WorldWideScience

Sample records for omega 1 cm-1

  1. About spaces of $\\omega_1$-$\\omega_2$-ultradifferentiable functions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmets, Jean; Valdivia, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Let $\\Omega_1$ and $\\Omega_2$ be non empty open subsets of $\\mathbb R^r$ and $\\mathbb R^s$ respectively and let $\\omega_1$ and $\\omega_2$ be weights. We introduce the spaces of ultradifferentiable functions $\\mathcal{E}_{(\\omega_1,\\omega_2)}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, $\\mathcal{D}_{(\\omega_1,\\omega_2)}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, $\\mathcal{E}_{\\{\\omega_1,\\omega_2\\}}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$ and $\\mathcal{D}_{\\{\\omega_1,\\omega_2\\}}(\\Omega_1 \\times \\Omega_2)$, study their l...

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of the NO3 radical from 2000 to 3000 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Fujimori, Ryuji; Tang, Jian; Ishiwata, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    The present paper reports high-resolution spectroscopic study of the 14NO3 radical in the 2000-3000 cm-1 region, where eight E‧-A2‧ bands from the ground state are observed. Three bands at 2206, 2246, and 2377 cm-1 are analyzed for the first time, and assigned to the ν1 + 3ν4, 2ν2 + 2ν4, and ν3 + 3ν4 bands, respectively. Bands at 2024, 2155, 2518, and 2585 cm-1 are reassigned to the ν1 + ν3, 2ν3, ν1 + ν3 + ν4, and 2ν3 + ν4 bands, respectively, by adopting the new ν3 vibrational frequency of 1055 cm-1 lower than the previous ν3 = 1492 cm-1. The band at 2902 cm-1 is observed for the first time and assigned to the ν1 + ν3 + 2ν4 band which is the ν1 combined band with the 1927 cm-1 band. Band intensities observed in the 2000-3000 cm-1 region are attributed to the intensity borrowing from the B˜2E‧ -X˜2 A2‧ electronic transition through the vibronic interaction. Although the ν3 fundamental band has not been observed due to the cancelation of vibrational intensity and borrowed intensity, the 2ν3 band becomes stronger than ν3 by a factor of more than 50. Perturbation effects are recognized for the bands observed except for the 2206 cm-1 and 2377 cm-1 bands, and are analyzed by taking into account the Coriolis interaction in the most cases. However, the 2024 cm-1 band is free from the Coriolis interaction, and the v1-v3 interaction is incorporated in the analysis, leading to the 2ν1 frequency of 2008.8 cm-1, which is close to the energy value of 2010 cm-1 observed by a laser induced fluorescence study.

  3. Accurate measurements of solar spectral irradiance between 4000-10000 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, J.; Coleman, M. D.; Gardiner, T.; Shine, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The near-infrared solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is an important input into simulations of weather and climate; the distribution of energy throughout this region of the spectrum influences atmospheric heating rates and the global hydrological cycle through absorption and scattering by water vapour. Current measurements by a mixture of ground-based and space-based instruments show differences of around 10% in the 4000-7000 cm-1 region, with no resolution to this controversy in sight. This work presents observations of SSI taken using a ground-based Fourier Transform spectrometer between 4000-10000 cm-1 at a field site in Camborne, UK, with particular focus on a rigorously defined uncertainty budget. While there is good agreement between this work and the commonly-used ATLAS3 spectrum between 7000-10000 cm-1, the SSI is systematically lower by 10% than ATLAS3 between 4000-7000 cm-1, with no overlap within the k = 2 measurement uncertainties.

  4. Fourier Transform and Photoacoustic Absorption Spectra of Ethylene within 6035 6210 cm-1: Comparative Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitanov, V.A.; Solodov, A.M.; Petrova, T.M.; Ponomarev, Y.N.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of ethylene absorption spectra with Fourier Transform (FT) and Photoacoustic (PA) spectrometers within 6035-6210 cm -1 are described. The methodology used for building the frequency scale for both spectrometers is presented. The methane absorption spectrum, included into the HITRAN database, was used in both cases to calibrate the frequency scale. Ethylene absorption spectra were obtained with the two recording methods; a coincidence of the measured line center positions was obtained with an accuracy of 0.0005 cm -1

  5. An empirical spectroscopic database for acetylene in the regions of 5850-6341 cm-1 and 7000-9415 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyulin, O. M.; Campargue, A.

    2017-12-01

    Six studies have been recently devoted to a systematic analysis of the high-resolution near infrared absorption spectrum of acetylene recorded by Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy (CRDS) in Grenoble and by Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) in Brussels and Hefei. On the basis of these works, in the present contribution, we construct an empirical database for acetylene in the 5850-9415 cm-1 region excluding the 6341-7000 cm-1 interval corresponding to the very strong ν1+ν3 manifold. Our database gathers and extends information included in our CRDS and FTS studies. In particular, the intensities of about 1700 lines measured by CRDS in the 7244-7920 cm-1 region are reported for the first time together with those of several bands of 12C13CH2 present in natural isotopic abundance in the acetylene sample. The Herman-Wallis coefficients of most of the bands are derived from a fit of the measured intensity values. A recommended line list is provided with positions calculated using empirical spectroscopic parameters of the lower and upper energy vibrational levels and intensities calculated using the derived Herman-Wallis coefficients. This approach allows completing the experimental list by adding missing lines and improving poorly determined positions and intensities. As a result the constructed line list includes a total of 11113 transitions belonging to 150 bands of 12C2H2 and 29 bands of 12C13CH2. For comparison the HITRAN database in the same region includes 869 transitions of 14 bands, all belonging to 12C2H2. Our weakest lines have an intensity on the order of 10-29 cm/molecule, about three orders of magnitude smaller than the HITRAN intensity cut off. Line profile parameters are added to the line list which is provided in HITRAN format. The comparison of the acetylene database to the HITRAN2012 line list or to results obtained using the global effective operator approach is discussed in terms of completeness and accuracy.

  6. Experimental Line List of Water Vapor Absorption Lines in the Spectral Ranges 1850 - 2280 CM-1 and 2390-4000 CM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Joep; Birk, Manfred; Wagner, Georg

    2017-06-01

    A new experimental line parameter list of water vapor absorption lines in the spectral ranges 1850 - 2280 cm-1 and 2390 - 4000 cm-1 is presented. The line list is based on the analysis of several transmittance spectra measured using a Bruker IFS 125 HR high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 54 measurements of pure water and water/air-mixtures at 296 K as well as water/air-mixtures at high and low temperatures were performed. A multispectrum fitting approach was used applying a quadratic speed-dependent hard collision line shape model in the Hartmann-Tran implementation extended to account for line mixing in the Rosenkranz approximation in order to retrieve line positions, intensities, self- and air-broadening parameters, their speed-dependence, self- and air-shifts as well as line mixing and in some cases collisional narrowing parameters. Additionally, temperature dependence parameters for widths, shifts and in a few cases line mixing were retrieved. For every parameter an extensive error estimation calculation was performed identifying and specifying systematic error sources. The resulting parameters are compared to the databases HITRAN12 as well as experimental values. For intensities, a detailed comparison to results of recent ab initio calculations performed at University College London was done showing an agreement within 2 % for a majority of the data. However, for some bands there are systematic deviations attributed to ab initio calculation errors. .H. Ngo et al. JQSRT 129, 89-100 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.034; JQSRT 134, 105 (2014) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.10.016. H. Tran et al. JQSRT 129, 199-203 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.06.015; JQSRT 134, 104 (2014) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.10.015. L.S. Rothman et al. JQSRT 130, 4-50 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.07.002. N. Jacquinet-Husson et al. JMS 112, 2395-2445 (2016) doi:10.1016/j.jms.2016.06.007.

  7. High resolution spectroscopy of the OsO4 stretching fundamental at 961 cm-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, R.S.; Radziemski, L.J.; Flicker, H.; Galbraith, H.W.; Kennedy, R.C.; Nereson, N.G.; Krohn, B.J.; Aldridge, J.P.; King, J.D.; Fox, K.

    1978-01-01

    The ν 3 bands of 187 Os 16 O 4 , 189 Os 16 O 4 , and 192 Os 16 O 4 have been recorded using both a Michelson interferometer (resolution 0.06 cm -1 ) and a tunable semiconductor diode laser (resolution limited by the Doppler width, approx.0.0007 cm -1 ). The rotational fine structure differs from that of most other spherical-top molecules, for only rotational levels of A symmetry exist. A total of 112 individual vibration--rotation lines in the P and R branches of the three isotopic species were calibrated against stimulated emission lines from a high-voltage CO 2 gain cell, and were used to determine three scalar and two tensor spectroscopic constants for each species; an additional scalar constant was obtained from an analysis of the Q branch of 192 OsO 4 . The strength of P (11) A 2 /sup ts0/ was measured for 192 OsO 4 and yields a vibrational transition moment for ν 3 of 0.17 +- 0.02 D. Transitions of all isotopic species that are expected to fall near CO 2 laser lines in the region 949--972 cm -1 are tabulated as an aid in the interpreation of saturation spectroscopy experiments. The general quadratic symmetry and valence force constants of OsO 4 were redetermined, using the isotope shifts in ν 3 as the additional constraints for the F 2 symmetry block

  8. Accuracy of free energies of hydration using CM1 and CM3 atomic charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udier-Blagović, Marina; Morales De Tirado, Patricia; Pearlman, Shoshannah A; Jorgensen, William L

    2004-08-01

    Absolute free energies of hydration (DeltaGhyd) have been computed for 25 diverse organic molecules using partial atomic charges derived from AM1 and PM3 wave functions via the CM1 and CM3 procedures of Cramer, Truhlar, and coworkers. Comparisons are made with results using charges fit to the electrostatic potential surface (EPS) from ab initio 6-31G* wave functions and from the OPLS-AA force field. OPLS Lennard-Jones parameters for the organic molecules were used together with the TIP4P water model in Monte Carlo simulations with free energy perturbation theory. Absolute free energies of hydration were computed for OPLS united-atom and all-atom methane by annihilating the solutes in water and in the gas phase, and absolute DeltaGhyd values for all other molecules were computed via transformation to one of these references. Optimal charge scaling factors were determined by minimizing the unsigned average error between experimental and calculated hydration free energies. The PM3-based charge models do not lead to lower average errors than obtained with the EPS charges for the subset of 13 molecules in the original study. However, improvement is obtained by scaling the CM1A partial charges by 1.14 and the CM3A charges by 1.15, which leads to average errors of 1.0 and 1.1 kcal/mol for the full set of 25 molecules. The scaled CM1A charges also yield the best results for the hydration of amides including the E/Z free-energy difference for N-methylacetamide in water. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of 18O-Enriched Carbonyl Sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm -1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugariu, T.; Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.; Bredohl, H.; Blavier, J.-F.; Dubois, I.

    1998-06-01

    We have measured the Fourier transform spectrum of carbonyl sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm-1, using a sample enriched in both18O (94.0%) and17O (1.54%). A careful calibration yields a line-position accuracy between 1.5 and 3.0 10-5cm-1. We have observed and analyzed 118 infrared bands of which 93 are measured for the first time: 55 for18O12C32S, 20 for18O12C34S, 11 for18O12C33S, 1 for18O12C36S, 12 for17O12C32S, 4 for17O12C34S, 2 for17O12C33S, and 13 for18O13C32S. Intensities are also reported and analyzed for all those bands. The intensity accuracy is better than 10%, and the precision of approximately 1% allows us to determine some Herman-Wallis coefficients.

  10. The 1943 K emission spectrum of H216O between 6600 and 7050 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czinki, Eszter; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Eckhardt, André K.; Mellau, Georg Ch.

    2018-02-01

    An emission spectrum of H216O has been recorded, with Doppler-limited resolution, at 1943 K using Hot Gas Molecular Emission (HOTGAME) spectroscopy. The wavenumber range covered is 6600 to 7050 cm-1. This work reports the analysis and subsequent assignment of close to 3700 H216O transitions out of a total of more than 6700 measured peaks. The analysis is based on the Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels (MARVEL) energy levels of H216O determined in 2013 and emission line intensities obtained from accurate variational nuclear-motion computations. The analysis of the spectrum yields about 1300 transitions not measured previously and 23 experimentally previously unidentified rovibrational energy levels. The accuracy of the line positions and intensities used in the analysis was improved with the spectrum deconvolution software SyMath via creating a peak list corresponding to the dense emission spectrum. The extensive list of labeled transitions and the new experimental energy levels obtained are deposited in the Supplementary Material of this article as well as in the ReSpecTh (http://www.respecth.hu) information system.

  11. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of Carbonyl Sulfide from 3700 to 4800 cm -1and Selection of a Line-Pointing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.; Bredohl, H.; Blavier, J.-F.; Dubois, I.

    1998-11-01

    We have measured the Fourier transform spectrum of natural OCS from 3700 to 4800 cm-1with a near Doppler resolution and a line-position accuracy between 4 and 8 × 10-5cm-1. For the normal isotopic species, 37 vibrational transitions have been analyzed for both frequencies and intensities. We also report 15 bands of OC34S, eight bands of O13CS, nine bands of OC33S, and two bands of18OCS. Important effective Herman-Wallis terms are explained on the basis of eigenvectors. A comparison of different line-pointing programs is also presented.

  12. The intensity of the 1602 cm-1 band in human cells is related to mitochondrial activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pully, V.V.; Otto, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    We report a Raman band at 1602 cm−1 in the spectra of human cells, which previously had only been observed in mitochondria of yeast cells. This band, which has not yet been assigned to a particular molecular species, was found to occur in HeLa cells, peripheral blood lymphocytes, human mesenchymal

  13. An Empirical Spectroscopic Database for Acetylene in the Regions of 5850-9415 CM^{-1}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Lyulin, Oleg

    2017-06-01

    Six studies have been recently devoted to a systematic analysis of the high-resolution near infrared absorption spectrum of acetylene recorded by Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy (CRDS) in Grenoble and by Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) in Brussels and Hefei. On the basis of these works, in the present contribution, we construct an empirical database for acetylene in the 5850 - 9415 \\wn region excluding the 6341-7000 \\wn interval corresponding to the very strong νb{1}+ νb{3} manifold. The database gathers and extends information included in our CRDS and FTS studies. In particular, the intensities of about 1700 lines measured by CRDS in the 7244-7920 \\wn are reported for the first time together with those of several bands of ^{12}C^{13}CH_{2} present in natural isotopic abundance in the acetylene sample. The Herman-Wallis coefficients of most of the bands are derived from a fit of the measured intensity values. A recommended line list is provided with positions calculated using empirical spectroscopic parameters of the lower and upper energy vibrational levels and intensities calculated using the derived Herman-Wallis coefficients. This approach allows completing the experimental list by adding missing lines and improving poorly determined positions and intensities. As a result the constructed line list includes a total of 10973 lines belonging to 146 bands of ^{12}C_{2}H_{2} and 29 bands of ^{12}C^{13}CH_{2}. For comparison the HITRAN2012 database in the same region includes 869 lines of 14 bands, all belonging to ^{12}C_{2}H_{2}. Our weakest lines have an intensity on the order of 10^{-29} cm/molecule,about three orders of magnitude smaller than the HITRAN intensity cut off. Line profile parameters are added to the line list which is provided in HITRAN format. The comparison to the HITRAN2012 line list or to results obtained using the global effective operator approach is discussed in terms of completeness and accuracy.

  14. Comb-assisted cavity ring down spectroscopy of 17O enriched water between 7443 and 7921 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelain, D.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Karlovets, E. V.; Béguier, S.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-12-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 7443 and 7921 cm-1. Three series of recordings were performed with pressure values around 0.1, 1 and 10 Torr. The frequency calibration of the present spectra benefited of the combination of the CRDS spectrometer to a self-referenced frequency comb. The resulting CRD spectrometer combines excellent frequency accuracy over a broad spectral region with a high sensitivity (Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin∼ 10-11-10-10 cm-1). The investigated spectral region corresponds to the high energy range of the first hexade. The assignments were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. Overall about 4150 lines were measured and assigned to 4670 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). Their intensities span six orders of magnitude from 10-28 to 10-22 cm/molecule. Most of the new results concern the H217O and HD17O isotopologues for which about 1600 and 400 transitions were assigned leading to the determination of 329 and 207 new energy levels, respectively. For comparison only about 300 and four transitions of H217O and HD17O were previously known in the region, respectively. By comparison to highly accurate H216O line positions available in the literature, the average accuracy on our line centers is checked to be on the order of 3 MHz (10-4 cm-1) or better for not weak well isolated lines. This small uncertainty represents a significant improvement of the line center determination of many H216O lines included in the experimental list provided as Supplementary Material.

  15. One year of downwelling spectral radiance measurements from 100 to 1400 cm-1 at Dome Concordia: Results in clear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, R.; Arosio, C.; Maestri, T.; Palchetti, L.; Bianchini, G.; Del Guasta, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work examines downwelling radiance spectra measured at the ground during 2013 by a Far Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer at Dome C, Antarctica. A tropospheric backscatter and depolarization lidar is also deployed at same site, and a radiosonde system is routinely operative. The measurements allow characterization of the water vapor and clouds infrared properties in Antarctica under all sky conditions. In this paper we specifically discuss cloud detection and the analysis in clear sky condition, required for the discussion of the results obtained in cloudy conditions. First, the paper discusses the procedures adopted for the quality control of spectra acquired automatically. Then it describes the classification procedure used to discriminate spectra measured in clear sky from cloudy conditions. Finally a selection is performed and 66 clear cases, spanning the whole year, are compared to simulations. The computation of layer molecular optical depth is performed with line-by-line techniques and a convolution to simulate the Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed-Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) measurements; the downwelling radiance for selected clear cases is computed with a state-of-the-art adding-doubling code. The mean difference over all selected cases between simulated and measured radiance is within experimental error for all the selected microwindows except for the negative residuals found for all microwindows in the range 200 to 400 cm-1, with largest values around 295.1 cm-1. The paper discusses possible reasons for the discrepancy and identifies the incorrect magnitude of the water vapor total absorption coefficient as the cause of such large negative radiance bias below 400 cm-1.

  16. Universal graphs at $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a supercompact cardinal we build a model in which $2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1}}=2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}}=\\aleph_{\\omega_1+3}$ but there is a jointly universal family of size $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+2}$ of graphs on $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$. The same technique will work for any uncountable cardinal in place of $\\omega_1$.

  17. High-Resolution Laser Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of OCS in the 12 000-13 000 cm -1 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchart, S.; Hadj Bachir, I.; Huet, T. R.; Olafsson, A.; Destombes, J.-L.; Naı¨m, S.; Fayt, A.

    1999-08-01

    A spectrum of natural OCS has been recorded in the near-infrared region using the laser photoacoustic technique. The source is a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by an Ar+ laser. The tunable 1.5 W beam was sent through the photoacoustic cell. This windowless longitudinal resonant cell was designed with two λ/4 buffer volumes at both ends in order to reduce the noise and so to increase the sensitivity (αmin ≈ 10-9 cm-1). The spectrum of OCS, at a pressure of 90 Torr, has been recorded in the regions 11 953-12 084, 12 829-12 890, and 12 998-13 001 cm-1. In addition to the 0006-0000 band of 16O12C32S recently identified by Ch. Hornberger, B. Boor, R. Stuber, W. Demtröder, S. Naı̈m, and A. Fayt, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 179, 237-245, 1996, new weaker bands have been observed: 0405-0000, 1 1003-0000, 1006-0000, 1405-0000, 0206-0000, and 0116-0110, and also the 0006-0000 band of 16O12C34S. Effective state parameters are deduced from the band-by-band least-squares fits. The new data have also been introduced in the global analysis which takes into account the l-type resonance and the main anharmonic interactions and so allows a full understanding of the perturbations and the intensity transfers.

