness about and purchases of seafood and other foods rich in n-3s. Repeated-measures design with a convenience sample (n = 56) of grocery shoppers who listened to the podcast while shopping. Pre- and postintervention semistructured interviews were conducted. The Theory of Reasoned Action was the study's framework. Shoppers were primarily females (mean age, 41 ± 15.3 years). Their perceived ability to buy [t(55) = 6.27, P Podcasts may effectively communicate nutrition information. More research with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the effects of the podcast on long-term changes in shopping behavior. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Studying the omega mass in-medium in gamma+A ->pi(0)gamma+X reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, JG; Sibirtsev, A; Cassing, W; Metag, V.; Schadmand, S

    Simulations based on a coupled-channel transport model have been performed to analyze the feasibility to study the in-medium omega mass exploiting the process gamma + A --> pi (o)gamma + X for C, Ca and Nb nuclei. The distortions due to final-state interactions of the pi (o) and background

  10. Adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid content and breast cancer in the euramic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsen, N.; Veer, P. van 't; Strain, J.J.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.; Huttunen, J.K.; Navajas, J.F.-C.; Martin, B.C.; Thamm, M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kohlmeier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid content of adipose tissue in postmenopausal breast cancer cases and controls from five European countries in the European Community Multicenter Study on Antioxidants, Myocardial Infarction, and Cancer (EURAMIC) breast cancer study (1991-1992) was used to explore the hypothesis that

  11. Adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid content and breast cancer in the euramic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsen, N.; Veer, P. van 't; Strain, J.J.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.; Huttunen, J.K.; Navajas, J.F.-C.; Martin, B.C.; Thamm, M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kohlmeier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid content of adipose tissue in postmenopausal breast cancer cases and controls from five European countries in the European Community Multicenter Study on Antioxidants, Myocardial Infarction, and Cancer (EURAMIC) breast cancer study (1991-1992) was used to explore the hypothesis that fa

  12. Study on the use of omega-3 fatty acids as a therapeutic supplement in treatment of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Balbás G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available G Márquez Balbás, M Sánchez Regaña, P Umbert MilletPsoriasis and Phototherapy Unit, Hospital Universitario Sagrat Cor, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Previous studies have suggested a benefit for patients with plaque psoriasis when omega-3 fatty acids are added to topical treatment. This study evaluated the efficacy of a nutritional complement rich in omega-3 fatty acids in patients with mild or moderate plaque psoriasis. Thirty patients were recruited, 15 of whom were given topical treatment with tacalcitol, forming the control group. The remaining 15 patients were given topical tacalcitol and 2 capsules of Oravex® daily. Three visits, the baseline, intermediate (week 4, and final (week 8, were held over an 8-week period. The main efficacy endpoints were the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI and Dermatological Life Quality Index (DLQI. A clear and significant improvement was observed in all the efficacy endpoints in both groups between the baseline visit and the end visit. This improvement was significantly greater in the group treated additionally with Oravex® than in the control group. Supplementary treatment with omega-3 fatty acids complements topical treatment in psoriasis, and makes a significant contribution to reducing PASI and NAPSI and improving DLQI; and to reducing scalp lesion and pruritus, erythema, scaling, and infiltration of the treated areas.Keywords: psoriasis, metabolic syndrome, vitamin D derivates, omega-3 fatty acids, tacalcitol

  13. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  14. A porcine gluteus medius muscle genome-wide transcriptome analysis: dietary effects of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on biological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Szostak, Agnieszka; Pas, te Marinus F.W.; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R.; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O.; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2017-01-01


    Background

    The level of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids can affect many cellular systems and function via nuclear receptors or the bioactive lipid regulation of gene expression. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the muscle transcriptome and the b

  15. On topological groups admitting a base at identity indexed with $\\omega^\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Leiderman, Arkady G.; Pestov, Vladimir G.; Tomita, Artur H.

    2015-01-01

    A topological group $G$ is said to have a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base if the neighbourhood system at identity admits a monotone cofinal map from the directed set $\\omega^\\omega$. In particular, every metrizable group is such, but the class of groups with a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base is significantly wider. The aim of this article is to better understand the boundaries of this class, by presenting new examples and counter-examples. Ultraproducts and non-arichimedean ordered fields lead to natur...

  16. Determination of calf thymus DNA using resonance light-scattering quenching method based on the terbium (omega) (Tb{sup 3+})/europium (omega) (Eu{sup 3+})-quercetin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Juan; Kang Jing; Lu Juan; Li Xiaozhou; Tang Jieli; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang Yihua, E-mail: yihuazh47@yahoo.com.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2009-09-15

    It is found that at pH 7.5 Tris-HCl buffer solution, calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) can quench the resonance light-scattering (RLS) of terbium (omega) (Tb{sup 3+})/europium (omega) (Eu{sup 3+})-quercetin system. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of ctDNA is proposed. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimal experimental conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the quenched RLS intensity is in proportion to the concentration of ctDNA. For Tb{sup 3+}-quercetin-ctDNA system, the linear concentration ranges for determining ctDNA are 0.03-0.2 and 0.5-4 mug/ml, respectively, while for Eu{sup 3+}-quercetin-ctDNA system, the linear concentration range is 0.05-2.5 mug/ml.

  17. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  18. Pilot study of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Iheanyi; Ibegbulam, Obike; Duru, Augustine; Ocheni, Sunday; Emodi, Ifeoma; Ikefuna, Anthony; Umar, Garba; Asinobi, Isaac; Madu, Anazoeze; Okoye, Augustine; Nwagha, Tessy; Oguonu, Uche; Uamai, Ify; Agwu, Obineche; Nonyelu, Charles; Anike, Uche; Agu, Kingsley; Anigbo, Chukwudi; Chukwura, Awele; Ugwu, Ogechukwu; Herrada, Sagrario

    2011-07-01

    In a previous retrospective study, it was observed that the greater the amounts of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the blood, the lesser the number of complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) and the higher the steady state haemoglobin level. SCD causes ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation; which can be ameliorated by a metabolite of DHA that down-regulates expression of pro-inflammatory genes. The objectives of this prospective pilot study were to evaluate the effects of DHA and EPA supplements in SCD, and test the hypothesis that these effects are mediated partly by reducing inflammation. Oral DHA and EPA supplements were given to 16 SCD patients for 6 months. We then compared pre- and post-supplementation values of number of crisis, steady state Hb, plasma unconjugated bilirubin and three indices of inflammation: plasma interleukin-6, blood neutrophil and platelet counts. There was a significant reduction in the plasma level of unconjugated bilirubin, and the number of sickle cell crisis; but not in the markers of inflammation. The pilot data suggest that DHA and EPA supplements reduce the number of crisis and steady state haemolysis in SCD; but provide no evidence that these effects are mediated by reducing inflammation.

  19. Study of baryon acoustic oscillations with SDSS DR12 data and measurements of $\\Omega_k$ and $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeneisen, B

    2016-01-01

    We define Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) observables $\\hat{d}_\\alpha(z, z_c)$, $\\hat{d}_z(z, z_c)$, and $\\hat{d}_/(z, z_c)$ that do not depend on any cosmological parameter. From each of these observables we recover the BAO correlation length $d_\\textrm{BAO}$ with its respective dependence on cosmological parameters. These BAO observables are measured as a function of redshift $z$ with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release DR12. From the BAO measurements alone, or together with the correlation angle $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), we constrain the curvature parameter $\\Omega_k$ and the dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$ as a function of the expansion parameter $a$ in several scenarios. These observables are further constrained with external measurements of $h$ and $\\Omega_\\textrm{b} h^2$. We find some tension between the data and a cosmology with flat space and constant dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$.

  20. Studies in vivo of omega-gliadins in gluten sensitivity (coeliac sprue disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensari, A; Marsh, M N; Moriarty, K J; Moore, C M; Fido, R J; Tatham, A S

    1998-10-01

    1. Highly purified omega-gliadins from wheat were used to challenge gluten-sensitized individuals. Characteristic responses by mucosal CD3(+) and gamma delta+ lymphocytes were demonstrated. Each lymphocyte subset showed an increase within 8-12 h post-challenge, indicating a specific response by the rectal mucosa to this gliadin species.2. Available sequence data for the omega-gliadins and homologous proteins from barley and rye indicate a common repeating octapeptide motif (consensus PQQPFPQQ). The results indicate, therefore, that the octapeptide repeat, or a contained sequence such as PQQP, plays an important role in the mucosal immunopathology of gluten sensitivity.

  1. Study of antiproton annihilation on neutrons into $\\omega\\pi^{-} \\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Case, A; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Sarantsev, A V; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K

    2004-01-01

    Data are presented on antiproton neutron annihilation at rest into omega pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ taken with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR (CERN) using a liquid deuterium target. The partial wave analysis shows evidence for at least two omega pi vector resonances above the rho (770) ground-state. Possible evidence for a third rho ' state with a mass around 1180 MeV is discussed. The results are compared to model dependent predictions concerning the nature of the rho ' states. (35 refs).

  2. Effect of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in rats: A multigeneration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Richa S; Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids are important nutrients required for neuronal functioning. We have demonstrated the beneficial effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in the first and second generation offspring. However, there is a need to examine if the effects are sustained in the third generation offspring. This study reports the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across three consecutive generations on brain neurotrophins like brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); nerve growth factor (NGF) and cognitive performance in the third generation male offspring. Three successive generations of Wistar rats were assigned the following groups throughout pregnancy, lactation and adulthood: i) Control, ii) vitamin B12 deficient (BD), iii) vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid (BDO), iv) vitamin B12 supplemented (BS) and v) vitamin B12 supplemented + omega-3 fatty acid (BSO). The BD group demonstrated lower (p B12 supplementation showed comparable BDNF levels in the hippocampus while their levels were lower in the cortex as compared to the control (p B12 and omega-3 fatty acid showed higher (p B12 and omega-3 fatty acids in improving brain development.

  3. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction a...

  4. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids...... with altered PUFA content and looked at the effects on circulating omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status as a measure of overall omega-3 status. Supplemental oral administration of omega-3 DHA or reduction of RUTF omega-6 linoleic acid using high oleic peanuts improved DHA status, whereas increasing omega......-3 alpha-linolenic acid in RUTF did not. The results of these two small studies are consistent with well-established effects in animal studies and highlight the need for basic and operational research to improve fat composition in support of omega-3-specific development in young children as RUTF use...

  5. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astarita, G.; McKenzie, J.H.; Wang, B.; Strassburg, K.; Doneanu, A.; Johnson, J.; Baker, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Murphy, J.; Vreeken, R.J.; Langridge, J.; Kang, J.X.

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confound

  6. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  7. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  8. Study of the process $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ in the energy range $\\sqrt{s} <2$ GeV with the SND detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achasov, M N; Barnyakov, A Yu; Beloborodov, K I; Berdyugin, A V; Berkaev, D E; Bogdanchikov, A G; Botov, A A; Dimova, T V; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kardapoltsev, L V; Kharlamov, A G; Koop, I A; Korol, A A; Kovrizhin, D P; Koshuba, S V; Kupich, A S; Lysenko, A P; Melnikova, N A; Martin, K A; Pakhtusova, E V; Obrazovsky, A E; Perevedentsev, E A; Rogovsky, Yu A; Serednyakov, S I; Silagadze, Z K; Shatunov, Yu M; Shatunov, P Yu; Shtol, D A; Skrinsky, A N; Surin, I K; Tikhonov, Yu A; Usov, Yu V; Vasiljev, A V; Zemlyansky, I M

    2016-01-01

    The process $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ is studied in the energy range $1.45-2.00$ GeV using data with an integrated luminosity of 33 pb$^{-1}$ accumulated by the SND detector at the $e^+e^-$ collider VEPP-2000. The $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ cross section is measured for the first time. The cross section has a threshold near 1.75 GeV. Its value is about 2 nb in the energy range $1.8-2.0$ GeV. The dominant intermediate state for the process $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\eta\\pi^0$ is found to be $\\omega a_0(980)$.

  9. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy to sertraline in controlling suicidal ideation in patients with depression: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sahoo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan have been gaining attention as promising alternative treatment for depressive illness. These agents are given as as add on treatment to conventional antidepressant drugs. The present study was carried out to evaluate efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy in controlling suicidal ideation in depressive patients on sertraline.Methods: This was a prospective, open label, randomized, parallel group study conducted in department of Psychiatry. Ninety treatment naïve patients (18-65 years age were divided into 3 groups of 30 each. Group I: Sertraline, Group II: Sertraline plus omega-3 fatty acids, Group III: Sertraline plus 5-hydroxytryptophan. Suicidal ideations were assessed with Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation (BSI at weeks 0, 4 and 8. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (SPSS version 20.0. Post hoc analysis was done using Bonferroni test.Results: Baseline parameters in patients of all groups were comparable. Administration of sertraline resulted in reduction of Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation scores as compared to baseline. Addition of omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan also showed reduction in BSI scores. Effect of sertraline monotherapy was more as compared to omega-3 fatty acids or 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy, which was statistically significant (p value < 0.05.Conclusion: Both omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan produce significant effect in controlling suicidal ideations in patients with depression.

  10. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-02

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids.

  11. High potency fish oil supplement improves omega-3 fatty acid status in healthy adults: an open-label study using a web-based, virtual platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Jay K; Ritz, Barry W

    2013-08-08

    The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids from fish are well known, and fish oil supplements are used widely in a preventive manner to compensate the low intake in the general population. The aim of this open-label study was to determine if consumption of a high potency fish oil supplement could improve blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and impact SF-12 mental and physical health scores in healthy adults. A novel virtual clinical research organization was used along with the HS-Omega-3 Index, a measure of EPA and DHA in red blood cell membranes expressed as a percentage of total fatty acids that has been shown to correlate with a reduction in cardiovascular and other risk factors. Briefly, adult subjects (mean age 44 years) were recruited from among U.S. health food store employees and supplemented with 1.1 g/d of omega-3 from fish oil (756 mg EPA, 228 mg DHA, Minami Nutrition MorEPA Platinum) for 120 days (n = 157). Omega-3 status and mental health scores increased with supplementation (p virtual, web-based platform shows considerable potential for engaging in clinical research with normal, healthy subjects. A high potency fish oil supplement may further improve omega-3 status in a healthy population regularly consuming an omega-3 supplement.

  12. Effects of omega-3 PUFA on immune markers in adolescent individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis - Results of the randomized controlled Vienna omega-3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smesny, Stefan; Milleit, Berko; Schaefer, Miriam R; Hesse, Jana; Schlögelhofer, Monika; Langbein, Kerstin; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Berger, Maximus; Cotter, David R; Sauer, Heinrich; McGorry, Patrick D; Amminger, G Paul

    2017-01-23

    Alterations of immune function have been reported in ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis patients causing expectations in terms of predictive meaningfulness and benefits of anti-inflammatory agents. According to a RCT in UHR-patients supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was effective in reducing transition to psychosis risk and to improve symptomatology. Based on preclinical findings, we now investigated state marker properties of and the influence of PUFA on immune markers in a RCT (clinical trials.gov Identifier: NCT00396643). In a longitudinal design we measured plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory interleukin 6 (IL-6), the soluble alpha (Tac) subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2r), and the circulating soluble form of the intercellular adhesion molecule one (sICAM-1), in 79 help-seeking UHR individuals (13-25years of age). Using linear mixed model (LMM) analysis, we investigated the effects of 12weeks supplementation of either 1.2g/d PUFA (n=38) or Placebo (n=41). At baseline, inflammatory markers were not altered in patients who later suffered transition to psychosis within one year (n=12; 11 PUFA-group, 1 PL-group). IL-6 was weakly inverse associated with omega-6 PUFA, and highly increased in nicotine users. In univariate tests of the LMM omega-3 PUFA caused a significant increase of sICAM-1 (p=0.022). PUFA did not significantly influence IL-6 or sIL-2r. The enhancement of sICAM-1 in the PUFA condition is suggestive for supportive effects on vascular immune response and immediate Th1 helper cell mediated immune answer, which was found disturbed in manifest schizophrenia, e.g. by facilitating the leukocyte adhesion and migration across the endothelium.

  13. HUBUNGAN ASUPAN DAN KADAR OMEGA-3 PLASMA DENGAN KEJADIAN HIPERTENSI PADA ETNIK MINANGKABAU DI KOTA PADANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delmi Sulastri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHipertensi merupakan masalah kesehatan utama di Indonesia maupun di dunia Hampir 95% kasus hipertensi tidak diketahui penyebabnya atau disebut hipertensi esensial (HET. Pola konsumsi yang baik dan seimbang merupakan salah satu upaya pengendalikan tekanan darah. Omega-3 adalah salah satu zat gizi yang dapat menurunkan tekanan darah. Omega-3, terbukti berperan dalam mencegah beberapa penyakit kronis termasuk hipertensi.Telah dilakukan penelitian dengan desain cross sectional study untuk melihat hubungan omega-3 plasma dengan kejadian hipertensi. Penelitian dilakukan pada 130 orang yang terdiridari subjek hipertensi dan normotensi. Pengambilan sampel dengan cara sistematik random sampling dengan memperhatikan kriteria inklusi dan ekslusi. Asupan omega-3 dihitung menggunakan FFQ dan kadar omega-3 plasma diukur dengan teknik methylasi.Hasil penelitian ini adalah asupan omega-3 adalah 0,66±0,61 gram/hari, EPA 0,29 ± 0,23 gram/hari, DHA (22:6 0,85± 0,65 gram/hari dan kelompok normotensi ALA 0,64± 0,55 gram/hari, EPA 0,27±0,15 gram/hari, DHA 21,34 ± 174,14 gram/hari. Tidak terdapat perbedaan bermakna asupan omega-3 dengan kadar omega-3 plasma antara kelompok hipertensi dengan kelompok normotensi dan tidak terdapat hubungan yang bermakna antara asupan omega-3 dan kadar omega-3 plasma dengan kejadian hipertensi.Hasil penelitian ini tidak mendukung hubungan antara omega-3 dengan kejadian hipertensiKata kunci : hipertensi, omega-3, EPA, ALA, DHAAbstractHypertension is the leading health problem in the community in Indonesia and even in certain countries all over the world. Almost 95% of hypertension cases are from unknown cause which is also known as essential hypertension (HET. Planned and balanced consumption pole is one of the efforts to control blood pressure. Omega-3 is one of the nutrients that reduce blood pressure. Omega-3 is proven to involve in preventing certain chronic disease including hypertension.A cross-sectional study carried

  14. Experimental constraints on the $\\omega$-nucleus real potential

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, S; Metag, V; Bayadilov, D; Bantes, B; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -T; Challand, Th; Crede, V; Dahlke, T; Dietz, F; Drexler, P; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fornet-Ponse, K; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hammann, D; Hannappel, J; Hartmann, J; Hillert, W; Hirenzaki, S; Hoffmeister, P; Honisch, Ch; Jaegle, I; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Keshelashvili, I; Kleber, V; Klein, F; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lopatin, I V; Maghrbi, Y; Nanova, M; Nagahiro, H; Müller, J; Odenthal, T; Piontek, D; Rostomyan, T; Schaepe, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Weil, J; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Zenke, F

    2014-01-01

    In a search for $\\omega$ mesic states, the production of $\\omega$-mesons in coincidence with forward going protons has been studied in photon induced reactions on $^{12}$C for incident photon energies of 1250 - 3100 MeV. The $\\pi^0 \\gamma$ pairs from decays of bound or quasi-free $\\omega$-mesons have been measured with the CBELSA/TAPS detector system in coincidence with protons registered in the MiniTAPS forward array. Structures in the total energy distribution of the $\\pi^0 \\gamma$ pairs, which would indicate the population and decay of bound $\\omega~^{11}$B states, are not observed. The $\\pi^0 \\gamma$ cross section of 0.3 nb/MeV/sr observed in the bound state energy regime between -100 and 0 MeV may be accounted for by yield leaking into the bound state regime because of the large in-medium width of the $\\omega$-meson. A comparison of the measured total energy distribution with calculations suggests the real part $V_0$ of the $\\omega~^{11}$B potential to be small and only weakly attractive with $V_0(\\rho=\\...

  15. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  16. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  17. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic study of hydration-induced structure changes in the solid state of omega-gliadins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, N; Belton, P S; Tatham, A S

    1996-11-01

    The hydration of omega-gliadins and party deamidated and esterified omega-gliadins has been studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The secondary structure of the fully hydrated proteins was a mixture of beta-turns and extended chains, with a small amount of intermolecular beta-sheets. The absorption of the glutamine side chain amide groups contributed considerably to the amide I band with two well-defined peaks at 1658 and 1610 cm-1. the amide I band of the dry native sample could not be resolved into single component bands. There the backbone structure seemed to be distorted by extensive hydrogen bonding involving glutamine side chains. With increasing water content, these hydrogen bonds were broken successively by water molecules, resulting in an increase in extended, hydrated structures, which gave rise to the formation of intermolecular beta-sheet structures. Above 35% (w/w) water the beta-sheet content fell sharply and was replaced by extensively hydrated extended structures. An amide I band similar to dissolved poly-L-proline proved that parts of the polymer were in a solution-like state. The replacement of many glutamine side chains in the esterified protein produced more resolved secondary structures even in the dry sample. The beta-sheet content of the dry sample was higher than in the native omega-gliadins, but hydration generally caused very similar changes. At all hydration levels the spectra indicated a more ordered structure than in the native sample. Overall, the modification caused changes that go beyond the simple presence or absence of glutamine bands.

  18. A randomized, double-masked study to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in meibomian gland dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleñik A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Oleñik,1 Ignacio Jiménez-Alfaro,1 Nicolás Alejandre-Alba,1 Ignacio Mahillo-Fernández2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Jiménez Díaz Foundation, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Statistics, Jiménez Díaz Foundation, Madrid, Spain Background: Dysfunction of the meibomian gland (MG is among the most frequent causes of ophthalmological symptoms. The inflammation seen in meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD is part of its pathogenesis, and evidence of the antioxidant-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids suggests this to be an appropriate treatment for MGD. Objective: We aimed to assess the effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acids versus placebo, in improving the symptoms and signs of MGD. Methods: We conducted a randomized and double-mask trial of 3 months duration. We enrolled 61 patients who presented with symptomatic MGD and no tear instability (defined as tear breakup time [TBUT] <10 seconds. Participants were randomly assigned to two homogeneous subgroups. For patients in group A, the study treatment included cleaning the lid margins with neutral baby shampoo and use of artificial tears without preservatives, plus a placebo oral agent. For patients in group B, the study treatment included cleaning the lid margins with neutral baby shampoo and use of artificial tears without preservatives, plus oral supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. We performed the following tests: (1 TBUT; (2 Schirmer I test; (3 Ocular Surface Disease Index© (OSDI©; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; (4 MG expression; (5 evaluation of lid margin inflammation; and (6 interpalpebral and corneal dye staining. Results: After 3 months of evaluation, the mean OSDI, TBUT, lid margin inflammation, and MG expression presented improvement from the baseline values, in group B (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, respectively. The Schirmer test results were also improved and statistically significant (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Oral omega-3 fatty acids, 1.5 grams per

  19. Probing Multi-Strange Dibaryon with Proton-Omega Correlation in High-energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Kenji; Etminan, Faisal; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Two-particle intensity correlation between the proton ($p$) and the Omega-baryon ($\\Omega$) in high-energy heavy ion collisions is studied to unravel the possible spin-2 $p\\Omega$ dibaryon recently suggested by lattice QCD simulations. The ratio of correlation functions between small and large collision systems, $C_{\\rm SL}(Q)$, is proposed to be a new measure to extract the strong $p\\Omega$ interaction without much contamination from the Coulomb attraction. Relevance of this quantity to the experimental observables in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids decreased irritability of patients with bipolar disorder in an add-on, open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldassano Claudia F

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a report on a 37-patient continuation study of the open ended, Omega-3 Fatty Acid (O-3FA add-on study. Subjects consisted of the original 19 patients, along with 18 new patients recruited and followed in the same fashion as the first nineteen. Subjects carried a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder and were visiting a Mood Disorder Clinic regularly through the length of the study. At each visit, patients' clinical status was monitored using the Clinical Monitoring Form. Subjects reported on the frequency and severity of irritability experienced during the preceding ten days; frequency was measured by way of percentage of days in which subjects experienced irritability, while severity of that irritability was rated on a Likert scale of 1 – 4 (if present. The irritability component of Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS was also recorded quarterly on 13 of the 39 patients consistently. Patients had persistent irritability despite their ongoing pharmacologic and psychotherapy. Omega-3 Fatty Acid intake helped with the irritability component of patients suffering from bipolar disorder with a significant presenting sign of irritability. Low dose (1 to 2 grams per day, add-on O-3FA may also help with the irritability component of different clinical conditions, such as schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder and other psychiatric conditions with a common presenting sign of irritability.

  1. An evaluation of differential Omega for general aviation area navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, W. M.; Dodge, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which compared the expected cost and performance of Differential Omega with that of Loran-C and VORTAC for general aviation area navigation. Analysis is directed toward a comparison of the systems with respect to specified performance parameters and the cost-effectiveness of each system in relation to the specifications. Loran-C offers the highest performance with respect to accuracy. Differential Omega requires the least expenditure. It was found cost ineffective to attempt to obtain complete coverage by expanding the existing VORTAC system.

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  3. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant ...

  4. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations....

  5. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations....

  6. Measurement of exclusive $\\omega$ electroproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Derrick, Malcolm; Krakauer, D A; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Abbiendi, G; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, A; Amelung, C; Bornheim, A; Brock, I; Coboken, K; Crittenden, James Arthur; Deffner, R; Hartmann, H; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Wieber, H; Bailey, D S; Barret, O; Brook, N H; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; McFall, J D; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Jeoung, H Y; Kim, J Y; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Liu, W; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Sampson, S; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Klimek, K H; Olkiewicz, K; Piotrzkowski, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Kotanski, Andrzej; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bienlein, J K; Borras, K; Dannheim, D; Desler, K; Drews, G; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Göttlicher, P; Graciani, R; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hebbel, K; Kasemann, M; Koch, W; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lindemann, L; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Martínez, M; Milite, M; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Pelucchi, F; Petrucci, M C; Rohde, M; Savin, A A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Sievers, M; Stonjek, S; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Coldewey, C; López-Duran-Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Straub, P B; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Maccarrone, G D; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Benen, A; Eisenhardt, S; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bussey, Peter J; Bell, M; Doyle, A T; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; MacDonald, N; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Waugh, R; Bohnet, I; Gendner, N; Holm, U; Meyer-Larsen, A; Salehi, H; Wick, K; Garfagnini, A; Gialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Kcira, D; Klanner, Robert; Lohrmann, E; Poelz, G; Zetsche, F; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Mallik, U; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Ahn, S H; Lee, S B; Park, S K; Lim, H; Park, I H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; García, G; Glasman, C; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Barbi, M S; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Stairs, D G; Wing, M; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Bashkirov, V; Danilov, M V; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Sheheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Botje, M; Brümmer, N; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P M; Schagen, S; Van Sighem, A; Tassi, E; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Matsushita, T; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dosselli, U; Dusini, S; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Turcato, M; Voci, C; Adamczyk, L; Iannotti, L; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Saull, P R B; Toothacker, W S; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Shah, T P; Epperson, D E; Heusch, C A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Wichmann, R; Williams, D C; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Fagerstroem, C P; Galea, R; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Polenz, S; Sabetfakhri, A; Simmons, D; Butterworth, J M; Catterall, C D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Grzelak, G; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Smalska, B; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Gadaj, T; Deppe, O; Eisenberg, Y; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Badgett, W F; Chapin, D; Cross, R; Foudas, C; Mattingly, S E K; Reeder, D D; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wildschek, T; Wodarczyk, M; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Hughes, V W; Bhadra, S; Cole, J E; Frisken, W R; Hall-Wilton, R; Khakzad, M; Menary, S R

    2001-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of omega mesons, ep -> e omega p, has been studied in the kinematic range 3 pi^+pi^-pi^0. The exclusive (ep -> e omega p) cross section in the above kinematic region is 0.108 +- 0.014(stat.) +- 0.026(syst.) nb. The reaction ep -> e phi p, phi -> pi^+pi^-pi^0, has also been measured. The cross sections, as well as the cross-section ratios omega/rho and omega/phi, are presented as a function of W and Q^2. Thus, for the first time, the properties of omega electroproduction can be compared to those of rho^0, phi and J/psi electroproduction at high W.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids in the management of autism spectrum disorders: findings from an open-label pilot study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Y P; Weng, S-J; Jang, L Y; Low, L; Seah, J; Teo, S; Ang, R P; Lim, C G; Liew, A; Fung, D S; Sung, M

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this open-label trial was to examine the efficacy and safety of a 12-week omega-3 fatty acids supplementation among children suffering with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A total of 41 children and adolescents aged 7-18 years (36 boys, 5 girls; mean age = 11.66, s.d. = 3.05) diagnosed with ASD participated in the study. At post-treatment, participants showed significant improvements on all subscales of the Social Responsiveness Scale (P fatty acid levels were significantly correlated with changes in the core symptoms of ASD. Baseline levels of blood fatty acid levels were also predictive of response to the omega-3 treatment. Omega-3 fatty acids supplementation was well-tolerated and did not cause any serious side effects. Our findings lend some preliminary support for the use of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in addressing ASD. Future randomized controlled trials of omega-3 fatty acids in ASD with blood fatty acid measurements with a larger sample and longer follow-up period is warranted.

  8. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy- Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  9. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confounding factors derived from genetic and environmental variability. In our study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model as a proxy for long-term omega-3 supplementation to determine, in a well-controlled manner, the molecular phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio. The fat-1 mouse can convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs, which protect against a wide variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Both wild-type (WT and fat-1 mice were subjected to an identical diet containing 10% corn oil, which has a high omega-6 content similar to that of the Western diet, for a six-month duration. We used a multi-platform lipidomic approach to compare the plasma lipidome between fat-1 and WT mice. In fat-1 mice, an unbiased profiling showed a significant increase in the levels of unesterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, EPA-containing cholesteryl ester, and omega-3 lysophosphospholipids. The increase in omega-3 lipids is accompanied by a significant reduction in omega-6 unesterified docosapentaenoic acid (omega-6 DPA and DPA-containing cholesteryl ester as well as omega-6 phospholipids and triacylglycerides. Targeted lipidomics profiling highlighted a remarkable increase in EPA-derived diols and epoxides formed via the cytochrome P450 (CYP450 pathway in the plasma of fat-1 mice compared with WT mice. Integration of the results of untargeted and targeted analyses has identified a lipidomic biosignature that may underlie the healthful phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio, and can potentially be used as a circulating biomarker for monitoring the health status and the efficacy of omega-3 intervention in humans.

  10. Primary endpoint results of the OMEGA Study: One-year clinical outcomes after implantation of a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, John C., E-mail: john.wang@medstar.net [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore MD (United States); Carrié, Didier, E-mail: carrie.didier@chu-toulouse.fr [Centre Hôpital Universitaire Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Masotti, Monica, E-mail: MASOTTI@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona (Spain); Erglis, Andrejs, E-mail: a.a.erglis@stradini.lv [Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Mego, David, E-mail: David.Mego@arheart.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States); Watkins, Matthew W., E-mail: Matthew.Watkins@vtmednet.org [University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington VT (United States); Underwood, Paul, E-mail: Paul.underwood@bsci.com [Boston Scientific, Marlborough MA USA (United States); Allocco, Dominic J., E-mail: Dominic.allocco@bsci.com [Boston Scientific, Marlborough MA USA (United States); Hamm, Christian W., E-mail: C.Hamm@kerckhoff-klinik.de [Kerckhoff Heart and Thoraxcenter, Bad Nauheim (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Background/purpose: Bare metal stents (BMS) have similar rates of death and myocardial infarction (MI) compared to drug-eluting stents (DES). DES lower repeat revascularization rates compared to BMS, but may have higher rates of late stent thrombosis (ST) potentially due to impaired endothelialization requiring longer dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT). OMEGA evaluated a novel BMS designed to have improved deliverability and radiopacity, in comparison to currently available platforms. Methods/materials: OMEGA was a prospective, multicenter, single-arm study enrolling 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). Patients received the OMEGA stent (bare platinum chromium element stent) for the treatment of de novo native coronary artery lesions (≤ 28 mm long; diameter ≥ 2.25 mm to ≤ 4.50 mm). The primary endpoint was 9-month target lesion failure (TLF: cardiac death, target vessel-related MI, target lesion revascularization [TLR]) compared to a prespecified performance goal (PG) based on prior generation BMS. All major cardiac events were independently adjudicated. DAPT was required for a minimum of 1 month post procedure. Results: In the OMEGA study, the mean age was 65; 17% had diabetes mellitus. The primary endpoint was met; 9 month TLF rate was 11.5%, and the upper 1-sided 95% confidence bound of 14.79% was less than the prespecified PG of 21.2% (p < 0.0001). One-year event rates were low including a TLF rate of 12.8% and an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months. Conclusions: One-year outcomes of OMEGA show low rates of TLF, revascularization and ST. This supports safety and efficacy of the OMEGA BMS for the treatment of coronary artery disease. - Highlights: • The OMEGA study evaluated a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent. • OMEGA enrolled 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). • The primary endpoint of 9 month target lesion failure was 11.5%. • One-year event rates were low including an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months.

  11. Supplementation with Eicosapentaenoic Omega-3 Fatty Acid Does Not Influence Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Major Depression : A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna; Jansen, Eugene H. J. M.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients wit

  12. Laboratory discharge studies of a 6 V alkaline lantern-type battery Eveready Energizer no. 528, under various ambient temperatures (-15 deg C and + 22 deg C) and loads (30 omega and 60 omega)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The voltages of two Eveready No. 528 batteries, one the test battery, the other the control battery, were simultaneously recorded as they were discharged across 30 omega loads using a dual chart recorder. The test battery was initially put in a freezer at -15 + or - 3 C. After its voltage had fallen to .6 V, it was brought back out into the room at 22 + or - 3 C. A second run was made with 60 omega loads. Assuming a 3.0 V cut-off, the total energy output of the test battery at -15 C was 26 WHr 30 omega and 35 WHr 60 omega, and the corresponding numbers for the control battery at 22 C were 91 WHr and 100 WHr. When the test battery was subsequently allowed to warm up, the voltage rose above 4 V and the total energy output rose to 80 WHr 30 omega and 82 WHR 60 omega.

  13. Low-energy photoproduction of omega-mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, J; Glander, K H; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Klein, F; Lawall, R; Menze, D; Neuerburg, W; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wiegers, B; Ernst, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klempt, E; Link, J; Pee, H V; Klein, F J; Wieland, F W; Wisskirchen, J; Wu, C

    2003-01-01

    The photoproduction of the vector meson omega has been studied between threshold and W=2.4 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at the Bonn electron stretcher ring ELSA. Besides, the total cross-sections angular distributions in the CMS and decay angular distributions in the helicity and Gottfried-Jackson systems have been measured.

  14. Omega-6/Omega-3 and PUFA/SFA in Colossoma macropomum Grown in Roraima, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves Melho Filho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study was evaluated the fatty acids composition of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum fillet, fish species cultivated in Roraima State, Brazil. For the extraction of tambaqui oil was used Sohxlet device and then it was methylated. The oil  was identified using a gas chromatograph and were identified 24 acids and these were divided into characteristic groups such as: saturated fatty acids (SFA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and series fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. The ratios obtained were PUFA/SFA and omega-6/omega-3. The results of chromatographic analysis were subjected to tests by variance ANOVA and multiple comparisons of Tukey at 5%. The ratios omega-6/omega-3 and PUFA/SFA showed values ​​of 8.58 and 0.75 respectively.

  15. Photoproduction of omega mesons off protons and neutrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, F.; Metag, V.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D. E.; Beck, R.; Belogazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, C.; Gothe, R.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoeffgren, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Lohner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Nikonov, V. A.; Nanova, M.; Novinski, D. V.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S. V.; Shklyar, V.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walter, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.

    2015-01-01

    Omega photoproduction off hydrogen and deuterium has been studied with the tagged photon beam of the ELSA accelerator in Bonn for photon energies up to 2.0 GeV. The omega meson has been identified via the omega -> pi(0) gamma -> gamma gamma gamma decay mode, using the combined setup of the Crystal B

  16. Observation of in-medium modifications of the omega Meson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trnka, D.; Anton, G.; Bacelar, J.C.S; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beloglazov, Y.A.; Bogendorfer, R.; Castelijns, R.J.J.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Ehmanns, A.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Essig, K.; Funke, Ch.; Gothe, R.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hoffgen, S.K.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Hössl, J.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kopf, B.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Langheinrich, J.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.W.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Mertens, T.; Metag, V.; Morales, C.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L.M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Radkov, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Suft, G.; Sumachev, V.; Szczepanek, T.; Sule, A.; Thoma, U.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wendel, Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The photoproduction of omega mesons on nuclei has been investigated using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The aim is to study possible in-medium modifications of the omega meson via the reaction gamma+A ->omega+X ->pi(0)gamma+X-'. Results obtained for N

  17. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-01-01

    Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3...

  18. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons

    OpenAIRE

    Lauretani, F.; BANDINELLI, S.; Benedetta, B.; Cherubini, A; Iorio, A. D.; Blè, A.; Giacomini, V.; Corsi, A.M.; Guralnik, J.M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and t...

