WorldWideScience

Sample records for omega cryogenic target

  1. Cryogenic-laser-fusion target implosion studies performed with the OMEGA uv-laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Letzring, S.A.; Verdon, C.P.; Skupsky, S.; Keck, R.L.; Knauer, J.P.; Kremens, R.L.; Bradley, D.K.; Kessler, T.; Delettrez, J.; and others.

    1989-01-01

    A series of direct-drive laser-fusion implosion experiments was performed on cryogenically cooled, DT-filled glass microballoons with the OMEGA 24-beam uv (351-nm) laser system. The targets consisted of glass microballoons having radii of 100 to 150 μm, wall thicknesses of 3 to 7 μm, filled with DT gas at pressures of 75 to 100 atm. The targets were cooled to below the freezing point of DT, in situ, by a cryogenic target system. The targets were irradiated by approximately 1 to 1.2 kJ of uv light in 650-ps Gaussian pulses. The on-target irradiation uniformity was enhanced for these experiments by the use of distributed phase plates, which brought the estimated irradiation nonuniformities to ∼12% (σ rms ). Target performance was diagnosed by an array of x-ray, plasma, and nuclear instruments. The measured target performance showed ∼70% absorption, thermonuclear yields of 10 6 to 10 8 neutrons, and final fuel areal densities of 20 to 40 mg/cm 2 for the optimum targets examined in these experiments. Fuel densities at the time of thermonuclear neutron production, inferred from direct measurements of the fuel areal density, were in the range of 20 to 50 g/cm 3 (100 to 200 times the density of liquid DT) for the optimum targets

  2. Design of the fill/transfer station cryostat for the OMEGA cryogenic target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.R.; Charmin, C.M.; Del Bene, J.V.; Hoffmann, E.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Anteby, I.

    1997-09-01

    General Atomics is designing, testing and fabricating a system for supplying cryogenic targets for the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser system. A prototype system has demonstrated the filling of 1 mm diameter, 3 microm wall plastic spheres to 111 MPa (1,100 atm) with deuterium and then cooling to 18 K to condense the fuel. The production design must be capable of routinely filling and cooling targets with a 50/50 mix of deuterium and tritium and transferring them to a device which places the targets into the focus of 60 laser beams. This paper discusses the design and analysis of the production Fill/Transfer Station cryostat. The cryostat has two major components, a fixed base and a removable dome. The joint between the base and the dome is similar to a bayonet fitting and is sealed by a room temperature elastomeric o-ring. Since the cryostat must be housed in a glovebox, its design is driven strongly by maintenance requirements. To reach the equipment inside the cryostat, the dome is simply unbolted and lifted. The inside of the cryostat is maintained at 16 K by a closed loop helium flow system. Gaseous helium at about 1.4 MPa (200 psi) flows through tubes which are brazed to the inner walls. Cooling is provided by several cryocoolers which are located external to the cryostat. Liquid nitrogen is used as a heat intercept and to precool the helium gas

  3. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIKROO, A.; CZECHOWICZ, D.; CHEN, K.C.; DICKEN, M.; MORRIS, C.; ANDREWS, R.; GREENWOOD, A.L; CASTILLO, E.

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D 2 and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D 2 . In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells

  4. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V N; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Boehly, T R; Campbell, E M; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Froula, D H; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Radha, P B

    2016-01-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR< 17 and fuel adiabat α > 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production. (paper)

  5. OMEGA polar-drive target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium–tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (∼7 × 10 14 W/cm 2 at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser–plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR ∼ 22 or at lower intensity (∼3 × 10 14 W/cm 2 ) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR ∼ 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

  6. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIKROO, A; CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; PONTELANDOLFO, JM

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 (micro)m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 (micro)m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, ∼ 1.5 (micro)m thick, 900 (micro)m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 (micro)m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition

  7. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium–tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium–tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  8. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  9. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. (W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D[sub 2] or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  10. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. [W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (US)

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D{sub 2} or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  11. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J.; Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D 2 or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility

  12. Cryogenic polarized target facility: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.; Nash, H.K.; Roberson, N.; Schneider, M.; Seagondollar, W.; Soderstrum, J.

    1985-01-01

    The TUNL cryogenically polarized target facility consists of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet, together capable of maintaining samples at between 10 and 20 mK in magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla. At these temperatures and magnetic fields brute-force nuclear orientation occurs. Polarizations from 20 to 60% are attainable in about twenty nonzero spin nuclei. Most are metals, ranging in mass from 6 Li to 209 Bi, but the nuclei 1 H and 3 He are also polarizable via this method. The main effort is directed towards a better determination of the effective spin-spin force in nuclei. These experiments are briefly described and the beam stabilization system, cryostat and polarized 3 He targets are discussed

  13. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 microm) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling

  14. A cryogenic infrared calibration target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ⩽ 0.003, from 800 to 4800 cm-1 (12 - 2 μm). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10 000 cm-1 (25 - 1 μm) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ⩽ 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ˜4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials—Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder—are characterized and presented.

  15. Effects of local defect growth in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Shmayda, W. T.; Harding, D. R.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Spherically symmetric, low-adiabat (adiabat α ≲ 3) cryogenic direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)] yield less than 10% of the neutrons predicted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations suggest that this performance degradation can be explained assuming perturbations from isolated defects of submicron to tens-of-micron scale on the outer surface or inside the shell of implosion targets. These defects develop during the cryogenic filling process and typically number from several tens up to hundreds for each target covering from about 0.2% to 1% of its surface. The simulations predict that such defects can significantly perturb the implosion and result in the injection of about 1 to 2 μg of the hot ablator (carbon-deuterium) and fuel (deuterium-tritium) materials from the ablation surface into the targets. Both the hot mass injection and perturbations of the shell reduce the final shell convergence ratio and implosion performance. The injected carbon ions radiatively cool the hot spot, reducing the fuel temperature, and further reducing the neutron yield. The negative effect of local defects can be minimized by decreasing the number and size of these defects and/or using more hydrodynamically stable implosion designs with higher shell adiabat.

  16. High-Performance Cryogenic Designs for OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; McCrory, R. L.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvydky, A.

    2016-10-01

    The main advantage of laser symmetric direct drive (SDD) is a significantly higher coupled drive laser energy to the hot-spot internal energy at stagnation compared to that of laser indirect drive. Because of coupling losses resulting from cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), however, reaching ignition conditions on the NIF with SDD requires designs with excessively large in-flight aspect ratios ( 30). Results of cryogenic implosions performed on OMEGA show that such designs are unstable to short-scale nonuniformity growth during shell implosion. Several CBET reduction strategies have been proposed in the past. This talk will discuss high-performing designs using several CBET-mitigation techniques, including using drive laser beams smaller than the target size and wavelength detuning. Designs that are predicted to reach alpha burning regimes as well as a gain of 10 to 40 at the NIF-scale will be presented. Hydrodynamically scaled OMEGA designs with similar CBET-reduction techniques will also be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets, are described. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using three-dimension hydrodynamic simulations performed using a newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams, capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm), and imperfect pointing, energy balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σ rms ~10 μm, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which a 880-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by the same-diameter beams, and a “R75” design using a capsule of 900 μm in diameter and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations found that nonuniformities because of capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores resulting in an incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores is well represented by neutron images, but loosely in x-rays. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations and up to ~ 2 keV variation of the hot spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design is more hydrodynamically efficient because of mitigation of crossed-beam energy transfer, but also suffers more from the nonuniformities. Furthermore, simulations predict a performance advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam imbalance σ rms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively

  19. Characterization of cryogenic direct-drive ICF targets during layering studies and just prior to shot time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgell, D.H.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Elasky, L.M.; Harding, D.R.; Keck, R.L.; Lund, L.D.; Wittman, M.D.

    2006-07-13

    The characterization of OMEGA cryogenic targets is based on shadowgraphs obtained from multiple angular views taken with the target in the layering sphere. The D2 ice has been observed to re-layer during slow rotations, leading to procedural changes that avoid re-layering thus ensuring high-quality, spherical-harmonic, 3-D ice layer reconstructions.

  20. Targeted Alpha Therapy: From Alpha to Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J; Clarke, Raymond; Huang Chenyu

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the broad spectrum of Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT) research in Australia; from in vitro and in vivo studies to clinical trials. The principle of tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT) is discussed in terms of its validation by Monte Carlo calculations of vascular models and the potential role of biological dosimetry is examined. Summmary of this review is as follows: 1. The essence of TAT 2. Therapeutic objectives 3. TAVAT and Monte Carlo microdosimetry 4. Biological dosimetry 5. Preclinical studies 6. Clinical trials 7. What next? 8. Obstacles. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic Measurements of Target Preheating on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, R.C.; Griem, H.R.; Iglesias, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The preheating of laser-heated microballoon targets has been measured by time-resolved x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (euv) spectroscopy on the 30 kJ, 351 nm, 60-beam laser-fusion system at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Thin coatings of aluminum overcoated with magnesium served as indicators. both the sequence of the x-ray line emission and the intensity of euv radiation were used to determine a preheating peaking at ∼ 10 ns prior to onset of the main laser pulse, with a power density ≅1% of the main pulse. The measurements are supported by numerical modeling. Further information is provided by absorption spectra from the aluminum coating, backlighted by continuum from the heated surface. The exact source of the preheating energy remains unknown at present, but most likely arrives from early laser leakage through the system. The present target diagnostic is particularly useful when all beams cannot be monitored directly at all laser wavelengths

  2. Characterization of cryogenic direct-drive ICF targets during layering studies and just prior to shot time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgell, D.H.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Elasky, L.M.; Harding, D.R.; Keck, R.L.; Lund, L.D.; Wittman, M.D. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The characterization of OMEGA cryogenic targets is based on shadow-graphs obtained from multiple angular views taken with the target in the layering sphere. The D{sub 2} ice has been observed to re-layer during slow rotations, leading to procedural changes that avoid re-layering thus ensuring high-quality, spherical-harmonic, 3-dimensional ice layer reconstructions. Shadow-grams taken inside the target chamber within 20 ms of shot time have verified that the ice layers remain preserved during the transport. (authors)

  3. Technological aspects of cryogenic laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musinski, D.L.; Henderson, T.M.; Simms, R.J.; Pattinson, T.R.; Jacobs, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Most current laser-fusion targets consist of hollow spherical glass shells which have been filled with a mixture of gaseous deuterium-tritium fuel. Theoretical considerations suggest that optimum yields can be obtained from these targets if the fuel is condensed as a uniform liquid or solid layer on the inner surface of the glass shell at the time it is irradiated. In principle, this can be accomplished in a straightforward way by cooling the target below the condensation or freezing point of the fuel. In practice, cryogenic targets can appear in routine laser experiments only when the necessary cryogenic technology is reliably integrated into experimental target chambers. Significant progress has been made recently in this field. The authors will discuss the scientific basis and the various technological features of a system which has allowed the successful irradiation of uniform solid-fuel-layer targets

  4. Design of a cryogenic deuterium gas target for neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, F.T.; Waterman, F.M.; Forsthoff, H.; Skaggs, L.S.; Vander Arend, P.C.; Stoy, S.

    1976-01-01

    A cryogenic deuterium gas target operating at 80 0 K and 10 atm pressure has been designed for use with a small cyclotron; the D(d,n) reaction is used to produce a neutron beam suitable for radiation therapy. The target is cooled by circulation of the gas in a closed loop between the target and an external heat exchanger immersed in liquid nitrogen

  5. Preliminary results on the cryogenic target for FIREX project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, A.; Maekawa, R.; Mito, T.; Okamoto, M.; Motojima, O.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Nagai, K.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary tests on the cryogenic target for the fast ignition realization experiment (FIREX) project has been conducted. A foam shell method is proposed to realize its target design. A foam target consists of three parts: a foam shell, a conical laser guide and a liquid or gas feeder made of glass. The shell is a hollow sphere (500 μm in diameter) with a uniform and thin foam layer (about 20 μm in thickness). Epoxy resin is utilized to assemble the parts into the target. Liquid fuel is fed into the shell by the feeder and is soaked up by the foam material through capillarity. The fuel is then solidified. Regarding target fabrication, one of the concerns is the influence on various thermal contractions from the different materials when it is cooled down to cryogenic environment. This paper describes the result on the validity check at cryogenic environment and the demonstration of H 2 liquefaction using a dummy target instead of the foam target. Judging from these results, the target assembled in the same process as the dummy target is sure to be practicable for the FIREX project. (authors)

  6. Laboratory facility for production of cryogenic targets for hot plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Cwiek, E.

    1990-10-01

    Results of preliminary operational tests of the cryogenic stand designed for the production of small droplets of liquid hydrogen or deuterium are presented. Such cryogenic micro-targets are needed for nuclear and thermonuclear experiments. (author)

  7. Laser ``M'egajoule'' cryogenic target program: from target fabrication to conformation of the deuterium-tritium ice layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Rémy; Durut, Frédéric; Reneaume, Benoît; Chicane, Cédric; Théobald, Marc; Breton, Olivier; Martin, Michel; Fleury, Emmanuel; Vincent-Viry, Olivier; Bachelet, Franck; Jeannot, Laurent; Geoffray, Isabelle; Botrel, Ronan; Dauteuil, Christophe; Hermerel, Cyril; Choux, Alexandre; Bednarczyk, Sophie; Legaie, Olivier

    2008-11-01

    For the French inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the LMJ program are manufactured and filled at CEA Valduc (Dijon) in the cryogenic targets filling station (IRCC). They will be moved at about 20 K into a transport cryostat for cryogenic targets and will be driven from CEA/Valduc to CEA/CESTA (Bordeaux). Cryogenic targets will then be transferred by several cryogenic grippers on the cryogenic target positioner before shots. The CTA has to meet severe specifications and involves a lot of challenging tasks for its manufacture. To fill CTAs by permeation with deuterium-tritium (DT), the IRCC need to meet strict thermal, mechanical and dimensional specifications. To obtain a good combustion yield, a very homogenous DT ice layer and very smooth roughness at 1.5 K below the DT triple point are also required. This paper deals with the up to date main issues in the different fields of the LMJ cryogenic target program.

  8. A honeycomb sandwich structure vacuum jacket for cryogenic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, M.; Kasai, S.; Kato, S.

    1988-11-01

    Cryogenic targets (H 2 , D 2 and 4 He) have been built for use in the study of photonuclear reactions with π sr spectrometer, TAGX at the 1.3 GeV Tokyo electron synchrotron. A new type of vacuum jacket fabricated from plastic honeycomb core and Mylar skins has been used in the target system for more than 5000 hours. The average radiation thickness and the average density of this jacket are measured to be 3.3 x 10 -3 X 0 and 0.15 g/cm 3 , respectively. (author)

  9. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R., E-mail: elena.koresheva@gmail.com; Krokhin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Osipov, I. E. [Power Efficiency Centre, Inter RAO UES (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  10. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkov, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The application of cryogenics in various areas of science and technology is related in a popular way. Utilization of cryogenics in the following production processes is described: separation of air, gas mixtures; production of helium; separation of hydrogen isotopes; production of deuterium. Applications of cryogenics in refrigerating engineering, superconductivity and high-energy physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, superconducting electric motors and electric energy storages are considered

  11. Fabrication and characterization of cryogenic targets for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, H.; Kim, K.

    1979-08-01

    A new technique has been developed which is capable of fabricating uniform cryogenic targets for use in inertial confinement fusion. The essence of the technique is to directly wet a target with a cold helium gas jet, which results in freezing of the DT mixture contained in the target. A controlled amount of current is pulsed through a heater wire surrounding the target, giving rise to fast evaporation and refreezing of the DT-condensate into a uniform layer. Experiments, which have been performed with D 2 -filled glass microshells, successfully produce uniform layers of both liquid and solid D 2 inside the glass shells. A set of data illustrating the technique is presented and analyzed

  12. Cryogenic control system of the large COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Gautheron, F; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Görtz, S; Gustafsson, K K; Horikawa, N; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Kondo, K; Meyer, Werner T; Reicherz, G

    2004-01-01

    The dilution refrigerator used to cool the large COMPASS polarized target is monitored through a PC running LabVIEW trademark 6.1 under Windows 2000 trademark . About 60 parameters of the target (temperatures, pressures, flow rates) are continuously plotted and checked. They are periodically recorded in an Oracle trademark database and in a data file. An alarm for every parameter can be individually activated and optionally connected to a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) delivery message system. A web server receives and publishes the online status of the target with online tables and graphics on a dedicated COMPASS polarized target information web site. A Siemens programmable logic controller (PLC) powered by an uninterruptable source keeps the cryogenic system safe and stable during the long beam periods by controlling valves and interlocks. This safety feature protects the dilution refrigerator against potential damages in case of power failure.

  13. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for

  14. Irradiation uniformity of spherical targets by multiple uv beams from OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beich, W.; Dunn, M.; Hutchison, R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct-drive laser fusion demands extremely high levels of irradiation uniformity to ensure uniform compression of spherical targets. The assessment of illumination uniformity of targets irradiated by multiple beams from the OMEGA facility is made with the aid of multiple beams spherical superposition codes, which take into account ray tracing and absorption and a detailed knowledge of the intensity distribution of each beam in the target plane. In this report, recent estimates of the irradiation uniformity achieved with 6 and 12 uv beams of OMEGA will be compared with previous measurements in the IR, and predictions will be made for the uv illumination uniformity achievable with 24 beams of OMEGA

  15. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenics refers to the coldest area known in nature. This temperature range has an upper limit arbitrarily defined as -100 degrees C (-250 degrees C by some) and a lower limit of absolute zero. These limits separate it from the temperature range generally used in refrigerating engineering. One important application of cryogenics is the separation ad purification of air into its various components (oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and the rare gases). Other important developments have been the large-scale production of liquid hydrogen; helium extraction from natural gas; storage and transport of liquefied gases such as oxygen, argon, nitrogen, helium, neon, xenon, and hydrogen; liquefaction of natural gas for ocean transport and peak shaving; and many new types of cryogenic refrigeration devices. This paper introduces the topic of cryogenic engineering. Cryogenic processes generally range from ambient conditions to the boiling point of the cryogenic fluid. Cryogenic cycles also incorporate two or more pressure levels. These properties must also cover the vapor, vapor-liquid, and sometimes the solid regions. Therefore, the physical properties of fluids over a great range of temperatures and pressures must be known. Solubility of contaminants must be known in order to design for their removal. The main physical properties for design purposes are those usually used in unit operations, such as fluid flow, heat transfer, and the like, in addition to those directly related to the Joule-Thomson effect and expansion work. Properties such as density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, vapor pressure, and vapor-liquid equilibriums are generally obtained in graphical, tabular, or equation form, as a function of temperature and pressure

  16. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  17. Cryogenic Hydrogen Fuel for Controlled Inertial Confinement Fusion (Cryogenic Target Factory Concept Based on FST-Layering Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, I. E.; Krokhin, O. N.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    A central element of a power plant based on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a target with cryogenic hydrogen fuel that should be delivered to the center of a reactor chamber with a high accuracy and repetition rate. Therefore, a cryogenic target factory (CTF) is an integral part of any ICF reactor. A promising way to solve this problem consists in the FST layering method developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). This method (rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets) is unique, having no analogs in the world. The further development of FST-layering technologies is implemented in the scope of the LPI program for the creation of a modular CTF and commercialization of the obtained results. In this report, we discuss our concept of CTF (CTF-LPI) that exhibits the following distinctive features: using a FST-layering technology for the elaboration of an in-line production of cryogenic targets, using an effect of quantum levitation of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in magnetic field for noncontacting manipulation, transport, and positioning of the free-standing cryogenic targets, as well as in using a Fourier holography technique for an on-line characterization and tracking of the targets flying into the reactor chamber. The results of original experimental and theoretical investigations performed at LPI indicate that the existing and developing target fabrication capabilities and technologies can be applied to ICF target production. The unique scientific, engineering, and technological base developed in Russia at LPI allows one to make a CTFLPI prototype for mass production of targets and delivery thereof at the required velocity into the ICF reactor chamber.

  18. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  19. MULTI-KEV X-Ray Yields From High-Z Gas Targets Fielded At Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.O.; Fournier, K.B.; May, M.J.; Colvin, J.D.; Thomas, C.A.; Marrs, R.E.; Compton, S.M.; Moody, J.D.; Bond, E.J.; Davis, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on modeling of x-ray yield from gas-filled targets shot at the OMEGA laser facility. The OMEGA targets were 1.8 mm long, 1.95 mm in diameter Be cans filled with either a 50:50 Ar:Xe mixture, pure Ar, pure Kr or pure Xe at ∼ 1 atm. The OMEGA experiments heated the gas with 20 kJ of 3ω (∼ 350 nm) laser energy delivered in a 1 ns square pulse. the emitted x-ray flux was monitored with the x-ray diode based DANTE instruments in the sub-keV range. Two-dimensional x-ray images (for energies 3-5 keV) of the targets were recorded with gated x-ray detectors. The x-ray spectra were recorded with the HENWAY crystal spectrometer at OMEGA. Predictions are 2D r-z cylindrical with DCA NLTE atomic physics. Models generally: (1) underpredict the Xe L-shell yields; (2) overpredict the Ar K-shell yields; (3) correctly predict the Xe thermal yields; and (4) greatly underpredict the Ar thermal yields. However, there are spreads within the data, e.g. the DMX Ar K-shell yields are correctly predicted. The predicted thermal yields show strong angular dependence.

  20. Fabrication of cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion targets using target free-fall technique. Report No. 2-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Murphy, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for fabricating cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets (i.e., spherical shells containing a uniform layer of DT ice) are investigated using target free-fall concept. Detection and characterization of the moving targets are effected by optoelectronic means, of which the principal is an RF ac-interferometer. This interferometer system demonstrates, for the first time, the speed capabilities of the phase-modulation ac-interferometry. New techiques developed for handling, holding, launching, and transporting targets are also described. Results obtained at both room and cryogenic temperatures are presented

  1. Characterization of the omega-conotoxin target. Evidence for tissue-specific heterogeneity in calcium channel types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, L.J.; Johnson, D.S.; Olivera, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Omega-Conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx-VIA) is a 27 amino acid peptide from the venom of the fish-hunting snail, Conus geographus, that blocks voltage-activated Ca channels. The characterization of a biologically active, homogeneous 125 I-labeled monoiodinated Tyr 22 derivative of omega-conotoxin GVIA and its use in binding and cross-linking studies are described. The 125 I-labeled toxin is specifically cross-linked to a receptor protein with an apparent M/sub r/ of 135,000. The stoichiometry between omega-conotoxin and nitrendipine binding sites in different chick tissues was determined. Skeletal muscle has a high concentration of [ 3 H]nitrendipine binding sites but no detectable omega-conotoxin sites. Brain microsomes have both binding sites, but omega-conotoxin targets are in excess. These results, combined with recent electrophysiological studies define four types of Ca channels in chick tissues, N, T, L/sub n/ (omega sensitive), and L/sub m/ (omega insensitive), and are consistent with the hypothesis that the α-subunits of certain neuronal Ca 2+ channels (L/sub n/, N) are the molecular targets of omega-conotoxin GVIA

  2. Design and fabrication of foam-insulated cryogenic target for wet-wall laser fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, T.; Takeda, T.; Nagai, K.; Mima, K.; Yamanaka, T.

    2003-01-01

    A foam insulated cryogenic target was proposed for use in a future laser fusion reactor with a wet wall. This scheme can protect the solid DT layer from melting due to surface heating by adsorption of metal vapor without significant reduction in the target gain. Design spaces for the injection velocity and the acceptable vapor pressure in the reactor are discussed. Basic technology to fabricate such structure was demonstrated by emulsion process. Concept of a cryogenic fast-ignition target with a gold guiding cone was proposed together with direct injection filling of liquid DT. (author)

  3. Shock-ignition relevant experiments with planar targets on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Theobald, W.; Lafon, M.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, CELIA, Université Bordeaux 1-CEA-CNRS, Talence (France)

    2014-02-15

    We report on laser-driven, strong-shock generation and hot-electron production in planar targets in the presence of a pre-plasma at shock-ignition (SI) relevant laser and pre-plasma conditions. 2-D simulations reproduce the shock dynamics well, indicating ablator shocks of up to 75 Mbar have been generated. We observe hot-electron temperatures of ∼70 keV at intensities of 1.4 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} with multiple overlapping beams driving the two-plasmon decay instability. When extrapolated to SI-relevant intensities of ∼10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the hot electron temperature will likely exceed 100 keV, suggesting that tightly focused beams without overlap are better suited for launching the ignitor shock.

  4. The Cryogenic Studying and Filling Facilities for the Laser Megajoule Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, F.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Collier, R.; Fleury, E.; Jeannot, L.; Legaie, O.; Pascal, G. [CEA Valduc, DAM, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Perin, J. P.; Viargues, F. [CEA Grenoble, DSM INAC SBT, 38 (France)

    2009-04-15

    As part of the French Inertial Confinement Fusion program, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has developed cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) and a program in two stages for the permeation filling of these CTAs: (a) the permeation filling studies with the Study Filling Station cryostats and (b) the design and manufacturing of the whole operational chain of CTA filling facilities. This paper deals with the description of both the cryogenic studying and the filling facilities for the LMJ targets. (authors)

  5. Transverse-target-spin asymmetry in exclusive $\\omega$-meson electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avetissian, A.; Belostotski, S.; Blok, H.P.; Borissov, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capitani, G.P.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Deconinck, W.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gabbert, D.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Hasch, D.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H.E.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krivokhijine, V.G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lorenzon, W.; Ma, B.Q.; Manaenkov, S.I.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Muccifora, V.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.D.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrosyan, A.; Reimer, P.E.; Reolon, A.R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shibata, T.A.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Stinzing, F.; Taroian, S.; Terkulov, A.; Truty, R.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Vogel, C.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2015-12-17

    Hard exclusive electroproduction of $\\omega$ mesons is studied with the HERMES spectrometer at the DESY laboratory by scattering 27.6 GeV positron and electron beams off a transversely polarized hydrogen target. The amplitudes of five azimuthal modulations of the single-spin asymmetry of the cross section with respect to the transverse proton polarization are measured. They are determined in the entire kinematic region as well as for two bins in photon virtuality and momentum transfer to the nucleon. Also, a separation of asymmetry amplitudes into longitudinal and transverse components is done. These results are compared to a phenomenological model that includes the pion pole contribution. Within this model, the data favor a positive $\\pi\\omega$ transition form factor.

  6. Molecular targets of omega 3 and conjugated linoleic fatty acids – micromanaging cellular response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eVisioli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized de novo by mammals and need to be ingested either with the diet or through the use of supplements/functional foods to ameliorate cardiovascular prognosis. This review focus on the molecular targets of omega 3 fatty acids and CLA, as paradigmatic molecules that can be explored both as nutrients and as pharmacological agents, especially as related to cardioprotection. In addition, we indicate novel molecular targets, namely microRNAs that might contribute to the observed biological activities of such essential fatty acids.

  7. Reviewing Hit Discovery Literature for Difficult Targets: Glutathione Transferase Omega-1 as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiyue; Dahlin, Jayme L; Oakley, Aaron J; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G; Baell, Jonathan B

    2018-05-10

    Early stage drug discovery reporting on relatively new or difficult targets is often associated with insufficient hit triage. Literature reviews of such targets seldom delve into the detail required to critically analyze the associated screening hits reported. Here we take the enzyme glutathione transferase omega-1 (GSTO1-1) as an example of a relatively difficult target and review the associated literature involving small-molecule inhibitors. As part of this process we deliberately pay closer-than-usual attention to assay interference and hit quality aspects. We believe this Perspective will be a useful guide for future development of GSTO1-1 inhibitors, as well serving as a template for future review formats of new or difficult targets.