  18. New Raman-peak at 1850 cm(-1) observed in multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by hydrogen arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Kadowaki, Y; Inoue, S; Ohkohchi, M; Zhao, X; Ando, Y

    2010-06-01

    The new peak (near 1850 cm(-1)) assigned to carbon linear chain included in the centre of very thin innermost multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been verified by Raman spectroscopy. These MWNTs were produced by dc arc discharge of pure graphite rods in pure hydrogen gas and existed in the cathode deposit. In this paper, we clarified that the new Raman-peaks could also be observed in the cathode deposit including MWNTs produced by hydrogen dc arc discharge using graphite electrode with added Y or La. By changing the quantity of addition (Y or La), dc arc current and pressure of ambient hydrogen gas, the optimum condition to get maximum intensity of the new Raman-peaks was obtained. For the case of 1 wt% La, dc 50 A, H2 pressure of 50 Torr was found to be optimum, and the intensity of new Raman-peak was even higher than the G-band peak. For the case of 1 wt% Y, dc 50 A, H2 pressure of 50 Torr was optimum, but the intensity of new Raman-peak was weaker than the G-band peak. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the crystallinity of MWNTs produced with pure graphite rod was better than those produced with added Y or La.

  19. Validation of HITEMP-2010 for carbon dioxide and water vapour at high temperatures and atmospheric pressures in 450-7600cm-1 spectral range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the work is validation of HITEMP-2010 at atmospheric pressures and temperatures reaching 1770K. To this end, spectral transmissivities at 1cm-1 resolution and excellent signal-to-noise-ratio have been measured for 22 CO2/H2O/N2 mixtures. In this paper we consider the 450cm-1-7600...

  20. On the 590cm-1 B1g feature in underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta

    OpenAIRE

    Hewitt, Kevin C.; Wang, N. L.; Irwin, J. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Pantoja, A. E.; Trodahl, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    Raman scattering studies have been performed on underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta. In single crystals underdoped by oxygen removal, a 590 cm-1 peak is observed in the B1g spectrum. The feature is observed to soften in frequency by 3.8% with isotopic exchange for 16-O by 18-O. In contrast, the 590cm-1 peak is not observed in crystals underdoped by Y substitution which suggests that it correspond to a disorder induced vibrational mode. We have also found that underdoping leads to a depletion of lo...

  1. Observation of chi(c1) Decays into Vector Meson Pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using (106 +/- 4) x 10(6) psi(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+) e(-) collider, we present the first measurement of decays of chi(c1) to vector meson pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.5) x

  2. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy of fluoroform 12CHF3 and critical analysis of the infrared spectrum from 25 to 1500 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, S.; Bauerecker, S.; Bekhtereva, E. S.; Bolotova, I. B.; Hollenstein, H.; Quack, M.; Ulenikov, O. N.

    2018-05-01

    We report high-resolution (? 0.001 cm-1) Fourier Transform Infrared spectra of fluoroform (CHF3) including the pure rotational (far infrared or THz) range (28-65 cm-1), the ν3 fundamental (? = 700.099 cm-1), as well as the associated "hot' band 2ν3 - ν3 (? = 699.295 cm-1) and the 'atmospheric window' range 1100-1250 cm-1 containing the strongly coupled polyad of the levels ν2, ν5 and ν3 + ν6, at room temperature and at 120 K using the collisional cooling cell coupled to our Bruker IFS 125 HR prototype (ZP2001) spectrometer and Bruker IFS 125 HR ETH-SLS prototype at the Swiss Light Source providing intense synchrotron radiation. The pure rotational spectra provide new information about the vibrational ground state of CHF3, which is useful for further analysis of excited vibrational states. The ν3 fundamental band is re-investigated together with the corresponding 'hot' band 2ν3 - ν3 leading to an extension of the existing line lists up to 4430 transitions with ? = 66 for ν3 and 1040 transitions with ? = 43 for 2ν3 - ν3. About 6000 transitions were assigned to rovibrational levels in the polyad ν2/ν5/ν3 + ν6 with ? = 63 for ν2 (? = 1141.457 cm-1), ? = 63 for ν5 (? = 1157.335 cm-1) and ? = 59 for ν3 + ν6 (? = 1208.771 cm-1)(? = ? in each case). The resonance interactions between the ν2, ν5 and ν3 + ν6 states have been taken into account providing an accurate set of effective hamiltonian parameters, which reproduce the experimental results with an accuracy close to the experimental uncertainties (with a root mean square deviation drms = 0.00025 cm-1). The analysis is further extended to the ν4 fundamental (? = 1377.847 cm-1) interacting with 2ν3 (? = 1399.394 cm-1). The results are discussed in relation to the importance of understanding the spectra of CHF3 as a greenhouse gas and as part of our large effort to measure and understand the complete spectrum of CHF3 from the far-infrared to the near-infrared as a prototype for intramolecular

  3. The 590 cm-1 B_1g feature in underdoped Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kevin C.; Wang, N. L.; Irwin, J. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Pantoja, A. E.; Trodahl, H. J.

    1999-05-01

    Raman scattering studies have been performed on underdoped Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+δ. In single crystals underdoped by oxygen removal, a 590 cm-1 peak is observed in the B_1g spectrum. The feature is observed to soften in frequency by 3.8% with isotopic exchange of ^16O by ^18O. In contrast, the 590 cm-1 peak is not observed in crystals underdoped by Y substitution which suggests that it corresponds to a disorder induced vibrational mode. We have also found that underdoping leads to a depletion of low energy spectral weight from regions of the Fermi surface located near the Brillouin zone axes.

  4. Development of a lateral flow test to detect metabolic resistance in Bemisia tabaci mediated by CYP6CM1, a cytochrome P450 with broad spectrum catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauen, Ralf; Wölfel, Katharina; Lueke, Bettina; Myridakis, Antonis; Tsakireli, Dimitra; Roditakis, Emmanouil; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Stephanou, Euripides; Vontas, John

    2015-06-01

    Cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major sucking pest in many agricultural and horticultural cropping systems globally. The frequent use of insecticides of different mode of action classes resulted in populations resisting treatments used to keep numbers under economic damage thresholds. Recently it was shown that resistance to neonicotinoids such as imidacloprid is linked to the over-expression of CYP6CM1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase detoxifying imidacloprid and other neonicotinoid insecticides when recombinantly expressed in insect cells. However over-expression of CYP6CM1 is also known to confer cross-resistance to pymetrozine, an insecticide not belonging to the chemical class of neonicotinoids. In addition we were able to demonstrate by LC-MS/MS analysis the metabolisation of pyriproxyfen by recombinantly expressed CYP6CM1. Based on our results CYP6CM1 is one of the most versatile detoxification enzymes yet identified in a pest of agricultural importance, as it detoxifies a diverse range of chemical classes used to control whiteflies. Therefore we developed a field-diagnostic antibody-based lateral flow assay which detects CYP6CM1 protein at levels providing resistance to neonicotinoids and other insecticides. The ELISA based test kit can be used as a diagnostic tool to support resistance management strategies based on the alternation of different modes of action of insecticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective line intensity measurements of trans-nitrous acid (HONO) of the ν1 band near 3600 cm-1 using laser difference-frequency spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Fourmentin, Marc; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Chen, Changshui; Chen, Weidong

    2017-07-01

    We report on the measurements of the effective line intensities of the ν1 fundamental band of trans-nitrous acid (trans-HONO) in the infrared near 3600 cm-1 (2.78 μm). A home-made widely tunable laser spectrometer based on difference-frequency generation (DFG) was used for this study. The strengths of 28 well-resolved absorption lines of the ν1 band were determined by scaling their absorption intensities to the well referenced absorption line intensity of the ν3 band of trans-HONO around 1250 cm-1 recorded simultaneously with the help of a DFB quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectrometer. The maximum measurement uncertainty of 12% in the line intensities is mainly determined by the uncertainty announced in the referenced line intensities, while the measurement precision in frequency positions of the absorption lines is better than 6×10-4 cm-1. The cross-measurement carried out in the present work allows one to perform intensity calibration using well referenced line parameters.

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of D212CO in the 2500-4500 cm-1 region and the first rovibrational analysis of its v2 = 2 state

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'dawiah, Rabia'tul; Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.

    2018-03-01

    A low-resolution (0.5 cm-1) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of formaldehyde-d2 (D212CO) in the 2500-4500 cm-1 region was recorded to study the combination bands in this region. The bands ν2 +ν4,ν2 +ν6 , ν2 +ν3 , ν1 +ν2 , ν2 +ν5 , 3ν3 , 2ν2 and 2ν5 were identified and their band centers (with an uncertainty of ± 0.1 cm-1) and band types were determined. Furthermore, the high-resolution FTIR spectrum of the 2ν2 overtone band (3315-3440 cm-1) of D212CO was recorded at an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 and its infrared lines were analyzed. A total of 970 rovibrational transitions have been assigned and fitted up to J‧ = 35 and Ka‧ = 14 using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation. Upper state (v2 = 2) rovibrational constants inclusive of three rotational and five quartic centrifugal distortion constants were accurately determined for the first time. The band center of the 2ν2 band was determined as 3385.200666 ± 0.000035 cm-1. The rms deviation of the rovibrational fit was 0.00093 cm-1. From the fitting of 451 ground state combination differences (GSCDs) of D212CO which were derived from the infrared transitions of the 2ν2 band of this work, together with 360 microwave frequencies from a previous study, new and accurate ground state constants of D212CO up to three octic terms were obtained. The combination and overtone bands and the newly assigned high-resolution infrared lines of the 2ν2 band in the 2500-4500 cm-1 region can be used to detect D212CO in this infrared region. In addition, the results derived from this study give information on the rovibrational molecular structure of D212CO.

  7. Amide or amine: determining the origin of the 3300 cm(-1) NH mode in protein SFG spectra using 15N isotope labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Tobias; Breen, Nicholas F; Drobny, Gary P; Castner, David G

    2009-11-26

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been employed in biomaterials research and protein adsorption studies with growing success in recent years. A number of studies focusing on understanding SFG spectra of proteins and peptides at different interfaces have laid the foundation for future, more complex studies. In many cases, a strong NH mode near 3300 cm(-1) is observed in the SFG spectra, but the relationship of this mode to the peptide structure is uncertain, since it has been assigned to either a backbone amide mode or a side chain related amine resonance. A thorough understanding of the SFG spectra of these first model systems is an important first step for future experiments. To clarify the origin of the NH SFG mode, we studied (15)N isotopically labeled 14-amino acid amphiphilic model peptides composed of lysine (K) and leucine (L) in an alpha-helical secondary structure (LKalpha14) that were adsorbed onto charged surfaces in situ at the solid-liquid interface. (15)N substitution at the terminal amine group of the lysine side chains resulted in a red-shift of the NH mode of 9 cm(-1) on SiO(2) and 13 cm(-1) on CaF(2). This clearly shows the 3300 cm(-1) NH feature is associated with side chain NH stretches and not with backbone amide modes.

  8. The ratio 1660/1690 cm(-1) measured by infrared microspectroscopy is not specific of enzymatic collagen cross-links in bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlay, Delphine; Duclos, Marie-Eve; Gineyts, Evelyne; Bertholon, Cindy; Viguet-Carrin, Stéphanie; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Bertrand, Dominique; Roger, Thierry; Hartmann, Daniel J; Chapurlat, Roland; Boivin, Georges

    2011-01-01

    In postmenopausal osteoporosis, an impairment in enzymatic cross-links (ECL) occurs, leading in part to a decline in bone biomechanical properties. Biochemical methods by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are currently used to measure ECL. Another method has been proposed, by Fourier Transform InfraRed Imaging (FTIRI), to measure a mature PYD/immature DHLNL cross-links ratio, using the 1660/1690 cm(-1) area ratio in the amide I band. However, in bone, the amide I band composition is complex (collagens, non-collagenous proteins, water vibrations) and the 1660/1690 cm(-1) by FTIRI has never been directly correlated with the PYD/DHLNL by HPLC. A study design using lathyritic rats, characterized by a decrease in the formation of ECL due to the inhibition of lysyl oxidase, was used in order to determine the evolution of 1660/1690 cm(-1) by FTIR Microspectroscopy in bone tissue and compare to the ECL quantified by HPLC. The actual amount of ECL was quantified by HPLC on cortical bone from control and lathyritic rats. The lathyritic group exhibited a decrease of 78% of pyridinoline content compared to the control group. The 1660/1690 cm(-1) area ratio was increased within center bone compared to inner bone, and this was also correlated with an increase in both mineral maturity and mineralization index. However, no difference in the 1660/1690 cm(-1) ratio was found between control and lathyritic rats. Those results were confirmed by principal component analysis performed on multispectral infrared images. In bovine bone, in which PYD was physically destructed by UV-photolysis, the PYD/DHLNL (measured by HPLC) was strongly decreased, whereas the 1660/1690 cm(-1) was unmodified. In conclusion, the 1660/1690 cm(-1) is not related to the PYD/DHLNL ratio, but increased with age of bone mineral, suggesting that a modification of this ratio could be mainly due to a modification of the collagen secondary structure related to the mineralization process.

  9. Observation of an energy threshold for large ΔE collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (Evib=31 000-41 000 cm-1) by CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elioff, Michael S.; Wall, Mark C.; Lemoff, Andrew S.; Mullin, Amy S.

    1999-03-01

    Energy dependent studies of the collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine through collisions with CO2 were performed for initial pyrazine energies Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. These studies are presented along with earlier results for pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1. High-resolution transient IR laser absorption of individual CO2 (0000) rotational states (J=56-80) was used to investigate the magnitude and partitioning of energy gain into CO2 rotation and translation, which comprises the high energy tail of the energy transfer distribution function. Highly vibrationally excited pyrazine was prepared by absorption of pulsed UV light at seven wavelengths in the range λ=281-324 nm, followed by radiationless decay to pyrazine's ground electronic state. Nascent CO2 (0000) rotational populations were measured for each UV excitation wavelength and distributions of nascent recoil velocities for individual rotational states of CO2 (0000) were obtained from Doppler-broadened transient linewidth measurements. Measurements of energy transfer rate constants at each UV wavelength yield energy-dependent probabilities for collisions involving large ΔE values. These results reveal that the magnitude of large ΔE collisional energy gain in CO2 (0000) is fairly insensitive to the amount of vibrational energy in pyrazine for Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. A comparison with earlier studies on pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1 indicates that the V→RT energy transfer increases both in magnitude and probability for Evib>36 000 cm-1. Implications of incomplete intramolecular vibrational relaxation, electronic state coupling, and isomerization barriers are discussed in light of these results.

  10. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm-1 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.S.

    1991-05-01

    This project uses high resolution infrared spectroscopy to probe the mechanism of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) in isolated polyatomic molecules. We have found only vibrationally anharmonic coupling in the C-H stretch region of 1-butyne but rotationally mediated coupling is evident in similar spectra of ethanol. The ''keyhole'' model of IVR was developed to account for the similarities and differences between these molecules. The concepts of the model are being implemented numerically in random matrix calculations. A second F-center laser has been purchased and is now being set up to develop an infrared double resonance technique which can be applied to this problem. 4 refs., 5 figs

  11. The methane absorption spectrum near 1.73 μm (5695-5850 cm-1): Empirical line lists at 80 K and 296 K and rovibrational assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, M.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Campargue, A.

    2018-07-01

    The methane absorption spectrum is studied at 297 K and 80 K in the center of the Tetradecad between 5695 and 5850 cm-1. The spectra are recorded by differential absorption spectroscopy (DAS) with a noise equivalent absorption of about αmin≈ 1.5 × 10-7 cm-1. Two empirical line lists are constructed including about 4000 and 2300 lines at 297 K and 80 K, respectively. Lines due to 13CH4 present in natural abundance were identified by comparison with a spectrum of pure 13CH4 recorded in the same temperature conditions. About 1700 empirical values of the lower state energy level, Eemp, were derived from the ratios of the line intensities at 80 K and 296 K. They provide accurate temperature dependence for most of the absorption in the region (93% and 82% at 80 K and 296 K, respectively). The quality of the derived empirical values is illustrated by the clear propensity of the corresponding lower state rotational quantum number, Jemp, to be close to integer values. Using an effective Hamiltonian model derived from a previously published ab initio potential energy surface, about 2060 lines are rovibrationnally assigned, adding about 1660 new assignments to those provided in the HITRAN database for 12CH4 in the region.

  12. Isotope shift of the 590-cm-1 Raman feature in underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, K. C.; Wang, N. L.; Irwin, J. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Pantoja, A. E.; Trodahl, H. J.

    1999-10-01

    Raman-scattering studies have been performed on underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. In single crystals underdoped by oxygen removal, a 590-cm-1 peak is observed in the B1g spectrum. The feature is observed to soften in frequency by 3.8% with isotopic exchange of 16O by 18O. In contrast, the 590-cm-1 peak is not observed in crystals underdoped by Y substitution which suggests that it is a vibrational mode activated by oxygen deficency. We have also found that underdoping leads to a depletion of low-energy spectral weight from regions of the Fermi surface located near the Brillouin-zone axes.

  13. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of Carbonyl Sulfide from 4800 to 8000 cm -1and New Global Analysis of 16O 12C 32S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rbaihi, E.; Belafhal, A.; Vander Auwera, J.; Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.

    1998-09-01

    We have measured the FT spectrum of natural OCS from 4800 to 8000 cm-1with a near Doppler resolution and a line-position accuracy between 2 and 8 × 10-4cm-1. For the normal isotopic species16O12C32S, 37 vibrational transitions have been analyzed for both frequencies and intensities. We also report six bands of16O12C34S, five bands of16O13C32S, two bands of16O12C33S, and two bands of18O12C32S. Important effective Herman-Wallis terms are explained by the anharmonic resonances between closely spaced states. As those results complete the study of the Fourier transform spectra of natural carbonyl sulfide from 1800 to 8000 cm-1, a new global rovibrational analysis of16O12C32S has been performed. We have determined a set of 148 molecular parameters, and a statistical agreement is obtained with all the available experimental data.

  14. Vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy of CH2Cl2 and CD2Cl2 in the energy region 50,000-95,000 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anuvab; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Jagatap, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    A consolidated study of the VUV absorption spectra of CH2Cl2 and CD2Cl2 in the 50,000-95,000 cm-1 region using synchrotron radiation is presented. Rydberg series and vibronic analysis are carried out and supported by quantum chemical calculations. The broad absorption band of CH2Cl2 in the region 50,000-60,000 cm-1 is attributed to the valence states 11B2, 11B1 and 11A1. Most of the bands in the 60,000-95,000 cm-1 region are fitted to Rydberg series of ns, np and nd type converging to the first four ionization potentials 11.320, 11.357, 12.152 and 12.271 eV of CH2Cl2 arising from excitation of an electron from one of the four outermost Cl non-bonding orbitals (2b1, 3b2, 1a2 and 4a1). Vertical excited states of CH2Cl2 calculated using TDDFT are correlated with experimentally observed electronic states based on the symmetries of the initial and final MOs involved in a transition. A few Rydberg transitions viz. 2b1→5s, 4p, 5p, 6p; 3b2→4p, 5p; 1a2→4p are accompanied by vibronic features. Observed vibronic bands are assigned mainly to the CCl symmetric stretch (ν3‧) mode with smaller contributions from the CH symmetric stretch (ν1‧), CH2 bend (ν2‧) and CH2 wag (ν8‧) modes. Assignments are corroborated by comparison with the VUV absorption spectrum of the deuterated isotopologue CD2Cl2, reported here for the first time. The high underlying intensities seen in several sub-regions are explained by valence or valence-Rydberg mixed type transitions predicted with high oscillator strengths by the TDDFT calculations.

  15. Line Intensity Measurements in 14N 216O and Their Treatment Using the Effective Dipole Moment Approach . I. The 4300- to 5200-cm -1 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumont, L.; Auwera, J. Vander; Teffo, J.-L.; Perevalov, V. I.; Tashkun, S. A.