  19. Lower omega-3 fatty acids are associated with the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies in a population at risk for future rheumatoid arthritis: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ryan W; Young, Kendra A; Zerbe, Gary O; Demoruelle, M Kristen; Weisman, Michael H; Buckner, Jane H; Gregersen, Peter K; Mikuls, Ted R; O'Dell, James R; Keating, Richard M; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Deane, Kevin D; Holers, V Michael; Norris, Jill M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplement use and omega-3 FAs in erythrocyte membranes [omega-3 FA % in erythrocyte membranes (RBC)] and their association with anti-CCP autoantibodies in a population without RA, but who are at genetic risk for RA. The multicentre Studies of the Etiology of RA (SERA) cohort includes RA-free subjects who are first-degree relatives of RA probands or are enriched with the HLA-DR4 allele. In a nested case-control study, 30 SERA cases were identified who were anti-CCP2 antibody positive. We further identified 47 autoantibody negative controls, frequency matched to cases on age at study visit, sex, race and study site. Anti-CCP2 status, self-reported omega-3 FA supplement use and omega-3 FA % in RBCs were obtained from a single visit. Anti-CCP2 positive cases were less likely than controls to report omega-3 FA supplement use (odds ratio: 0.14; 95% CI 0.03, 0.68). In addition, the likelihood of anti-CCP2 positivity was inversely associated with total omega-3 FA % in RBCs (odds ratio: 0.47; 95% CI 0.24, 0.92, for a s.d. increase). The inverse association between anti-CCP2 positivity and self-reported omega-3 FA supplement use and omega-3 FA % in RBCs suggests that omega-3 FAs may protect against the development of RA-related autoimmunity in pre-clinical RA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Study of the process e+e- -> omega pi0 in the phi-meson mass region with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Crucianelli, F; De Lucia, E; de Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zori, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Santangelo, P; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the e+e- -> omegapi0 cross section in the sqrt(s) interval 1000-1030 MeV using the pi+pi-pi0pi0 and pi0pi0gamma final states with a sample of ~600 pb^-1 collected with the KLOE detector at DAFNE. By fitting the observed interference pattern around M_phi for both final states, we extract the ratio of the decay widths Gamma(omega->pi0gamma)/Gamma(omega->pi+pi-pi0) = 0.0897 +- 0.0016 and derive the branching fractions BR(omega -> pi+pi-pi0)= (90.24 +- 0.19)%, BR(omega -> pi0gamma) = (8.09 +- 0.14)%. The parameters describing the e+e- -> omegapi0 reaction around M_\\phi are also used to extract the branching fraction for the OZI and G-parity violating phi -> omegapi0 decay: BR(phi->omegapi0) = (4.4 +- 0.6)x10^-5.

  1. The Role for Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Molfino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal nutrition is one of the most important determinants of healthier ageing, reducing the risk of disability, maintaining mental and physical functions, and thus preserving and ensuring a better quality of life. Dietary intake and nutrient absorption decline with age, thus increasing the risk of malnutrition, morbidity and mortality. Specific nutrients, particularly long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, might have the potential of preventing and reducing co-morbidities in older adults. Omega-3 PUFAs are able to modulate inflammation, hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, and hypertension. Different mechanisms contribute to these effects, including conditioning cell membrane function and composition, eicosanoid production, and gene expression. The present review analyzes the influence of omega-3 PUFAs status and intake on brain function, cardiovascular system, immune function, muscle performance and bone health in older adults. Omega-3 FAs may have substantial benefits in reducing the risk of cognitive decline in older people. The available data encourage higher intakes of omega-3 PUFAs in the diet or via specific supplements. More studies are needed to confirm the role of omega-3 FAs in maintaining bone health and preventing the loss of muscle mass and function associated with ageing. In summary, omega-3 PUFAs are now identified as potential key nutrients, safe and effective in the treatment and prevention of several negative consequences of ageing.

  2. Study of direct Cp violation in B decay into vector mesons including rho zero-omega mixing in the framework of the LHCb experiment; Etude de la violation directe de CP dans la desintegration du meson B en mesons vecteurs incluant le melange {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} dans le cadre de l'experience LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C

    2004-02-01

    {rho}{sub 0} - {omega} mixing effect on direct CP violation in B decay into vector mesons is one of the main studies of this work. The first part is dedicated to the calculation of the decay amplitudes of the channels B {yields} V{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) which have been represented by a model. We have used the helicity formalism. In such a way branching ratios and asymmetries depending on form factor models and other parameters are predicted. Direct CP violation appears at several levels: in branching ratios, in angular distributions and in differential asymmetry as a function of {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} mass. The dominance of the longitudinal polarization in the studied channels is confirmed by Babar and Belle experimental results. We calculated too the strong phase and the ratio of Penguin to Tree amplitudes for each channel. In a second part, was developed an analysis of the channel B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup *0}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) in the framework of LHCb experiment. It will start in 2007 and is dedicated to b flavor study and CP violation. The realistic analysis which has been performed shows that this channel is not appropriate to observe {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} mixing effect on asymmetry in LHCb, while the {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) channel, for which we have predicted a branching ratio value confirmed by Babar and Belle, is much more promising. (author)

  3. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have sugg...

  4. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have sugg...

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  6. On the asymptotic wavenumber of spiral waves in \\lambda -\\omega systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguareles, M.; Baldomà, I.; M-Seara, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider spiral wave solutions of a general class of λ -ω systems with a small twist parameter q and we prove that the asymptotic wavenumber of the spirals is a {{C}∞} -flat function of the perturbation parameter q.

  7. Maternal Omega-3 Supplement Improves Dopaminergic System in Pre- and Postnatal Inflammation-Induced Neurotoxicity in Parkinson's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, Ana Marcia; Carabelli, Bruno; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Kempe, Paula G; Rizzo de Souza, Luiz E; Zanata, Silvio M; Machado, Ricardo B; Suchecki, Deborah; Andrade da Costa, Belmira L S; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ferraz, Anete C

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is the consequence of a neurodevelopmental disruption, rather than strictly a consequence of aging. Thus, we hypothesized that maternal supplement of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) may be associated with neuroprotection mechanisms in a self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-model of PD. To test this hypothesis, behavioral and neurochemical assay were performed in prenatally LPS-exposed offspring at postnatal day 21. To further determine whether prenatal LPS exposure and maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation had persisting effects, brain injury was induced on PN 90 rats, following bilateral intranigral LPS injection. Pre- and postnatal inflammation damage not only affected dopaminergic neurons directly, but it also modified critical features, such as activated microglia and astrocyte cells, disrupting the support provided by the microenvironment. Unexpectedly, our results failed to show any involvement of caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis pathway in neuronal death mechanisms. On the other hand, learning and memory deficits detected with a second toxic exposure were significantly attenuated in maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation group. In addition, ω-3 PUFAs promote beneficial effect on synaptic function, maintaining the neurochemical integrity in remaining neurons, without necessarily protect them from neuronal death. Thus, our results suggest that ω-3 PUFAs affect the functional ability of the central nervous system in a complex way in a multiple inflammation-induced neurotoxicity animal model of PD and they disclose new ways of understanding how these fatty acids control responses of the brain to different challenges.

  8. A fish a day, keeps the cardiologist away! - A review of the effect of omega-3 fatty acids in the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Peter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and its consequences are emerging as epidemics with deleterious consequences on cardiovascular (CV health. The beneficial effects of omega-3-fatty acids on cardiac and extra cardiac organs have been extensively studied in the last two decades, and continue to show great promise in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Omega-3-fatty acid supplementation has been proven to have beneficial action on lipid profile, cytokine cascade, oxidant-anti-oxidant balance, parasympathetic and sympathetic tone and nitric oxide synthesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the basis of its cardiac and non-cardiac benefits, present results from clinical trials and the recommendations for its use in cardiac diseases and dyslipidemias.

  9. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Agliata, A; Barnak, D; Brent, G; Chang, P-Y; Folnsbee, L; Gates, G; Hasset, D; Lonobile, D; Magoon, J; Mastrosimone, D; Shoup, M J; Betti, R

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  10. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  11. Feasibility of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation as an adjunct therapy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, Ashley S; Hill, Alison M.; Williams, Marie T; Howe, Peter RC; Frith, Peter A; Wood, Lisa G.; Garg, Manohar L.; Coates, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence to support the use of supplementation with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) from oily fish or fish oil for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, terminal disease characterized by persistent airflow limitation, lung and systemic inflammation. To date, one randomized controlled trial has been published that assessed the efficacy of LCn-3PUF...

  12. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-06-28

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, “warm” targets with and without the use of an equatorial “Saturn-like” toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core.

  13. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JACOBSEN Charlotte

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the polyunsaturated nature of omega-3 fatty acids, lipid oxidation is a major challenge when developing omega-3 enriched foods. In multiphase food systems, several factors can affect lipid oxidation and efficacy of antioxidants, added to prevent lipid oxidation. This review discusses the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté. Moreover, the effect of different antioxidants (tocopherol, EDTA, lactoferrin, caffeic acid, ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, propyl gallate, gallic acid, as well as lipophilized antioxidants is compared in different food systems.

  14. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Due to the polyunsaturated nature of omega-3 fatty acids, lipid oxidation is a major challenge when developing omega-3 enriched foods. In multiphase food systems, several factors can affect lipid oxidation and efficacy of antioxidants, added to prevent lipid oxidation. This review discusses...... the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté). Moreover......, the effect of different antioxidants (tocopherol, EDTA, lactoferrin, caffeic acid, ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, propyl gallate, gallic acid, as well as lipophilized antioxidants) is compared in different food systems....

  15. Spectroscopy of the D-wave q{bar q} system; evidence for two J{sup P} = 2{sup {minus}} strange meson states decaying to K{sup {minus}}{omega}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, B.N.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dunwoodie, W.; Johnson, W.B.; Kunz, P.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Levinson, L.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Sinervo, P.K.; Toge, N.; Waite, A.; Williams, S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Awaji, N.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.; Kajikawa, R.; Matsui, T.; Miyamoto, A.; Ozaki, H.; Pak, C.O.; Shimomura, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Tauchi, T. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; D`Amore, J.; Endorf, R.; Meadows, B.T.; Nussbaum, M. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ukai, K. [Tokai Univ. Tokyo (Japan). Inst. for Nuclear Study

    1992-09-01

    Evidence is presented for two J{sup p} = 2{minus} strange mesons; one at {approx} 1.77 and the other at {approx} 1.82 GeV/c{sup 2}. These states have been observed in a partial wave analysis of the K{sup {minus}}{omega} system in the reaction K{sup {minus}}p {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}+{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}p where the strange mesons decay into K{sup {minus}}{omega} and the {omega} then decays to {pi}+{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}. The data set contains {approx} 10{sup 5} K{sup {minus}}{omega}p events at 11 GeV/c taken with the LASS spectrometer at SLAC.

  16. Design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study: A double blind, placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation among adult individuals at risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Killeen, Therese K; Magruder, Kathryn M; Holes-Lewis, Kelly; Tolliver, Bryan K; Turner, Travis H

    2016-03-01

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death among adults in the United States (U.S.). Annually, approximately 30 per 100,000 U.S. military Veterans commit suicide, compared to 14 per 100,000 U.S. civilians. Symptoms associated with suicidality can be treatment resistant and proven-effective pharmaceuticals may have adverse side-effects. Thus, a critical need remains to identify effective approaches for building psychological resiliency in at-risk individuals. Omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs) are essential nutrients, which must be consumed in the diet. N-3 HUFAs have been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and impulsivity - which are associated with suicide risk. Here we present the design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study, which is a double blind, randomized, controlled trial among individuals at risk of suicide of an n-3 HUFA versus placebo supplementation in the form of all natural fruit juice beverages. The BRAVO study seeks to determine if dietary supplementation with n-3 HUFAs reduces the risk for serious suicidal behaviors, suicidal thinking, negative emotions, and symptoms associated with suicide risk. Sub-analyses will evaluate efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms, alcohol, and nicotine use. A sub-study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate the neuropsychological and neurophysiological effects of n-3 HUFAs. We also outline selection of appropriate proxy outcome measures for detecting response to treatment and collection of ancillary data, such as diet and substance use, that are critical for interpretation of results.

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation for the Treatment of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptomatology: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H.; Qawasmi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have demonstrated differences in omega-3 fatty acid composition in plasma and in erythrocyte membranes in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared with unaffected controls. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and can alter central nervous system cell membrane fluidity and…

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation for the Treatment of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptomatology: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H.; Qawasmi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have demonstrated differences in omega-3 fatty acid composition in plasma and in erythrocyte membranes in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared with unaffected controls. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and can alter central nervous system cell membrane fluidity and…

  19. Observation of the Decay $\\Omega_{C}^{0}\\$ to $\\Omega^{-}e^{+}\\ nu_{e}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, R; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Jian, L; Saleem, M; Wappler, F; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Wilksen, T; Zoeller, M M; Muramatsu, H; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Dytman, S A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Chen, S; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; Xu, Z; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Mahapatra, R; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Drell, P S; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Viehhauser, G; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Benslama, K; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Marsh, M A; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W

    2002-01-01

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have observed the Omega_c (css ground state) in the decay Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu. We find a signal of 11.4 +- 3.8 (stat) events. The probability that we have observed a background fluctuation is 7.6 x 10-5. We measure BF(Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu) x sigma(e+ e- -> Omega_c X) = (42.2 +- 14.1 (stat) +- 5.7 (syst)) fb and R = Gamma(Omega_c -> Omega- pi+)/Gamma(Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu) = 0.41 +- 0.19 (stat) +- 0.04 (syst). This is the first statistically significant observation of an individual decay mode of the Omega_c in e+ e- annhiliation, and the first example of a baryon decaying via beta-emmision, where no quarks from the first generation participate in the reaction.

  20. Omega-3 index levels and associated factors in a middle-aged French population: the MONA LISA-NUT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Simon, C; Morio, B; Dallongeville, J; Ruidavets, J B; Haas, B; Laillet, B; Cottel, D; Ferrières, J; Arveiler, D

    2015-04-01

    The omega-3 index (the summed percentage content of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in red blood cells) is associated with a lower risk of fatal coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death. We aimed to determine which socio-demographic, behavioural or clinical factors are independently associated with the omega-3 index and the extent to which seafood consumption mediates the index's association with socio-economic status (SES). As part of the cross-sectional MONA LISA-NUT survey (2005-2007), gas chromatography was used to analyse the red blood cell fatty acid composition in 503 French subjects aged 35-64 years. Dietary data were collected by trained dieticians via a validated food frequency questionnaire and a prospective 3-day food record. Risk factors were estimated with standardised measurements and questionnaires. SES was assessed through the self-reported educational and income tax levels. The mean ± s.d. omega-3 index was 6.02 ± 1.75%. In the best parsimonious predictive model (which explained 32% of the variability in the omega-3 index), age, educational level and seafood servings were significantly and positively associated with the index. In contrast, waist circumference and smoking were inversely associated with the index. In a mediation analysis that took account of all these factors, seafood servings explained about 40% of the association between educational level and the omega-3 index. Similar results were obtained for the income tax level. The inverse association between SES and omega-3 index is largely explained (40%) by an insufficient seafood intake. It remains to be seen which other factors mediate this association.

  1. A host-microbiome interaction mediates the opposing effects of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on metabolic endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiang-Yong; Kim, Kui-Jin; Kang, Jing X

    2015-06-11

    Metabolic endotoxemia, commonly derived from gut dysbiosis, is a primary cause of chronic low grade inflammation that underlies many chronic diseases. Here we show that mice fed a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids exhibit higher levels of metabolic endotoxemia and systemic low-grade inflammation, while transgenic conversion of tissue omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids dramatically reduces endotoxemic and inflammatory status. These opposing effects of tissue omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids can be eliminated by antibiotic treatment and animal co-housing, suggesting the involvement of the gut microbiota. Analysis of gut microbiota and fecal transfer revealed that elevated tissue omega-3 fatty acids enhance intestinal production and secretion of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), which induces changes in the gut bacteria composition resulting in decreased lipopolysaccharide production and gut permeability, and ultimately, reduced metabolic endotoxemia and inflammation. Our findings uncover an interaction between host tissue fatty acid composition and gut microbiota as a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of omega-3 fatty acids. Given the excess of omega-6 and deficiency of omega-3 in the modern Western diet, the differential effects of tissue omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on gut microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia provide insight into the etiology and management of today's health epidemics.

  2. New insights into the health effects of dietary saturated and omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia

    2012-05-21

    Cardiovascular diseases and cancers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Reducing dietary saturated fat and replacing it with polyunsaturated fat is still the main dietary strategy to prevent cardiovascular diseases, although major flaws have been reported in the analyses supporting this approach. Recent studies introducing the concept of myocardial preconditioning have opened new avenues to understand the complex interplay between the various lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The optimal dietary fat profile includes a low intake of both saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and a moderate intake of omega-3 fatty acids. This profile is quite similar to the Mediterranean diet. On the other hand, recent studies have found a positive association between omega-6 and breast cancer risk. In contrast, omega-3 fatty acids do have anticancer properties. It has been shown that certain (Mediterranean) polyphenols significantly increase the endogenous synthesis of omega-3 whereas high intake of omega-6 decreases it. Finally, epidemiological studies suggest that a high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio may be the optimal strategy to decrease breast cancer risk. Thus, the present high intake of omega-6 in many countries is definitely not the optimal strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancers. A moderate intake of plant and marine omega-3 in the context of the traditional Mediterranean diet (low in saturated and omega-6 fatty acids but high in plant monounsaturated fat) appears to be the best approach to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular diseases and cancers, in particular breast cancer.

  3. [Supplementation with omega fatty acids in various diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicińska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Kurowska, Joanna; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-07-24

    For some decades, an increase in propagation of coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes, tumors and mental disorders has been observed. Consequently, new and effective methods of treatment of these diseases using drugs and diet supplements have been developed. A promising solution is the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of some diseases. These compounds have broad application in prevention of many diseases and are used to support standard therapies. Their activity is connected with participation in metabolic processes regulating biochemical transformations in cells and tissues. Omega-3 fatty acids regulate production of cytokines, increased levels of which may contribute to occurrence of chronic inflammatory diseases, autoaggression of the immunological system, arteriosclerosis or tumor development. These substances exert a beneficial effect on the blood system by improvement of blood circulation and nerve signal transmission. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of irregular heartbeat, stabilize arterial pressure, and restore balance in cholesterol metabolism disorders. They also play a key role in maintaining physical and mental efficiency; thus administration of these compounds for young children is of great importance. Nevertheless, administration of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet seems to be essential. The purpose of this study is to present the structure and sources of omega-3 and - 6 fatty acids and discuss the problems concerning therapeutic use of these compounds in various disorders.

  4. Study of the {omega} meson produced in the 700-750 MeV/c pp{yields}K{sub 1}{sup 0}K{sub 1}{sup 0}{omega} annihilations; Estudio del meson {omega} en las aniquilaciones pp{yields}K{sub 1}{sup =}K{sub 1}{sup =} {omega} a 700-750 MeV/c de momento del haz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salicio, J.

    1976-07-01

    We have measured the mass, width and branching ratio ({yields} neutrals) {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} of the {omega} meson, using the reactions pp -- K{sub 1}{sup 0} K{sub 1}{sup 0} {down_arrow} neutrals and pp {yields} K{sub 1}{sup 0}K{sub 1}{sup 0}. The statistics is 11.5 events/{mu}b. In this report we present the methods of analysis and discuss the results. (Author)

  5. A compact, high-efficiency charged-particle spectrometer for studies of stellar nucleosynthesis and kinetic implosion physics at OMEGA and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, G. D.; Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Milanese, L. M.; Simpson, R.; Wink, C.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Zylstra, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H.-S.; Bionta, R.

    2016-10-01

    A compact and highly efficient magnet-based spectrometer (called MOS, for Mini Orange Spectrometer) has been designed for measurements of energy spectra of low-energy protons and alphas in experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The MOS brings a much needed capability to these laser facilities, able to measure charged-particle spectra with high accuracy and high energy resolution at energies <5 MeV for yields <5x108. High efficiency is accomplished by maximizing the solid angle. The MOS enables studies of low-probability stellar nucleosynthesis reactions like the 3He+3He reaction, which is part of the solar proton-proton chain. It will also enable other basic science experiments, including studies of stopping power in ICF-relevant plasmas, astrophysical shocks and kinetic physics. The optimization of the MOS design utilized simulated magnetic fields and particle tracing with the software COMSOL. Performance requirements of the MOS system, including desired detection efficiencies and energy resolution, are discussed. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE and LLNL.

  6. Structure and orientation changes of omega- and gamma-gliadins at the air-water interface: a PM-IRRAS spectroscopy and Brewster angle microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc, Amélie; Desbat, Bernard; Renard, Denis; Popineau, Yves; Mangavel, Cécile; Navailles, Laurence

    2007-12-18

    Microscopic and molecular structures of omega- and gamma-gliadin monolayers at the air-water interface were studied under compression by three complementary techniques: compression isotherms, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). For high molecular areas, gliadin films are homogeneous, and a flat orientation of secondary structures relative to the interface is observed. With increasing compression, the nature and orientation of secondary structures changed to minimize the interfacial area. The gamma-gliadin film is the most stable at the air-water interface; its interfacial volume is constant with increasing compression, contrary to omega-gliadin films whose molecules are forced out of the interface. gamma-Gliadin stability at a high level of compression is interpreted by a stacking model.

  7. The structure of omega3 food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Fish oil is rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) which are generally recognized as being beneficial to the health [1]. The addition of fish oil to food products is attractive to both the consumers and the food industry. Indeed, these components will improve nutritional value...... and add product value. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds in their fatty acid chains and this attribute renders them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. Omega-3 PUFAs can be added to food products as neat oil or as a delivery system such as oil-in-water emulsions. In this last configuration...... and the prooxidants. But this protective aspect is a really complex process and it is dependent on the food matrix to which the oil is added [2]. Oxidation is presumed to be initiated at the emulsifier layer, i.e. the interface layer between the oil and water where the oil is most likely to come into contact...

  8. Interaction Effect of 8-Week Aerobic Exercise and Omega-3 Fatty Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khedri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific evidence indicates the impact of aerobic exercise and omega-3 fatty acids - both –are for the improvement of the cardiovascular system .The purpose of this research was about studies interaction effect of 8 weeks aerobic exercise and omega- 3 fatty acids supplementation on plasma adiponectin concentration of elderly men.Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 male non-athletes aged were between 50 to 70 year age range of men aged the city of Genaveh. Statistical sample of 36 male non- athletes in the age range 50 to 70 years old randomly selected in four groups of nine persons, respectively, the first group: exercise supplemental omega-3, Group II: Exercise placebo group: supplementation with omega-3 groups quarter: placebo. Endurance exercise training program includes 24 sessions and 3 sessions per week, with duration and intensity was determined. (55-70% HRmax. Daily supplements of omega-3 fatty acids were 2 Capsule. Blood samples were taken after fasting 14 hours before the study and 48 hours after the last training session was conducted. The data Kolmogrov-Smirnov, t-test, One-Way Anova at significance level of p≤ 0.05 were analyzed in SPSS 17. Results: The results of research after 8 weeks showed that moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation, only increased in the exercise + omega-3 fatty acids group (7.8% that could not created a significant increase in plasma adiponectin concentration groups. Also in final of research did not show a significant difference between groups in compare after 8 weeks. Conclusion: The results showed that by aerobic exercise and use of omega-3 fatty acids and increase amounts of adiponectin and its anti boil property, perhaps maybe that, adiponectin by effect of its preservation has a great role in prevention and reduce of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Rheological characterization and stability study of an emulsion made with a dairy by-product enriched with omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela María Ormaza ZAPATA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study involved a rheological characterization of a W/O emulsion manufactured on a pilot scale using omega-3 fatty acids as part of the oil phase and butter milk as the emulsifier. Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids are essential to prevent cardiovascular diseases, improve pulmonary function and also form part of the neurological structure. Buttermilk is a by-product of the dairy industry and has a high organic load which possesses surfactant properties and constitutes a good substitute for conventional emulsifiers in the food industry. The microstructural nature of the emulsion was characterized from the viscoelastic parameters and mechanical spectra. The linear viscoelastic range was determined, from which the maximum stress that the emulsion could withstand from the processing conditions without altering its microstructure was established. In addition, the storage stability of the emulsion was studied to instrumentally predict the rheological behaviour before sensory destabilization of the emulsion was observed. At the frequencies used, a significant decrease in dynamic viscoelastic parameters was periodically observed (G 'and G'', showing a structural change during storage. Furthermore, a coalescence phenomenon was observed after 18 months. The formulation with added omega-3 fatty acids and buttermilk provided a basis for obtaining a functional food as well as adding value to an industrial by-product.

  10. Study of $D^{**}$ production and light hadronic states in the $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+} \\omega \\pi^-$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Matvienko, D; Eidelman, S; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Lange, J S; Lee, D H; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamamoto, H; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first observations of $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D_1(2430)^0 \\omega$, $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D_1(2420)^0 \\omega$ and $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^*_2(2460)^0 \\omega$ decays. The $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+} \\rho(1450)^-$ decay is also observed. The branching fraction measurements are based on $(771.6 \\pm 10.6)\\times 10^6$ $B\\bar{B}$ events collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. The fractions of longitudinal polarization of the $D^{**}$ states as well as partial wave fractions of the $D_1(2430)^0$ are obtained. We also set a $90\\%$ confidence level upper limit for the product of branching fractions of $\\mathcal{B}(\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+} b_1(1235)^-) \\times \\mathcal{B}(b_1(1235)^- \\to \\omega \\pi^-)$. The measurements show evidence of nontrivial final-state interaction phases for the $\\rho$-like amplitudes.

  11. Burden of Ischemic Heart Disease Attributable to Low Omega-3 Fatty Acids Intake in Iran: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nejatinamini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dietary risk factors constitute some of the leading risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Iran. The current study reports the burden of ischemic heart disease (IHD attributable to a low omega-3 fatty acids intake in Iran using the data of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD Study 2010.Methods: We used data on Iran for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 derived from the GBD Study conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME in 2010. Using the comparative risk assessment, we calculated the proportion of death, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs caused by IHD attributable to a low omega-3 fatty acids intake in the GBD studies from 1990 to 2010. Results: In 1990, a dietary pattern low in seafood omega-3 fatty acids intake was responsible for 423 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 300 to 559, 3000 (95% UI, 2182 to 3840, and 4743 (95% UI, 3280 to 6047 DALYs per 100000 persons in the age groups of 15 to 49 years, 50 to 69 years, and 70+ years — respectively — in both sexes.  The DALY rates decreased to 250 (95% UI, 172 to 331, 2078 (95% UI, 1446 to 2729, and 3911 (95% UI, 2736 to 5142 in 2010. The death rates per 100000 persons in the mentioned age groups were 9 (95% UI, 6 to 12, 113 (95% UI, 82 to 144, and 366 (95% UI, 255 to 469 in 1990 versus 6 (95% UI, 4 to 7, 76 (95% UI, 53 to 99, and 344 (95% UI, 241 to 453 in 2010. The burden of IHD attributable to diet low in seafood omega-3 was 1.3% (95% UI, 0.97 to 1.7 of the total DALYs in 1990 and 2.0% (95% UI, 1.45 to 2.63 in 2010 for Iran.Conclusion: The findings of the GBD Study 2010 showed a declining trend in the burden of IHD attributable to a low omega-3 fatty acids intake in a period of 20 years. Additional disease burden studies at national and sub-national levels in Iran using more data sources are suggested for public health priorities and planning public health strategies.

  12. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  13. Enzymatic Modification of Antioxidants Towards Omega-3 Oil Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong

    This PhD dissertation entitled “Enzymatic Modification of Antioxidants Towards Omega-3 Oil Protection” is primarily focused on synthesize of novel antioxidant from natural sources for better protection of oxidation-prone omega 3 oil. Selected phenolic acids were conjugated with fatty alcohols...... in different chain length and triacylglycerol (TAG). Several synthesis strategies were evaluated. Synthesis of lipophilic phenolic fatty alcohols esters were initially conducted in a binary organic solvent system, which was composed of hexane and butanone. Preliminary studies were conducted to identify...... the main parameters affecting yield of these novel lipophilized phenolic fatty alcohol esters in a binary solvent system. The parameters studied in these preliminary studies included volume ratio of hexane to butanone, chain lengths of fatty alcohols and types of phenolic acids (dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA...

  14. Relationship between Erythrocyte Fatty Acid Composition and Psychopathology in the Vienna Omega-3 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wan Kim

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between erythrocyte membrane fatty acid (FA levels and the severity of symptoms of individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR for psychosis. Subjects of the present study consisted of 80 neuroleptic-naïve UHR patients. Partial correlation coefficients were calculated between baseline erythrocyte membrane FA levels, measured by gas chromatography, and scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS after controlling for age, sex, smoking and cannabis use. Subjects were divided into three groups according to the predominance of positive or negative symptoms based on PANSS subscale scores; membrane FA levels in the three groups were then compared. More severe negative symptoms measured by PANSS were negatively correlated with two saturated FAs (myristic and margaric acids, one ω-9 monounsaturated FA (MUFA; nervonic acid, and one ω-3 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA; docosapentaenoic acid, and were positively correlated with two ω-9 MUFAs (eicosenoic and erucic acids and two ω-6 PUFAs (γ-linolenic and docosadienoic acids. More severe positive symptoms measured by PANSS were correlated only with nervonic acid. No associations were observed between FAs and MADRS scores. In subjects with predominant negative symptoms, the sum of the ω-9 MUFAs and the ω-6:ω-3 FA ratio were both significantly higher than in those with predominant positive symptoms, whereas the sum of ω-3 PUFAs was significantly lower. In conclusion, abnormalities in FA metabolism may contribute to the neurobiology of psychopathology in UHR individuals. In particular, membrane FA alterations may play a role in negative symptoms, which are primary psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia-related disability.

  15. Study of baryon acoustic oscillations with SDSS DR12 data and measurement of $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeneisen, B

    2016-01-01

    We define Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distances $\\hat{d}_\\alpha(z, z_c)$, $\\hat{d}_z(z, z_c)$, and $\\hat{d}_/(z, z_c)$ that do not depend on cosmological parameters. These BAO distances are measured as a function of redshift $z$ with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release DR12. From these BAO distances alone, or together with the correlation angle $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), we constrain the cosmological parameters in several scenarios. We find $4.3 \\sigma$ tension between the BAO plus $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ data and a cosmology with flat space and constant dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$. Releasing one and/or the other of these constraints obtains agreement with the data. We measure $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$ as a function of $a$.

  16. Impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on vascular function and blood pressure: Relevance for cardiovascular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, G; Catena, C; Novello, M; Bertin, N; Sechi, L A

    2017-03-01

    To overview the effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on blood vessels and blood pressure (BP) and their relevance for cardiovascular prevention. The importance of omega-3 PUFA for the cardiovascular system has come under the spotlight during the last decades. These fatty acids are present in variable amounts in cell membranes of mammal species, and their content affects a variety of cellular functions. Evidence obtained in animal and human studies suggests that omega-3 PUFA affect many steps of the atherosclerotic process. In blood vessels, omega-3 PUFA improve endothelial function; promote vasodilatation through relaxation of smooth muscle cells; exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic actions; delay development of plaques and increase their stability; and decrease wall stiffening. Omega-3 PUFA might affect BP, and studies conducted with ambulatory monitoring suggest that supplementation with these fatty acids decreases the average 24-h BP levels. This effect on BP is related to the pretreatment membrane content of omega-3 PUFA, and this might explain some inconsistencies among intervention trials. Meta-analyses indicate that omega-3 PUFA have a mild but significant BP lowering effect. While encouraging results were initially obtained with the use of omega-3 PUFA supplements in secondary prevention trials, meta-analyses have not confirmed the ability of these fatty acids to decrease the risk of coronary heart and cerebrovascular disease. Omega-3 PUFA are associated with significant improvement in vascular function and lowering of BP. However, the evidence currently supporting the role of these fatty acids in cardiovascular prevention is weak and needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  17. Food supplementation for workers: flour enriched with omega -3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Nery de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was preparing a product (omega-3 flour to increase the nutritional value of the food for workers concerning the content of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA. The omega-3 flour was prepared using waste (head sardines and leaves of carrot, flaxseed flour, manioc flour and spices. The fatty acids (FA concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography. A total of 28 FA were identified in the omega-3 flour. The concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were 329.23mg EPA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour and 545.35 mg DHA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour. To meet the minimum requirements of omega -3, it is necessary the intake 2.5 to 3 tablespoons (soup of omega-3 flour day-1.There were analyzed two meals (A and B generally consumed by workers without and with the addition of the omega-3 flour (1 and 2 tablespoons to verify if there was an increase of n-3 FA. It was concluded that there was a significant increase of these FA in both meals. It was found that the omega-3 flour is constituted of a good nutritional value, especially the n-3 FA, so the product can be used as a supplement in the feeding of the workers as well as in other segments.

  18. Evidence for the decay B0 --> omega omega and search for B0 --> omega phi

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Dey, B; Gary, J W; Long, O; Campagnari, C; Sevilla, M Franco; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Vazquez, W Panduro; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Bougher, J; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Piredda, G; Buenger, C; Dittrich, S; Gruenberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindemann, D; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wang, W F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Ziegler, V; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2013-01-01

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states omega omega and omega phi with 471 x 10^6 B Bbar pairs produced in e+ e- annihilation at sqrt(s) = 10.58 GeV using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We measure the branching fraction B(B0 --> omega omega) = (1.2 +- 0.3 +0.3-0.2) x 10^-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic, corresponding to a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. We also determine the upper limit B(B0 --> omega phi) omega omega, and an improvement of the upper limit for the decay B0 --> omega phi.

  19. Study of High Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Interactions Using the $\\Omega^{'}$ Spectrometer Equipped with a Multiparticle High $p_{T}$ Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is looking for new physics in 200~GeV/c per nucleon sulphur-tungsten collisions in the $\\Omega$' spectrometer. In particular, we are looking for a quark gluon plasma signature in the increase of the production rate of strange and multistrange baryons and antibaryons. In view of the large number of secondaries, we are using a special detector arrangement, called a ``butterfly system'', which has a large acceptance for particles with 2.2~$\\leq$~ $y _{l}ab $ ~$\\leq$~3.2 and $p _{T} $ ~$>$~0.6 ~GeV/c and is insensitive to all the other particles.

  20. The $\\Omega_{M}-\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ Constraint from CNOC Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, R G; Ellingson, E; Morris, S L; Lin, H; Sawicki, M; Patton, D; Wirth, G; Abraham, R; Gravel, P; Pritchet, C J; Smecker-Hane, T A; Schade, D J; Hartwick, F D A; Hesser, J E; Hutchings, J B; Oke, J B

    1998-01-01

    The CNOC redshift survey of galaxy clusters measures Omega_M from Omega_e(z)= M/L x j/\\rho_c which can be applied on a cluster-by-cluster basis. The mass-to-light ratios, M/L, are estimated from rich galaxy clusters, corrected to the field population over the 0.18 to 0.55 redshift range. Since the luminosity density depends on cosmological volumes, the resulting Omega_e(z) has a strong dependence on cosmology which allows us to place the results in the Omega_M-Omega_Lambda plane. The resulting Omega_M declines if Omega_Lambda>0 and we find that Omega_Lambda<1.5.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your ... the foods you eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important ...

  2. [Antioxidant activity of vegetable oils with various omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, D A; Prozorovskaia, N N; Shironin, A V; Sanzhakov, M A; Evteeva, N M; Rusina, I F; Kasaikina, O T

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant activity and the oxidative stability were investigated in flax, sesame, silybum oils and oils with different omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio. The content of antioxidants (AO) in crude oils and their reactivity towards peroxyl radicals were studied using kinetic method for addition of oil in a model reaction of cumol oxidation. There were correlations between PUFA/omega-9 and thermal stability (50 degrees C); between gamma-tocopherol content and resistantance to oxidative changes after storage at (10 +/- 2) degrees C for 6 months.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the development of preneoplasic lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques,Viviana Teixeira; Dias,Cristina Maria Ganns Chaves; Sylvia do Carmo Castro FRANCESCHINI; Sabarense,Céphora Maria; Neuza Maria Brunoro COSTA; Leite,Jacqueline Isaura Alvarez; Peluzio,Maria do Carmo Gouveia

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticancer potential of dietary omega-3 supplementation to reduce induced intestinal preneoplastic lesions in Wistar rats. METHODS: A total of 58 11-week-old male Wistar rats (Rattus norvergicus, albinus variety, Rodentia) were distributed into two groups: a control group (n=25) and an omega-3-treated group (n=28). Aberrant crypt foci were induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Tissue incorporation of the supplemented omega-3 fatty acids was...

  4. Combining Exergame Training with Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Study Assessing the Effect on Neuronal Structure/Function in the Elderly Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schättin, Alexandra; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    A common problem in the older population is the risk of falling and related injury, immobility, and reduced survival. Age-related neuronal changes, e.g., decline in gray-and white-matter, affect neuronal, cognitive, and motor functioning. The improvement of these factors might decrease fall events in elderly. Studies showed that administration of video game-based physical exercise, a so-called exergame, or omega-3 fatty acid (FA) may improve motor and/or cognitive functioning through neuronal changes in the brain of older adults. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of a combination of exergame training with omega-3 FA supplementation on the elderly brain. We hypothesize that an intervention using a combination approach differently affects on the neuronal structure and function of the elderly's brain as compared to the sole administration of exergame training. The study is a parallel, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial lasting 26 weeks. Sixty autonomous living, non-smoking, and right-handed healthy older (>65 years) adults who live independently or in a senior residency are included, randomized, and allocated to one of two study groups. The experimental group receives a daily amount of 13.5 ml fish oil (including 2.9 g of omega-3 FA), whereas the control group receives a daily amount of 13.5 ml olive oil for 26 weeks. After 16 weeks, both groups start with an exergame training program three times per week. Measurements are performed on three time-points by treatment blinded investigators: pre-intervention measurements, blood sample after 16 week, and post-intervention measurements. The main outcomes are motor evoked potentials of the right M. tibialis anterior (transcranial magnetic stimulation) and response-related potentials (electroencephalography) during a cognitive test. For secondary outcomes, reaction time during cognitive tests and spatio-temporal parameters during gait performance are measured. Statistics will include effect sizes and a

  5. OMEGA 3 DAN KECERDASAN ANAK

    OpenAIRE

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2013-01-01

    Kejadian gizi kurangdi Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masih tinggi . Penyebab fingginya angka kejadiangizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 3, EPA, DHA hubungan omega 3 dengan kecerdasan anak balita. Oleh sebab itu disarankan satn, untuk perlu dilakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 3 dengan turnbuh-kembang anak, kedua, bagi ibuibu disarankan imtuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 3 guna pengoptim...