  8. Primary design of Si cooling arm structure in ICF cryogenic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Yi Yong; Tang Changhuan; Zhang Jicheng

    2013-01-01

    According to the requirement of the cryogenic target system to the Si cooling arm structure, the Si cooling arm was primarily designed based on the USA National Ignition Facility (NIF) target. A new three-dimensional model of Si cooling arm was developed by SolidWorks software, and the simulation and analysis of Si cooling arm in aspect of mechanical property, thermal response and assembly were made based on the model. A law about the effect of the arm length of Si cooling arm and the width and the length of bifurcation on Si cooling arm was achieved. The research may provide the theoretical foundation and reference for the further improvement of cryogenic target. (authors)

  9. Understanding Laser-Imprint Effects on Plastic-Target Implosions on OMEGA with New Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Using the state-of-the-art physics models (nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation of state) recently implemented in our two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, we have performed a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA by both simulations and experiments. Through varying the laser picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats ranging from α = 2 to α = 6 . As the shell adiabat α decreases, we observed: (1) the measured shell thickness at the hot spot emission becomes larger than the uniform prediction; (2) the hot-spot core emits and neutron burn starts earlier than the corresponding 1-D prediction; and (3) the measured neutron yields are significantly reduced from their 1-D designs. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by our DRACO simulations with laser imprints. These studies clearly identify that laser imprint is the major cause for target performance degradation of OMEGA implosions of α ignition attempts. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Low-Z internal target from a cryogenically cooled liquid microjet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, M.; Petridis, N. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Winters, D.F.A. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Popp, U. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grisenti, R.E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany)], E-mail: grisenti@atom.uni-frankfurt.de

    2009-04-21

    We carried out an extensive investigation on the production of cryogenically cooled liquid hydrogen and helium droplet beams at the experimental storage ring at GSI with the goal to achieve high area densities for these low-Z internal targets. Our results show that an area density of up to 10{sup 14}cm{sup -2} is achieved for both light gases by expanding the liquid through sub-10 {mu}m diameter nozzles. The achieved area density is comparable with the previous results for the hydrogen internal target and represents an improvement by about four orders of magnitude for the helium target.

  11. Low-Z internal target from a cryogenically cooled liquid microjet source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, M.; Petridis, N.; Winters, D.F.A.; Popp, U.; Doerner, R.; Stoehlker, Th.; Grisenti, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an extensive investigation on the production of cryogenically cooled liquid hydrogen and helium droplet beams at the experimental storage ring at GSI with the goal to achieve high area densities for these low-Z internal targets. Our results show that an area density of up to 10 14 cm -2 is achieved for both light gases by expanding the liquid through sub-10 μm diameter nozzles. The achieved area density is comparable with the previous results for the hydrogen internal target and represents an improvement by about four orders of magnitude for the helium target.

  12. Recent Developments in Fabrication of Direct Drive Cylinder Targets for Hydrodynamics Experiments at the OMEGA Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Balkey, M.M.; Bartos, J.J.; Batha, S.H.; Day, R.D.; Elliott, J.E.; Elliott, N.E.; Gomez, V.M.; Hatch, D.J.; Lanier, N.E.; Fincke, J.R.; Manzanares, R.; Pierce, T.H.; Sandoval, D.L.; Schmidt, D.W.; Steckle, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental campaigns are being conducted at the 60 beam OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics to acquire data to validate hydrodynamic models in the high energy-density regime. This paper describes targets that have been developed and constructed for these experimental campaigns. Targets are 860 μm inner diameter by 2.2 mm length cylinders with 70 μm thick polymer ablator. On the ablator inner surface and located halfway along the axis of the cylinder is a 500 μm wide Al marker band. Band thicknesses in the range 8-16 microns are used. CH foam with densities in the range 30-90 mg/cc fills the inside of the cylinder. While these targets have been fabricated for years, several new improvements and features have recently been developed. Improvements include the use of epoxy instead of polystyrene for the ablator, and the use of electrodeposited Al for the marker band. A critical feature of the target is the surface feature that is placed on the marker band. Experiments are aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of imploding cylinders as a function of this surface feature. Recent development work has focused on production of engineered surface features on the target marker band. Using a fast tool servo on a diamond turning lathe, a wide range of specified surface features have been produced. This paper will address improvements to the cylinder targets as well as current development efforts

  13. The cryogenic target for the G0 experiment at Jefferson lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covrig, S.D.; Beise, E.J.; Carr, R.; Gustafsson, K.K.; Hannelius, L.; Herda, M.-C.; Jones, C.E.; Liu, J.; McKeown, R.D.; Neveling, R.; Rauf, A.W.; Smith, G.

    2005-01-01

    A cryogenic horizontal single loop target has been designed, built, tested and operated for the G 0 experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The target cell is 20cm long, the loop volume is 6.5l and the target operates with the cryogenic pump fully immersed in the fluid. The target has been designed to operate at 30Hz rotational pump speed with either liquid hydrogen or liquid deuterium. The high-power heat exchanger is able to remove 1000W of heat from the liquid hydrogen, while the nominal electron beam with current of 40μA and energy of 3GeV deposits about 320W of heat into the liquid. The increase in the systematic uncertainty due to the liquid hydrogen target is negligible on the scale of a parity violation experiment. The global normalized yield reduction for 40μA beam is about 1.5% and the target density fluctuations contribute less than 238ppm (parts per million) to the total asymmetry width, typically about 1200ppm, in a Q 2 bin

  14. Cryogenic polarized-target facility. Progress report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this three-year research project is to build a cryogenically polarized target facility for measuring total neutron cross sections for polarized neutrons incident on polarized nuclei. The components of the system have been assembled at TUNL during the current contract period. These include the dilution-refrigerator support assembly, the dilution-refrigerator itself, the dewar, the beam line, the shielding cave for the neutron source, and the neutron-detector shield and rolling-cart assembly. The dilution refrigerator is presently undergoing testing at liquid-nitrogen and liquid-helium temperatures. Experiments with aluminum and copper targets are scheduled for the coming contract period

  15. First demonstration of multi-MeV proton acceleration from a cryogenic hydrogen ribbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Stephan D.; Obst, Lieselotte; Metzkes-Ng, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Zeil, Karl; Michaux, Sylvain; Chatain, Denis; Perin, Jean-Paul; Chen, Sophia N.; Fuchs, Julien; Gauthier, Maxence; Cowan, Thomas E.; Schramm, Ulrich

    2018-04-01

    We show efficient laser driven proton acceleration up to 14 MeV from a 62 μm thick cryogenic hydrogen ribbon. Pulses of the short pulse laser ELFIE at LULI with a pulse length of ≈350 fs at an energy of 8 J per pulse are directed onto the target. The results are compared to proton spectra from metal and plastic foils with different thicknesses and show a similarly good performance both in maximum energy as well as in proton number. Thus, this target type is a promising candidate for experiments with high repetition rate laser systems.

  16. Investigation on fabrication and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets. Annual report, October 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1978-01-01

    The research has been directed toward fabrication and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets, with particular emphasis on the development of a scheme which would allow for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of the targets. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following areas: (1) fabrication of a uniform layer of solid DT inside a glass microshell using a combination of helium gas jets and a heater wire; (2) levitation-freezing of a DT-filled glass microshell as a method for fabricating and positioning a cryogenic shell target; (3) a target fabrication system intended for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of cryogenic targets; and (4) development of diagnostics for inspection, recording, and analysis of a solid DT layer inside a glass microshell, and for observing the parameters controlling the target freezing process

  17. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  18. Stability time of a DT-filled cryogenic ICF target in a high vacuum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebey, P.S.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Following the successful pressure loading with DT of a thin-walled plastic inertial fusion target shell (such as those designed for use at the OMEGA facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE)), continual care must be taken to safeguard the shell from being exposed to unacceptable pressure differentials across its wall. In particular, once the DT has been condensed into a liquid or solid phase and the outside pressure has been reduced, the target must be maintained below some upper cutoff temperature such that the vapor pressure of the DT is below the bursting pressure for the shell. Through the process of β-decay the DT self-heats, but while the shell is in a high vacuum environment (P much-lt 0.8 Pa (6 mtorr) for the OMEGA layering sphere) there is only a negligible heat loss mechanism. This will cause the temperature to increase. A calculation has been done to estimate the rate of temperature increase of the loaded target under high vacuum conditions. A functional form for calculating the target's temperature increase given its starting temperature is presented. An overall result is that under high vacuum conditions the DT changes from a solid at 10 K to a liquid at 37 K (T c = 39.4 K) in about 19 minutes. This holding time is significantly less if the initial temperature is higher, the initial state is liquid, or the upper allowed temperature is lower. Simplifying assumptions which were made and their impact on interpreting the results of this calculation are discussed

  19. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  20. Commissioning and Operation of a Cryogenic Target at HI γS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendellen, David; Compton@HIγS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cryogenic target for use at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HI γS). The target system is able to liquefy helium-4 (LHe) at 4 K, hydrogen (LH2) at 20 K, or deuterium (LD2) at 23 K to fill a 0.3 L Kapton cell. Liquid temperatures and condenser pressures are recorded throughout each run in order to ensure that the target's areal density is known to 1%. A low-temperature valve enables cycling between full and empty modes in less than 15 minutes. The target is being utilized in a series of experiments which probe the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon by Compton scattering high-energy photons from the liquid and detecting them with the HI γS NaI Detector Array (HINDA). During a 50-hour-long commissioning run, the target held LHe at 3.17 K, followed by 600 hours of production running with LD2 at 23.9 K. The design of the target will be presented and its performance during these runs will be discussed. Work supported by US Department of Energy contracts DE-FG02-97ER41033, DE-FG02-06ER41422, and DE-SCOO0536

  1. Hydrodynamic simulations of integrated experiments planned for OMEGA/OMEGA EP laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Myatt, J.; Radha, P. B.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments for the combined OMEGA/OMEGA EP laser systems have been simulated with the multidimensional hydrodynamic code DRACO. In the simplified electron transport model included in DRACO, the electrons are introduced at the pole of a 2-D simulation and transported in a straight line toward the target core, depositing their energy according to a recently published slowing-down formula.1 Simulations, including alpha transport, of an OMEGA cryogenic target designed to reach a 1-D fuel R of 500 mg/cm2 have been carried out for 1-D (clean) and, more realistic, 2-D (with nonuniformities) implosions to assess the sensitivity to energy, timing, and irradiance of the Gaussian fast-ignitor beam. The OMEGA laser system provides up to 30 kJ of compression energy, and OMEGA EP will provide two short pulse beams, each with energies up to 2.6 kJ. For the 1-D case, the neutron yield is predicted to be in excess of 1015 (compared to 1014 for no ignitor beam) over a timing range of about 80 ps. This talk will present these results and new 2-D simulation results that include the effects of realistic cryogenic target perturbations on the compressed core. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article. (Author)

  2. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  3. Investigation on cryogenic laser fusion targets: fabrication, characterization, and transport. Annual report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1979-01-01

    The research has been directed toward fabrication, characterization, and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets, with particular emphasis on the development of a scheme which would allow for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of the targets. Specifically, progress has been made in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of a uniform spherical shell of DT-condensate using a cold-wall target-freezing-cell. (2) Fabrication of a uniform spherical shell of liquid DT using a room-temperature wall target-freezing-cell. (3) Support-free cryogenic target fabrication using cold-gas-levitation. (4) Continuous fabrication of cryogenic targets using free-fall method. (5) Automatic characterization of DT-layer uniformity. (6) Sorting of DT-filled glass microshells using an interference microscope. (7) Development of an a-c interference microscope for accurate characterization of moving targets. (8) Development of a machine which is capable of producing a continuous stream of uniform DT spheres of controllable sizes. (9) Theoretical study on the behavior of liquid hydrogen contained in a spherical shell

  4. OMEGA ICF experiments and preparations for direct drive on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, R.L.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct-drive laser-fusion ignition experiments rely on detailed understanding and control of irradiation uniformity, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and target fabrication. LLE is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct-drive NIF ignition target based on an 'all-DT' design: a spherical target of ∼3.4-mm diameter, 1 to 2 μm of CH wall thickness, and an ∼340-μm DT-ice layer near the triple point of DT (∼19 K). OMEGA experiments are designed to address the critical issues related to direct-drive laser fusion and to provide the necessary data to validate the predictive capability of LLE computer codes. The cryogenic targets to be used on OMEGA are hydrodynamically equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address the essential components of direct-drive laser fusion: irradiation uniformity and laser imprinting, Rayleigh-Taylor growth and saturation, compressed core performance and shell fuel mixing, laser plasma interactions and their effect on target performance, and cryogenic target fabrication and handling. (author)

  5. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids influence gene expression. Because of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their metabolic pathways, blood levels of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are determined by both endogenous metabolism and dietary intake making the need of balanced dietary intake essential for health and disease prevention. Whether an omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3:1 to 4:1 could prevent the pathogenesis of many diseases induced by today’s Western diets (AFSSA, 2010, a target of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment, and genetics. A target of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment and genetics. A balanced ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is important for health and in the prevention of CHD and possibly other chronic diseases.

  6. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E.; Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G.; Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Pellinen, D.; Watts, P.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  7. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G. [California at Davis Univ., CA (United States); Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Pellinen, D.; Watts, P. [Bechtel Nevada Corporation, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  8. Targeting inflammation in the preterm infant: The role of the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi H. Fink

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are critical for the normal growth and development of preterm infants. Interest in these compounds rests in their anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical conditions with an inflammatory component such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotising enterocolitis and sepsis are risks to the survival of these infants. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses plays a central role in the aetiology of many of these neonatal disorders. There is evidence to suggest that the omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can down-regulate local and systemic inflammation in adults and animal models; however, very little is known about its protective effects in infants, especially preterm infants. Due to their immunological immaturity, preterm infants are particularly sensitive to diseases with an inflammatory aetiology in the early postnatal period. This makes DHA supplementation immediately after birth to combat neonatal inflammation an attractive therapy. Mechanistic data for DHA use in preterm infants are lacking and results from adult and animal studies may not be relevant to this population because of fundamental immune system differences. While there is increasing evidence from randomised controlled trials to support a beneficial effect of DHA for the preterm infant, more evidence is required to establish short and long-term effects of DHA on the immune status of preterm infants.

  9. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10{sup 13} and ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  10. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; McCrory, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10 13 and ∼0.3 g/cm 2 , respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA

  11. National direct-drive program on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage of the laser direct-drive (DD) approach to ignition is the increased fraction of laser drive energy coupled to the hot spot and relaxed hot-spot requirements for the peak pressure and convergence ratios relative to the indirect-drive approach at equivalent laser energy. With the goal of a successful ignition demonstration using DD, the recently established national strategy has several elements and involves multiple national and international institutions. These elements include the experimental demonstration on OMEGA cryogenic implosions of hot-spot conditions relevant for ignition at MJ-scale energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and developing an understanding of laser-plasma interactions and laser coupling using DD experiments on the NIF. DD designs require reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The current experiments on OMEGA have achieved inferred peak pressures of 56 Gbar (Regan et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117 025001). Extensive analysis of the cryogenic target experiments and two- and three-dimensional simulations suggest that power balance, target offset, and target quality are the main limiting factors in target performance. In addition, cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been identified as the main mechanism reducing laser coupling. Reaching the goal of demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA includes improving laser power balance, target position, and target quality at shot time. CBET must also be significantly reduced and several strategies have been identified to address this issue.

  12. Omega experiments and preparation for moderate-gain direct-drive experiments on Nif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr Crory, R.L.; Bahr, R.E.; Boehly, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Direct-drive laser-fusion ignition experiments rely on detailed understanding and control of irradiation uniformity, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and target fabrication. LLE is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct-drive NIF ignition target based on an 'all-DT' design: a spherical target of ∼ 3.5 mm diameter, 1 to 2 μm if CH wall thickness, and a ∼ 350 μm DT-ice layer near the triple point of DT (μ19K). OMEGA experiments are designed to address the critical issues related to direct-drive laser fusion and to provide the necessary data to validate the predictive capability of LLE computer codes. The future cryogenic targets used on OMEGA are hydrodynamically equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address all of the essential components of direct-drive laser fusion: irradiation uniformity and laser imprinting, Rayleigh-Taylor growth and saturation, compressed core performance and shell-fuel mixing, laser-plasma interactions and their effect on target performance, and cryogenic target fabrication and handling. (authors)

  13. OMEGA 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masihtinggi Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 6, secara alami terdapat pada minyak biji-bijian, minyakjagung dan kacang kedelai. Omega 6 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat terutama untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan kecerdasan balita. Tulisan ini membahas tentang defenisi omega 6, sumber, klasifikasi, manfaat dan kerugian bila mengkonsumsi omega 6. Disarankan untuk melakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 6 dengan tumbuh-kembang anak, selain itu bagi ibu-ibu disarankan untuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 6 guna pengoptimalan tumbuh-kembang anak. Hal ini jika terlaksana dapat memberikan dukungan terhadap program pemerintah di bidang promosi kesehatan.

  14. OMEGA upgrade staging options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Shoup, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how they are designing an upgrade to its 24-beam OMEGA laser system, OMEGA is a frequency tripled, all-rod system capable of producing 2 kJ at 0.8 ns on target. Important direct-drive-target-ignition physics could be investigated with an upgraded system capable of producing a shaped pulse consisting of a long (5ns) low-intensity, foot, smoothly transitioning into a short (0.5 ns), intense, compression pulse. The total pulse energy is 30 kJ, which, from target-irradiation uniformity considerations, must be distributed over 60 beams

  15. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  16. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  17. Transport behaviour of commercially available 100-Omega standard resistors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schumacher, B

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Several types of commercial 100-Omega resistors can be used with the cryogenic current comparator to maintain the resistance unit, derived from the Quantized Hall Effect (QHE), and to disseminate this unit to laboratory resistance standards. Up...

  18. About spaces of $\\omega_1$-$\\omega_2$-ultradifferentiable functions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmets, Jean; Valdivia, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Let $\\Omega_1$ and $\\Omega_2$ be non empty open subsets of $\\mathbb R^r$ and $\\mathbb R^s$ respectively and let $\\omega_1$ and $\\omega_2$ be weights. We introduce the spaces of ultradifferentiable functions $\\mathcal{E}_{(\\omega_1,\\omega_2)}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, $\\mathcal{D}_{(\\omega_1,\\omega_2)}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, $\\mathcal{E}_{\\{\\omega_1,\\omega_2\\}}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$ and $\\mathcal{D}_{\\{\\omega_1,\\omega_2\\}}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, study their l...

  19. OMEGA Upgrade preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1989-10-01

    The OMEGA laser system at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester is the only major facility in the United States capable of conducting fully diagnosed, direct-drive, spherical implosion experiments. As such, it serves as the national Laser Users Facility, benefiting scientists throughout the country. The University's participation in the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program underwent review by a group of experts under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences (the Happer Committee) in 1985. The Happer Committee recommended that the OMEGA laser be upgraded in energy to 30 kJ. To this end, Congress appropriated $4,000,000 for the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade, spread across FY88 and FY89. This document describes the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade. The proposed enhancements to the existing OMEGA facility will result in a 30-kHJ, 351-nm, 60-beam direct-drive system, with a versatile pulse-shaping facility and a 1%--2% uniformity of target drive. The Upgrade will allow scientists to explore the ignition-scaling regime, and to study target behavior that is hydrodynamically equivalent to that of targets appropriate for a laboratory microfusion facility (LMF). In addition, it will be possible to perform critical interaction experiments with large-scale-length uniformly irradiated plasmas

  20. Multidimensional Analysis of Direct-Drive Plastic-Shell Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Direct-drive implosions of plastic shells with the OMEGA laser are used as energy-scaled warm surrogates for ignition cryogenic targets designed for use on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic targets involve varying shell thickness (15 to 33 μm), fill pressures (3 to 15 atm), and shell adiabats. The multidimensional hydrodynamics code DRACO is used to evaluate the effects of capsule-surface roughness and illumination nonuniformities on target performance. These simulations indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining fusion yields. For shells that are thick enough to survive the Rayleigh--Taylor growth, target yields are significantly reduced by growth of the long (ℓ surrogacy between these plastic-shell implosions and the cryogenic ignition designs.

  1. Optical smoothing of laser imprinting in planar-target experiments on OMEGA EP using multi-FM 1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Dorrer, C.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Zuegel, J. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires single-beam smoothing to minimize imprinting of laser nonuniformities that can negatively affect implosion performance. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required smoothing [Marozas et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 294 (2010)]. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into the NIF-like beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Experiments have been performed to verify the smoothing performance by measuring Rayleigh–Taylor growth rates in planar targets of laser-imprinted and preimposed surface modulations. Multi-FM 1-D SSD has been observed to reduce imprint levels by ∼50% compared to the nominal OMEGA EP SSD system. The experimental results are in agreement with 2-D DRACO simulations using realistic, time-dependent far-field spot-intensity calculations that emulate the effect of SSD.

  2. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K.; Iwamoto, A.; Asahina, T.; Yamanoi, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH2 evaporation rate. Although LH2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm2, which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  3. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K; Iwamoto, A; Asahina, T; Yamanoi, K; Arikawa, Y; Nagatomo, H; Nakai, M; Norimatsu, T; Azechi, H

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH 2 evaporation rate. Although LH 2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm 2 , which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  4. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  5. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe -cryogenic target for external experiments at cosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G.A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2008-01-01

    A gravity assisted Gold Coated Heat Pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a polished gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers super isolation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super isolation and without. The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages

  6. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe-cryogenic target for external experiments at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G. A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2009-05-01

    A gravity assisted Gold coated heat pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a shiny gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers of' super-insulation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super-insulation (WI) and without super-insulation (WOI). The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997 - September 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''On-site Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks

  8. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  9. OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    The OMEGA - Observation of Multiple particle production, Exotic Interactions and Gamma-ray Air Shower-project is presented. The project try to associate photosensitive detectors from experiences of hadronic interactions with electronic detectors used by experiences that investigate extensive atmospheric showers. (M.C.K.)

  10. Theoretical and numerical analysis of auxiliary heating for cryogenic target fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaohu; Tian Chenglin; Yin Yan; Xu Han; Zhuo Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    In order to compensate for the nonspherical-symmetric heat flux in the hohlraum, auxiliary heating is usually applied to the outside wall of the hohlraum during the cooling process. A one-dimensional heat exchange theoretical model has been proposed in the indirect-drive target, to analyze the required auxiliary heat flux. With a two dimensional axisymmetric model, the auxiliary heating mechanism has been simulated by FLUENT code. The optimum heat flux which is 635 W/m 2 has been obtained as the heaters around the outside of the hohlraum about 1.3 mm above and below the mid-plane. The result is in good agreement with the theoretical model. (authors)

  11. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  12. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  13. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is reviewed under the headings: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase; crystallography; physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase; electronic structure of omega phase; electronic basis for omega phase stability; omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase; conclusion. The following elements of nuclear interest (or their alloys) are included: Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Mo. (U.K.)

  14. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  15. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, M.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''Onsite Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks

  17. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``Onsite Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  18. Identification of Protein Targets of 12/15-Lipoxygenase-Derived Lipid Electrophiles in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages Using Omega-Alkynyl Fatty Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yosuke; Kawashima, Yusuke; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Kenji; Ohara, Osamu; Arita, Makoto

    2018-04-20

    The 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) enzyme introduces peroxyl groups, in a position-specific manner, into polyunsaturated fatty acids to form various kinds of bioactive lipid metabolites, including lipid-derived electrophiles (LDE). The resident peritoneal macrophage is the site of highest 12/15-LOX expression in the mouse. However, the role of the enzyme in the regulation of resident macrophages is not fully understood. Here, we describe a chemoproteomic method to identify the targets of enzymatically generated LDE. By treating mouse peritoneal macrophages with omega-alkynyl arachidonic acid (aAA), we identified a series of proteins adducted by LDE generated through a 12/15-LOX catalyzed reaction. Pathway analysis revealed a dramatic enrichment of proteins involved in energy metabolism and found that glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were significantly affected by the expression of 12/15-LOX. Our findings thus highlight the utility of chemoproteomics using aAA for identifying intracellular targets of enzymatically generated LDE.

  19. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-01-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, ''warm'' targets with and without the use of an equatorial ''Saturn-like'' toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core

  20. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The huge superconducting magnet (3 m inside coil diameter, 2 m gap, 18 kGauss) contains a large number of optical spark chambers partly surrounding a hydrogen target which is hit by the beam entering from behind. The half cylindrical aluminium hut houses eight television cameras viewing the spark chambers from the top. The big gas Cerenkov counter in front of the picture (6 m x 4 m x 3 m) which identifies fast forward particles was constructed at Saclay as a contribution of one of the Omega.

  1. Studies of implosion dynamics of D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as {rho}R) and burn of direct-drive, D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d{sup 3}He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. {rho}R asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average {rho}R, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target.

  2. Studies of implosion dynamics of D3He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as ρR) and burn of direct-drive, D 3 He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d 3 He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. ρR asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average ρR, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target

  3. Omega Meson Production at High Transverse momentum by negative 515-GeV/c pions incident on beryllium and copper targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Barbaro, Lucyna [Rochester U.

    1995-01-01

    The inclusive cross section for !(783) meson production by 515 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ beam incident on Be and Cu targets has been measured as a function of transverse momentum (pT ). The data were collected during the 1990 run of experiment E706 at Fermilab. The E706 trigger selected events containing high pT electromagnetic showers detected in a nely segmented lead liquid argon calorimeter. The ! mesons were reconstructed in the neutral decay mode $\\omega \\to \\pi^{0}\\gamma$. Results are reported averaged over the center of mass rapidity interval -0.5 < y < 0.75, and in the transverse momentum range from 3.5 to 8 GeV/c. The $\\gamma$ to $\\pi^0$ production ratio was measured and used to obtain the ratio of vector to pseudoscalar mesons directly produced in the fragmentation process. Measurements are compared with HERWIG 5.7 Monte Carlo results, and with data from other experiments. The nuclear dependence of ! meson production is also discussed

  4. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  5. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Ali, S. J.; Benstead, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Coppari, F.; Eggert, J.; Erskine, D.; Panella, A. F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Hua, R.; Huntington, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Jiang, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; LePape, S.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J. S.; Rubery, M.; Sio, H.; Smith, R. F.; Swadling, G. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2016-01-01

    In FY16, LLNL's High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  6. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996 - September 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct open-quotes Onsite Supportclose quotes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks

  7. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, M.

    1997-02-01

    On December 30, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. In September 1995 this contract ended and a second contract was issued for us to continue this ICF target support work. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. During this period, GA and our partners WJ Schafer Associates (WJSA) and Soane Technologies, Inc. (STI) were assigned 14 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct open-quotes Onsite Supportclose quotes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). We fabricated and delivered over 800 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. We produced nearly 1,200 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We also delivered over 100 flat foil targets for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and SNLA in FY96. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require capsules containing cryogenic layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Substantial progress has been made on ways to both create and characterize viable layers. During FY96, significant progress was made in the design of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA

  8. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  9. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase (omega phase in Ti, Zr and Hf under high pressures; omega phase in Group IV transition metal alloys; omega in other systems; omega embryos at high temperatures); crystallography (omega structure; relationship of ω-structure to bcc (β) and hcp (α) structures); physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase (kinetics of α-ω transformation under high pressures; kinetics of β-ω transformation; synthesis and metastability studies); electronic structure of omega phase (electronic structure models; band structure calculations; theoretical results and experimental studies); electronic basis for omega phase stability (unified phase diagram; stability of omega phase); omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys (Ti-V alloys under pressure - a prototype case study; P-X phase diagrams for alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase (is omega structure a charge density distortion of the bcc phase; nature of incommensurate ω-structure and models for diffuse scattering); conclusion. (U.K.)

  10. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  11. Omega documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos

  12. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  13. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of the Effects of Laser Imprint in OMEGA Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Campbell, E. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Shvydky, A.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Illumination of direct-drive implosion targets by the OMEGA laser introduces large-amplitude broadband modulations in the absorbed energy from the largest (target size 900- μm) to smallest (speckle size 2- μm) spatial scales. These modulations ``imprint'' perturbations into a target that are amplified because of the secular and Rayleigh-Taylor growths during acceleration and deceleration of the target. The degradation of performance of room-temperature and cryogenic OMEGA implosions caused by these perturbations were simulated in three dimensions using the code ASTER. The highest-resolution simulations resolve perturbation modes as high as l 200 . The high modes l 50to 100 dominate in the perturbation spectrum during the linear growth, while the late-time nonlinear evolution results in domination of modes with l 30to 50 . Smoothing by spectral dispersion reduces the linear-phase mode amplitudes by a factor of 4 and results in substantial improvements in implosion performance that is in good agreement with measurements. The effects of imprint on implosion performance are compared with the effects of other implosion asymmetries, such as those induced because of laser beam imbalance, mistiming and mispointing, and target offset. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckl, C., E-mail: csto@lle.rochester.edu; Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub α} line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  15. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C; Jimenez D, J; Cejudo A, J; Hernandez M, V [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  16. Cryogenic regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kush, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Importance of regenerators in cryogenic refrigerators is highlighted. Design aspects of regenerator are reviewed and the factors involved in the selection of regenerator material are enumerated. Various methods used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and regenerator effectiveness are mentioned. Variation of effectiveness with various parameters is calculated by a computer programme using the ideal, Ackermann and Tipler formulae. Results are presented in graphical form. Listing of the computer programme is given in the Appendix. (author)

  17. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  18. Cryogenic photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardin, G.