    2001-08-01

    This work continues a series of publications devoted to the application of the effective operator approach to the vibrational-rotational treatment of linear triatomic molecules, aiming at the analysis and prediction of their infrared spectra. In that frame work, we have started a large-scale work aiming at the global description of line intensities of cold and hot bands of 14N216O in its ground electronic state in the spectral range above 3600 cm-1. In 14N216O, vibrational interacting levels group in polyads as a result of the relation 2ω1≈4ω2≈ω3 existing between the harmonic frequencies. The polyads are identified by the so-called polyad number P=2V1+V2+4V3. The work described in the present paper concerns bands associated with transitions corresponding to ΔP=7, 8, and 9. The absorption spectra of N2O at room temperature have been recorded at a resolution of 0.007 cm-1 in the range from 4300 to 5200 cm-1 using a Bruker IFS120HR Fourier transform spectrometer. Sample pressure/absorption path length products ranging from 7 to 1753 mbar × m have been used. More than 3000 absolute line intensities have been measured in 66 different bands belonging to the ΔP=7, 8, and 9 series. Dicke narrowing has been observed in the high-pressure spectra. Using wavefunctions previously determined from a global fit of an effective Hamiltonian to about 18,000 line positions (S. A. Tashkun, V. I. Perevalov, and J.-L. Teffo to be published), the experimental intensities measured in this work and by R. A. Toth (J. Mol. Spectrosc.197, 158-187 (1999)) were fitted to 47 parameters of a corresponding effective dipole moment, with residuals very close to the experimental uncertainty. Exa mples are given showing that the modeling reproduces intensities of perturbed lines well.

  16. ICLAS of water in the 770 nm transparency window (12 746-13 558 cm-1). Comparison with current experimental and calculated databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campargue, A.; Mikhailenko, S.; Liu, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of water vapor has been investigated by intracavity laser spectroscopy (ICLAS) in the 12 746-13 558 cm -1 spectral region corresponding to an interesting transparency window of the atmosphere, partly obscured by the A band of molecular oxygen. The achieved sensitivity-in the order of α min ∼10 -9 cm -1 -has allowed one to measure 1062 water lines with intensities ranging from 1.6x10 -28 to 2.35x10 -24 cm/molecule at 296 K. A total of 169 new and improved energy levels belonging to 21 vibrational states could be determined from 374 newly measured transitions. The retrieved experimental line list is compared with the spectra calculated by Schwenke and Partridge, and Barber and Tennyson. Comparison with the available experimental databases shows that the obtained results represent a significant improvement of the knowledge of the water absorption in the considered region, in particular in the region of the oxygen A band

  17. Study of the relation of the band at 3595 CM-1 in FTIR spectrum of natural quartz with color development by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Helena Cristina M.; Lameiras, Fernando S.

    2015-01-01

    Brazil is a major producer of gemological quartz as smoky quartz, morion, citrine, amethyst, and prasiolite. Due to its abundance, hardness, and color varieties, quartz is used in jewelry industry. However, very often quartz is found in nature colorless or with faint colors, which requires exposure to ionizing radiation for color enhancement or development. Not all quartz can develop color. Chromophore chemical elements must be present in suitable proportions for color development after irradiation and heating. Infrared spectrometry is used to separate the quartz that can develop colors from the ones that cannot. Bands in infrared spectrum can indicate the presence and relative contents of chromophore chemical elements, such as aluminum, iron, lithium, sodium, and hydrogen. Some samples of colorless quartz show a band at 3595 cm -1 whose origin is yet not assigned. Samples of quartz with a prominent band at 3595 cm -1 were exposed to gamma rays and heating to observe its behavior. From the statistical point of view, no modification was observed on the position and amplitude of this band after irradiation up 75 kGy and heating to 300-330 deg C. This study should be completed with samples of different origins and higher doses, as well as chemical analyses of trace chemical elements in the samples. (author)

  18. Measurements of NH3 linestrengths and collisional broadening coefficients in N2, O2, CO2, and H2O near 1103.46cm-1

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle

    2013-05-01

    Laser-based ammonia gas sensors have useful applications in many fields including combustion, atmospheric monitoring, and medical diagnostics. Calibration-free trace gas sensors require the spectroscopic parameters including linestrengths and collisional broadening coefficients to be known. Ammonia\\'s strong ν2 vibrational band between 9 - 12 μm has the high absorption strength needed for sensing small concentrations. Within this band, the 1103.46cm-1 feature is one of the strongest and has minimal interference from CO2 and H2O. However, the six rotational transitions that make up this feature have not been studied previously with absorption spectroscopy due to their small line spacing ranging from 0.004 to 0.029cm-1. A tunable quantum cascade laser was used to accurately study these six transitions. A retrieval program was used to determine the linestrengths and collisional broadening coefficients based on Voigt and Galatry profiles. The experiments were performed with ammonia mixtures in nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide at room temperature in an optical cell. These data are going to aid in the development of quantitative ammonia sensors utilizing this strong absorption feature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Understanding the branching ratios of \\chi_{c1}\\to\\phi\\phi, \\omega\\omega, \\omega\\phi observed at BES-III

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dian-Yong; He, Jun; Li, Xue-Qian; Liu, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we discuss the contribution of the mesonic loops to the decay rates of $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\phi,\\,\\omega\\omega$ which are suppressed by the helicity selection rules and $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\omega$ which is a double-OZI forbidden process. We find that the mesonic loop effects naturally explain the clear signals of $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\phi,\\,\\omega\\omega$ decay modes observed by the BES collaboration. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the $\\omega-\\phi$ mixing which may result in t...

  20. Speed-dependent Voigt lineshape parameter database from dual frequency comb measurements up to 1305 K. Part I: Pure H2O absorption, 6801-7188 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Paul J.; Cich, Matthew J.; Yang, Jinyu; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Swann, William C.; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.; Drouin, Brian J.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2018-05-01

    We measure speed-dependent Voigt lineshape parameters with temperature-dependence exponents for several hundred spectroscopic features of pure water spanning 6801-7188 cm-1. The parameters are extracted from broad bandwidth, high-resolution dual frequency comb absorption spectra with multispectrum fitting techniques. The data encompass 25 spectra ranging from 296 K to 1305 K and 1 to 17 Torr of pure water vapor. We present the extracted parameters, compare them to published data, and present speed-dependence, self-shift, and self-broadening temperature-dependent parameters for the first time. Lineshape data is extracted using a quadratic speed-dependent Voigt profile and a single self-broadening power law temperature-dependence exponent over the entire temperature range. The results represent an important step toward a new high-temperature database using advanced lineshape profiles.

  1. On employing H216O, H217O, H218O, and D216O lines as frequency standards in the 15-170 cm-1 window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Csaszar, Attila G.

    2008-01-01

    The protocol MARVEL, standing for measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels, is used to study high-accuracy measurements of rotational lines of four isotopologues of water, H 2 16 O, H 2 17 O, H 2 18 O, and D 2 16 O, obtained by spectroscopy in the far-infrared (FIR) region of 15-170 cm -1 by Matsushima et al. [Matsushima F, Odashima H, Iwasaki T, Tsunekawa S, Takagi K. Frequency measurement of pure rotational transitions of H 2 O from 0.5 to 5 THz. J Mol Struct 1995; 352/353, 371-8; Matsushima F, Nagase H, Nakauchi T, Odashima H, Takagi K. Frequency measurement of pure rotational transitions of H 2 17 O and H 2 18 O from 0.5 to 5 THz. J Mol Spectrosc 1999;193: 217-23; Matsushima F, Matsunaga M, Qian GY, Ohtaki Y, Wang RL, Takagi K. Frequency measurement of pure rotational transitions of D 2 O from 0.5 to 5 THz. J Mol Spectrosc 2001;206: 41-6; Matsushima F, Tomatsu N, Nagai T, Moriwaki Y, Takagi K. Frequency measurement of pure rotational transitions in the v 2 =1 state of H 2 O. J Mol Spectrosc 2006;235: 190-5]. MARVEL validates the high accuracy of most of the measured line positions. It results in a considerable number of energy levels with an average internal uncertainty of only 40 kHz (2σ). It also supports serious inaccuracy problems when Watson-type A-reduced Hamiltonians are used for predicting the highly accurate rotational measurements for water. Finally, MARVEL suggests a large number of para-water levels, for example 41 for H 2 16 O, which are candidates for becoming frequency standards in the FIR region of 15-170 cm -1 (the 0.5-5 THz window) when an accuracy of about 0.1 MHz is deemed to be sufficient

  2. Transparency of the 2 μm (5000 cm-1) methane window in Titan's atmosphere and impact on retrieved surface reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannou, Pascal; Seignovert, Benoit; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    The study of Titan properties with remote sensing relies on a good knowledge of the atmosphere properties. The in-situ observations made by Huygens combined with recent advances in the definition of methane properties enable to model and interpret observations with a very good accuracy. Thanks to these progresses, we can analyze in this work the observations made at the limb of Titan in order to retrieve information on the haze properties as its vertical profiles and its spectral behaviour along the VIMS/Cassini range (from 0.88 to 5.1 μm). However, for applications to real atmospheres, one need to account for the widening of the spectroscopic lines (e.g., Voigt profile) and apply an empirical cut-off of the far wings. In general, this is a multiplying function of the wavenumber, f(ν), applied to the Voigt profile that allows a faster decay of the wing profile beyond a given distance from the center of the line ν0 : f(ν)=1 if |ν- ν0| ≤ Δν, and f(ν)=exp(-|ν- ν0|/ σ) if |ν- ν0| > Δν. Although the 2-μm window is apparently straitforward to model, it appears that the standard cut-off parameters (that is Δν ~ 26 cm-1 and σ ~ 120 cm-1) which is used for other windows in Titan's atmosphere is not adequat for this window. Other sets of parameter must be used to reproduce Titan spectrum at 2 μm. However, there is no convergence of the results between these works and a large variety of cut-off parameters are used. Alternatively, it was found that some gas absorptions (ethane and another unknown gas) leave a signature around 2-μm and also affect the transparency in this window. In our study we make an exhaustive investigation on the cut-off parameters to determine which are the best couples of parameters to fit the 2-μm window. We also evaluated how gaseous absorptions can allow to reach a satisfactory agreement and, especially, if it allows to match observations with the standard cut-off. Finally, we investigate the impact of the different solutions

  3. A high-resolution atlas of the infrared spectrum of the sun and the earth atmosphere from space. A compilation of ATMOS spectra of the region from 650 to 4800 cm-1 (2.3 to 16 microns). Volume 2: Stratosphere and mesosphere, 650 to 3350 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Crofton B.; Norton, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    During the period April 29 to May 2, 1985, the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment was operated for the first time, as part of the Spacelab-3 payload of the shuttle Challenger. The principal purpose of this experiment was to study the distributions of the atmosphere's minor and trace molecular constituents. The instrument, a modified Michelson interferometer covering the frequency range from 600 to 5000/cm-1 at a spectral resolution of 0.01/cm-1, recorded infrared absorption spectra of the sun and of the earth's atmosphere at times close to entry into and exit from occultation by the earth's limb. Spectra were obtained that are free from absorptions due to constituents of the atmosphere (i.e., they are pure solar spectra), as well as spectra of the atmosphere itself, covering line-of-sight tangent altitudes that span the range from the lower thermosphere to the bottom of the troposphere. This atlas presents a compilation of these spectra arranged in a hardcopy format suitable for quick-look reference purposes. Volume 2 covers the stratosphere and mesosphere (i.e., tangent altitudes from 20 to 80 km) for frequencies from 650 to 3350/cm-1.

  4. Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anuvab; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Sunanda, K.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide and its deuterated isotopologue (DMSO-h6 and DMSO-d6) are performed using synchrotron radiation in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region. In the photoabsorption spectrum, Rydberg series converging to the first three ionization potentials of DMSO at 9.1, 10.1 and 12.3 eV corresponding to removal of an electron from the highest three occupied molecular orbitals (14a‧, 7a″ and 13a‧) are observed. Based on a quantum defect analysis, Rydberg series assignments are extended to higher members as compared to earlier works and a few ambiguities in earlier assignments are clarified. Analysis is aided by quantum chemical calculations using the DFT and TDDFT methodologies. Vibronic structures observed in the spectrum of DMSO-h6 in the regions 7.7-8.1 eV and 8.1-8.8 eV are attributed to the transitions 7a″→4p at 7.862 eV and 14a‧→6s/4d at 8.182 eV, respectively. Photoabsorption spectra of DMSO-h6 and -d6 recorded using a broad band incident radiation show prominent peaks, which are identified and assigned to electronic and vibronic transitions of the SO radical. This provides a direct confirmation of the fact that DMSO preferentially dissociates into CH3 and SO upon UV-VUV excitation, as proposed in earlier photodissociation studies. An extended vibronic band system associated with the e1Π-X3Σ- transition of the SO radical is identified and assigned. The complete VUV photoabsorption spectrum of DMSO-d6 is also reported here for the first time.

  5. Genetic significance of the 867 cm- 1 out-of-plane Raman mode in graphite associated with V-bearing green grossular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rainer; Rericha, Adolf; Pohl, Walter L.; Davidson, Paul

    2018-03-01

    SE Kenya is the world's largest producer of green vanadium grossular gemstones (tsavorite). Samples from one of the mines near Mwatate, and of occurrences in Tanzania yielded remarkable new insights into the genesis of tsavorite. Graphite is intimately associated with V-grossular and is one of the keys to understanding its origin. In the course of this study we found five different types of graphite. Surprisingly, in one graphite type the "Raman-forbidden" and IR-active 867 cm- 1 band was observed. In this communication, we attempt to find an explanation for this unusual phenomenon. Additionally, our observations also address some of the issues pertaining to the origin of the green grossular-dominated rocks (grossularites), as well as the gem quality tsavorite crystals, since we propose that the anomalous spectroscopic behavior of the graphite is related to the unusual conditions during crystallization of both the grossular and graphite from a near-supercritical volatile- and sulfur-rich silicate melt. The massive green vanadium grossular contains abundant unequivocal crystallized melt inclusions, while the transparent gem quality grossular (tsavorite) displays only fluid inclusions. On the basis of inclusion studies we suggest that anatectic melts originated in the peculiar evaporitic host lithology of the tsavorite deposits. Near peak metamorphic temperatures ( 700 °C) these liquids occurred as a supercritical volatile-rich "fluid/melt phase" characterized by complete miscibility between H2O and silicate liquid. Relatively dry liquid batches precipitated non-transparent green grossular, whereas wet batches segregated fluids that formed transparent tsavorite.

  6. Absorption spectrum and absorption cross sections of the 2ν1 band of HO2 between 20 and 760 Torr air in the range 6636 and 6639 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Liu, Lu; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2018-05-01

    The absorption spectrum of HO2 radicals has been measured in the range 6636-6639 cm-1 at several pressures between 20 and 760 Torr of air. Absolute absorption cross sections of the strongest line at around 6638.2 cm-1 have been determined from kinetic measurements, taking advantage of the well known rate constant of the self-reaction. Peak absorption cross sections of 22.6, 19.5, 14.4, 7.88, 5.12 and 3.23 × 10-20 cm2 were obtained at 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 760 Torr, respectively. By fitting these data, an empirical expression has been obtained for the absorption cross section of HO2 in the range 20-760 Torr air: σ6638.2cm-1 = 1.18 × 10-20 + (2.64 × 10-19 × (1-exp (-63.1/p (Torr))) cm2.

  7. An accelerated line-by-line option for MODTRAN combining on-the-fly generation of line center absorption within 0.1 cm-1 bins and pre-computed line tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Hawes, Fred

    2015-05-01

    A Line-By-Line (LBL) option is being developed for MODTRAN6. The motivation for this development is two-fold. Firstly, when MODTRAN is validated against an independent LBL model, it is difficult to isolate the source of discrepancies. One must verify consistency between pressure, temperature and density profiles, between column density calculations, between continuum and particulate data, between spectral convolution methods, and more. Introducing a LBL option directly within MODTRAN will insure common elements for all calculations other than those used to compute molecular transmittances. The second motivation for the LBL upgrade is that it will enable users to compute high spectral resolution transmittances and radiances for the full range of current MODTRAN applications. In particular, introducing the LBL feature into MODTRAN will enable first-principle calculations of scattered radiances, an option that is often not readily available with LBL models. MODTRAN will compute LBL transmittances within one 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin at a time, marching through the full requested band pass. The LBL algorithm will use the highly accurate, pressure- and temperature-dependent MODTRAN Padé approximant fits of the contribution from line tails to define the absorption from all molecular transitions centered more than 0.05 cm-1 from each 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin. The beauty of this approach is that the on-the-fly computations for each 0.1 cm-1 bin will only require explicit LBL summing of transitions centered within a 0.2 cm-1 spectral region. That is, the contribution from the more distant lines will be pre-computed via the Padé approximants. The status of the LBL effort will be presented. This will include initial thermal and solar radiance calculations, validation calculations, and self-validations of the MODTRAN band model against its own LBL calculations.

  8. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400 1400 cm 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-24

    Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400...1400 cm‐1 R. L. Aggarwal, L. W. Farrar, S. Di Cecca, and T. H. Jeys MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA 02420‐9108 Raman spectra of...region 400‐1400 cm‐1. A relatively compact (< 2’x2’x2’), sensitive, 532 nm 10 W CW Raman system with double‐pass

  9. Raman Spectra and Cross Sections of Ammonia, Chlorine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Phosgene, and Sulfur Dioxide Toxic Gases in the Fingerprint Region 400-1400 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400...1400 cm‐1 R. L. Aggarwal, L. W. Farrar, S. Di Cecca, and T. H. Jeys MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA 02420‐9108 Raman spectra of...region 400‐1400 cm‐1. A relatively compact (< 2’x2’x2’), sensitive, 532 nm 10 W CW Raman system with double‐pass

  10. Time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy of Cu in the 1800-3800 cm(-1) region: transitions involving f and g states and oscillator strengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Kubelík, Petr; Kawaguchi, K.; Chernov, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2011), 025002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metal poor stars * atomic data * FTIR emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.875, year: 2011

  11. Time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy of Au in the 1800-4000-cm(-1) region: Rydberg transitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2010), 012510 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * Rydberg transitions * theoretical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2010

  12. Measurement of the surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) due to the 1574 cm(-1) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mode of benzenethiol using low-power (CW diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Roshan L; Farrar, Lewis W; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Van Duyne, Richard P; Polla, Dennis L

    2013-02-01

    The surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of benzenethiol on a silver-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been measured for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode. A value of 9.6 ± 1.7×10(-14) W was determined for the resonant component of the SECARS signal using 17.8 mW of 784.9 nm pump laser power and 7.1 mW of 895.5 nm Stokes laser power; the pump and Stokes lasers were polarized parallel to each other but perpendicular to the grooves of the diffraction grating in the spectrometer. The measured value of resonant component of the SECARS signal is in agreement with the calculated value of 9.3×10(-14) W using the measured value of 8.7 ± 0.5 cm(-1) for the SERS linewidth Γ (full width at half-maximum) and the value of 5.7 ± 1.4×10(-7) for the product of the Raman cross section σSERS and the surface concentration Ns of the benzenethiol SAM. The xxxx component of the resonant part of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility |3 χxxxx((3)R)| for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode has been determined to be 4.3 ± 1.1×10(-5) cm·g(-1)·s(2). The SERS enhancement factor for the 1574 cm(-1) mode was determined to be 3.6 ± 0.9×10(7) using the value of 1.8×10(15) molecules/cm(2) for Ns.

  13. Solid-State Chemistry as a Formation Mechanism for C 4N 2 Ice and Possibly the Haystack (220 cm -1 ice emission feature) in Titan's Stratosphere as Observed by Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert E.; McLain, Jason L.; Nna Mvondo, Delphine; Romani, Paul; Flasar, F. Michael

    2016-10-01

    A profusion of organic ices containing hydrocarbons, nitriles, and combinations of their mixtures comprise Titan's complex stratospheric cloud systems, and are typically formed via vapor condensation. These ice particles are then distributed throughout the mid-to-lower stratosphere, with an increased abundance near the winter poles (see Anderson et al., 2016). The cold temperatures and the associated strong circumpolar winds that isolate polar air act in much the same way as on Earth, giving rise to compositional anomalies and stratospheric clouds that provide heterogeneous chemistry sites.Titan's C4N2 ice emission feature at 478 cm-1 and "the Haystack," a strong unidentified stratospheric ice emission feature centered at 220 cm-1, share a common characteristic. Even though both are distinctive ice emission features evident in Cassini Composite InfraRed (CIRS) far-IR spectra, no associated vapor emission features can be found in Titan's atmosphere. Without a vapor phase, solid-state chemistry provides an alternate mechanism beside vapor condensation for producing these observed stratospheric ices.Anderson et al., (2016) postulated that C4N2 ice formed in Titan's stratosphere via the solid-state photochemical reaction HCN + HC3N → C4N2 + H2 can occur within extant HCN-HC3N composite ice particles. Such a reaction, and potentially similar reactions that may produce the Haystack ice, are specific examples of solid-state chemistry in solar system atmospheres. This is in addition to the reaction HCl + ClONO2 → HNO3 + Cl2, which is known to produce HNO3 coatings on terrestrial water ice particles, a byproduct of the catalytic chlorine chemistry that produces ozone holes in Earth's polar stratosphere (see for example, Molina et al., 1987 Soloman, 1999).A combination of radiative transfer modeling of CIRS far-IR spectra, coupled with optical constants derived from thin film transmittance spectra of organic ice mixtures obtained in our Spectroscopy for Planetary ICes

  14. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astarita, G.; McKenzie, J.H.; Wang, B.; Strassburg, K.; Doneanu, A.; Johnson, J.; Baker, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Murphy, J.; Vreeken, R.J.; Langridge, J.; Kang, J.X.