  6. Marine lipids and the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Marine lipids are enriched with omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acids are important membrane lipids and have many recognized health benefits, the bioavailability of these fatty acids can therefore be important for achieving...... of omega-3 fatty acids has been reported to be affected by several factors; among the important factors were the digestion and absorption processes of omega-3 containing lipids in the gastrointestinal tract. Both lipid structures and food structures can affect the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids....... Human studies have shown that the relative bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil (triglyceride formulation) was similar to that from fish, whereas lower relative bioavailability was observed from fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) formulation in comparison with other lipid formulations...

  7. Combining Exergame Training with Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Study assessing the Effect on Neuronal Structure/Function in the Elderly Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schättin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A common problem in the older population is the risk of falling that might lead to injury, immobility, and reduced survival. Age-related neuronal changes, e.g. decline in grey- and white-matter, affect neuronal, cognitive, and motor functioning. The improvement of these factors might decrease fall events in elderly. Studies showed that the sole administration of video game-based physical exercise, a so-called exergame, or omega-3 fatty acid (FA may improve motor and/or cognitive functioning through neuronal changes in the brain of older adults. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of a combination of exergame training with omega-3 FA supplementation on the elderly brain. We hypothesize that an intervention using a combination approach differently effects on the neuronal structure and function of the elderly’s brain as compared to the sole administration of exergame training. The study is a parallel, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial lasting 26 weeks. Sixty autonomous living, non-smoking, and right-handed healthy older (>65 years adults who live independently or in a senior residency are included, randomized, and allocated to one of two study groups. The experimental group receives a daily amount of 13.5ml fish oil (including 2.9g of omega-3 FA, whereas the control group receives a daily amount of 13.5ml olive oil for 26 weeks. After 16 weeks, both groups start with an exergame training program three times per week. Measurements are performed on three time-points by treatment blinded investigators: pre-intervention measurement, blood sample after 16 week, and post-intervention measurements. The main outcomes are motor evoked potentials of the right M. tibialis anterior (transcranial magnetic stimulation and response-related potentials (electroencephalography during a cognitive test. For secondary outcomes, reaction times during cognitive tests and spatio-temporal parameters during gait performance are measured. Statistics

  8. High Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in fat-1 Mice Reduce Inflammatory Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enji; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Shin, Nara; Yin, Yuhua; Nan, Yongshan; Xu, Yinshi; Hong, Jinpyo; Hsu, Tzung Min; Chung, Woosuk; Ko, Youngkwon; Lee, Wonhyung; Lim, Kyu; Kim, Dong Woon; Lee, Sun Yeul

    2017-06-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as α-linolenic and linoleic acids, are essential fatty acids in mammals, because they cannot be synthesized de novo. However, fat-1 transgenic mice can synthesize omega-3 PUFAs from omega-6 PUFAs without dietary supplementation of omega-3, leading to abundant omega-3 PUFA accumulation in various tissues. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice to investigate the role of omega-3 PUFAs in response to inflammatory pain. A high omega-3 PUFA tissue content attenuated formalin-induced pain sensitivity, microglial activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and the phosphorylation of NR2B, a subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Our findings suggest that elevated omega-3 PUFA levels inhibit NMDA receptor activity in the spinal dorsal horn and modulate inflammatory pain transmission by regulating signal transmission at the spinal dorsal horn, leading to the attenuation of chemically induced inflammatory pain.

  9. Effects of omega-3 supplementation on interleukin and neurotrophin levels in an animal model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugno, Alexandra I; Canever, Lara; Mastella, Gustavo; Heylmann, Alexandra S; Oliveira, Mariana B; Steckert, Amanda V; Castro, Adalberto A; dal Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João; Gama, Clarissa S

    2015-08-01

    New studies suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as omega-3, may reduce the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study evaluated the preventive effect of omega-3 on interleukines (IL) and neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the brains of young rats subjected to a model of schizophrenia. Treatment was performed over 21 days, starting on the 30th day of rat's life. After 14 days of treatment with omega-3 or vehicle, a concomitant treatment with saline or ketamine (25 mg/kg) was started and maintained until the last day of the experiment. BDNF levels in the rat's prefrontal cortex were decreased at 1 h and 24 h after the last administration of ketamine, whereas the group administered with ketamine and omega-3 showed a decrease in BDNF levels only after 24 h. In contrast, both interventions induced similar responses in levels of IL-1β and IL6. These findings suggest that the similarity of IL-1β and IL6 levels in our experimental groups is due to the mechanism of action of ketamine on the immune system. More studies have to be carried out to explain this pathology. In conclusion, according to previous studies and considering the current study, we could suggest a prophylactic role of omega-3 against the outcome of symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  10. Effects of omega-3 supplementation on interleukin and neurotrophin levels in an animal model of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA I. ZUGNO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNew studies suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as omega-3, may reduce the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study evaluated the preventive effect of omega-3 on interleukines (IL and neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in the brains of young rats subjected to a model of schizophrenia. Treatment was performed over 21 days, starting on the 30th day of rat's life. After 14 days of treatment with omega-3 or vehicle, a concomitant treatment with saline or ketamine (25 mg/kg was started and maintained until the last day of the experiment. BDNF levels in the rat's prefrontal cortex were decreased at 1 h and 24 h after the last administration of ketamine, whereas the group administered with ketamine and omega-3 showed a decrease in BDNF levels only after 24 h. In contrast, both interventions induced similar responses in levels of IL-1β and IL6. These findings suggest that the similarity of IL-1β and IL6 levels in our experimental groups is due to the mechanism of action of ketamine on the immune system. More studies have to be carried out to explain this pathology. In conclusion, according to previous studies and considering the current study, we could suggest a prophylactic role of omega-3 against the outcome of symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  11. Photoproduction of the omega meson off the proton near threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Strakovsky, I I; Azimov, Ya I; Aguar-Bartolome, P; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Berghaeuser, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F B; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Demissie, B T; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D J; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Jaegle, I; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Maghrbi, Y; Manley, D M; Marinides, Z; McGeorge, J C; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Pheron, F; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Taragin, M F; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Zehr, F

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study of omega photoproduction off the proton has been conducted by using the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. The gp-->omega p differential cross sections are measured from threshold to the incident-photon energy Eg=1.4 GeV with ~15 MeV binning and full production-angle coverage. The quality of the present data near threshold gives access to a variety of interesting physics, including an estimation of the omegaN scattering length alpha_{omega p}.

  12. {tau}{yields}{omega}3{pi}{nu} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.; Li, B.A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2001-11-01

    A theoretical study of the anomalous decay mode {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{pi}{pi}{nu} is presented. The theoretical value of the branching ratio of {tau}{sup -}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} agrees well with the data. The branching ratio of {tau}{sup -}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is predicted. It is found that the vertices of a{sub 1}{rho}{pi} and {omega}{rho}{pi} play a dominant role in these two decay modes. CVC is satisfied, and there is no adjustable parameter. (orig.)

  13. Lowered omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Christophe, A; Delanghe, J; Altamura, C; Neels, H; Meltzer, H Y

    1999-03-22

    Depression is associated with a lowered degree of esterification of serum cholesterol, an increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 ratio and decreases in omega3 fractions in fatty acids (FAs) or in the red blood cell membrane. The aims of the present study were to examine: (i) serum phospholipid and cholesteryl ester compositions of individual saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in major depressed patients vs. healthy volunteers; (ii) the relationships between the above FAs and lowered serum zinc (Zn), a marker of the inflammatory response in depression; and (iii) the effects of subchronic treatment with antidepressants on FAs in depression. The composition of the FAs was determined by means of thin layer chromatography in conjunction with gas chromatography. Lipid concentrations were assayed by enzymatic colorimetric methods. The oxidative potential index (OPI) of FAs was computed in 34 major depressed inpatients and 14 normal volunteers. Major depression was associated with: increased MUFA and C22:5omega3 proportions and increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios; lower C22:4omega6, C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega3 fractions in phospholipids; lower C18:3omega3, C20:5omega3 and total (sigma)omega3 FAs, and higher C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3 ratios in cholesteryl esters; lower serum concentrations of phospholipids and cholesteryl esters; and a decreased OPI. In depression, there were significant and positive correlations between serum Zn and C20:5omega3 and C22:6omega3 fractions in phospholipids; and significant inverse correlations between serum Zn and the sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3, C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3, and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios in phospholipids. There was no significant effect of antidepressive treatment on any of the FAs. The results show that, in major depression, there is a deficiency of omega3 PUFAs and a compensatory increase in MUFAs and C22:5omega6 in

  14. Serum omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in men: the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K; Mursu, Jaakko; Voutilainen, Sari; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The relationship between fish or omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and type 2 diabetes is inconclusive. Even contaminants in fish, such as mercury, may modify the effects. We investigated the associations between serum omega-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), hair mercury, and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and older Finnish men. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 2,212 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study, aged 42-60 years and free of type 2 diabetes at baseline in 1984-1989, were investigated. Serum PUFA and hair mercury were used as biomarkers for exposure. Dietary intakes were assessed with 4-day food recording. Type 2 diabetes was assessed by self-administered questionnaires and fasting and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test blood glucose measurement at re-examination rounds 4, 11, and 20 years after the baseline and by record linkage to hospital discharge registry and reimbursement register on diabetes medication expenses. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associations. RESULTS During the average follow-up of 19.3 years, 422 men developed type 2 diabetes. Men in the highest versus the lowest serum EPA + DPA + DHA quartile had 33% lower multivariate-adjusted risk for type 2 diabetes (95% CI 13-49; P trend 0.01). No statistically significant associations were observed with serum or dietary ALA, dietary fish or EPA + DHA, or hair mercury. CONCLUSIONS Serum long-chain omega-3 PUFA concentration, an objective biomarker for fish intake, was associated with long-term lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

  15. Fatty acid composition in major depression: decreased omega 3 fractions in cholesteryl esters and increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl esters and phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Smith, R; Christophe, A; Cosyns, P; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H

    1996-04-26

    Recently, there were some reports that major depression may be accompanied by alterations in serum total cholesterol, cholesterol ester and omega 3 essential fatty acid levels and by an increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20: 5 omega 3, i.e., arachidonic acid/eicosapentaenoic, ratio. The present study aimed to examine fatty acid composition of serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids in 36 major depressed, 14 minor depressed and 24 normal subjects. Individual saturated (e.g., C14:0; C16:0, C18:0) and unsaturated (e.g., C18:1, C18:2, C20:4) fatty acids in phospholipid and cholesteryl ester fractions were assayed and the sums of the percentages of omega 6 and omega 3, saturated, branched chain and odd chain fatty acids, monoenes as well as the ratios omega 6/omega 3 and C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 were calculated. Major depressed subjects had significantly higher C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in both serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids and a significantly increased omega 6/omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl ester fraction than healthy volunteers and minor depressed subjects. Major depressed subjects had significantly lower C18:3 omega 3 in cholesteryl esters than normal controls. Major depressed subjects showed significantly lower total omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cholesteryl esters and significantly lower C20:5 omega 3 in serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids than minor depressed subjects and healthy controls. These findings suggest an abnormal intake or metabolism of essential fatty acids in conjunction with decreased formation of cholesteryl esters in major depression.

  16. Observation of five new narrow $\\Omega_c^0$ states decaying to $\\Xi^+_c K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning

    2017-05-02

    The $\\Xi^+_c K^-$ mass spectrum is studied with a sample of $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The $\\Xi^+_c$ is reconstructed in the decay mode $pK^- \\pi^+$. Five new, narrow excited $\\Omega_c^0$ states are observed: the $\\Omega_c (3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3090)^0$, and $\\Omega_c (3119)^0$. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  17. Polarisation of the omega meson in the pd-->3He+omega reaction at 1360 and 1450 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Schonning, K; Bashkanov, M; Berlowski, M; Bogoslawsky, D; Calén, H; Clement, H; Demirors, L; Ekström, C; Fransson, K; Geren, L; Gustafsson, L; Höistad, B; Ivanov, G; Jacewicz, M; Jiganov, E; Johansson, T; Keleta, S; Khakimova, O; Koch, I; Kren, F; Kullander, Sven; Kupsc, A; Kuzmin, A; Lindberg, K; Marciniewski, P; Morosov, B; Oelert, W; Pauly, C; Pettersson, H; Petukhov, Yu P; Povtorejko, A; Ruber, R J M Y; Scobel, W; Shafigullin, R; Shwartz, B; Skorodko, T; Sopov, V; Stepaniak, J; Tegner, P -E; Engblom, P Thorngren; Tikhomirov, V; Turowiecki, A; Wagner, G J; Wilkin, C; Wolke, M; Zabierowski, J; Zartova, I; Zlomanczuk, Yu

    2008-01-01

    The tensor polarisation of omega mesons produced in the pd-->3He+omega reaction has been studied at two energies near threshold. The 3He nuclei were detected in coincidence with the pi0pi+pi- or pi0gamma decay products of the omega. In contrast to the case of phi meson production, the omega mesons are found to be unpolarised. This brings into question the applicability of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule when comparing the production of vector mesons in low energy hadronic reactions.

  18. Beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated Fatty acids in gestational diabetes: consequences in macrosomia and adulthood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessoufou, Akadiri; Nekoua, Magloire P; Gbankoto, Adam; Mashalla, Yohana; Moutairou, Kabirou

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th) cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases.

  19. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akadiri Yessoufou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases.

  20. Effect of a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on the pig liver transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Agnieszka; Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Te Pas, Marinus F W; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is important for keeping the homeostasis of biological processes and metabolism, yet the underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to identify changes in the pig liver transcriptome induced by a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and to characterize the biological mechanisms related to PUFA metabolism. Polish Landrace pigs (n = 12) were fed diet enriched with linoleic acid (LA, omega-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3) or standard diet as a control. The fatty acid profiling was assayed in order to verify how feeding influenced the fatty acid content in the liver, and subsequently next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) between transcriptomes between dietary groups. The biological mechanisms and pathway interaction networks were identified using DAVID and Cytoscape tools. Fatty acid profile analysis indicated a higher contribution of PUFAs in the liver for LA- and ALA-enriched diet group, particularly for the omega-3 fatty acid family, but not omega-6. Next-generation sequencing identified 3565 DEG, 1484 of which were induced and 2081 were suppressed by PUFA supplementation. A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids resulted in the modulation of fatty acid metabolism pathways and over-representation of genes involved in energy metabolism, signal transduction, and immune response pathways. In conclusion, a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids altered the transcriptomic profile of the pig liver and would influence animal health status.

  1. Comparing WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ with $\\Sigma^0_2$ induction

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Let WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ be the statement that the ordinal number $\\omega^\\omega$ is well ordered. WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ has occurred several times in the reverse-mathematical literature. The purpose of this expository note is to discuss the place of WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ within the standard hierarchy of subsystems of second-order arithmetic. We prove that WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ is implied by I$\\Sigma^0_2$ and independent of B$\\Sigma^0_2$. We also prove that WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ and B$\\Sigma^0_2$ toge...

  2. On the biologic origin of C6-C10-dicarboxylic and C6-C10-omega-1-hydroxy monocarboxylic acids in human and rat with acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiencies: in vitro studies on the omega- and omega-1-oxidation of medium-chain (C6-C12) fatty acids in human and rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, N; Mortensen, P B; Kølvraa, S

    1983-10-01

    C6-C10-dicarboxylic acid C6-C10-omega-1-hydroxy monocarboxylic acids were measured in postmitochondrial (10,000 g) fractions of rat liver after incubation with hexanoic, octanoic, and decanoic acids. In livers both from fed and starved rats, the proportion of decanoic acid converted to sebacic acid was high (approximately 25%) with only minor accumulation of the intermediate 10-hydroxy decanoic acid (1-2%). The conversion of octanoic and hexanoic acids to suberic and adipic acids, respectively, was low (less than 1%). The intermediate 8-hydroxy octanoic and 6-hydroxy hexanoic acids were also accumulated in very small amounts (less than 1%). It was concluded that cytochrome-P-450-mediated omega-hydroxylation was of decisive importance for the production rate of the dicarboxylic acids. Analysis of kinetic parameters of human and rat liver microsomal omega- and omega-1-hydroxylation of hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acids gave the following results: in rats, the apparent Km values for the omega-hydroxylation for dodecanoic and decanoic acids are low, ie., 171 and 3.1 mumole/liter, respectively, whereas they are high for octanoic and hexanoic acids (8211 and 8822 mumole/liter, respectively). In two different humans, the corresponding Km values for dodecanoic, decanoic, octanoic, and hexanoic acids are 3.6-186, 522-247, 4861-3892, and 6825-10400 mumole/liter, respectively. Based on these results, it is argued that adipic and suberic acids found in urine from rats and humans with acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiencies are not biosynthesized by direct omega-oxidation of hexanoic and octanoic acids, but most probably by means of beta-oxidation of sebacic and dodecanedioic acids, produced by direct omega-oxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Study of the production of {phi}, {rho}, {omega} mesons in the ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the SPS of CERN; Etude de la production des mesons {phi}, {rho} et {omega} dans les collisions d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes au SPS du CERN (dans l'experience NA50)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatte, L

    2001-03-28

    The NA50 experiment is one of the experiment using the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) beam at CERN (european laboratory for particle physics). One of the common aim of the SPS experiment is to look for the existence of a new state of the nuclear matter: the quark-gluon plasma. Among the proposed signatures of the quark-gluon plasma is the enhanced production of particles containing strange quarks. In the current work, the NA50/NA38 experiment data are analysed and the relative production of the {phi} and {rho} + {omega} mesons are obtained from Pb-Pb collisions at 158 and S-U at 200 GeV per nucleon. The measured ({phi}/({rho} +{omega})){mu}{mu} ratio as a function of the transverse mass does not present any unexpected behavior, however, central collisions as compared to peripheral collisions show an increase by a factor 1.7. The {phi} and {rho}+{omega} multiplicities are extracted for the Pb-Pb collisions and show that the enhancement of the ({phi}/({rho}+{omega})){mu}{mu} ratio is due to the {phi} meson production increase. The evolution of the {phi} meson multiplicity, versus the number of participant nucleus (N{sub part}), is different from that of the multi-strange baryons. The effective temperatures are deduced from the study of the {phi} and {rho} + {omega} production cross sections with respect to the transverse mass and compared to those obtained by other experiments and other particles. An additional study is done to extract the K/{pi} ratio versus N{sub part}. (authors)

  4. Rare B Meson Decays With Omega Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; /Colorado U.

    2006-04-24

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are particularly interesting because of their importance in understanding the CP violation, which is essential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe, and of their roles in testing the ''effective'' theory of B physics. The study has been done with the BABAR experiment, which is mainly designed for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons, and secondarily for rare processes that become accessible with the high luminosity of the PEP-II B Factory. In a sample of 89 million produced B{bar B} pairs on the BABAR experiment, we observed the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup +} for the first time, made more precise measurements for B{sup +} {yields} {omega}h{sup +} and reported tighter upper limits for B {yields} {omega}K* and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup 0}.

  5. Pathway markers for pro-resolving lipid mediators in maternal and umbilical cord blood: A Secondary analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, & Mental Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L Mozurkewich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protections. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites: We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA- rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-HDHA concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P=0.02 We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P=0.049. Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P<0.001, both.

  6. Pathway Markers for Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood: A Secondary Analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L; Greenwood, Matthew; Clinton, Chelsea; Berman, Deborah; Romero, Vivian; Djuric, Zora; Qualls, Clifford; Gronert, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protectins. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites. We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P = 0.02). We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P = 0.049). Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P < 0.001, both).

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Tanja Hess; Trinette Ross-Jones

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are a family of essential fatty acids with many biological activities. These fatty acids are incorporated into cell membranes, changing their structural and functional characteristics. N-3 PUFA can act by modulating inflammatory responses at different levels. Omega-3 PUFA can be converted in the body to longer-chain n-3 PUFA at a limited rate and are differently converted in body systems. It appears that when specific longer-chain n-3 PUFA are de...

  8. Update on marine omega-3 fatty acids: management of dyslipidemia and current omega-3 treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Howard

    2013-10-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is currently the primary target in the management of dyslipidemia, and statins are first-line pharmacologic interventions. Adjunct therapy such as niacins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants, or cholesterol absorption inhibitors may be considered to help reduce cardiovascular risk. This review discusses the need for alternative adjunct treatment options and the potential place for omega-3 fatty acids as such. The cardiovascular benefits of fish consumption are attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and a variety of omega-3 fatty acid products are available with varied amounts of EPA and DHA. The product types include prescription drugs, food supplements, and medical foods sourced from fish, krill, algal and plant oils or purified from these oils. Two prescription omega-3 fatty acids are currently available, omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters (contains both EPA and DHA ethyl esters), and icosapent ethyl (IPE; contains high-purity EPA ethyl ester). A pharmaceutical containing free fatty acid forms of omega-3 is currently in development. Omega-3 fatty acid formulations containing EPA and DHA have been shown to increase LDL-C levels while IPE has been shown to lower triglyceride levels without raising LDL-C levels, alone or in combination with statin therapy. In addition, recent studies have not been able to demonstrate reduced cardiovascular risk following treatment with fibrates, niacins, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, or omega-3 fatty acid formulations containing both EPA and DHA in statin-treated patients; thus, there remains a need for further cardiovascular outcomes studies for adjunct therapy.

  9. Omega Wave系统评价赛艇运动员心功能的应用研究%Application Research of Evaluation Rowing Athletes' Heart Function by Omega Wave System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓春

    2013-01-01

    运用实验法、比较法等对广东省优秀赛艇运动员一周强度训练前后机体疲劳状态进行监测,通过Omega Wave系统评价运动员的心功能.结果表明:部分运动员神经疲劳程度偏高,个别运动员已产生疲劳积累.针对改善疲劳状态提出了若干建议.

  10. Effects of an omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion on eicosanoid synthesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacon Pilar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lipid emulsions has been associated with changes in lung function and gas exchange which may be mediated by biologically active metabolites derived from arachidonic acid. The type and quantity of the lipid emulsions used could modulate this response, which is mediated by the eicosanoids. This study investigates the use of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsions in ARDS patients and their effects on eicosanoid values. Methods Prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study carried out at the Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain. We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men; age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40. Patients were randomized into two groups: Group A (n = 8 received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B. Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% fish oil (FO; Group B (n = 8 received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT. Lipid emulsions were administered for 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. We measured LTB4, TXB2, and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α values at baseline [immediately before the administration of the lipid emulsions (T-0], at the end of the administration (T-12 and 24 hours after the beginning of the infusion (T 24 in arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Results In group A (FO LTB4, TXB2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1α levels fell during omega-3 administration (T12. After discontinuation (T24, levels of inflammatory markers (both systemic and pulmonary behaved erratically. In group B (LCT all systemic and pulmonary mediators increased during lipid administration and returned to baseline levels after discontinuation, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. There was a clear interaction between the treatment in group A (fish oil and changes in LTB4 over time. Conclusions Infusion of

  11. Omega 3 fatty acids and the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay

    2008-01-01

    The health benefits of fish oil have been known for decades. Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 essential fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Clinical studies have suggested that DHA and EPA lower triglycerides; slow the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques; lower blood pressure slightly; as well as reduce the risk of death, heart attack, and arrhythmias. Studies have also shown that omega-3 fatty acids may slow the progression of vision loss from AMD and reverse the signs of dry eye syndrome.

  12. New insights into the health effects of dietary saturated and omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lorgeril Michel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular diseases and cancers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Reducing dietary saturated fat and replacing it with polyunsaturated fat is still the main dietary strategy to prevent cardiovascular diseases, although major flaws have been reported in the analyses supporting this approach. Recent studies introducing the concept of myocardial preconditioning have opened new avenues to understand the complex interplay between the various lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The optimal dietary fat profile includes a low intake of both saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and a moderate intake of omega-3 fatty acids. This profile is quite similar to the Mediterranean diet. On the other hand, recent studies have found a positive association between omega-6 and breast cancer risk. In contrast, omega-3 fatty acids do have anticancer properties. It has been shown that certain (Mediterranean polyphenols significantly increase the endogenous synthesis of omega-3 whereas high intake of omega-6 decreases it. Finally, epidemiological studies suggest that a high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio may be the optimal strategy to decrease breast cancer risk. Thus, the present high intake of omega-6 in many countries is definitely not the optimal strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancers. A moderate intake of plant and marine omega-3 in the context of the traditional Mediterranean diet (low in saturated and omega-6 fatty acids but high in plant monounsaturated fat appears to be the best approach to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular diseases and cancers, in particular breast cancer.

  13. Omega-3 fiskeolie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Sørensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Rapport afgrænser sig til evidensbaserede helbredsmæssige gevinster ved et øget indtag af langkædede omega-3, som opnås ved en kost rig på fisk eller som et tilskud af fiskeolier. Der gennemføres en systematisk litteraturgennemgang, som baserer sig på et evidensniveau svarende til styrke A. Det...... betyder, at gennemgangen inkluderer metaanalyser/oversigtsartikler af enten eksperimentelle studier eller observationsstudier, endvidere indgår udvalgte større RCT, som er refereret i meta-analyserne. Sammenfattende findes på baggrund af litteraturgennemgang, at tilskud af omega-3 har effekt på...... hjertesygdom ved at nedsætte mortaliteten. Effekten er mest evident ved personer i særlig risiko for at udvikle hjerte-karsygdom, eller som sekundær/tertiær profylakse. Tilsvarende findes også ved tilskud af omega-3 en forebyggende effekt i forhold til iskæmisk apopleksi. Af mulige virkningsmekanismer viser...

  14. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  15. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  16. Extracting the Omega- electric quadrupole moment from lattice QCD data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena

    2011-03-01

    The Omega- has an extremely long lifetime, and is the most stable of the baryons with spin 3/2. Therefore the Omega- magnetic moment is very accurately known. Nevertheless, its electric quadrupole moment was never measured, although estimates exist in different formalisms. In principle, lattice QCD simulations provide at present the most appropriate way to estimate the Omega- form factors, as function of the square of the transferred four-momentum, Q2, since it describes baryon systems at the physical mass for the strange quark. However, lattice QCD form factors, and in particular GE2, are determined at finite Q2 only, and the extraction of the electric quadrupole moment, Q_Omega= GE2(0) e/(2 M_Omega), involves an extrapolation of the numerical lattice results. In this work we reproduce the lattice QCD data with a covariant spectator quark model for Omega- which includes a mixture of S and two D states for the relative quark-diquark motion. Once the model is calibrated, it is used to determine Q_Omega. Our prediction is Q_Omega= (0.96 +/- 0.02)*10^(-2) efm2 [GE2(0)=0.680 +/- 0.012].

  17. Ds+ Exclusive Hadronic Decays Involving omega

    OpenAIRE

    The CLEO Collaboration; Ge, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using data collected near the Ds*+ Ds- peak production energy Ecm=4170 MeV by the CLEO-c detector, we search for Ds+ exclusive hadronic decays involving omega. We find B(Ds+ -> pi+ omega) = (0.21 +- 0.09 +- 0.01)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi0 omega) = (2.78 +- 0.65 +- 0.25)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi+ pi- omega) = (1.58 +- 0.45 +- 0.09)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ eta omega) = (0.85 +- 0.54 +- 0.06)%, B(Ds+ -> K+ omega) K+ pi0 omega) K+ pi+ pi- omega) K+ eta omega)

  18. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production.

  19. Effect of a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on the pig liver transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szostak, Agnieszka; Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Pas, Te Marinus F.W.; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Juszczuk Kubiak, Edyta; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R.; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O.; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is important for keeping the homeostasis of biological processes and metabolism, yet the underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to identify changes in the pig liver transcriptom

  20. Are dietary vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and folate associated with treatment results in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? Data from a Swedish population-based prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdudoss, Cecilia; Wolk, Alicja; Nise, Lena; Alfredsson, Lars; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Background Dietary intake of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (FA) may be associated with superior response to antirheumatic treatments. In addition, dietary folate intake may be associated with worse response to methotrexate (MTX). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and treatment results of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This prospective study was based on data from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, and included 727 patients with early RA from 10 hospitals in Sweden. Data on dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA and folate intake based on food frequency questionnaires were linked with data on European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response after 3 months of DMARD treatment. Associations between vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and EULAR response were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. Results The majority of patients (89.9%) were initially treated with MTX monotherapy and more than half (56.9%) with glucocorticoids. Vitamin D and omega-3 FA were associated with good EULAR response (OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.83) and OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), respectively). Folate was not significantly associated with EULAR response (OR 1.20 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.91)). Similar results were seen in a subgroup of patients who were initially treated with MTX monotherapy at baseline. Conclusions Higher intake of dietary vitamin D and omega-3 FA during the year preceding DMARD initiation may be associated with better treatment results in patients with early RA. Dietary folate intake was not associated with worse or better response to treatment, especially to MTX. Our results suggest that some nutrients may be associated with enhanced treatment results of DMARDs. PMID:28601838

  1. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psota, Tricia L; Gebauer, Sarah K; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2006-08-21

    Dietary omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both epidemiologic and interventional studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on many CVD end points, including all CVD (defined as all coronary artery disease [CAD], fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and stroke combined), all CAD, fatal and nonfatal MI, stroke, sudden cardiac death, and all-cause mortality. Much of the evidence comes from studies with fish oil and fish; to a lesser extent, data relate to plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids. Cardioprotective benefits have been observed with daily consumption of as little as 25 to 57 g (approximately 1 to 2 oz) of fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, an intake equivalent to >or=1 fish meal weekly or even monthly, with greater intakes decreasing risk further in a dose-dependent manner, up to about 5 servings per week. Fish, including farm-raised fish and their wild counterparts, are the major dietary sources of the longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Sources of plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids include flaxseed, flaxseed oil, walnuts, canola oil, and soybean oil. Because of the remarkable cardioprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids, consumption of food sources that provide omega-3 fatty acids--especially the longer-chain fatty acids (>or=20 carbons) from marine sources--should be increased in the diet to decrease CVD risk significantly.

  2. $CP$ violation for $B^{0}\\rightarrow \\rho^{0}(\\omega)\\rho^{0}(\\omega) \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ in QCD factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Gang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Wei, Ke-Wei

    2014-01-01

    In the QCD factorization (QCDF) approach we study the direct $CP$ violation in $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\rho^0(\\omega)\\rho^0(\\omega)\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ via the $\\rho-\\omega$ mixing mechanism. We find that the $CP$ violation can be enhanced by double $\\rho-\\omega$ mixing when the masses of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ pairs are in the vicinity of the $\\omega$ resonance, and the maximum $CP$ violation can reach 28{\\%}. We also compare the results from the naive factorization and the QCD factorization.

  3. Bioavailability of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Supplements have reached a prominent role in improving the supply of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, such as Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5n-3) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA 22:6n-3). Similar to other nutrients, the availability of omega-3 fatty acids is highly variable and determined by numerous factors. However, the question of omega-3 fatty acids bioavailability has long been disregarded, which may have contributed to the neutral or negative results concerning their effects in several studies. This review provides an overview of the influence of chemical binding form (free fatty acids bound in ethylesters, triacylglycerides or phospholipids), matrix effects (capsule ingestion with concomitant intake of food, fat content in food) or galenic form (i.e. microencapsulation, emulsification) on the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids. There is a need to systematically investigate the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids formulations, which might be a key to designing more effective studies in the future.

  4. [Omega-3 fatty acids in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2005-02-01

    The brain is one of the organs with the highest level of lipids (fats). Brain lipids, formed of fatty acids, participate in the structure of membranes, for instance 50 % fatty acids are polyunsaturated in the gray matter, 1/3 are of the omega-3 family, and are thus of dietary origin. The omega-3 fatty acids (mainly alpha-linolenic acid, ALA) participated in one of the first experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary substances (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. Experiments were first of all carried out on ex vivo cultured brain cells, then on in vivo brain cells (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) from animals fed ALA deficient diet, finally on physicochemical (membrane fluidity), biochemical, physiological, neurosensory (vision an auditory responses), and behavioural or learning parameters. These findings indicated that the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for human infants determines to a certain extend the visual, neurological, and intellectual abilities. Thus, in view of these results and of the high polyunsaturated fatty acid content of the brain, it is normal to consider that they could be involved in psychiatric diseases and in the cognitive decline of ageing. Omega-3 fatty acids appear effective in the prevention of stress, however their role as regulator of mood is a matter for discussion. Indeed, they play a role in the prevention of some disorders including depression (especially post partum), as well as in dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Their role in major depression and bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disease), only poorly documented, is not clearly demonstrated. The intervention of omega-3 in dyslexia, autism, and schizophrenia has been suggested, but it does not necessarily infer a nutritional problems. The respective importance of the vascular system (where the omega-3 are actually active) and the cerebral parenchyma itself, remain to be

  5. Baseline Omega-3 Index Correlates with Aggressive and Attention Deficit Disorder Behaviours in Adult Prisoners

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Barbara J.; Mitchell K Byrne; Carole Collier; Natalie Parletta; Donna Crawford; Winberg, Pia C.; David Webster; Karen Chapman; Gayle Thomas; Jean Dally; Marijka Batterham; Ian Farquhar; Anne-Marie Martin; Luke Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence that the supplementation of omega-3 contributes to a decrease in aggressive behaviour in prison populations. A challenge of such research is achieving statistical power against effect sizes which may be affected by the baseline omega-3 index. There are no published data on the blood omega-3 index with studies of this kind to assess the variability of the blood omega-3 index in conjunction with aggression and attention deficit assessments. Objective To det...

  6. Spectrum and Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of $\\Omega$ baryons from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Jian; Chen, Ying; Chiu, Wei-Feng; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhaofeng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The $\\Omega$ baryons with $J^P=3/2^\\pm, 1/2^\\pm$ are studied on the lattice in the quenched approximation. Their mass levels are ordered as $M_{3/2^+}Omega$ states observed in experiments, respectively. We calculate the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of $\\Omega(3/2^+)$ and $\\Omega(1/2^+)$ and find there is a radial node for the $\\Omega(1/2^+)$ Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, which may imply that $\\Omega(1/2^+)$ is an orbital excitation of $\\Omega$ baryons as a member of the $(D,L_N^P)=(70,0_2^+)$ supermultiplet in the $SU(6)\\bigotimes O(3)$ quark model description. Our results are helpful for identifying the quantum number of experimentally observed $\\Omega$ states.

  7. Effect of Atomic Coherence on Absorption in Four-level Systems: an Analytical study

    CERN Document Server

    Sandhya, S N

    2006-01-01

    Absorption profile of a four-level ladder atomic system interacting with three driving fields is studied perturbatively and analytical results are presented. Numerical results where the driving field strengths are treated upto all orders are presented. The absorption features is studied in two regimes, i) the weak middle transition coupling, i.e. $\\Omega_2 \\Omega_{1,3}$ and ii) the strong middle transition coupling $\\Omega_2 \\Omega_{1,3}$. In case i), it is shown that the ground state absorption and the saturation characteristics of the population of level 2 reveal deviation due to the presence of upper level couplings. In particular, the saturation curve for the population of level 2 shows a dip for $\\Omega_1 = \\Omega_3$. While the populations of levels 3 and 4 show a maxima when this resonance condition is satisfied. Thus the resonance condition provides a criterion for maximally populating the upper levels. A second order perturbation calculation reveals the nature of this minima (maxima). In the second ca...

  8. 3(omega) Damage: Growth Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, M; Demos, S; Wu, Z-L; Wong, J; Penetrante, B; Hrubesh, L

    2001-02-22

    The design of high power UV laser systems is limited to a large extent by the laser-initiated damage performance of transmissive fused silica optical components. The 3{omega} (i.e., the third harmonic of the primary laser frequency) damage growth mitigation LDRD effort focused on understanding and reducing the rapid growth of laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica optics. Laser-initiated damage can be discussed in terms of two key issues: damage initiated at some type of precursor and rapid damage growth of the damage due to subsequent laser pulses. The objective of the LDRD effort has been the elucidation of laser-induced damage processes in order to quantify and potentially reduce the risk of damage to fused silica surfaces. The emphasis of the first two years of this effort was the characterization and reduction of damage initiation. In spite of significant reductions in the density of damage sites on polished surfaces, statistically some amount of damage initiation should always be expected. The early effort therefore emphasized the development of testing techniques that quantified the statistical nature of damage initiation on optical surfaces. This work led to the development of an optics lifetime modeling strategy that has been adopted by the NIF project to address damage-risk issues. During FY99 interest shifted to the damage growth issue which was the focus of the final year of this project. The impact of the remaining damage sites on laser performance can be minimized if the damage sites did not continue to grow following subsequent illumination. The objectives of the final year of the LDRD effort were to apply a suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools to elucidate the nature of the initiated damage sites, and to identify a method that effectively mitigates further damage growth. Our specific goal is to understand the cause for the rapid growth of damage sites so that we can develop and apply an effective means to mitigate it. The

  9. Observation of in-medium modifications of the omega meson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, D; Anton, G; Bacelar, J C S; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beloglazov, Y A; Bogendörfer, R; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Essig, K; Funke, Ch; Gothe, R; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Höffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Hössl, J; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kopf, B; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Messchendorp, J G; Mertens, T; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Radkov, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suft, G; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Süle, A; Thoma, U; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2005-05-20

    The photoproduction of omega mesons on nuclei has been investigated using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The aim is to study possible in-medium modifications of the omega meson via the reaction gamma + A --> omega + X --> pi(0)gamma + X('). Results obtained for Nb are compared to a reference measurement on a LH2 target. While for recoiling, long-lived mesons (pi(0), eta, and eta;(')), which decay outside of the nucleus, a difference in the line shape for the two data samples is not observed, we find a significant enhancement towards lower masses for omega mesons produced on the Nb target. For momenta less than 500 MeV/c an in-medium omega meson mass of M(medium) = [722(+4)(-4)(stat)+35-5(syst)] MeV/c(2) has been deduced at an estimated average nuclear density of 0.6rho(0).