    2000-03-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  19. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  20. Setup and commissioning of a cryogenic system for the production of targets to be used in experiments with high energy lasers and heavy ion beams; Aufbau und Inbetriebnahme einer Kryoanlage zur Targeterzeugung fuer Experimente mit Hochenergielasern und Schwerionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Jurij Alexander

    2010-02-10

    Part of this work was the development of a cryogenic system to produce solid state targets out of nitrogen and rare gases but also hydrogen and deuterium. For target optimization a portable cryogenic test and development chamber has been set up, which can be used offline at different experimental places. Cryogenic targets with different geometries have been produced. Targets with a high aspect ratio having a thickness of only a few micrometers and transverse sizes of millimeters are of special interest for the envisioned investigations. Such targets permit the generation of laser plasmas with a high degree of homogeneity, thus enabling the measurement of the ion energy loss under well defined conditions. Nevertheless, high aspect ratio targets are technologically demanding. Thus, in view of energy loss experiments a simpler geometry has also been considered. Therefore, cryogenic nitrogen targets with cm sizes have been produced and irradiated by the nhelix high energy laser system. The free electron density of the generated plasma has been measured in the range up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The measured electron temperature was about 200 eV. The experimental results have been compared to computer simulations and analyzed. It turned out that simulation and experiment are in good agreement, but the free electron density was too low and inhomogeneous for reliable energy loss experiments. Therefore, further deuterium targets with a high aspect ratio but varying geometries have been produced. These targets have been probed by the UNILAC ion beam and it has been shown that the ion beam can penetrate through them. The targets have also been simultaneously irradiated by the high energy laser systems nhelix and Phelix. The free electron density inside the deuterium plasma has been measured and compared with computer simulations. As in the case of nitrogen plasmas a good agreement has been observed. A new measurement technique has been developed to characterize the target

  1. Omega-3 Index and Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Omega-3 PUFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribulova, Narcis; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Egan Benova, Tamara; Knezl, Vladimir; Barancik, Miroslav; Slezak, Jan

    2017-10-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are permanent subjects of interest in relation to the protection of cardiovascular health and the prevention of the incidence of both ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. The purpose of this updated review is to focus on the novel cellular and molecular effects of omega-3 PUFAs, in the context of the mechanisms and factors involved in the development of cardiac arrhythmias; to provide results of the most recent studies on the omega-3 PUFA anti-arrhythmic efficacy and to discuss the lack of the benefit in relation to omega-3 PUFA status. The evidence is in the favor of omega-3 PUFA acute and long-term treatment, perhaps with mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. However, for a more objective evaluation of the anti-arrhythmic potential of omega-3 PUFAs in clinical trials, it is necessary to monitor the basal pre-interventional omega-3 status of individuals, i.e., red blood cell content, omega-3 index and free plasma levels. In the view of evidence-based medicine, it seems to be crucial to aim to establish new approaches in the prevention of cardiac arrhythmias and associated morbidity and mortality that comes with these conditions.

  2. Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer: Implication of two-state focal zooming on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froula, D. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Huang, H.; Hu, S. X.; Hill, E.; Kelly, J. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Shvydky, A.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA low-adiabat cryogenic experiments reduces the hydrodynamic efficiency by ∼35%, which lowers the calculated one-dimensional (1-D) yield by a factor of 7. CBET can be mitigated by reducing the diameter of the laser beams relative to the target diameter. Reducing the diameter of the laser beams by 30%, after a sufficient conduction zone has been generated (two-state zooming), is predicted to maintain low-mode uniformity while recovering 90% of the kinetic energy lost to CBET. A radially varying phase plate is proposed to implement two-state zooming on OMEGA. A beam propagating through the central half-diameter of the phase plate will produce a large spot, while a beam propagating through the outer annular region of the phase plate will produce a narrower spot. To generate the required two-state near-field laser-beam profile, a picket driver with smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) would pass through an apodizer, forming a beam of half the standard diameter. A second main-pulse driver would co-propagate without SSD through its own apodizer, forming a full-diameter annular beam. Hydrodynamic simulations, using the designed laser spots produced by the proposed zooming scheme on OMEGA, show that implementing zooming will increase the implosion velocity by 25% resulting in a 4.5× increase in the 1-D neutron yield. Demonstrating zooming on OMEGA would validate a viable direct-drive CBET mitigation scheme and help establish a pathway to hydrodynamically equivalent direct-drive–ignition implosions by increasing the ablation pressure (1.6×), which will allow for more stable implosions at ignition-relevant velocities

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  4. The experimental plan for cryogenic layered target implosions on the National Ignition Facility - The inertial confinement approach to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M. J.; Lindl, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Atherton, L. J.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D; Collins, G. W.; Fair, J. E.; Fortner, R. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatchett, S. P.; Izumi, N.; Jacoby, B.

    2011-01-01

    Ignition requires precisely controlled, high convergence implosions to assemble a dense shell of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel with ρR>∼1 g/cm 2 surrounding a 10 keV hot spot with ρR ∼ 0.3 g/cm 2 . A working definition of ignition has been a yield of ∼1 MJ. At this yield the α-particle energy deposited in the fuel would have been ∼200 kJ, which is already ∼10 x more than the kinetic energy of a typical implosion. The National Ignition Campaign includes low yield implosions with dudded fuel layers to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel in a diagnostics rich environment. The fuel is a mixture of tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) with a density equivalent to DT. The fraction of D can be adjusted to control the neutron yield. Yields of ∼10 14-15 14 MeV (primary) neutrons are adequate to diagnose the hot spot as well as the dense fuel properties via down scattering of the primary neutrons. X-ray imaging diagnostics can function in this low yield environment providing additional information about the assembled fuel either by imaging the photons emitted by the hot central plasma, or by active probing of the dense shell by a separate high energy short pulse flash. The planned use of these targets and diagnostics to assess and optimize the assembly of the fuel and how this relates to the predicted performance of DT targets is described. It is found that a good predictor of DT target performance is the THD measurable parameter, Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor, ITFX ∼ Y x dsf 2.3 , where Y is the measured neutron yield between 13 and 15 MeV, and dsf is the down scattered neutron fraction defined as the ratio of neutrons between 10 and 12 MeV and those between 13 and 15 MeV.

  5. LDR cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T.

    1988-01-01

    A brief summary from the 1985 Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Asilomar 2 workshop of the requirements for LDR cryogenic cooling is presented. The heat rates are simply the sum of the individual heat rates from the instruments. Consideration of duty cycle will have a dramatic effect on cooling requirements. There are many possible combinations of cooling techniques for each of the three temperatures zones. It is clear that much further system study is needed to determine what type of cooling system is required (He-2, hybrid or mechanical) and what size and power is required. As the instruments, along with their duty cycles and heat rates, become better defined it will be possible to better determine the optimum cooling systems.

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  7. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report 10/1/98 through 9/30/99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Jane

    1999-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has served as the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy since December 30, 1990. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999. During this period, GA and our partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''Onsite Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). We fabricated and delivered over 1790 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNL. We produced more than 1380 glass and plastic target capsules over a wide range of sizes and designs (plus over 300 near target-quality capsules) for LLNL, LANL, SNL, and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetic (UR/LLE). We also delivered various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UWLLE in FY99. We fabricated a device to polish NIF-sized beryllium shells and prepared a laboratory for the safe operation of beryllium polishing activities. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY99, the GA/Schafer portion of the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team effort for design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA was completed. All components of the OCTS were procured, fabricated, assembled, tested, and shipped to UR/LLE. Only minor documentation tasks remain to be done in FY00. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D2 or deuterium

  8. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  9. OMEGA EP high-energy petawatt laser: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maywar, D N; Kelly, J H; Waxer, L J; Morse, S F B; Begishev, I A; Bromage, J; Dorrer, C; Edwards, J L; Folnsbee, L; Guardalben, M J; Jacobs, S D; Jungquist, R; Kessler, T J; Kidder, R W; Kruschwitz, B E; Loucks, S J; Marciante, J R; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Okishev, A V

    2008-01-01

    OMEGA EP (extended performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. It will enable high-energy picosecond backlighting of high-energy-density experiments and inertial confinement fusion implosions, the investigation of advanced-ignition experiments such as fast ignition, and the exploration of high-energy-density phenomena. The OMEGA EP short-pulse beams have the flexibility to be directed to either the existing OMEGA target chamber, or the new, auxiliary OMEGA EP target chamber for independent experiments. This paper will detail progress made towards activation, which is on schedule for completion in April 2008

  10. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  11. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  12. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  13. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  14. Splitting families and the Noetherian type of $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Milovich, David

    2007-01-01

    Extending some results of Malykhin, we prove several independence results about base properties of $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$ and its powers, especially the Noetherian type $Nt(\\beta\\omega-\\omega)$, the least $\\kappa$ for which $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$ has a base that is $\\kappa$-like with respect to containment. For example, $Nt(\\beta\\omega-\\omega)$ is never less than the splitting number, but can consistently be that $\\omega_1$, $2^\\omega$, $(2^\\omega)^+$, or strictly between $\\omega_1$ and $2^\\omega...

  15. Omega test series - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, C.P.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has supported a series of high explosive calibration experiments that were conducted in the Degelen Mountain area of the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan (ROK). This paper will provide an overview of the second and third tests of this series which have been designated Omega-2 and Omega-3. Omega-2 was conducted on Saturday, September 25, 1999 and Omega-3 on Saturday, July 29, 2000. (author)

  16. FY17 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doeppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gumbrell, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krygier, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marley, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Saunders, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-26

    The Capseed campaign goal is to measure shock front velocity non-uniformities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator materials and quantify the level of non-uniformity caused by intrinsic effects. This is done using the Omega High Resolution Velocimeter (OHRV) to obtain velocity maps of the optically reflecting shock front following release of the ablator material into either PMMA for the warm experiments or cryogenic deuterium for the cryo experiments. For the three half-days in FY17 the focus was twofold: complete measurements on the impact of oxygen heterogeneity and oxygen mitigation layers for glow discharge polymer (GDP), and begin measuring velocity non-uniformities on deep release from Be, GDP, and highdensity carbon (HDC) into D2 with improved velocity sensitivity.

  17. Target developments program to prepare LMJ campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, R; Bachelet, F; Botrel, R; Breton, O; Chicanne, C; Dauteuil, C H; Durut, F; Fleury, E; Guillot, L; Hermerel, C; Jeannot, L; Legaie, O; Legay, G; Martin, M; Reneaume, B; Theobald, M; Vincent-Viry, O, E-mail: remy.collier@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Direction des Applications Militaires, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-08-01

    To carry out laser plasma experiments on CEA laser facilities, a R and D program was set up and is still under way to deliver complex targets. For a decade, specific developments are also dedicated to 'Ligne d'Integration Laser' (LIL) in France and Omega facilities (USA). To prepare the targets intended for the first experiments on the Laser 'Megajoule' (LMJ) facility, new developments are required, such as cocktail hohlraum fabrication, gas barrier coating and foam shells developments. For fusion experiments on LMJ, an important program is also under way to elaborate the Cryogenic Target Assembly (CTA), to fill and transport the CTA and to study the conformation process of the DT layer.

  18. Measurements of $\\jpsi$ decays into $\\omega\\pio$, $\\omega\\eta$, and $\\omega\\etap$

    OpenAIRE

    Ablikim, M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on $5.8 \\times 10^7 \\jpsi$ events collected with BESII at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC), the decay branching fractions of $\\jpsi\\to\\omega\\pio$, $\\omega\\eta$, and $\\omega\\etap$ are measured using different $\\eta$ and $\\etap$ decay modes. The results are higher than previous measurements. The $\\omega\\pio$ electromagnetic form factor is also obtained.

  19. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  20. Omega: A 24-beam UV irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Beich, W.; Delettrez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on the characterization and performance of the 24-beam Omega laser facility under full third harmonic (351-nm) upconversion. This system provides for the first time a multibeam laser facility for the illumination of spherical targets with UV laser light in symmetric irradiation conditions with energies in the kilojoule range. This facility is capable of providing sufficient irradiation uniformity to test concepts of direct drive laser fusion with UV-driven ablation targets. The results of initial studies of ablatively driven DT-fueled glass microballoon targets will be described. The 24-beam Omega Nd:phosphate glass facility is capable of providing at 1054 nm output powers in excess of 10 TW in short ( 10 4 full system shots to date) irradiation facility with beam synchronism of approx. =3 psec, beam placement accuracy on target of 10 μm, and interbeam energy variance of approx. =2%. From measured target plane intensity distributions, overall illumination uniformity with tangentially focused beams is estimated to be approx. =5%. In 1984, a symmetric set of six beams was upconverted to 351-nm radiation using the polarization-mismatch scheme developed by Craxton. Monolithic cells of 20-cm clear aperture containing both frequency and doubler and tripler type II KDP crystals in index-matching propylene carbonate liquid were incorporated to output of six of the Omega beams with a full set of UV beam diagnostics

  1. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  2. Cryogenics for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Three cryogenic questions of importance to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are discussed: the primary cooling requirement, the secondary cooling requirement, and the instrument changeout requirement.

  3. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  4. Photoproduction of {omega} mesons on nuclei near the production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanova, M.; Friedrich, S.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M.; Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Novotny, R.; Pant, L.M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Weil, J.; Mosel, U. [Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Giessen (Germany); Anton, G.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Hoessl, J.; Suft, G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Shende, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Institut, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartholomy, O.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klempt, E.; Lotz, J.; Pee, H. van; Schmidt, C.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bayadilov, D. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, Y.A.; Gridnev, A.B.; Lopatin, I.V.; Radkov, A.; Sumachev, V.V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Gothe, R.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Konrad, M.; Menze, D.; Morales, C.; Ostrick, M.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Suele, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Jaegle, I.; Krusche, B.; Mertens, T. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Kopf, B. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany); Langheinrich, J. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    The photoproduction of {omega} mesons on LH{sub 2}, C and Nb has been measured for incident photon energies from 900 to 1300MeV using the CB/TAPS detector at ELSA. The {omega} lineshape does not show any significant difference between the LH{sub 2} and the Nb targets. The experiment was motivated by transport calculations that predicted a sensitivity of the {omega} lineshape to in-medium modifications near the production threshold on a free nucleon of E{sub {gamma}}{sup lab}=1109 MeV. A comparison with recent calculations is given. (orig.)

  5. OMEGA: a short-wavelength laser for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soures, J.M.; Hutchison, R.J.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lund, L.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The OMEGA, Nd:glass laser facility was constructed for the purpose of investigating the feasibility of direct-drive laser fusion. With 24 beams producing a total energy of 4 kJ or a peak power of 12 TW, OMEGA is capable of nearly uniform illumination of spherical targets. Six of the OMEGA beams have recently been converted to short-wavelength operation (351 nm). In this paper, we discuss details of the system design and performance, with particular emphasis on the frequency-conversion system and multi-wavelength diagnostic system

  6. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  7. MOSFET's for Cryogenic Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaye, R.; Ventrice, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Study seeks ways to build transistors that function effectively at liquid-helium temperatures. Report discusses physics of metaloxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) and performances of these devices at cryogenic temperatures. MOSFET's useful in highly sensitive cryogenic preamplifiers for infrared astronomy.

  8. MFTF magnet cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    The prime requirement of the cryogenics of the magnets is to assure a superconducting state for the magnet coils, a large task considering their enormous size. The following presentation addresses the principal topics that have been considered in this cryogenic design

  9. Omega report: energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Adam Smith Institute's Omega Project was conceived to fill a significant gap in the field of public policy research. Administrations entering office in democratic societies are often aware of the problems which they face, but lack a well-developed range of policy options. The Omega Project was designed to create and develop new policy initiatives, to research and analyze these new ideas, and to bring them forward for public discussion in ways which overcame the conventional shortcomings. The organization of the Project is described. The results are presented in sections entitled: energy supplies and policy; the gas industry; North Sea oil; the coal industry; the electricity industry; nuclear energy; renewable and alternative fuel sources; energy conservation. (U.K.)

  10. Recent advances in indirect drive ICF target physics at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, B.A.; Bernat, T.P.; Collins, G.W.; Haan, S.; Landen, O.L.; MacGowan, B.J.; Suter, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    In preparation for ignition on the National Ignition Facility, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester, has performed a broad range of experiments on the Nova and Omega lasers to test the fundamentals of the NIF target designs. These studies have refined our understanding of the important target physics, and have led to many of the specifications for the NIF laser and the cryogenic ignition targets. Our recent work has been focused in the areas of hohlraum energetics, symmetry, shock physics, and target design optimization and fabrication. (author)

  11. Omega-3 fiskeolie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Sørensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Rapport afgrænser sig til evidensbaserede helbredsmæssige gevinster ved et øget indtag af langkædede omega-3, som opnås ved en kost rig på fisk eller som et tilskud af fiskeolier. Der gennemføres en systematisk litteraturgennemgang, som baserer sig på et evidensniveau svarende til styrke A. Det...... betyder, at gennemgangen inkluderer metaanalyser/oversigtsartikler af enten eksperimentelle studier eller observationsstudier, endvidere indgår udvalgte større RCT, som er refereret i meta-analyserne. Sammenfattende findes på baggrund af litteraturgennemgang, at tilskud af omega-3 har effekt på...... hjertesygdom ved at nedsætte mortaliteten. Effekten er mest evident ved personer i særlig risiko for at udvikle hjerte-karsygdom, eller som sekundær/tertiær profylakse. Tilsvarende findes også ved tilskud af omega-3 en forebyggende effekt i forhold til iskæmisk apopleksi. Af mulige virkningsmekanismer viser...

  12. Lightweight HPC beam OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Michal; Jedlinský, Petr; Komanec, Jan

    2017-09-01

    In the design and construction of precast bridge structures, a general goal is to achieve the maximum possible span length. Often, the weight of individual beams makes them difficult to handle, which may be a limiting factor in achieving the desired span. The design of the OMEGA beam aims to solve a part of these problems. It is a thin-walled shell made of prestressed high-performance concrete (HPC) in the shape of inverted Ω character. The concrete shell with prestressed strands is fitted with a non-stressed tendon already in the casting yard and is more easily transported and installed on the site. The shells are subsequently completed with mild steel reinforcement and cores are cast in situ together with the deck. The OMEGA beams can also be used as an alternative to steel - concrete composite bridges. Due to the higher production complexity, OMEGA beam can hardly substitute conventional prestressed beams like T or PETRA completely, but it can be a useful alternative for specific construction needs.

  13. PROPERTIES OF THE $omega$ MESON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, J. B.; Murray, J. J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Huwe, D. O.

    1963-06-15

    Properties of the omega meson were studied from the reaction K/sup -/ + p yields LAMBDA + omega in a 72-in. hydrogen bubble chamber. The momentum of the K/sup -/ mesons was 1.2 to 1.75 Bev/c. The mass of the omega meson is found to be 782 Mev with a width, predominated by three-meson( pi ) decay mode, estimated to be less than 4 Mev. Branching ratios for omega -meson decay into pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup o/, pi /sup o/ gamma , pi /sup +/ i/ sup -/, and e/sup +/e/sup -o/ were determined. (R.E.U.)

  14. Integrated cryogenic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanarena, D.B.; Rao, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated cryogenic pressure-temperature, level-temperature, and flow-temperature sensors have several advantages over the conventional single parameter sensors. Such integrated sensors were not available until recently. Pressure Systems, Inc. (PSI) of Hampton, Virginia, has introduced precalibrated precision cryogenic pressure sensors at the Los Angeles Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1989. Recently, PSI has successfully completed the development of integrated pressure-temperature and level-temperature sensors for use in the temperature range 1.5-375K. In this paper, performance characteristics of these integrated sensors are presented. Further, the effects of irradiation and magnetic fields on these integrated sensors are also reviewed

  15. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  16. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  17. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  18. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  19. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  20. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  1. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  2. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  3. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  4. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  5. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  6. Outline of OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hirokazu

    1989-01-01

    Attention has been paid to the research and development on the group partition and annihilation disposal technology which separates long life radioactive nuclides, rare stable nuclides and so on in high level radioactive wastes and utilizes those for respective suitable uses, or which searches for the possibility of promoting the nuclear disintegration of long life radioactive nuclides, as the basic research aiming at the further development of atomic energy. It was named 'OMEGA project' and its promotion has been carried out. The outline of the project and the international circumstances surrounding it are described. In the high level radioactive wastes generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, the alpha and beta-gamma radionuclides having long life are contained. Consequently, it is necessary to isolate them from human environment for very long period, and the basic method is the glass solidification and the disposal in deep strata, therefore the technical development has been advanced. The OMEGA project was decided in October, 1988, and the course of the research carried out so far, the international cooperation and the subjects of research and development are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Bioavailability of Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Added to a Variety of Sausages in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Anton; Heinrich, Johanna; von Schacky, Clemens

    2017-06-19

    A low Omega-3 Index (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in erythrocytes) is associated with cardiac, cerebral, and other health issues. Intake of EPA and DHA, but not of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), increases the Omega-3 Index. We investigated bioavailability, safety, palatability and tolerability of EPA and DHA in a novel source: a variety of sausages. We screened 96 healthy volunteers, and recruited 44 with an Omega-3 Index Omega-3 Index increased from 4.18 ± 0.54 to 5.72 ± 0.66% ( p Omega-3 Index per intake of EPA and DHA we observed was higher than for other sources previously studied, indicating superior bioavailability. As increasing production of EPA and DHA is difficult, improvements of bioavailability can facilitate reaching the target range for the Omega-3 Index (8-11%).

  8. Infrared detectors and test technology of cryogenic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaole; Liu, Xingxin; Xing, Mailing; Ling, Long

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic camera which is widely used in deep space detection cools down optical system and support structure by cryogenic refrigeration technology, thereby improving the sensitivity. Discussing the characteristics and design points of infrared detector combined with camera's characteristics. At the same time, cryogenic background test systems of chip and detector assembly are established. Chip test system is based on variable cryogenic and multilayer Dewar, and assembly test system is based on target and background simulator in the thermal vacuum environment. The core of test is to establish cryogenic background. Non-uniformity, ratio of dead pixels and noise of test result are given finally. The establishment of test system supports for the design and calculation of infrared systems.

  9. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku

    2015-01-01

    with altered PUFA content and looked at the effects on circulating omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status as a measure of overall omega-3 status. Supplemental oral administration of omega-3 DHA or reduction of RUTF omega-6 linoleic acid using high oleic peanuts improved DHA status, whereas increasing omega...

  10. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system

  11. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  12. Tetrahedral hohlraums at omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrala, G.A.; Goldman, S.R.; Batha, S.H.; Wallace, J.M.; Klare, K.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Oertel, J.; Turner, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    We have initiated a study of the usefulness of tetrahedrally illuminated spherical hohlraums, using the Omega laser beams, to drive planar shocks in packages that require indirect drive. A first suite of experiments used spherical hohlraums with a 2-μm thick gold wall surrounded by a 100-μm thick epoxy layer and had an internal diameter of 2.8 mm. Four laser entrance holes each of diameter 700 μm, located on the tips of a regular tetrahedron were used. The shock velocities and the shock uniformities were measured using optical shock break out techniques. The hohlraum x-ray radiation spectrum was also measured using a 10-channel x-ray detector. Tentatively, peak temperatures approaching 195 eV were achieved and shock speeds of 60 μm/ns were measured, when the hohlraum was driven by 22 kJ of 3 ω radiation. (authors)

  13. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  14. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, M.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D 2 or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments

  16. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iori, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the (Omega) c 0 lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c Σ - , π - and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 ± 19 reconstructed (Omega) c 0 in the (Omega) - π - π + π + and (Omega) - π + decay modes. The lifetime of the (Omega) c 0 is measured to be 65 ± 13(stat) ± 9(sys) fs

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids upregulate adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Tlusty, Michael F.; Benton, Jeannie L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play crucial roles in the development and function of the central nervous system. These components, which must be obtained from dietary sources, have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the presence of omega-6 fatty acids may interfere with omega-3 fatty acid metabolism. The present study investigated whether changes in dietary ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids influence neurogenesis in the lobster (Homarus america...

  18. Cryogenic process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems

  19. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF cryogenic system consists of 3 refrigeration systems: Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), and End Station Refrigerator (ESR). CHL is the main cryogenic system for CEBAF, consisting of a 4.8 kW, 2.0 K refrigerator and transfer line system to supply 2.0 K and 12 kW of 50 K shield refrigeration for the Linac cavity cryostats and 10 g/s of liquid for the end stations. This paper describes the 9-year effort to commission these systems, concentrating on CHL with the cold compressors. The cold compressors are a cold vacuum pump with an inlet temperature of 3 K which use magnetic bearings, thereby eliminating the possibility of air leaks into the subatmospheric He

  20. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  1. Cryogenic support member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is described for restraining a cryogenic system comprising; a rod having a depression at a first end. The rod is made of non-metallic material. The non-metallic material has an effectively low thermal conductivity; a metallic plug; and a metallic sleeve. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod and assembled thereto such that the plug is disposed inside the depression of the rod. The sleeve is disposed over the depression in the rod and the rod is clamped therebetween. The shrink-fit clamping the rod is generated between the metallic plug and the metallic sleeve

  2. Mergers as an Omega estimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The redshift dependence of the fraction of galaxies which are merging or strongly interacting is a steep function of Omega and depends on the ratio of the cutoff velocity for interactions to the pairwise velocity dispersion. For typical galaxies the merger rate is shown to vary as (1 + z)exp m, where m is about 4.51 (Omega)exp 0.42, for Omega near 1 and a CDM-like cosmology. The index m has a relatively weak dependence on the maximum merger velocity, the mass of the galaxy, and the background cosmology, for small variations around a cosmology with a low redshift, z of about 2, of galaxy formation. Estimates of m from optical and IRAS galaxies have found that m is about 3-4, but with very large uncertainties. If quasar evolution follows the evolution of galaxy merging and m for quasars is greater than 4, then Omega is greater than 0.8. 21 refs

  3. The Omega spectrometer in the West Hall.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    Inside the hut which sits on top of the superconducting magnet are the TV cameras that observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet gap below. On the background the two beam lines feeding the spectrometer target, for separated hadrons up to 40 GeV, on the right, for 80 GeV electrons, on the left, respectively. The latter strikes a radiator thus sending into Omega tagged photons up to 80 GeV. On the foreground, the two sections of the large gas Cerenkov counter working at atmospheric pressure, used for trigger purpose.

  4. MCNP and OMEGA criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, E.

    1998-04-01

    The reliability of OMEGA criticality calculations is shown by a comparison with calculations by the validated and widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP. The criticality of 16 assemblies with uranium as fissionable is calculated with the codes MCNP (Version 4A, ENDF/B-V cross sections), MCNP (Version 4B, ENDF/B-VI cross sections), and OMEGA. Identical calculation models are used for the three codes. The results are compared mutually and with the experimental criticality of the assemblies. (orig.)

  5. Double shell planar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H.; Ping, Y.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Amendt, P. A.

    2017-10-01

    The double shell project is aimed at fielding neutron-producing capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in which an outer low-Z ablator collides with an inner high-Z shell to compress the fuel. However, understanding these targets experimentally can be challenging when compared with conventional single shell targets. Halfraum-driven planar targets at OMEGA are being used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions outside of a convergent geometry. Both VISAR and radiography through a tube have advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. A number physics issues are being studied with this platform that include 1-d and higher dimensional effects such as defect-driven hydrodynamic instabilities from engineering features. Additionally, the use of novel materials with controlled density gradients require study in easily diagnosed 1-d systems. This work ultimately feeds back into the NIF capsule platform through manufacturing tolerances set using data from OMEGA. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-17-25386.

  6. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon OmegaC* Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    OpenAIRE

    The BABAR Collaboration; Aubert, B.

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly-charm baryon OmegaC* (css) in the radiative decay OmegaC0 Gamma, where the OmegaC0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega-pi+, Omega-pi+pi0, Omega-pi+pi-pi+, and Cascade-K-pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb$-1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the OmegaC* and the OmegaC0 baryons...