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other

  15. IR absorption spectrum (4200-3100 cm-1) of H2O and (H2O)2 in CCl4. Estimates of the equilibrium constant and evidence that the atmospheric water absorption continuum is due to the water dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaisen, Flemming M.

    2009-01-01

    IR absorption spectra, 4200-3100 cm -1 , of water in CCl 4 solutions are presented. It is shown that for saturated solutions significant amounts of water are present as dimer (ca. 2%). The IR spectra of the monomer and dimer are retrieved. The integrated absorption coefficients of the monomer absorption are significantly enhanced relative to the gas phase values. The dimer spectrum consists of 5 bands, of which 4 were expected from data from cold beams and cold matrices. The origin of the 'extra' band is discussed. In addition it is argued that the dimer absorption bands intensities must be enhanced relative to the gas phase values. Based on recent calculations of band strengths, and observed frequency shifts relative to the gas phase, the intensity enhancement factors are estimated as well as the monomer/dimer equilibrium constant in CCl 4 solution at T=296 K (K c =1.29 mol -1 L). It is noted that the observed dimer spectrum has a striking resemblance with the water vapour continuum determined by Burch in 1985 which was recently remeasured by Paynter et al. and it is concluded that the atmospheric water absorption continuum in the investigated spectral region must be due to water dimer. Based on the newly published spectral data a revised value of the gas phase equilibrium constant is suggested (K p =0.035 atm -1 at T=296 K) as well as a value for the standard enthalpy of formation, ΔH 0 =15.4 kJ mol -1 .

  16. New accurate theoretical line lists of 12CH4 and 13CH4 in the 0-13400 cm-1 range: Application to the modeling of methane absorption in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Bézard, Bruno; Rannou, Pascal; Coustenis, Athena; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2018-03-01

    The spectrum of methane is very important for the analysis and modeling of Titan's atmosphere but its insufficient knowledge in the near infrared, with the absence of reliable absorption coefficients, is an important limitation. In order to help the astronomer community for analyzing high-quality spectra, we report in the present work the first accurate theoretical methane line lists (T = 50-350 K) of 12CH4 and 13CH4 up to 13400 cm-1 ( > 0.75 μm). These lists are built from extensive variational calculations using our recent ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces and will be freely accessible via the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru). Validation of these lists is presented throughout the present paper. For the sample of lines where upper energies were available from published analyses of experimental laboratory 12CH4 spectra, small empirical corrections in positions were introduced that could be useful for future high-resolution applications. We finally apply the TheoRetS line list to model Titan spectra as observed by VIMS and by DISR, respectively onboard Cassini and Huygens. These data are used to check that the TheoReTS line lists are able to model observations. We also make comparisons with other experimental or theoretical line lists. It appears that TheoRetS gives very reliable results better than ExoMol and even than HITRAN2012, except around 1.6 μm where it gives very similar results. We conclude that TheoReTS is suitable to be used for the modeling of planetary radiative transfer and photometry. A re-analysis of spectra recorded by the DISR instrument during the descent of the Huygens probe suggests that the CH4 mixing ratio decreases with altitude in Titan's stratosphere, reaching a value of ∼10-2 above the 110 km altitude.

  17. Rovibrational spectra of DCF3 in the 1900 cm(-)1 region: High-resolution study of the v(3) = v(4)=1/v(3)=2, v(6)=1 Fermi-interacting levels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ceausu-Velcescu, A.; Pracna, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 295, JAN 2014 (2014), s. 31-36 ISSN 0022-2852 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : deuterated fluoroform * combination bands * Fermi interaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.482, year: 2014

  18. Evaluation of creep residual life for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel based on Omega method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Isamu; Torihata, Shoji; Kihara, Shigemitu; Umaki, Hideo; Maruyama, Kouichi.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the accuracy of creep residual life prediction by the Omega method which is based on creep deformation, a series of creep tests on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted at 500degC, 550degC and 600degC, and the Omega method was applied to the residual life estimation. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) There was a obvious linear portion, which corresponded to the tertiary creep, in the relationship between logarithm of strain and strain. So it was easy to define the Omega value as a gradient of linear portion. (2) It was proved that the Omega value depended on stress and temperature in such a way as it was the larger, the lower the stress and the lower the temperature. (3) By using the Omega value and strain rate which were determined experimentally, the residual life could be predicted within a factor of 1.5 at the stage of 50% and 80% of actual life. It was confirmed that the accuracy of this method was higher than that of the former method based on rupture time. (4) To apply this method to the residual life evaluation of operating plant materials, the Omega value has to be determined in the lower stress condition. So it is important to develop the extrapolation method of the Omega value based on the laboratory acceleration test to the longer service life. (author)

  19. Splitting families and the Noetherian type of $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Milovich, David

    2007-01-01

    Extending some results of Malykhin, we prove several independence results about base properties of $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$ and its powers, especially the Noetherian type $Nt(\\beta\\omega-\\omega)$, the least $\\kappa$ for which $\\beta\\omega-\\omega$ has a base that is $\\kappa$-like with respect to containment. For example, $Nt(\\beta\\omega-\\omega)$ is never less than the splitting number, but can consistently be that $\\omega_1$, $2^\\omega$, $(2^\\omega)^+$, or strictly between $\\omega_1$ and $2^\\omega...

  20. Determination expediency of the omega-3 unsaturated acids in fatty oils by NMR 1"H spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananikyan, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    1"H NMR spectra of fatty oils obtained from seeds of 55 plants were investigated 8 groups of signals were identified in all NMR spectra. Omega-3 fatty acids CH_3 groups signals were noticed in some of the spectra as a triplet in the area of 0.85-1.05 p.p.m. (oil CH_3 groups signals area). Integral intensities of omega-3 fatty acids CH_3 groups signals were calculated by using integral intensities of oils all CH_3 groups signals. Percents of omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids in each of the investigated oils were then calculated. Theoretical percents of omega-3 fatty acids in oils were calculated. For that it was assumed that the signals of 2 CH_2 groups corresponds to 4"H signal and the signals of 3CH_3 group corresponds to 9"H signal. The experimental and theoretical percents of omega-3 fatty acids calculations were compared, and the accuracy of omega-3 fatty acids percent in oil was determined

  1. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic ac...

  2. Association study on glutathione S-transferase omega 1 and 2 and familial ALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Fogh, Isabella; Gopinath, Sumana; Smith, Bradley; Hu, Xun; Powell, John; Andersen, Peter; Nicholson, Garth; Al Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase omega 1 and 2 (GSTO1 and 2) protect from oxidative stress, a possible pathogenic mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease. Significant association of age of onset in Alzheimer's

  3. Low-excited f-, g- and h-states in Au, Ag and Cu observed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in the 1000-7500 cm(-1) region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Kubelík, Petr; Kawaguchi, K.; Chernov, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 10 (2011), s. 105002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * infrared emission spectra * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.875, year: 2011

  4. 40 CFR 721.5356 - Ethanol, 2,2′2″-nitrilotris-, compound with alpha-2,4,6-tris (1-phenylethyl)phenyl]-omega...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-, compound with alpha-2,4,6-tris (1-phenylethyl)phenyl]-omega-hydroxypoly (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) phosphate. 721...]-omega-hydroxypoly (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) phosphate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... alpha-[2,4,6-tris(1-phenylethyl)phenyl]-omega-hydroxypoly (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) phosphate (PMN P-98-185...

  5. High resolution spectroscopy in the second excited torsional state of $CH_{3}/OD$ and the atlas of the Fourier transform spectrum in the range 20-205 cm$^{-1}/$...

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, I

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the reduced eighth order Hamiltonian that has been used for the determination of the molecular parameters-using the high resolution Fourier transform far-infrared (FIR) assigned transitions in the ground and first $9 excited torsional states of CH/sub 3/OD-has been applied to assign and refine the model for the second excited torsional state. The data set consisted of 1220 FIR transitions with the rotational angular momentum J<21 and K<7 in the $9 second excited torsional state. It should be noted that the second excited torsional states of methanol are almost at the top of the torsional barrier. Thus it was interesting to see how the large amplitude motion is taken care of by $9 the eighth order Hamiltonian. We are in the process of a global fit including all the assigned transitions up to the second excited state. Additionally, in this paper we present the detailed Fourier transform spectral map of CH/sub $9 3/OD in the range 20-205 cm/sup -1/, as was done for the parent species. This sp...

  6. Photoacoustic absorption spectra of atmospheric gases near 7603 cm-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, S.A.; Bragg, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Absorption spectra of carbon monoxide, water vapor, memane, and ammonia are presented as part of an effort to determine absolute absorption cross sections for some atmospheric gases at the iodine laser wavelength

  7. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids influence gene expression. Because of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their metabolic pathways, blood levels of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are determined by both endogenous metabolism and dietary intake making the need of balanced dietary intake essential for health and disease prevention. Whether an omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3:1 to 4:1 could prevent the pathogenesis of many diseases induced by today’s Western diets (AFSSA, 2010, a target of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment, and genetics. A target of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment and genetics. A balanced ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is important for health and in the prevention of CHD and possibly other chronic diseases.

  8. Evaluating Changes in Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake after Receiving Personal FADS1 Genetic Information: A Randomized Nutrigenetic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roke, Kaitlin; Walton, Kathryn; Klingel, Shannon L.; Harnett, Amber; Subedi, Sanjeena; Haines, Jess; Mutch, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Nutrigenetics research is anticipated to lay the foundation for personalized dietary recommendations; however, it remains unclear if providing individuals with their personal genetic information changes dietary behaviors. Our objective was to evaluate if providing information for a common variant in the fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) gene changed omega-3 fatty acid (FA) intake and blood levels in young female adults (18–25 years). Participants were randomized into Genetic (intervention) and Non-Genetic (control) groups, with measurements taken at Baseline and Final (12 weeks). Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was assessed using an omega-3 food frequency questionnaire. Red blood cell (RBC) FA content was quantified by gas chromatography. Implications of participation in a nutrigenetics study and awareness of omega-3 FAs were assessed with online questionnaires. Upon completion of the study, EPA and DHA intake increased significantly (p = 1.0 × 10−4) in all participants. This change was reflected by small increases in RBC %EPA. Participants in the Genetic group showed increased awareness of omega-3 terminology by the end of the study, reported that the dietary recommendations were more useful, and rated cost as a barrier to omega-3 consumption less often than those in the Non-Genetic group. Providing participants FADS1 genetic information did not appear to influence omega-3 intake during the 12 weeks, but did change perceptions and behaviors related to omega-3 FAs in this timeframe. PMID:28272299

  9. Evaluating Changes in Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake after Receiving Personal FADS1 Genetic Information: A Randomized Nutrigenetic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin Roke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutrigenetics research is anticipated to lay the foundation for personalized dietary recommendations; however, it remains unclear if providing individuals with their personal genetic information changes dietary behaviors. Our objective was to evaluate if providing information for a common variant in the fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1 gene changed omega-3 fatty acid (FA intake and blood levels in young female adults (18–25 years. Participants were randomized into Genetic (intervention and Non-Genetic (control groups, with measurements taken at Baseline and Final (12 weeks. Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA was assessed using an omega-3 food frequency questionnaire. Red blood cell (RBC FA content was quantified by gas chromatography. Implications of participation in a nutrigenetics study and awareness of omega-3 FAs were assessed with online questionnaires. Upon completion of the study, EPA and DHA intake increased significantly (p = 1.0 × 10−4 in all participants. This change was reflected by small increases in RBC %EPA. Participants in the Genetic group showed increased awareness of omega-3 terminology by the end of the study, reported that the dietary recommendations were more useful, and rated cost as a barrier to omega-3 consumption less often than those in the Non-Genetic group. Providing participants FADS1 genetic information did not appear to influence omega-3 intake during the 12 weeks, but did change perceptions and behaviors related to omega-3 FAs in this timeframe.

  10. Cold dark matter dominated, inflationary universe with Omega(0) less than 1 and n less than 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittorio, N.; Matarrese, S.; Lucchin, F.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical prejudice for a flat universe with an initially scale-invariant power spectrum has restricted the number of cosmological scenarios investigated for studying the formation of structure in the universe. A cold dark matter-dominated universe with a density parameter Omega(0) and a primordial spectral index n different from unity is considered, and its possible consistency with the inflationary model is discussed. It is shown that some of the difficulties of a flat cold dark matter scenario can be avoided by having Omega(0) less than 1 and n less than 1. For Omega(0) roughly 0.4 and n roughly 0.75 a good agreement is obtained with the large-scale drifts, the bounds on the cosmic microwave background smoothness, the Abell cluster abundance, and their correlation function. 85 references

  11. Study of the {omega} meson produced in the 700-750 MeV/c pp{yields}K{sub 1}{sup 0}K{sub 1}{sup 0}{omega} annihilations; Estudio del meson {omega} en las aniquilaciones pp{yields}K{sub 1}{sup =}K{sub 1}{sup =} {omega} a 700-750 MeV/c de momento del haz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salicio, J

    1976-07-01

    We have measured the mass, width and branching ratio ({yields} neutrals) {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} of the {omega} meson, using the reactions pp -- K{sub 1}{sup 0} K{sub 1}{sup 0} {down_arrow} neutrals and pp {yields} K{sub 1}{sup 0}K{sub 1}{sup 0}. The statistics is 11.5 events/{mu}b. In this report we present the methods of analysis and discuss the results. (Author)

  12. PNPLA1 Deficiency in Mice and Humans Leads to a Defect in the Synthesis of Omega-O-Acylceramides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grond, Susanne; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Dubrac, Sandrine; Kolb, Dagmar; Schmuth, Matthias; Fischer, Judith; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Radner, Franz P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PNPLA1 have been identified as causative for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans and dogs. So far, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we generated and characterized PNPLA1-deficient mice and found that PNPLA1 is crucial for epidermal sphingolipid synthesis. The absence of functional PNPLA1 in mice impaired the formation of omega-O-acylceramides and led to an accumulation of nonesterified omega-hydroxy-ceramides. As a consequence, PNPLA1-deficient mice lacked a functional corneocyte-bound lipid envelope leading to a severe skin barrier defect and premature death of newborn animals. Functional analyses of differentiated keratinocytes from a patient with mutated PNPLA1 demonstrated an identical defect in omega-O-acylceramide synthesis in human cells, indicating that PNPLA1 function is conserved among mammals and indispensable for normal skin physiology. Notably, topical application of epidermal lipids from wild-type onto Pnpla1-mutant mice promoted rebuilding of the corneocyte-bound lipid envelope, indicating that supplementation of ichthyotic skin with omega-O-acylceramides might be a therapeutic approach for the treatment of skin symptoms in individuals affected by omega-O-acylceramide deficiency. PMID:27751867

  13. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid has an anti-oxidant effect via the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Chisato, E-mail: yosizaki@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Yang, Liu; Yoshizaki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Ishikado, Atsushi; Kondo, Motoyuki; Morino, Katsutaro; Sekine, Osamu; Ugi, Satoshi [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Nishio, Yoshihiko [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi [Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA has a direct anti-oxidant effect in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPA and DHA induce HO-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA and its end-product, 4-HHE, activates the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA protects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress is produced in adipose tissue of obese subjects and has been associated with obesity-related disorders. Recent studies have shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ({omega}3-PUFA) has beneficial effects in preventing atherosclerotic diseases and insulin resistance in adipose tissue. However, the role of {omega}3-PUFA on adipocytes has not been elucidated. In this study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE). {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites dose-dependently increased mRNA and protein levels of the anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); whereas no changes in the well-known anti-oxidant molecules, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were observed. Knockdown of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) significantly reduced EPA, DHA or 4-HHE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Also, pretreatment with {omega}3-PUFA prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity in a HO-1 dependent manner. In conclusion, treatment with EPA and DHA induced HO-1 through the activation of Nrf-2 and prevented oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This anti-oxidant defense may be of high therapeutic value for clinical conditions associated with systemic oxidative stress.

  14. OMEGA 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masihtinggi Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 6, secara alami terdapat pada minyak biji-bijian, minyakjagung dan kacang kedelai. Omega 6 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat terutama untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan kecerdasan balita. Tulisan ini membahas tentang defenisi omega 6, sumber, klasifikasi, manfaat dan kerugian bila mengkonsumsi omega 6. Disarankan untuk melakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 6 dengan tumbuh-kembang anak, selain itu bagi ibu-ibu disarankan untuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 6 guna pengoptimalan tumbuh-kembang anak. Hal ini jika terlaksana dapat memberikan dukungan terhadap program pemerintah di bidang promosi kesehatan.

  15. Schistosome-derived omega-1 drives Th2 polarization by suppressing protein synthesis following internalization by the mannose receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Bart; Hussaarts, Leonie; Driessen, Nicole N.; Meevissen, Moniek H.J.; Schramm, Gabriele; van der Ham, Alwin J.; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Scholzen, Thomas; Burgdorf, Sven; Mohrs, Markus; Pearce, Edward J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Haas, Helmut; Smits, Hermelijn H.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-1, a glycosylated T2 ribonuclease (RNase) secreted by Schistosoma mansoni eggs and abundantly present in soluble egg antigen, has recently been shown to condition dendritic cells (DCs) to prime Th2 responses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unknown. We show in this study by site-directed mutagenesis of omega-1 that both the glycosylation and the RNase activity are essential to condition DCs for Th2 polarization. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that omega-1 is bound and internalized via its glycans by the mannose receptor (MR) and subsequently impairs protein synthesis by degrading both ribosomal and messenger RNA. These experiments reveal an unrecognized pathway involving MR and interference with protein synthesis that conditions DCs for Th2 priming. PMID:22966004

  16. Effect of omega-3 supplementation on neuropathy in type 1 diabetes: A 12-month pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Evan J H; Perkins, Bruce A; Lovblom, Leif E; Bazinet, Richard P; Wolever, Thomas M S; Bril, Vera

    2017-06-13

    To test the hypothesis that 12 months of seal oil omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) supplementation will stop the known progression of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Individuals with T1DM and evidence of DSP as determined by a Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score ≥1 were recruited to participate in a single-arm, open-label trial of seal oil ω-3 PUFA supplementation (10 mL·d -1 ; 750 mg eicosapentaenoic acid, 560 mg docosapentaenoic acid, and 1,020 mg docosahexaenoic acid) for 1 year. The primary outcome was the 1-year change in corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) measured by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy, with sensory and nerve conduction measures as secondary outcomes. Forty participants (53% female), aged 48 ± 14 years, body mass index 28.1 ± 5.8 with diabetes duration of 27 ± 18 years, were enrolled. At baseline, 23 participants had clinical DSP and 17 did not. Baseline CNFL was 8.3 ± 2.9 mm/mm 2 and increased 29% to 10.1 ± 3.7 mm/mm 2 ( p = 0.002) after 12 months of supplementation. There was no change in nerve conduction or sensory function. Twelve months of ω-3 supplementation was associated with increase in CNFL in T1DM. NCT02034266. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with T1DM and evidence of DSP, 12 months of seal oil omega-3 supplementation increases CNFL. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Reviewing Hit Discovery Literature for Difficult Targets: Glutathione Transferase Omega-1 as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiyue; Dahlin, Jayme L; Oakley, Aaron J; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G; Baell, Jonathan B

    2018-05-10

    Early stage drug discovery reporting on relatively new or difficult targets is often associated with insufficient hit triage. Literature reviews of such targets seldom delve into the detail required to critically analyze the associated screening hits reported. Here we take the enzyme glutathione transferase omega-1 (GSTO1-1) as an example of a relatively difficult target and review the associated literature involving small-molecule inhibitors. As part of this process we deliberately pay closer-than-usual attention to assay interference and hit quality aspects. We believe this Perspective will be a useful guide for future development of GSTO1-1 inhibitors, as well serving as a template for future review formats of new or difficult targets.