  10. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan C. Vesa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some general facts about omega-3 fatty acids and their role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the human body. Their beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been known for decades. Since then, several epidemiological and interventional trials showed the value of omega-3 acids in the treatment of certain diseases. Most of them revealed the protective role of omega-3 fatty acids on heart and cardiac functions. However, some of these studies couldn?t demonstrate a positive association between fish oils and preventing cardiac events. The major cardiologic societies from European Union and United States of America recommend omega-3 fatty acids as supplements for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Systems Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  12. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The huge superconducting magnet (3 m inside coil diameter, 2 m gap, 18 kGauss) contains a large number of optical spark chambers partly surrounding a hydrogen target which is hit by the beam entering from behind. The half cylindrical aluminium hut houses eight television cameras viewing the spark chambers from the top. The big gas Cerenkov counter in front of the picture (6 m x 4 m x 3 m) which identifies fast forward particles was constructed at Saclay as a contribution of one of the Omega.

  13. The Omega RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, H.W. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Beusch, W. (CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Engelfried, J. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Faller, F. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Gerassimov, S.G. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)); Lennert, P. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Martens, K. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Michaels, R. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)); Mueller, U. (Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Rieseberg, H. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Waelder, G. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    A large-aperture RICH for identification of secondary particles is in operation at the Omega spectrometer since 1984. Photons are detected in drift chambers with quartz windows, using TMAE-loaded counting gases. The RICH was used by two experiments, WA69 and WA82, until 1988. It was then equipped with new drift chambers and mirrors and is in use since 1990 mainly for the hyperon beam experiment WA89. The present setup is described in more detail, and efficiencies, resolutions and particle separation achieved are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Recent developments in $\\varrho$-$\\omega$ mixing

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connell, H B

    1997-01-01

    The topic of rho-omega mixing has received renewed interest in recent years and has been studied using a variety of modern techniques. A brief history of the subject is presented before summarising recent developments in the field. The present status of our understanding is discussed.

  15. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid has an anti-oxidant effect via the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Chisato, E-mail: yosizaki@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Yang, Liu; Yoshizaki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Ishikado, Atsushi; Kondo, Motoyuki; Morino, Katsutaro; Sekine, Osamu; Ugi, Satoshi [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Nishio, Yoshihiko [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA has a direct anti-oxidant effect in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPA and DHA induce HO-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA and its end-product, 4-HHE, activates the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA protects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress is produced in adipose tissue of obese subjects and has been associated with obesity-related disorders. Recent studies have shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ({omega}3-PUFA) has beneficial effects in preventing atherosclerotic diseases and insulin resistance in adipose tissue. However, the role of {omega}3-PUFA on adipocytes has not been elucidated. In this study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE). {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites dose-dependently increased mRNA and protein levels of the anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); whereas no changes in the well-known anti-oxidant molecules, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were observed. Knockdown of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) significantly reduced EPA, DHA or 4-HHE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Also, pretreatment with {omega}3-PUFA prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity in a HO-1 dependent manner. In conclusion, treatment with EPA and DHA induced HO-1 through the activation of Nrf-2 and prevented oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This anti-oxidant defense may be of high therapeutic value for clinical conditions associated with systemic oxidative stress.

  16. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  17. Omega-3 Supplements: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Omega-3 Supplements: In Depth ... JAMA Internal Medicine . 2014;174(3):460-462. Hooper L, Harrison RA, Summerbell CD, et al. Omega ... on November 2, 2012. Kris-Etherton PM, Harris WS, Appel LJ, et al. Fish consumption, fish oil, ...

  18. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD). The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV) can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arr...

  19. Laser-Driven Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnak, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach that combines the implosion and compression of fusion fuel (a hallmark of inertial fusion) with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses (a hallmark of magnetic fusion). It is of interest because it could potentially reduce some of the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed to enable a test of the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy from of the order of 20 kJ (on OMEGA) to 500 kJ (on Z). It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for the Omega Laser Facility that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diam plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a 10-T axial magnetic field, generated by MIFEDS (magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system), the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over a 0.7-mm height have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. Preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat will be reported for the first time. The scaling of laser-driven MagLIF from OMEGA up to the 1800 kJ available on the NIF (National Ignition Facility) will also be described briefly. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  1. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  2. Extracting the Omega- electric quadrupole moment from lattice QCD data

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2010-01-01

    The Omega- has an extremely long lifetime, and is the most stable of the baryons with spin 3/2. Therefore the Omega- magnetic moment is very accurately known. Nevertheless, its electric quadrupole moment was never measured, although estimates exist in different formalisms. In principle, lattice QCD simulations provide at present the most appropriate way to estimate the Omega- form factors, as function of the square of the transferred four-momentum, Q2, since it describes baryon systems at the physical mass for the strange quark. However, lattice QCD form factors, and in particular GE2, are determined at finite Q2 only, and the extraction of the electric quadrupole moment, Q_Omega= GE2(0) e/(2 M_Omega), involves an extrapolation of the numerical lattice results. In this work we reproduce the lattice QCD data with a covariant spectator quark model for Omega- which includes a mixture of S and two D states for the relative quark-diquark motion. Once the model is calibrated, it is used to determine Q_Omega. Our pr...

  3. Cardiac mortality is associated with low levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the heart of cadavers with a history of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Suwannahoi, Padiphat; Mahakranukrauh, Pasuk; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of omega-3 (ie, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 (ie, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid [AA]) fatty acids on reducing cardiac mortality are still debated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues are associated with low cardiac mortality in Thai cadavers. One hundred fresh cadavers were examined in this study. The cause of death, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and fish consumption habits were obtained from death certificates, cadaver medical record profiles, and a questionnaire to a person who lived with the subject before death. In each cadaver, biopsies of cardiac tissues were taken from the interventricular septum for measurement of fatty acid. Of the 100 cadavers (average age, 69 +/- 13 years), 60 were men. The frequency of fish consumption was directly associated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues (P fatty acids. However, in cadavers with a history of CHD, high levels of omega-3 and omega-6, particularly DHA and AA, were associated with low cardiac mortality (P fatty acids in heart tissues. Although omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are not associated with cardiac mortality in the overall studied population, their low levels (especially DHA and AA) in heart tissues are associated with high cardiac mortality in cadavers with a history of CHD.

  4. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system.

  5. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega 3 and Omega 6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2016-01-08

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese-overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome.

  6. Study of $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\chi_{cJ}$ at center-of-mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Li, Cheng; Li, C H; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Based on data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider at 9 center-of-mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV, we search for the production of $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{cJ}$ ($J$=0, 1, 2). The process $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{c0}$ is observed for the first time, and the Born cross sections at $\\sqrt{s}$=4.23 and 4.26 GeV are measured to be $(55.4\\pm 6.0\\pm 5.9)$ and $(23.7\\pm 5.3\\pm 3.5)$ pb, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. The $\\omega\\chi_{c0}$ signals at the other 7 energies and $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\omega\\chi_{c2}$ signals are not significant, and the upper limits on the cross sections are determined. By examining the $\\omega\\chi_{c0}$ cross section as a function of center-of-mass energy, we find that it is inconsistent with the line shape of the $Y(4260)$ observed in $e^+ e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$.

  7. Observation of five new narrow $\\Omega_c^0$ states decaying to $\\Xi_c^+ K^-$ arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    The $\\Xi_c^+ K^-$ mass spectrum is studied with a sample of $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The $\\Xi_c^+$ is reconstructed in the decay mode $p K^- \\pi^+$. Five new, narrow excited $\\Omega_c^0$ states are observed: the $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$, and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  8. The omega-class glutathione transferases: structure, function, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    The omega class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) is a relatively ancient member of the cytosolic GST superfamily, and the omega-class GSTs are found in plants, animals, and some microbial species. The omega-class GSTs exhibit the canonical GST fold, but, unlike other GSTs, the omega-class GSTs have a cysteine residue in their active site. Consequently, the omega-class GSTs catalyze a range of thiol transferase and reduction reactions that are not catalyzed by members of the other classes. Human GSTO1-1 can catalyze the reduction of monomethylarsonic acid (V), but this does not appear to be physiologically important in cases of high environmental arsenic exposure. GSTO1-1 also plays an important role in the biotransformation of reactive α-haloketones to nontoxic acetophenones. Genetic variation is common in the omega-class GST genes, and variants that result in deficiency of GSTO1-1 have been characterized. Genetic linkage studies have discovered associations between GSTO genes and the age at onset of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanism underlying this association with neurological disease may derive from the capacity of omega-class GSTs to mitigate oxidative stress or their role in activating the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β.

  9. Photoproduction of $\\omega$ mesons on nuclei near the production threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Nanova, M; Friedrich, S; Metag, V; Mosel, U; Anton, G; Bacelar, J C S; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beloglazov, Y A; Bogendörfer, R; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Essig, K; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Funke, Ch; Gothe, R; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Höffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Hössl, J; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kopf, B; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Morales, C; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Radkov, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suft, G; Süle, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2010-01-01

    The photoproduction of $\\omega$ mesons on LH_2, C and Nb has been studied for incident photon energies from 900 to 1300 MeV using the CB/TAPS detector at ELSA. The $\\omega$ line shape does not show any significant difference between the LH_2 and the Nb targets. The data are compared with results of transport calculations that predict a sensitivity of the $\\omega$ line shape to in-medium modifications near the production threshold on a free nucleon of $E_{\\gamma}^{lab}$ = 1109 MeV.}

  10. OMEGA FY13 HED requests - LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, Jonathan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loomis, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-25

    This is a summary of scientific work to be performed on the OMEGA laser system located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester New York. The work is funded through Science and ICF Campagins and falls under the category of laser-driven High-Energy Density Physics experiments. This summary is presented to the Rochester scheduling committee on an annual basis for scheduling and planning purposes.

  11. Vitamin E supplementation modulates the biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids in naturally aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Kottekkat, Anagha; Mathew, Shaji E; Illam, Soorya P; Suseela, Indu M; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2017-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are well-known class of nutraceuticals with established health benefits. Recently, the oxidation products of these fatty acids are gaining attention, as they are likely to disturb body redox balance. Therefore, the efficacy of omega-3 fats under conditions of diminished antioxidant status, such as aging, is always a concern. Present study assessed the effects of omega-3 fats (DHA and EPA) together with or without vitamin-E in naturally aged rats. It was found that in omega-3 fats alone consumed rats the lipid profile was improved, while in omega-3 fat with vitamin-E-consumed group (OMVE), the hepato protective and antioxidant properties were pronounced, especially the redox status of brain tissue. It is possible that vitamin-E might have reduced the peroxidation of omega-3 fats, thereby allowing their synergistic effects. Hence, the use of vitamin-E along with omega-3 fat may be beneficial under aged conditions.

  12. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Akadiri Yessoufou; Nekoua, Magloire P.; Adam Gbankoto; Yohana Mashalla; Kabirou Moutairou

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering ...

  13. Omega-3/Omega-6 Fatty Acids for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mats; Ostlund, Sven; Fransson, Gunnar; Kadesjo, Bjorn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess omega 3/6 fatty acids (eye q) in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: The study included a randomized, 3-month, omega 3/6 placebo-controlled, one-way crossover trial with 75 children and adolescents (8-18 years), followed by 3 months with omega 3/6 for all. Investigator-rated ADHD…

  14. Omega-3/Omega-6 Fatty Acids for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mats; Ostlund, Sven; Fransson, Gunnar; Kadesjo, Bjorn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess omega 3/6 fatty acids (eye q) in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: The study included a randomized, 3-month, omega 3/6 placebo-controlled, one-way crossover trial with 75 children and adolescents (8-18 years), followed by 3 months with omega 3/6 for all. Investigator-rated ADHD…

  15. One of the three multiwire proportional chambers used in the photon tagging system at the Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The momentum of incoming electrons, generated by SPS beams, is determined by magnets before they are directed onto a foil. The tagging system, a magnet and the MWPCs then determines the electron momentum after the foil and the difference between the two measurements gives the momentum of the photon which is heading for the spectrometer. The MWPCs were built in Daresburyand coupled with new CERN read0ut electronics.

  16. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: The Way Forward in Times of Mixed Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weylandt, Karsten H; Serini, Simona; Chen, Yong Q; Su, Hui-Min; Lim, Kyu; Cittadini, Achille; Calviello, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Almost forty years ago, it was first hypothesized that an increased dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from fish fat could exert protective effects against several pathologies. Decades of intense preclinical investigation have supported this hypothesis in a variety of model systems. Several clinical cardiovascular studies demonstrated the beneficial health effects of omega-3 PUFA, leading medical institutions worldwide to publish recommendations for their increased intake. However, particularly in recent years, contradictory results have been obtained in human studies focusing on cardiovascular disease and the clinical evidence in other diseases, particularly chronic inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, was never established to a degree that led to clear approval of treatment with omega-3 PUFA. Recent data not in line with the previous findings have sparked a debate on the health efficacy of omega-3 PUFA and the usefulness of increasing their intake for the prevention of a number of pathologies. In this review, we aim to examine the controversies on the possible use of these fatty acids as preventive/curative tools against the development of cardiovascular, metabolic, and inflammatory diseases, as well as several kinds of cancer.

  17. Performance of a superconducting magnet system operated in the Super Omega Muon beam line at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makida, Yasuhiro; Ikedo, Yutaka; Ogitsu, Toru; Shimomura, Koichiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Makoto; Adachi, Taihei; Kadono, Ryosuke; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Strasser, Patric; Koda, Akihiro; Fujimori, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Ohhata, Hirokatsu; Okamura, Takahiro; Okada, Ryutaro [J-PARC, KEK, Shirakata 203-1, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Orikasa, Tomofumi [Keihin Product Operations, Toshiba, Suehiro 2-4, Tsurumi, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A superconducting magnet system, which is composed of an 8 m long solenoid for transportation and 12 short solenoids for focusing, has been developed for Muon Science Establishment facility of J-PARC. The transport solenoid is composed of a 6 m straight section connected to a 45 degree curved section at each end. Muons of various momenta and of both electric charges are transported through the solenoid inner bore with an effective diameter of 0.3 m, where 2 T magnetic field is induced. There are 12 focusing solenoids with an effective bore diameter of 0.6 m and a length of 0.35 m arranged on a straight line at suitable intervals. The maximum central field of each focusing solenoid is 0.66 T. All solenoid coils are cooled by GM cryocoolers through their own conductions. The magnet system has been installed into the beam line in the summer of 2012, and its performance has been checked. Beam commissioning has been carried out since October 2012. During beam operation, temperature rise over 6 K in the transport solenoid due to a nuclear heating from the muon production target is observed at beam intensity of about 300 kW.

  18. Characterization of omega-3 tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestland, Tina Lien; Jacobsen, Øyvind; Sande, Sverre Arne; Myrset, Astrid Hilde; Klaveness, Jo

    2016-04-15

    Omega-3 nutraceuticals are extensively used as health supplements worldwide. Various administration forms for delivery of omega-3 are available. However, the niche omega-3 tablets have so far remained unexplored. In this work tablets containing 25-40% (w/w) omega-3 oil as triglycerides or ethyl esters were prepared utilizing a direct compaction grade powder with β-cyclodextrin as encapsulating agent. It was found that powders with up to 35% (w/w) triglyceride oil and 30% (w/w) ethyl ester oil, respectively, can be directly compressed into tablets of excellent quality. Physical properties of omega-3 containing powders and tablets are described. The powder X-ray diffractograms of the powders and crushed tablets show evidence of the formation of new crystalline phases not present in β-cyclodextrin. In addition, (1)H NMR data suggest that the ethyl esters form inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin. Compaction of other, commercially available, omega-3 powders was performed as a comparison and deemed unsuccessful.

  19. A model study of cost estimates of decontamination and decommissioning with an emphasis to derive cost functions for alpha contaminated material using OMEGA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Rehak, Ivan; Vasko, Marek [DECOM SLOVAKIA spol. s.r.o., Trnava (Slovakia)

    2004-12-01

    The presented study is focused on model decommissioning cost calculations for primary circuit of A-1 nuclear power plant in Jaslovske Bohunice. In addition, the survey of advanced decommissioning costing is included together with impact analyses of contamination on particular decommissioning parameters. OMEGA code decommissioning cost calculations for primary circuit of A-1 NPP presented in the study are performed and evaluated under the following conditions: different contamination level of inner and outer surfaces; different waste management scenarios; application and non-application of pre-dismantling decontamination; different start of decommissioning: 2004, 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040; radionuclide composition of primary circuit contamination in A-1 NPP with occurrence of alpha radionuclides and fission products as a consequence of operational accident with damaged fuel cladding; radionuclide composition of primary circuit contamination in V-2 NPP in Jaslovske Bohunice as a representative NPP with an operation without accidents and therefore neither non-alpha contaminants nor fission products are included. The results of all the above mentioned conditions impacts on calculated costs, manpower, exposure and distribution of materials arisen from decommissioning are evaluated in detail within the calculation sensitivity analysis.

  20. [The essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3: from their discovery to their use in therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, G

    2008-04-01

    In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in unsaturated essential fatty acids as they form the framework for the organism's cell membranes, particularly the neurones in the brain, are involved in the energy-transformation process, regulate the information flows between cells. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are also precursors of ''hormonal'' molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that raised levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids allows the cell membranes to develop with exactly the right flexibility and fluidity, to carry messages between neurones, that is a determining factor in physical and mental well-being and has a profound influence on all the body's inflammatory responses. The results of a number of scientific studies suggest that omega-3 acids contribute to measuring and restricting inflammatory symptoms, whereas omega-6 acids (and saturated fats) give free range to inflammatory responses and amplify allergic reactions. Today in the Western countries, the ratio of omega-3 acids to omega-6 in the diet is weighted 1:10 in favour of omega-6 to up to 1:25 in some areas, while for proper functioning a 4:1 ratio of omega-6 acids to omega-3 acids is generally considered the optimum. In addition, the type of diet followed in the Western countries is very rich in saturated fats like butter and animal fats, but because of an excessive supply of these less noble fats, the cell membranes lose flexibility and this can affect the way they work. An appropriate supplement can be an

  1. Are dietary vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and folate associated with treatment results in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? Data from a Swedish population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdudoss, Cecilia; Wolk, Alicja; Nise, Lena; Alfredsson, Lars; Vollenhoven, Ronald van

    2017-06-10

    Dietary intake of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (FA) may be associated with superior response to antirheumatic treatments. In addition, dietary folate intake may be associated with worse response to methotrexate (MTX). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and treatment results of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This prospective study was based on data from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, and included 727 patients with early RA from 10 hospitals in Sweden. Data on dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA and folate intake based on food frequency questionnaires were linked with data on European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response after 3 months of DMARD treatment. Associations between vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and EULAR response were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. The majority of patients (89.9%) were initially treated with MTX monotherapy and more than half (56.9%) with glucocorticoids. Vitamin D and omega-3 FA were associated with good EULAR response (OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.83) and OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), respectively). Folate was not significantly associated with EULAR response (OR 1.20 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.91)). Similar results were seen in a subgroup of patients who were initially treated with MTX monotherapy at baseline. Higher intake of dietary vitamin D and omega-3 FA during the year preceding DMARD initiation may be associated with better treatment results in patients with early RA. Dietary folate intake was not associated with worse or better response to treatment, especially to MTX. Our results suggest that some nutrients may be associated with enhanced treatment results of DMARDs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  2. Omega, the final multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, T. N.

    2008-12-01

    The application of optimisation theory to vegetation processes has rarely extended beyond the context of diurnal to intra-annual gas exchange of individual leaves and crowns. One reason is that the Lagrange multipliers in the leaf-scale solutions, which are marginal products for allocatable photosynthetic resource inputs (water and nitrogen), are mysterious in origin, and their numerical values are difficult to measure -- let alone to predict or interpret in concrete physiological or ecological terms. These difficulties disappear, however, when the optimisation paradigm itself is extended to encompass carbon allocation and growth at the lifespan scale. The trajectories of leaf (and canopy) level marginal products are then implicit in the trajectory of plant and stand structure predicted by optimal carbon allocation. Furthermore, because the input and product are the same resource -- carbon -- in the whole plant optimisation, the product in one time step defines the input constraint, and hence implicitly the marginal product for carbon, in the next time step. This effectively converts the problem from a constrained optimisation of a definite integral, in which the multipliers are undetermined, to an unconstrained maximisation of a state, in which the multipliers are all implicit. This talk will explore how the marginal products for photosynthetic inputs as well as the marginal product for carbon -- i.e., the 'final multiplier,' omega -- are predicted to vary over time and in relation to environmental change during tree growth.

  3. Relations between distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, Juan Luis Garcia [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/Paseo Alfonso XIII, 30203-Cartagena (Region de Murcia) (Spain)]. E-mail: juan.garcia@upct.es; Lampart, Marek [Mathematical Institute at Opava, Silesian University at Opava, Na Rybnicku 1, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: marek.lampart@math.slu.cz

    2006-05-15

    The forcing relations between notions of distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos were studied by many authors. In this paper we summarize all known connections between these three different types of chaos and fulfill the results for general compact metric spaces by the construction of a selfmap on a compact perfect set which is {omega} chaotic, not distributionally chaotic and has zero topological entropy.

  4. Beam asymmetry in near threshold omega photoproduction off the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Frank; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, B; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglasov, Yu A; Castelijns, R; Credé, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Essig, K; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Funke, C; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Hoffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Kleber, V; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V A; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; Van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Radkov, A; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A V; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S V; Sokhoyan, V; Sule, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, C; Wendel, C

    2008-01-01

    The photoproduction of omega mesons off protons has been studied at the Bonn ELSA accelerator from threshold to E_gamma = 1700 MeV. Linearly polarized beams were produced via coherent bremsstrahlung. Large photon asymmtries in excess of 50% were obtained, whereas the pion asymmetries from omega \\to pi^0 gamma are close to zero. The asymmetries do characteristically depend on Theta_{cm} rather than |t| and indicate s-channel resonance formation on top of t-channel exchange processes.

  5. Torsion and Supersymmetry in Omega-background

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Katsushi; Sasaki, Shin

    2012-01-01

    We study the dimensional reduction of ten-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory in curved backgrounds with torsion. We examine the parallel spinor conditions and the constraints for the torsion parameters which preserve supersymmetry and gauge symmetry in four dimensions. In particular we examine the ten-dimensional Omega-background with the torsion which is identified with the R-symmetry Wilson line gauge fields. After the dimensional reduction, we obtain the Omega-deformed N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. Solving the parallel spinor conditions and the torsion constraints, we classify the deformed supersymmetry associated with the topological twist of N=4 supersymmetry. We also study deformed supersymmetries in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit.

  6. On $\\omega_3$-chains in P($\\omega_1$) mod finite

    CERN Document Server

    Irrgang, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    We prove that if there exists a simplified $(\\omega_1,2)$-morass, then there is a ccc forcing which adds an $\\omega_3$-chain in P($\\omega_1$) mod finite and a ccc forcing which adds a family of $\\omega_3$-many strongly almost disjoint functions from $\\omega_1$ to $\\omega$. The idea is to use a finite support iteration of countable forcings which is not linear but three-dimensional.

  7. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of an electrostatic shock wave and ensuing ion acceleration is studied on the OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Previous work using a 10- μm CO2 laser in a H2 gas jet shows promising results for obtaining narrow spectral features in the accelerated proton spectra. Scaling the shock-wave acceleration mechanism to the 1- μm-wavelength drive laser makes it possible to use petawatt-scale laser systems such as OMEGA-EP, but involves tailoring of the plasma profile. To accomplish the necessitated sharp rise to near-critical plasma density and a long exponential fall, an 1- μm-thick CH foil is illuminated on the back side by thermal x rays produced from an irradiated gold foil. The plasma density is measured using the fourth-harmonic probe system, the accelerating fields are probed using an orthogonal proton source, and the accelerated protons and ions are detected with a Thomson parabola. These results will be presented and compared with particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and LLNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program under project 15-LW-095.

  8. Comparative study of fatty-acid composition of table eggs from the Jeddah food market and effect of value addition in omega-3 bio-fortified eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida Aziz Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Health consciousness has increased the desire of people around the world to consume functional foods. Omega-3 essential fatty acids are one among these beneficial and important health supplements without which a general predisposition to degenerative and stress related disorders can occur. Saudi Arabia has shown an alarming increase in obesity (Al-Nozha et al., 2005, diabetes (Alqurashi et al., 2011, and cardiovascular disease (Al-Nozha et al., 2004 in the last few decades mainly due to nutritional transitions and lifestyle alterations (Amuna and Zotor, 2008. Lack of nutrient dense foods and the prevailing food related disorder of obesity (Popkin, 2001; Prentice, 2014 especially render egg as a choice food to be value-added for attaining nutritional security in Saudi Arabia and in effect reverse the increasing incidences of lifestyle diseases. Nutritional intervention through a commonly consumed food product would be an important step in improving the health of the people, and reducing health care costs. As eggs are a frequently consumed food item in Saudi Arabia, enriching them with omega-3 fatty acids would be an excellent way to alleviate the existing problems. A significant deposition of omega-3 fatty acids in the eggs was observed when the diet of hens was supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids from either flaxseed or fish oil source. Inadequacy of omega-3 fatty acids could thus be rectified by producing omega-3 enriched eggs from hens supplemented with flaxseed or fish oil source, and thus contribute toward better health choice of the consumer.

  9. OMEGA型空间太阳能电站聚光系统设计%SSPS-OMEGA:A New Concentrator System for SSPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨阳; 段宝岩; 黄进; 李勋; 张逸群; 范健宇

    2014-01-01

    The concentrator system of the space solar power station (SSPS ) has a dimension of km scale, which requires the knowledge of optics, mechanics, thermology, control,and other disciplines. The existing concentrator schemes of the SSPS, such as the SSPS-ALPHA scheme, have the disadvantages of low efficiency and/or large fluctuation in solar concentration, large mass, and complicated control system. Thus, the SSPS scheme with high efficiency,light weight and simple control strategy was proposed. The SSPS-ALPHA scheme was analyzed,and then a new scheme called SSPS-OMEGA was presented under the premise of the same power hypothesis with the ALPHA scheme. With the same power collection of the ALPHA scheme, the proposed scheme has higher and more stable solar concentration efficiency,and the power-mass ratio is higher with 31.68%.%空间太阳能电站聚光系统的尺度在千米级,聚光系统的方案设计涉及光、机、电、热及控制等多个学科。现有的空间太阳能电站聚光系统的设计方案不同程度上存在太阳光收集效率低、收集功率波动大、聚光系统质量高、控制系统复杂等不足。因此,需要综合考虑各种因素,提出高效、稳定、轻质和控制简单的聚光系统设计方案。文章对SSPS-ALPHA方案的聚光系统作了深入分析,并基于与 ALPHA方案相同的能量传输假设,针对ALPHA方案的不足提出了一种新的聚光系统设计方案,称之为 SSPS-OMEGA方案。通过比对分析,在与ALPHA聚光方案相同收集功率的前提下,OMEGA聚光方案不仅可以高效、稳定地收集太阳光,而且 OMEGA方案的功率质量比比ALPHA方案提升了31.68%。

  10. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) Omega

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil

    2010-01-01

    [JDEM-Omega is one of the three concepts that contributed to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission advocated by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. It is the concept on which the recommended observatory configuration is based.] The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a space-based observatory designed to perform precision measurements of the nature of dark energy in the Universe. It will make an order of magnitude progress in measuring the equation of state parameters of the Universe of most importance for understanding dark energy. JDEM-Omega is a wide-field space telescope operating in the near infrared. Dark energy measurements will be made via large surveys of galaxies and supernova monitoring. These will be an order of magnitude larger surveys than currently available and will provide enormous catalogs of astrophysical objects for many communities ranging from solar system to galaxy to galaxies/clusters to cosmology. JDEM-Omega is a mission concept collaboratively developed by NASA and the ...

  11. Polar-direct-drive experiments on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Y.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the National Ignition Facility while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings re-pointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, 'warm' targets (865 {mu}m long diameter, 20 {mu}m thick, polymer (CH) shells filled with 15-atm D{sub 2}) with and without the use of an equatorial 'Saturn-like' toroidally shaped CH ring (nominal dimensions: 2.2 mm long diameter measured to ring center, 0.3 mm thick). For the Saturn case, the plasma formed around the ring refracts light toward the target equator as the ring plasma expands. The nominal laser drive is a 1 ns flat pulse, {approx} 400 J per beam, employing 1 THz, 2 dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with polarization smoothing. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed X-ray back-lighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-irradiated X-ray imaging of the stagnating core. The best results have been obtained with Saturn targets by varying the beam pointing and ring diameter, achieving about 75% of the fusion yield from symmetrically illuminated targets with the same total energy (60 beams, 15.3 kJ). (authors)

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Case for Omega-3 Index as a New Risk Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, William S.

    2007-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) found in fish and fish oils (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, EPA and DHA) have been reported to have a variety of beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. Ecological and prospective cohort studies as well as randomized, controlled trials have supported the view that the effects of these FAs are clinically-relevant. They operate via several mechanisms, all beginning with the incorporation of EPA and DHA into cell membranes. From here, these omega...

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids in ADHD and related neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alexandra J

    2006-04-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are dietary essentials, and are critical to brain development and function. Increasing evidence suggests that a relative lack of omega-3 may contribute to many psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. This review focuses on the possible role of omega-3 in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related childhood developmental disorders, evaluating the existing evidence from both research and clinical perspectives. Theory and experimental evidence support a role for omega-3 in ADHD, dyslexia, developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and autism. Results from controlled treatment trials are mixed, but the few studies in this area have involved different populations and treatment formulations. Dietary supplementation with fish oils (providing EPA and DHA) appears to alleviate ADHD-related symptoms in at least some children, and one study of DCD children also found benefits for academic achievement. Larger trials are now needed to confirm these findings, and to establish the specificity and durability of any treatment effects as well as optimal formulations and dosages. Omega-3 is not supported by current evidence as a primary treatment for ADHD or related conditions, but further research in this area is clearly warranted. Given their relative safety and general health benefits, omega-3 fatty acids offer a promising complementary approach to standard treatments.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-19

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Jeromson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  16. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Tavakkoli-Kakhki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Materials and Methods: Firstly, reliable sources of Iranian Traditional Medicine were reviewed in order to identify the prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients. Afterwards, according to the online database of United States Department of Agriculture (URL: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list, the ratio of linoleic acid to alpha linolenic acid (as representatives of omega-6 and omega-3, respectively was identified in each foodstuff. Finally, the ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 were compared between seven food groups of vegetables, fruits, dry goods, high protein products, dairies, breads, and spices. Results: Based on the resources of Iranian Traditional Medicine, the following foods are prescribed for depressed patients: basil, coriander, spinach, lettuce, squash, peppermint, dill, chicory, celery, beet, quince, cucumber, watermelon, grape, peach, pomegranate, banana, apple, currant, pistachio, dried fig, almond, egg, chicken, lamb, trout, milk, bread without bran,saffron, oregano, and coriander seeds. On the other hand, cabbage, eggplant, onion, garlic, broad beans, lentils, beef, whole wheat bread, and mustard are prohibited. It should be noted that omega-3 content in some prescribed foods is more than that of the prohibited ones. Conclusion: The present study showed that mint, basil, spinach, lettuce, squash, lamb, saffron, oregano, cucumber, pistachio, milk, and also wild trout can be considered as medicinal foods for depressed patients.

  17. In-medium modifications of the {omega} meson near the production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, M.; Metag, V.; Berghaeuser, H.; Drexler, P.; Friedrich, S.; Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.W. [University of Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Aguar Bartolome, P.; Akasoy, L.K.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Martinez, M.; Middleton, D.G.; Ostrick, M.; Schumann, S.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mancell, J.; McGeorge, J.C.; McNicoll, E.F.; Robinson, J.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bantawa, K.; Manley, D.M. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (United States); Beck, R. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); University Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Bekrenev, V.; Kulbardis, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Briscoe, W.J. [The George Washington University, Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington, DC (United States); Brudvik, J.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Prakhov, S.N.; Starostin, A. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Cherepnya, S.; Fil' kov, L.V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dieterle, M.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Maghrbi, Y.; Pheron, F.; Rostomyan, T.; Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Downie, E.J. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); The George Washington University, Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington, DC (United States); Glazier, D.I.; Jude, T.C.; Sikora, M.H.; Watts, D.P. [University of Edingburgh, SUPA, School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Hornidge, D. [Mount Allison University, New Brunswick (Canada); Kashevarov, V.L. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Supek, I.; Zamboni, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Lemmer, B. [University of Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); University of Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Mushkarenkov, A. [University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (United States); Nikolaev, A. [University Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Weil, J. [University of Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Giessen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The in-medium properties of the {omega} meson were investigated at the MAMI-C electron accelerator using the Crystal Ball/TAPS detector system to identify {omega} mesons through their {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {gamma} decay channel. Two solid targets (C, Nb) and a LH{sub 2} target as a reference have been used. In the energy range 900 to 1300 MeV the {omega} lineshapes for the different nuclei are compared and a broadening of the {omega} signal for the niobium target is observed in comparison to the liquid-hydrogen target. In a second analysis the {omega} momentum distributions for the solid targets are determined for 50 MeV/c wide bins. For both analyses a comparison to transport calculations shows that the data are consistent with an in-medium modification by collisional broadening, as observed by transparency ratio measurements. (orig.)

  18. A randomized controlled study of the efficacy of six-month supplementation with concentrated fish oil rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in first episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Grancow-Grabka, Marta; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Trafalska, Elżbieta; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Short-term clinical trials of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) as add-on therapy in patients with schizophrenia revealed mixed results. The majority of these studies used an 8- to 12-week intervention based on ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid. A randomized placebo-controlled trial was designed to compare the efficacy of 26-week intervention, composed of either 2.2 g/day of n-3 PUFA, or olive oil placebo, with regard to symptom severity in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Seventy-one patients (aged 16-35) were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to the study arms. The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation was schizophrenia symptom severity change measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Mixed models repeated measures analysis revealed significant differences between the study arms regarding total PANSS score change favouring n-3 PUFA (p = 0.016; effect size (ES) = 0.29). A fifty-percent improvement in symptom severity was achieved significantly more frequently in the n-3 PUFA group than in the placebo group (69.4 vs 40.0%; p = 0.017). N-3 PUFA intervention was also associated with an improvement in general psychopathology, measured by means of PANSS (p = 0.009; ES = 0.32), depressive symptoms (p = 0.006; ES = 0.34), the level of functioning (p = 0.01; ES = 0.31) and clinical global impression (p = 0.046; ES = 0.29). The findings suggest that 6-month intervention with n-3 PUFA may be a valuable add-on therapy able to decrease the intensity of symptoms and improve the level of functioning in first-episode schizophrenia patients.

  19. omega-Helices in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  20. Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids Act as Inhibitors of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Eleonora; Sinibaldi, Federica; Sannino, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Giuseppina; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Cozza, Paola; Santucci, Roberto; Piro, Maria Cristina

    2017-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been reported to play a protective role in a wide range of diseases characterized by an increased metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. The recent finding that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids exert an anti-inflammatory effect in periodontal diseases has stimulated the present study, designed to determine whether such properties derive from a direct inhibitory action of these compounds on the activity of MMPs. To this issue, we investigated the effect exerted by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes that actively participate to the destruction of the organic matrix of dentin following demineralization operated by bacteria acids. Data obtained (both in vitro and on ex-vivo teeth) reveal that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids inhibit the proteolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes present in dentin. This observation is of interest since it assigns to these compounds a key role as MMPs inhibitors, and stimulates further study to better define their therapeutic potentialities in carious decay.

  1. The $\\Xi^* \\bar{K}$ and $\\Omega \\eta$ interaction within a chiral unitary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siqi; Chen, Xurong; Jia, Duojie

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the interaction of the coupled channels $\\Omega \\eta$ and $\\Xi^* \\bar{K}$ within the chiral unitary approach. The systems under consideration have total isospins $0$, strangeness $S = -3$, and spin $3/2$. We studied the $s$ wave interaction which implies that the possible resonances generated in the system can have spin-parity $J^P = 3/2^-$. The unitary amplitudes in coupled channels develop poles that can be associated with some known baryonic resonances. We find there is a dynamically generated $3/2^-$ $\\Omega$ state with mass around $1800$ MeV, which is in agreement with the predictions of the five-quark model.

  2. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Omega-3 as Supplemental Treatment in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Jamilian, Hamidreza; Solhi, Hasan; Jamilian, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies found omega-3 fatty acid deficiency in brain cell membranes of schizophrenic patients. Conventional antipsychotics have many adverse reactions. Safety, availability and low price made omega-3 as a potential supplement for treatment of these patients. This study investigated the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid as add-on treatment in schizophrenia. Material & Methods: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled fixed-dose, add-on clinical trial conducted over 8 we...