  7. Cryogenic vacuum pump design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, A.J.; Lessard, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the problems and tradeoffs involved in cryogenic vacuum pump analysis, design and manufacture. Particular attention is paid to the several issues unique to cryopumps, e.g., radiation loading, adsorption of noncondensible gases, and regeneration. A general algorithm for cryopump design is also proposed. 12 references

  8. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  9. High-Intensity Laser Diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Junquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP is a new high-energy petawatt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from <1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy petawatt laser at full energy

  10. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  11. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  12. Production of structured lipid with a low omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio by enzymatic interesterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyasoglu, H.

    2017-01-01

    A structured lipid (SL) constituting omega fatty acids was synthesized by using linseed and grape seed oils as substrates via a lipase-catalyzed reaction. Lipozyme® TL IM was used as a biocatalyst. Good quadratic models predicting the incorporation of omega fatty acids were achieved via the Response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal conditions for targeted omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio (2:1) were obtained at a substrate molar ratio 1.4, time 8.4 h, and enzyme amount 6.4%. The SL contained linoleic acid (43 g 100g-1), which was mainly located in the sn-2 position (40 g 100g-1). α-Linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid at the sn-2 position were 22 g 100g-1, and 11 g 100g-1, respectively. The oxidative stability of the SL, and SL with antioxidants was also investigated. The produced SL may be proposed as a source of a balanced intake of omega fatty acids and an ingredient in functional food formulations. [es

  13. Observation of chi(c1) Decays into Vector Meson Pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using (106 +/- 4) x 10(6) psi(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+) e(-) collider, we present the first measurement of decays of chi(c1) to vector meson pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.5) x

  14. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  15. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  16. Cryogenics for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A wide-ranging study of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) structural and cryogenic requirements was made. Concepts and computational methods have been developed for all of the major problems in these areas. Design analyses have been made to provide more detailed information on some items and experimental work has been performed to create data bases in the areas of superfluid heat transfer, superfluid dielectric properties, heat transfer from conductors, and in the thermal and mechanical properties of materials at low temperatures. In most cases optimum solutions have not been made because of the developing nature of the overall study but methodology for optimization has been worked out for essentially all SMES cryogenic and structural elements. The selection of 1.8 K cooling and all aluminum systems in bedrock continues to be the best choice

  17. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  18. Chemiluminescence in cryogenic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotnik, S. V.; Kazakov, Valeri P.

    1989-04-01

    The literature data on chemiluminescence (CL) in cryogenic matrices have been classified and correlated for the first time. The role of studies on phosphorescence and CL at low temperatures in the development of cryochemistry is shown. The features of low-temperature CL in matrices of nitrogen and inert gases (fine structure of spectra, matrix effects) and the data on the mobility and reactivity of atoms and radicals at very low temperatures are examined. The trends in the development of studies on CL in cryogenic matrices, such as the search for systems involving polyatomic molecules and extending the forms of CL reactions, are followed. The reactions of active nitrogen with hydrocarbons that are accompanied by light emission and CL in the oxidation of carbenes at T >= 77 K are examined. The bibliography includes 112 references.

  19. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity. PMID:26950145

  20. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  1. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  2. Omega-3 Index and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittus, Janine; Huber, Marie Theres; Storck, Klaus; Köhler, Anton; Köhler, Jan M; von Arnim, Thomas; von Schacky, Clemens

    2017-10-15

    Erythrocyte levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (Omega-3 Index) were previously found to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at very low levels (Omega-3 Index. These comorbidities can be improved by increasing intake of EPA and DHA, and thus the Omega-3 Index, preferably to its target range of 8% to 11%. Symptoms of OSA might improve by increasing the Omega-3 Index, but more research is needed. In our sleep laboratory, 357 participants with OSA were recruited, and data from 315 participants were evaluated. Three categories of OSA (none/ mild, moderate, severe) were defined based on apnea-hypopnea index. Anthropometrics and lifestyle characteristics (smoking, alcohol, fish intake, omega-3 supplementation) were recorded. Erythrocyte fatty acid compositions were assessed with the HS-Omega-3 Index methodology. The mean Omega-3 Index in all 3 categories of OSA was 5.7%, and no association with OSA was found. There were more male participants with severe OSA (79.7%, P = .042) than females, and participants with severe OSA had a significantly higher body mass index (32.11 ± 6.39 kg/m 2 , P = .009) than participants with mild or moderate OSA. Lifestyle characteristics were not significantly different. In contrast to our hypothesis, an Omega-3 Index of 5.7% was not associated with OSA severity. Previously, an Omega-3 Index Omega-3 Index > 5.7% in an intervention trial with EPA and DHA in OSA, comorbidities of OSA suggest a target range of 8% to 11%. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  3. Cryogenic high current discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meierovich, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    Z-pinches formed from frozen deuterium fibers by a rapidly rising current have enhanced stability and high neutron yield. The efforts to understand the enhanced stability and neutron yield on the basis of classical picture of Bennett equilibrium of the current channel has not given satisfactory results. The traditional approach does not take into account the essential difference between the frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinches and the usual Z-pinches such as exploding wires or classical gas-puffed Z-pinches. The very low temperature of the fiber atoms (10 K), together with the rapidly rising current, result in the coexistence of a high current channel with unionized fiber atoms for a substantial period of time. This phenomena lasts during the risetime. This approach takes into account the difference of the breakdown in a dielectric deuterium fiber and the breakdown in a metallic wire. This difference is essential to the understanding of specific features of cryogenic high current discharges. Z-pinches in frozen deuterium fibers should be considered as a qualitatively new phenomenon on the boundary of cryogenic and high current physics. It is a start of a new branch in plasma physics: the physics of cryogenic high current discharges

  4. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.; Rode, C.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. These accelerating cavities are arranged in pairs in a cryounit. The ensemble of four cryounits (8 cavities) together with their end caps makes up a complete cryostat called a cryogenic module. The four cryounit helium vessels are cross connected to each other and share a common cryogen supply, radiation shield and insulating vacuum. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2 K and the 4.5 K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0 K at .031 ATM and 4.4 K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  5. A measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Tovey, Stuart N; Tresher, J J

    1979-01-01

    In an experiment at the CERN-SPS charged-hyperon beam, a sample of 2500 Omega /sup -/ to Lambda K/sup -/ decays has been collected at Omega /sup -/ momenta at 98.5 and 115 GeV/c. The Omega /sup -/ lifetime is found to be tau /sub Omega /=(0.822+or-0.028)*10/sup -10/ s. (15 refs).

  6. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega*C Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B

    2006-01-01

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon (Omega)* c (css) in the radiative decay (Omega) c 0 γ, where the (Omega) c 0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states (Omega) - π + , (Omega) - π + π 0 , (Omega) - π + π - π + , and Ξ - K - π + π + . This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb -1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the (Omega)* c and the (Omega) c 0 baryons is measured to be 70.8 ± 1.0(stat) ± 1.1(syst) MeV/c 2 . They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of (Omega)* c and (Omega) c 0 in e + e - annihilation

  7. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  8. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  9. Cryogenic implications for DT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souers, P.C.

    1977-10-01

    Cryogenic hydrogen data is being compiled for magnetic fusion engineering. Many physical properties of DT can be extrapolated from H 2 and D 2 values. The phase diagram properties of the D 2 -DT-T 2 mixture are being measured. Three properties which will be greatly affected by tritium should be measured. In order of their perceived importance, they are: (1) solid thermal conductivity, (2) solid mechanical strength, and (3) gaseous electrical conductivity. The most apparent need for DT data is in Tokomak fuel pellet injection. Cryopumping and distillation applications are also considered

  10. Kodak AMSD Cryogenic Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Hammon, John; Barrett, David; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGST will be an IR based optical system that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. As part of the AMSD program, Kodak must demonstrate the ability of our system to perform at these very cold temperatures. Kodak will discuss the test approach that will be used for cryogenic testing at MSFC's XRCF.

  11. Cryogenic forced convection refrigerating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method of refrigerating products by contact with a refrigerating gas which comprises introducing product into a refrigeration zone, contacting the product with the refrigerating gas for a sufficient time to refrigerate it to the appropriate extent and removing the refrigerated product. The improvement for producing the refrigeration gas from a liquid cryogen such that essentially all of the liquid cryogen is fully vaporized before contacting the product comprises: (a) introducing the liquid cryogen, selected from the group consisting of liquid air and liquid nitrogen, at elevated pressure into an ejector as the motive fluid to accelerate a portion of a warm refrigerating gas through the ejector while mixing the cryogen and gas to effect complete vaporization of the liquid cryogen and substantial cooling of the portion of the refrigerating gas resulting in a cold discharge gas which is above the liquefaction temperature of the cryogen; (b) introducing the cold discharge gas into a forced circulation pathway of refrigerating gas and producing a cold refrigerating gas which contacts and refrigerates product and is then at least partially recirculated; (c) sensing the temperature of the refrigerating gas in the forced circulation pathway and controlling the introduction of liquid cryogen with regard to the sensed temperature to maintain the temperature of the discharge gas above the liquefacton temperature of the cryogen utilized

  12. Study of \\Omega_c^0 and \\Omega_c^{*0} Baryons at Belle

    OpenAIRE

    Solovieva, E.; Chistov, R.; Collaboration, for the Belle

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a study of the charmed double strange baryons \\Omega_c^0 and \\Omega_c^{*0} at Belle. The \\Omega_c^0 is reconstructed using the \\Omega_c^0 --> \\Omega^- \\pi^+ decay mode, and its mass is measured to be (2693.6 \\pm 0.3 {+1.8 \\atop -1.5}) MeV/c^2. The \\Omega_c^{*0} baryon is reconstructed in the \\Omega_c^0 \\gamma mode. The mass difference M_{\\Omega_c^{*0}} - M_{\\Omega_c^0} is measured to be (70.7 \\pm 0.9 {+0.1 \\atop -0.9}) MeV/c^2. The analysis is performed using 673 fb^{-1...

  13. Development of cryogenic targets for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grilly, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    The best method of cooling D-T to get the condensate into a uniform spherical layer seems to be through a high conductance fiber. One end of this is cemented to the bottom of the microballoon container and the other end kept at 2 to 10 K above the freezing temperature. Future tests will be made with thin fibers of various materials in order to minimize mass

  14. Cryogenics in CEBAF HMS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogensberger, P.; Ramsauer, F.; Brindza, P.; Wines, R.; Koefler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will report upon the final design, manufacturing and tests of CEBAF's HMS Dipole cryogenic equipment. The liquid nitrogen circuits, the helium circuits and thermal insulation of the magnet will be addressed. The cryogenic reservoir and control module as an integral part of the HMS Dipole magnet will be presented. The construction, manufacturing, tests and final performance of the HMS Dipole cryogenic system will be reported. The LN 2 circuit and the He circuit are tied together by the control system for cool down, normal operation and standby. This system monitors proper temperature differences between both circuits and controls the cryogenic supply to meet the constraints. Implementation of the control features for the cryogenic system into the control system will be reported

  15. Topical application of omega-3-, omega-6-, and omega-9-rich oil emulsions for cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Wan Maznah Wan; Katas, Haliza; Yuen, Ng Pei; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif

    2018-04-17

    Wound healing is a physiological event that generates reconstitution and restoration of granulation tissue that ends with scar formation. As omega fatty acids are part of membrane phospholipids and participate in the inflammatory response, we investigated the effects of omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids in the form of oils on wound healing. Linseed (LO), evening primrose (EPO), and olive oils (OO) rich in omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids were formulated into emulsions and were topically applied on rats with excision wounds. All omega-3-, omega-6-, and omega-9-rich oil formulations were found to accelerate wound closure compared to untreated, with significant improvement (p < 0.05) being observed at day 14. EPO induced early deposition of collagen as evaluated by Masson trichrome staining that correlated well with the hydroxyproline content assay, with the highest level at days 3 and 7. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) showed greater amount of new microvasculature formed in the EPO-treated group, while moderate improvement occurs in the LO and OO groups. EPO increased both the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors in the early stage of healing and declined at the later stage of healing. LO modulates the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine but did not affect the growth factors. In contrast, OO induced the expression of growth factors rather than proinflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that LO, EPO, and OO emulsions promote wound healing but they accomplish this by different mechanisms.

  16. On topological groups admitting a base at identity indexed with $\\omega^\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Leiderman, Arkady G.; Pestov, Vladimir G.; Tomita, Artur H.

    2015-01-01

    A topological group $G$ is said to have a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base if the neighbourhood system at identity admits a monotone cofinal map from the directed set $\\omega^\\omega$. In particular, every metrizable group is such, but the class of groups with a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base is significantly wider. The aim of this article is to better understand the boundaries of this class, by presenting new examples and counter-examples. Ultraproducts and non-arichimedean ordered fields lead to natur...

  17. The f2(1565) in pbar-p -> (omega-omega)pizero interactions at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Braune, K.; Bugg, D.V.; Cramer, O.; Crede, V.; Djaoshvili, N.; Dunnweber, W.; Faessler, M.A.; Hessey, N.P.; Hidas, P.; Hodd, C.; Jamnik, D.; Kilinowsky, H.; Kisiel, J.; Klempt, E.; Kolo, C.; Montanet, L.; Pick, B.; Roethel, W.; Sarantsev, A.; Scott, I.; Strassburger, C.; Thoma, U.; Volcker, C.; Wallis, S.; Walther, D.; Wittmack, K.; Zou, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Data are presented on the reaction pbar-p -> omega-omega-pizero at rest from the Crystal Barrel detector. These data identify a strong signal due to f2(1565) -> omega-omega. The relative production from initial pbar-p states 3P2, 3P1 and 1S0 is well determined from omega-omega decay angular correlations; P-state annihilation dominates strongly. A combined fit is made with data on pbar-p -> 3pizero at rest, where f2(1565) -> pizero-pizero is observed.

  18. FY 1997 report on the study on cryogenic aggregate target PLD process by multi-laser excitation for using gaseous materials; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kitai genryo riyo no tame no taju laser reiki ni yoru gokuteion gyoshutai target PLD process ni kansuru kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This paper reports the result in fiscal 1995 of the study on PLD (pulse laser deposition) thin film formation process having been made since 1993. In fiscal 1995, the effect of irradiation of excimer laser and YGA(SHG) on ablation of aggregates of N2, CH4, Ar, Kr and Xe, and the effect of time-delayed irradiation of YGA(SHG) and KrF excimer laser on ablation of N2 aggregate were studied aiming at exciting ablation by cryogenic aggregate alone. Experimental results by a newly developed multi-laser excitation experiment equipment are as follows. Ablation was not caused by KrF excimer laser irradiation, while caused by YGA(SHG) irradiation. Ablation was caused by 1mm thick N2 or CH4 aggregate alone. Kr target was the most promising among rare gas solid targets expected as seed of ablation occurrence. Multi-irradiation showed a different ablation behavior as compared with single YGA(SHG) irradiation, and in some cases, multi-irradiation not increased scattering of particles. Time-delayed multi- irradiation (YGA(SHG) excitation after excimer excitation) was effective. 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Omega spectrometer ready for SPS beams

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    Two different beams arrive into the Omega magnet: - a tagged photon beam for a charm search - experiment WA4 by the Bonn-CERN-Daresbury-Ecole Polytechnique-Glasgow-Lancaster-Manchester-Orsay-Sheffield Collaboration; - a separated hadron beam, at first for a beam-dump experiment - WA12 by the Birmingham-CERN-Ecole Polytechnique-MPI, Munich-Neuchâtel Collaboration. Beams of either negative or positive pions or kaons, protons or antiprotons, all at an energy around 40 GeV were made to impinge on a copper target where a shower of hadrons was produced and, on occasion, two muons which before detection passed through an iron absorber (not visible here). WA12 was completed in February 1977. At the centre, on top of the superconducting magnet, the hut containing the TV cameras, These observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet below.

  20. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  1. Rare Nonleptonic Decays of the Omega Hyperon: Measurement of the Branching Ratios for Omega-+ --> Xi*0(1530) (anti-Xi*0(1530)) pi-+ and Omega-+ --> Xi-+ pi+- pi-+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaev, Oleg; IIT, Chicago

    2007-01-01

    A clean signal of 78 (24) events has been observed in the rare nonleptonic particle (antiparticle) decay modes (Omega) # -+# → Ξ # -+π# ± π # -+# using data collected with the HyperCP spectrometer during Fermilab's 1999 fixed-target run. We obtain B((Omega) - → Ξ - π + π - ) = [4.32 ± 0.56(stat) ± 0.28(syst)] x 10 -4 and B((Omega) + → Ξ + π - π + ) = 3.13 ± 0.71(stat) ± 0.20(syst) x 10 -4 . This is the first observation of the antiparticle mode. Our measurement for the particle mode agrees with the previous experimental result and has an order-of-magnitude better precision. We extract the contribution from the resonance decay mode (Omega) # -+# → Ξ* 1530 0 ((ovr Ξ* 1530 0 ))π # -+# to the final state Ξ # -+π# ± π # -+#. This the first actual measurement of the resonance-mode branching ratios, gives B((Omega) - → Ξ* 1530 0 π - ) = [4.55 ± 2.33(stat) ± 0.38(syst)] x 10 -5 , B((Omega) + → (ovr Ξ* 1530 0 )π + ) = [1.40 ± 2.83(stat) ± 0.12(syst)] x 10 -5 and disagrees with the current Particle Data Group review value, being ∼ 14 times smaller. Since the central value of the resonance-mode branching ratio is less than two standard deviations away from zero, we also calculate branching ratio upper limits at 90% confidence level: B((Omega) - → Ξ* 1530 0 π - ) -5 and B((Omega) + → (ovr Ξ* 1530 0 ) π + ) -5 . This analysis provides new data on nonleptonic hyperon decays which allows studies of how weak interaction processes occur in the presence of strong interactions

  2. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  3. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  4. Omega-X micromachining system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    A micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nonometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS. The omega axis, named for the angular measurement of the rotation of an eccentric mechanism supporting one end of a tool bar, enables the pulse increments of the tool toward the workpiece to be as little as 0 to 4.4 nm. A dedicated computer coordinates motion in the two axes to produce the workpiece contour. Inertia is reduced by reducing the mass pulsed toward the workpiece to about one-fifth of its former value. The tool system includes calibration instruments to calibrate the micromachining tool system. Backlash is reduced and flexing decreased by using a rotary table and servomotor to pulse the tool in the omega-axis instead of a ball screw mechanism. A thermally-stabilized spindle roates the workpiece and is driven by a motor not mounted on the micromachining tool base through a torque-smoothing pulley and vibrationless rotary coupling. Abbe offset errors are almost eliminated by tool setting and calibration at spindle center height. Tool contour and workpiece contour are gaged on the machine; this enables the source of machining errors to be determined more readily, because the workpiece is gaged before its shape can be changed by removal from the machine

  5. Meat-based functional foods for dietary equilibrium omega-6/omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglero, Guillermo; Frial, Paloma; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Risco, Mónica R; Jaime, Laura; Marin, Francisco R; Palanca, Vicente; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Santoyo, Susana; Señoráns, Francisco J; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Torres, Carlos; Ibañez, Elena

    2008-10-01

    Nutritionists encourage improving the diet by combining meat products with fish or other sea-related foods, in order to equilibrate the omega-6/omega-3 ratio. Strong scientific evidence supports the beneficial health effects of a balanced omega-6/omega-3 PUFA (poly unsaturated fatty acids) diets. In the present work, the scientific bases of new functional meat products with both a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio and a synergic combination of antioxidants are discussed. The aim is to contribute to the dietary equilibrium omega-6/omega-3 and to increase the antioxidant intake. Conventional meat products supplemented with a specific fatty acids and antioxidants combination led to functional foods with healthier nutritional parameters.

  6. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  7. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  8. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    for applications at sub-ambient to cryogenic temperatures. A growing need for energy efficiency and cryogenic applications is creating a worldwide demand for improved thermal insulation systems for low temperatures. The need for thermal characterization of these systems and materials raises a corresponding need for insulation test standards and thermal data targeted for cryogenic-vacuum applications. Such standards have a strong correlation to energy, transportation, and environment and the advancement of new materials technologies in these areas. In conjunction with this project, two new standards on cryogenic insulation were recently published by ASTM International: C1774 and C740. Following the requirements of NPR 7120.10, Technical Standards for NASA Programs and Projects, the appropriate information in this report can be provided to the NASA Chief Engineer as input for NASA's annual report to NIST, as required by OMB Circular No. A-119, describing NASA's use of voluntary consensus standards and participation in the development of voluntary consensus standards and bodies.

  9. Comparison of Omega-2 and Omega-3 calibration explosions basing on regional seismic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlova, N.N.; Sokolova, I.N.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of different parameters of seismic records of Omega-2 and Omega-3 calibration explosions was performed. It was shown that despite the equal charge the level of seismic oscillations was lower during the Omega-3 explosion than during Omega-2. Spectral composition, polarization of oscillations, wave picture is identical at a given station for both explosions. Assumptions were made on the reason of such difference in seismic effect. (author)

  10. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26848697

  11. Enhancements to the timing of the OMEGA laser system to improve illumination uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, W. R.; Katz, J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Kelly, J. H.; Hill, E. M.; Bahr, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    Two diagnostics have been developed to improve the uniformity on the OMEGA Laser System, which is used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The first diagnostic measures the phase of an optical modulator (used for the spectral dispersion technique employed on OMEGA to enhance spatial smoothing), which adds bandwidth to the optical pulse. Setting this phase precisely is required to reduce pointing errors. The second diagnostic ensures that the arrival times of all the beams are synchronized. The arrival of each of the 60 OMEGA beams is measured by placing a 1-mm diffusing sphere at target chamber center. By comparing the arrival time of each beam with respect to a reference pulse, the measured timing spread of the OMEGA Laser System is now 3.8 ps.

  12. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  13. Hadronic decay properties of newly observed $\\Omega_c$ baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic decay widths of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ have been calculated in a $^3P_0$ model. Our results indicate that $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ can be interpreted as the $1P-$wave $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ or $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{5}{2}^-)$. Though the measured masses of $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ are lower than existed theo...

  14. Trapping proton transfer intermediates in the disordered hydrogen-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Plessis, Sylvain; Marchand, Patrick

    2008-08-28

    A molecular-level description of the structural and dynamical aspects that are responsible for the weak acid behaviour of dilute hydrofluoric acid solutions and their unusual increased acidity at near equimolar concentrations continues to elude us. We address this problem by reporting reflection-absorption infrared spectra (RAIRS) of cryogenic HF-H(2)O binary mixtures at various compositions prepared as nanoscopic films using molecular beam techniques. Optical constants for these cryogenic solutions [n(omega) and k(omega)] are obtained by iteratively solving Fresnel equations for stratified media. Modeling of the experimental RAIRS spectra allow for a quantitative interpretation of the complex interplay between multiple reflections, optical interference and absorption effects. The evolution of the strong absorption features in the intermediate 1000-3000 cm(-1) range with increasing HF concentration reveals the presence of various ionic dissociation intermediates that are trapped in the disordered H-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions. Our findings are discussed in light of the conventional interpretation of why hydrofluoric acid is a weak acid revealing molecular-level details of the mechanism for HF ionization that may be relevant to analogous elementary processes involved in the ionization of weak acids in aqueous solutions.

  15. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  16. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  17. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  18. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  19. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of OMEGA implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Michel, D. T.; Shah, R. C.; Campbell, E. M.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲ 10) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming), target offset, and variation in target-layer thickness were investigated using the low-noise, three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Simulations indicate that these asymmetries can significantly degrade the implosion performance. The most important sources of the asymmetries are the target offsets ( ˜10 to 20 μm), beam-power imbalance ( σrms˜10 %), and variations ( ˜5 %) in target-layer thickness. Large-scale asymmetries distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of implosion targets. The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra is influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to an ˜1 -keV increase in apparent temperature. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires a reduction in large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing highly efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs, which mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth.

  20. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-08

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  1. Universal graphs at $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a supercompact cardinal we build a model in which $2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1}}=2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}}=\\aleph_{\\omega_1+3}$ but there is a jointly universal family of size $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+2}$ of graphs on $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$. The same technique will work for any uncountable cardinal in place of $\\omega_1$.

  2. Cryogenic system options for a superconducting aircraft propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, F; Dodds, Graham; Palmer, J; Bertola, L; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a perceived need in the future for a move away from traditional aircraft designs in order to meet ambitious emissions and fuel burn targets. High temperature superconducting distributed propulsion may be an enabler for aircraft designs that have better propulsive efficiency and lower drag. There has been significant work considering the electrical systems required, but less on the cryogenics to enable it. This paper discusses some of the major choices to be faced in cryocooling for aircraft. The likely need for a disposable cryogen to reduce power demand is explained. A set of cryocooling methods are considered in a sensitivity study, which shows that the feasibility of the cryogenic system will depend strongly on the superconducting technology and the aircraft platform. It is argued that all three aspects must be researched and designed in close collaboration to reach a viable solution. (paper)

  3. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  4. Production and Innovative Applications of Cryogenic Solid Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    For over two decades Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing cryogenic pellet injectors for fueling hot, magnetic fusion plasmas. Cryogenic solid pellets of all three hydrogen isotopes have been produced in a size range of 1- to 10-mm diameter and accelerated to speeds from <100 to ∼3000 m/s. The pellets have been formed discretely by cryocondensation in gun barrels and also by extrusion of cryogenic solids at mass flow rates up to ∼0.26 g/s and production rates up to ten pellets per second. The pellets traverse the hot plasma in a fraction of a millisecond and continuously ablate, providing fresh hydrogenic fuel to the interior of the plasma. From this initial application, uses of this technology have expanded to include (1) cryogenic xenon drops or solids for use as a debris-less target in a laser plasma source of X-rays for advanced lithography systems, (2) solid argon and carbon dioxide pellets for surface cleaning or decontamination, and (3) methane pellets in a liquid hydrogen bath for use as an innovative moderator of cold neutrons. Methods of production and acceleration/transport of these cryogenic solids will be described, and examples will be given of their use in prototype systems

  5. Estudo da Polarizacao dos Hiperons $\\Xi^-$ E $\\Omega^-$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho De Gouvea, Andre Luiz [Pontifical Catholic Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1995-01-01

    ln this thesis the polarization of the $\\Xi^-$ hyperon and the $\\Xi^+$ antihyperon produced in the Fermilab Experiment E791 was determined by the analysis of the weak decay $\\Xi^- \\to \\Lambda^0 + \\pi^-$. For $\\Xi^-$ produced in the interaction between a 500 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam and a unpolarized carbon (platinum) target in the region $p_t$ > 0.8 GeV/c and $X_F$ > 0, -10.9% ± 1.5% (-14.7% ± 3.1%) polarization was obtained perpendicular to the production plane and -5.92% ± 1.69% (-2.41%±3.53% $\\approx O$) polarization was measured for $\\Xi^+$. Evidence was also found for a polarized $\\Omega^-$ hyperon produced in the same experiment in the region $X_F$ >0, after analysis of the weak decay $\\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda^0 + K^-$.

  6. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  7. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté). Moreover...