  18. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon OmegaC* Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    OpenAIRE

    The BABAR Collaboration; Aubert, B.

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly-charm baryon OmegaC* (css) in the radiative decay OmegaC0 Gamma, where the OmegaC0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega-pi+, Omega-pi+pi0, Omega-pi+pi-pi+, and Cascade-K-pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb$-1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the OmegaC* and the OmegaC0 baryons...

  19. Selective Enrichment of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Oils by Phospholipase A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan Moharana, Tushar; Byreddy, Avinesh R; Puri, Munish; Barrow, Colin; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2016-01-01

    Omega fatty acids are recognized as key nutrients for healthier ageing. Lipases are used to release ω-3 fatty acids from oils for preparing enriched ω-3 fatty acid supplements. However, use of lipases in enrichment of ω-3 fatty acids is limited due to their insufficient specificity for ω-3 fatty acids. In this study use of phospholipase A1 (PLA1), which possesses both sn-1 specific activity on phospholipids and lipase activity, was explored for hydrolysis of ω-3 fatty acids from anchovy oil. Substrate specificity of PLA1 from Thermomyces lenuginosus was initially tested with synthetic p-nitrophenyl esters along with a lipase from Bacillus subtilis (BSL), as a lipase control. Gas chromatographic characterization of the hydrolysate obtained upon treatment of anchovy oil with these enzymes indicated a selective retention of ω-3 fatty acids in the triglyceride fraction by PLA1 and not by BSL. 13C NMR spectroscopy based position analysis of fatty acids in enzyme treated and untreated samples indicated that PLA1 preferably retained ω-3 fatty acids in oil, while saturated fatty acids were hydrolysed irrespective of their position. Hydrolysis of structured triglyceride,1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol, suggested that both the enzymes hydrolyse the fatty acids at both the positions. The observed discrimination against ω-3 fatty acids by PLA1 appears to be due to its fatty acid selectivity rather than positional specificity. These studies suggest that PLA1 could be used as a potential enzyme for selective concentrationof ω-3 fatty acids.

  20. Isozyme-specific fluorescent inhibitor of glutathione s-transferase omega 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Junghyun; Lee, Jae-Jung; Lee, Jun-Seok; Schüller, Andreas; Chang, Young-Tae

    2010-05-21

    Recently, the glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) is suspected to be involved in certain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. However, profound investigation on the pathological roles of GSTO1 has been hampered by the lack of specific methods to determine or modulate its activity in biological systems containing other isoforms with similar catalytic function. Here, we report a fluorescent compound that is able to inhibit and monitor the activity of GSTO1. We screened 43 fluorescent chemicals and found a compound (6) that binds specifically to the active site of GSTO1. We observed that compound 6 inhibits GSTO1 by covalent modification but spares other isoforms in HEK293 cells and demonstrated that compound 6 could report the activity of GSTO1 in NIH/3T3 or HEK293 cells by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the labeled amount of GSTO1 in SDS-PAGE. Compound 6 is a useful tool to study GSTO1, applicable as a specific inhibitor and an activity reporter.

  1. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega*C Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B

    2006-01-01

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon (Omega)* c (css) in the radiative decay (Omega) c 0 γ, where the (Omega) c 0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states (Omega) - π + , (Omega) - π + π 0 , (Omega) - π + π - π + , and Ξ - K - π + π + . This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb -1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the (Omega)* c and the (Omega) c 0 baryons is measured to be 70.8 ± 1.0(stat) ± 1.1(syst) MeV/c 2 . They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of (Omega)* c and (Omega) c 0 in e + e - annihilation

  2. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity. PMID:26950145

  3. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  4. PROPERTIES OF THE $omega$ MESON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, J. B.; Murray, J. J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Huwe, D. O.

    1963-06-15

    Properties of the omega meson were studied from the reaction K/sup -/ + p yields LAMBDA + omega in a 72-in. hydrogen bubble chamber. The momentum of the K/sup -/ mesons was 1.2 to 1.75 Bev/c. The mass of the omega meson is found to be 782 Mev with a width, predominated by three-meson( pi ) decay mode, estimated to be less than 4 Mev. Branching ratios for omega -meson decay into pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup o/, pi /sup o/ gamma , pi /sup +/ i/ sup -/, and e/sup +/e/sup -o/ were determined. (R.E.U.)

  5. Selective Enrichment of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Oils by Phospholipase A1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Ranjan Moharana

    Full Text Available Omega fatty acids are recognized as key nutrients for healthier ageing. Lipases are used to release ω-3 fatty acids from oils for preparing enriched ω-3 fatty acid supplements. However, use of lipases in enrichment of ω-3 fatty acids is limited due to their insufficient specificity for ω-3 fatty acids. In this study use of phospholipase A1 (PLA1, which possesses both sn-1 specific activity on phospholipids and lipase activity, was explored for hydrolysis of ω-3 fatty acids from anchovy oil. Substrate specificity of PLA1 from Thermomyces lenuginosus was initially tested with synthetic p-nitrophenyl esters along with a lipase from Bacillus subtilis (BSL, as a lipase control. Gas chromatographic characterization of the hydrolysate obtained upon treatment of anchovy oil with these enzymes indicated a selective retention of ω-3 fatty acids in the triglyceride fraction by PLA1 and not by BSL. 13C NMR spectroscopy based position analysis of fatty acids in enzyme treated and untreated samples indicated that PLA1 preferably retained ω-3 fatty acids in oil, while saturated fatty acids were hydrolysed irrespective of their position. Hydrolysis of structured triglyceride,1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol, suggested that both the enzymes hydrolyse the fatty acids at both the positions. The observed discrimination against ω-3 fatty acids by PLA1 appears to be due to its fatty acid selectivity rather than positional specificity. These studies suggest that PLA1 could be used as a potential enzyme for selective concentrationof ω-3 fatty acids.

  6. The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2017-01-24

    There is a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are capable of modulating immune function. Some studies have shown that these PUFAs might have a beneficial effect in patients suffering form multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). This could be due to increased n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. In the present study we tested the effect of an endogenously increased n-3 PUFA status on cuprizone-induced CNS demyelination and remyelination in fat-1 mice versus their wild-type (wt) littermates. Fat-1 mice express an n-3 desaturase, which allows them to convert n-6 PUFAs into n-3 PUFAs. CNS lipid profiles in fat-1 mice showed a significant increase of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels but similar docosahexaenoic acid levels compared to wt littermates. This was also reflected in significantly higher levels of monohydroxy EPA metabolites such as 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) in fat-1 brain tissue. Feeding fat-1 mice and wt littermates 0.2% cuprizone for 5 weeks caused a similar degree of CNS demyelination in both groups; remyelination was increased in the fat-1 group after a recovery period of 2 weeks. However, at p = 0.07 this difference missed statistical significance. These results indicate that n-3 PUFAs might have a role in promotion of remyelination after toxic injury to CNS oligodendrocytes. This might occur either via modulation of the immune system or via a direct effect on oligodendrocytes or neurons through EPA-derived lipid metabolites such as 18-HEPE.

  7. Hadronic decay properties of newly observed $\\Omega_c$ baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic decay widths of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ have been calculated in a $^3P_0$ model. Our results indicate that $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ can be interpreted as the $1P-$wave $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ or $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{5}{2}^-)$. Though the measured masses of $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ are lower than existed theo...

  8. Study of \\Omega_c^0 and \\Omega_c^{*0} Baryons at Belle

    OpenAIRE

    Solovieva, E.; Chistov, R.; Collaboration, for the Belle

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a study of the charmed double strange baryons \\Omega_c^0 and \\Omega_c^{*0} at Belle. The \\Omega_c^0 is reconstructed using the \\Omega_c^0 --> \\Omega^- \\pi^+ decay mode, and its mass is measured to be (2693.6 \\pm 0.3 {+1.8 \\atop -1.5}) MeV/c^2. The \\Omega_c^{*0} baryon is reconstructed in the \\Omega_c^0 \\gamma mode. The mass difference M_{\\Omega_c^{*0}} - M_{\\Omega_c^0} is measured to be (70.7 \\pm 0.9 {+0.1 \\atop -0.9}) MeV/c^2. The analysis is performed using 673 fb^{-1...

  9. OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    The OMEGA - Observation of Multiple particle production, Exotic Interactions and Gamma-ray Air Shower-project is presented. The project try to associate photosensitive detectors from experiences of hadronic interactions with electronic detectors used by experiences that investigate extensive atmospheric showers. (M.C.K.)

  10. OMEGA Upgrade preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1989-10-01

    The OMEGA laser system at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester is the only major facility in the United States capable of conducting fully diagnosed, direct-drive, spherical implosion experiments. As such, it serves as the national Laser Users Facility, benefiting scientists throughout the country. The University's participation in the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program underwent review by a group of experts under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences (the Happer Committee) in 1985. The Happer Committee recommended that the OMEGA laser be upgraded in energy to 30 kJ. To this end, Congress appropriated $4,000,000 for the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade, spread across FY88 and FY89. This document describes the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade. The proposed enhancements to the existing OMEGA facility will result in a 30-kHJ, 351-nm, 60-beam direct-drive system, with a versatile pulse-shaping facility and a 1%--2% uniformity of target drive. The Upgrade will allow scientists to explore the ignition-scaling regime, and to study target behavior that is hydrodynamically equivalent to that of targets appropriate for a laboratory microfusion facility (LMF). In addition, it will be possible to perform critical interaction experiments with large-scale-length uniformly irradiated plasmas

  11. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  12. Omega documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos

  13. The f2(1565) in pbar-p -> (omega-omega)pizero interactions at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Braune, K.; Bugg, D.V.; Cramer, O.; Crede, V.; Djaoshvili, N.; Dunnweber, W.; Faessler, M.A.; Hessey, N.P.; Hidas, P.; Hodd, C.; Jamnik, D.; Kilinowsky, H.; Kisiel, J.; Klempt, E.; Kolo, C.; Montanet, L.; Pick, B.; Roethel, W.; Sarantsev, A.; Scott, I.; Strassburger, C.; Thoma, U.; Volcker, C.; Wallis, S.; Walther, D.; Wittmack, K.; Zou, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Data are presented on the reaction pbar-p -> omega-omega-pizero at rest from the Crystal Barrel detector. These data identify a strong signal due to f2(1565) -> omega-omega. The relative production from initial pbar-p states 3P2, 3P1 and 1S0 is well determined from omega-omega decay angular correlations; P-state annihilation dominates strongly. A combined fit is made with data on pbar-p -> 3pizero at rest, where f2(1565) -> pizero-pizero is observed.

  14. The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten H.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are capable of modulating immune function. Some studies have shown that these PUFAs might have a beneficial effect in patients suffering form multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). This could be due to increased n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. In the present study we tested the effect...

  15. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is reviewed under the headings: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase; crystallography; physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase; electronic structure of omega phase; electronic basis for omega phase stability; omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase; conclusion. The following elements of nuclear interest (or their alloys) are included: Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Mo. (U.K.)

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid has an anti-oxidant effect via the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Chisato; Yang, Liu; Yoshizaki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Ishikado, Atsushi; Kondo, Motoyuki; Morino, Katsutaro; Sekine, Osamu; Ugi, Satoshi; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Omega-3 PUFA has a direct anti-oxidant effect in adipocytes. ► EPA and DHA induce HO-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ► Omega-3 PUFA and its end-product, 4-HHE, activates the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway. ► Omega-3 PUFA protects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress is produced in adipose tissue of obese subjects and has been associated with obesity-related disorders. Recent studies have shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω3-PUFA) has beneficial effects in preventing atherosclerotic diseases and insulin resistance in adipose tissue. However, the role of ω3-PUFA on adipocytes has not been elucidated. In this study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with ω3-PUFA and its metabolites, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE). ω3-PUFA and its metabolites dose-dependently increased mRNA and protein levels of the anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); whereas no changes in the well-known anti-oxidant molecules, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were observed. Knockdown of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) significantly reduced EPA, DHA or 4-HHE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Also, pretreatment with ω3-PUFA prevented H 2 O 2 -induced cytotoxicity in a HO-1 dependent manner. In conclusion, treatment with EPA and DHA induced HO-1 through the activation of Nrf-2 and prevented oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This anti-oxidant defense may be of high therapeutic value for clinical conditions associated with systemic oxidative stress.

  17. The MicrOmega Investigation Onboard Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, J.-P.; Hamm, V.; Langevin, Y.; Pilorget, C.; Arondel, A.; Bouzit, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Darié, A.; Evesque, C.; Hansotte, J.; Gardien, V.; Gonnod, L.; Leclech, J.-C.; Meslier, L.; Redon, T.; Tamiatto, C.; Tosti, S.; Thoores, N.

    2017-07-01

    MicrOmega is a near-IR hyperspectral microscope designed to characterize in situ the texture and composition of the surface materials of the Hayabusa2 target asteroid. MicrOmega is implemented within the MASCOT lander (Ho et al. in Space Sci. Rev., 2016, this issue, doi:10.1007/s11214-016-0251-6). The spectral range (0.99-3.65 μm) and the spectral sampling (20 cm^{-1}) of MicrOmega have been chosen to allow the identification of most potential constituent minerals, ices and organics, within each 25 μm pixel of the 3.2× 3.2 mm2 FOV. Such an unprecedented characterization will (1) enable the identification of most major and minor phases, including the potential organic phases, and ascribe their mineralogical context, as a critical set of clues to decipher the origin and evolution of this primitive body, and (2) provide the ground truth for the orbital measurements as well as a reference for the analyses later performed on returned samples.

  18. Mergers as an Omega estimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The redshift dependence of the fraction of galaxies which are merging or strongly interacting is a steep function of Omega and depends on the ratio of the cutoff velocity for interactions to the pairwise velocity dispersion. For typical galaxies the merger rate is shown to vary as (1 + z)exp m, where m is about 4.51 (Omega)exp 0.42, for Omega near 1 and a CDM-like cosmology. The index m has a relatively weak dependence on the maximum merger velocity, the mass of the galaxy, and the background cosmology, for small variations around a cosmology with a low redshift, z of about 2, of galaxy formation. Estimates of m from optical and IRAS galaxies have found that m is about 3-4, but with very large uncertainties. If quasar evolution follows the evolution of galaxy merging and m for quasars is greater than 4, then Omega is greater than 0.8. 21 refs

  19. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26848697

  20. Extended general relativity: Large-scale antigravity and short-scale gravity with {omega}=-1 from five-dimensional vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madriz Aguilar, Jose Edgar [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, C.P. 37150, Leon Guanajuato (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: madriz@mdp.edu.ar; Bellini, Mauricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)], E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar

    2009-08-31

    Considering a five-dimensional (5D) Riemannian spacetime with a particular stationary Ricci-flat metric, we obtain in the framework of the induced matter theory an effective 4D static and spherically symmetric metric which give us ordinary gravitational solutions on small (planetary and astrophysical) scales, but repulsive (anti gravitational) forces on very large (cosmological) scales with {omega}=-1. Our approach is an unified manner to describe dark energy, dark matter and ordinary matter. We illustrate the theory with two examples, the solar system and the great attractor. From the geometrical point of view, these results follow from the assumption that exists a confining force that make possible that test particles move on a given 4D hypersurface.

  1. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase (omega phase in Ti, Zr and Hf under high pressures; omega phase in Group IV transition metal alloys; omega in other systems; omega embryos at high temperatures); crystallography (omega structure; relationship of ω-structure to bcc (β) and hcp (α) structures); physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase (kinetics of α-ω transformation under high pressures; kinetics of β-ω transformation; synthesis and metastability studies); electronic structure of omega phase (electronic structure models; band structure calculations; theoretical results and experimental studies); electronic basis for omega phase stability (unified phase diagram; stability of omega phase); omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys (Ti-V alloys under pressure - a prototype case study; P-X phase diagrams for alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase (is omega structure a charge density distortion of the bcc phase; nature of incommensurate ω-structure and models for diffuse scattering); conclusion. (U.K.)

  2. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation Differentially Modulates the SDF-1/CXCR-4 Cell Homing Axis in Hypertensive and Normotensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmenschlager, Luiza; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado; Marcadenti, Aline; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2017-08-01

    We assessed the effect of acute and chronic dietary supplementation of ω-3 on lipid metabolism and cardiac regeneration, through its influence on the Stromal Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor (CXCR4) axis in normotensive and hypertensive rats. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were allocated in eight groups (of eight animals each), which received daily orogastric administration of ω-3 (1 g) for 24 h, 72 h or 2 weeks. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of the lipid profile and SDF-1 systemic levels (ELISA). At the end of the treatment period, cardiac tissue was collected for CXCR4 expression analysis (Western blot). The use of ω-3 caused a reduction in total cholesterol levels ( p = 0.044), and acutely activated the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in normotensive animals ( p = 0.037). In the presence of the ω-3, after 72 h, SDF-1 levels decreased in WKY and increased in SHR ( p = 0.017), and tissue expression of the receptor CXCR4 was higher in WKY than in SHR ( p = 0.001). The ω-3 fatty acid supplementation differentially modulates cell homing mediators in normotensive and hypertensive animals. While WKY rats respond acutely to omega-3 supplementation, showing increased release of SDF-1 and CXCR4, SHR exhibit a weaker, delayed response.

  4. Measurement of the Spin of the Omega- Hyperon at Babar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement of the spin of the (Omega) - hyperon produced through the exclusive process Ξ c 0 → (Omega) - K + is presented using a total integrated luminosity of 116 fb -1 recorded with the BABAR detector at the e + e - asymmetric-energy B-Factory at SLAC. Under the assumption that the Ξ c 0 has spin 1/2, the angular distribution of the Λ from (Omega) - → ΛK - decay is inconsistent with all half-integer (Omega) - spin values other than 3/2. Lower statistics data for the process (Omega) c 0 → (Omega) - π + from a 230 fb -1 sample are also found to be consistent with (Omega) - spin 3/2. If the Ξ c 0 spin were 3/2, an (Omega) - spin of 5/2 cannot be excluded

  5. First measurement of the Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Thresher, J J; Tovey, Stuart N

    1979-01-01

    In an experiment in the CERN-SPS charged-hyperon beam, the main Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios have been measured to be Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Lambda K/sup -/)/ Gamma (all)=0.686+or-0.013, Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/ pi /sup -/)/ Gamma (all) =0.234+or-0.013, Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/)/ Gamma (all)=0.080+or-0.008. The relative branching ratio of the two Xi pi modes provides a test of the Delta I=1/2 rule in decuplet-octet transitions. A search has also been made for the rare decay modes Omega /sup -/ to Lambda pi /sup -/, Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ gamma , Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ and Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/e/sup -/ nu . (6 refs).

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids protect the brain against ischemic injury by activating Nrf2 and upregulating heme oxygenase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Suping; Mao, Leilei; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Wenting; Hu, Xiaoming; Sun, Baoliang; Cao, Guodong; Gao, Yanqin; Xu, Yun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-29

    Ischemic stroke is a debilitating clinical disorder that affects millions of people, yet lacks effective neuroprotective treatments. Fish oil is known to exert beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying protective mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study tests the hypothesis that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) attenuate ischemic neuronal injury by activating nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulating heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in both in vitro and in vivo models. We observed that pretreatment of rat primary neurons with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) significantly reduced neuronal death following oxygen-glucose deprivation. This protection was associated with increased Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation. Inhibition of HO-1 activity with tin protoporphyrin IX attenuated the protective effects of DHA. Further studies showed that 4-hydroxy-2E-hexenal (4-HHE), an end-product of peroxidation of n-3 PUFAs, was a more potent Nrf2 inducer than 4-hydroxy-2E-nonenal derived from n-6 PUFAs. In an in vivo setting, transgenic mice overexpressing fatty acid metabolism-1, an enzyme that converts n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs, were remarkably resistant to focal cerebral ischemia compared with their wild-type littermates. Regular mice fed with a fish oil-enhanced diet also demonstrated significant resistance to ischemia compared with mice fed with a regular diet. As expected, the protection was associated with HO-1 upregulation, Nrf2 activation, and 4-HHE generation. Together, our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFAs are highly effective in protecting the brain, and that the protective mechanisms involve Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation by 4-HHE. Further investigation of n-3 PUFA neuroprotective mechanisms may accelerate the development of stroke therapies.