  3. Long-term aerobic exercise and omega-3 supplementation modulate osteoporosis through inflammatory mechanisms in post-menopausal women: a randomized, repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaley Jill

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence indicates that dietary fats and physical activity influence bone health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long-term aerobic exercise and omega-3 (N-3 supplementation on serum inflammatory markers, bone mineral density (BMD, and bone biomarkers in post-menopausal women. Methods Seventy-nine healthy sedentary post-menopausal women aged 58-78 years participated in this study. Subjects were randomized to one of 4 groups: exercise + supplement (E+S, n = 21, exercise (E, n = 20, supplement (S, n = 20, and control (Con, n = 18 groups. The subjects in the E+S and E groups performed aerobic exercise training (walking and jogging up to 65% of HRmax, three times a week for 24 weeks. Subjects in the E+S and S groups consumed 1000 mg/d N-3 for 24 weeks. The lumbar spine (L2-L4 and femoral neck BMD, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF α, interleukin (IL 6, prostaglandin (PG E2, estrogen, osteocalcin, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1, 25 Vit D, C-telopeptide (CTX, parathyroid hormone (PTH and calcitonin (CT were measured at baseline, the end of week 12 and 24. Results Serum estrogen, osteocalcin, 1, 25 Vit D, CT, L2-L4 and femoral neck BMD measures increased (P 2 decreased (P 2-L4 and femoral neck BMD, estrogen, osteocalcin, and CT were negatively (P 2. PTH and CT were correlated positively and negatively with IL-6, respectively (P Conclusions The present study demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise training plus N-3 supplementation have a synergistic effect in attenuating inflammation and augmenting BMD in post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  4. Analysis of GPS Timing Data in Support of Omega System Synchronization: A Cesium Stability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-21

    Road 14 SPONSORING AGENCY CODE Alexandria, VA 22310-3998 15. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES This report includes an Addendum and a software User’s Guide. 16...we will detail the CSP software file structure which allows the user to define the parameters of the estimation process. The user must define the...END C c SUBROUTINE KFTABL(EXTAB, IPTAB) DIMENSION ETAB (508B),ITAB(50,8),IPTAB(50,80) CACTER*l IR.EC(80) CHARACTER*4 IEVENT C1HARACTER*4 IPAPNC

  5. A Design Study for a Meteorological Instrumentation System for an OMEGA Tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    count, recycling after a count of 256. They are convenient to use with pulse or pulse rate output devices such as cup anemometers or propellors. For...some transducer configurations are con’nidered. 4.4.1 Wind Velocity Transducers which have been considered for this parameter are: Sonic anemometer ...Vortex shedding anemometer /vane Bivane and propellor. While these all have particular advantages it is considered that the best compromise between

  6. Inflammation as a predictive biomarker for response to omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, M H; Nierenberg, A A; Schettler, P J; Kinkead, B; Cardoos, A; Walker, R; Mischoulon, D

    2016-01-01

    This study explores whether inflammatory biomarkers act as moderators of clinical response to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred fifty-five subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) MDD, a baseline 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17) score ⩾ 15 and baseline biomarker data (interleukin (IL)-1ra, IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), leptin and adiponectin) were randomized between 18 May 2006 and 30 June 2011 to 8 weeks of double-blind treatment with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-enriched n-3 1060 mg day(-1), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched n-3 900 mg day(-1) or placebo. Outcomes were determined using mixed model repeated measures analysis for 'high' and 'low' inflammation groups based on individual and combined biomarkers. Results are presented in terms of standardized treatment effect size (ES) for change in HAM-D-17 from baseline to treatment week 8. Although overall treatment group differences were negligible (ES=-0.13 to +0.04), subjects with any 'high' inflammation improved more on EPA than placebo (ES=-0.39) or DHA (ES=-0.60) and less on DHA than placebo (ES=+0.21); furthermore, EPA-placebo separation increased with increasing numbers of markers of high inflammation. Subjects randomized to EPA with 'high' IL-1ra or hs-CRP or low adiponectin ('high' inflammation) had medium ES decreases in HAM-D-17 scores vs subjects 'low' on these biomarkers. Subjects with 'high' hs-CRP, IL-6 or leptin were less placebo-responsive than subjects with low levels of these biomarkers (medium to large ES differences). Employing multiple markers of inflammation facilitated identification of a more homogeneous cohort of subjects with MDD responding to EPA vs placebo in our cohort. Studies are needed to replicate and extend this proof-of-concept work.

  7. Observation of chi(c1) Decays into Vector Meson Pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using (106 +/- 4) x 10(6) psi(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+) e(-) collider, we present the first measurement of decays of chi(c1) to vector meson pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.5) x 10(-4)

  8. Huevos enriquecidos con omega 3

    OpenAIRE

    Viteri, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo es una contribución al estudio de usos de ingredientes no tradicionales; harina de algas, Macrocystis pyrifera, y la inclusión en raciones para aves de postura destinado a aumentar la concentración de omega 3 del huevo. Objetivo: Evaluar en la alimentación de la gallina la inclusión de harina de alga marina Macrocystis pyrifera con el fin de aumentar el valor de omega 3 en el huevo, y el grado de aceptación de un producto elaborado con el mismo en estudiante...

  9. Topological Complexity of Context-Free omega-Languages: A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Finkel, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We survey recent results on the topological complexity of context-free omega-languages which form the second level of the Chomsky hierarchy of languages of infinite words. In particular, we consider the Borel hierarchy and the Wadge hierarchy of non-deterministic or deterministic context-free omega-languages. We study also decision problems, the links with the notions of ambiguity and of degrees of ambiguity, and the special case of omega-powers.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids EPA and DHA: Health Benefits Throughout Life12

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, Danielle; Block, Robert; Mousa, Shaker A

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3 [(n-3)] fatty acids have been linked to healthy aging throughout life. Recently, fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA have been associated with fetal development, cardiovascular function, and Alzheimer’s disease. However, because our bodies do not efficiently produce some omega-3 fatty acids from marine sources, it is necessary to obtain adequate amounts through fish and fish-oil products. Studies have shown that EPA and DHA are important for proper fetal development, includin...

  11. Glutathione S-transferase omega genes in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease risk, age-at-diagnosis and brain gene expression: an association study with mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mariet; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Miles, Richard; Nair, Asha A; Crook, Julia E; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Bisceglio, Gina; Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Palusak, Ryan; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Georgescu, Constantin; Schultz, Debra; Rakhshan, Fariborz; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Sando, Sigrid B; Aasly, Jan O; Barcikowska, Maria; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-04-11

    Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and 2 genes (GSTO1, GSTO2), residing within an Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (AD and PD) linkage region, have diverse functions including mitigation of oxidative stress and may underlie the pathophysiology of both diseases. GSTO polymorphisms were previously reported to associate with risk and age-at-onset of these diseases, although inconsistent follow-up study designs make interpretation of results difficult. We assessed two previously reported SNPs, GSTO1 rs4925 and GSTO2 rs156697, in AD (3,493 ADs vs. 4,617 controls) and PD (678 PDs vs. 712 controls) for association with disease risk (case-controls), age-at-diagnosis (cases) and brain gene expression levels (autopsied subjects). We found that rs156697 minor allele associates with significantly increased risk (odds ratio = 1.14, p = 0.038) in the older ADs with age-at-diagnosis > 80 years. The minor allele of GSTO1 rs4925 associates with decreased risk in familial PD (odds ratio = 0.78, p = 0.034). There was no other association with disease risk or age-at-diagnosis. The minor alleles of both GSTO SNPs associate with lower brain levels of GSTO2 (p = 4.7 × 10-11-1.9 × 10-27), but not GSTO1. Pathway analysis of significant genes in our brain expression GWAS, identified significant enrichment for glutathione metabolism genes (p = 0.003). These results suggest that GSTO locus variants may lower brain GSTO2 levels and consequently confer AD risk in older age. Other glutathione metabolism genes should be assessed for their effects on AD and other chronic, neurologic diseases.

  12. Brans-Dicke theory of gravity with torsion: A possible solution of $\\omega$-problem

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yu-Huei

    2012-01-01

    We study Brans-Dicke theory of gravity in Riemann-Cartan space-times, and obtain general torsion solutions, which are completely determined by Brans-Dicke scalar field $\\Phi$, in the false vacuum energy dominated epoch. The substitution of the torsion solutions back to our action gives the original Brans-Dicke action with $\\Phi$-dependent Brans-Dicke parameter $\\omega(\\Phi)$. The evolution of $\\omega(\\Phi)$ during inflation is studied and it yields that $\\omega$ approaches to infinity at the end of inflation. It may solve the $\\omega$-problem in the extended inflation model.

  13. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids in health and disease: Part 1--cardiovascular disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Miraliakbari, Homan

    2004-01-01

    The omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids have a wide range of beneficial effects in several human health conditions. Animal and in vitro studies have indicated that omega-3 fatty acids affect blood lipid profiles, cardiovascular health, membrane lipid composition, eicosanoid biosynthesis, cell signaling cascades, and gene expression. Findings from epidemiological studies suggest that intake of omega-3 fatty acids from natural sources or supplements may influence the onset and progression of several disease states, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. This review highlights some recent research findings that help advance our understanding of how omega-3 fatty acids influence cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  14. Omega-3 supplementation in autism spectrum disorders: A still open question?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most commonly used complementary and alternative practices in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD is the supplementation of omega-3. We describe the case of a child with ASD who seemed to respond to omega-3 supplementation in a relevant and lasting manner. So far, based on the results of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine negates the effectiveness of omega-3 in ASD children. Nevertheless, considering anecdotal experiences, including that of our patient, and nonrandomized trials, the presence of a subgroup of ASD patients who are really responders to omega-3 cannot be excluded. These responders might not appear when evaluating the omega-3 effects in a sample taken as a whole. Studies that check for the possible presence of this subgroup of ASD individuals responders to omega-3 are necessary.

  15. Heterologous Reconstitution of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Roh, Kyung Hee; Park, Jong-Sug; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Kang, Han-Chul; Kim, Jong-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Reconstitution of nonnative, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC-PUFA) biosynthetic pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana was undertaken. The introduction of three primary biosynthetic activities to cells requires the stable coexpression of multiple proteins within the same cell. Herein, we report that C22 VLC-PUFAs were synthesized from C18 precursors by reactions catalyzed by Δ(6)-desaturase, an ELOVL5-like enzyme involved in VLC-PUFA elongation, and Δ(5)-desaturase. Coexpression of the corresponding genes (McD6DES, AsELOVL5, and PtD5DES) under the control of the seed-specific vicilin promoter resulted in production of docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3) and docosatetraenoic acid (22:4 n-6) as well as eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) in Arabidopsis seeds. The contributions of the transgenic enzymes and endogenous fatty acid metabolism were determined. Specifically, the reasonable synthesis of omega-3 stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3) could be a useful tool to obtain a sustainable system for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in seeds of a transgenic T3 line 63-1. The results indicated that coexpression of the three proteins was stable. Therefore, this study suggests that metabolic engineering of oilseed crops to produce VLC-PUFAs is feasible.

  16. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ross, J. S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Casey, D.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    We are performing scaled astrophysics experiments on Omega and on NIF. Laser driven counter-streaming interpenetrating supersonic plasma flows can be studied to understand astrophysical electromagnetic plasma phenomena in a controlled laboratory setting. In our Omega experiments, the counter-streaming flow plasma state is measured using Thomson scattering diagnostics, demonstrating the plasma flows are indeed super-sonic and in the collisionless regime. We observe a surprising additional electron and ion heating from ion drag force in the double flow experiments that are attributed to the ion drag force and electrostatic instabilities. [1] A proton probe is used to image the electric and magnetic fields. We observe unexpected large, stable and reproducible electromagnetic field structures that arise in the counter-streaming flows [2]. The Biermann battery magnetic field generated near the target plane, advected along the flows, and recompressed near the midplane explains the cause of such self-organizing field structures [3]. A D3He implosion proton probe image showed very clear filamentary structures; three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations and simulated proton radiography images indicate that these filamentary structures are generated by Weibel instabilities and that the magnetization level (ratio of magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the system) is ∼0.01 [4]. These findings have very high astrophysical relevance and significant implications. We expect to observe true collisionless shock formation when we use >100 kJ laser energy on NIF.

  17. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon OmegaC* Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly-charm baryon OmegaC* (css) in the radiative decay OmegaC0 Gamma, where the OmegaC0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega-pi+, Omega-pi+pi0, Omega-pi+pi-pi+, and Cascade-K-pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb$-1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the OmegaC* and the OmegaC0 baryons is measured to be 70.8 +/- 1.0 (stat) +/- 1.1 (syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of OmegaC* and OmegaC0 in e+e- annihilation.

  18. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-08

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation.

  19. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homer S. Black

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase (COX pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk.

  20. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Homer S; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2016-02-04

    Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA) in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk.

  1. Neuronal calcium channel antagonists. Discrimination between calcium channel subtypes using omega-conotoxin from Conus magus venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivera, B.M.; Cruz, L.J.; de Santos, V.; LeCheminant, G.W.; Griffin, D.; Zeikus, R.; McIntosh, M.; Galyean, R.; Varga, J.; Gray, W.R.; Rivier, J.

    1987-04-21

    The omega-conotoxins from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails are probably the most useful of presently available ligands for neuronal Ca channels from vertebrates. Two of these peptide toxins, omega-conotoxins MVIIA and MVIIB from the venom of Conus magus, were purified. The amino acid sequences show significant differences from omega-conotoxins from Conus geographus. Total synthesis of omega-conotoxin MVIIA was achieved, and biologically active radiolabeled toxin was produced by iodination. Although omega-conotoxins from C. geographus (GVIA) and C. magus (MVIIA) appear to compete for the same sites in mammalian brain, in amphibian brain the high-affinity binding of omega-conotoxin MVIIA has narrower specificity. In this system, it is demonstrated that a combination of two omega-conotoxins can be used for biochemically defining receptor subtypes and suggested that these correspond to subtypes of neutronal Ca/sup 2 +/ channels.

  2. Exclusive {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production with muons at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinelli, Massimo Maria

    2010-02-02

    In the present thesis the exclusive reaction {mu}+N{yields}{mu}'+{omega}{pi}{sup 0}+N is studied from collisions of a polarized muon beam (160 GeV/c momentum) with a polarized {sup 6}LiD target. The goal is the quantitative determination of the spin-parity (J{sup P}) 1{sup -} contribution in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} signal, which is in theoretical models identified as the first radial excitation of the {rho}(770) meson with mass {proportional_to}1250 MeV/c{sup 2}. The concurring 1{sup +} in this mass region is the known b{sub 1}(1235) with dominant {omega}{pi}{sup 0} decay. The power of the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL2 was studied by means of exclusive {omega} and the existence of crystals detected. It was shown that the contribution of the energy calibration of a single crystal to the observed {pi}{sup 0} width is small. The {omega}{pi}{sup 0} selection for the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} gives the kinematical range of the reaction: Squared mass of the virtual photon ({gamma}{sup *}): left angle Q{sup 2} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -1} (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2}; Bjorken variable left angle x{sub B} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -3}; energy in the photon-nucleon c. m. rest system: left angle W right angle {proportional_to}13.5 GeV; inclination of the exponential t-distribution: b=5.27{+-}0.29 GeV{sup -2}. The background was determined by means of a fit of the accociated {lambda} distribution in a height of 19{+-}4% (<11% in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} peak for incoherent scattering). The spin-parity was studied by the consideration of numerous angular distributions for the relative orientations of muon scattering, {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production, and decay planes. Acceptance corrections were calculated by means of a self-developed Monte-Carlo generator. We observed a 42.1{+-}29.2% strong J{sup P}=1{sup -} contribution (77.2{sub -35.2}{sup 22.8}% for incoherent scattering), compatible with theoretical prediction. For this contribution the conservation of the

  3. A computational search for lipases that can preferentially hydrolyze long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil triacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Md Zahid; Barrow, Colin J; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2015-04-15

    Consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids is known to decrease the risk of major cardiovascular events. Lipases, a class of triacylglycerol hydrolases, have been extensively tested to concentrate omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils, under mild enzymatic conditions. However, no lipases with preference for omega-3 fatty acids selectivity have yet been discovered or developed. In this study we performed an exhaustive computational study of substrate-lipase interactions by docking, both covalent and non-covalent, for 38 lipases with a large number of structured triacylglycerols containing omega-3 fatty acids. We identified some lipases that have potential to preferentially hydrolyze omega-3 fatty acids from structured triacylglycerols. However omega-3 fatty acid preferences were found to be modest. Our study provides an explanation for absence of reports of lipases with omega-3 fatty acid hydrolyzing ability and suggests methods for developing these selective lipases.

  4. Compositional study of the putative chloride-bearing materials with OMEGA/MEx data and implications on their relationship with phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, O.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Erkeling, G.; Reiss, D.; Bibring, J.

    2011-12-01

    Daytime infrared images of the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) have been used to infer the presence of hundreds occurrences of chloride salts distributed throughout the southern highlands of Mars (Osterloo et al. 2008, 2010). We used NIR OMEGA data to characterize the surface composition of all putative chloride-bearing deposits and their surrounding terrains. Our systematic survey shows that none of the deposits is associated with signatures of sulfates. The deposits preferentially exhibit low albedo (medium albedo of 0.2-0.25. The spectral ratio technique applied to the deposits exhibiting pyroxene and blank signatures reveals a lack of absorptions and a blue slope in the 1-2.6 μm range, also reported by Murchie et al. (2009) and Glotch et al. (2011). For a few dozens of sites, we identified the presence of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates in proximity to the chloride deposits, with some juxtaposed or even superimposed. We classified the chloride/phyllosilicates association in two groups. 1) Phyllosilicates exposed in small eroded terrains with distinct thermophysical properties from the surrounding terrain materials. These deposits are representative of the phyllosilicate-bearing outcrops that are commonly found in the ancient (pre-)Noachian plains and show no relationship with the chloride terrains. 2) Of special interest are the juxtaposed/superimposed phyllosilicates/chlorides deposits found exclusively in the intercrater plains of the northwestern Terra Sirenum region. In these rare occurrences, the phyllosilicate signatures correspond to a high standing rugged material overlying an anhydrous basement; this setting is rather unique and distinct from the common setting of phyllosilicates-bearing exposures of the ancient crust and those of extensive phyllosilicates-rich regions such as Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae. The spectral signatures are consistent with Fe/Mg smectites, with vermiculite and smectite-chlorite mixed-layer clays providing the

  5. Gamma bang time analysis at OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, A M; Herrmann, H W; Horsfield, C J; Young, C S; Miller, E K; Mack, J M; Kim, Y; Stoeffl, W; Rubery, M; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Ali, Z A

    2010-10-01

    Absolute bang time measurements with the gas Cherenkov detector (GCD) and gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic have been performed to high precision at the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester with bang time values for the two diagnostics agreeing to within 5 ps on average. X-ray timing measurements of laser-target coupling were used to calibrate a facility-generated laser timing fiducial with rms spreads in the measured coupling times of 9 ps for both GCD and GRH. Increased fusion yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will allow for improved measurement precision with the GRH easily exceeding NIF system design requirements.

  6. Gamma bang time analysis at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, A. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Miller, E. K. [National Security Technologies-Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93101 (United States); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ali, Z. A. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Absolute bang time measurements with the gas Cherenkov detector (GCD) and gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic have been performed to high precision at the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester with bang time values for the two diagnostics agreeing to within 5 ps on average. X-ray timing measurements of laser-target coupling were used to calibrate a facility-generated laser timing fiducial with rms spreads in the measured coupling times of 9 ps for both GCD and GRH. Increased fusion yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will allow for improved measurement precision with the GRH easily exceeding NIF system design requirements.

  7. Relationship between achieved blood pressure, dietary habits and cardiovascular disease in hypertensive patients treated with olmesartan: the OMEGA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Tamio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Teramukai, Satoshi; Shirayama, Masayuki; Hiramatsu, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Fumiaki

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the achieved blood pressure, dietary habits and the presence/absence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in hypertensive patients treated with olmesartan medoxomil. A prospective cohort study with a 3-year follow-up was conducted in 14 721 olmesartan-naive outpatients (mean age: 64.9 years, 49.6% women) with essential hypertension. The association of CVD with achieved blood pressure, dietary habits and MetS was investigated by Cox proportional hazards analysis. There were 3059 patients (31.8%) with MetS (Japanese criteria) among 9625 evaluable patients. The mean baseline blood pressure was 157.4/88.8 mm Hg, which decreased to 134.0/76.1 mm Hg during treatment (Pdietary habits revealed a significant association between salt intake and the risk of stroke. Higher salt intake was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke than lower salt intake (hazard ratio, 1.897; 95% confidence interval, 1.003-3.590). Blood pressure was well controlled in both patients with and without MetS, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of events between the two groups. In conclusion, the severity of hypertension (achieved blood pressure) is associated with the incidence of CVD, and the results of this study suggest that tight blood pressure control and salt restriction are important for preventing stroke.

  8. First observation of in-medium modifications of the omega meson

    CERN Document Server

    Trnka, D; Bacelar, J C S; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beloglasov, Yu A; Bogendorfer, R; Castelijns, R; Credé, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Essig, K; Funke, C; Gothe, R W; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Hoffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Hossl, J; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kopf, B; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Messchendorp, J G; Mertens, T; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; Van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Radkov, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suft, G; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Sule, A; Thoma, U; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, C; Wendel, C; Powai, I I T

    2005-01-01

    The photoproduction of omega mesons on nuclei has been investigated using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The aim is to study possible in-medium modifications of the omega meson via the reaction A(gamma, omega)X. Results obtained for Nb are compared to a reference measurement on a liquid hydrogen target. While for recoiling, long-lived mesons (pi, eta and etaprime), which decay outside of the nucleus, a difference in the lineshape for the two data samples is not observed, we find a significant enhancement towards lower masses for omega mesons with low momenta produced on the Nb target.

  9. micrOMEGAs: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Belanger, G.; Boudjema, F.; Pukhov, A.; Semenov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The program micrOMEGAs that calculates the relic density of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) in the MSSM is presented. The impact of coannihilation channels and of higher order corrections to Higgs widths is stressed. The dependence on the RGE code used to calculate the soft parameters is also discussed.

  10. Effect of acetylsalicylic acid on fatty acid omega-hydroxylation in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, R

    1986-12-01

    The effect of acetylsalicylic acid on the cytochrome P-450-mediated fatty acid omega-hydroxylation system was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats after they were fed a diet containing 1% (w/w) acetylsalicylic acid. A 3-fold increase in the specific activity of laurate omega-hydroxylation was observed in the acetylsalicylic acid fed rats in comparison to control rats. This effect of acetylsalicylic acid was unique as the specific activities of other cytochrome P-450-mediated reactions were not increased. The induction of the laurate omega-hydroxylation system was also manifested in a rapid formation of its dicarboxylic acid derivative, dodecanedioic acid, as the omega-hydroxy derivative was further oxidized by alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. These results suggest the acetylsalicylic acid is similar to other peroxisomal proliferating agents in that it also induces the microsomal fatty acid omega-hydroxylation system and may account for the appearance of unique dicarboxylic acids in Reye's syndrome patients.

  11. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for the treatment of patients with major depression disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rising number of studies have raised questions regarding the association of mental illness in a particular mood disorders such as depression with low intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Given all the side-effects that traditional antidepressants put patients at risk for, omega-3 is certainly a better alternative that might improve depressive symptoms and patient′s compliance to treatment by removing the stigma of psychiatric drugs. This study critically reviewed 12 relevant studies from PubMed published between 1992 - 2013 in order to determine whether omega-3 supplements or diet rich in fish were likely to show affectivity in reducing depressive symptoms. Most of the studies showed clear association between omega-3 and reduced depressive symptoms. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 and high fish consumption in reducing depression. Omega-3 fatty acids have also shown to be safe when used during pregnancy to prevent postpartum depression. Although some studies showed mixed results of positive findings, the use of omega-3 supplements could not be an absolute substitute of antidepressants due to limitation in their studies. Minority of the studies reviewed did not correlate omega-3 with the improvement of depressive symptoms for many reasons such as the healthy life-style of subjects, etc. Given the fact that depression has various causes, this puts the testing of omega-3 in a lot of bias due to several variables such as dose, formula, period administered as well as the candidates′ state of health. Further research is definitely warranted on a larger sample size with close follow-up using proper assessment tools. Omega-3 has shown to have minimal or no side-effects at all, which makes it important for mental health professional to at least ensure that patients diagnosed with depression have adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids whether by supplementation or in their daily diet.

  12. Determination of \\Omega_\\Lambda and H_0 from photometric data of radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhodanov, O V; Starobinsky, A A

    2005-01-01

    From photometric observations of elliptical galaxies, among which are both radio galaxies and radio-quiet objects, an investigation was carried out of the relationship `redshift -- age of the stellar system' $(\\Delta z/\\Delta t)$. By means of this relationship cosmological parameters $H(z)$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda$ are estimated. Ages of stellar systems are determined within the framework of evolution models of synthetic spectra PEGASE and GISSEL. This approach can be considered as time study of objects of the early Universe independent of other cosmological models. Construction of a pooled sample is described, containing 220 objects from different populations of elliptical galaxies, for which an analysis of the upper limit of the age of formation of a stellar system was performed. These data were used to estimate the boundaries of determination of the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $\\Lambda$--term: $H_0=72\\pm10$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.8\\pm0.1$ in the model GISSEL and $H_0=53\\pm10$, and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.8\\pm0....

  13. Measurements of J/\\psi decays into \\omega K \\bar{K} \\pi and \\phi K \\bar{K} \\pi

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Bai, Y; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, Jin; Chen, X D; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guoa, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huangb, G S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liaoc, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liud, H H; Liu, H M; Liue, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, H B; Liu, J; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, S; Liu, Z A; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Maf, L L; Ma, Q M; Malik, M Q A; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tian, J P; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wan, X; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wangg, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, M; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zangh, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhaoi, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhong, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhu, Z L; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2007-01-01

    The decays of $J/\\psi \\to \\omega K\\bar{K}\\pi$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\phi K\\bar{K}\\pi$ are studied using $5.8 \\times 10^{7}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC). The $K^{0}_{S}K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ and $K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{0}$ systems, produced in $J/\\psi \\to \\omega K\\bar{K}\\pi$, have enhancements in the invariant mass distributions at around 1.44 GeV/$c^{2}$. However, there is no evidence for mass enhancements in the $K\\bar{K}\\pi$ system in $J/\\psi \\to \\phi K\\bar{K}\\pi$. The branching fractions of $J/\\psi \\to \\omega K^{0}_{S}K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$, $\\phi K^{0}_{S}K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$, $\\omega K^{*}\\bar{K}+c.c.$, and $\\phi K^{*}\\bar{K}+c.c.$ are obtained, and the $J/\\psi \\to \\eta K^{0}_{S}K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ branching fraction is measured for the first time.

  14. A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer for the OMEGA EP Laser (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, P. M.; Ehrne, F.; Mileham, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Jungquist, R. K.; Taylor, C.; Stillman, C. R.; Ivancic, S. T.; Boni, R.; Hassett, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Kidder, R. W.; Shoup, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Froula, D. H.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, L.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer has been developed for the OMEGA EP Laser System based on a spherically bent Si [220] crystal with a radius of curvature of 330 mm and a Spectral Instruments (SI) 800 Series charge-coupled device. The instrument measures time-integrated x-ray emission spectra in the 7.97- to 8.11-keV range, centered on the Cu Kα1 line. To demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer under high-power conditions, Kα1,2 emission spectra were measured from Cu foils irradiated by the OMEGA EP laser with 100-J, 1-ps pulses at focused intensities above 1018 W/cm2. The ultimate goal is to couple the spectrometer to a picosecond x-ray streak camera and measure temperature-equilibration dynamics inside rapidly heated materials. The plan for these ultrafast streaked x-ray spectroscopy studies is discussed.

  15. Functional and safety evaluation of transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maoxue; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Zhang, Jian; Song, Pengkun; Chen, Yaoxing; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2014-08-01

    Genetically modified animals rich in omega-3 unsaturated fatty acid offer a new strategy to improve the human health, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. In this study, we evaluated the function and safety of sFat-1 transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids in mice by feeding basic diet and diets that contain wild type pork and sFat-1 transgenic pork. Blood biochemistry, haematology, peripheral T cell distributions, bacterial counts, gross necropsy, histopathology and organ weights were performed in mice fed with different doses of wild type and transgenic pork. Results indicated that both low and high dose of wild type and transgenic pork had no significant effect on blood biochemistry, T cell distribution, immunoglobulins and bacterial counts in intestine and feces. However, it was noted that both low and high dose of transgenic pork improved the liver immune system in mice, which is probably due to the beneficial contribution of high level of the "good" fatty acids in transgenic pork. There is no significant effect of transgenic pork on all other organs in mice. In summary, our study clearly demonstrated that feeding transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids did not cause any harm to mice, and in fact, improved the liver immune system.

  16. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Atherosclerosis-induced Chronic Pelvic Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ji Sung; Kim, Dae Hee; Bae, Jae Hyun; Moon, Du Geon

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the omega-3 fatty acids help to improve erectile function in an atherosclerosis-induced erectile dysfunction rat model. A total of 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 8 weeks were divided into three groups: Control group (n = 6, untreated sham operated rats), Pathologic group (n = 7, untreated rats with chronic pelvic ischemia [CPI]), and Treatment group (n = 7, CPI rats treated with omega-3 fatty acids). For the in vivo study, electrical stimulation of the cavernosal nerve was performed and erectile function was measured in all groups. Immunohistochemical antibody staining was performed for transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α). In vivo measurement of erectile function in the Pathologic group showed significantly lower values than those in the Control group, whereas the Treatment group showed significantly improved values in comparison with those in the Pathologic group. The results of western blot analysis revealed that systemically administered omega-3 fatty acids ameliorated the cavernosal molecular environment. Our study suggests that omega-3 fatty acids improve intracavernosal pressure and have a beneficial role against pathophysiological consequences such as fibrosis or hypoxic damage on a CPI rat model, which represents a structural erectile dysfunction model.

  17. A normative price for energy from an electricity generation system: An Owner-dependent Methodology for Energy Generation (system) Assessment (OMEGA). Volume 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Mcmaster, K. M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility owned solar electric system methodology is generalized and updated. The net present value of the system is determined by consideration of all financial benefits and costs (including a specified return on investment). Life cycle costs, life cycle revenues, and residual system values are obtained. Break even values of system parameters are estimated by setting the net present value to zero. While the model was designed for photovoltaic generators with a possible thermal energy byproduct, it applicability is not limited to such systems. The resulting owner-dependent methodology for energy generation system assessment consists of a few equations that can be evaluated without the aid of a high-speed computer.

  18. The Omega Deformation From String and M-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hellerman, Simeon; Reffert, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    We present a string theory construction of Omega-deformed four-dimensional gauge theories with generic values of \\epsilon_1 and \\epsilon_2. Our solution gives an explicit description of the geometry in the core of Nekrasov and Witten's realization of the instanton partition function, far from the asymptotic region of their background. This construction lifts naturally to M-theory and corresponds to an M5-brane wrapped on a Riemann surface with a selfdual flux. Via a 9-11 flip, we finally reinterpret the Omega deformation in terms of non-commutative geometry. Our solution generates all modified couplings of the \\Omega-deformed gauge theory, and also yields a geometric origin for the quantum spectral curve of the associated quantum integrable system.

  19. Circular dichroism in hydrogen multiphoton ionization by a bichromatic field of frequencies {omega} and 3{omega}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifirig, Magda [Department of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Cionga, Aurelia [Institute of Space Sciences, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2002-02-28

    The dichroic effects in the multiphoton ionization of the ground state hydrogen atom by a coherent superposition of a laser beam and its third harmonic, are studied via perturbative calculations. The final state of the photoelectrons, which has the energy E=E{sub 1}+3(h/2{pi}){omega} (E{sub 1} the ground state energy and {omega} the laser frequency), is reached by two interfering quantum paths: (a) absorption of one harmonic photon and (b) absorption of three laser photons. In the chosen regime of field intensities, the radiative corrections to the absorption of one harmonic photon may be disregarded. Our numerical results illustrate the influence of the laser frequency, of the relative intensity and of the harmonic phase upon the dichroic signal. (author)

  20. Pengaruh Pemberian Omega-3, Omega-6, dan Kolesterol Sintetis terhadap Kualitas Reproduksi Burung Puyuh Jantan

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwi Isnaeni; Abyadul Fitriyah; Ning Setiati

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this research were to study the effect of using the omega-3 (O-3), omega-6(O-6), and synthetic cholesterol (Ch) on the reproductive quality of the male quails.Samples of this research were 35 of 4 weeks old male quails with 60 to 98 g of weight.The samples were grouped randomly into 7 groups, that are R-0 (control-group), R-1(0,163 mg O-3/100 g body weight), R-2 (0,326 mg O-3/100 g bw), R-3 (0,163 mgO-6/100 gbw), R-4 (0,326 mg O6/100 g bw), R-5 (20 mg Ch/100 g bw), and R-6 (40mg C...

  1. Randomized study of nutritional status and treatment toxicities of oral arginine, glutamine, and Omega-3 fatty acids during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imjai Chitapanarux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT are at high risk of dysphagia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression. Arginine, glutamine, and Omega-3 fatty acidsare immune-enhanced nutrition that can promote cellular immunity.We aimed to examine the impact of immunonutrition diet on nutritional status, and CCRT toxicities, in this group of patients. Methods: Forty patients with HNC who treated with curative CCRT were randomized to: group A (n = 20, patients who received a regular diet and dietary counselingby a protocol dietician; group B (n = 20, patients who received a regular diet plus immune-enhanced nutrition supplements and dietary counseling by the same protocol dietician. Outcome measures were weight loss, protein and energy intake, serum pre-albumin and albumin, and toxicities of CCRT were evaluated at baseline, weekly and at the end of treatment. Results:Both groups were well balanced at baseline.One patient from group A (1/20 withdrew consent. Seven patients from group B (7/20 withdrew from the study; 1 patient could not tolerate the side effect of chemotherapy and 6 patients could not tolerate the taste of oral immune-enhanced nutrition.A significant loss in total body weight was observed in group A patients (p<0.001, whereas not significant loss in group B (p=0.109. Median percentage change from baseline of energy intake was 19.6%, and 22.9% at the end of treatment for group A, and B, respectively. The circulating levels of nutritional markers, pre-albumin and albumin decreased after CCRT in both groups. There was a significantly decreased level of albumin in group A more than group B, at the end of treatment. During CCRT; 4 patients (20% in group A and 1 patient(5% in group B developed grade 3 mucositis, respectively. One patient (5% in group A had grade 3 radiation dermatitis. Grade 3 – 4 hematologic toxicities, mainly in absolute neutrophil count (ANC were significant higher in

  2. Histopathologic investigation of the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids against boric acid-induced injury in kidney and testis tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1 Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Histoloji ve Embriyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Ankara, Türkiye 2 Mustafa Kemal Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Histoloji ve Embriyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Hatay, Türkiye 3 Mustafa Kemal Üniversitesi, Hatay Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu, Hatay , Türkiye 4 Antakya Doğumevi, Hatay, Türkiye 5 Fatih Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Histoloji ve Embriyoloji Anabilim Dalı, İstanbul, Türkiye 6 Turgut Özal Üniversitesi, Sağlık Bilimleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu, Ankara, Türkiye Yazışma Adresi / Correspondence : Ahmet Nacar, Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Histoloji ve Embriyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Ankara, Türkiye Email: drnacar@gmail.com Geliş Tarihi / Received: 09.01.2014, Kabul Tarihi / Accepted: 10.02.2014 Copyright © Dicle Tıp Dergisi 2014, Her hakkı saklıdır / All rights reserved Dicle Tıp Dergisi / 2014; 41 (2: 385-390 Dicle Medical Journal doi: 10.5798/diclemedj.0921.2014.02.0436 ÖZGÜN ARAŞTIRMA / ORIGINAL ARTICLE Borik asit uygulamasının sıçan böbrek ve testis dokusunda oluşturduğu hasara karşı Omega-3 yağ asitlerinin koruyucu etkisinin histopatolojik olarak incelenmesi Histopathologic investigation of the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids against boric acid-induced injury in kidney and testis tissue Ahmet Nacar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the effects of boric acid on rat kidney and testis tissues histopathologically. Secondly, the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acid against boric acid-induced renal and testicular toxicity were investigated. Methods: 32 wistar albino rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: Control, Omega-3 (400 mg/kg/day for 10 days, Boric acid (375 mg/kg/day for 10 days and Boric acid+omega-3 (both drugs same dosage for same day. Kidney and testis tissues were evaluated using a scoring system based on the extent of certain histopathological changes. Results: In histopathological examination, boric acid caused significant degeneration in both testis and kidney tissues. Most evident findings were glomerular shrinkage and necrosis, hemorrhage and tubular cell degeneration in kidneys, and exfoliation of seminiferous tubule cells, detachement of epithelium from basement membrane, decreased cellularity and degeneration in epithelial cells in testis tissues. Omega-3 administration significantly attenuated these changes. Conclusion: To our literature search, this is the first study reporting protective effects of omega-3 fatty acid against boric-acid-induced testicular and renal injury.

  3. The Omega-Infinity Limit of Single Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    A new infinite-size limit of strings in RxS2 is presented. The limit is obtained from single spike strings by letting their angular velocity omega become infinite. We derive the energy-momenta relation of omega-infinity single spikes as their linear velocity v-->1 and their angular momentum J-->1. Generally, the v-->1, J-->1 limit of single spikes is singular and has to be excluded from the spectrum and be studied separately. We discover that the dispersion relation of omega-infinity single spikes contains logarithms in the limit J-->1. This result is somewhat surprising, since the logarithmic behavior in the string spectra is typically associated with their motion in non-compact spaces such as AdS. Omega-infinity single spikes seem to completely cover the surface of the 2-sphere they occupy, so that they may essentially be viewed as some sort of "brany strings". A proof of the sphere-filling property of omega-infinity single spikes is given in the appendix.

  4. Observation of the $Omega_{c}$ Charmed Baryon at CLEO

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J

    2000-01-01

    The CLEO detector at the CESR collider has used 13.7 fb^{-1} to search for the production of Omega_c (css-ground state) in e^{+}e^{-} collisions at sqrt{s} = 10.6 GeV The modes used to study the Omega_c are Omega- pi+, Omega- pi+ pi0, Xi- K- pi+ pi+, Xi0 K- pi+, and Omega- pi+ pi+ pi-. We observe 40.4 +- 9.0(stat) combined events at a mass of 2694.6 +- 2.6(stat) +- 2.4(syst) MeV. We have also measured the \\sigma * Br of the above modes for xp > 0.5 to be 11.3 +- 3.9 +- 2.3 fb, 47.6 +- 18.0 +- 2.8 fb, 45.1 +- 23.2 +- 4.1 fb, 18.2 +- 10.6 +- 3.8 fb, and <5.1 fb @ 90 % CL, respectively.