  8. Hohlraum Radiation Drive Measurements on the Omega Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, C.; Turner, R.E.; Landen, O.L.; Suter, L.J.; Amendt, P.; Kornblum, H.N.; Hammel, B.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Wallace, J.; Delamater, N.D.; Gobby, P.; Hauer, A.A.; Magelssen, G.R.; Oertel, J.A.; Knauer, J.; Marshall, F.J.; Bradley, D.; Seka, W.; Soures, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved drive measurements with thin-walled hohlraum targets on Omega [J.M.Soures et al., Phys.Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] are presented and compared with two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. For the first time, radiation fluxes are measured through the laser entrance hole instead of through a diagnostic side hole. We find improved agreement between time dependent experiments and simulations using this new technique. In addition, the drive history obtained in this manner correlates well with the drive onto the capsule at target center. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. The Omega-3 Index and relative risk for coronary heart disease mortality: Estimation from 10 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William S; Del Gobbo, Liana; Tintle, Nathan L

    2017-07-01

    A recent 19-cohort meta-analysis examined the relationships between biomarkers of omega-3 fatty acids and risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). That study did not, however, report hazard ratios (HRs) specifically as a function of erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic (DHA) levels, a metric called the Omega-3 Index in which EPA + DHA content is expressed as a percent of total fatty acids. The Omega-3 Index has been used in several recent studies and is a validated biomarker of omega-3 fatty acid tissue levels, but additional data are needed to confirm (or refute) the originally-proposed clinical cut-points of Omega-3 Index and median quintile values for this metric across 10 of the cohorts for which the needed data were available. The overall mean (SD) for the Omega-3 Index in these 10 cohort studies was 6.1% (2.1%), and the HR for a 1-SD increase was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.91). Median quintile 1 and 5 levels were 4.2% vs. 8.3%, respectively. Based on these values, we estimate that risk for fatal CHD would have been reduced by about 30% moving from an Omega-3 Index of 4%-8%. These findings support the use of 8% as reasonable therapeutic targets for the Omega-3 Index. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  11. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  12. CEBAF cryogenic system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.; Brindza, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. There is one recirculating arc for each energy beam that is circulating and any three of the four correlated energies may be supplied to any of the three experimental halls. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2K and the 4.5K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0K at .031 ATM and 4.4K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  13. The role of Omega-3 and Omega-9 fatty acids for the treatment of neuropathic pain after neurotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Arriero, Iriana; Serrano-Muñoz, Diego; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Goicoechea, Carlos; Taylor, Julian; Velasco, Ana; Ávila-Martín, Gerardo

    2017-09-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as docosaexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), mediate neuroactive effects in experimental models of traumatic peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. Cellular mechanisms of PUFAs include reduced neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, enhanced neurotrophic support, and activation of cell survival pathways. Bioactive Omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA) and 2-hydroxy oleic acid (2-OHOA), also show therapeutic effects in neurotrauma models. These FAs reduces noxious hyperreflexia and pain-related anxiety behavior following peripheral nerve injury and improves sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury (SCI), including facilitation of descending inhibitory antinociception. The relative safe profile of neuroactive fatty acids (FAs) holds promise for the future clinical development of these molecules as analgesic agents. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given.......There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take...

  15. Effect of omega-3 on auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Omega-3 fatty acid have structural and biological roles in the body 's various systems . Numerous studies have tried to research about it. Auditory system is affected a s well. The aim of this article was to review the researches about the effect of omega-3 on auditory system.Methods: We searched Medline , Google Scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SID search engines with the "auditory" and "omega-3" keywords and read textbooks about this subject between 19 70 and 20 13.Conclusion: Both excess and deficient amounts of dietary omega-3 fatty acid can cause harmful effects on fetal and infant growth and development of brain and central nervous system esspesially auditory system. It is important to determine the adequate dosage of omega-3.

  16. Omega-3 Index of Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Kellie; Ratnayake, Walisundera M N

    2015-11-01

    Cardioprotective properties have been associated with two fatty acids-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The Omega-3 Index indicates the percentage of EPA+DHA in red blood cell fatty acids. Omega-3 Index levels of the Canadian population have not been directly measured. Data for respondents aged 20 to 79 from cycle 3 (2012/2013) of the Canadian Health Measures Survey were used to calculate means and the prevalence of Omega-3 Index coronary heart disease (CHD) risk cut-offs-high (4% or less), moderate (more than 4% to less than 8%), and low (8% or more)-by sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, including fish consumption and use of omega-3 supplements. Associations between the Omega-3 Index and CHD-related factors including biomarkers, risk factors, and previous CHD events, were examined in multivariate regression models. The mean Omega-3 Index level of Canadians aged 20 to 79 was 4.5%. Levels were higher for women, older adults, Asians and other non-white Canadians, omega-3 supplement users, and fish consumers; levels were lower for smokers and people who were obese. Fewer than 3% of adults had levels associated with low CHD risk; 43% had levels associated with high risk. No CHD-related factor was associated with the Omega-3 Index when control variables were taken into account. Omega-3 Index levels among Canadian adults were strongly related to age, race, supplement use, fish consumption, smoking status and obesity. Fewer than 3% of adults had Omega-3 Index levels associated with low risk for CHD.

  17. Liquid helium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Kitami, T.; Torikoshi, M.

    1984-12-01

    A liquid helium target system has been built and used for the experiment on the reaction 4 He(γ, p). The target system has worked satisfactorily; the consumption rate of liquid helium is 360 ml/h and the cryogenic system retains liquid helium for about ten hours. The structure, operation and performance of the target system are reported. (author)

  18. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  19. The MicrOmega Investigation Onboard Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, J.-P.; Hamm, V.; Langevin, Y.; Pilorget, C.; Arondel, A.; Bouzit, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Darié, A.; Evesque, C.; Hansotte, J.; Gardien, V.; Gonnod, L.; Leclech, J.-C.; Meslier, L.; Redon, T.; Tamiatto, C.; Tosti, S.; Thoores, N.

    2017-07-01

    MicrOmega is a near-IR hyperspectral microscope designed to characterize in situ the texture and composition of the surface materials of the Hayabusa2 target asteroid. MicrOmega is implemented within the MASCOT lander (Ho et al. in Space Sci. Rev., 2016, this issue, doi:10.1007/s11214-016-0251-6). The spectral range (0.99-3.65 μm) and the spectral sampling (20 cm^{-1}) of MicrOmega have been chosen to allow the identification of most potential constituent minerals, ices and organics, within each 25 μm pixel of the 3.2× 3.2 mm2 FOV. Such an unprecedented characterization will (1) enable the identification of most major and minor phases, including the potential organic phases, and ascribe their mineralogical context, as a critical set of clues to decipher the origin and evolution of this primitive body, and (2) provide the ground truth for the orbital measurements as well as a reference for the analyses later performed on returned samples.

  20. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  1. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  2. Omega-6/Omega-3 and PUFA/SFA in Colossoma macropomum Grown in Roraima, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves Melho Filho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study was evaluated the fatty acids composition of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum fillet, fish species cultivated in Roraima State, Brazil. For the extraction of tambaqui oil was used Sohxlet device and then it was methylated. The oil  was identified using a gas chromatograph and were identified 24 acids and these were divided into characteristic groups such as: saturated fatty acids (SFA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and series fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. The ratios obtained were PUFA/SFA and omega-6/omega-3. The results of chromatographic analysis were subjected to tests by variance ANOVA and multiple comparisons of Tukey at 5%. The ratios omega-6/omega-3 and PUFA/SFA showed values ​​of 8.58 and 0.75 respectively.

  3. SiPM properties at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biroth, Maik; Achenbach, Patrick; Thomas, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Downie, Evangeline [George Washington University, DC (United States); Collaboration: A2-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    At the electron accelerator Mainzer Mikrotron (MAMI) an active target build of polarizable scintillators will be operated at approximately 25 mK. To read out the scintillation light, the photodetectors have to withstand cryogenic temperatures of 4 K and high count rates. Therefore the properties of different types of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were studied at cryogenic temperatures. In liquid nitrogen at 77 K, problems with quenching in Hamamatsu SiPMs and with the protective epoxy layer covering Zecotek SiPMs were observed. Tests with one Zecotek SiPM were successful after removal of the epoxy layer in liquid helium at 4 K and no after-pulses could be observed. Fundamental parameters like break-down voltage, single-pixel gain, crosstalk probability and the dark-count rate were measured and compared to room temperature. The photon detection efficiency was estimated by SiPMs response to short LED pulses. All these parameters were extracted by curve-fitting of SiPM charge spectra with a new analytical function.

  4. The DAΦNE cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, M.

    1997-12-01

    The DAΦNE Project utilises superconductivity technology for a total of six superconducting magnets: the two Experiment magnets (KLOE and FINUDA) and the four Compensator Solenoid magnets needed to compensate the magnetic effect of the Experiment magnets on the electron and positron beams. This effect, on beams of 510 MeV (nominal DAΦNE Energy), is expected to be relevant, especially with the aim of achieving a very high luminosity, which is the main target of the Project. The KLOE superconducting magnet has two possible working positions: the first in the DAΦNE Hall, when the Experiment will be in operation, and the second one in the KLOE Assembly Hall. This second position is the first to be utilised for the KLOE magnet Acceptance Test and magnetic field mapping, prior to the mounting of all the experimental apparatus inside the magnet. This note intends to present the DAΦNE Cryogenic System and how the authors have converged to the definition of a common Cryogenic System compatible with all the six superconducting magnets

  5. Understanding the branching ratios of \\chi_{c1}\\to\\phi\\phi, \\omega\\omega, \\omega\\phi observed at BES-III

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dian-Yong; He, Jun; Li, Xue-Qian; Liu, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we discuss the contribution of the mesonic loops to the decay rates of $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\phi,\\,\\omega\\omega$ which are suppressed by the helicity selection rules and $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\omega$ which is a double-OZI forbidden process. We find that the mesonic loop effects naturally explain the clear signals of $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\phi,\\,\\omega\\omega$ decay modes observed by the BES collaboration. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the $\\omega-\\phi$ mixing which may result in t...

  6. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astarita, G.; McKenzie, J.H.; Wang, B.; Strassburg, K.; Doneanu, A.; Johnson, J.; Baker, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Murphy, J.; Vreeken, R.J.; Langridge, J.; Kang, J.X.

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other

  7. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  8. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  9. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M.J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.; Schneider, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  10. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  11. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  12. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors

  14. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  15. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  16. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-11-01

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  17. OMEGA for the Future of Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    OMEGA: Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. To develop a photobioreactor (PBR) for growing algae (Oil, food, fertilizer) that does not compete with agriculture for land (deployed offshore), water or fertilizer (uses/treats wastewater).

  18. The structure of omega3 food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Fish oil is rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) which are generally recognized as being beneficial to the health [1]. The addition of fish oil to food products is attractive to both the consumers and the food industry. Indeed, these components will improve nutritional value...... and add product value. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds in their fatty acid chains and this attribute renders them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. Omega-3 PUFAs can be added to food products as neat oil or as a delivery system such as oil-in-water emulsions. In this last configuration...... and the prooxidants. But this protective aspect is a really complex process and it is dependent on the food matrix to which the oil is added [2]. Oxidation is presumed to be initiated at the emulsifier layer, i.e. the interface layer between the oil and water where the oil is most likely to come into contact...

  19. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  20. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  1. Production of structured lipid with a low omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio by enzymatic interesterification; Producción de lípidos estructurados con una baja relación de ácidos grasos omega-6/omega-3 mediante interesterificación enzimática.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyasoglu, H.

    2017-07-01

    A structured lipid (SL) constituting omega fatty acids was synthesized by using linseed and grape seed oils as substrates via a lipase-catalyzed reaction. Lipozyme® TL IM was used as a biocatalyst. Good quadratic models predicting the incorporation of omega fatty acids were achieved via the Response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal conditions for targeted omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio (2:1) were obtained at a substrate molar ratio 1.4, time 8.4 h, and enzyme amount 6.4%. The SL contained linoleic acid (43 g 100g-1), which was mainly located in the sn-2 position (40 g 100g-1). α-Linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid at the sn-2 position were 22 g 100g-1, and 11 g 100g-1, respectively. The oxidative stability of the SL, and SL with antioxidants was also investigated. The produced SL may be proposed as a source of a balanced intake of omega fatty acids and an ingredient in functional food formulations. [Spanish] Se sintetizaron lípidos estructurados (SL), formados por ácidos grasos omega, utilizando aceites de linaza y semillas de uva como sustratos a través de una reacción catalizada por lipasa. Se utilizó Lipozyme® TL IM como biocatalizador. Los buenos modelos cuadráticos que predecían la incorporación de los ácidos grasos omega se lograron a través de la metodología de superficie de respuesta (RSM). Se obtuvieron las condiciones óptimas para una proporción de ácidos grasos omega-6/omega-3 (2:1) con una relación molar de sustrato 1:4, tiempo de 8,4 h, y cantidad de enzima 6,4%. El SL contenía ácido linoleico (43 g·100 g-1), que se localizaba principalmente en la posición sn-2 (40 g·100 g-1). El ácido α-linoleico y el ácido α-linolénico en la posición sn-2 fueron de 22 g·100 g-1y 11 g·100 g-1, respectivamente. También se investigó la estabilidad oxidativa del SL y SL con antioxidantes. El SL producido puede ser propuesto como una fuente para una ingesta equilibrada de ácidos grasos omega y un ingrediente en las formulaciones

  2. Cryogenically assisted abrasive jet micromachining of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getu, H; Papini, M; Spelt, J K

    2008-01-01

    The abrasive jet micromachining (AJM) of elastomers and polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for use in micro-fluidic devices was found to be very slow or impossible at room temperature. To enhance the material removal rate in such materials, a stream of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) was injected into the abrasive jet, cooling the target to cryogenic temperatures. Erosion rate measurements on the three polymeric materials (PDMS, ABS and PTFE) with and without the use of LN 2 were compared along with the profiles of micromachined channels and holes. It was found that the use of LN 2 cooling caused brittle erosion in PDMS, allowing it to be micromachined successfully. An erosion rate increase was also observed in PTFE and ABS at high and intermediate impact angles. The use of LN 2 also was found to reduce particle embedding

  3. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  4. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  5. Measurements of B Meson Decays to omega K* and omega rho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2005-02-14

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K* and {omega}{rho} in 89 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV.

  6. Development of a cryogenic EOS capability for the Z Pulsed Radiation Source: Goals and accomplishments of FY97 LDRD project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.; Johnston, R.R.; Asay, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Experimental cryogenic capabilities are essential for the study of ICF high-gain target and weapons effects issues involving dynamic materials response at low temperatures. This report describes progress during the period 2/97-11/97 on the FY97 LDRD project ''Cryogenic EOS Capabilities on Pulsed Radiation Sources (Z Pinch)''. The goal of this project is the development of a general purpose cryogenic target system for precision EOS and shock physics measurements at liquid helium temperatures on the Z accelerator Z-pinch pulsed radiation source. Activity during the FY97 LDRD phase of this project has focused on development of a conceptual design for the cryogenic target system based on consideration of physics, operational, and safety issues, design and fabrication of principal system components, construction and instrumentation of a cryogenic test facility for off-line thermal and optical testing at liquid helium temperatures, initial thermal testing of a cryogenic target assembly, and the design of a cryogenic system interface to the Z pulsed radiation source facility. The authors discuss these accomplishments as well as elements of the project that require further work

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids: potential role in the management of early Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Jicha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gregory A Jicha, William R MarkesberyUniversity of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USAbstract: Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain growth and development. They play an important role throughout life, as critical modulators of neuronal function and regulation of oxidative stress mechanisms, in brain health and disease. Docosahexanoic acid (DHA, the major omega-3 fatty acid found in neurons, has taken on a central role as a target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A plethora of in vitro, animal model, and human data, gathered over the past decade, highlight the important role DHA may play in the development of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including AD. Cross sectional and prospective cohort data have demonstrated that reduced dietary intake or low brain levels of DHA are associated with accelerated cognitive decline or the development of incipient dementia, including AD. Several clinical trials investigating the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in AD have been completed and all failed to demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of AD. However, these trials produced intriguing data suggesting that the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may depend on the stage of disease, other dietary mediators, and apolipoprotein E status.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stress, clinical studies, treatment

  8. Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things To Know About Omega-3s for Heart Disease Share: Omega-3 fatty acids are a group ... shows omega-3s have a protective effect against heart disease. Experts agree that fish rich in omega-3 ...

  9. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  10. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  11. COOLING STAGES OF CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Троценко, А. В.

    2011-01-01

    The formalized definition for cooling stage of low temperature system is done. Based on existing information about the known cryogenic unit cycles the possible types of cooling stages are single out. From analyses of these stages their classification by various characteristics is suggested. The results of thermodynamic optimization of final throttle stage of cooling, which are used as working fluids helium, hydrogen and nitrogen, are shown.

  12. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  13. Reliable, Practical Kilowatt-class Cryogenics for Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoor, Philip [Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Following the successful development of a Flexibly-Attached Remote cryocooler for ~200W at 80K under a Phase II DOE grant, Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc. (dba CFIC-Qdrive; acquired by Chart Industries in 2012) was invited by the DOE to scale up this technology to ~1000W/80K in a Phase III program. This target is responsive to the “Cryogenics Roadmap” developed by the DOE to accelerate the development of cryogenic cooling necessary to support the emerging superconducting power applications. Mirroring the Roadmap, our proposal included a capacity target (1000W at 80K) and a cost target (<$40/watt, at 80K), but unlike the Roadmap, we did not formally propose to meet a specific efficiency target. We achieved 75% of the capacity target, with a record-size coaxial “pulse-tube” coldfinger, but only by working on the project well beyond the original “period of performance” on unfunded extension. We believe 100% of the capacity target was within reach, but our own budget and time constraints forbade additional effort. We were less successful in meeting the cost targets. Ultimately, the specific configuration that was the subject of Phase III was not commercialized, largely because the market for superconducting devices has not been nearly as robust as was expected at the advent of the Roadmap.

  14. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castles, S.H.; Schein, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is described for use in craft such as launch, orbital and space vehicles subject to changes in orientation and conditions of vibration and weightlessness comprising: an insulated tank; a porous open celled sponge-like material disposed substantially throughout the contained volume of the insulated tank; a cryogenic fluid disposed within the sponge-like material; a cooling finger immersed in the cryogenic fluid, the finger extending from inside the insulated tank externally to an outside source such as an instrument detector for the purpose of transmitting heat from the outside source into the cryogenic fluid; means for filling the insulated tank with cryogenic fluid; and means for venting vaporized cryogenic fluid from the insulated tank

  15. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  16. Observation of scattered light between omega/2 and 3/2 omega in short wavelength laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, L.M.; Seka, W.; Tanaka, K.; Simon, A.; Short, R.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive measurements have been carried out on scattered radiation in the spectral region between omega/2 and 3/2 omega from plasmas produced by 351 nm lasers. The relative intensities of the continuum radiation relative to the line features at omega/2 and 3/2 omega will be shown. A new spectral feature has been observed between 3/2 omega and omega which may be interpreted as an upscattered component produced by ordinary Raman scattering. The overall experimental evidence for ordinary Raman scattering vs stimulated Raman scattering will be discussed

  17. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-01-01

    The semileptonic decays of (Omega) c and (Omega) b are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy Λ baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For (Omega) b to (Omega) c the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured Λ c + → Λe + ν rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of (Omega) b to pairs of ground and excited (Omega) c states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of (Omega) Q vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 ± 2%) for the fraction of (Omega) c → Ξ (*) decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of (Omega) c → (Omega) (*) decays to the ground state (Omega). The elastic fraction of (Omega) b → (Omega) c ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models

  18. Rare B Meson Decays With Omega Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; /Colorado U.

    2006-04-24

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are particularly interesting because of their importance in understanding the CP violation, which is essential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe, and of their roles in testing the ''effective'' theory of B physics. The study has been done with the BABAR experiment, which is mainly designed for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons, and secondarily for rare processes that become accessible with the high luminosity of the PEP-II B Factory. In a sample of 89 million produced B{bar B} pairs on the BABAR experiment, we observed the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup +} for the first time, made more precise measurements for B{sup +} {yields} {omega}h{sup +} and reported tighter upper limits for B {yields} {omega}K* and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup 0}.

  19. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation

  20. Direct-drive high-convergence-ratio implosion studies on the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.

    2000-01-01

    A series of direct-drive implosion experiments, using room-temperature, gas-filled CH targets, are performed on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The target performance at stagnation and its dependence on beam smoothing and pulse shaping is investigated. Compressed core conditions are diagnosed using x-ray and neutron spectroscopy, and x-ray imaging. The individual beams of OMEGA are smoothed by spectral dispersion in two dimensions (2D SSD) with laser bandwidths up to ∼0.3 THz, with 1 ns square to 2.5 ns shaped pulses. A clear dependence of target performance on pulse shape and beam smoothing is seen, with the target performance (yield, areal density, and shell integrity) improving as SSD bandwidth is applied. (c)

  1. The cryogenic control system of EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L.B.; Zhow, Z.W.; Xia, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A reliable and flexible duplex control system is required for cryogenic system. ► The cryogenic control system is based on Delta-V DCS. ► It has been proved to be an effective way to control cryogenic process. ► It will provide useful experience and inspiration for the development in the cryogenic control engineering. - Abstract: A large scale helium cryogenic system is one of the key components for the EAST tokamak device for the cooling of PF and TF coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines, current leads and cryopumps. Since the cooling scheme of the EAST cryogenic system is fairly complicated, a reliable and flexible control system is required for cryogenic system. The cryogenic control system is based on DeltaV DCS which is the process control software developed by Emerson Company. The EAST cryogenic system has been in operation for four years and has been proved to be safe, stable and energy saving by the past 7 experiments. This paper describes the redundant control network, hardware configuration, software structure, auxiliary system and the new development in the future.

  2. Effects of Diets Enriched in Omega-9 or Omega-6 Fatty Acids on Reproductive Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Neda Mousavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal type and amounts of dietary fatty acids affect on reproductive process in the mice. The present study investigated the effects of maternal supplementation with different amounts of omega-6 or omega-9 during pregnancy on the number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of gestation.Materials and methods: Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into four dietary groups including low omega-6 (16%; LO6, low omega-9 (16%; LO9, high omega-6 (45%; HO6 and high omega-9 (45%; HO9 during gestation. Number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of pregnancy were compared among four dietary groups.Results: There was significant difference between LO6 and HO6 (p < 0.0001, LO9 and HO9 (p < 0.0001 groups in total number of pups. The number of female and male offspring were significantly different between LO6 and LO9 (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001, respectively, LO9 and HO9 (p = 0.01 and p = 0.025 groups. Duration of pregnancy was significantly higher in low fat diet than high fat diet groups (< 0.001.Conclusion: High fat diet reduced number of pups, gestation duration and lead to early labor. Omega-9 fatty acids shifted sex of offspring to females.

  3. Measurement of the Spin of the Omega- Hyperon at Babar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement of the spin of the (Omega) - hyperon produced through the exclusive process Ξ c 0 → (Omega) - K + is presented using a total integrated luminosity of 116 fb -1 recorded with the BABAR detector at the e + e - asymmetric-energy B-Factory at SLAC. Under the assumption that the Ξ c 0 has spin 1/2, the angular distribution of the Λ from (Omega) - → ΛK - decay is inconsistent with all half-integer (Omega) - spin values other than 3/2. Lower statistics data for the process (Omega) c 0 → (Omega) - π + from a 230 fb -1 sample are also found to be consistent with (Omega) - spin 3/2. If the Ξ c 0 spin were 3/2, an (Omega) - spin of 5/2 cannot be excluded

  4. Omega-Harmonic Functions and Inverse Conductivity Problems on Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berenstein, Carlos A; Chung, Soon-Yeong

    2003-01-01

    .... To do this, they introduce an elliptic operator DELTA omega and an omega-harmonic function on the graph, with its physical interpretation being the diffusion equation on the graph, which models an electric network...

  5. First measurement of the Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Thresher, J J; Tovey, Stuart N

    1979-01-01

    In an experiment in the CERN-SPS charged-hyperon beam, the main Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios have been measured to be Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Lambda K/sup -/)/ Gamma (all)=0.686+or-0.013, Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/ pi /sup -/)/ Gamma (all) =0.234+or-0.013, Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/)/ Gamma (all)=0.080+or-0.008. The relative branching ratio of the two Xi pi modes provides a test of the Delta I=1/2 rule in decuplet-octet transitions. A search has also been made for the rare decay modes Omega /sup -/ to Lambda pi /sup -/, Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ gamma , Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ and Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/e/sup -/ nu . (6 refs).

  6. Investigation of methods for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion tartets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate methods for fabricating, characterizing and transporting cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets on a continuous basis. A microprocessor-based data acquisition system has been built that converts a complete target image to digital data, which are then analyzed by automated software procedures. The low temperatures required to freeze the hydrogen isotopes contained in a target is provided by a cryogenic cold chamber capable of attaining 15 K. A new method for target manipulation and positioning is studied that employs molecular gas beams to levitate a target and an electrostatic quadrupole structure to provide for its lateral containment. Since the electrostatic target-positioning scheme requires that the targets be charged, preliminary investigation has been carried out for a target-charging mechanism based on ion-bombardment

  7. Investigation of methods for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion tartets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate methods for fabricating, characterizing and transporting cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets on a continuous basis. A microprocessor-based data acquisition system has been built that converts a complete target image to digital data, which are then analyzed by automated software procedures. The low temperatures required to freeze the hydrogen isotopes contained in a target is provided by a cryogenic cold chamber capable of attaining 15 K. A new method for target manipulation and positioning is studied that employs molecular gas beams to levitate a target and an electrostatic quadrupole structure to provide for its lateral containment. Since the electrostatic target-positioning scheme requires that the targets be charged, preliminary investigation has been carried out for a target-charging mechanism based on ion-bombardment.

  8. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations.......Growing consumer awareness of functional foods and understanding of their positive nutritional effects have led to the need of specific studies and have captured more attention than ever before. In Europe, Danish consumers have been found to be relatively negative towards the concept of functional...

  9. Developmentally dependent and different roles of fatty acids OMEGA-6 and OMEGA-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourek, J; Mourek, J

    2011-01-01

    The developmentally-dependent differences in the biological significances and effects of PUFA-OMEGA-6 (namely of arachidonic acid) and PUFA-OMEGA-3 (namely of docosahexaenoic acid) are discussed. The clinical results as well as developmental experiences are indicating a hypothesis of the evolution...... that created mutual relationship between those two substances (with immunological basis and following recuperation). The anti-inflammatory actions of PUFA-OMEGA-3 are the most visible (and significant) contrasts as compared with the large affects of namely arachidonic acid and its metabolites....

  10. OMEGA EP: High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the OMEGA Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals

  11. OMEGA EP: High-energy peta-watt capability for the OMEGA laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a peta-watt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals. (authors)

  12. OMEGA EP: High-energy peta-watt capability for the OMEGA laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a peta-watt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals. (authors)

  13. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  14. Hierarchical Analysis of the Omega Ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Paulson, Patrick R.

    2009-12-01

    Initial delivery for mathematical analysis of the Omega Ontology. We provide an analysis of the hierarchical structure of a version of the Omega Ontology currently in use within the US Government. After providing an initial statistical analysis of the distribution of all link types in the ontology, we then provide a detailed order theoretical analysis of each of the four main hierarchical links present. This order theoretical analysis includes the distribution of components and their properties, their parent/child and multiple inheritance structure, and the distribution of their vertical ranks.

  15. Status of optics on the OMEGA laser after 18 months of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigatti, A.L.; Smith, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The 60-beam OMEGA laser has sustained approximately 1000 target shots without significant damage to the optics. Approximately 3000 optics on the OMEGA laser system were closely monitored during their installation, and inspections continue throughout the operation of the system. A review of the condition of these optics at each stage of the laser and a summary of the peak incident fluences are presented. The most severe damage on OMEGA is seen on the input, fused-silica, spatial filter lenses. Since these optics are under vacuum, inspection of damaged lenses occurs on a more frequent cycle to track the growth of the defect and to maintain the system's safety. An optic is replaced well before massive failure is expected to occur. Other optics on the system that exhibit different types of damage are BK-7 spatial filter lenses, focus lenses, and target mirrors. The majority of OMEGA optics are not damaging. These include the polarizers, frequency-conversion crystals, primary pickoff lenses, calorimeters, and liquid-crystal optics. Laser glass and development optics such as distributed phase plates are not covered in this review

  16. Hubungan Asupan Asam Lemak Omega-3 dan Omega-6 dengan Tekanan Darah Wanita Usia 30 – 50 Tahun

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Mega Lucyta; Probosari, Enny; Wijayanti, Hartanti Sandi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Decreased intake of omega-3 and increased intake of omega-6 can increase the risk of hypertension. Hypertension cases in Indonesia are highest in women especially aged 30 - 50 years. This study aimed to determine correlation of omega-3 and omega-6 intake with blood pressure in women aged 30-50 years.Method : This was an observational research with cross-sectional study design. Fifty four subjects were select...

  17. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akadiri Yessoufou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases.

  18. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  19. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavakkoli-Kakhki, Mandana; Motavasselian, Malihe; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Esfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Nematy, Mohsen; Eslami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM).

  20. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    OpenAIRE

    von Hahn, Robert; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A.; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion a...

  1. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  2. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    OpenAIRE

    Brenna, Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku; Berkley, James; Calder, Phillip; Jones, Kelsey; Liu, Lei; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Briend, André

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in neurocognitive and immune development led two independent groups to evaluate RUTFs. Jones et al. (BMC Med 13:93, 2015), in a study in BMC Medicine, and Hsieh et al. (J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nu...