  7. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  8. Optical smoothing of laser imprinting in planar-target experiments on OMEGA EP using multi-FM 1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Dorrer, C.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Zuegel, J. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires single-beam smoothing to minimize imprinting of laser nonuniformities that can negatively affect implosion performance. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required smoothing [Marozas et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 294 (2010)]. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into the NIF-like beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Experiments have been performed to verify the smoothing performance by measuring Rayleigh–Taylor growth rates in planar targets of laser-imprinted and preimposed surface modulations. Multi-FM 1-D SSD has been observed to reduce imprint levels by ∼50% compared to the nominal OMEGA EP SSD system. The experimental results are in agreement with 2-D DRACO simulations using realistic, time-dependent far-field spot-intensity calculations that emulate the effect of SSD.

  9. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of 1-N [(S)-omega-amino-2-hydroxyalkyl] kanamycin A derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, K; Jevons, S; Moore, J W; Ross, B C; Wright, J R

    1977-10-01

    Four 1-N-aminohydroxy-alkyl derivatives of kanamycin A were prepared and their in vitro activities against aminoglycoside-sensitive and aminoglycoside-resistant organisms were compared with amikacin. 1-N-[(S)-4-Amino-2-hydroxybutyl] kanamycin A (Fig. 1, compound 2, code no. UK-18,892) was equipotent to amikacin in all these tests and in mouse protection studies.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  11. Gene polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 and 2, urinary arsenic methylation profile and urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chi-Jung [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in arsenic-metabolizing enzymes may be involved in the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic and may increase the risk of developing urothelial carcinoma (UC). The present study evaluated the roles of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and GSTO2 polymorphisms in UC carcinogenesis. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted. Questionnaire information and biological specimens were collected from 149 UC cases and 251 healthy controls in a non-obvious inorganic arsenic exposure area in Taipei, Taiwan. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping for GSTO1 Ala140Asp and GSTO2 Asn142Asp was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase. GSTO1 Glu208Lys genotyping was performed using high-throughput matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A significant positive association was found between total arsenic, inorganic arsenic percentage and monomethylarsonic acid percentage and UC, while dimethylarsinic acid percentage was significantly inversely associated with UC. The minor allele frequency of GSTO1 Ala140Asp, GSTO1 Glu208Lys and GSTO2 Asn142Asp was 18%, 1% and 26%, respectively. A significantly higher MMA% was found in people who carried the wild type of GSTO1 140 Ala/Ala compared to those who carried the GSTO1 140 Ala/Asp and Asp/Asp genotype (p = 0.02). The homogenous variant genotype of GSTO2 142 Asp/Asp was inversely associated with UC risk (OR = 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03 - 0.88; p = 0.03). Large-scale studies will be required to verify the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms of arsenic-metabolism-related enzymes and UC risk. - Research Highlights: {yields} The homogenous variant genotype of GSTO2 was inversely associated with UC risk. {yields} A higher urinary MMA% was found in people carrying the wild type of GSTO1 Ala140Asp. {yields

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  13. Unusual morphology of the omega phase in a Zr-1.75 At. pct Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Ramadasan, E.; Banerjee, S.

    1993-01-01

    The observations reported in the present communication were made in the course of a microstructural investigation on dilute Zr-Ni alloys. The alloys were prepared from nuclear-grade sponge zirconium and high-purity nickel by nonconsumable arc melting. Repeated melting was carried out to enhance homogeneity. A master alloy was used in the preparation of very dilute alloys. The observations reported here clearly indicate that the formation of the ω phase on β quenching, can occur in the binary Zr-Ni system at very low solute concentrations, suggesting that nickel is a strong ω stabilizer. Such a situation is known to obtain in the binary Zr-Mo system also. However, the unusual ω morphology observed in the present work has not been reported in the context of dilute Zr-Mo alloys. The appearance of sharp ω reflections and the absence of streaking and diffuse distributions in the selected area electron diffraction (SAD) patterns suggest that the Zr-1.75 at. pct Ni composition lies toward the solute lean end of the composition range associated with the formation of the athermal ω phase in the binary Zr-Ni system. In a more dilute Zr-Ni alloy (Zr-1.30 at. pct Ni), no athermal ω could be observed in β quenched specimens. The absence of streaking is also consistent with the fact that the ω phase in the β quenched Zr-1.75 at. pct Ni alloy did not occur in the form of very fine precipitates. The unusual ω morphology encountered in this work merits further investigation

  14. 1-O-alkyl-2-(omega-oxo)acyl-sn-glycerols from shark oil and human milk fat are potential precursors of PAF mimics and GHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Karsten; Ravandi, A.; Harkewicz, R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility that peroxidation and lipolysis of 1-O-alkyl-2,3-diacyl-sn-glycerols (DAGE) found in shark liver oil and human milk fat constitutes a potential source of dietary precursors of platelet activating factor (PAF) mimics and of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Purified...... yielded 1-O-octadecyl-2-(9-oxo)nonanoyl-sn-glycerol, as the major core aldehyde. Because diradylglycerols with short fatty chains are absorbed in the intestine and react with cytidine diphosphate-choline in the enterocytes, it is concluded that formation of such PAF mimics as 1-O-alkyl-2-(omega...

  15. On Chromatic no. of 3K1-free graphs and R(3, k)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhurandhar, Medha S.

    2012-01-01

    Here we prove that if G has independence no. 2 and clique size omega with omega less than or equal to 11, then (1) chromatic no. is less than or equal to (omega2+12omega-13)/8, if omega is odd, and (2) chromatic no. is less than or equal to (omega2+10omega)/8, if omega is even. We further conjecture that the results are true in general for all omega. We also conjecture that (A) if omega is odd and R(3, omega) is even, then R(3, omega) = (omega2+8omega-9)/4, (B) if omega and R(3, omega) are bo...

  16. Brain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate microglia cell number and morphology in response to intracerebroventricular amyloid-β 1-40 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopperton, Kathryn E; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Giuliano, Vanessa; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-09-29

    Neuroinflammation is a proposed mechanism by which Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology potentiates neuronal death and cognitive decline. Consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is associated with a decreased risk of AD in human observational studies and exerts protective effects on cognition and pathology in animal models. These fatty acids and molecules derived from them are known to have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, presenting a potential mechanism for these protective effects. Here, we explore this mechanism using fat-1 transgenic mice and their wild type littermates weaned onto either a fish oil diet (high in n-3 PUFA) or a safflower oil diet (negligible n-3 PUFA). The fat-1 mouse carries a transgene that enables it to convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFA. At 12 weeks of age, mice underwent intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of amyloid-β 1-40. Brains were collected between 1 and 28 days post-icv, and hippocampal microglia, astrocytes, and degenerating neurons were quantified by immunohistochemistry with epifluorescence microscopy, while microglia morphology was assessed with confocal microscopy and skeleton analysis. Fat-1 mice fed with the safflower oil diet and wild type mice fed with the fish oil diet had higher brain DHA in comparison with the wild type mice fed with the safflower oil diet. Relative to the wild type mice fed with the safflower oil diet, fat-1 mice exhibited a lower peak in the number of labelled microglia, wild type mice fed with fish oil had fewer degenerating neurons, and both exhibited alterations in microglia morphology at 10 days post-surgery. There were no differences in astrocyte number at any time point and no differences in the time course of microglia or astrocyte activation following infusion of amyloid-β 1-40. Increasing brain DHA, through either dietary or transgenic means, decreases some elements of the inflammatory response to amyloid-β in a mouse model of AD. This supports the

  17. Food supplementation for workers: flour enriched with omega -3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Nery de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was preparing a product (omega-3 flour to increase the nutritional value of the food for workers concerning the content of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA. The omega-3 flour was prepared using waste (head sardines and leaves of carrot, flaxseed flour, manioc flour and spices. The fatty acids (FA concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography. A total of 28 FA were identified in the omega-3 flour. The concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were 329.23mg EPA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour and 545.35 mg DHA 100 g-1 omega-3 flour. To meet the minimum requirements of omega -3, it is necessary the intake 2.5 to 3 tablespoons (soup of omega-3 flour day-1.There were analyzed two meals (A and B generally consumed by workers without and with the addition of the omega-3 flour (1 and 2 tablespoons to verify if there was an increase of n-3 FA. It was concluded that there was a significant increase of these FA in both meals. It was found that the omega-3 flour is constituted of a good nutritional value, especially the n-3 FA, so the product can be used as a supplement in the feeding of the workers as well as in other segments.

  18. The structure of omega3 food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Fish oil is rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) which are generally recognized as being beneficial to the health [1]. The addition of fish oil to food products is attractive to both the consumers and the food industry. Indeed, these components will improve nutritional value...... and add product value. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds in their fatty acid chains and this attribute renders them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. Omega-3 PUFAs can be added to food products as neat oil or as a delivery system such as oil-in-water emulsions. In this last configuration...... and the prooxidants. But this protective aspect is a really complex process and it is dependent on the food matrix to which the oil is added [2]. Oxidation is presumed to be initiated at the emulsifier layer, i.e. the interface layer between the oil and water where the oil is most likely to come into contact...

  19. Cold dark matter confronts the cosmic microwave background - Large-angular-scale anisotropies in Omega sub 0 + lambda 1 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is used to compute the correlation function for large-angle cosmic microwave background anisotropies resulting from both the space and time variations in the gravitational potential in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models. Such models with Omega sub 0 of about 0.2, fit the excess power, relative to the standard cold dark matter model, observed in the large-scale galaxy distribution and allow a high value for the Hubble constant. The low order multipoles and quadrupole anisotropy that are potentially observable by COBE and other ongoing experiments should definitively test these models.

  20. OMEGA EP: High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the OMEGA Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals

  1. OMEGA EP: High-energy peta-watt capability for the OMEGA laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a peta-watt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals. (authors)

  2. OMEGA EP: High-energy peta-watt capability for the OMEGA laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a peta-watt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals. (authors)

  3. Omega Air 707/F/A-18A-D Aerial Refueling Ground and Flight Test Evaluation and MA-3-1 Coupling Ground Test Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markowich, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Omega Air, Incorporated, a private organization that provides shipping and transportation services, contracted Marconi Flight Systems, Incorporated, to retrofit a Boeing 707 aircraft with an internal...

  4. Effect of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Supplementation on Body Composition and Circulating Levels of Follistatin-Like 1 in Males With Coronary Artery Disease: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Salim, Shirin; Alizadeh, Shahab; Djalali, Mahmoud; Nematipour, Ebrahim; Hassan Javanbakht, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    Adipokines are mediators of body composition and are involved in obesity-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. Omega-3 supplementation has not been studied in the setting of body composition and follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) levels in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to investigate the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) supplementation on body composition indices and serum levels of FSTL1 in CAD patients. A total of 42 male (aged 45-65 years) subjects with angiographically confirmed CAD were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial study. The subjects were randomly divided into omega-3 and placebo groups. During the 8-week intervention, the omega-3 group received 1,200 mg of omega-3 daily, while the placebo group received paraffin. Before and after the study, anthropometric measurements and body composition components were taken; serum FSTL1 levels were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. In the omega-3 group, a significant 27.6% increase in serum FSTL1 was seen after 8 weeks of intervention ( p = .001), but no significant difference in posttreatment levels of FSTL1 was observed between the two groups ( p > .05). At the end of the study, a significant decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; 94.29 ± 22.04 vs. 112.24 ± 24.5; p = .01) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; 1.92 ± 0.79 vs. 3.19 ± 2.51; p = .03) concentration was detected between the two groups. Changes in fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin, body composition, and anthropometric parameters were not significant within and between the groups. Oral omega-3 might increase FSTL1 and decrease LDL-C and hs-CRP concentrations in CAD patients. However, omega-3 supplementation did not have any effect on FSTL1 levels between the groups.

  5. MOESM1 of The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Additional file 1: Figure S1. Experimental groups. In order to assess the impact of n-3 versus n-6 PUFAs on de- and remyelination, animals were divided into six experimental groups. Ten wt and twelve fat-1 animals were put on a 0.2 % cuprizone diet for five weeks, while four wt and four fat-1 animals were fed a normal diet instead. At the end of the five weeks both control groups and the five wt and six fat-1 animals that had been fed cuprizone were sacrificed. The remaining animals were allo...

  6. Observation of five new narrow $\\Omega_c^0$ states decaying to $\\Xi^+_c K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-05-02

    The $\\Xi^+_c K^-$ mass spectrum is studied with a sample of $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The $\\Xi^+_c$ is reconstructed in the decay mode $pK^- \\pi^+$. Five new, narrow excited $\\Omega_c^0$ states are observed: the $\\Omega_c (3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3090)^0$, and $\\Omega_c (3119)^0$. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  7. Omega test series - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, C.P.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has supported a series of high explosive calibration experiments that were conducted in the Degelen Mountain area of the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan (ROK). This paper will provide an overview of the second and third tests of this series which have been designated Omega-2 and Omega-3. Omega-2 was conducted on Saturday, September 25, 1999 and Omega-3 on Saturday, July 29, 2000. (author)

  8. OMEGA upgrade staging options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Shoup, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how they are designing an upgrade to its 24-beam OMEGA laser system, OMEGA is a frequency tripled, all-rod system capable of producing 2 kJ at 0.8 ns on target. Important direct-drive-target-ignition physics could be investigated with an upgraded system capable of producing a shaped pulse consisting of a long (5ns) low-intensity, foot, smoothly transitioning into a short (0.5 ns), intense, compression pulse. The total pulse energy is 30 kJ, which, from target-irradiation uniformity considerations, must be distributed over 60 beams

  9. Measurements of $\\jpsi$ decays into $\\omega\\pio$, $\\omega\\eta$, and $\\omega\\etap$

    OpenAIRE

    Ablikim, M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on $5.8 \\times 10^7 \\jpsi$ events collected with BESII at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC), the decay branching fractions of $\\jpsi\\to\\omega\\pio$, $\\omega\\eta$, and $\\omega\\etap$ are measured using different $\\eta$ and $\\etap$ decay modes. The results are higher than previous measurements. The $\\omega\\pio$ electromagnetic form factor is also obtained.

  10. Measurement of the Xi(-)(b) and Omega(-)(b) baryon lifetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Onderwater, G.; Pellegrino, A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a data sample of pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), the Xi(-)(b) and Omega(-)(b) baryons are reconstructed in the Xi(-)(b) -> J/psi Xi(-) and Omega(-)(b) -> J/psi Omega(-) decay modes and their lifetimes measured to be tau(Xi(-)(b)) = 1.55(-0.09)(+0.10) (stat)

  11. Soft X-ray spectroscopy measurements of plasma conditions at early times in ICF experiments on OMEGA. Semi-annual report, November 1, 1998-April 30, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Since arrival of FY-99 funding in December, the authors have been preparing for the first series of experiments under this grant on the OMEGA laser facility, which just took place (for one day) on April 27, 1999. The campaign was successful and results will be included in the next progress report following analyses. For the first time, they fielded their Ten Inch Manipulator (TIM-) mounted flat-field, grazing-incidence extreme-ultraviolet (euv) spectrograph with a four-channel gated-stripline microchannel plate (MCP) detector. This spectrograph covers the spectral range of 30--250 angstrom (hv = 50--400 eV). As in a previous campaign of May 1998, where the authors used this instrument with time-integrated photographic recording, the spectrograph reached closer to the target than did the previous version mounted on the chamber wall; such that the sensitivity increased by at least a factor-of-10 for viewing weak spectral features. The analysis during this reporting period of the euv spectroscopic results from the October 1998 NLUF/OMEGA campaign of Mg X, XI and XII spectra from n = 3 to n = 2 transitions are shown in Fig. 1 versus time. The data plotted represent a composite between the three most sensitive striplines, delayed relative to each other, for a number of shots. The intended emphasis was on the early portion of the event while the laser intensity is rising to a peak. This measured euv history agrees with that from the x-ray streak spectrographic data shown in Fig. 2 from the same campaign, i.e., the peak period of emission being in the first 1.5 ns

  12. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  13. RENORMALIZATION FACTOR AND ODD-OMEGA GAP SINGLET SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOLGOV, OV; LOSYAKOV, VV

    1994-01-01

    Abrahams et al. [Phys. Rev. B 47 (1993) 513] have considered the possibility of a nonzero critical temperature of the superconductor transition to the state with odd-omega pp function and shown that the condition for it is the following inequality for the renormalization factor. Z (k, omega(n)) <1.

  14. Observation of the Singly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay D+ -> omega pi(+) and Evidence for D-0 -> omega pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on 2.93 fb(-1) e(+)e(-) collision data taken at center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV by the BESIII detector, we report searches for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays D+ -> omega pi(+) and D-0 -> omega pi(0). A double tag technique is used to measure the absolute branching fractions B(D+ ->

  15. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Omega(-)(b) baryon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Beteta, C. Abellan; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at root s = 7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 +/- 9 Omega(-)(b) -> Omega(0)(c)pi(-), Omega(0)(c) -> pK(-)K(-)pi(+) decays. Using the Xi(-)(b) ->Xi(0)(c)pi(-), Xi(0)(c) ->

  16. eta pi(+)pi(-) Resonant Structure around 1.8 GeV/c(2) and eta in J/psi -> omega eta pi(+)pi(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A. C.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yu, S. P. Yu; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a study of the decay J/psi -> omega eta pi(+)pi(-) using a sample of (225.2 +/- 2.8) x 10(6) J/psi events collected by the BESIII detector, and report the observation of a new process J/psi -> omega X(1870) with a statistical significance of 7.2 sigma, in which X(1870) decays

  17. Omega report: energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Adam Smith Institute's Omega Project was conceived to fill a significant gap in the field of public policy research. Administrations entering office in democratic societies are often aware of the problems which they face, but lack a well-developed range of policy options. The Omega Project was designed to create and develop new policy initiatives, to research and analyze these new ideas, and to bring them forward for public discussion in ways which overcame the conventional shortcomings. The organization of the Project is described. The results are presented in sections entitled: energy supplies and policy; the gas industry; North Sea oil; the coal industry; the electricity industry; nuclear energy; renewable and alternative fuel sources; energy conservation. (U.K.)

  18. Omega-3 fiskeolie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Sørensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Rapport afgrænser sig til evidensbaserede helbredsmæssige gevinster ved et øget indtag af langkædede omega-3, som opnås ved en kost rig på fisk eller som et tilskud af fiskeolier. Der gennemføres en systematisk litteraturgennemgang, som baserer sig på et evidensniveau svarende til styrke A. Det...... betyder, at gennemgangen inkluderer metaanalyser/oversigtsartikler af enten eksperimentelle studier eller observationsstudier, endvidere indgår udvalgte større RCT, som er refereret i meta-analyserne. Sammenfattende findes på baggrund af litteraturgennemgang, at tilskud af omega-3 har effekt på...... hjertesygdom ved at nedsætte mortaliteten. Effekten er mest evident ved personer i særlig risiko for at udvikle hjerte-karsygdom, eller som sekundær/tertiær profylakse. Tilsvarende findes også ved tilskud af omega-3 en forebyggende effekt i forhold til iskæmisk apopleksi. Af mulige virkningsmekanismer viser...

  19. Lightweight HPC beam OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Michal; Jedlinský, Petr; Komanec, Jan

    2017-09-01

    In the design and construction of precast bridge structures, a general goal is to achieve the maximum possible span length. Often, the weight of individual beams makes them difficult to handle, which may be a limiting factor in achieving the desired span. The design of the OMEGA beam aims to solve a part of these problems. It is a thin-walled shell made of prestressed high-performance concrete (HPC) in the shape of inverted Ω character. The concrete shell with prestressed strands is fitted with a non-stressed tendon already in the casting yard and is more easily transported and installed on the site. The shells are subsequently completed with mild steel reinforcement and cores are cast in situ together with the deck. The OMEGA beams can also be used as an alternative to steel - concrete composite bridges. Due to the higher production complexity, OMEGA beam can hardly substitute conventional prestressed beams like T or PETRA completely, but it can be a useful alternative for specific construction needs.