  5. Coherent control of optical four-wave mixing by two-color $\\omega$-$3\\omega$ ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Serrat, C

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical investigation on the phase control of optical transient four-wave mixing interactions in two-level systems driven by two intense temporal coherent femtosecond laser pulses of central angular frequencies $\\omega$ and $3\\omega$ is reported. By solving the full Maxwell-Bloch equations beyond the slowly-varying envelope and rotating-wave approximations in the time domain, the parametric nonlinear coupling to the optical field at frequency $5\\omega$ is found to depend critically on the initial relative phase $\\phi$ of the two propagating pulses; the coupling is enhanced when the pulses interfere constructively in the center ($\\phi=0$), while it is nearly suppressed when they are out of phase ($\\phi=\\pi$).

  6. [Treatment of hypertriglyceridemia with omega-3 fatty acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) have important biologic functions, including effects on membranes, eicosanoid metabolism, and gene transcription. Studies indicate that the use of EPA and DHA lowered triglyceride levels, which is accomplished by decreasing the production of hepatic triglycerides and increasing the clearance of plasma triglycerides. Recent clinical studies showed that intake of omega-3 fatty acids reduced cardiovascular events. In addition, combination therapy with omega-3 fatty acids and a statin is a safe and effective way to improve lipid levels and cardiovascular prognosis beyond the benefits provided by statin therapy alone. Our focus is to review the potential mechanisms by which these fatty acids reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

  7. Analysis of $\\Omega_b^-(bss)$ and $\\Omega_c^0(css)$ with QCD sum rules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we calculate the masses and the pole residues of the ${1/2}^+$ heavy baryons $\\Omega_c^0(css)$ and $\\Omega_b^-(bss)$ with the QCD sum rules. The numerical values $M_{\\Omega_c^0}=(2.72\\pm0.18) \\rm{GeV}$ (or $M_{\\Omega_c^0}=(2.71\\pm0.18) \\rm{GeV}$) and $M_{\\Omega_b^-}=(6.13\\pm0.12) \\rm{GeV}$ (or $M_{\\Omega_b^-}=(6.18\\pm0.13) \\rm{GeV}$) are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Magnetic field effect on the exciplex between all-s-trans- 1,4-diphenylbuta- 1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene: a comparative study with other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T; Basu, S

    2001-04-01

    The exciplex between all-s-trans-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene has been studied by steady state fluorescence along with the magnetic field effect (MFE) and compared with the other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes. The exciplex formation and magnetic field effect are dictated by the chain length of the polyene rather than the electronic requirement of these phenomena. The wavelength dependence of the MFE confirms the presence of two different charge-transfer complexes.

  9. Skyddar omega-3 mot demens?

    OpenAIRE

    Söderberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Det finns ett stort intresse för omega-3 idag på grund av dess många hälsogivande egenskaper. Brist på vissa typer av fett i kosten kan vara en viktig faktor för kognitiv nedsättning, demens och Alzheimers sjukdom. Dokosahexaensyra (DHA) är den dominerande omega-3-fettsyran i hjärnan. Det finns många faktorer som förklarar varför fettsyraintaget kan påverka kognitiva funktioner och risken att bli dement. Obduktionsstudier visar att patienter med Alzheimer har mindre mängd DHA i hjärnan än kog...

  10. Positive association between blood Omega-3 index and cognition in healthy Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wurff, Inge; Von Schacky, Clemens; Berge, Kjetil; Zeegers, Maurice P; Kirschner, Paul A.; De Groot, Renate

    2016-01-01

    The impact of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) on cognition is heavily debated. In the current study, the possible association between omega-3 LCPUFAs in blood and cognitive performance of 266 typically developing adolescents aged 13–15 years is investigated. Baseline data fr

  11. Fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease: do they really work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Yasuda, S.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Shimokawa, H.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found abundantly in fish oil, exert pleiotropic cardiometabolic effects with a diverse range of actions. The results of previous studies raised a lot of interest in the role of fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disea

  12. Observation of Y(3940) to J/psi omega in B to J/psi omega K at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2007-12-04

    The authors report the results of a study of the decays B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{omega}K{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0} using 383 million B{bar B} events from {Upsilon}(4S) decays with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. They observe evidence for Y(3940) {yields} J/{psi}{omega} with product branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} Y K{sup +}, Y {yields} J/{psi}{omega}) = (4.9 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.5(syst)) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} Y K{sup 0}, Y {yields} J/{psi}{omega}) = (1.5{sub -1.2}{sup +1.4}(stat){sub -0.2}{sup +0.2}(syst)) x 10{sup -5}. The measured mass and width are M(Y) = (3914.6{sub -3.4}{sup +3.8}(stat){sub -1.9}{sup +1.9}(syst)) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(Y) = (33{sub -8}{sup +12}(stat){sub -5}{sup +5}(syst)) MeV, respectively.

  13. Study of the micellization and micellar growth in pure alkanediyl-alpha-omega-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide and MEGA10 surfactant solutions and their mixtures. Influence of the spacer on the enthalpy change accompanying sphere-to-rod transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Victoria Isabel; Rodríguez, Amalia; Graciani, María del Mar; Robina, Inmaculada; Moyá, María Luisa

    2010-06-17

    The micellization and micellar growth in pure aqueous alkanediyl-alpha-omega-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide, 12-s-12,2Br(-) (with s = 2,5,6,8,10,12), and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamide MEGA10 solutions and their mixtures are investigated at 303 K. Application of different theoretical approaches to the binary mixtures shows a nonideal behavior. It also shows that the spacer length does not play an important role in the attractive interactions shown by the mixed systems. The sphere-to-rod morphological transition in the pure dimeric micellar solutions is studied at 303 K. From comparison of these results with those at 298 K the key role played by the spacer in the micellar growth is shown. The spacer length controls not only the surfactant concentration at which the morphological transition happens but also the sign of the enthalpy change accompanying the sphere-to-rod equilibrium. Spacers with an even number of methylenes show smaller C* values than those with an odd number of -CH(2)- units. An endothermic enthalpy change is found for even spacers whereas an exothermic enthalpy change is found for odd spacers. To the authors knowledge, this is the first time this experimental trend has been shown. Addition of MEGA10 diminishes the tendency of the aggregates to grow. An increment in the solution mole fraction of MEGA10 makes the formation of elongated micelles difficult. Microviscosity measurements provide additional information about the influence of the MEGA10 content on the sphere-to-rod transition.

  14. Low blood long chain omega-3 fatty acids in UK children are associated with poor cognitive performance and behavior: a cross-sectional analysis from the DOLAB study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Montgomery

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA, especially DHA (docosahexaenonic acid are essential for brain development and physical health. Low blood Omega-3 LC-PUFA have been reported in children with ADHD and related behavior/learning difficulties, as have benefits from dietary supplementation. Little is known, however, about blood fatty acid status in the general child population. We therefore investigated this in relation to age-standardized measures of behavior and cognition in a representative sample of children from mainstream schools. PARTICIPANTS: 493 schoolchildren aged 7-9 years from mainstream Oxfordshire schools, selected for below average reading performance in national assessments at age seven. METHOD: Whole blood fatty acids were obtained via fingerstick samples. Reading and working memory were assessed using the British Ability Scales (II. Behaviour (ADHD-type symptoms was rated using the revised Conners' rating scales (long parent and teacher versions. Associations were examined and adjusted for relevant demographic variables. RESULTS: DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, accounted for only 1.9% and 0.55% respectively of total blood fatty acids, with DHA showing more individual variation. Controlling for sex and socio-economic status, lower DHA concentrations were associated with poorer reading ability (std. OLS coeff. = 0.09, p = <.042 and working memory performance (0.14, p = <.001. Lower DHA was also associated with higher levels of parent rated oppositional behavior and emotional lability (-0.175, p = <.0001 and -0.178, p = <.0001. CONCLUSIONS: In these healthy UK children with below average reading ability, concentrations of DHA and other Omega-3 LC-PUFA were low relative to adult cardiovascular health recommendations, and directly related to measures of cognition and behavior. These findings require confirmation, but suggest that the benefits from dietary supplementation with

  15. Neurobehavioral changes associated with chronic treatment of omega-3 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of chronic use for 2 month with omega-3 on the level of neurobehavioral and motor activity in the open field. The study showed an effect for different doses of omega-3 on the nervous system and behavior when drainage drug by mouth, that are easily hand to deal with the rats dosage with 10, 50, 250, 500 mgkg of body weight. Rats in doses 10, 50, 250, 500, 1000 mg/kg recorded a significant decrease in number of crossed squares and the number of rearing comparison with the control group. Pocking test recorded significant increase in the number of times introduction of head in the holes compared to the control group in doses of 50, 250, 500 mgkg of body weight, a dose of 1000 mgkg showed a prolongation in the time required to avoid animal high edge, with a lower score swimming and stretching in a period of rotation in the negative geotaxis test compared with the control group, while the rest of the doses did not show any significant difference compared with control. In test of tonic immobility response all the doses recorded a significant decrease in the stillness and freeze for rats movement, compared with control group. We concluded that omega-3 has beneficial effect on the level of neurobehavioral and motor activity in the open field activity in addition to development cognitive behavior of animals, except dose 1000 mgkg Shaw some behavioral difference compare with control group.

  16. Stability and Stabilization of Omega-3 Oils as such and in Selected Foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    oxidation, which will lead to formation of undesirable fishy and rancid off-flavours. Such off-flavours can lead to consumer rejection of omega-3 enriched foods. Important issues to address in order to avoid lipid oxidation are 1) processing conditions and product composition, 2) omega-3 PUFA source......The application of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in foods has increased dramatically during the last decade due to the increasing awareness about the health beneficial effects of these fatty acids. Due to their polyunsaturated nature omega-3 PUFA are highly susceptible to lipid...... and delivery system, and 3) addition of antioxidants. This presentation will summarize our current knowledge about these issues in a range of different omega-3 enriched foods....

  17. Pathophysiological role of omega pore current in channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eJurkat-Rott

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In voltage-gated cation channels, a recurrent pattern for mutations is the neutralization of positively charged residues in the voltage-sensing S4 transmembrane segments. These mutations cause dominant ion channelopathies affecting many tissues such as brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of associated phenotypes is not limited to alterations in the gating of the ion-conducting alpha pore. Instead, aberrant so-called omega currents facilitated by the movement of the S4 segments during activation and during recovery are thought to cause symptoms. Surprisingly, these omega currents display uni- or bi-directionality and conduct cations with varying ion selectivity. Additionally, the voltage-sensitivity enables the channels to conduct different omega currents in the various voltage ranges. This review gives an overview of voltage sensor channelopathies in general and focuses on pathogenesis of skeletal muscle S4 disorders for which current knowledge is most advanced.

  18. Improved gamma bang time measurements on omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H W; Caldwell, S E; Evans, S C; Mack, J M; Sanchez, P; Sedillo, T; Wilson, D C; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Drew, D; Horsfield, C J [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Glebov, V Y; Stoeckl, C [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Macrum, G S; Miller, E K [National Security Technologies/Special Technologies Lab, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)], E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The time of peak fusion reactivity with respect to the impingement of laser light on an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule is known as Bang Time (BT). For deuterium-tritium fueling, fusion reactivity and BT can be measured using either fusion neutrons or fusion gammas. Initial gamma bang time (GBT) measurements on Omega using a Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) have been previously reported. Recent improvements have significantly enhanced the ability to measure GBT precisely. By relating the peak of the GCD gamma signal to laser timing fiducials, and cross calibrating the resulting raw bang time to the neutron bang time obtained using the absolutely calibrated Neutron Temporal Diagnostic (NTD), we demonstrate a precision of better than 25 ps on Omega. Bang time, along with other aspects of reaction history (RH), is an essential component of diagnosing failed attempts at ICF ignition. For the NIF, gammas are preferred over neutrons for this application due to the unacceptably large neutron temporal spreading resulting from detector standoff limitations on the NIF. The NIF System Design Requirement specifies a gamma bang time accuracy of better than 50 ps.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Hess

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA are a family of essential fatty acids with many biological activities. These fatty acids are incorporated into cell membranes, changing their structural and functional characteristics. N-3 PUFA can act by modulating inflammatory responses at different levels. Omega-3 PUFA can be converted in the body to longer-chain n-3 PUFA at a limited rate and are differently converted in body systems. It appears that when specific longer-chain n-3 PUFA are desired these need to be supplemented directly in the diet. In different species some evidence indicates a potential effect on improving insulin sensitivity. Recently, a novel class of n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory mediators have been recognized, termed E-series and D-series resolvins, formed from EPA and DHA, respectively. N-3 PUFA derived resolvins and protectins are heavily involved in the resolution of inflammation. Supplementation with n-3 fatty acids in horses may help manage chronic inflammatory conditions such as osteoarthritis, equine metabolic syndrome, laminitis, and thereby help to improve longevity of sport horse.

  20. Omega-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in rat liver microsomes: implications for Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komen, J C; Duran, M; Wanders, R J A

    2004-07-01

    The 3-methyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid is degraded by the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation route because the 3-methyl group blocks beta-oxidation. In adult Refsum disease (ARD), peroxisomal alpha-oxidation is defective, which is caused by mutations in the gene coding for phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase in the majority of ARD patients. As a consequence, phytanic acid accumulates in tissues and body fluids. This study focuses on an alternative route of phytanic acid degradation, omega-oxidation. The first step in omega-oxidation is hydroxylation at the omega-end of the fatty acid, catalyzed by a member of the cytochrome P450 multienzyme family. To study this first step, the formation of hydroxylated intermediates was studied in rat liver microsomes incubated with phytanic acid and NADPH. Two hydroxylated metabolites of phytanic acid were formed, omega- and (omega-1)-hydroxyphytanic acid (ratio of formation, 5:1). The formation of omega-hydroxyphytanic acid was NADPH dependent and inhibited by imidazole derivatives. These results indicate that phytanic acid undergoes omega-hydroxylation in rat liver microsomes and that an isoform of cytochrome P450 catalyzes the first step of phytanic acid omega-oxidation.

  1. Omega 3 Fatty Acids: Novel Neurotherapeutic Targets for Cognitive Dysfunction in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöchel, Christian; Voss, Martin; Grüter, Florian; Alves, Gilberto S; Matura, Silke; Sepanski, Beate; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Prvulovic, David; Carvalho, André F; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidences from preclinical as well as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a potential beneficial role of dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids for cognitive functioning. In this narrative review, we will summarize and discuss recent findings from epidemiological, interventional and experimental studies linking dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to cognitive function in healthy adults. Furthermore, affective disorders and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by cognitive dysfunction encompassing several domains. Cognitive dysfunction is closely related to impaired functioning and quality of life across these conditions. Therefore, the current review focues on the potential influence of omega-3 fatty acids on cognition in SZ and affective disorders. In sum, current data predominantly from mechanistic models and animal studies suggest that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could lead to improved cognitive functioning in SZ and affective disorders. However, besides its translational promise, evidence for clinical benefits in humans has been mixed. Notwithstanding evidences indicate that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acids may have benefit for affective symptoms in both unipolar and bipolar depression, to date no randomized controlled trial had evaluated omega-3 as cognitive enhancer for mood disorders, while a single published controlled trial suggested no therapeutic benefit for cognitive improvement in SZ. Considering the pleiotropic mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids, the design of well-designed controlled trials of omega-3 supplementation as a novel, domain-specific, target for cognitive impairment in SZ and affective disorders is warranted.

  2. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA.

  3. A combination of omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and B-group vitamins is superior at lowering homocysteine than omega-3 alone: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Samantha Loren; Bowe, Steven John; Crowe, Timothy Charles

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation alone or in combination with folic acid and B-group vitamins is effective in lowering homocysteine. The Medline Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized-controlled trial studies that intervened with omega-3 supplementation (with or without folic acid) and measured changes in homocysteine concentration. Studies were pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. Three different models were analyzed: all trials combined, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid trials, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with folic acid and B-group vitamin trials. Nineteen studies were included, consisting of 3267 participants completing 21 trials. Studies were heterogeneous; varying by dose, duration and participant health conditions. Across all trials, omega-3 supplementation was effective in lowering homocysteine by an average of 1.18μmol/L (95%CI: (-1.89, -0.48), P=.001). The average homocysteine-lowering effect was greater when omega-3 supplementation was combined with folic acid and B-group vitamins (-1.37μmol/L, 95%CI: (-2.38, -0.36), Pomega-3 supplementation alone (-1.09μmol/L 95%CI: (-2.04, -0.13), P=.03). Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in homocysteine. For the purposes of reducing homocysteine, a combination of omega-3s (0.2-6g/day), folic acid (150 - 2500μg/day) and vitamins B6 and B12 may be more effective than omega-3 supplementation alone.

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p climbing behavior and the efficacy of combination of omega-3 fatty acids and fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  5. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given....

  6. The implication of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in retinal physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acar Niyazi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal tissues such as the retina and the brain are characterized by their high content in phospholipids. In the retina, phospholipids can account for until 80% of total lipids and are mainly composed by species belonging to phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine sub-classes. Within fatty acids esterified on retinal phospholipids, omega-3 PUFAs are major components since docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can represent until 50% of total fatty acids in the photoreceptor outer segments. For long time, DHA is known to play a major role in membrane function and subsequently in visual processes by affecting permeability, fluidity, thickness and the activation of membrane-bound proteins. Today, more and more studies show that PUFAs from the omega-3 series may also operate as protective factors in retinal vascular and immuno-regulatory processes, in maintaining the physiologic redox balance and in cell survival. They may operate within complex systems involving eicosanoids, angiogenic factors, inflammatory factors and matrix metalloproteinases. This new and emerging concept based on the interrelationship of omega-3 PUFAs with neural and vascular structure and function appears to be essential when considering retinal diseases of public health significance such as age-related macular degeneration.

  7. A Dynamical N-body Model for the Central Region of $\\omega$ Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, B; Kissler-Patig, M; Gebhardt, K; Noyola, E; Lützgendorf, N; de Zeeuw, P T

    2011-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are fundamental keys to understand the formation and evolution of their host galaxies. However, the formation and growth of SMBHs are not yet well understood. One of the proposed formation scenarios is the growth of SMBHs from seed intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, 10^2 to 10^5 M_{\\odot}) formed in star clusters. In this context, and also with respect to the low mass end of the M-sigma relation for galaxies, globular clusters are in a mass range that make them ideal systems to look for IMBHs. Among Galactic star clusters, the massive cluster $\\omega$ Centauri is a special target due to its central high velocity dispersion and also its multiple stellar populations. We study the central structure and dynamics of the star cluster $\\omega$ Centauri to examine whether an IMBH is necessary to explain the observed velocity dispersion and surface brightness profiles. We perform direct N-body simulations to follow the dynamical evolution of $\\omega$ Centauri. The simulations are co...

  8. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Their potential role in blood pressure prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Borghi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs from fish and fish oils appear to protect against coronary heart disease: their dietary intake is in fact inversely associated to cardiovascular disease morbidity/mortality in population studies. Recent evidence suggests that at least part of their heart protective effect is mediated by a relatively small but significant decrease in blood pressure level. In fact, omega-3 PUFAs exhibit wide-ranging biological actions that include regulating both vasomotor tone and renal sodium excretion, partly competing with omega- 6 PUFAs for common metabolic enzymes and thereby decreasing the production of vasocostrincting rather than vasodilating and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. PUFAs also reduce angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE activity, angiotensin II formation, TGF-beta expression, enhance eNO generation and activate the parasympathetic nervous system. The final result is improved vasodilation and arterial compliance of both small and large arteries. Preliminary clinical trials involving dyslipidemic patients, diabetics and elderly subjects, as well as normotensive and hypertensive subjects confirm this working hypothesis. Future research will clarify if PUFA supplementation could improve the antihypertensive action of specific blood pressure lowering drug classes and of statins.

  9. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  10. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on orexigenic and anorexigenic modulators at the onset of anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eduardo J B; Romanova, Irina V; Suzuki, Susumu; Chen, Chung; Ugrumov, Michael V; Sato, Tomoi; Goncalves, Carolina G; Meguid, Michael M

    2005-06-07

    In cancer anorexia, a decrease in food intake (FI) occurs concomitant with changes in orexigenic peptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexigenic peptides such as alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and anorexigenic neurotransmitter serotonin. omega-3 Fatty acid (omega-3FA) inhibits cytokine synthesis, and delays tumor appearance, tumor growth, and onset of anorexia in tumor-bearing rats. We hypothesize that, in cancer anorexia, omega-3FA is associated with quantitative reversal of hypothalamic NPY, alpha-MSH, and serotonin receptor (5-HT(1B)-receptor) enhancing FI. Fischer rats were divided into: MCA tumor bearing fed chow (TB-Chow) or omega-3FA diet (TB-omega-3FA) and controls: non-tumor bearing fed chow (NTB-Chow) or omega-3FA diet (NTB-omega-3FA). Rats were euthanized at anorexia and brains were removed for hypothalamic immunohistochemical study, using NPY, alpha-MSH, and 5-HT(1B)-receptor-specific antibodies and slides assessed by image analysis. Immunostaining specificity was controlled by omission of primary or secondary antibodies and pre-absorption test. At anorexia, FI decreased (P anorexia, concomitant with an increase in FI, were probably mediated by omega-3FA inhibition of tumor-induced cytokines.

  11. Characteristics of plasmas imploded by. omega. , 2. omega. , 3. omega. and 4. omega. lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, T.; Mochozuki, T.; Azechi, H.

    1986-02-01

    The wavelength scalings of soft X-ray and hot electron generation efficiencies were studied using 1.05, 0.53, 0.35 and 0.26 ..mu..m lasers. A coupling efficiency from absorbed laser energy to compressed fuel core of 4.5% was obtained by using the GEKKO XII green laser.

  12. Enrichment of foods with omega-3 fatty acids: A multidisciplinary challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Enrichment of foods with marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) poses a multidisciplinary challenge to food industry and academia. Although our knowledge about possible health effects of omega-3 PUFA has increased tremendously during the last 30 years, there is still a lot to be learned...... about these healthy fatty acids. Moreover, consumer acceptance and lipid oxidation of omega-3 PUFA-enriched food are other major challenges that the food industry meet when developing omega-3-enriched foods. Two examples on multidisciplinary research projects to overcome some of these challenges...... are given in this article together with cases studies illustrating how lipid oxidation can be prevented in a range of different omega-3-enriched foods....

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  14. The fratricide of alpha-Omega dynamos by their alpha-squared siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Context. Helically forced magneto-hydrodynamic shearing-sheet turbulence can support different large-scale dynamo modes, although the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is generally expected to dominate because it is the fastest growing. In an {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} dynamo, most of the field amplification is produced by the shear. As differential rotation is an ubiquitous source of shear in astrophysics, such dynamos are believed to be the source of most astrophysical large-scale magnetic fields. Aims. We study the stability of oscillatory migratory {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} type dynamos in turbulence simulations. Methods. We use shearing-sheet simulations of hydromagnetic turbulence that is helically forced at a wavenumber that is about three times larger than the lowest wavenumber in the domain so that both {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} and {\\alpha}2 dynamo action is possible. Results. After initial dominance and saturation, the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is found to be destroyed by an orthogonal {\\alpha}2 mode sustained by the helical t...

  15. Observation of the $\\Omega_{c}^{0}$ Charmed Baryon at CLEO

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin-Hennessy, D; Thorndike, E H; Savinov, V; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Gao, Y S; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Kostin, M A; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Gritsan, A; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Drell, P S; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Palmer, M; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Romano, A; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Viehhauser, G; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V

    2001-01-01

    The CLEO experiment at the CESR collider has used 13.7 fb$^{-1}$ of data to search for the production of the $\\Omega_c^0$ (css-ground state) in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 10.6$ {\\rm GeV}. The modes used to study the $\\Omega_c^0$ are $\\Omega^- \\pi^+$, $\\Omega^- \\pi^+ \\pi^0$, $\\Xi^- K^- pi^+ \\pi^+$, $\\Xi^0 K^- pi^+$, and $\\Omega^- \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$. We observe a signal of 40.4$\\pm$9.0(stat) events at a mass of 2694.6$\\pm$2.6(stat)$\\pm$1.9(syst) {\\rm MeV/$c^2$}, for all modes combined.

  16. Hadronic decay properties of newly observed $\\Omega_c$ baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic decay widths of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ have been calculated in a $^3P_0$ model. Our results indicate that $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ can be interpreted as the $1P-$wave $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ or $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{5}{2}^-)$. Though the measured masses of $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ are lower than existed theo...

  17. On positive solutions and the Omega limit set for a class of delay differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuge, Changjing; Lei, Jinzhi

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the positive solutions of a class of delay differential equations with two delays. These equations originate from the modeling of hematopoietic cell populations. We give a sufficient condition on the initial function for $t\\leq 0$ such that the solution is positive for all time $t>0$. The condition is "optimal". We also discuss the long time behavior of these positive solutions through a dynamical system on the space of continuous functions. We give a characteristic description of the $\\omega$ limit set of this dynamical system, which can provide informations about the long time behavior of positive solutions of the delay differential equation.

  18. (O)Mega Split

    CERN Document Server

    Benakli, Karim; Goodsell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We study two realisations of the Fake Split Supersymmetry Model (FSSM), the simplest model that can easily reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass for an arbitrarily high supersymmetry scale, as a consequence of swapping higgsinos for equivalent states, fake higgsinos, with suppressed Yukawa couplings. If the LSP is identified as the main Dark matter component, then a standard thermal history of the Universe implies upper bounds on the supersymmetry scale, which we derive. On the other hand, we show that renormalisation group running of soft masses above the supersymmetry scale barely constrains the model - in stark contrast to Split Supersymmetry - and hence we can have a "Mega Split" spectrum even with all of these assumptions and constraints, which include the requirements of a correct relic abundance, a gluino life-time compatible with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and absence of signals in present direct detection experiments of inelastic dark matter. In an appendix we describe a related scenario, ...

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content in Various Tissues of Different Persian Gulf Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Zibaee Nezhad

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fatty acids of omega-3 family have high nutritional value and can prevent coronary heart disease.These fatty acids are found in various fish and sea foods. To investigate the level of omega-3 fatty acids indifferent kind of fish head, muscle and liver from 30 species of fish collected from Persian Gulf.Material and Methods: In this experimental study, the fish were collected by hunting from Boushehr and Hormozgansea ports. Their head, muscle and liver fatty acids were determined on their methylated fatty acids dissolvedin N-hexin. Quantitative analysis of fatty acids was performed by gas chromatography (GC with methylmyristateused as the reference material in this analysis and the qualitative analysis of fatty acids was done bygas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC- mass and cod liver oil which contained all of omega-3 fattyacids used as standard.Results: Our study showed that some fish were good sources of omega-3 fatty acids and Trout (Ghezel-ALA,Bartail flathead (Zaminkan-e-domnavari, Malabar blood snapper (Sorkhoo malabari had maximum levels ofomega-3 in all body tissues. Other types of fish were rich in omega 3 fatty acids in separate organs, such as liverin Bartail flathead (Zaminkan-e-domnavari, head in Sillago Sihama (Shoort and muscle in Trout (Ghezel-ALA. In contrast, lesser amount of omega 3 fatty acids is found in tissues of other species of fish such as Silverpomfret (Halva sefid, Longfin trevally (Gish-e-derazbale and Xiphophorus Hellerii (Dom-shamshiri.Conclusion: This research showed that the liver of fish had the highest level of omega-3 fatty acids and fish musclecontained more omega-3 fatty acids than the head. Thus for having maximum levels of omega-3 fatty acids inthe diet, all fish tissues can be served. As liver and head of fish are not usually consumed, it is recommended thatsuch organs be used for preparation of omega 3-containing cardio supportive supplements.

  20. Testing the Difference between Reliability Coefficients Alpha and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lifang; Chan, Wai

    2017-01-01

    Reliable measurements are key to social science research. Multiple measures of reliability of the total score have been developed, including coefficient alpha, coefficient omega, the greatest lower bound reliability, and others. Among these, the coefficient alpha has been most widely used, and it is reported in nearly every study involving the…

  1. Universal graphs at $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a supercompact cardinal we build a model in which $2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1}}=2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}}=\\aleph_{\\omega_1+3}$ but there is a jointly universal family of size $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+2}$ of graphs on $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$. The same technique will work for any uncountable cardinal in place of $\\omega_1$.

  2. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters+{alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) III. H{sub m}{sup E}andV{sub m}{sup E} for 20 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}C{sub 4}H{sub 9}+(1-x){alpha},{omega}-ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl{r_brace}, where u=1 to 4, {alpha}=1 and v={omega}=2 to 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)]. E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Marrero, E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Toledo, F.J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    In this article, the experimental data of excess molar enthalpies H{sub m}{sup E} and excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E} are presented for a set of 20 binary mixtures comprised of the first four butyl alkanoates (methanoate to butanoate) and five {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes (1,2-dichloroethane to 1,6-dichlorohexane), obtained at atmospheric pressure and at a temperature of 298.15K. The results indicate the existence of specific interactions between both kinds of compounds resulting in exothermic processes for most mixtures, except for those containing butyl methanoate which give rise to net endo/exothermic effects. The V{sub m}{sup E} are positive for mixtures of (butyl esters+1,2-dichloroethane or 1,3-dichloropropane) and negative for the remaining ones. The change in H{sub m}{sup E} with the dichloroethane chain length for a same ester is regular although the V{sub m}{sup E} presents an irregular variation. It can, therefore, be deuced from this that the mixing process involves both effects, exothermic/endothermic and expansion/contraction, simultaneously. The behaviour of the mixtures is interpreted on the basis of the results observed and attributed to different effects taking place among the molecules studied. To improve application of the UNIFAC model using the version of Dang and Tassios, average values were recalculated again for parameters of the ester/chloride interaction, distinguishing, during its application, the functional group of the acid part of the ester. In spite of this, the model does not adequately reproduce the systems' behaviour.

  3. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for cardiovascular diseases: present, past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies on Greenlandic, Canadian and Alaskan Eskimos have examined the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids consumed as part of the diet, and found statistically significant relative reduction in cardiovascular risk in people consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Areas covered: This article reviews studies on omega-3 fatty acids during the last 50 years, and identifies issues relevant to future studies on cardiovascular (CV) risk. Expert commentary: Although a meta-analysis of large-scale prospective cohort studies and randomized studies reported that fish and fish oil consumption reduced coronary heart disease-related mortality and sudden cardiac death, omega-3 fatty acids have not yet been shown to be effective in secondary prevention trials on patients with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The ongoing long-term CV interventional outcome studies investigate high-dose, prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids. The results are expected to clarify the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in reducing CV risk. The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids are also important. Future clinical trials should also focus on the role of these anti-inflammatory mediators in human arteriosclerotic diseases as well as inflammatory diseases.

  4. Influences of process parameters on preparation of microparticle used as a carrier system for omega - 3 unsaturated fatty acid ethyl esters used in supplementary nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, A; Schäfer, U; Lehr, C M

    2001-01-01

    Microparticles were prepared by complex coacervation to encapsulate eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (EPA-EE) for incorporation into foods as a nutrition supplement. Gelatin and acacia were used in the coacervation process. With an increasing oil/polymer ratio, both yield and encapsulation rate decreased; with an increasing homogenization time, the yield remained constant while the encapsulation rate slightly increased. Several particle hardening techniques were examined and their influence on particle structure, yield and encapsulation rate were examined. Ethanol hardening was compared to cross-linking with dehydroascrobic acid with respect to both yield and encapsulation rate. The particle diameters for both formulations were similar (ethanol: 38.4 +/- 4.1 microm; cross-linking: 41.8 +/- 3.0 microm). Spray-drying of the coacervates led to the smallest particles (5.2 +/- 1.1 microm), lowest yield and encapsulation rate. All microencapsulation products were assayed for their storage stability over 4 weeks with respect to the oxidation of the encapsulated omega - 3 unsaturated fatty acid ester inside the particles. Hardening with ethanol showed the lowest amount of peroxides: particle wall cross-linking by dehydroascorbic acid and spray-drying were observed to be less protective. All microparticles were characterized for their internal structure with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) after fluorescence labelling of the polymers, in order to localize the oil phase and visualize the distribution of the polymers in the coacervates. With increasing homogenization time, the internal structure changed stepwise from a capsule structure (core/wall) towards a matrix structure. For all experiments, a homogeneous distribution for both polymers, gelatin and acacia was observed inside the particle wall. No influence of the different particle hardening procedures on the polymer distribution was found.

  5. Omega-3 fats: Good for your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fat . We need these fats to build brain cells and for other important functions. Omega-3s help keep your heart healthy and protected against stroke. They also help improve your heart health ...

  6. Reduction of omega-3 oil oxidation in stable emulsion of caseinate-omega-3 oil-oat beta-glucan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipid oxidation, particularly oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 fatty acids, has posed a serious challenge to the food industry trying to incorporate heart-healthy oil products into their lines of healthful foods and beverages. In this study, heart healthy plant and marine based o...

  7. 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} high precision transportable setup to calibrate multifunction electrical instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, P P

    2015-01-01

    A temperature controlled 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} standard Resistors transportable setup was developed at National Institute of Metrological Research, (INRIM) for the calibration and adjustment of multifunction electrical instruments. The two Standards consist respectively of two 10 {\\Omega} and 100 k{\\Omega} parallel connected resistors nets inserted in a temperature controlled aluminium box. Novelty of the realization is the oil insertion of the 1 {\\Omega} net with its internal connectors lowering the thermo-electromotive forces (emfs) effects. Short and mid-term stabilities of the setup Standards resulted on the order and in some cases better than other top level 1 {\\Omega} and 10 k{\\Omega} commercial Standards. The transport effect turning off the setup temperature control did not cause appreciable measurement deviations on the two Standards. The Standards uncertainties meet those requested by DMMs and MFCs manufacturers to calibrate and adjust these instruments. A test to adjust a multifunction calibrator...

  8. M 54 + Sagittarius = omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, E; Gratton, R G; Lucatello, S; Bellazzini, M; Catanzaro, G; Leone, F; Momany, Y; Piotto, G; D'Orazi, V

    2010-01-01

    We derive homogeneous abundances of Fe, O, Na and alpha-elements from high resolution FLAMES spectra for 76 red giant stars in NGC 6715 (M 54) and for 25 red giants in the surrounding nucleus of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy. Our main findings are that: (i) we confirm that M 54 shows intrinsic metallicity dispersion, ~0.19 dex r.m.s.; (ii) when the stars of the Sgr nucleus are included, the metallicity distribution strongly resembles that in omega Cen; the relative contribution of the most metal-rich stars is however different in these two objects; (iii) in both GCs there is a very extended Na-O anticorrelation, signature of different stellar generations born within the cluster, and (iv) the metal-poor and metal-rich components in M 54 (and omega Cen) show clearly distinct extension of the Na-O anticorrelation, the most heavily polluted stars being those of the metal-rich component. We propose a tentative scenario for cluster formation that could explain these features. Finally, similarities and differen...

  9. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Treatment on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Insulin resistance (IR is a common pathogenic factor of several diseases: diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, etc. There are many therapeutic factors involved in decreasing IR. Among them we mention metformin, pioglitazone, physical activity, weight loss, diet, etc. In the last decade, there are more observations of the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on IR. The most powerful seem to be omega-3 fatty acids. In our study, we wanted to asses if the administration of omega-3 fatty acids is involved in modifying IR. Materials and methods: We evaluated 126 diabetic patients with IR from January 2011 until July 2014. The study was open-label and non-randomized. For the determination of IR we used the HOMA-IR method. Results: For both males and females there was a regression of HOMA-IR during the 4 weeks of treatment with omega-3 and also after 2 weeks after stopping the administration of these fatty acids. The decrease of HOMA-IR was statistically significant (p<0.05. The statistic result observed in the next 2 weeks after stopping administration of omega-3 was also significant (p<0.05.

  10. Golden Jubilee photos: The Alpha and the OMEGA

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In 1972, the OMEGA spectrometer was commissioned in the West Area and more than a million collisions were recorded that very first year. OMEGA was equipped with spark chambers - replaced at the end of the 1970s by electronic detectors - and a 15 000-tonne superconducting magnet. On this photo we can see the magnet's lower coil and, in the foreground, the support plate for the upper coil. No fewer than 48 experiments made use of this device, exploiting beams of various particles at various energies - from the PS at the beginning, and then from the highest energy beams of the SPS. OMEGA thus played a key role in many physics results and activities, notably the production of the J/psi particle, the study of particles carrying charm or beauty quarks, the study of «gluonia», and the CERN heavy ion programme. The OMEGA experiments ceased in 1996 when the facilities in the West Hall were shut down in preparation for the construction of the LHC.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-05-04

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-κB-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids: a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, G; Franceschi, F; Bibbò, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of gastric barrier derives from the balance between defending and damaging factors. In particular, prostaglandins play a relevant role in the maintenance of gastric homeostasis and prevention of peptic disease, at different levels. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentanoic acid, are the precursors of the third series of prostaglandins (with anti-inflammatory properties), also reducing the formation of the second series of prostaglandins (pro-inflammatory ones). Such a pathophysiological rationale brought to the experimental application, both in animal models and, more recently, in humans, of omega-3 fatty acids against gastrointestinal damage. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown interesting results in preventing different types of gastric damage in mouse models. A large retrospective case-control study on patients taking both anti-thrombotic therapy and eicosapentanoic acid showed (although only at unadjusted analysis) an inverse correlation between consumption of eicosapentanoic acid and gastrointestinal injury. Prospective, well-designed, comparative studies are warranted to clarify if omega-3 fatty acids may represent, or not, a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

  13. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given.......There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take...