  3. Cerenkov counters at the Omega Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    P. Petroff on the left. Here one sees both the gas Cerenkov counters sitting in front of the magnet to select forward emitted particles. The smaller one, working at high pressure, sits nearest to the Omega magnet (see photo 7505073X), the other (see photo 7505071X) works at atmospheric pressure.

  4. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  5. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  6. Photoproduction of omega mesons off the proton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, A.; Crede, V.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Brinkmann, K. T.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Jude, T.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Loehner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J.G; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Sparks, N.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Wiedner, U.

    2015-01-01

    The differential cross sections and unpolarized spin-density matrix elements for the reaction gamma rho -> rho omega were measured using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment for initial photon energies ranging from the reaction threshold to 2.5GeV. These observables were measured from the radiative decay of

  7. An $ omega $-complete equational specification of interleaving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Fokkink (Wan); S.P. Luttik (Bas)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the process theory $PA$ that includes an operation for parallel composition, based on the interleaving paradigm. We prove that the standard set of axioms of $PA$ is not $omega$-complete by providing a set of axioms that are valid in $PA$, but not derivable from the

  8. Impact of flows on ion temperatures inferred from neutron spectra in asymmetrically driven OMEGA DT implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Lahmann, B.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.; Walsh, C.; Delettrez, J.; Igumenshchev, I.; Knauer, J. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Grimble, W.; Marshall, F.; Michel, T.; Stoeckl, C.; Haines, B. M.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Ion temperatures (Tion) in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments have traditionally been inferred from the broadening of primary neutron spectra. Directional motion (flow) of the fuel at burn, expected to arise due to asymmetries imposed by e.g. engineering features or drive non-uniformity, also impacts broadening and may lead to artificially inflated ``Tion'' values. Flow due to low-mode asymmetries is expected to give rise to line-of-sight variations in measured Tion, as observed in OMEGA cryogenic DT implosions but not in similar experiments at the NIF. In this presentation, we report on OMEGA experiments with intentional drive asymmetry designed for testing the ability to accurately predict and measure line-of-sight differences in apparent Tion due to low-mode asymmetry-seeded flows. The measurements are contrasted to CHIMERA, RAGE and ASTER simulations, providing insight into implosion dynamics and the relative importance of laser drive non-uniformity, stalk and offset as sources of asymmetry. The results highlight the complexity of hot-spot dynamics, which is a problem that must be mastered to achieve ICF ignition. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF and LLE.

  9. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlig, K

    2012-01-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4 He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4 He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  10. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  11. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  12. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  13. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  14. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. von; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2016-06-15

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm{sup −3} is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10{sup −14} mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  15. Cryogenics for CERN experiments past, present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Kesseler, G; Passardi, Giorgio; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Tischhauser, Johann; Haug, F

    1997-01-01

    Use of cryogenics at CERN was originated (in the 1960s) by bubble chambers and the associated s.c. solenoids. Complex cryoplants were installed to provide cooling at LH2 and LHe temperatures. Continuity (in the 1970s) in He cryogenics for experiments was provided by spectrometer magnets for fixed target physics of the SPS accelerator. More recently (in the 1980s), large "particle-transparent" s.c. solenoids for collider experiments (LEP) have been built demanding new cryoplants. The LHC experiments (in the 2000s) will continue the tradition with s.c. dipoles (ALICE and LHCb), solenoids (CMS, ATLAS) and toroids (ATLAS) of unusual size. Cryogenics for experiments using noble liquids follows the same trend since the development (in the 1970s) of the first shower LAr detectors. A LKr calorimeter (about 10 m3) will be operated in 1996 and the ATLAS experiment foresees a set of three huge LAr calorimeters (almost 90 m3 total volume of liquid) to be installed underground.

  16. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Spatially and spectrally resolved filamentary structures in the (3/2)omega 0 emission from laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Willi, O.; Rumsby, P.T.

    This study was conducted to explore the problem of filamentation of laser light in the underdense plasma corona surrounding ablatively imploded spherical targets, a phenomenon which may prevent the realization of laser-driven fusion schemes. Preliminary observations were made of filamentary structures in the (3/2)(omega sub o) emission from microballoon targets irradiated in the ablative mode. Time integrated spectroscopy showed double and single peaked (3/2)(omega sub o) emission spectra. A simple model for the growth and collapse of filaments was based on the movement of the density contours at the bottom of the filament with large velocity. Here the laser intensity was high and various decay instabilities and scattering processes took place. In particular the two plasmon decay instability occurred where the electron density was nc/4, a region of (3/2)(omega sub o) emission. The model was consistent with the experimentally observed spectra and predicted the type of omega sub o and 2 omega sub o that should be observed in future experiments

  18. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Schaeffer, J. C.; Frankel, R.; Sinenian, N.; Childs, R. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Burke, M.; Roberts, S.

    2011-01-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  19. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H; Manuel, M J-E; Gatu Johnson, M; Schaeffer, J C; Frankel, R; Sinenian, N; Childs, R A; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Burke, M; Roberts, S

    2011-07-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  20. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  1. Food supplementation for workers: flour enriched with omega -3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Nery de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was preparing a product (omega-3 flour to increase the nutritional value of the food for workers concerning the content of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA. The omega-3 flour was prepared using waste (head sardines and leaves of carrot, flaxseed flour, manioc flour and spices. The fatty acids (FA concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography. A total of 28 FA were identified in the omega-3 flour. The concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were 329.23mg EPA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour and 545.35 mg DHA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour. To meet the minimum requirements of omega -3, it is necessary the intake 2.5 to 3 tablespoons (soup of omega-3 flour day-1.There were analyzed two meals (A and B generally consumed by workers without and with the addition of the omega-3 flour (1 and 2 tablespoons to verify if there was an increase of n-3 FA. It was concluded that there was a significant increase of these FA in both meals. It was found that the omega-3 flour is constituted of a good nutritional value, especially the n-3 FA, so the product can be used as a supplement in the feeding of the workers as well as in other segments.

  2. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  3. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  4. Development of a cryogenic source of polarized deuterons ''Polaris''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, N.G.; Belushkina, A.A.; Ershov, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    To obtain a beam of polarized deuterons, a cryogenic source ''Polaris'' has been developed according to the program of research at the Dubna synchrophasotron. The source is installed on a high-voltage terminal of the linac preaccelerator. A beam of deuterons from the source is accelerated in the synchrophasotron. At present the source is being improved. A polarimeter with 3 He and 4 He targets has been developed to measure the polarization of the beam of deuterons after the linac. Results of this work are presented in the report

  5. Superconducting RF separator for Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows an Nb-deflector for the superconducting RF separator ready for installation in its cryostat (visible at the back). Each deflector was about 3 m long. L. Husson and P. Skacel (Karlsruhe) stand on the left, A. Scharding (CERN) stands on the right. This particle separator, the result of a collaboration between the Gesellshaft für Kernforschung, Karlsruhe, and CERN was installed in the S1 beam line to Omega spectrometer. (See Annual Report 1977.)

  6. The outline of the OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umesawa, Hirokazu

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the Japanese commitment to establish an environmentally friendly technology for the separation and utilization of radioactive stable nuclides in high-level radioactive wastes. The development of OMEGA (Options Making Extra Gains of Actinides and Fission Products) group partitioning/annihilation disposal is proposed to allow an effective utilisation of uranium resources. There will be information exchange with the OECD/NEA. (UK)

  7. Control System For Cryogenic THD Layering At The National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, M.; Blubaugh, J.; Edwards, O.; Mauvais, M.; Sanchez, R.; Wilson, B.

    2011-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world largest and most energetic laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In 2010, NIF began ignition experiments using cryogenically cooled targets containing layers of the tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) fuel. The 75 (micro)m thick layer is formed inside of the 2 mm target capsule at temperatures of approximately 18 K. The ICF target designs require sub-micron smoothness of the THD ice layers. Formation of such layers is still an active research area, requiring a flexible control system capable of executing the evolving layering protocols. This task is performed by the Cryogenic Target Subsystem (CTS) of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The CTS provides cryogenic temperature control with the 1 mK resolution required for beta-layering and for the thermal gradient fill of the capsule. The CTS also includes a 3-axis x-ray radiography engine for phase contrast imaging of the ice layers inside of the plastic and beryllium capsules. In addition to automatic control engines, CTS is integrated with the Matlab interactive programming environment to allow flexibility in experimental layering protocols. The CTS Layering Matlab Toolbox provides the tools for layer image analysis, system characterization and cryogenic control. The CTS Layering Report tool generates qualification metrics of the layers, such as concentricity of the layer and roughness of the growth boundary grooves. The CTS activities are automatically coordinated with other NIF controls in the carefully orchestrated NIF Shot Sequence.

  8. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  9. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  10. The cryogenic control system of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; WANG Ke-Xiang; ZHAO Ji-Jiu; YUE Ke-Juan; DAI Ming-Sui; HUANG Yi-Ling; JIANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade Project(BEPCⅡ).The system consists of a Siemens PLC(ST-PLC,Programmable Logic Controller)for the compressor control,an Allen Bradley(AB)PLC for the cryogenic equipments,and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System(EPICS)that integrates the PLCs.The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control,PID(Proportional-Integral-Differential)control loops,real-time data access and data storage,alarm handler and human machine interface.It is capable of automatic recovery as well.This paper describes the BEPCⅡ cryogenic control system,data communication between ST-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers(IOCs),and the integration of the flow control,the low level interlock,the AB-PLC,and EPICS.

  11. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of...

  12. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Bremer, J; Delany, M; Diaz, A; Doubnik, R; Haaf, K; Henstchel, S; Norris, B; Voirin, E

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  13. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  14. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, D.; Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Delaney, M.; Diaz, A.; Doubnik, R.; Haaf, K.; Hentschel, S.; Norris, B.; Voirin, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  15. Fatty acid composition of Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp. and Chaetoceros sp. microalgae and introduction as potential new sources to extinct omega 3 and omega 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Gorjzdadeh

    2016-05-01

    equivalent whereas the amount of Omega 3 in Chlorella sp. was higher than two other species. Conclusion: Results of this study revealed a diverse profile of fatty acids among many species of phytoplanktons and microalgae. There Chlorella sp. with a good candidate and a rich source of Omega 3 future applications. It is indicated that different species have totally different fatty acid profiles. Therefore, to acquire special products for a particular target, selection of specific species is essential.

  16. Measurement of the $\\Omega_{c}^{0}$ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Yu.A.; Barberis, D.; Beck, M.; Berat, C.; Beusch, W.; Boss, M.; Brons, S.; Bruckner, W.; Buenerd, M.; Buscher, C.; Charignon, F.; Chauvin, J.; Chudakov, E.A.; Dropmann, F.; Engelfried, J.; Faller, F.; Fournier, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Godbersen, M.; Grafstrom, P.; Haller, T.; Heidrich, M.; Hurst, R.B.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konorov, I.; Martens, K.; Martin, P.; Masciocchi, S.; Michaels, R.; Muller, U.; Newsom, C.; Paul, S.; Povh, B.; Ren, Z.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, L.; Rudolph, H.; Schmitt, L.; Siebert, H.W.; Simon, A.; Smith, V.J.; Thilmann, O.; Trombini, A.; Vesin, E.; Volkemer, B.; Vorwalter, K.; Walcher, T.; Walder, G.; Werding, R.; Wittmann, E.; Zavertyaev, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    We present the measurement of the lifetime of the Omega_c we have performed using three independent data samples from two different decay modes. Using a Sigma- beam of 340 GeV/c we have obtained clean signals for the Omega_c decaying into Xi- K- pi+ pi+ and Omega- pi+ pi- pi+, avoiding topological cuts normally used in charm analysis. The short but measurable lifetime of the Omega_c is demonstrated by a clear enhancement of the signals at short but finite decay lengths. Using a continuous maximum likelihood method we determined the lifetime to be tau(Omega_c) = 55 +13-11(stat) +18-23(syst) fs. This makes the Omega_c the shortest living weakly decaying particle observed so far. The short value of the lifetime confirms the predicted pattern of the charmed baryon lifetimes and demonstrates that the strong interaction plays a vital role in the lifetimes of charmed hadrons.

  17. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  18. Neutron detection with cryogenics and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Zane W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.; Burger, Arnold; Woodfield, Brian F.; Niedermayr, Thomas; Dragos Hau, I.; Labov, Simon E.; Friedrich, Stephan; Geoffrey West, W.; Pohl, Kenneth R.; Berg, Lodewijk van den

    2005-01-01

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI 2 for direct detection of neutrons. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Fundamental of cryogenics (for superconducting RF technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This review briefly illustrates a few fundamental concepts of cryogenic engineering, the technological practice that allows reaching and maintaining the low-temperature operating conditions of the superconducting devices needed in particle accelerators. To limit the scope of the task, and not to duplicate coverage of cryogenic engineering concepts particularly relevant to superconducting magnets that can be found in previous CAS editions, the overview presented in this course focuses on superconducting radio-frequency cavities.

  20. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H. (Inventor); Schein, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is provided for use in craft such as launch, orbital, and space vehicles subject to substantial vibration, changes in orientation, and weightlessness. The cooler contains a small pore, large free volume, low density material to restrain a cryogen through surface tension effects during launch and zero-g operations and maintains instrumentation within the temperature range of 10 to 140 K. The cooler operation is completely passive, with no inherent vibration or power requirements.

  1. A hall for assembly and cryogenic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaunier, J.; Buhler, S.; Caruette, A.; Chevrollier, R.; Junquera, T.; Le Scornet, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Cryodrome, an assembly hall and the testing ground for cryogenic equipment and R and D experiments for the superconducting cavities is going to be transformed for its future missions. The cryogenic utilities, especially the He low pressure pumping capacity, was rearranged and extended to a new area. Space was provided to install CRYHOLAB, a new horizontal cryostat for cavity testing. Automatic control and supervision of the utilities and the experimental area are rebuilt and updated. (authors)

  2. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  3. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  4. Simulationen zur Optimierung der omega-Rekonstruktion in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2239688; Khoukaz, Alfons

    In this thesis pp-collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV are simulated using PYTHIA and the produced omega-mesons are reconstructed via the $\\omega \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ decay-channel. By using further simulations of single omega-mesons, kinematic angle cuts are extracted and applied to the simulation data in order to check, whether or not the reconstruction can be improved.

  5. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  6. Modeling Dynamic Fracture of Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This work is part of an investigation with the long-range objective of predicting the size distribution function and velocity dispersion of shattered pellet fragments after a large cryogenic pellet impacts a solid surface at high velocity. The study is vitally important for the shattered pellet injection (SPI) technique, one of the leading technologies being implemented at ORNL for the mitigation of disruption damage on current tokamaks and ITER. The report contains three parts that are somewhat interwoven. In Part I we formulated a self-similar model for the expansion dynamics and velocity dispersion of the debris cloud following pellet impact against a thick (rigid) target plate. Also presented in Part I is an analytical fracture model that predicts the nominal or mean size of the fragments in the debris cloud and agrees well with known SPI data. The aim of Part II is to gain an understanding of the pellet fracturing process when a pellet is shattered inside a miter tube with a sharp bend. Because miter tubes have a thin stainless steel (SS) wall a permanent deformation (dishing) of the wall is produced at the site of the impact. A review of the literature indicates that most projectile impact on thin plates are those for which the target is deformed and the projectile is perfectly rigid. Such impacts result in “projectile embedding” where the projectile speed is reduced to zero during the interaction so that all the kinetic energy (KE) of the projectile goes into the energy stored in plastic deformation. Much of the literature deals with perforation of the target. The problem here is quite different; the softer pellet easily undergoes complete material failure causing only a small transfer of KE to stored energy of wall deformation. For the real miter tube, we derived a strain energy function for the wall deflection using a non-linear (plastic) stress-strain relation for 304 SS. Using a dishing profile identical to the linear Kirchkoff-Love profile (for lack

  7. Intermittent cryogen spray cooling for optimal heat extraction during dermatologic laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2002-09-01

    Fast heat extraction is critically important to obtain the maximal benefit of cryogen spray cooling (CSC) during laser therapy of shallow skin lesions, such as port wine stain birthmarks. However, a film of liquid cryogen can build up on the skin surface, impairing heat transfer due to the relatively low thermal conductivity and higher temperature of the film as compared to the impinging spray droplets. In an attempt to optimize the cryogen mass flux, while minimally affecting other spray characteristics, we apply a series of 10 ms spurts with variable duty cycles. Heat extraction dynamics during such intermittent cryogen sprays were measured using a custom-made metal-disc detector. The highest cooling rates were observed at moderate duty cycle levels. This confirms the presence, and offers a practical way to eliminate the adverse effect of liquid cryogen build-up on the sprayed surface. On the other hand, lower duty cycles allow a substantial reduction in the average rate of heat extraction, enabling less aggressive and more efficient CSC for treatment of deeper targets, such as hair follicles.

  8. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  9. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  10. Cryogenic Deflashing for Rubber Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deflashing is the process of removal of excess flashes from the rubber products. Initially deflashing was a manual operation where dozen of workers, seated at small work stations would take each part and trim the excess rubber off with scissors, knives or by grinding. Still the same method is employed in most of the rubber industry. The drawbacks of this method are demand inconsistent and repeatable quality. Work done by hand is often inconsistent. There are commercially available cryogenic deflashing machine but they are too expensive hence cost effectiveness is also a prime factor. The objective of this paper is to develop a technique, to identify the media through which the flashes can be removed easily and effectively. Based on the test results obtained from testing of five different types of media, ABCUT Steel media gave best results. The testing of the ABCUT Steel media on rubber samples like O-rings, grommet tail door, bottom bush etc. shows good results.

  11. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  12. Depression and serum adiponectin and adipose omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalakis, George; Kiriakakis, Michael; Tsibinos, George; Hatzis, Christos; Flouri, Sofia; Mantzoros, Christos; Kafatos, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate for a possible relationship between depression and serum adiponectin and adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA. The sample consisted of 90 healthy adolescent volunteers from the island of Crete. There were 54 girls and 36 boys, aged 13 to 18. The mean age was 15.2 years. Subjects were examined by the Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic of the University of Crete. Depression was assessed through the use of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in adipose tissue. CES-D correlated with dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that BDI was negatively associated with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), while CES-D was positively associated with DGLA in adipose tissue. Serum adiponectin was not significantly associated with depression. The negative relationship between adipose EPA and depression in adolescents, is in line with findings of previous studies involving adult and elderly subjects, demonstrating negative relations between depression and adipose omega-3 PUFA. This is the first literature report of a relationship between depression and an individual omega-3 fatty acid in adolescents. The inverse relationship between adipose EPA and depression indicates that a low long-term dietary intake of EPA is associated with an increased risk for depression in adolescents.

  13. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  14. Needs in omega 3 and ocular pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bretillon Lionel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy at birth has regularly increased decade after decade, especially since the beginning of the 20th century: 15 years have been gained over the past 50 years. Changes in living and dietary habits during this time period have been associated with the development of various pathologies which represent a growing socioeconomic burden. Among age-related disorders, ocular diseases are the second most prevalent ones after 65 years. Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of visual impairment after the age of 50 years. Age is the prominent risk factor for AMD and is accompanied with both endogenous (including genetics and environmental factors, such as smoking habits and dietary factors (diet rich in cholesterol and saturated fatty acids. AMD is characterized by the loss of cells at the most central area of the retina, called macula. The neural retina is a highly structured neurosensory tissue that is responsible for the transduction pathway. The transduction pathway is initiated in photoreceptors where the light stimulus is coded into an electrical signal. This signal is transmitted to neighboured neurons and transferred to the brain via the optic nerve. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is the cellular and metabolic interface between the neural retina and choriocapillaris through Bruch’s membrane. The close association between RPE and photoreceptors is one of the factors that promote the efficacy of RPE to, in the one hand, provide nutrients and oxygen to photoreceptors and, in the other hand, eliminate the metabolic debris originating from shedding of the outer segments. Epidemiological data suggest that dietary habits privileging the consumption of omega- 3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids participate to prevent from the development of AMD (Sangiovanni et al., 2009. The mechanisms underlying the effects of omega-3 fatty acids remain unclear until now. The purpose of the present paper is to give a review on

  15. Progress of Rugby Hohlraum Experiments on Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Casner, Alexis; Gauthier, Pascal; Seytor, Patricia; Monteil, Marie-Christine; Park, Hye-Sook; Robey, Harry; Ross, Steven; Amendt, Peter; Girard, Frederic; Villette, Bruno; Reverdin, Charles; Loiseau, Pascal; Caillaud, Tony; Landoas, Olivier; Li, Chi Kang; Petrasso, Richard; Seguin, Fredrick; Rosenberg, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept is predicted to enable better coupling and higher gains in the indirect drive approach to ignition. A collaborative experimental program is currently pursued on OMEGA to test this concept in preparation for future megajoule-scale ignition designs. A direct comparison of gas-filled rugby hohlraums with classical cylinders was recently performed, showing a significant (up to ~40%) observed x-ray drive enhancement and neutron yields that are consistently higher in the rugby case. This work extends and confirms our previous findings in empty rugby hohlraums.

  16. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his

  17. Status of the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; Goullon, Johannes; Grieser, Manfred; Krantz, Claude; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Repnow, Roland; Schornikov, Andrey; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A novel cryogenic storage ring is currently under construction at the MPIK. By electrostatic ion optical elements, the 35 m circumference Cryogenic Storage Ring will be able to store ions at energies of up to 300 keV per charge unit without any mass limitations. The CSR consists of a cryogenic ({proportional_to}5 K) beam pipe surrounded by two radiation shields (40 and 80 K) in a large outer, thermal insulation vacuum. Extreme vacuum (density {proportional_to}10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) will be achieved by 2 K cryopumping as demonstrated in a prototype ion beam trap. The ion optics was completely assembled within the precision cryogenic mounting and shielding structure of the first corner. There, cooldown tests to {proportional_to}40 K were performed which confirmed the required sub-millimeter accuracy of the specially designed electrode positioning under large temperature changes. The high-voltage connections to the cryogenic electrodes were installed and breakdown tests will be reported. Based on the test results the beam pipe, electrode mounting and shielding structures are under final construction for mounting during 2012.

  18. Extracting the Omega- electric quadrupole moment from lattice QCD data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena

    2011-03-01

    The Omega- has an extremely long lifetime, and is the most stable of the baryons with spin 3/2. Therefore the Omega- magnetic moment is very accurately known. Nevertheless, its electric quadrupole moment was never measured, although estimates exist in different formalisms. In principle, lattice QCD simulations provide at present the most appropriate way to estimate the Omega- form factors, as function of the square of the transferred four-momentum, Q2, since it describes baryon systems at the physical mass for the strange quark. However, lattice QCD form factors, and in particular GE2, are determined at finite Q2 only, and the extraction of the electric quadrupole moment, Q_Omega= GE2(0) e/(2 M_Omega), involves an extrapolation of the numerical lattice results. In this work we reproduce the lattice QCD data with a covariant spectator quark model for Omega- which includes a mixture of S and two D states for the relative quark-diquark motion. Once the model is calibrated, it is used to determine Q_Omega. Our prediction is Q_Omega= (0.96 +/- 0.02)*10^(-2) efm2 [GE2(0)=0.680 +/- 0.012].

  19. Lipid profile and levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids especially omega-3 is projected to be way below the recommended intake in Kenya. Thus, there is need to find other sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). This study screened for the lipid profile and levels of omega-3 PUFAs in jackfruit and explored the variation in lipid ...

  20. Dual-shank attachment design for omega seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattinger, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process is disclosed for attaching welded omega seal segments to reactor heads, standpipes, mechanisms, and plugs which comprises a first shank in combination with a second shank to attach an omega seal at a metal-to-metal interface

  1. RENORMALIZATION FACTOR AND ODD-OMEGA GAP SINGLET SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOLGOV, OV; LOSYAKOV, VV

    1994-01-01

    Abrahams et al. [Phys. Rev. B 47 (1993) 513] have considered the possibility of a nonzero critical temperature of the superconductor transition to the state with odd-omega pp function and shown that the condition for it is the following inequality for the renormalization factor. Z (k, omega(n)) <1.

  2. The Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector readout system user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallewell, G.

    1984-11-01

    The manual describes the electronic readout system of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The system is described in its configuration of September 1984 after the Rich readout system had been used in two Omega experiments. (U.K.)

  3. Modification of the omega-meson lifetime in nuclear matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotulla, M.; Trnka, D.; Muehlich, P.; Anton, G.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Ehmanns, A.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Essig, K.; Funke, Ch.; Gothe, R.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Hoessl, J.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kopf, B.; Krusche, B.; Langheinrich, J.; Loehner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mertens, T.; Metag, V.; Mosel, U.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Radkov, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Suft, G.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Suele, A.; Thoma, U.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wendel, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Information on hadron properties in the nuclear medium has been derived from the photoproduction of omega mesons on the nuclei C, Ca, Nb, and Pb using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS detector at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The dependence of the omega-meson cross section on the nuclear mass

  4. [Experiments on the OMEGA Laser System]. LLE Review. Quarterly report, July-September 1985. Volume 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the first 24-beam uv experiments on the OMEGA laser system, the use of absorption spectroscopy to diagnose high-density compressions, the development of a new target fabrication technique to coat mechanically unsupported laser-fusion targets with a parylene layer, the use of liquid crystals as laser-beam apodizers, the investigation of the process of melting using a subpicosecond probe, the development of a new picosecond oscilloscope, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for June-September 1985. 80 refs., 36 figs

  5. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  6. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  7. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-01-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ∼12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ∼14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ∼ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  8. Recent advances in the field of omega-3-lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    During the last 15-20 years the use of fish and algae oils for human applications has received increasing attention from academia, industry and consumers. This is due to the fact that a growing body of evidence supports that marine omega-3 lipids have a wide range of health beneficial effects......, and at the same time the intake of these healthy lipids is far below the recommendable level in many parts of the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of recent advances in the body of knowledge about the health benefits of omega-3 lipids. For many years fish oil produced from wild fish has been...... the most important source of marine omega-3 fatty acids. However, the production of fish oil has been stable during the last decade. Therefore, to meet the increased demand for omega-3 lipids new sources are available. The presentation will discuss possible future sources of omega-3 lipids for human...

  9. Marine lipids and the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    of omega-3 fatty acids has been reported to be affected by several factors; among the important factors were the digestion and absorption processes of omega-3 containing lipids in the gastrointestinal tract. Both lipid structures and food structures can affect the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids....... In vitro studies provided a mechanistic understanding on the varied bioavailability caused by different lipid structures, the lower relative bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from FAEE formulation was closely related to the slower digestion rate of FAEE. Microencapsulated fish oil has often been used...... as a food additive because of its better chemical stability; studies showed that microencapsulation did not affect the bioavailability significantly. Even though food structures also affect the digestion and absorption of omega-3 containing lipids, several studies have shown that long-term intake of fish...

  10. Progress of LMJ-relevant implosions experiments on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casner A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In preparation of the first ignition attempts on the Laser Mégajoule (LMJ, an experimental program is being pursued on OMEGA to investigate LMJ-relevant hohlraums. First, radiation temperature levels close to 300 eV were recently achieved in reduced-scale hohlraums with modest backscatter losses. Regarding the baseline target design for fusion experiments on LMJ, an extensive experimental database has also been collected for scaled implosions experiments in both empty and gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums. We acquired a full picture of hohlraum energetics and implosion dynamics. Not only did the rugby hohlraums show significantly higher x-ray drive energy over the cylindrical hohlraums, but symmetry control by power balance was demonstrated, as well as high-performance D2 implosions enabling the use of a complete suite of neutrons diagnostics. Charged particle diagnostics provide complementary insights into the physics of these x-ray driven implosions. An overview of these results demonstrates our ability to control the key parameters driving the implosion, lending more confidence in extrapolations to ignition-scale targets.

  11. Cryogenic Hazard at ESS – strategy, safety studies and lessons learned

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is building a linear accelerator (linac) aiming at delivering a 2 GeV proton beam on a tungsten target wheel at 5 MW nominal power. The entire accelerator will be housed in an underground tunnel and will be fully operational by 2023. The superconducting section of the linac is composed of 21 High Beta cryomodules, 9 Medium Beta cryomodules and 13 Spoke cryomodules, as well as a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) that will be provided with liquid helium. A total of 146 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities operating at 2 K will be housed in those cryomodules. Additionally, cryogenic fluids will also be used for the cold hydrogen moderator surrounding the target as well as for several neutron instruments. In order to achieve a proper cooling, different facilities are being built to house the future cryogenic installation and therefore will be subject to Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH). In order to address cryogenic safety issues ESS wide, a long-term strategy has ...