  20. Sea cucumber and blue mussel: new sources of phospholipid enriched omega-3 fatty acids with a potential role in 3T3-L1 adipocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Hitesh; Cheema, Sukhinder K

    2014-12-01

    Omega (n)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), namely docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are known to reduce the risk of insulin resistance and ameliorate obesity-associated disorders. DHA and EPA structured in the phospholipid form possess superior biological effects compared to the triglyceride form available in fish oil. In this study, we have found that sea cucumber (SC) and blue mussel (BM) from Newfoundland and Labrador are rich sources of n-3 PUFA structured in the phospholipid form. Treatment with SC and BM methanolic extracts (250 and 100 μg mL(-1), respectively) significantly (p triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, along with an increase in the mRNA expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (37 and 39%, respectively) and adiponectin (57 and 56%, respectively) compared with control cells (p triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells as opposed to an increase in triglyceride accumulation at lower concentrations. This was due to inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 and SREBP-1 mRNA expression compared to control cells (p triglyceride accumulation at higher concentrations is not due to breakdown and release of fat. This is the first report to show that SC and BM are new sources of phospholipid bonded n-3 PUFA, with the potential to target insulin resistance and obesity.

  1. Electric field measurements from satellites-to-forbidden line ratios in an Omega-Upgrade laser-produced plasma. Semi-annual report, February 1--May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.; Welch, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    Under this FY-96 NLUF program, the authors began their search for satellite lines to forbidden transitions for localized laser-induced electric field measurements by preparing in their laboratory a flat-field grazing incidence spectrograph for use on the OMEGA-Upgrade facility. This involved wavelength calibration using a (small) laser-produced plasma, as well as designing and constructing a mounting table compatible with the large 60-beam target chamber at LLE. Beginning in April 1996 they installed and aligned the spectrograph at LLE. Following final alignment on Monday, April 29, they obtained the following day their first time-integrated spectral data in the 30--250 angstrom range. A total of 28 successful shots were obtained. For most shots, two beams of the OMEGA-Upgrade laser were used at nominal uv-pulse widths of 1.1 ns and energies ranging from 76--470 J/beam, with focal spots of 80--450 microm and irradiances covering approximately 10 14 --10 16 Watt/cm 2 . Planar targets used consisted of Mg and NaF, as well as boron mounted on a plastic film, with some of the former two overcoated with 5 microm of CH on each side for containing the plasma, at least during the early portion of the pulse. Preliminary analyses indicate that they do indeed observe the desired Li-like L-shell spectra for oxygen, fluorine, sodium and magnesium, as well as L-shell lines in the corresponding H-(Balmer) and He-like species. Similarly, they recorded K-shell lines from B and C. Sample traces for Mg and Na fluoride from their soft x-ray spectrograph are shown. Both of these shots were obtained at a rather low applied irradiance of 2 X 10 14 W/cm 2 , and were chosen mainly for line identification. The parent Li-like 2s-3p allowed lines corresponding to the forbidden-line satellites sought for E-field determinations are clearly present. The calculated satellite line intensity relative to the intensity from this 2s-3p transition is ∼ 3%

  2. Regulation of rabbit lung cytochrome P-450 prostaglandin omega-hydroxylase (P-450/sub PG-omega/) during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muerhoff, A.S.; Williams, D.E.; Jackson, V.; Leithauser, M.T.; Waterman, M.R.; Johnson, E.F.; Masters, B.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of induction during pregnancy of a rabbit lung prostaglandin omega-hydroxylase cytochrome P-450 has been investigated. This activity has been demonstrated to be induced over 100-fold in 28-day pregnant rabbits, as compared to nonpregnant rabbits. The induction is reflected by an increase in the amount of P-450/sub PG-omega/ protein as measured by Western blotting. P-450/sub PG-omega/ microsomal protein increases throughout gestation concomitant with an increase in PGE 1 omega-hydroxylase activity. Elucidation of the level of induction involved extraction of RNA from rabbit lungs obtained at various days of gestation followed by in vitro translation of the RNA in the presence of 35 S-methionine. Immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized P-450 and analysis of the immunoisolates by SDS-PAGE, autoradiography and densitometry of the P-450/sub PG-omega/ band revealed that the P-450/sub PG-omega/ mRNA levels followed the gestational time-dependent increase observed for both PGE 1 omega-hydroxylase activity and P-450/sub PG-omega/ protein, i.e., a gradual increase peaking at 28-days, dropping precipitously to near control levels following parturition. These data suggest that control of P-450/sub PG-omega expression occurs at the transcriptional level. Western blots of human lung bronchioloalveolar-carcinoma cell lines NCL-H322 and NCL-H358 utilizing a guinea pig IgG to P-450/sub PG-omega/ detect a cross-reactive species

  3. Characterization and mutational analysis of omega-class GST (GSTO1 from Apis cerana cerana, a gene involved in response to oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Meng

    Full Text Available The Omega-class of GSTs (GSTOs is a class of cytosolic GSTs that have specific structural and functional characteristics that differ from those of other GST groups. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of the GSTO1 gene from A. cerana cerana in the oxidative stress response and further investigated the effects of three cysteine residues of GSTO1 protein on this response. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR showed that AccGSTO1 was highly expressed in larvae and foragers, primarily in the midgut, epidermis, and flight muscles. The AccGSTO1 mRNA was significantly induced by cold and heat at 1 h and 3 h. The TBA (2-Thiobarbituric acid method indicated that cold or heat resulted in MDA accumulation, but silencing of AccGSTO1 by RNAi in honeybees increased the concentration of MDA. RNAi also increased the temperature sensitivity of honeybees and markedly reduced their survival. Disc diffusion assay indicated that overexpression of AccGSTO1 in E. coli caused the resistance to long-term oxidative stress. Furthermore, AccGSTO1 was active in an in vitro DNA protection assay. Mutations in Cys-28, Cys-70, and Cys-124 affected the catalytic activity and antioxidant activity of AccGSTO1. The predicted three-dimensional structure of AccGSTO1 was also influenced by the replacement of these cysteine residues. These findings suggest that AccGSTO1 plays a protective role in the response to oxidative stress.

  4. Some fundamental problems relating to optical fibres. I. The attainment of loss coefficients of 10-5cm-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambling, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Fibres for optical communications are currently being made with two types of material, namely low-temperature compound glasses and high-temperature silica-based glasses. The paper outlines the techniques used in the two cases and summarizes the results which have so far been achieved. (author)

  5. Potassium spectra in the 700–7000 cm-1 domain: Transitions involving f-, g-, and h-states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Jelínek, Petr; Chernov, V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 541, May 2012 (2012), A125 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Grant - others:GA MF(CZ) ECPF:049/4V Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : atomic data * line: identification * methods: laboratory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2012

  6. FTS improvements and connection with a long White cell. Application: H216O intensity measurements around 1200 cm-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regalia, L.; Oudot, C.; Thomas, X.; Von der Heyden, P.; Decatoire, D.

    2010-01-01

    Acquisition electronics, data software and optics of the Fourier transform spectrometer of the Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique laboratory have been optimized over the past 5 years. Among the improvements brought on to this system is the optical fitting of 50-m White cell. This cell can be used to achieve absorption path lengths as long as 2 km. This new setup allows us to perform spectroscopic analysis of very small absorption lines.

  7. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the $\\Omega_b^-$ baryon

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; 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Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-05-19

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ collected by LHCb at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct $63\\pm9$ $\\Omega_b^-\\to\\Omega_c^0\\pi^-$, $\\Omega_c^0\\to pK^-K^-\\pi^+$ decays. Using the $\\Xi_b^-\\to\\Xi_c^0\\pi^-$, $\\Xi_c^0\\to pK^-K^-\\pi^+$ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and absolute lifetime of the $\\Omega_b^-$ baryon are measured to be \\begin{align*} \\frac{\\tau_{\\Omega_b^-}}{\\tau_{\\Xi_b^-}} &= 1.11\\pm0.16\\pm0.03, \\\\ \\tau_{\\Omega_b^-} &= 1.78\\pm0.26\\pm0.04\\pm0.05~{\\rm ps}, \\end{align*} where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for $\\tau_{\\Omega_b^-}$ only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, $m_{\\Omega_b^-}-m_{\\Xi_b^-}$, and the corresponding $\\Omega_b^-$ mass, which yields \\begin{align*} m_{\\Omega_b^-}-m_{\\Xi_b^-} &= 247.4\\pm3.2\\pm0.5~{\\rm MeV}/c^2, \\\\ m_{\\Omega_b^-} &= 6045.1\\pm3.2\\pm 0.5\\pm0.6~{\\rm MeV}/c^2. \\end{align*} These results are consistent with p...

  8. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The huge superconducting magnet (3 m inside coil diameter, 2 m gap, 18 kGauss) contains a large number of optical spark chambers partly surrounding a hydrogen target which is hit by the beam entering from behind. The half cylindrical aluminium hut houses eight television cameras viewing the spark chambers from the top. The big gas Cerenkov counter in front of the picture (6 m x 4 m x 3 m) which identifies fast forward particles was constructed at Saclay as a contribution of one of the Omega.

  9. Preventive effects of omega-3 and omega-6 Fatty acids on peroxide mediated oxidative stress responses in primary human trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Tourtas

    Full Text Available Pathologic processes in glaucoma include increased apoptosis, accumulation of extracellular material in the trabecular meshwork and optic nerve, condensations of the cytoskeleton and precocious cellular senescence. Oxidative stress was shown to generate these alterations in primary ocular cells. Fatty acids omega-3 and -6 are alleged to constitute a prophylaxis against these deleterious effects. Here, we tested actual preventive effects omega-3 and -6 against peroxide induced stress responses in primary human trabecular meshwork cells. Changes of mitochondrial activity, proliferation, heat shock proteins, extracellular matrix components, and inflammatory markers were evaluated. Alterations of the cytoskeleton were evaluated by phalloidin labeling. Here we report a repressive effect of omega-6 on metabolic activity and proliferation, which was not detected for omega-3. Both agents were able to prevent the anti-proliferative effect of H₂O₂, but only omega-3 prevented metabolic repression. Expression of heat shock protein 27 was unaltered by both fatty acids, whereas heat shock protein 90 was significantly induced by both. Omega-6 increased fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor synthesis, as well as the amount of secreted fibronectin. Omega-3, instead, induced plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 synthesis. H₂O₂ further increased fibronectin production in omega-6 supplemented cells, which was not the case in omega-3 treated cells. H₂O₂ stimulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and connective tissue growth factor was repressed by both fatty acids. Both fatty acids appeared to abolish H₂O₂ mediated stimulation of nuclear factor κB and IL-6, but not IL-1α and IL-8. H₂O₂ induced formation of cross-linked actin networks and stress fibers, which was reduced by preemptive application of omega-3. Omega-6, in contrast, had no protective effect on that, and even seemed to promote condensation. Based on the observed side

  10. Elevated blood pressure in cytochrome P4501A1 knockout mice is associated with reduced vasodilation to omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbor, Larry N.; Walsh, Mary T.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walker, Mary K., E-mail: mwalker@salud.unm.edu

    2012-11-01

    In vitro cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) metabolizes omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n − 3 PUFAs); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), primarily to 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EEQ) and 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid (19,20-EDP), respectively. These metabolites have been shown to mediate vasodilation via increases in nitric oxide (NO) and activation of potassium channels. We hypothesized that genetic deletion of CYP1A1 would reduce vasodilatory responses to n − 3 PUFAs, but not the metabolites, and increase blood pressure (BP) due to decreases in NO. We assessed BP by radiotelemetry in CYP1A1 wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice ± NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. We also assessed vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh), EPA, DHA, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP in aorta and mesenteric arterioles. Further, we assessed vasodilation to an NO donor and to DHA ± inhibitors of potassium channels. CYP1A1 KO mice were hypertensive, compared to WT, (mean BP in mm Hg, WT 103 ± 1, KO 116 ± 1, n = 5/genotype, p < 0.05), and exhibited a reduced heart rate (beats per minute, WT 575 ± 5; KO 530 ± 7; p < 0.05). However, BP responses to NOS inhibition and vasorelaxation responses to ACh and an NO donor were normal in CYP1A1 KO mice, suggesting that NO bioavailability was not reduced. In contrast, CYP1A1 KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated vasorelaxation responses to EPA and DHA in both the aorta and mesenteric arterioles, but normal vasorelaxation responses to the CYP1A1 metabolites, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP, and normal responses to potassium channel inhibition. Taken together these data suggest that CYP1A1 metabolizes n − 3 PUFAs to vasodilators in vivo and the loss of these vasodilators may lead to increases in BP. -- Highlights: ► CYP1A1 KO mice are hypertensive. ► CYP1A1 KO mice exhibit reduced vasodilation responses to n-3 PUFAs. ► Constitutive CYP1A1 expression regulates blood pressure and vascular function.

  11. Elevated blood pressure in cytochrome P4501A1 knockout mice is associated with reduced vasodilation to omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agbor, Larry N.; Walsh, Mary T.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walker, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    In vitro cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) metabolizes omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n − 3 PUFAs); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), primarily to 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EEQ) and 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid (19,20-EDP), respectively. These metabolites have been shown to mediate vasodilation via increases in nitric oxide (NO) and activation of potassium channels. We hypothesized that genetic deletion of CYP1A1 would reduce vasodilatory responses to n − 3 PUFAs, but not the metabolites, and increase blood pressure (BP) due to decreases in NO. We assessed BP by radiotelemetry in CYP1A1 wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice ± NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. We also assessed vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh), EPA, DHA, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP in aorta and mesenteric arterioles. Further, we assessed vasodilation to an NO donor and to DHA ± inhibitors of potassium channels. CYP1A1 KO mice were hypertensive, compared to WT, (mean BP in mm Hg, WT 103 ± 1, KO 116 ± 1, n = 5/genotype, p < 0.05), and exhibited a reduced heart rate (beats per minute, WT 575 ± 5; KO 530 ± 7; p < 0.05). However, BP responses to NOS inhibition and vasorelaxation responses to ACh and an NO donor were normal in CYP1A1 KO mice, suggesting that NO bioavailability was not reduced. In contrast, CYP1A1 KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated vasorelaxation responses to EPA and DHA in both the aorta and mesenteric arterioles, but normal vasorelaxation responses to the CYP1A1 metabolites, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP, and normal responses to potassium channel inhibition. Taken together these data suggest that CYP1A1 metabolizes n − 3 PUFAs to vasodilators in vivo and the loss of these vasodilators may lead to increases in BP. -- Highlights: ► CYP1A1 KO mice are hypertensive. ► CYP1A1 KO mice exhibit reduced vasodilation responses to n-3 PUFAs. ► Constitutive CYP1A1 expression regulates blood pressure and vascular function.

  12. High dietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated acids during pregnancy and prevalence of post-partum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Camilla M M; Kac, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies suggest association between low concentrations of omega-3 family fatty acids and greater risk for post-partum depression (PPD). The objective was to investigate the effect of unbalanced dietary intake of omega-6/omega-3 ratio >9:1 in the prevalence for PPD. The study comprises a prospective cohort with four waves of follow-up during pregnancy and one following delivery. PPD was evaluated according to the Edinburgh Post-partum Depression Scale (PPD ≥ 11) in 106 puerperae between 2005 and 2007, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Independent variables included socio-demographic, obstetric, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and dietary intake data, which were obtained by means of a food frequency questionnaire in the first trimester of pregnancy. Statistical analysis involved calculation of PPD prevalence and multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. PPD prevalence amounted to 26.4% [n = 28; confidence interval (CI) 95%: 18.0-34.8], and higher prevalences of PPD were observed in women who consumed an omega-6/omega-3 ratio >9:1 (60.0%) and in those with pre-pregnancy BMI <18.5 kg/m(2) (66.7%). These variables held as factors associated to PPD in the multivariate model, elevating the chances of occurrence of the outcome in 2.50 (CI 95%: 1.21-5.14) and 4.01 times (CI 95%: 1.96-8.20), respectively. Analyses were adjusted for age, schooling, pre-pregnancy BMI, lipids consumption and time elapsed since delivery. It verified an association between omega-6/omega-3 ratio above 9:1, the levels recommended by the Institute of Medicine, and the prevalence of PPD. These results add to the evidence regarding the importance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the regulation of mental health mechanisms. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  14. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  15. Outline of OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hirokazu

    1989-01-01

    Attention has been paid to the research and development on the group partition and annihilation disposal technology which separates long life radioactive nuclides, rare stable nuclides and so on in high level radioactive wastes and utilizes those for respective suitable uses, or which searches for the possibility of promoting the nuclear disintegration of long life radioactive nuclides, as the basic research aiming at the further development of atomic energy. It was named 'OMEGA project' and its promotion has been carried out. The outline of the project and the international circumstances surrounding it are described. In the high level radioactive wastes generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, the alpha and beta-gamma radionuclides having long life are contained. Consequently, it is necessary to isolate them from human environment for very long period, and the basic method is the glass solidification and the disposal in deep strata, therefore the technical development has been advanced. The OMEGA project was decided in October, 1988, and the course of the research carried out so far, the international cooperation and the subjects of research and development are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Dai Omega, a large solid angle axial focusing superconducting surface muon channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyadera, H.; Nagamine, K.; Shimomura, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tanaka, H.; Fukuchi, K.; Makimura, S.; Ishida, K.

    2003-01-01

    An axial focusing surface muon channel, Dai Omega, was installed at KEK-MSL in the summer of 2001. Large aperture superconducting coils are utilized instead of quadrupole magnets. Dai Omega adopts an axial focusing beam path using symmetric magnetic fields from four coils. Computer simulations were performed on constructing Dai Omega, and the calculated solid angle acceptance of Dai Omega was larger than 1 sr at the optimum momentum. The momentum acceptance of Dai Omega was 6% FWHM. Dai Omega improved the solid angle acceptance by almost 20 times, in comparison with conventional muon channels. Beam tuning tests of Dai Omega have been carried out, and a beam intensity of 10 6 μ + /s was achieved at KEK-NML (500 MeV, 5 μA), which was almost comparable with that of RAL (800 MeV, 200 μA)

  17. A study of tau decays involving eta and omega mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The 132 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1994 have been used to analyze $\\eta$ and $\\omega$ production in $\\tau$ decays. The following branching fractions have been measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} B(\\tau^-\\to\

  18. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis in Association with Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Hiromi; Yanai, Ryoji; Yoshimura, Takeru; Nagai, Tomohiko; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sobrin, Lucia; Connor, Kip M.; Sakoda, Yukimi; Tamada, Koji; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2015-01-01

    Omega (ω)–3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators and thereby contribute to the regulation of inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) is a well-established animal model of autoimmune retinal inflammation. To investigate the potential effects of dietary intake of ω-3 LCPUFAs on uveitis, we examined the anti-inflammatory properties of these molecules in comparison with ω-6 LCPUFAs in a mouse EAU model. C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing ω-3 LCPUFAs or ω-6 LCPUFAs for 2 weeks before as well as after the induction of EAU by subcutaneous injection of a fragment of human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein emulsified with complete Freund’s adjuvant. Both clinical and histological scores for uveitis were smaller for mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs than for those fed ω-6 LCPUFAs. The concentrations of the T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine interferon-γ and the Th17 cytokine interleukin-17 in intraocular fluid as well as the production of these cytokines by lymph node cells were reduced for mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs. Furthermore, the amounts of mRNAs for the Th1- and Th17-related transcription factors T-bet and RORγt, respectively, were reduced both in the retina and in lymph node cells of mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs. Our results thus show that a diet enriched in ω-3 LCPUFAs suppressed uveitis in mice in association with inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cell function. PMID:26393358

  19. Mapping QTL for Omega-3 Content in Hybrid Saline Tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace; Wang, Le; Ngoh, Si Te; Ji, Lianghui; Orbán, Laszlo; Yue, Gen Hua

    2018-02-01

    Tilapia is one of most important foodfish species. The low omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio in freshwater tilapia meat is disadvantageous for human health. Increasing omega-3 content is an important task in breeding to increase the nutritional value of tilapia. However, conventional breeding to increase omega-3 content is difficult and slow. To accelerate the increase of omega-3 through marker-assisted selection (MAS), we conducted QTL mapping for fatty acid contents and profiles in a F 2 family of saline tilapia generated by crossing red tilapia and Mozambique tilapia. The total omega-3 content in F 2 hybrid tilapia was 2.5 ± 1.0 mg/g, higher than that (2.00 mg/g) in freshwater tilapia. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) technology was used to discover and genotype SNP markers, and microsatellites were also genotyped. We constructed a linkage map with 784 markers (151 microsatellites and 633 SNPs). The linkage map was 2076.7 cM long and consisted of 22 linkage groups. Significant and suggestive QTL for total lipid content were mapped on six linkage groups (LG3, -4, -6, -8, -13, and -15) and explained 5.8-8.3% of the phenotypic variance. QTL for omega-3 fatty acids were located on four LGs (LG11, -18, -19, and -20) and explained 5.0 to 7.5% of the phenotypic variance. Our data suggest that the total lipid and omega-3 fatty acid content were determined by multiple genes in tilapia. The markers flanking the QTL for omega-3 fatty acids can be used in MAS to accelerate the genetic improvements of these traits in salt-tolerant tilapia.