  14. Genetic relationship of Sardinella lemuru from lombok strait with fish rich in omega-3 fatty acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrus; Sumitro, Sutiman Bambang; Utomo, Didik Huswo; Sartimbul, Aida; Toha, Abdul Hamid; Widodo, Nashi

    2012-01-01

    Lombok Strait has abundance of Sardine, Sardinella lemuru, which contains such high amount of omega-3 fatty acid (omega-3). However, the genetic relationship of S. lemuru with other commercial fish rich in omega-3 has not been widely studied yet. Studies on genetic proximity of S. lemuru with the other marine fish using 12S rRNA gene is very important in order to obtain genetic information of the Sardine to develop an appropriate strategy for future conservation of the fish in Lombok Strait. The aim of this study was to find out the genetic relationship of Sardinella lemuru living in Lombok Strait with the economically valuable fish and its correlation with omega-3 production. Sardinella lemuru were collected from Lombok Strait, the phylogenetic tree was done based on 12S rRNA gene through a neighbor-joining method to identify the relationship of Sardines and fish rich in omega-3 fatty acid. The phylogenetic tree showed that Sardinella lemuru is similar to Sardinella aurita and has a close similarity with Sardinella maderensis. However, the relationship did not correspond to omega-3 production. Based on the results of the study, it is suggested that the production of omega-3 is not specifically based on the proximity of the species, but it is more associated with conserved domain of Δ6-desaturase. Nevertheless, detailed mechanisms still need to be elucidated.

  15. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxygenated metabolism in atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichardant, Michel; Calzada, Catherine; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Lagarde, Michel; Véricel, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials have reported the health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including a lower risk of coronary heart diseases. This review mainly focuses on the effects of alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on some risk factors associated with atherothrombosis, including platelet activation, plasma lipid concentrations and oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Special focus is given to the effects of marine PUFA on the formation of eicosanoids and docosanoids, and to the bioactive properties of some oxygenated metabolites of omega-3 PUFA produced by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. The antioxidant effects of marine omega-3 PUFA at low concentrations and the pro-oxidant effects of DHA at high concentrations on the redox status of platelets and LDL are highlighted. Non enzymatic peroxidation end-products deriving from omega-3 PUFA such as hydroxy-hexenals, neuroketals and EPA-derived isoprostanes are also considered in relation to atherosclerosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  17. Oxidation of Marine Omega-3 Supplements and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Albert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine omega-3 rich oils are used by more than a third of American adults for a wide range of purported benefits including prevention of cardiovascular disease. These oils are highly prone to oxidation to lipid peroxides and other secondary oxidation products. Oxidized oils may have altered biological activity making them ineffective or harmful, though there is also evidence that some beneficial effects of marine oils could be mediated through lipid peroxides. To date, human clinical trials have not reported the oxidative status of the trial oil. This makes it impossible to understand the importance of oxidation to efficacy or harm. However, animal studies show that oxidized lipid products can cause harm. Oxidation of trial oils may be responsible for the conflicting omega-3 trial literature, including the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The oxidative state of an oil can be simply determined by the peroxide value and anisidine value assays. We recommend that all clinical trials investigating omega-3 harms or benefits report the results of these assays; this will enable better understanding of the benefits and harms of omega-3 and the clinical importance of oxidized supplements.

  18. Do we need 'new' omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids formulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Morbini, Martino; Borghi, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    The therapeutic value of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), mainly (but not only) found in fish oils, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA and DHA, respectively), has been extensively studied in a wide variety of disease conditions, predominantly in cardiovascular disease. However, the significant difference in efficacy observed in various conditions with different dosages seems to be at least partly related to the large discrepancy in quality of the product and to the bioavailability of the omega-3 PUFA. The research of new sources (e.g., from arctic Krill oil) and pharmaceutical forms of omega-3 PUFA (e.g., omega-3 carboxylic acids) is needed in order to detect the one with the best bioavailability and efficacy, and with a parallel reduction in the production costs. There is also the need to understand if long-term PUFA supplementation could increase the efficacy of the already-available evidence-based therapies for cardiovascular disease prevention and for the management of the diseases where the use of PUFA could have a possible improving effect.

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Chronic Kidney Disease-Associated Pruritus: a Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Farnood, Farahnoosh; Noshad, Hamid; Lotfi, Mahsa; Gharekhani, Afshin

    2016-12-01

    Uremic pruritus remains one of the most tormenting, frequent and potentially disabling problem in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, an area of substantial etiological interest with relation to uremic pruritus is the essential fatty acids deficiency. So we performed a literature review to elucidate the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids on uremic pruritus. This review evaluated all of the studies published in English language, focusing on the clinical effects of omega-3 fatty acids on uremic pruritus. The literature review was conducted in December 2015 and carried out by searching Scopus, Medline, Cochrane central register of controlled trials, and Cochrane database of systematic reviews. The search terms were "kidney injury", "kidney failure", "chronic kidney disease", "end-stage renal disease", "dialysis", "hemodialysis", "peritoneal dialysis", "pruritus", "itch", "skin problems", "fish oil", "omega 3", "n-3 fatty acids", "polyunsaturated fatty acids", "docosahexaenoic acid", and "eicosapentaenoic acid". Four small studies investigating potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acids on symptoms of uremic pruritus were found. Among them, three small randomized controlled trials have shown a significant improvement in pruritus symptoms (evaluated by a standard questionnaire) in CKD patients who took omega-3 supplement compared to omega-6, omega-9, and placebo supplementation. Despite numerous limitations of the studies, it is worth noting that even minor reduction in itching symptoms may be clinically significant for CKD patients. Therefore, and considering multiple health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in advanced CKD and negligible risk profile, omega-3 intake can wisely be applied to CKD patients with uremic pruritus.

  20. Excited State Mass spectra of doubly heavy baryons $\\Omega_{cc}$, $\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum of $\\Omega$ baryon with two heavy quarks and one light quark (\\textit{ccs, bbs and bcs}). The main goal of the paper is to calculate the ground state masses and after that, the positive and negative parity excited states masses are also obtained within a Hypercentral Constituent quark model, using coulomb plus linear potential framework. We also added first order correction to the potential. The mass spectra upto 5S for radial excited states and 1P-5P, 1D-4D and 1F-2F states for orbital excited states are computed for $\\Omega_{cc}$, $\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$ baryons. Our obtained results are compared with other theoretical predictions which could be a useful complementary tool for the interpretation of experimentaly unknown heavy baryon spectra. The Regge trajectory is constructed in both ($n_r$, $M^{2}$) and ($J$, $M^{2}$) planes for $\\Omega_{cc}$,$\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$ baryons and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Magnetic moments of doubly heavy $\\...

  1. Effectiveness and tolerability of dietary supplementation with a combination of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants in the treatment of dry eye symptoms: results of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleñik A

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea OleñikOn behalf of the Dry Eye Clinical Study Group (DECSGOphthalmology Department, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, SpainBackground: We assessed the effectiveness and tolerability of a dietary supplement based on the combination of omega-3 essential fatty acids and antioxidants on dry eye-related symptoms.Methods: A total of 905 patients (72% women, median age 60 years with dry eye syndrome and using artificial tears to relieve symptoms participated in an open-label prospective intervention study. They were recruited during a routine ophthalmological appointment. Patients were instructed to take three capsules/day of the nutraceutical formulation (Brudysec® 1.5 g for 12 weeks. Dry eye symptoms (categorized as 0, none; 1, mild; 2, moderate; and 3, severe included scratchy and stinging sensation in the eyes, eye redness, grittiness, painful eyes, tired eyes, grating sensation, and blurry vision.Results: The mean intensity of dry eye symptoms varied from 1.1 (± standard deviation [SD] 0.9 for painful eyes to 2.0 (0.9 for grittiness, with a mean value of 11.9 (4.8 for all symptoms together. At week 12, all individual symptoms improved significantly (P<0.001. The mean value for all symptoms together decreased from a mean value of 11.9 (± SD 4.8 at baseline to 6.8 (± SD 4.5 after 12 weeks of treatment (P<0.001. There was a decrease in the percentage of patients in which dry eye symptoms predominated nearly all the time (53.5% versus 34.1%. A total of 68.1% of patients reported better tolerance to contact lenses after treatment. The mean number of daily instillations of artificial tears also decreased significantly (3.8 [± SD 1.6] versus 3.3 [± SD 1.6], P<0.001. A total of 634 patients (70.1% did not report any adverse events. In the remaining patients with adverse events, the most frequent was fish-tasting regurgitation in 13.5% of cases, followed by nausea in 4.9%, diarrhea in 1.3%, and vomiting in 0.3%.Conclusion: Dietary

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants in edible wild plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2004-01-01

    Human beings evolved on a diet that was balanced in the omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and was high in antioxidants. Edible wild plants provide alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and higher amounts of vitamin E and vitamin C than cultivated plants. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins, edible wild plants are rich in phenols and other compounds that increase their antioxidant capacity. It is therefore important to systematically analyze the total antioxidant capacity of wild plants and promote their commercialization in both developed and developing countries. The diets of Western countries have contained increasingly larger amounts of linoleic acid (LA), which has been promoted for its cholesterol-lowering effect. It is now recognized that dietary LA favors oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increases platelet response to aggregation. In contrast, ALA intake is associated with inhibitory effects on the clotting activity of platelets, on their response to thrombin, and on the regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. In clinical studies, ALA contributed to lowering of blood pressure, and a prospective epidemiological study showed that ALA is inversely related to the risk of coronary heart disease in men. Dietary amounts of LA as well as the ratio of LA to ALA appear to be important for the metabolism of ALA to longer-chain omega-3 PUFAs. Relatively large reserves of LA in body fat. as are found in vegans or in the diet of omnivores in Western societies, would tend to slow down the formation of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from ALA. Therefore, the role of ALA in human nutrition becomes important in terms of long-term dietary intake. One advantage of the consumption of ALA over omega-3 fatty acids from fish is that the problem of insufficient vitamin E intake does not exist with high intake of ALA from plant sources.

  3. Omega 3 fatty acids in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LC-PUFAs are thought to be important for normal dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. Depression is less prevalent in societies with high fish consumption, and depressed patients have significantly lower red blood cell ω-3 levels. Studies with ω-3 supplementation have led to controversial results. A significantly longer remission of bipolar symptomatology has been confirmed from a high-dose DHA and EPA mixture. Greater seafood consumption per capita has been connected with a lower prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders. Reduced levels of ω-6 and ω-3 PUFAs were found in patients with schizophrenia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175033 i br. 175022

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids and depression: scientific evidence and biological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Galvano, Fabio; Marventano, Stefano; Malaguarnera, Michele; Bucolo, Claudio; Drago, Filippo; Caraci, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    The changing of omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the food supply of Western societies occurred over the last 150 years is thought to promote the pathogenesis of many inflammatory-related diseases, including depressive disorders. Several epidemiological studies reported a significant inverse correlation between intake of oily fish and depression or bipolar disorders. Studies conducted specifically on the association between omega-3 intake and depression reported contrasting results, suggesting that the preventive role of omega-3 PUFA may depend also on other factors, such as overall diet quality and the social environment. Accordingly, tertiary prevention with omega-3 PUFA supplement in depressed patients has reached greater effectiveness during the last recent years, although definitive statements on their use in depression therapy cannot be yet freely asserted. Among the biological properties of omega-3 PUFA, their anti-inflammatory effects and their important role on the structural changing of the brain should be taken into account to better understand the possible pathway through which they can be effective both in preventing or treating depression. However, the problem of how to correct the inadequate supply of omega-3 PUFA in the Westernized countries' diet is a priority in order to set food and health policies and also dietary recommendations for individuals and population groups.

  5. Association between Blood Omega-3 Index and Cognition in Typically Developing Dutch Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge S. M. van der Wurff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs on cognition is heavily debated. In the current study, the possible association between omega-3 LCPUFAs in blood and cognitive performance of 266 typically developing adolescents aged 13–15 years is investigated. Baseline data from Food2Learn, a double-blind and randomized placebo controlled krill oil supplementation trial in typically developing adolescents, were used for the current study. The Omega-3 Index was determined with blood from a finger prick. At baseline, participants finished a neuropsychological test battery consisting of the Letter Digit Substitution Test (LDST, D2 test of attention, Digit Span Forward and Backward, Concept Shifting Test and Stroop test. Data were analyzed with multiple regression analyses with correction for covariates. The average Omega-3 Index was 3.83% (SD 0.60. Regression analyses between the Omega-3 Index and the outcome parameters revealed significant associations with scores on two of the nine parameters. The association between the Omega-3 Index and both scores on the LDST (β = 0.136 and p = 0.039, and the number of errors of omission on the D2 (β = −0.053 and p = 0.007. This is a possible indication for a higher information processing speed and less impulsivity in those with a higher Omega-3 Index.

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Depression: Scientific Evidence and Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Grosso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The changing of omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in the food supply of Western societies occurred over the last 150 years is thought to promote the pathogenesis of many inflammatory-related diseases, including depressive disorders. Several epidemiological studies reported a significant inverse correlation between intake of oily fish and depression or bipolar disorders. Studies conducted specifically on the association between omega-3 intake and depression reported contrasting results, suggesting that the preventive role of omega-3 PUFA may depend also on other factors, such as overall diet quality and the social environment. Accordingly, tertiary prevention with omega-3 PUFA supplement in depressed patients has reached greater effectiveness during the last recent years, although definitive statements on their use in depression therapy cannot be yet freely asserted. Among the biological properties of omega-3 PUFA, their anti-inflammatory effects and their important role on the structural changing of the brain should be taken into account to better understand the possible pathway through which they can be effective both in preventing or treating depression. However, the problem of how to correct the inadequate supply of omega-3 PUFA in the Westernized countries’ diet is a priority in order to set food and health policies and also dietary recommendations for individuals and population groups.

  7. Association between Blood Omega-3 Index and Cognition in Typically Developing Dutch Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wurff, Inge S. M.; von Schacky, Clemens; Berge, Kjetil; Zeegers, Maurice P.; Kirschner, Paul A.; de Groot, Renate H. M.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) on cognition is heavily debated. In the current study, the possible association between omega-3 LCPUFAs in blood and cognitive performance of 266 typically developing adolescents aged 13–15 years is investigated. Baseline data from Food2Learn, a double-blind and randomized placebo controlled krill oil supplementation trial in typically developing adolescents, were used for the current study. The Omega-3 Index was determined with blood from a finger prick. At baseline, participants finished a neuropsychological test battery consisting of the Letter Digit Substitution Test (LDST), D2 test of attention, Digit Span Forward and Backward, Concept Shifting Test and Stroop test. Data were analyzed with multiple regression analyses with correction for covariates. The average Omega-3 Index was 3.83% (SD 0.60). Regression analyses between the Omega-3 Index and the outcome parameters revealed significant associations with scores on two of the nine parameters. The association between the Omega-3 Index and both scores on the LDST (β = 0.136 and p = 0.039), and the number of errors of omission on the D2 (β = −0.053 and p = 0.007). This is a possible indication for a higher information processing speed and less impulsivity in those with a higher Omega-3 Index. PMID:26729157

  8. Association between Blood Omega-3 Index and Cognition in Typically Developing Dutch Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wurff, Inge S M; von Schacky, Clemens; Berge, Kjetil; Zeegers, Maurice P; Kirschner, Paul A; de Groot, Renate H M

    2016-01-02

    The impact of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) on cognition is heavily debated. In the current study, the possible association between omega-3 LCPUFAs in blood and cognitive performance of 266 typically developing adolescents aged 13-15 years is investigated. Baseline data from Food2Learn, a double-blind and randomized placebo controlled krill oil supplementation trial in typically developing adolescents, were used for the current study. The Omega-3 Index was determined with blood from a finger prick. At baseline, participants finished a neuropsychological test battery consisting of the Letter Digit Substitution Test (LDST), D2 test of attention, Digit Span Forward and Backward, Concept Shifting Test and Stroop test. Data were analyzed with multiple regression analyses with correction for covariates. The average Omega-3 Index was 3.83% (SD 0.60). Regression analyses between the Omega-3 Index and the outcome parameters revealed significant associations with scores on two of the nine parameters. The association between the Omega-3 Index and both scores on the LDST (β = 0.136 and p = 0.039), and the number of errors of omission on the D2 (β = -0.053 and p = 0.007). This is a possible indication for a higher information processing speed and less impulsivity in those with a higher Omega-3 Index.

  9. Effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacanell Judit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We investigated the effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of a lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS. Methods The design was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study in our Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain. We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men and 2 women; mean age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score: 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40. Patients were randomized into 2 groups: Group A (n = 8 received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B.Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% ω-3; Group B (n = 8 received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT. Lipid emulsions were administered during 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. Measurements of the main hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters were made at baseline (immediately before administration of the lipid emulsions, every hour during the lipid infusion, at the end of administration, and six hours after the end of administration lipid infusion. Results No statistically significant changes were observed in the different hemodynamic values analyzed. Likewise, the gas exchange parameters did not show statistically significant differences during the study. No adverse effect attributable to the lipid emulsions was seen in the patients analyzed. Conclusion The lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids was safe and well tolerated in short-term administration to patients with ARDS. It did not cause any significant changes in hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. Trial registration ISRCTN63673813

  10. Measurements of $\\psi(2S)$ decays into $\\phi \\pi^0$, $\\phi \\eta$, $\\phi \\eta^{'}$, $\\omega \\eta$, and $\\omega \\eta^{'}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Zhe Wang; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-01-01

    Decays of the $\\psi(2S)$ into Vector plus Pseudoscalar meson final states have been studied with 14 million $\\psi(2S)$ events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions of $\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\eta$, $\\phi\\etap$, and $\\omega\\etap$, and upper limits of $\\psi(2S) \\rar \\phi\\piz$ and $\\omega\\eta$ are obtained: $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\eta) = 3.5 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\etap) = (3.3 \\pm 1.3 \\pm 0.7)\\times 10^{-5}$, and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\omega\\etap) = (3.1 \\pm 2.4 \\pm 0.7) \\times 10^{-5}$; and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\piz) < 0.3 \\times 10^{-5}$, and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\omega\\eta) < 1.1 \\times 10^{-5}$ at the 90 % C.L.. These results are used to test the pQCD ``12% rule''.

  11. Oral supplementation with a nutraceutical formulation containing omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants in a large series of patients with dry eye symptoms: results of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatell-Tortajada J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Gatell-TortajadaOn behalf of the Large Dry Eye Clinical Study Group (LDECSGCornea and Ocular Surface Department, Institut Català de Retina, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: To assess the benefits and tolerability of a dietary supplement based on omega-3 fatty acids to relieve dry eye symptoms.Methods: A total of 1,419 patients (74.3% women, mean age 58.9 years with dry eye syndrome using artificial tears participated in a 12-week prospective study. Patients were instructed to take 3 capsules/day of the nutraceutical formulation (Brudysec® 1.5 g. Study variables were dry eye symptoms (scratchy and stinging sensation, eye redness, grittiness, painful and tired eyes, grating sensation, and blurry vision, conjunctival hyperemia, tear breakup time (TBUT, Schrimer I test, and Oxford grading scheme.Results: At 12 weeks, each dry eye symptom improved significantly (P<0.001, and the use of artificial tears decreased significantly from 3.77 (standard deviation [SD] =2.08 at baseline to 3.45 (SD =1.72 (P<0.01. In addition, the Schirmer test scores and the TBUT increased significantly, and there was an increase in patients grading 0–I in the Oxford scale and a decrease of those grading IV–V. Significant differences in improvements of dry eye symptoms were also found in compliant versus noncompliant patients as well as in those with moderate/severe versus none/mild conjunctival hyperemia.Conclusion: Oral ω-3 fatty acids supplementation was an effective treatment for dry eye symptoms.Keywords: dry eye symptoms, artificial tears, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, nutraceutical supplement, ocular inflammation, eye discomfort

  12. Influence of selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid on serum mineral profile and nutrient utilization of broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the effect of selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid on serum mineral profile and nutrient utilization of broiler chicken. Materials and Methods: The present study was a 2×3 factorial arrangement of two levels of selenomethionine (0 and 0.3 ppm and three levels of omega-3 fatty acid (0, 0.5 and 1%. Day-old Vencobb broiler chicks (n=180, were randomly assigned in six treatment groups. The experiment lasted for 42 days. Treatment groups followed of: Group I was a control. Group II, III, IV, V and VI were supplemented with 0 ppm selenomethionine with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid, 0 ppm selenomethionine with 1% omega-3 fatty acid, 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 0% omega-3 fatty acid, 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid and 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 1% omega-3 fatty acid, respectively. Linseed oil was used as a source of omega-3 fatty acid while sel-plex is used for selenomethionine supplementation. Results: Significant (p<0.05 interaction exist between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for serum zinc and iron concentration whereas, it was non-significant for serum calcium and copper. Significantly (p<0.05 increased concentration of selenium, zinc, iron and phosphorus was observed in birds fed 0.3 ppm selenomethionine whereas, significantly (p<0.05 increased zinc and iron was observed in birds fed 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid. There was significant (p<0.05 interaction exist between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for calcium and phosphorus retention percentage. The maximum retention of calcium and phosphorus was recorded in birds supplemented with 0.3 ppm selenomethionine in combination with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid. There was marked interaction between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for hemoglobin (Hb, total erythrocytic count, total leukocytic count and platelets (p<0.05 however, it was non-significant for mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb, MCH concentration

  13. The role of $f_0(1710)$ in the $\\phi \\omega$ threshold peak of $J/\\Psi \\to \\gamma \\phi \\omega$

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, A Martínez; Navarra, F S; Nielsen, M; Oset, E

    2013-01-01

    We study the process $J/\\Psi \\to \\gamma \\phi \\omega$, measured by the BES experiment, where a neat peak close to the $\\phi \\omega$ threshold is observed and is associated to a scalar meson resonance around 1800 MeV. We make the observation that a scalar resonance coupling to $\\phi \\omega$ unavoidably couples strongly to $K \\bar K$, but no trace of a peak is seen in the $K \\bar K$ spectrum of the $J/\\Psi \\to \\gamma K \\bar K$. This, reinforced by the negative results from a devoted Belle experiment in a related reaction, serves us to rule out the interpretation of the observed peak as a signal of a new resonance. After this is done, a thorough study is done on the production of a pair of vector mesons and how its unavoidable interaction leads necessarily to a peak in the $J/\\Psi \\to \\gamma \\phi \\omega$ reaction close to the $\\phi \\omega$ threshold, due to the dynamical generation of the $f_0(1710)$ resonance by the vector-vector interaction. We then show that both the shape obtained for the $\\phi \\omega$ mass d...

  14. Exposure to omega-3 fatty acids at early age accelerate bone growth and improve bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Netta; Simsa-Maziel, Stav; Shahar, Ron; Schwartz, Betty; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2014-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) are essential nutritional components that must be obtained from foods. Increasing evidence validate that omega-3 FAs are beneficial for bone health, and several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate their effects on bone, including alterations in calcium absorption and urinary calcium loss, prostaglandin synthesis, lipid oxidation, osteoblast formation and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. However, to date, there is scant information regarding the effect of omega-3 FAs on the developing skeleton during the rapid growth phase. In this study we aim to evaluate the effect of exposure to high levels of omega-3 FAs on bone development and quality during prenatal and early postnatal period. For this purpose, we used the fat-1 transgenic mice that have the ability to convert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and the ATDC5 chondrogenic cell line as models. We show that exposure to high concentrations of omega-3 FAs at a young age accelerates bone growth through alterations of the growth plate, associated with increased chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. We further propose that those effects are mediated by the receptors G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and hepatic nuclear factor 4α, which are expressed by chondrocytes in culture. Additionally, using a combined study on the structural and mechanical bone parameters, we show that high omega-3 levels contribute to superior trabecular and cortical structure, as well as to stiffer bones and improved bone quality. Most interestingly, the fat-1 model allowed us to demonstrate the role of maternal high omega-3 concentration on bone growth during the gestation and postnatal period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids moderate effects of physical activity on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Regina L; Manuck, Stephen B; Bhattacharjee, Neha; Muldoon, Matthew F; Flory, Janine M; Erickson, Kirk I

    2014-07-01

    Greater amounts of physical activity (PA) and omega-3 fatty acids have both been independently associated with better cognitive performance. Because of the overlapping biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids and PA, fatty acid intake may modify the effects of PA on neurocognitive function. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining whether the ratio of serum omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid levels would moderate the association between PA and executive and memory functions in 344 participants (Mean age=44.42 years, SD=6.72). The Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ), serum fatty acid levels, and performance on a standard neuropsychological battery were acquired on all subjects. A principal component analysis reduced the number of cognitive outcomes to three factors: n-back working memory, Trail Making test, and Logical Memory. We found a significant interaction between PA and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid serum levels on Trail Making performance and n-back performance, such that higher amounts of omega-3 levels offset the deleterious effects of lower amounts of PA. These effects remained significant in a subsample (n=299) controlling for overall dietary fat consumption. There were no significant additive or multiplicative benefits of higher amounts of both omega-3 and PA on cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids might mitigate the effect of lower levels of PA on cognitive performance. This study illuminates the importance of understanding dietary and PA factors in tandem when exploring their effects on neurocognitive health.

  16. Renal-protective and ameliorating impacts of omega-3 fatty acids against aspartame damaged MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Veerappan, Muthuviveganandavel; Mistry, Bhupendra; Patel, Rahul; Moon, So Hyun; Nagajyothi, Patnamsetty Chidanandha; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2017-09-07

    Aspartame is widely used artificial sweeteners as food additives. Several researchers have pointed that the controversial report on the use of aspartame over more than decades. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential and unsaturated fatty acids, and it plays a remarkable role in vision, intelligence, neural development, and metabolism of neurotransmitters. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on aspartame treated renal cells. Experimental groups were divided into three such as sham control, aspartame treated, and aspartame with omega-3 fatty acids. Cell viability was determined by sulforhodamine-b assay and flow cytometric analysis. The experimental results showed that the aspartame induced altered cell viability were reduced following treatment of aspartame with omega-3 fatty acids. Altered cell morphology was recovered by omega-3 fatty acids. DNA damage appeared in the highest concentration of aspartame used in this study. DNA damage characteristics such as comet tail and tiny head sections did not appear in the omega-3 fatty acids treated cells. Several microvilli and vesicular structures were found in aspartame treated cells. Altered morphology such as rounding, microvilli, and formation of dome-like structures did not appear in the omega-3 fatty acids with aspartame treated cells. Caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression were increased in aspartame treated cells, and these levels were reduced following omega-3 fatty acids treatment. Taking all these data together, it is suggested that the omega-3 fatty acids may be a therapeutic agent to reduce the aspartame induced biochemical and morphological alterations in normal renal cells. © 2017 BioFactors, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Bioavailability of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling

    2008-01-01

    Increasing recognition of the importance of the omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) has caused greater attention about dietary intake of these fatty acids. Fatty fish is the major dietary source of these fatty acids. Because of the low intake of fish at many places, foods...... enriched with omega-3 LCPUFA can be good alternatives to improve the intake of these fatty acids. Effects of lipid structures and food matrices on bioavailability of omega-3 LCPUFA have been investigated. Short term studies showed that both lipid structure and food matrix affect the bioavailability...

  18. The reactions $pn \\to d\\omega$ and $pn \\to d\\phi$ near threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, K; Speth, J

    2001-01-01

    The reactions p+n-->d+omega and p+n-->d+phi are studied within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. Predictions for the total cross sections and for the angular distributions of the vector mesons are presented. The resulting cross sections near threshold are around 10 - 30 microb for p+n-->d+omega$ and 200 - 250 nb for p+n-->d+phi. A moderate deviation of the cross section ratio sigma_{p+n-->d+phi} / sigma_{p+n-->d+omega} from that of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule is predicted.

  19. Automatic Detection of Omega Signals Captured by the Poynting Flux Analyzer (PFX) on Board the Akebono Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Suarjaya, I Made Agus Dwi; Goto, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The Akebono satellite was launched in 1989 to observe the Earth's magnetosphere and plasmasphere. Omega was a navigation system with 8 ground stations transmitter and had transmission pattern that repeats every 10 s. From 1989 to 1997, the PFX on board the Akebono satellite received signals at 10.2 kHz from these stations. Huge amounts of PFX data became valuable for studying the propagation characteristics of VLF waves in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. In this study, we introduce a method for automatic detection of Omega signals from the PFX data in a systematic way, it involves identifying a transmission station, calculating the delay time, and estimating the signal intensity. We show the reliability of the automatic detection system where we able to detect the omega signal and confirmed its propagation to the opposite hemisphere along the Earth's magnetic field lines. For more than three years (39 months), we detected 43,734 and 111,049 signals in the magnetic and electric field, respectively, and demons...

  20. Automatic Detection of Omega Signals Captured by the Poynting Flux Analyzer (PFX on Board the Akebono Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Agus Dwi Suarjaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Akebono satellite was launched in 1989 to observe the Earth’s magnetosphere and plasmasphere. Omega was a navigation system with 8 ground stations transmitter and had transmission pattern that repeats every 10 s. From 1989 to 1997, the PFX on board the Akebono satellite received signals at 10.2 kHz from these stations. Huge amounts of PFX data became valuable for studying the propagation characteristics of VLF waves in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. In this study, we introduce a method for automatic detection of Omega signals from the PFX data in a systematic way, it involves identifying a transmission station, calculating the delay time, and estimating the signal intensity. We show the reliability of the automatic detection system where we able to detect the omega signal and confirmed its propagation to the opposite hemisphere along the Earth’s magnetic field lines. For more than three years (39 months, we detected 43,734 and 111,049 signals in the magnetic and electric field, respectively, and demonstrated that the proposed method is powerful enough for the statistical analyses.

  1. Important bioactive properties of omega-3 fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Xu

    2015-01-01

    Good health has been linked with healthy diet. N-3 fatty acids are required for proper functioning of many physiological systems. There is a large body of evidence documenting the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids with the first double bond at the third position from methyl-terminal on health benefits. Scientific evidence is accumulating to substantiate the role omega-3 fatty acids play in conditions such as cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and other diseases. The availability of ...

  2. Solar system constraints on asymptotically flat IR modified Horava gravity through light deflection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Molin; Yu, Benhai; Lu, Jianbo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the motion of photons around a Kehagias-Sfetsos (KS) black hole and obtain constraints on IR modified Ho$\\check{r}$ava gravity without cosmological constant ($\\sim \\Lambda_{W}$). An analytic formula for the light deflection angle is obtained. For a propagating photon, the deflection angle $\\delta \\varphi$ increases with large values of the Ho$\\check{r}$ava gravity parameter $\\omega$. Under the UV limit $\\omega \\longrightarrow \\infty$, deflection angle reduces to the result of usual Schwarzschild case, $4GM/R$. It is also found that with increasing scale of astronomical observation system the Ho$\\check{r}$ava-Lifshitz gravity should satisfy $|\\omega M^2|>1.1725 \\times10^{-16}$ with $12%$ precision for Earth system, $|\\omega M^2| > 8.27649 \\times 10^{-17}$ with $17%$ precision for Jupiter system and $|\\omega M^2| > 8.27650\\times 10^{-15}$ with $0.17%$ precision for solar system.

  3. Omega-3脂肪酸对颈动脉粥样硬化患者血管内皮功能影响的临床研究%Clinical Study on the effect of Omega- 3 fatty acids on Endothelial Functions in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷宝玲; 张健

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨Omega-3不饱和脂肪酸对颈动脉粥样硬化患者血管内皮功能的影响.方法将40例经颈动脉超声证实存在颈动脉粥样硬化的患者随机分为常规治疗组(原有疾病治疗)和Omega-3治疗组(常规治疗+Omega-32250mg每日三次服用)观察4周,治疗前后测定血清内皮素(ET),一氧化氮(NO)及von Willebrand因子(vWF)的变化.结果常规治疗组:ET及NO及NO/ET指标组内治疗前后无明显差异(P>0.05),vWF指标较治疗前上升(P<0.05).Omega-3治疗组:ET,NO及NO/ET,vWF指标组内治疗前后存在差异(P<0.05).组间比较ET(P<0.01)NO(P=0.05),NO/ET(P<0.01)及VWF(P<0.05)治疗前后存在差异.结论Omega-3不饱和脂肪酸对存在动脉粥样硬化患者的血管内皮功能有一定的改善作用.

  4. Impact of the long chain omega-acylceramides on the stratum corneum lipid nanostructure. Part 1: Thermotropic phase behaviour of CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Doreen; Brezesinski, Gerald; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, is the main skin barrier. Ceramides (CERs) as the major constituent of the SC lipid matrix are of particular interest. At the moment, 11 classes of CERs are identified, but the effect of each single ceramide species is still not known. Therefore in this article, the thermotropic behaviour of the long chain omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] was studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] do not show a pronounced polymorphism which is observed for shorter chain ceramides as a significant feature. The phase behaviour of both ceramides is strongly influenced by the extremely long acyl-chain residue. The latter has a much stronger influence compared with the structure of the polar head group, which is discussed as extremely important for the appearance of a rich polymorphism. Despite the strong influence of the long chain, the additional OH-group of the phyto-sphingosine type CER[EOP] influences the lamellar repeat distance and the chain packing. The less polar sphingosine type CER[EOS] is stronger influenced by the long acyl-chain residue. Hydration is necessary for the formation of an extended hydrogen-bonding network between the polar head groups leading to the appearance of a long-periodicity phase (LPP). In contrast, the more polar CER[EOP] forms the LPP with densely packed alkyl chains already in the dry state.

  5. Synthesis of 15N omega-hydroxy-L-arginine and ESR and 15N-NMR studies for the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of enzymic nitric oxide formation from L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, B; Schnörwangen, E; Kämpchen, T; Mordvintcev, P; Mülsch, A

    1994-12-01

    N omega-Hydroxy-L-arginine (2) was prepared by a multi-stage synthesis; the key step was the addition of hydroxylamine to the protected cyanamide 8. The presence of N-hydroxyguanidines was confirmed, above all, by 15N-NMR investigations. 15N omega-Hydroxy-L-arginine (2) was converted quantitatively to 15NO by NO synthases from macrophages. 15NO was identified by ESR-spectroscopy. These experiments confirm that 15N omega-hydroxy-L-arginine (2) is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of NO from arginine (1) and that the N-hydroxylated N-atom is present in the NO formed.

  6. Baseline omega-3 index correlates with aggressive and attention deficit disorder behaviours in adult prisoners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Meyer

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence that the supplementation of omega-3 contributes to a decrease in aggressive behaviour in prison populations. A challenge of such research is achieving statistical power against effect sizes which may be affected by the baseline omega-3 index. There are no published data on the blood omega-3 index with studies of this kind to assess the variability of the blood omega-3 index in conjunction with aggression and attention deficit assessments.To determine if the variance of the omega-3 index is correlated with aggressive and attention deficit behaviour in a prison population.136 adult male prisoners were recruited from South Coast Correctional Centre (SCCC, NSW Australia. A 7 point categorisation was used to quantify levels of aggressive behaviour (4 weeks from individual SCCC case notes, whereby higher scores correspond to increasingly aggressive behaviour. Study participants completed the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ and the Brown's Attention Deficit Disorder Scales (BADDS, provided a blood sample for erythrocyte fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography and the omega-3 index was calculated.The baseline omega-3 index ranged from 2.3% to 10.3%, indicating that some participants already had substantial omega-3 intake, however a median of 4.7% indicated a lower overall omega-3 intake than the general Australian population. Assessment of aggressive and attention deficit behaviour shows that there were negative correlations between baseline omega-3 index and baseline aggression categorisation scores (r = -0.21, P = 0.016; total AQ score (r = -0.234, P = 0.011; Anger (r = -0.222 p = 0.016; Hostility AQ (r = -0.239, P = 0.009; indirect aggression (r = -0.188 p = 0.042; total BADDS (r = -0.263, p = 0.005; Activation (r = -0.224, p = 0.016; Attention (r = -0.192, p = 0.043; Effort (r = -0.253, p = 0.007; Affect (r = -0.330, p = 0.000 and Memory (r = -0.240, p = 0.010.There is a high variability in omega-3 status of a NSW prison

  7. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in early undifferentiated peripheral arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Evgeniyevich Karateev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the effect of a drug of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA in patients with early undifferentiated peripheral arthritis (UPA on the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the induction of remission, the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, the immunological manifestations of the disease during a 12-week follow-up. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 40 patients with UPA and a symptom duration of less than 12 months, who took nonsteroidal anti-inflamma tory drugs (NSAIDs and omega-3 PUFA (Vitrum Cardio Omega-3 as one capsule twice daily for 12 weeks. A control group comprised 20 patients with UPA receiving therapy with NSAIDs for 3 months. The groups did not differ significantly (p > 0.05 in age (42.98±10.81 and 48.25±13.92 years, the duration of symptoms (6.73±2.81 and 5.95±2.54 months, the number of patients positive for rheumatoid factor [14 (35% and 7 (35%] and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide [9 (22.5% and 7 (35%] patients, the duration of morning stiffness (35.6±25.82 and 37.0±19.15 min, the number of swollen (3.08±1.39 and 3.30±1.21 and tender (3.63±1.63 and 3.85±1.69 joints, and DAS 28 (4.21±0.65 and 4.35±0.63. Results. The use of omega-3 PUFA did not affect significantly the incidence of RA and the use of DMARDs. Clinical remission and low DAS28 were considerably observed in the study group patients, but no statistical significance was achieved. The dose of NSAIDs, including on-demand drugs, was decreased in 22 (55% and 4 (20% patients in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.013. At 12 weeks, the study group showed signifi cant reductions in the number of tender joints, the duration of morning stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, DAS 28, and interleukin 6 levels (p < 0.05; no significant changes were found in the control group. There were no significant differences in the frequency of undesirable events. Conclusion. Omega-3 PUFAs

  8. Potential Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on the Myogenic Program of Satellite Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Amritpal S; Putman, Charles T; Mazurak, Vera C

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle loss is associated with aging as well as pathological conditions. Satellite cells (SCs) play an important role in muscle regeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids are widely studied in a variety of muscle wasting diseases; however, little is known about their impact on skeletal muscle regeneration. The aim of this review is to evaluate studies examining the effect of omega-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid on the regulation of SC proliferation and differentiation. This review highlights mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may modulate the myogenic program of the stem cell population within skeletal muscles and identifies considerations for future studies. It is proposed that minimally three myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors, paired box 7 (Pax7), myogenic differentiation 1 protein, and myogenin, should be measured to confirm the stage of SCs within the myogenic program affected by omega-3 fatty acids.