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Greg M.; Ma, Qiu-Lan; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    More than a dozen epidemiological studies have reported that reduced levels or intake of omega-3 fatty acids or fish consumption is associated with increased risk for age-related cognitive decline or dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased dietary consumption or blood levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) appear protective for AD and other dementia in multiple epidemiological studies; however, three studies suggest that the ApoE4 genotype limits protection. DHA is broadly neuroprotective via multiple mechanisms that include neuroprotective DHA metabolites, reduced arachidonic acid metabolites, and increased trophic factors or downstream trophic signal transduction. DHA is also protective against several risk factors for dementia including head trauma, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. DHA is specifically protective against AD via additional mechanisms: It limits the production and accumulation of the amyloid β peptide toxin that is widely believed to drive the disease; and it also suppresses several signal transduction pathways induced by Aβ, including two major kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule associated protein tau and promote neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Based on the epidemiological and basic research data, expert panels have recommended the need for clinical trials with omega-3 fatty acids, notably DHA, for the prevention or treatment of age-related cognitive decline—with a focus on the most prevalent cause, AD. Clinical trials are underway to prevent and treat AD. Results to-date suggest that DHA may be more effective if it is begun early or used in conjunction with antioxidants. PMID:19523795

  13. An astrometric standard field in omega Cen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Rosemary

    2003-07-01

    We propose to obtain a high-precision astrometric standard in a two-step procedure. First, we will create a ground-based astrometric standard field around omega Cen down to V=22 with a 3 mas accuracy in positions and better than 0.5 mas/yr in proper motions. This standard will be used to obtain precise absolute plate solutions for selected WFPC2 CCD frames and refine the self-calibrated mean distortion solution for the WFPC2 CCD chips. This will eliminate systematic errors inherent in the self-calibration techniques down to the rms=0.3 mas level, thus opening new opportunities to perform precision astrometry with WFPC2 alone or in combination with the other HST imaging instruments. We will also address the issue of the distortion's variation which has a paramount significance for space astrometry such as spearheaded by the HST or being under development {SIM, GAIA}. Second, all reduced WFPC2 CCD frames will be combined into the two field catalogs {astrometric flat fields} of positions in omega Cen of unprecedented precision {s.e.=0.1 mas} down to V=22 and will be available to the GO community and readily applicable to calibrating the ACS.

  14. A Reference Guide for Cryogenic Properties of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisend, John G

    2003-09-16

    A thorough knowledge of the behavior of materials at cryogenic temperatures is critical for the design of successful cryogenic systems. Over the past 50 years, a tremendous amount of material properties at cryogenic temperatures have been measured and published. This guide lists resources for finding these properties. It covers online databases, computer codes, conference proceedings, journals, handbooks, overviews and monographs. It includes references for finding reports issued by government laboratories and agencies. Most common solids and fluids used in cryogenics are covered.

  15. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  16. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  17. The Management of Cryogens at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2005-01-01

    CERN is a large user of industrially procured cryogens essentially liquid helium and nitrogen. Recent contracts have been placed by the Organization for the delivery of quantities up to 280 tons of liquid helium over four years and up to 50000 tons of liquid nitrogen over three years. Main users are the very large cryogenic system of the LHC accelerator complex, the physics experiments using superconducting magnets and liquefied gases and all the related test facilities whether industrial or laboratory scale. With the commissioning of LHC, the need of cryogens at CERN will considerably increase and the procurement policy must be adapted accordingly. In this paper, we discuss procurement strategy for liquid helium and nitrogen, including delivery rates, distribution methods and adopted safety standards. Global turnover, on site re-liquefaction capacity, operational consumption, accidental losses, purification means and storage capacity will be described. Finally, the short to medium term evolution of the Orga...

  18. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  19. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  20. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackowrth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electro-magnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exists simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers

  1. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  2. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  3. Efficient production and diagnostics of MeV proton beams from a cryogenic hydrogen ribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velyhan, A.; Giuffrida, L.; Scuderi, V.; Lastovicka, T.; Margarone, D.; Perin, J.P.; Chatain, D.; Garcia, S.; Bonnay, P.; Dostal, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Cykhardt, J.; Prokupek, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Rosinski, M.; Krasa, J.; Brabcova, K.; Napoli, M. De

    2017-01-01

    A solid hydrogen thin ribbon, produced by the cryogenic system ELISE (Experiments on Laser Interaction with Solid hydrogEn) target delivery system, was experimentally used at the PALS kJ-laser facility to generate intense proton beams with energies in the MeV range. This sophisticated target system operating at cryogenic temperature (∼ 10 K) continuously producing a 62 μm thick target was combined with a 600 J sub-nanosecond laser pulse to generate a collimated proton stream. The accelerated proton beams were fully characterized by a number of diagnostics. High conversion efficiency of laser to energetic protons is of great interest for future potential applications in non-conventional proton therapy and fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Observation of the Singly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay D+ -> omega pi(+) and Evidence for D-0 -> omega pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on 2.93 fb(-1) e(+)e(-) collision data taken at center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV by the BESIII detector, we report searches for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays D+ -> omega pi(+) and D-0 -> omega pi(0). A double tag technique is used to measure the absolute branching fractions B(D+ ->

  5. Exclusive {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production with muons at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinelli, Massimo Maria

    2010-02-02

    In the present thesis the exclusive reaction {mu}+N{yields}{mu}'+{omega}{pi}{sup 0}+N is studied from collisions of a polarized muon beam (160 GeV/c momentum) with a polarized {sup 6}LiD target. The goal is the quantitative determination of the spin-parity (J{sup P}) 1{sup -} contribution in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} signal, which is in theoretical models identified as the first radial excitation of the {rho}(770) meson with mass {proportional_to}1250 MeV/c{sup 2}. The concurring 1{sup +} in this mass region is the known b{sub 1}(1235) with dominant {omega}{pi}{sup 0} decay. The power of the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL2 was studied by means of exclusive {omega} and the existence of crystals detected. It was shown that the contribution of the energy calibration of a single crystal to the observed {pi}{sup 0} width is small. The {omega}{pi}{sup 0} selection for the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} gives the kinematical range of the reaction: Squared mass of the virtual photon ({gamma}{sup *}): left angle Q{sup 2} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -1} (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2}; Bjorken variable left angle x{sub B} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -3}; energy in the photon-nucleon c. m. rest system: left angle W right angle {proportional_to}13.5 GeV; inclination of the exponential t-distribution: b=5.27{+-}0.29 GeV{sup -2}. The background was determined by means of a fit of the accociated {lambda} distribution in a height of 19{+-}4% (<11% in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} peak for incoherent scattering). The spin-parity was studied by the consideration of numerous angular distributions for the relative orientations of muon scattering, {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production, and decay planes. Acceptance corrections were calculated by means of a self-developed Monte-Carlo generator. We observed a 42.1{+-}29.2% strong J{sup P}=1{sup -} contribution (77.2{sub -35.2}{sup 22.8}% for incoherent scattering), compatible with theoretical prediction. For this contribution the conservation of the

  6. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... filling density for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid is defined as the percent ratio of the weight of lading in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in...

  7. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher.

  8. Cryogenic propulsion for lunar and Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Future missions to the moon and Mars have been investigated with regard to propulsion system selection. The results of this analysis show that near state-of-the-art LO2/LH2 propulsion technology provides a feasible means of performing lunar missions and trans-Mars injections. In other words, existing cryogenic space engines with certain modifications and product improvements would be suitable for these missions. In addition, present day cryogenic system tankage and structural weights appear to scale reasonably when sizing for large payload and high energy missions such as sending men to Mars.

  9. Computer automation of a dilution cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, C.

    1992-09-01

    This study has been realized in the framework of studies on developing new technic for low temperature detectors for neutrinos and dark matter. The principles of low temperature physics and helium 4 and dilution cryostats, are first reviewed. The cryogenic system used and the technic for low temperature thermometry and regulation systems are then described. The computer automation of the dilution cryogenic system involves: numerical measurement of the parameter set (pressure, temperature, flow rate); computer assisted operating of the cryostat and the pump bench; numerical regulation of pressure and temperature; operation sequence full automation allowing the system to evolve from a state to another (temperature descent for example)

  10. Cryogenic test facility at VECC, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Amit; Bhunia, Uttam; Pradhan, J.; Sur, A.; Bhandari, R.K.; Ranganathan, R.

    2003-01-01

    In view of proposed K-500 superconducting cyclotron project, cryogenic test facility has been set up at the centre. The facility can broadly be categorized into two- a small scale test facility and a large scale test facility. This facility has been utilized for the calibration of liquid helium level probe, cryogenic temperature probe, and I-B plot for a 7 T superconducting magnet. Spiral-shaped superconducting short sample with specific dimension and specially designed stainless steel sample holder has already been developed for the electrical characterisation. The 1/5 th model superconducting coil along with its quench detection circuit and dump resistor has also been developed

  11. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  12. Regulation of rabbit lung cytochrome P-450 prostaglandin omega-hydroxylase (P-450/sub PG-omega/) during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muerhoff, A.S.; Williams, D.E.; Jackson, V.; Leithauser, M.T.; Waterman, M.R.; Johnson, E.F.; Masters, B.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of induction during pregnancy of a rabbit lung prostaglandin omega-hydroxylase cytochrome P-450 has been investigated. This activity has been demonstrated to be induced over 100-fold in 28-day pregnant rabbits, as compared to nonpregnant rabbits. The induction is reflected by an increase in the amount of P-450/sub PG-omega/ protein as measured by Western blotting. P-450/sub PG-omega/ microsomal protein increases throughout gestation concomitant with an increase in PGE 1 omega-hydroxylase activity. Elucidation of the level of induction involved extraction of RNA from rabbit lungs obtained at various days of gestation followed by in vitro translation of the RNA in the presence of 35 S-methionine. Immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized P-450 and analysis of the immunoisolates by SDS-PAGE, autoradiography and densitometry of the P-450/sub PG-omega/ band revealed that the P-450/sub PG-omega/ mRNA levels followed the gestational time-dependent increase observed for both PGE 1 omega-hydroxylase activity and P-450/sub PG-omega/ protein, i.e., a gradual increase peaking at 28-days, dropping precipitously to near control levels following parturition. These data suggest that control of P-450/sub PG-omega expression occurs at the transcriptional level. Western blots of human lung bronchioloalveolar-carcinoma cell lines NCL-H322 and NCL-H358 utilizing a guinea pig IgG to P-450/sub PG-omega/ detect a cross-reactive species

  13. Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S. [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies, Sassenage (France); Souli, M. [GANIL, Caen (France); Commeaux, C. [IPN, Orsay (France)

    2014-01-29

    The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL (“Grand Accélérateur d’Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

  14. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  15. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  16. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  17. EFEK SUPLEMENTASI OMEGA-3 PADA PENDERITA ARTRITIS REUMATOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviana Christiani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Omega-3 Supplementation on Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.A study on omega-3 supplementation was conducted to women of 55-90 years old with active rheumatoid arthritis who stay at home for elderly (in six nursing home in Bogor. The objective of this study is to see the effects of omega-3 supplementation on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Sixty subjects (respondents were devided into two groups. The first group, 30 respondents, were given an omega-3 capsuls (180 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA every day for two months; the second group, also 30 respondents, were given placebo capsules (equal. Data collected including identity of respondents, anthropometric, clinical status, radiology (rontgen, and blood sample analysis (LED and ARF. The results of this study showed that omega-3 supplementation proportionally decreased the quantity of patients with morning stiffness significantly, decreased the quantity of patients with joint swelling (not significant, failed inreducing the quantity of patients with joint pain, and failed in changing the value of RF (from + to - of patients. The omega-3 supplementation on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis also failed in decreasing the average of LED of the patients, and failed in changing the result of rontgen.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, EPA & DHA omega-3, supplementtaion, elderly.

  18. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Fieseler, K V; Fettman, M J; Zabel, S; Rosychuk, R A W; Ogilvie, G K; Greenwalt, T L

    2004-06-01

    Twenty-nine dogs were included in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised trial and were orally supplemented for 10 weeks with either flax oil (200 mg/kg/day), eicosapentaenoic acid (50 mg/kg/day) and docosahexaenoic acid (35 mg/kg/day) in a commercial preparation, or mineral oil as a placebo. For each dog, clinical scores were determined based on a scoring system developed prior to the trial. Total omega-6 and omega-3 intake and the ratio of omega-6:omega-3 (omega-6:3) were calculated before and after the trial. The dogs' clinical scores improved in those supplemented with flax oil and the commercial preparation, but not in the placebo group. No correlation was identified between total fatty acid intake or omega-6:3 ratio and clinical scores. Based on the results of this study, the total intake of fatty acids or the omega-6:3 ratio do not seem to be the main factors in determining the clinical response.

  19. Mapping QTL for Omega-3 Content in Hybrid Saline Tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace; Wang, Le; Ngoh, Si Te; Ji, Lianghui; Orbán, Laszlo; Yue, Gen Hua

    2018-02-01

    Tilapia is one of most important foodfish species. The low omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio in freshwater tilapia meat is disadvantageous for human health. Increasing omega-3 content is an important task in breeding to increase the nutritional value of tilapia. However, conventional breeding to increase omega-3 content is difficult and slow. To accelerate the increase of omega-3 through marker-assisted selection (MAS), we conducted QTL mapping for fatty acid contents and profiles in a F 2 family of saline tilapia generated by crossing red tilapia and Mozambique tilapia. The total omega-3 content in F 2 hybrid tilapia was 2.5 ± 1.0 mg/g, higher than that (2.00 mg/g) in freshwater tilapia. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) technology was used to discover and genotype SNP markers, and microsatellites were also genotyped. We constructed a linkage map with 784 markers (151 microsatellites and 633 SNPs). The linkage map was 2076.7 cM long and consisted of 22 linkage groups. Significant and suggestive QTL for total lipid content were mapped on six linkage groups (LG3, -4, -6, -8, -13, and -15) and explained 5.8-8.3% of the phenotypic variance. QTL for omega-3 fatty acids were located on four LGs (LG11, -18, -19, and -20) and explained 5.0 to 7.5% of the phenotypic variance. Our data suggest that the total lipid and omega-3 fatty acid content were determined by multiple genes in tilapia. The markers flanking the QTL for omega-3 fatty acids can be used in MAS to accelerate the genetic improvements of these traits in salt-tolerant tilapia.

  20. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  1. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  2. Nuclear heat sources for cryogenic refrigerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, B.; Schock, A.; King, W.G.; Kline, T.; Russo, F.A.

    1975-01-01

    Spacecraft cryogenic refrigerators require thermal inputs on the order of 1000 W. First, the characteristics of solar-electric and radioisotope heat source systems for supplying this thermal input are compared. Then the design of a 238 Pu heat source for this application is described, and equipment for shipping and handling the heat source is discussed. (LCL)

  3. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  4. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  5. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  6. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M; Pernau, H-F; Strunk, C; Scheer, E; Pietsch, T

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  7. Cryogenic refrigeration for cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau-Baguer, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Neutron moderation by means of a fluid at cryogenic temperature is a very interesting way to obtain cold neutrons. Today, a number of nuclear research reactors are using this technology. This paper deals with thermodynamics and technology which are used for cooling Cold Neutron Sources

  8. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  9. Cryogenic Filters for RFI Mitigation in Radioastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Tuccari, G.; Caddemi, A.; Barbarino, S.; Nicotra, G.; Consoli, F.; Schilliro, F.; Catalfamo, F.

    2005-01-01

    RFI mitigation in Radioastronomy can be achieved adopting cryogenic filters in appropriate typologies. A study has been conducted in L, C and X band with the evaluation of the filter architecture in copper, with theoretical estimation, computer simulations, prototypes realization, laboratory measurements. Such work has been preliminary to the realization of HTS samples with the purpose of a similar complete characterization approach.

  10. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  11. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  12. Long Duration Backlighter Experiments at Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reighard, A; Glendinning, S; Young, P; Hsing, W; Foord, M; Schneider, M; Lu, K; Dittrich, T; Wallace, R; Sorce, C

    2008-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a 7.5 ns-duration pinhole-apertured backlighter at the Omega laser facility. Pinhole-apertured point-projection backlighting for 8 ns will be useful for imaging evolving features in experiments at the National Ignition Facility. The backlighter consisted of a 20 (micro)m diameter pinhole in a 75 (micro)m thick Ta substrate separated from a Zn emitter (9 keV) by a 400 (micro)m thick high-density carbon piece. The carbon prevented the shock from the laser-driven surface from reaching the substrate before 8 ns and helped minimize x-ray ablation of the pinhole substrate. Grid wires in x-ray framing camera images of a gold grid have a source-limited resolution significantly smaller than the pinhole diameter due to the high aspect ratio of the pinhole, but do not become much smaller at late times

  13. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of V vs B-V, V vs V-I, and V vs B-I have been constructed based on 179 BVRI CCD frames of two adjoining 4x2.5-arcmin fields in Omega Cen (NGC 5139) obtained with the 1.54-m Danish La Silla telescope. The spread in the main sequences noted in the three CMDs indicates that the wide range in chemical composition among the evolved stars in this cluster persists as well in the unevolved stars. This result suggests that the abundance variations are primordial. A difference in magnitude between the turnoff and the horizontal branch of 3.8 + or - 0.15 is found which is greater than a previous value. 38 references

  14. The double main sequence of Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Anderson, J.; King, I. R.; Cassisi, S.; Momany, Y.

    Recent, high precision photometry of Omega Centauri, the biggest Galactic globular cluster, has been obtained with Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The color magnitude diagram reveals an unexpected bifurcation of colors in the main sequence (MS). The newly found double MS, the multiple turnoffs and subgiant branches, and other sequences discovered in the past along the red giant branch of this cluster add up to a fascinating but frustrating puzzle. Among the possible explanations for the blue main sequence an anomalous overabundance of helium is suggested. The hypothesis will be tested with a set of FLAMES@VLT data we have recently obtained (ESO DDT program), and with forthcoming ACS@HST images. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. 10 distinct stellar populations in omega Centauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Andrea; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Cool, Adrienne; King, Ivan R.; van der marel, roeland p.

    2015-08-01

    We are constructing the most comprehensive catalog of photometry and proper motions ever assembled for a globular cluster. The core of omega Centauri has been imaged over 600 times through WFC3’s UVIS and IR channels for the purposes of detector calibration. There exist ~30 exposures each for 26 filters, stretching uniformly from F225W in the UV to F160W in the infrared. Furthermore, the 12-year baseline between this data and a 2002 ACS survey will more than triple both the accuracy and the number of well-measured stars compared to previous studies.This totally unprecedented complete spectral coverage for over 400,000 stars, from the red-giant branch down to the white dwarfs, provides the best chance yet to understand the multiple-population phenomenon in any globular cluster. A preliminary analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams in different bands already allows us to identify 10 distinct sequences.

  16. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2017-11-02

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and CVDs has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of CVDs, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese/overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of CVD risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in CVDs and metabolic syndrome.

  18. High dietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated acids during pregnancy and prevalence of post-partum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Camilla M M; Kac, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies suggest association between low concentrations of omega-3 family fatty acids and greater risk for post-partum depression (PPD). The objective was to investigate the effect of unbalanced dietary intake of omega-6/omega-3 ratio >9:1 in the prevalence for PPD. The study comprises a prospective cohort with four waves of follow-up during pregnancy and one following delivery. PPD was evaluated according to the Edinburgh Post-partum Depression Scale (PPD ≥ 11) in 106 puerperae between 2005 and 2007, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Independent variables included socio-demographic, obstetric, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and dietary intake data, which were obtained by means of a food frequency questionnaire in the first trimester of pregnancy. Statistical analysis involved calculation of PPD prevalence and multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. PPD prevalence amounted to 26.4% [n = 28; confidence interval (CI) 95%: 18.0-34.8], and higher prevalences of PPD were observed in women who consumed an omega-6/omega-3 ratio >9:1 (60.0%) and in those with pre-pregnancy BMI <18.5 kg/m(2) (66.7%). These variables held as factors associated to PPD in the multivariate model, elevating the chances of occurrence of the outcome in 2.50 (CI 95%: 1.21-5.14) and 4.01 times (CI 95%: 1.96-8.20), respectively. Analyses were adjusted for age, schooling, pre-pregnancy BMI, lipids consumption and time elapsed since delivery. It verified an association between omega-6/omega-3 ratio above 9:1, the levels recommended by the Institute of Medicine, and the prevalence of PPD. These results add to the evidence regarding the importance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the regulation of mental health mechanisms. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cryogenic Photogrammetry and Radiometry for the James Webb Space Telescope Microshutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Victor J.; Morey, Peter A.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Collins, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) relies on several innovations to complete its five year mission. One vital technology is microshutters, the programmable field selectors that enable the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) to perform multi-object spectroscopy. Mission success depends on acquiring spectra from large numbers of galaxies by positioning shutter slits over faint targets. Precise selection of faint targets requires field selectors that are both high in contrast and stable in position. We have developed test facilities to evaluate microshutter contrast and alignment stability at their 35K operating temperature. These facilities used a novel application of image registration algorithms to obtain non-contact, sub-micron measurements in cryogenic conditions. The cryogenic motion of the shutters was successfully characterized. Optical results also demonstrated that shutter contrast far exceeds the NIRSpec requirements. Our test program has concluded with the delivery of a flight-qualified field selection subsystem to the NIRSpec bench.

  20. FABRICATION AND PROPERTIES OVERCOATED RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE SHELLS FOR OMEGA EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIKROO, A; CZECHOWICZ, D; PAGUIO, R; GREENWOOD, A.L; TAKAGI, M.

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 New high gain designs for direct drive ignition on NIF require foam shells. Scaled down versions of these designs are needed for near term experiments on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory Laser Energetics (LLE). These shells need to be about 1 mm in diameter and 50-100 (micro)m wall thickness and densities of 100-250 mg/cc. In addition, a full density permeation seal needs to be deposited for retention of the fill gas at room temperature or the ice at cryogenic temperatures. They have fabricated such shells using Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R/F) as the selected foam material due to its transparency in the optical region. Extensive characterization of the wall uniformity of these shells has been performed. The foam shells have ∼ 5%-6% non-concentricities on the average. A full density permeation seal has been deposited on the R/F shells using two different techniques. In the first technique R/F shells are coated directly with plasma polymer to thicknesses of 3-4 (micro)m. In the second technique, R/F shells are coated with polyvinylphenol, using a chemical interfacial polymerization technique. Data on surface finish and gas retention for R/F shells coated by both methods are provided

  1. Use of Liberia Omega Transmissions for Frequency Calibration in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuel, Safaa

    1986-01-01

    .... Frequency comparisons with different transmissions has been going on for several years. In this paper, the measuring method used for frequency comparison by means of Omega transmission system between Liberia (12 kHz...

  2. A study of tau decays involving eta and omega mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The 132 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1994 have been used to analyze $\\eta$ and $\\omega$ production in $\\tau$ decays. The following branching fractions have been measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} B(\\tau^-\\to\

  3. Omega 3 mastné kyseliny v diabetologii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, Suppl.B (2011), B60-B64 ISSN 1212-7299 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Omega-3 PUFA * sea fish * cardiovascular disease Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  4. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini

    2018-03-25

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) include α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 ω-3), stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 ω-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 ω-3), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5 ω-3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 ω-3). In the past few decades, many epidemiological studies have been conducted on the myriad health benefits of omega-3 PUFAs. In this review, we summarized the structural features, properties, dietary sources, metabolism, and bioavailability of omega-3 PUFAs and their effects on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, dementia, depression, visual and neurological development, and maternal and child health. Even though many health benefits of omega-3 PUFAs have been reported in the literature, there are also some controversies about their efficacy and certain benefits to human health.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders, from the biochemical rationale for their use to the growing body of data supporting their clinical efficacy.

  6. Y*, Xi * and Omega /sup -/ in production experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hemingway, R J

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of all production experiment data relevant to the spectroscopy of Y*, Xi * and Omega /sup -/ since the previous Baryon Resonances Conference at Purdue in 1973. A short look at future prospects is appended. (27 refs).

  7. Operational characteristics of the OMEGA short-wavelength laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soures, J.M.; Hutchison, R.; Jacobs, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Peck, R.; Seka, W.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve beams of the OMEGA, 24 beam direct-drive laser facility have been converted to 351-nm wavelength operation. The performance characteristics of this short-wavelength facility will be discussed. Beam-to-beam energy balance of +-2.3% and on-target energy, at 351-nm, in excess of 70 J per beam have been demonstrated. Long-term performance (>600 shots) of the system has been optimized by appropriate choice of index matching liquid, optical materials and coatings. The application of this system in direct-drive laser fusion experiments will be discussed

  8. Ambiguity resolution in systems using Omega for position location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, G.; Gan, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The lane ambiguity problem prevents the utilization of the Omega system for many applications such as locating buoys and balloons. The method of multiple lines of position introduced herein uses signals from four or more Omega stations for ambiguity resolution. The coordinates of the candidate points are determined first through the use of the Newton iterative procedure. Subsequently, a likelihood function is generated for each point, and the ambiguity is resolved by selecting the most likely point. The method was tested through simulation.

  9. Relations between distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, Juan Luis Garcia [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/Paseo Alfonso XIII, 30203-Cartagena (Region de Murcia) (Spain)]. E-mail: juan.garcia@upct.es; Lampart, Marek [Mathematical Institute at Opava, Silesian University at Opava, Na Rybnicku 1, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: marek.lampart@math.slu.cz

    2006-05-15

    The forcing relations between notions of distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos were studied by many authors. In this paper we summarize all known connections between these three different types of chaos and fulfill the results for general compact metric spaces by the construction of a selfmap on a compact perfect set which is {omega} chaotic, not distributionally chaotic and has zero topological entropy.

  10. The CERN omega spectrometer. 25 years of physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.; Quercigh, E.

    1997-01-01

    The OMEGA spectrometer facility was closed down at the end of 1996. This was a necessary sacrifice in order to free resources for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider, which is now so closely associated with CERN's future. On December 10th, a symposium was organized at CERN to review physics at OMEGA. This report brings together the talks which were presented on that occasion. It starts with an introduction and a list of all the experiments at the facility. (orig.)

  11. Dynamical coupled channel approach to omega meson production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Paris

    2007-09-10

    The dynamical coupled channel approach of Matsuyama, Sato, and Lee is used to study the $\\omega$--meson production induced by pions and photons scattering from the proton. The parameters of the model are fixed in a two-channel (\\omega N,\\pi N) calculation for the non-resonant and resonant contributions to the $T$ matrix by fitting the available unpolarized differential cross section data. The polarized photon beam asymmetry is predicted and compared to existing data.

  12. Polarized proton target-IV. Operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Fletcher, O.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are presented for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The systems are comprised of (1) a target cryostat; (2) a 4 He pumping system; (3) a 3 He pumping system; (4) a microwave system; (5) a magnet and power supply; (6) a computerized polarization monitor; and (7) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  13. Study of the decay B0bar -> D* omega pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-24

    We report on a study of the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -} with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million B{bar B} decays, we measure the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.88 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}. We also measure the polarization of the D*{sup +} as a function of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*{sup +} to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda} = 0.654 {+-} 0.042(stat.) {+-} 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{rho}(1450), {rho}(1450) {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Jeromson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  15. FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Petr; Kohoutková, Alena; Jedlinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam. Omega beam is a precast prestressed high-performance concrete element with the shape of Greek letter omega. Omega beam was designed as a self-supporting permanent formwork member for construction of girder bridges. FEM program ATENA Science was exploited for simulation of load-bearing test of the beam. The numerical model was calibrated using the data from both static loading test and tests of material properties. Comparison of load-displacement diagrams obtained from the experiment and the model was conducted. Development of cracks and crack patterns were compared. Very good agreement of experimental data and the FEM model was reached. The calibrated model can be used for design of optimized Omega beams in the future without the need of expensive loading tests. The calibrated material model can be also exploited in other types of FEM analyses of bridges constructed with the use of Omega beams, such as limit state analysis, optimization of shear connectors, prediction of long-term deflections or prediction of crack development.