  9. Celecoxib and omega-3 fatty acids alone and in combination with risperidone affect the behavior and brain biochemistry in amphetamine-induced model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed El-Sisi, Alaa; Sokkar, Samia Salem; El-Sayed El-Sayad, Magda; Sayed Ramadan, Ehab; Osman, Enass Yossef

    2016-08-01

    The implications of oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have been elucidated. Despite their effectiveness against positive symptoms of schizophrenia, antipsychotics have limited effectiveness against negative and cognitive symptoms and are associated with remarkable adverse effects. The use of celecoxib or omega-3 in schizophrenia may have beneficial effects. This study aimed to evaluate the possible efficacies of celecoxib, omega-3 or the combination of celecoxib+risperidone and omega-3+ risperidone compared to risperidone on the behavior and brain biochemistry in rats. In the present study, an amphetamine-induced model of schizophrenia in adult male rats was used to evaluate the effects of celecoxib, omega-3, celecoxib+risperidone and omega-3+ risperidone on the behavior of animals and on brain lipid peroxidation or tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In the water maze task, celecoxib, omega-3, celecoxib+risperidone, omega-3+ risperidone significantly decreased the latency time compared to amphetamine-treated group. Celecoxib, omega-3, celecoxib+risperidone, omega-3+risperidone also significantly reversed the decreased spontaneous alternation induced by amphetamine in the Y-maze task. In the social interaction task, groups treated with celecoxib, omega-3, celecoxib+risperidone, omega-3+ risperidone spent less time to recognize foreign animals than animals in the amphetamine-treated group. Increased brain MDA and TNF-α levels due to amphetamine were significantly reduced in groups treated with celecoxib+risperidone or omega-3+ risperidone. The present findings showed that celecoxib or omega-3 can attenuate amphetamine- induced behavioral impairment and these effects may be associated with their ability to decrease lipid peroxidation and cytokine release. Celecoxib or omega-3 may be promising candidates as adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia.

  10. Fish Oil and Microalga Omega-3 as Dietary Supplements: A Comparative Study on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in High-Fat Fed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimeur, Adil; Mimouni, Virginie; Ulmann, Lionel; Martineau, Anne-Sophie; Messaouri, Hafida; Pineau-Vincent, Fabienne; Tremblin, Gérard; Meskini, Nadia

    2016-09-01

    Dietary supplementation with marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) can have beneficial effects on a number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We compared the effects of two n-3 PUFA rich food supplements (freeze-dried Odontella aurita and fish oil) on risk factors for CVD. Male rats were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each and fed with the following diets: control group (C) received a standard diet containing 7 % lipids; second group (HF high fat) was fed with a high-fat diet containing 40 % lipids; third group (HFFO high fat+fish oil) was fed with the high-fat diet supplemented with 0.5 % fish oil; and fourth group (HFOA high fat+O. aurita) received the high-fat diet supplemented with 12 % of freeze-dried O. aurita. After 8 weeks rats fed with the high-fat diet supplemented with O. aurita displayed a significantly lower bodyweight than those in the other groups. Both the microalga and the fish oil significantly reduced insulinemia and serum lipid levels. O. aurita was more effective than the fish oil in reducing hepatic triacyglycerol levels and in preventing high-fat diet-induced steatosis. O. aurita and fish oil also reduced platelet aggregation and oxidative status induced by high fat intake. After an OA supplementation, the adipocytes in the HFOA group were smaller than those in the HF group. Freeze-dried O. aurita showed similar or even greater biological effects than the fish oil. This could be explained by a potential effect of the n-3 PUFA but also other bioactive compounds of the microalgae.

  11. Pattern of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and fish consumption and retinal vascular caliber in children and adolescents: A cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshtaghian, Hanieh; Flood, Victoria M.; Louie, Jimmy C. Y.; Liew, Gerald; Burlutsky, George; Mitchell, Paul

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether fish and long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCn-3 PUFA) consumption changed appreciably during adolescence. We also assessed whether these dietary variables are associated with retinal microvascular signs (possible markers of future cardiovascular disease risk). 633 children had dietary data at ages 12 and 17. Fish and LCn-3 PUFA [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Retinal vessel caliber was quantified from digital photographs using computer software. Mean energy-adjusted intakes (mg/day) of total LCn-3 PUFA, EPA, and DHA at age 12 were 297.1±261.1; 102.5±106.9; and 129.7±137.7, respectively; and this increased significantly at age 17 to: 347.0±324.0 (p<0.0001); 122.5±132.7 (p = 0.0001); and 160.3±171.4 (p <0.0001), respectively. Increasing quartiles of LCn-3PUFA intake were associated with widening of mean retinal arteriolar caliber among 17-year old girls ~3.9 μm (multivariable-adjusted P-trend = 0.001). Girls who consumed ≥2 serves of fish/week versus those who did not had ~2.1 μm wider retinal arterioles (p = 0.03). No associations were observed among boys or with retinal venules. Mean dietary intakes of LCn-3 PUFA increased during adolescence, but are still below recommended levels of consumption. These results suggest that LCn-3 PUFA and fish intake might have a beneficial influence. PMID:28192538

  12. OMEGA for the Future of Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    OMEGA: Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. To develop a photobioreactor (PBR) for growing algae (Oil, food, fertilizer) that does not compete with agriculture for land (deployed offshore), water or fertilizer (uses/treats wastewater).

  13. Lipidomics to Assess Omega 3 Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Visioli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available How can we resolve the conflict between the strong epidemiological evidence pointing to the usefulness of fish—and, thus, omega 3—consumption with the debacle of supplementation trials? One potential explanation is that the null results obtained thus far are the consequences of ill-contrived investigations that do not allow us to conclude on the effects (or lack thereof of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation. One potential solution is through the use of lipidomics, which should prove very useful to screen suitable patients and to correlate plasma (or red blood cells, or whole blood, or phospholipid fatty acid profile with outcomes. This has never been done in omega 3 trials. The wise use of lipidomics should be essential part of future omega 3 trials and would help in untangling this current riddle.

  14. The Effect Of Omega-3 Supplementation And Aerobic Exercise On Cardiovascular Risk Factors Lipid Profile Of Men Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Khademi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supplementation with omega-3 and 8 weeks of aerobic exercise on cardiovascular risk factors - vascular lipid profile in elderly men, respectively. Methods: In this present quasi-experimental study, 36 non athletic elderly men with the age range of 37/3 ± 37/57 years of age from Genaveh, Iran were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 9 (training + omega-3 supplements, training + placebo, omega-3 supplements and placebo groups. Aerobic exercise program for 8 weeks, 3 sessions per week, term (30 to 45 minutes and intensity of 55 to 70% Maximum heart rate was performed. Daily intake of omega-3 supplement was 2000. After 14 hours of fasting, blood samples before and 48 hours after the last study session were conducted. For data analysis, kolmogorov -smirnov-test, t-dependent, one-way ANOVA was used (p≤0/05. Results: After 8 weeks of training, TC levels of omega-3 supplements, omega-3 supplements, aerobic exercise and aerobic exercise with placebo significantly decreased (p≤0/05. But they were not significantly different in the placebo group (p≥0/05. Serum TG levels in groups supplemented with omega-3, aerobic training, supplementation with omega-3 a significant reduction was found (p≤0/05, but in the placebo group and aerobic training placebo, the reduction was not significant (p ≥0/05. Amounts of LDL-C were not significant in various groups (p ≥0/05. Levels of HDL-C in aerobic training, supplementation of omega-3 and aerobic training + placebo were significant (p≤0/05, but the omega-3 supplement and placebo groups showed no significant change (p ≥0/05. Changes in TC / HDL-C in the supplemental omega-3, aerobic training, supplementation of omega-3 and aerobic training + placebo a significant reduction was found (p≤0/05, but in the placebo group, no significant change was observed (p ≥0/05. Conclusion: Considering that aerobic training

  15. Important bioactive properties of omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Good health has been linked with healthy diet. N-3 fatty acids are required for proper functioning of many physiological systems. There is a large body of evidence documenting the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids with the first double bond at the third position from methyl-terminal on health benefits. Scientific evidence is accumulating to substantiate the role omega-3 fatty acids play in conditions such as cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and other diseases. The availability of n-3 fatty acids to various tissues is of major importance to health and depends on dietary intake for both normal development and in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.In this review we will summarize the biological properties of omega-3 fatty acids.

  16. Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-13

    We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

  17. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (pomega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids.

  19. Total dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids have modest effects on urinary sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total fat and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet may affect breast cancer risk by altering estrogen metabolism. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of differing total fat and omega-3 fatty acid content of diets on a panel of urinary estrogens and metabolites. A controlled, cross-ove...

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids' supplementation in Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canhada, Scheine; Castro, Kamila; Perry, Ingrid Schweigert; Luft, Vivian Cristine

    2017-05-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegeneration disorder characterized by progressive impairments of memory, language, reasoning, and other cognitive functions. Evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may act as a possible protection factor in AD. To evaluate the results available in the literature involving omega-3 fatty acids supplementation and its effect on cognitive function in AD patients. A systematic review of MEDLINE (from PubMed), Excerpta Medica Database, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Inclusion criteria consisted in original intervention studies, controlled by placebo, that assessed the impact of supplementation or dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids on cognitive function, in humans with AD, without limitation for prime date of publication. Initial search resulted in 361 articles. Seven studies fully met the inclusion criteria. Most studies did not find statistically significant results for the omega-3 fatty acids supplementation compared to placebo, and those who show some benefit do it only in a few cognitive assessment scales. However, the effects of omega-3 fatty acids appear to be most effectively demonstrated in patients with very mild AD. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in mild AD corroborate epidemiological observational studies showing that omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in disease onset, when there is slight impairment of brain function. Although some studies have shown changes in scales of cognitive function in more severe cases, they are not enough to support omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in the treatment of AD.

  1. The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on aggression: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajos, Jamie M; Beaver, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    Evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are important for a variety of mental health outcomes and have been shown to improve both mood and behaviors. However, there is little consensus on whether omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for reducing aggressive behaviors. The current study assesses the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and aggression. A total of 73 effect sizes were calculated among 40 studies involving 7173 participants from both intervention and observational research designs. Effect sizes were separately meta-analyzed for two-group comparison studies (SMD=0.20), pre-post contrast studies (ESsg=0.62), and associational studies (r=-0.06), in the fixed-effect model. Results from the random-effects model also suggest a range of effects of omega-3 fatty acids on reducing aggression (SMD=0.24; ESsg=0.82; r=-0.09). Patterns in the relationship between omega-3s and aggression were additionally observed. Moderator analyses indicated that the effect of omega-3s on aggression is conditioned by how aggressive behaviors are measured, such as through self-report or parent/teacher surveys.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of omega-3 & interferon alpha-2b administration on partial bladder outlet obstruction in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Fatih; Uluocak, Nihat; Erdemir, Fikret; Atilgan, Dogan; Markoc, Fatma; Parlaktas, Bekir Suha; Yasar, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: In bladder outlet obstruction-induced rat models, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and collagen ratios have been shown to be increased. Increased TGF-β leads to fibrosis. In this study, the effect of omega-3 and interferon alpha-2b (IFN α-2b) was investigated on oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis in bladder structure in a partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) rat model. Methods: A total of 35 male Wistar albino rats, weighing 300-350 g, were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into five groups. At the end of the experimental period, bladders were harvested from all the rats, and pathological analysis of the rat bladder tissues was performed. In addition, investigations were carried out with enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems to study the antioxidant properties of omega-3 fatty acid and IFN alpha-2b. Results: Increased bladder weight in the PBOO group, in comparison to the control group, was decreased by the administration of omega-3 and IFN α-2b (P=0.002). Significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were detected in group 2 in comparison to the control group. It was also detected that serum SOD, glutathione peroxidase and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly higher in group 2 when compared to the control group (P<0.05). In the pathologic evaluation, group 2 showed significantly increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to the control group. Omega-3 treatment significantly decreased inflammation. It was shown that IFN α-2b application partially decreased inflammation. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study showed that in addition to the standard primary approaches to prevent the damage to the upper urinary tract secondary to PBOO, omega-3 fatty acid and IFN α-2b could be beneficial as adjunct treatment in clinical practice. However, this needs to be further investigated with prospective, randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes

  3. Increased [omega]6-Containing Phospholipids and Primary [omega]6 Oxidation Products in the Brain Tissue of Rats on an [omega]3-Deficient Diet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul H Axelsen; Robert C Murphy; Miki Igarashi; Stanley I Rapoport

    2016-01-01

      Polyunsaturated fatty acyl (PUFA) chains in both the [omega]3 and [omega]6 series are essential for normal animal brain development, and cannot be interconverted to compensate for a dietary deficiency of one or the other...

  4. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters+{alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) II: H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E} for 25 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}C{sub 2}H{sub 5}+(1-x){alpha},{omega}-BrCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}B= r{r_brace}, where u=1 to 5, {alpha}=1 and v={omega}=2 to 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)]. E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Navas, A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Placido, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Toledo, F.J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    Excess molar enthalpies H{sub m}{sup E}, and excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E}, have been determined experimentally at constant conditions of atmospheric pressure and a temperature of T=298.15K, for a set of 25 binary mixtures, composed of ethyl alkanoate (methanoate to pentanoate) with each of the {alpha},{omega}-dibromoalkanes (1,2-dibromoethane to 1,6-dibromohexane), presenting the values of excess quantities Y{sub m}{sup E} as a function of the ester composition x. Most of the mixtures presented V{sub m}{sup E}>0, except those formed by 1,5-dibromopentane and 1,6-dibromohexane with propanoate, butanoate and ethyl pentanoate, for which V{sub m}{sup E}<0. The five mixtures of (ethyl methanoate+{alpha},{omega}-dibromoalkanes) are all endothermic, although, in the other systems this endothermicity decreases slightly with the increase in the ester acid chain length, producing sigmoidal curves that reflect exo/endothermic effects in the mixing process. The results are explained on the basis of a structural model that considers the existence of several effects, some positive and some negative, which produce the previously mentioned variations in excess quantities. In all cases, the experimental values are correlated with a suitable polynomial equation. Finally, predictions of H{sub m}{sup E} are made using two versions of the UNIFAC group contribution model. The version proposed by Dang and Tassios produces unacceptable estimations, while the version of Gmehling et al. produces results closer to experimentals.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids as treatments for mental illness: which disorder and which fatty acid?

    OpenAIRE

    Sieswerda Lee E; Seguin Jennifer; Ross Brian M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background A growing number of observational and epidemiological studies have suggested that mental illness, in particular mood disorders, is associated with reduced dietary intake and/or cellular abundance of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This has prompted researchers to test the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA in a range of different psychiatric disorders. We have critically reviewed the double blind placebo controlled clinical trials published prior to April 2007 to determi...

  6. The effect of omega-3 supplements on antioxidant capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Hajianfar; Zamzam Paknahad; Ahmad Bahonar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in which antioxidant capacity changes. Omega-3 fatty acids have extensive biological effects including their advantage on lipoprotein metabolism, platelet function, cytokine production, clotting, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements on antioxidant capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This clinical trial enrolled 71 women with type 2...

  7. Induction of CD3 delta epsilon omega by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Neisig, A; Wallin, H

    1993-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the synthesis, assembly and processing of the components of the T cell receptor (TcR) was studied with special focus on the CD3 omega chain. Treatment of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat with PMA increased the synthesis of the Ti alpha, CD......3 gamma and CG3 zeta chains two- to threefold and the synthesis of Ti beta and CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes five- to sevenfold as assessed by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by scanning densitometry. The amount...... of TcR complexes expressed on the cell surface was decreased after 16 h of PMA treatment. Based on these results we propose a role of CD3 omega in retention of TcR complexes. From PMA-treated CEM cells more than 50-fold the amount of CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes was immunoprecipitated as compared...

  8. Resveratrol and Omega 3 fatty acid: Its implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhuti B Kakoti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed at summarizing the major therapeutic roles of resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids along with their related pathways. This article reviews some of the key studies involving the health benefits of resveratrol and omega 3 fatty acids. Oxidative stress has been considered as one of the most important pathophysiological factor associated with various cardiovascular disease conditions. Resveratrol with the potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties has been proven to be a significantly protective compound in restoring the normal cardiac health. A plethora of research also demonstrated the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke, and their complications by omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish and fish oils. This review describes the potential cardioprotective role of resveratrol and omega 3 fatty acids in ameliorating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress.

  9. Uses and benefits of omega-3 ethyl esters in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Levantesi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Giacomo Levantesi, Maria Giuseppina Silletta, Roberto MarchioliLaboratory of Clinical Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: Much evidence on the favorable effects of omega-3 ethyl esters on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been obtained in studies performed in healthy subjects and in different clinical settings. Here the clinical effects of omega-3 ethyl ester administration in patients with previous myocardial infarction or heart failure are reviewed, together with a discussion of underlying mechanisms of action. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of omega-3 ethyl esters, as well as evidence concerning their safety and tolerability, are also reported.Keywords: omega-3 ethyl esters, myocardial infarction, heart failure

  10. Metabolites derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kim; Malick, Mandy; Madingou, Ness; Touchette, Charles; Bourque-Riel, Valérie; Tomaro, Leandro; Rousseau, Guy

    2015-12-15

    Although controversial, some data suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are beneficial to cardiovascular diseases, and could reduce infarct size. In parallel, we have reported that the administration of Resolvin D1 (RvD1), a metabolite of docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 PUFA, can reduce infarct size. The present study was designed to determine if the inhibition of two important enzymes involved in the formation of RvD1 from omega-3 PUFA could reduce the cardioprotective effect of omega-3 PUFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a diet rich in omega-3 PUFA during 10 days before myocardial infarction (MI). Two days before MI, rats received a daily dose of Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, PD146176, an inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase, both inhibitors or vehicle. MI was induced by the occlusion of the left coronary artery for 40min followed by reperfusion. Infarct size and neutrophil accumulation were evaluated after 24h of reperfusion while caspase-3, -8 and Akt activities were assessed at 30min of reperfusion. Rats receiving inhibitors, alone or in combination, showed a larger infarct size than those receiving omega-3 PUFA alone. Caspase-3 and -8 activities are higher in ischemic areas with inhibitors while Akt activity is diminished in groups treated with inhibitors. Moreover, the study showed that RvD1 restores cardioprotection when added to the inhibitors. Results from this study indicate that the inhibition of the metabolism of Omega-3 PUFA attenuate their cardioprotective properties. Then, resolvins seem to be an important mediator in the cardioprotection conferred by omega-3 PUFA in our experimental model of MI.

  11. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms to produce omega-3 very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yangmin; Wan, Xia; Jiang, Mulan; Hu, Chuanjiong; Hu, Hanhua; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-10-01

    Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have received growing attention due to their significant roles in human health. Currently the main source of these nutritionally and medically important fatty acids is marine fish, which has not met ever-increasing global demand. Microorganisms are an important alternative source also being explored. Although many microorganisms accumulate omega-3 LC-PUFAs naturally, metabolic engineering might still be necessary for significantly improving their yields. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of microorganisms for production of omega-3 LC-PUFAs, including eicospentaenoic acid and docosohexaenoic acid. Both reconstitution of omega-3 LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways and modification of existing pathways in microorganisms have demonstrated the potential to produce high levels of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. However, the yields of omega-3 LC-PUFAs in host systems have been substantially limited by potential metabolic bottlenecks, which might be caused partly by inefficient flux of fatty acid intermediates between the acyl-CoA and different lipid class pools. Although fatty acid flux in both native and heterologous microbial hosts might be controlled by several acyltransferases, evidence has suggested that genetic manipulation of one acyltransferase alone could significantly increase the accumulation of LC-PUFAs. The number of oleaginous microorganisms that can be genetically transformed is increasing, which will advance engineering efforts to maximize LC-PUFA yields in microbial strains.

  12. Technological trends and market perspectives for production of microbial oils rich in omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Mamani, Luis Daniel Goyzueta; Carvalho, Júlio Cesar de; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-08-10

    In recent years, foods that contain omega-3 lipids have emerged as important promoters of human health. These lipids are essential for the functional development of the brain and retina, and reduction of the risk of cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. The global market for omega-3 production, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), saw a large expansion in the last decade due to the increasing use of this lipid as an important component of infant food formulae and supplements. The production of omega-3 lipids from fish and vegetable oil sources has some drawbacks, such as complex purification procedures, unwanted contamination by marine pollutants, reduction or even extinction of several species of fish, and aspects related to sustainability. A promising alternative system for the production of omega-3 lipids is from microbial metabolism of yeast, fungi, or microalgae. The aim of this review is to discuss the various omega-3 sources in the context of the global demand and market potential for these bioactive compounds. To summarize, it is clear that fish and vegetable oil sources will not be sufficient to meet the future needs of the world population. The biotechnological production of single-cell oil comes as a sustainable alternative capable of supplementing the global demand for omega-3, causing less environmental impact.

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids in health and disease and in growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, A P

    1991-09-01

    Several sources of information suggest that man evolved on a diet with a ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids of approximately 1 whereas today this ratio is approximately 10:1 to 20-25:1, indicating that Western diets are deficient in omega 3 fatty acids compared with the diet on which humans evolved and their genetic patterns were established. Omega-3 fatty acids increase bleeding time; decrease platelet aggregation, blood viscosity, and fibrinogen; and increase erythrocyte deformability, thus decreasing the tendency to thrombus formation. In no clinical trial, including coronary artery graft surgery, has there been any evidence of increased blood loss due to ingestion of omega 3 fatty acids. Many studies show that the effects of omega 3 fatty acids on serum lipids depend on the type of patient and whether the amount of saturated fatty acids in the diet is held constant. In patients with hyperlipidemia, omega 3 fatty acids decrease low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol if the saturated fatty acid content is decreased, otherwise there is a slight increase, but at high doses (32 g) they lower LDL cholesterol; furthermore, they consistently lower serum triglycerides in normal subjects and in patients with hypertriglyceridemia whereas the effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) varies from no effect to slight increases. The discrepancies between animal and human studies most likely are due to differences between animal and human metabolism. In clinical trials eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the form of fish oils along with antirheumatic drugs improve joint pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; have a beneficial effect in patients with ulcerative colitis; and in combination with drugs, improve the skin lesions, lower the hyperlipidemia from etretinates, and decrease the toxicity of cyclosporin in patients with psoriasis. In various animal models omega 3 fatty acids decrease the number and size of tumors and increase the time

  14. Chronic Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Treatment Variably Affects Cellular Repolarization in a Healed Post-MI Arrhythmia Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Vargas-Pinto, Pedro; Baine, Stephen H.; Sridhar, Arun; Li, Chun; Billman, George E.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last 40 years omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to be anti-arrhythmic or pro-arrhythmic depending on the method and duration of administration and model studied. We previously reported that omega-3 PUFAs do not confer anti-arrhythmic properties and are pro-arrhythmic in canine model of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Here, we evaluated the effects of chronic omega-3 PUFA treatment in post-MI animals susceptible (VF+) or resistant (VF−) to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods: Perforated patch clamp techniques were used to measure cardiomyocyte action potential durations (APD) at 50 and 90% repolarization and short term variability of repolarization. The early repolarizing transient outward potassium current Ito was also studied. Results: Omega-3 PUFAs prolonged the action potential in VF− myocytes at both 50 and 90% repolarization. Short term variability of repolarization was increased in both untreated and treated VF− myocytes vs. controls. Ito was unaffected by omega-3 PUFA treatment. Omega-3 PUFA treatment attenuated the action potential prolongation in VF+ myocytes, but did not return repolarization to control values. Conclusions: Omega-3 PUFAs do not confer anti-arrhythmic properties in the setting of healed myocardial infarction in a canine model of SCD. In canines previously resistant to ventricular fibrillation (VF−), omega-3 PUFA treatment prolonged the action potential in VF− myocytes, and may contribute to pro-arrhythmic responses. PMID:27378936

  15. Monochromatic backlighting of direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bittle, W.; Delettrez, J. A.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Janezic, R. T.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Mileham, C.; McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Morse, S. F. B.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Shmayda, W. T.; Sorce, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2017-05-01

    Backlighting is a powerful technique to observe the flow of cold and dense material in high-energy-density-plasma experiments. High-performance, direct-drive cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions are a challenging backlighting configuration because of the low opacity of the DT shell, the high shell velocity, the small size of the stagnating shell, and the very bright self-emission of the hot core. A crystal imaging system with a Si Heα backlighter at 1.865 keV driven by ˜20-ps short pulses from OMEGA EP was developed to radiograph the OMEGA cryogenic implosions. The high throughput of the crystal imaging system makes it possible to record high-quality images with good photon statistics and a spatial resolution of ˜15 μm at 10% to 90% modulation. This imager has been used to study the evolution of preimposed mass-density perturbations in the ablator, to quantify the perturbations caused by the stalk that is used to mount the target, and to study the mix caused by laser imprint or small-scale debris on the target surface. Because of the very low opacity of DT relative to carbon, even 0.1% of mix of carbon into the DT ice can be reliably inferred from the images. With the current implosion designs, mix is only observed for an adiabat below α = 4.

  16. Developmentally dependent and different roles of fatty acids OMEGA-6 and OMEGA-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourek, J; Mourek, J

    2011-01-01

    The developmentally-dependent differences in the biological significances and effects of PUFA-OMEGA-6 (namely of arachidonic acid) and PUFA-OMEGA-3 (namely of docosahexaenoic acid) are discussed. The clinical results as well as developmental experiences are indicating a hypothesis of the evolution...

  17. Measurements of B meson decays to (omega)K* and (omega)(rho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; . Wright, D M; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R H; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Y G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn' ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Keith, D W . S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O' Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, H; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va' vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Collaboration, B

    2006-03-14

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K* and {omega}{rho} in 89 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV.

  18. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku;

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (P...

  19. Effective action for. omega. -> 3. pi. ,. omega. ->. pi gamma. and rho ->. pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golterman, M.F.L.

    1988-10-31

    It is argued that the decay widths for ..omega.. -> 3..pi.., ..omega.. -> ..pi gamma.. and rho -> ..pi gamma.. do not follow from the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action. An alternative effective action for these decays is constructed and its parameters are fitted to the experimental values of the widths.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Vitamin D in Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Güttler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary modification and supplementation play an increasingly important role in the conservative treatment of cardiovascular disease. Current interest has focused on n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and vitamin D. Clinical trial results on this subject are contradictory in many aspects. Several studies indicate that n-3 PUFA consumption improves vascular and cardiac hemodynamics, triglycerides, and possibly endothelial function, autonomic control, inflammation, thrombosis, and arrhythmia. Experimental studies show effects on membrane structure and associated functions, ion channel properties, genetic regulation, and production of anti-inflammatory mediators. Clinical trials evaluating a possible reduction in cardiovascular disease by n-3 PUFA have shown different results. Supplementation of vitamin D is common regarding prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. But vitamin D also seems to have several effects on the cardiovascular system. Vitamin D deficiency appears to be related to an increase in parathyroid hormone levels and can predispose to essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, increased insulin resistance, and eventually to atherosclerosis and adverse cardiovascular events. Randomized prospective clinical trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D and omega-3 FA supplementation therapy should be recommended as a routine therapy for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Vitamin D in Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, Norbert; Zheleva, Kirila; Parahuleva, Mariana; Chasan, Ridvan; Bilgin, Mehmet; Neuhof, Christiane; Burgazli, Mehmet; Niemann, Bernd; Erdogan, Ali; Böning, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Dietary modification and supplementation play an increasingly important role in the conservative treatment of cardiovascular disease. Current interest has focused on n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and vitamin D. Clinical trial results on this subject are contradictory in many aspects. Several studies indicate that n-3 PUFA consumption improves vascular and cardiac hemodynamics, triglycerides, and possibly endothelial function, autonomic control, inflammation, thrombosis, and arrhythmia. Experimental studies show effects on membrane structure and associated functions, ion channel properties, genetic regulation, and production of anti-inflammatory mediators. Clinical trials evaluating a possible reduction in cardiovascular disease by n-3 PUFA have shown different results. Supplementation of vitamin D is common regarding prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. But vitamin D also seems to have several effects on the cardiovascular system. Vitamin D deficiency appears to be related to an increase in parathyroid hormone levels and can predispose to essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, increased insulin resistance, and eventually to atherosclerosis and adverse cardiovascular events. Randomized prospective clinical trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D and omega-3 FA supplementation therapy should be recommended as a routine therapy for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23346457

  2. Neutron Measurements in Small MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is participating in laser-driven magnetized linear inertial fusion (MagLIF) research on the OMEGA Laser System in partnership with Sandia as part of ARPA-E's ALPHA Program. In the current OMEGA setup, a CH cylindrical tube filled with D2 gas is compressed by 40 laser beams, preheated by one of the beams, and an axial magnetic field is applied to limit electron heat loss. Two copper coils provide 10-T magnetic fields. A neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector has been designed, fabricated, and calibrated to diagnose primary D-D fusion neutron yield in the range of 1 ×107 to 5 ×109 and ion temperature from 2 to 8 keV. The design details and calibration results of these nTOF detectors will be presented together with neutron measurement results from recent laser-driven MagLIF experiments on OMEGA. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000568, and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Effect of Feeding Intensity and Milking System on Nutritionally Relevant Milk Components in Dairy Farming Systems in the North East of England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stergiadis, Sokratis; Leifert, Carlo; Seal, Chris J.;

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing concern that the intensification of dairy production reduces the concentrations of nutritionally desirable compounds in milk. This study therefore compared important quality parameters (protein and fatty acid profiles; α- tocopherol and carotenoid concentrations) in milk from...... four dairy systems with contrasting production intensities (in terms of feeding regimens and milking systems). The concentrations of several nutritionally desirable compounds (β-lactoglobulin, omega-3 fatty acids, omega-3/omega-6 ratio, conjugated linoleic acid c9t11, and/or carotenoids) decreased...... mainly linked to contrasting feeding regimens and that milking system and breed choice also contributed to differences in milk composition between production systems....

  4. Free-free transitions in a bichromatic field of frequencies $\\omega $ and $2\\omega$ at moderate field intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Cionga, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    Free-free transitions in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen scattering in a bichromatic field of frequencies $\\omega $ and $2\\omega $ are studied at moderate intensities for fast projectiles. A hybrid approach is used, in which the field-projectile interaction is described exactly but the field-target one is described by second order perturbation theory; the projectile-target interaction is treated in the first Born approximation. The adopted description of the target enables a consistent study of the leading process to each of the considered sidebands. Numerical results are presented for the angular distributions in a geometry and at frequencies for which the target dressing is important. The influence of the relative phase between the fields is investigated, too.

  5. Efficient production of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (sFat-1)-transgenic pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, DengKe; Zhang, Li; Zhou, YanRong; Feng, Chong; Long, Chuan; Liu, Xiao; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Jian; Lin, AiXing; Dong, EnQiu; Wang, ShuChen; Xu, HouGang; Chen, HongXing

    2010-04-01

    Omega-3(omega-3) fatty acid desaturase transgenic pigs may improve carcass fatty acid composition. The use of transgenic pigs is also an excellent large animal model for studying the role of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease and cancer. Transgenic pigs carrying synthesized fatty acid desaturase-1 gene (sFat-1) from Caenorhabditis briggsae by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were produced for the first time in China. Porcine fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with a sFat-1 expression cassette by the liposome-mediated method. Transgenic embryos were reconstructed by nuclear transfer of positive cells into enucleated in vitro matured oocytes. A total of 1889 reconstructed embryos were transferred into 10 naturally cycling gilts. Nine early pregnancies were established, 7 of which went to term. Twenty-one piglets were born. The cloning efficiency was 1.1% (born piglets/transferred embryos). The integration of the sFat-1 gene was confirmed in 15 live cloned piglets by PCR and Southern blot except for 2 piglets. Expression of the sFat-1 gene in 12 of 13 piglets was detected with RT-PCR. The data demonstrates that an efficient system for sFat-1 transgenic cloned pigs was developed, which led to the successful production of piglets expressing the sFat-1 gene.

  6. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Boehly, T. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Bonino, M. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Collins, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Craxton, R. S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Delettrez, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Edgell, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Epstein, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Follett, R. K. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Forrest, C. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yu. Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Harding, D. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Henchen, R. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Janezic, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kelly, J. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kessler, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kosc, T. Z. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Loucks, S. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marozas, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Maximov, A. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McCrory, R. L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Michel, D. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nora, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Radha, P. B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Regan, S. P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shmayda, W. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Short, R.W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shvydky, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Skupsky, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yaakobi, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  7. Omega 3 Chia seed loading as a means of carbohydrate loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illian, Travis G; Casey, Jason C; Bishop, Phillip A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Omega 3 Chia seed loading is a viable option for enhancing sports performance in events lasting >90 minutes and allow athletes to decrease their dietary intake of sugar while increasing their intake of Omega 3 fatty acids. It has been well documented that a high dietary carbohydrate (CHO) intake for several days before competition is known to increase muscle glycogen stores resulting in performance improvements in events lasting >90 minutes. This study compared performance testing results between 2 different CHO-loading treatments. The traditional CHO-loading treatment served as the control (100% cals from Gatorade). The Omega 3 Chia drink (50% of calories from Greens Plus Omega 3 Chia seeds, 50% Gatorade) served as the Omega 3 Chia loading drink. Both CHO-loading treatments were based on the subject's body weight and were thus isocaloric. Six highly trained male subjects V(O2)max 47.8-84.2 ml · kg(-1); mean (SD) of V(O2)max 70.3 ml · kg(-1) (13.3) performed a 1-hour run at ∼65% of their V(O2)max on a treadmill, followed by a 10k time trial on a track. There were 2 trials in a crossover counterbalanced repeated-measures design with a 2-week washout between testing sessions to allow the participants to recover from the intense exercise and any effects of the treatment. There was no statistical difference (p = 0.83) between Omega 3 Chia loading (mean 10k time = 37 minutes 49 seconds) and CHO loading (mean = 37 minutes 43 seconds). Under our conditions, Omega 3 Chia loading appears a viable option for enhancing performance for endurance events lasting >90 minutes and allows athletes to decrease their dietary intake of sugar while increasing their intake of Omega 3 fatty acids but offered no performance advantages.

  8. Supplementation with Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Disorders: A Review of Literature Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzatello, Paola; Brignolo, Elena; De Grandi, Elisa; Bellino, Silvio

    2016-07-27

    A new application for omega-3 fatty acids has recently emerged, concerning the treatment of several mental disorders. This indication is supported by data of neurobiological research, as highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) are highly concentrated in neural phospholipids and are important components of the neuronal cell membrane. They modulate the mechanisms of brain cell signaling, including the dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide a complete and updated account of the empirical evidence of the efficacy and safety that are currently available for omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The main evidence for the effectiveness of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been obtained in mood disorders, in particular in the treatment of depressive symptoms in unipolar and bipolar depression. There is some evidence to support the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of conditions characterized by a high level of impulsivity and aggression and borderline personality disorders. In patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, small-to-modest effects of omega-3 HUFAs have been found. The most promising results have been reported by studies using high doses of EPA or the association of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. In schizophrenia, current data are not conclusive and do not allow us either to refuse or support the indication of omega-3 fatty acids. For the remaining psychiatric disturbances, including autism spectrum disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders and substance use disorder, the data are too scarce to draw any conclusion. Concerning tolerability, several studies concluded that omega-3 can be considered safe and well tolerated at doses up to 5 g/day.

  9. Supplementation with Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Disorders: A Review of Literature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bozzatello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new application for omega-3 fatty acids has recently emerged, concerning the treatment of several mental disorders. This indication is supported by data of neurobiological research, as highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs are highly concentrated in neural phospholipids and are important components of the neuronal cell membrane. They modulate the mechanisms of brain cell signaling, including the dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide a complete and updated account of the empirical evidence of the efficacy and safety that are currently available for omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The main evidence for the effectiveness of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been obtained in mood disorders, in particular in the treatment of depressive symptoms in unipolar and bipolar depression. There is some evidence to support the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of conditions characterized by a high level of impulsivity and aggression and borderline personality disorders. In patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, small-to-modest effects of omega-3 HUFAs have been found. The most promising results have been reported by studies using high doses of EPA or the association of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. In schizophrenia, current data are not conclusive and do not allow us either to refuse or support the indication of omega-3 fatty acids. For the remaining psychiatric disturbances, including autism spectrum disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders and substance use disorder, the data are too scarce to draw any conclusion. Concerning tolerability, several studies concluded that omega-3 can be considered safe and well tolerated at doses up to 5 g/day.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids as treatments for mental illness: which disorder and which fatty acid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieswerda Lee E

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of observational and epidemiological studies have suggested that mental illness, in particular mood disorders, is associated with reduced dietary intake and/or cellular abundance of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. This has prompted researchers to test the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA in a range of different psychiatric disorders. We have critically reviewed the double blind placebo controlled clinical trials published prior to April 2007 to determine whether omega-3 PUFA are likely to be efficacious in these disorders. Results Most trials involved a small number of participants but were largely well designed. Omega-3 PUFA were well tolerated by both children and adults with mild gastrointestinal effects being the only consistently reported adverse event. For schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder we found little evidence of a robust clinically relevant effect. In the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and related disorders, most trials showed at most small benefits over placebo. A limited meta-analysis of these trials suggested that benefits of