  16. The production of $\\phi , \\omega$ and $\\rho$ mesons in $p$-, $d$-, S- and Pb- induced reactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Jouan, D; Alessandro, B; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Boraldo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu, T

    2004-01-01

    From proton, deuteron, S- and Pb-induced reactions, experiments NA38 and NA50 have measured muon pair production with various targets. In particular, the production rates of the phi omega and rho mesons have been simultaneously extracted and compared. Preliminary partial results of the most recent Pb-Pb measurement done in year 2000 by NA50 are presented here. They are also included in the comparison with the results obtained with lighter interacting nuclei. (23 refs).

  17. A comparative study of the DG-OMEGA (DG Omega), DGII, and GAT method for the structure elucidation of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, A. H. C.; Beckers, M. L. M.; Buydens, L. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    This research continues the investigation of the properties of the recently developed structure elucidation method DG-OMEGA (DG Omega). Towards this end it was applied for the structure determination of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide. The performance of DG Omega was compared to the

  18. A study of the $\\omega\\omega$ channel produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D.; Close, F.E.; Danielsen, K.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Earl, B.C.; Evans, D.; French, B.R.; Hino, T.; Inaba, S.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobsen, T.; Khaustov, G.V.; Kinson, J.B.; Kirk, A.; Kondashov, A.A.; Lednev, A.A.; Lenti, V.; Minashvili, I.; Peigneux, J.P.; Romanovsky, V.; Russakovich, N.; Semenov, A.; Shagin, P.M.; Shimizu, H.; Singovsky, A.V.; Sobol, A.; Stassinaki, M.; Stroot, J.P.; Takamatsu, K.; Tsuru, T.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Votruba, M.F.; Yasu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction pp -> pf (omega omega) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c and a spin analysis of the omega omega channel has been performed for the first time in central production. Evidence is found for the f2(1910) in the JPC = 2++ wave with spin projection JZ = 2. This is the only state observed in central production with spin projection JZ = 2. Its dPT and phi dependencies are similar to those observed for other glueball candidates. In addition, evidence is found for a state with JPC = 4++ consistent with the f4(2300). The f0(2000), previously observed in the rho rho final state, is confirmed.

  19. Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl ketones using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Yosuke; Hyotanishi, Megumi; Miller, Brittany E; Maeda, Kensaku; Obora, Yasushi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2010-03-05

    Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl diketones was successfully achieved by using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents under the influence of an iridium catalyst. For example, the alkylation of butyl cyanoacetate with 1,13-tridecanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) or [IrCl(coe)(2)](2) gave rise to butyl 2-cyano-15-hydroxypentadecanoate in good yield which is easily converted to cyclopentadecanolide (CPDL). In addition, the alkylation of acetone with 1,10-decanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) and KOH resulted in an important muscone precursor, 2,15-hexadecanedione (HDDO), in good yield.

  20. Target imaging and backlighting diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Shvarts, D.; Marshall, F.J.; Epstein, R.; Su, Q.

    1995-01-01

    The expected backlighting and self-emission images of a particular CH target to be imploded on the Omega Upgrade are calculated for a variety of experimental parameters. It is shown that to overcome the problem of target self-emission, the image has to be monochromatized with a diffracting crystal. For the target studied, the two image components are then comparable in intensity and both provide useful information on target behavior. A particularly interesting feature is the appearance in the self-emission of a circular spike which closely delineates the fuel-shell interface, but requires high spatial resolution to be observed

  1. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Tavakkoli-Kakhki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Materials and Methods: Firstly, reliable sources of Iranian Traditional Medicine were reviewed in order to identify the prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients. Afterwards, according to the online database of United States Department of Agriculture (URL: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list, the ratio of linoleic acid to alpha linolenic acid (as representatives of omega-6 and omega-3, respectively was identified in each foodstuff. Finally, the ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 were compared between seven food groups of vegetables, fruits, dry goods, high protein products, dairies, breads, and spices. Results: Based on the resources of Iranian Traditional Medicine, the following foods are prescribed for depressed patients: basil, coriander, spinach, lettuce, squash, peppermint, dill, chicory, celery, beet, quince, cucumber, watermelon, grape, peach, pomegranate, banana, apple, currant, pistachio, dried fig, almond, egg, chicken, lamb, trout, milk, bread without bran,saffron, oregano, and coriander seeds. On the other hand, cabbage, eggplant, onion, garlic, broad beans, lentils, beef, whole wheat bread, and mustard are prohibited. It should be noted that omega-3 content in some prescribed foods is more than that of the prohibited ones. Conclusion: The present study showed that mint, basil, spinach, lettuce, squash, lamb, saffron, oregano, cucumber, pistachio, milk, and also wild trout can be considered as medicinal foods for depressed patients.

  2. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic ac...

  3. Omega-3 index and prognosis in acute coronary chest pain patients with a low dietary intake of omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Ricardo León; Naesgaard, Patrycja Anna; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Thomas; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2013-04-01

    The omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) content in red blood cell membranes has been suggested as a novel risk marker for cardiac death. Objective. To assess the ability of the omega-3 index to predict all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and to include arachidonic acid (AA) in risk assessment. The omega-3 index was measured in 572 consecutive patients (median 63 years and 59% males) admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS in an inland Northern Argentinean city with a dietary habit that was essentially based on red meat and a low intake of fish. Clinical endpoints were collected during a 5-year follow-up period, median 3.6 years, range 1 day to 5.5 years. Stepwise Cox regression analysis was employed to compare the rate of new events in the quartiles of the omega-3 index measured at inclusion. Multivariable analysis was performed. No statistical significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted between quartiles of the omega-3 index. The median of the adjusted omega-3 index was 3.6%. During the follow-up period, 100 (17.5%) patients died. Event rates were similar in all quartiles of the omega-3 index, with no statistical significant differences. AA added no prognostic information. In a population with a low intake of fish and fish oils, the adjusted omega-3 index did not predict fatal events following hospitalization in patients with acute chest pain and suspected ACS.

  4. Development of cryogenic permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Shirasawa, Katsutoshi; Kitamura, Hideo; Bizen, Teruhiko; Seike, Takamitsu; Marechal, Xavier; Tsuru, Rieko; Iwaki, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A short period undulator increases not only the photon energy of undulator radiation, but also the brilliance due to its increased number of undulator periods. As a result, brilliant undulator radiation becomes available in the photon energy range, which is currently covered by wigglers. In order to develop a short period undulator, high performance magnets are indispensable and superconductive undulators have been actively investigated in recent years. In this paper, however, we propose a new approach, so called a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB magnets at the temperatures around 150 K. The current status of this cryogenic permanent magnet undulator development at SPring-8 is presented including the results of the magnetic field measurements on a prototype undulator. (author)

  5. ODH, oxygen deficiency hazard cryogenic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustynowicz, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    An oxygen deficiency exists when the concentration of oxygen, by volume, drops to a level at which atmosphere supplying respiratory protection must be provided. Since liquid cryogens can expand by factors of 700 (LN 2 ) to 850 (LH e ), the uncontrolled release into an enclosed space can easily cause an oxygen-deficient condition. An oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH) fatality rate per hour (OE) is defined as: OE = Σ N i P i F i , where N i = number of components, P i = probability of failure or operator error, and F i = fatality factor. ODHs range from open-quotes unclassifiedclose quotes (OE -9 1/h) to class 4, which is the most hazardous (OE>10 -1 1/h). For Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) buildings where cryogenic systems exist, failure rate, fatality factor, reduced oxygen ratio, and fresh air circulation are examined

  6. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  7. The Cryogenic Supervision System in NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hsing-Chieh; Chiou, Wen-Song; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Tsai, Zong-Da

    2005-01-01

    The helium cryogenic system in NSRRC is a fully automatic PLC system using the Siemens SIMATIC 300 controller. Modularization in both hardware and software makes it easy in the program reading, the system modification and the problem debug. Based on the Laview program we had developed a supervision system taking advantage of the Internet technology to get system's real-time information in any place. The functions of this supervision system include the real-time data accessing with more than 300 digital/analog signals, the data restore, the history trend display, and the human machine interface. The data is accessed via a Profibus line connecting the PLC system and the supervision system with a maximum baud rate 1.5 Mbit/s. Due to this supervision system, it is easy to master the status of the cryogenic system within a short time and diagnose the problem.

  8. Characterization of titanium alloys for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reytier, M.; Kircher, F.; Levesy, B.

    2002-01-01

    Titanium alloys are employed in the design of superconducting magnet support systems for their high mechanical strength associated with their low thermal conductivity. But their use requires a careful attention to their crack tolerance at cryogenic temperature. Measurements have been performed on two extra low interstitial materials (Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Ti-6Al-4V ELI) with different thickness and manufacturing process. The investigation includes the tensile properties at room and liquid helium temperatures using smooth and notched samples. Moreover, the fracture toughness has been determined at 4.2 K using Compact Tension specimens. The microstructure of the different alloys and the various fracture surfaces have also been studied. After a detailed description of the experimental procedures, practical engineering characteristics are given and a comparison of the different titanium alloys is proposed for cryogenic applications

  9. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  10. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  11. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  12. Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids Act as Inhibitors of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Eleonora; Sinibaldi, Federica; Sannino, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Giuseppina; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Cozza, Paola; Santucci, Roberto; Piro, Maria Cristina

    2017-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been reported to play a protective role in a wide range of diseases characterized by an increased metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. The recent finding that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids exert an anti-inflammatory effect in periodontal diseases has stimulated the present study, designed to determine whether such properties derive from a direct inhibitory action of these compounds on the activity of MMPs. To this issue, we investigated the effect exerted by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes that actively participate to the destruction of the organic matrix of dentin following demineralization operated by bacteria acids. Data obtained (both in vitro and on ex-vivo teeth) reveal that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids inhibit the proteolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes present in dentin. This observation is of interest since it assigns to these compounds a key role as MMPs inhibitors, and stimulates further study to better define their therapeutic potentialities in carious decay.

  13. Contribution of Golden Apple Snail Flour to Enhance Omega- 3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids Contents in Weaning Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsyha, D. D.; Wijayanti, H. S.; Nuryanto; Anjani, G.

    2018-02-01

    The case of undernourished children in Grobogan District (15.3%) is caused by children nutrients intake less than the Recommendation Dietary Allowance (RDA). To enhance children nutrients intake, be required formulation of weaning food using high-nutrient local food such as golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata). Golden apple snail flour contains high contents of zinc, iron, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. This study aims to analyze the effect of golden apple snail flour substitution on nutrients content and organoleptic properties of weaning food (baby porridge). This is an experimental research by substitution of golden apple snail flour in the making of weaning food with four treatments of substitution (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%). Substitution of golden apple snails flour could affect the nutrient content levels of fat, zinc, iron (p=0.0001), carbohydrate (p=0.011), water (p=0.003), ash (p=0.001), omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Whereas, it could not affect the content of energy (p=0.678), protein (p=0.129) and fiber (p=0.482). Furthermore, the substitution could affect the organoleptic properties include color, texture and taste (p=0.0001) while not for the aroma (p=0.798). Based on nutrient content analysis, substitution of golden apple snail flour could enhance the zinc, iron, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids contents of weaning food.

  14. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  15. Uses of cryogenics in power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungnickel, H

    1975-05-01

    A review of the present and possible future uses of cryogenic engineering and applied superconductivity. The applications discussed cover: transport of natural gas, superconducting N/sub 2/-filled cable for 275 kV. Cable with Ni/Ti conductor, homopolar machines with dix-type superconducting field coils, and superconducting magnetic propulsion. Important references to original works from different countries describing the latest developments are given.

  16. Experiments with a cryogenic torsion balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The torsion balance is a remarkably capable instrument for the measurement of slowly varying exceedingly small forces; indeed its potential abilities are still largely untapped. The author outlines some of the virtues (and limitations) of the torsion balance, and presents a menu of gravitation-related experiments to which it may be applied. He discusses plans for developing torsion balances operating at cryogenic temperatures, and describes an experiment to search for anomalous long-range interactions associated with intrinsic spin. (Auth.)

  17. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  18. Primary endpoint results of the OMEGA Study: One-year clinical outcomes after implantation of a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, John C., E-mail: john.wang@medstar.net [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore MD (United States); Carrié, Didier, E-mail: carrie.didier@chu-toulouse.fr [Centre Hôpital Universitaire Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Masotti, Monica, E-mail: MASOTTI@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona (Spain); Erglis, Andrejs, E-mail: a.a.erglis@stradini.lv [Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Mego, David, E-mail: David.Mego@arheart.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States); Watkins, Matthew W., E-mail: Matthew.Watkins@vtmednet.org [University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington VT (United States); Underwood, Paul, E-mail: Paul.underwood@bsci.com [Boston Scientific, Marlborough MA USA (United States); Allocco, Dominic J., E-mail: Dominic.allocco@bsci.com [Boston Scientific, Marlborough MA USA (United States); Hamm, Christian W., E-mail: C.Hamm@kerckhoff-klinik.de [Kerckhoff Heart and Thoraxcenter, Bad Nauheim (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Background/purpose: Bare metal stents (BMS) have similar rates of death and myocardial infarction (MI) compared to drug-eluting stents (DES). DES lower repeat revascularization rates compared to BMS, but may have higher rates of late stent thrombosis (ST) potentially due to impaired endothelialization requiring longer dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT). OMEGA evaluated a novel BMS designed to have improved deliverability and radiopacity, in comparison to currently available platforms. Methods/materials: OMEGA was a prospective, multicenter, single-arm study enrolling 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). Patients received the OMEGA stent (bare platinum chromium element stent) for the treatment of de novo native coronary artery lesions (≤ 28 mm long; diameter ≥ 2.25 mm to ≤ 4.50 mm). The primary endpoint was 9-month target lesion failure (TLF: cardiac death, target vessel-related MI, target lesion revascularization [TLR]) compared to a prespecified performance goal (PG) based on prior generation BMS. All major cardiac events were independently adjudicated. DAPT was required for a minimum of 1 month post procedure. Results: In the OMEGA study, the mean age was 65; 17% had diabetes mellitus. The primary endpoint was met; 9 month TLF rate was 11.5%, and the upper 1-sided 95% confidence bound of 14.79% was less than the prespecified PG of 21.2% (p < 0.0001). One-year event rates were low including a TLF rate of 12.8% and an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months. Conclusions: One-year outcomes of OMEGA show low rates of TLF, revascularization and ST. This supports safety and efficacy of the OMEGA BMS for the treatment of coronary artery disease. - Highlights: • The OMEGA study evaluated a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent. • OMEGA enrolled 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). • The primary endpoint of 9 month target lesion failure was 11.5%. • One-year event rates were low including an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months.

  19. Primary endpoint results of the OMEGA Study: One-year clinical outcomes after implantation of a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, John C.; Carrié, Didier; Masotti, Monica; Erglis, Andrejs; Mego, David; Watkins, Matthew W.; Underwood, Paul; Allocco, Dominic J.; Hamm, Christian W.

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose: Bare metal stents (BMS) have similar rates of death and myocardial infarction (MI) compared to drug-eluting stents (DES). DES lower repeat revascularization rates compared to BMS, but may have higher rates of late stent thrombosis (ST) potentially due to impaired endothelialization requiring longer dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT). OMEGA evaluated a novel BMS designed to have improved deliverability and radiopacity, in comparison to currently available platforms. Methods/materials: OMEGA was a prospective, multicenter, single-arm study enrolling 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). Patients received the OMEGA stent (bare platinum chromium element stent) for the treatment of de novo native coronary artery lesions (≤ 28 mm long; diameter ≥ 2.25 mm to ≤ 4.50 mm). The primary endpoint was 9-month target lesion failure (TLF: cardiac death, target vessel-related MI, target lesion revascularization [TLR]) compared to a prespecified performance goal (PG) based on prior generation BMS. All major cardiac events were independently adjudicated. DAPT was required for a minimum of 1 month post procedure. Results: In the OMEGA study, the mean age was 65; 17% had diabetes mellitus. The primary endpoint was met; 9 month TLF rate was 11.5%, and the upper 1-sided 95% confidence bound of 14.79% was less than the prespecified PG of 21.2% (p < 0.0001). One-year event rates were low including a TLF rate of 12.8% and an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months. Conclusions: One-year outcomes of OMEGA show low rates of TLF, revascularization and ST. This supports safety and efficacy of the OMEGA BMS for the treatment of coronary artery disease. - Highlights: • The OMEGA study evaluated a novel platinum chromium bare metal stent. • OMEGA enrolled 328 patients at 37 sites (US and Europe). • The primary endpoint of 9 month target lesion failure was 11.5%. • One-year event rates were low including an ST rate of 0.6% at 12 months

  20. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  1. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  2. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Cryogenic Thermometers

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Suraci, A; Togny, F; Vauthier, N

    1999-01-01

    The stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), impose that the cryogenic temperature sensors meet compelling demands such as long-term stability, radiation hardness, readout accuracy better than 5 mK at 1.8 K and compatibility with industrial control equipment. This paper presents the results concerning long-term stability of resistance temperature sensors submitted to cryogenic thermal cycles. For this task a simple test facility has been designed, constructed and put into operation for cycling simultaneously 115 cryogenic thermometers between 300 K and 4.2 K. A thermal cycle is set to last 71/4 hours: 3 hours for either cooling down or warming up the sensors and 1 respectively 1/4 hour at steady temperature conditions at each end of the temperature cycle. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) drives automatically this operation by reading 2 thermometers and actuating on 3 valves and 1 heater. The first thermal cycle was accomplished in a...

  3. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  4. Cryogenic characterization of LEDs for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Jérôme; Philippon, Anne; How, Lip Sun; Delbergue, Audrey; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Cillierre, David; Danto, Pascale; Boutillier, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of EUCLID project, the Calibration Unit of the VIS (VISible Imager) instrument must provide an accurate and well characterized light source for in-flight instrument calibration without noise when it is switched off. The Calibration Unit consists of a set of LEDs emitting at various wavelengths in the visible towards an integrating sphere. The sphere's output provides a uniform illumination over the entire focal plane. Nine references of LEDs from different manufacturers were selected, screened and qualified under cryogenic conditions. Testing this large quantity of samples led to the implementation of automated testing equipment with complete in-situ monitoring of optoelectronic parameters as well as temperature and vacuum values. All the electrical and optical parameters of the LED have been monitored and recorded at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These results have been compiled in order to show the total deviation of the LED electrical and electro-optical properties in the whole mission and to select the best suitable LED references for the mission. This qualification has demonstrated the robustness of COTS LEDs to operate at low cryogenic temperatures and in the space environment. Then 6 wavelengths were selected and submitted to an EMC sensitivity test at room and cold temperature by counting the number of photons when LEDs drivers are OFF. Characterizations were conducted in the full frequency spectrum in order to implement solutions at system level to suppress the emission of photons when the LED drivers are OFF. LEDs impedance was also characterized at room temperature and cold temperature.

  5. Properties of strain gages at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Nobuo; Fujiyoshi, Toshimitsu.

    1978-01-01

    At the time of developing superconduction generators, the stress measurement for rotor parts is required to grasp the safety and performance of the rotor at cryogenic temperature, which is cooled with liquid helium. In case of carrying out the stress measurement with strain gages, the problems are as follows. The strain gages and lead wires are exposed to cryogenic temperature from 4 to 10 K and strong magnetic field of about 3T, and subjected to high centrifugal acceleration of about 500G. In order to establish the techniques of the stress measurement under such conditions, the adhesives and damp-proof coatings for strain gages and strain gages themselves in Japan and foreign countries were examined on the properties at cryogenic temperature. As for the properties of strain gages, mainly the apparent strain owing to temperature change was investigated, and the change of the gage factors was studies only at liquid nitrogen temperature. The stress measurement with strain gages at low temperature had been studied in detail down to liquid nitrogen temperature concerning LNG tanks. The experimental apparatus, the samples, the testing methods and the test results of cooling tests on adhesives and damp-proof coatings, and the temperature characteristics of strain gages are reported. The usable adhesives and coatings were found, and correction by accurate temperature measurement is required for apparent strain. (Kako, I.)

  6. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Anindya [Fermilab; Rane, Tejas [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  7. Cryogenic Safety HSE Seminar | 21 - 23 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC being the world’s largest superconducting installation, it’s not surprising that CERN is a world leader in cryogenic safety. On 21 and 22 September, over 100 experts in cryogenic safety will be coming to CERN to take part in CERN’s first Cryogenic Safety Seminar, which aims to stimulate collaboration and further the state of the art in this increasingly important field.  

  8. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  9. Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Samoilov, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures was experimentally examined. The average ozone concentration in the volume of the discharge tube was less at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperatures. The production of condensed ozone have been determined by measuring the ozone concentration when the walls was heated and ozone evaporated. The energy yield of ozone generation at cryogenic temperatures has been calculated. The maximum value was 200 g/kWh

  10. Observation of five new narrow $\\Omega_c^0$ states decaying to $\\Xi^+_c K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-05-02

    The $\\Xi^+_c K^-$ mass spectrum is studied with a sample of $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The $\\Xi^+_c$ is reconstructed in the decay mode $pK^- \\pi^+$. Five new, narrow excited $\\Omega_c^0$ states are observed: the $\\Omega_c (3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3090)^0$, and $\\Omega_c (3119)^0$. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  11. The DFBX cryogenic distribution boxes for the LHC straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, Jon P.; Corradi, Carol A.; Green, Michael A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Knolls, Michael J.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Rasson, Joseph E.; Reavill, Dulie; Turner, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The DFBX distribution boxes are designed to connect the LHC cryogenic distribution system to the interaction region quadrupoles [1] and dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DFBX distribution boxes also have the current leads for the superconducting interaction region magnets and the LHC interaction region correction coils. The DFBX boxes also connect the magnet and cryogenic instrumentation to the CERN data collection system. The DFBX boxes serve as the cryogenic circulation center and the nerve center for four of the LHC straight sections. This report describes primarily the cryogenic function of the DFBXs

  12. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; CERN; Ronayette, L.; GHMFL, Grenoble; Rabehl, R.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test

  13. Thermal Stabilization of Cryogenic System in Superconducting Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Jae; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hyung Hee; Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joon Sun; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Radiology has some useful applications for medical purpose. For cancer therapy, the superconducting cyclotron should generate heavy ion beams. It radiates heavy ion beams to cancer patients. In order to make cyclotron system stable, the cryogenic system which makes superconducting state should work constantly. However, radiation heat transfer of cryogenic system should be considered because liquid helium's boiling point is extremely low and there is huge temperature difference between the cryogenic system and ambient temperature. Accordingly, thermal analysis should be carried out. In this paper, the numerical analysis of the cryogenic system in practical superconducting cyclotron show temperature distribution and suggest the number of coolers using ANSYS Workbench program

  14. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  15. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-03-15

    time, and help explain the continuing dilemma of the dearth of solar neutrinos (December 1992, page 12). For the longer term future, a larger detector could provide an increased yield, boosting the neutrino capture rate by up to a factor of ten. Other, more spectacular, option is to shine the CERN neutrino beam towards a detector a long way off. Such a beam is practically unimpeded by matter and could pass right through the earth. Possible contenders for underground target stations equipped with big detectors are the Italian Gran Sasso laboratory, 730 kilometres south, or Superkamiokande, 8750 kilometres away in Japan. Other major ongoing 'flagship' SPS projects include the NA48 experiment to continue precision measurements on the still unexplained phenomenon of CP violation (March 1992, page 7) and the 'Spin Muon Collaboration' looking to probe the spin structure of the proton and the neutron using high energy muon beams (April 1992, page 21). Both these experiments address important physics issues. While SMC is already taking data, NA48 will not become operational until 1995, but should run then for more than three years. Elsewhere at the SPS, ongoing studies include a programme using hyperon beams, and a study of beauty particles (WA92) which would be hampered once the new neutrino programme starts. The spectroscopy of particles containing light quarks, although far from having solved all outstanding questions, is slowly coming to the end of its SPS career. The WA91 glueball search at the big Omega detector will continue taking data in 1994. The GAMS experiment took its final CERN data last year. One of the long-standing examples of CERN-Russian collaboration, GAMS earned its acronym from the Russian abbreviation for its characteristic large lead-glass arrays. GAMS experiments have run both at CERN and at Serpukhov's Institute for High Energy Physics near Moscow.

  16. Performance of a cryogenic system prototype for the XENON1T detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprile, E; Budnik, R; Choi, B; Contreras, H A; Giboni, K L; Goetzke, L W; Lang, R F; Lim, K E; Melgarejo, A J; Plante, G; Rizzo, A; Shagin, P

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an efficient cryogenic system with heat exchange and associated gas purification system as a prototype for the XENON1T experiment. The XENON1T detector will use about 3 tons of liquid xenon (LXe) at a temperature of 175K as target and detection medium for a dark matter search. In this paper we report results on the cryogenic system performance focusing on the dynamics of the gas circulation-purification through a heated getter, at flow rates above 50 Standard Liter per Minute (SLPM). A maximum flow of 114 SLPM has been achieved, and using two heat exchangers in series, a heat exchange efficiency better than 96% has been measured.

  17. Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01

    Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

  18. Potential applications of cryogenic technologies to plant genetic improvement and pathogen eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biao; Wang, Ren-Rui; Cui, Zhen-Hua; Bi, Wen-Lu; Li, Jing-Wei; Li, Bai-Quan; Ozudogru, Elif Aylin; Volk, Gayle M; Wang, Qiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Rapid increases in human populations provide a great challenge to ensure that adequate quantities of food are available. Sustainable development of agricultural production by breeding more productive cultivars and by increasing the productive potential of existing cultivars can help meet this demand. The present paper provides information on the potential uses of cryogenic techniques in ensuring food security, including: (1) long-term conservation of a diverse germplasm and successful establishment of cryo-banks; (2) maintenance of the regenerative ability of embryogenic tissues that are frequently the target for genetic transformation; (3) enhancement of genetic transformation and plant regeneration of transformed cells, and safe, long-term conservation for transgenic materials; (4) production and maintenance of viable protoplasts for transformation and somatic hybridization; and (5) efficient production of pathogen-free plants. These roles demonstrate that cryogenic technologies offer opportunities to ensure food security. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Exclusive Backward-Angle Omega Meson Electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenliang, Li [Univ. of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2017-10-01

    Exclusive meson electroproduction at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2 , and at different four-momentum transfers, t and u, can be used to probe QCD's transition from hadronic degrees of freedom at the long distance scale to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at the short distance scale. Backward-angle meson electroproduction was previously ignored, but is anticipated to offer complimentary information to conventional forward-angle meson electroproduction studies on nucleon structure. This work is a pioneering study of backward-angle ω cross sections through the exclusive 1H(e, e'p)ω reaction using the missing mass reconstruction technique. The extracted cross sections are separated into the transverse (T), longitudinal (L), and LT, TT interference terms. The analyzed data were part of experiment E01-004 (Fπ-2), which used 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C. The primary objective was to detect coincidence π in the forward-angle, where the backward-angle omega events were fortuitously detected. The experiment has central Q2 values of 1.60 and 2.45 GeV2 , at W = 2.21 GeV. There was significant coverage in phi and epsilon, which allowed separation of σT,L,LT,TT . The data set has a unique u coverage of -u ~ 0, which corresponds to -t > 4 GeV2 . The separated σT result suggest a flat ~ 1/Q1.33±1.21 dependence, whereas sigma_L seems to hold a stronger 1/Q9.43±6.28 dependence. The σL/σT ratio indicate σT dominance at Q2 = 2.45 GeV2 at the ~90% confidence level. After translating the results into the -t space of the published CLAS data, our data show evidence of a backward-angle omega electroproduction peak at both Q2 settings. Previously, this phenomenon showing both forward and backward-angle peaks was only observed in the meson

  20. The Omega-Infinity Limit of Single Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    A new infinite-size limit of strings in RxS2 is presented. The limit is obtained from single spike strings by letting their angular velocity omega become infinite. We derive the energy-momenta relation of omega-infinity single spikes as their linear velocity v-->1 and their angular momentum J-->1. Generally, the v-->1, J-->1 limit of single spikes is singular and has to be excluded from the spectrum and be studied separately. We discover that the dispersion relation of omega-infinity single spikes contains logarithms in the limit J-->1. This result is somewhat surprising, since the logarithmic behavior in the string spectra is typically associated with their motion in non-compact spaces such as AdS. Omega-infinity single spikes seem to completely cover the surface of the 2-sphere they occupy, so that they may essentially be viewed as some sort of "brany strings". A proof of the sphere-filling property of omega-infinity single spikes is given in the appendix.