  20. LHCb: Measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$, $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ baryon masses

    CERN Multimedia

    Märki, R

    2013-01-01

    Mass measurements of $\\Lambda_b^0$, $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ at LHCb using 1~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected in 2011, reconstructing $\\Lambda_b^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda$, $\\Xi_b^- \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Xi^-$ and $\\Omega_b^- \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Omega^-$.

  1. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku

    2015-01-01

    with altered PUFA content and looked at the effects on circulating omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status as a measure of overall omega-3 status. Supplemental oral administration of omega-3 DHA or reduction of RUTF omega-6 linoleic acid using high oleic peanuts improved DHA status, whereas increasing omega...

  2. Tetrahedral hohlraums at omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrala, G.A.; Goldman, S.R.; Batha, S.H.; Wallace, J.M.; Klare, K.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Oertel, J.; Turner, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    We have initiated a study of the usefulness of tetrahedrally illuminated spherical hohlraums, using the Omega laser beams, to drive planar shocks in packages that require indirect drive. A first suite of experiments used spherical hohlraums with a 2-μm thick gold wall surrounded by a 100-μm thick epoxy layer and had an internal diameter of 2.8 mm. Four laser entrance holes each of diameter 700 μm, located on the tips of a regular tetrahedron were used. The shock velocities and the shock uniformities were measured using optical shock break out techniques. The hohlraum x-ray radiation spectrum was also measured using a 10-channel x-ray detector. Tentatively, peak temperatures approaching 195 eV were achieved and shock speeds of 60 μm/ns were measured, when the hohlraum was driven by 22 kJ of 3 ω radiation. (authors)

  3. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 1-in vitro assays and evaluation in omega-3 enriched milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nina Skall, Nielsen

    2010-01-01

    and lactic acid and subsequently fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut off sizes of 30 kDa, 10 kDa and 3 kDa. The fractions were tested for antioxidant activity by investigating the inhibition of oxidation in liposome model system, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity......, tocopherol and sensory characteristics, the lower molecular weight fractions 3–10 kDa and...

  4. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iori, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the (Omega) c 0 lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c Σ - , π - and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 ± 19 reconstructed (Omega) c 0 in the (Omega) - π - π + π + and (Omega) - π + decay modes. The lifetime of the (Omega) c 0 is measured to be 65 ± 13(stat) ± 9(sys) fs

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids upregulate adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Tlusty, Michael F.; Benton, Jeannie L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play crucial roles in the development and function of the central nervous system. These components, which must be obtained from dietary sources, have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the presence of omega-6 fatty acids may interfere with omega-3 fatty acid metabolism. The present study investigated whether changes in dietary ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids influence neurogenesis in the lobster (Homarus america...

  6. Integral functionals that are continuous with respect to the weak topology on W-0(1,p)(Omega)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, R.; Hencl, S.; Kolář, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 71, 7-8 (2009), s. 2753-2763 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/0018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : weak continuity * nonlinear integral functional * Sobolev spaces * linearity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2009

  7. Factor Rings and their decompositions in the Eisenstein integers Ring ${\\huge\\mathbb{Z}}\\left[ \\omega \\right]$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Misaghian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will characterize the structure of factor rings for $\\mathbb{Z}\\left[ \\omega \\right]$ where $\\omega=\\frac{-1+\\sqrt{-3}}{2},$is a 3rd primitive root of unity. Consequently, we can recognize prime numbers(elements and their ramifications in $\\mathbb{Z}\\left[ \\omega \\right]$.

  8. MOESM3 of The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Additional file 3: Figure S3. Changes of animal weight in the course of the cuprizone treatment. There are clear differences in the development of animal weight between those animals that had received the cuprizone diet and those that had stayed on a normal one. However, no significant difference could be found between wt and fat-1 animals that belong to the same treatment group.

  9. FRACTIONATION OF FATTY ACID OMEGA 3, 6 AND 9 FROM SNAIL (Achatina fulica USING COLOUM CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winarto Haryadi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of fat from snail has been carried out by Soxhlet extractor with petroleum ether solvent. Fatty product from extraction was transesterificated in BF3/methanol solvent for an hour by reflux procedure, then extracted by n-hexane to produce methyl ester fatty acid. Free water fatty acid methyl ester was analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass spectrometer (GC-MS. Fatty acid ester was separated from its fractions use column chromatography in n-hexane, n-hexane:dietil eter (2:1 v/v, dietil eter, aseton, ethanol and methanol. This fractions wer also analized by GC-MS. From GC-MS data sheet can be obtained 5 fractions which details are; fraction 1 contains omega 3: 27.54 %, omega 6: 15.40 % and omega 9: 6.77 %. Fraction 2 contains omega 3: 3.08 %, omega 6: 15.62 % and omega 9: 10.72 %. Fraction 3 contains omega 6: 3.57 %, omega 9: 7.02 % and none omega 3 inside it. Omega 3, 6 and 9 can't be identification in fraction 4 and 5.   Keywords: extraction, transesterification, column chromatography, GC-MS

  10. Study of the decay B0bar -> D* omega pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-24

    We report on a study of the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -} with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million B{bar B} decays, we measure the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.88 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}. We also measure the polarization of the D*{sup +} as a function of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*{sup +} to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda} = 0.654 {+-} 0.042(stat.) {+-} 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{rho}(1450), {rho}(1450) {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}.

  11. MCNP and OMEGA criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, E.

    1998-04-01

    The reliability of OMEGA criticality calculations is shown by a comparison with calculations by the validated and widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP. The criticality of 16 assemblies with uranium as fissionable is calculated with the codes MCNP (Version 4A, ENDF/B-V cross sections), MCNP (Version 4B, ENDF/B-VI cross sections), and OMEGA. Identical calculation models are used for the three codes. The results are compared mutually and with the experimental criticality of the assemblies. (orig.)

  12. Superconducting RF separator for Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows an Nb-deflector for the superconducting RF separator ready for installation in its cryostat (visible at the back). Each deflector was about 3 m long. L. Husson and P. Skacel (Karlsruhe) stand on the left, A. Scharding (CERN) stands on the right. This particle separator, the result of a collaboration between the Gesellshaft für Kernforschung, Karlsruhe, and CERN was installed in the S1 beam line to Omega spectrometer. (See Annual Report 1977.)

  13. Randomized controlled trial of oral omega-3 PUFA in solar-simulated radiation-induced suppression of human cutaneous immune responses1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Pilkington, Suzanne M.; Massey, Karen A.; Bennett, Susan P.; Al-Aasswad, Naser M I; Roshdy, Khaled; Gibbs, Neil K.; Friedmann, Peter S.; Nicolaou, Anna; Rhodes, Lesley E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin cancer is a major public health concern, and the majority of cases are caused by solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, which suppresses skin immunity. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs protect against photoimmunosuppression and skin cancer in mice, but the impact in humans is unknown.OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that EPA-rich n-3 PUFA would abrogate photoimmunosuppression in humans. Therefore, a nutritional study was performed to assess the effect on UVR suppression of cutaneous cell-...

  14. Hydrodynamic simulations of integrated experiments planned for OMEGA/OMEGA EP laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Myatt, J.; Radha, P. B.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments for the combined OMEGA/OMEGA EP laser systems have been simulated with the multidimensional hydrodynamic code DRACO. In the simplified electron transport model included in DRACO, the electrons are introduced at the pole of a 2-D simulation and transported in a straight line toward the target core, depositing their energy according to a recently published slowing-down formula.1 Simulations, including alpha transport, of an OMEGA cryogenic target designed to reach a 1-D fuel R of 500 mg/cm2 have been carried out for 1-D (clean) and, more realistic, 2-D (with nonuniformities) implosions to assess the sensitivity to energy, timing, and irradiance of the Gaussian fast-ignitor beam. The OMEGA laser system provides up to 30 kJ of compression energy, and OMEGA EP will provide two short pulse beams, each with energies up to 2.6 kJ. For the 1-D case, the neutron yield is predicted to be in excess of 1015 (compared to 1014 for no ignitor beam) over a timing range of about 80 ps. This talk will present these results and new 2-D simulation results that include the effects of realistic cryogenic target perturbations on the compressed core. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article. (Author)

  15. Measurement of the masses of the $\\Xi_b^{-}$ and $\\Omega_b^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary measurements of the $\\Xi_b^{-}$ and $\\Omega_b^{-}$ masses are described. The decays of these bottom baryons with strangeness $\\Xi_b^{-}\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Xi^{-}$ and $\\Omega_b^{-} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Omega^{-}$ are fully reconstructed. Using 0.62 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the LHCb detector at the LHC in 2011. \\begin{align}M (\\Xi_b^{-}) = 5796.5 \\pm 1.2 (stat) 1.2 (syst) MeV/c^2; \\\\ M(\\Omega_b^{-}) = 6050.3 \\pm 4.5 (stat) 2.2 (syst) MeV/c^2. \\\\ \\end{align}

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates microglial-induced inflammation by inhibiting the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangrong; Wu, Shukai; Chen, Chunnuan; Xie, Baoyuan; Fang, Zhongning; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Junyan; Fu, Huangde; He, Hefan

    2017-07-24

    Microglial activation and the subsequent inflammatory response in the central nervous system play important roles in secondary damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, an important mediator in late inflammatory responses, interacts with transmembrane receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate downstream signaling pathways, such as the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway, leading to a cascade amplification of inflammatory responses, which are related to neuronal damage after TBI. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) is a commonly used clinical immunonutrient, which has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of ω-3 PUFA on HMGB1 expression and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway are not clear. The Feeney DM TBI model was adopted to induce brain injury in rats. Modified neurological severity scores, brain water content, and Nissl staining were employed to determine the neuroprotective effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Assessment of microglial activation in lesioned sites and protein markers for proinflammatory, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, and HMGB1 were used to evaluate neuroinflammatory responses and anti-inflammation effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis were used to detect HMGB1 nuclear translocation, secretion, and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to evaluate the effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation and gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroinflammatory response after TBI. It was found that ω-3 PUFA supplementation inhibited TBI-induced microglial activation and expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ), reduced brain edema, decreased neuronal apoptosis, and improved neurological

  17. Omega-3 index and prognosis in acute coronary chest pain patients with a low dietary intake of omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Ricardo León; Naesgaard, Patrycja Anna; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Thomas; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2013-04-01

    The omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) content in red blood cell membranes has been suggested as a novel risk marker for cardiac death. Objective. To assess the ability of the omega-3 index to predict all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and to include arachidonic acid (AA) in risk assessment. The omega-3 index was measured in 572 consecutive patients (median 63 years and 59% males) admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS in an inland Northern Argentinean city with a dietary habit that was essentially based on red meat and a low intake of fish. Clinical endpoints were collected during a 5-year follow-up period, median 3.6 years, range 1 day to 5.5 years. Stepwise Cox regression analysis was employed to compare the rate of new events in the quartiles of the omega-3 index measured at inclusion. Multivariable analysis was performed. No statistical significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted between quartiles of the omega-3 index. The median of the adjusted omega-3 index was 3.6%. During the follow-up period, 100 (17.5%) patients died. Event rates were similar in all quartiles of the omega-3 index, with no statistical significant differences. AA added no prognostic information. In a population with a low intake of fish and fish oils, the adjusted omega-3 index did not predict fatal events following hospitalization in patients with acute chest pain and suspected ACS.

  18. High-Intensity Laser-to-Hot-Electron Conversion Efficiency from 1 to 2100 J Using the OMEGA EP Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, P. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense laser--matter interactions generate high-current electron beams. The laser-electron conversion efficiency is an important parameter for fast ignition and for developing intense x-ray sources for flash-radiography and x-ray-scattering experiments. These applications may require kilojoules of laser energy focused to greater than 10^18 W/cm^2 with pulse durations of tens of picoseconds. Previous experiments have measured the conversion efficiency with picosecond and subpicosecond laser pulses with energies up to ˜500 J. The research extends conversion-efficiency measurements to 1- to 10-ps laser pulses with energies up to 2100 J using the OMEGA EP Laser System and shows that the conversion efficiency is constant (20±10%) over the entire range The conversion efficiency is measured for interactions with finite-mass, thin-foil targets. A collimated electron jet exits the target rear surface and initiates rapid target charging, causing the majority of laser-accelerated electrons to recirculate (reflux) within the target. The total fast-electron energy is inferred from K-photon spectroscopy. Time-resolved x-ray emission data suggest that electrons are accelerated into the target over the entire laser-pulse duration with approximately constant conversion. This work provides significant insight into high-intensity laser--target interactions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and DE-FC02-04ER54789. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Betti, A. A. Solodov (LLE/FSC), R. S. Craxton, J. A. Delettrez, C. Dorrer, L. Gao, P. A. Jaanimagi, J. H. Kelly, B. E. Kruschwitz, D. D. Meyerhofer, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, C. Stoeckl, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel (LLE), A. J. MacKinnon, P. K. Patel (LLNL), K. U. Akli (General Atomics), L. Willingale, K. M. Krushelnick (U. of Michigan).

  19. Production of $\\omega(782)$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    The production of $\\omega(782)$meson has been measured at mid-rapidity in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The particles are reconstructed in the $\\omega\\rightarrow\\pi^{0}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decay channel. A data sample with an integrated luminosity of 6 nb$^{-1}$ has been used to measure the invariant differential cross section of the $\\omega$ meson and the $p_{T}$-differential $\\omega /\\pi^{0}$ ratio in the transverse momentum range $2<$p_{T}$<17$ GeV/$c$. The measured cross section and the $\\omega /\\pi^{0}$ ratio are found to be in agreement with predictions of PYTHIA and PHOJET events generators. Furthermore, the $\\omega /\\pi^{0}$ ratio is consistent with previous measurements by other experiments at lower energies within uncertainties.

  20. Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl ketones using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Yosuke; Hyotanishi, Megumi; Miller, Brittany E; Maeda, Kensaku; Obora, Yasushi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2010-03-05

    Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl diketones was successfully achieved by using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents under the influence of an iridium catalyst. For example, the alkylation of butyl cyanoacetate with 1,13-tridecanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) or [IrCl(coe)(2)](2) gave rise to butyl 2-cyano-15-hydroxypentadecanoate in good yield which is easily converted to cyclopentadecanolide (CPDL). In addition, the alkylation of acetone with 1,10-decanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) and KOH resulted in an important muscone precursor, 2,15-hexadecanedione (HDDO), in good yield.

  1. The Omega-Infinity Limit of Single Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    A new infinite-size limit of strings in RxS2 is presented. The limit is obtained from single spike strings by letting their angular velocity omega become infinite. We derive the energy-momenta relation of omega-infinity single spikes as their linear velocity v-->1 and their angular momentum J-->1. Generally, the v-->1, J-->1 limit of single spikes is singular and has to be excluded from the spectrum and be studied separately. We discover that the dispersion relation of omega-infinity single spikes contains logarithms in the limit J-->1. This result is somewhat surprising, since the logarithmic behavior in the string spectra is typically associated with their motion in non-compact spaces such as AdS. Omega-infinity single spikes seem to completely cover the surface of the 2-sphere they occupy, so that they may essentially be viewed as some sort of "brany strings". A proof of the sphere-filling property of omega-infinity single spikes is given in the appendix.

  2. A measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Tovey, Stuart N; Tresher, J J

    1979-01-01

    In an experiment at the CERN-SPS charged-hyperon beam, a sample of 2500 Omega /sup -/ to Lambda K/sup -/ decays has been collected at Omega /sup -/ momenta at 98.5 and 115 GeV/c. The Omega /sup -/ lifetime is found to be tau /sub Omega /=(0.822+or-0.028)*10/sup -10/ s. (15 refs).

  3. Production of structured lipid with a low omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio by enzymatic interesterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyasoglu, H.

    2017-01-01

    A structured lipid (SL) constituting omega fatty acids was synthesized by using linseed and grape seed oils as substrates via a lipase-catalyzed reaction. Lipozyme® TL IM was used as a biocatalyst. Good quadratic models predicting the incorporation of omega fatty acids were achieved via the Response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal conditions for targeted omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio (2:1) were obtained at a substrate molar ratio 1.4, time 8.4 h, and enzyme amount 6.4%. The SL contained linoleic acid (43 g 100g-1), which was mainly located in the sn-2 position (40 g 100g-1). α-Linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid at the sn-2 position were 22 g 100g-1, and 11 g 100g-1, respectively. The oxidative stability of the SL, and SL with antioxidants was also investigated. The produced SL may be proposed as a source of a balanced intake of omega fatty acids and an ingredient in functional food formulations. [es

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Forward-Backward asymmetry in $\\Lambda_{b}$ production and search for the $\\Xi^{-}_{b}$ and $\\Omega^{-}_{b}$ baryons in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Jose Andres [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Inst., Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-04-21

    We present a search for the heavy-flavor baryons $\\Xi_{b}$ (bsd) and $\\Omega^{-}_{b}$ in decays $\\Xi^{-}_{b}$→ J/ψ$\\Xi^{-}_{b}$ → J/ψΛπ-, J/ψ → μ+ μ- and $\\Omega^{-}_{b}$ → J/ψ$\\Omega^{-}_{b}$ J/ψΛ $K^{-}_{b}$, J/ψ → μ+ μ- respectively.

  6. Measurements of the branching fractions of exclusive charmless B meson decays with eta(') or omega mesons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Hall, T L; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffner, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocain, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-26

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless two-body final states containing eta(') or omega mesons, based on 20.7 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We find the branching fractions Beta(B(+)-->eta(')K(+)) = (70+/-8+/-5) x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->eta(')K(0)) = (42(+13)(-11) +/- 4) x 10(-6), and Beta(B(+)-->omega pi(+)) = (6.6(+2.1)(-1.8) +/- 0.7) x 10(-6), where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. We give measurements of four additional modes for which the 90% confidence level upper limits are Beta(B(+)-->eta(')pi(+)) omega K(+)) omega K(0)) omega pi(0)) < 3 x 10(-6).

  7. Topical application of omega-3-, omega-6-, and omega-9-rich oil emulsions for cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Wan Maznah Wan; Katas, Haliza; Yuen, Ng Pei; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif

    2018-04-17

    Wound healing is a physiological event that generates reconstitution and restoration of granulation tissue that ends with scar formation. As omega fatty acids are part of membrane phospholipids and participate in the inflammatory response, we investigated the effects of omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids in the form of oils on wound healing. Linseed (LO), evening primrose (EPO), and olive oils (OO) rich in omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids were formulated into emulsions and were topically applied on rats with excision wounds. All omega-3-, omega-6-, and omega-9-rich oil formulations were found to accelerate wound closure compared to untreated, with significant improvement (p < 0.05) being observed at day 14. EPO induced early deposition of collagen as evaluated by Masson trichrome staining that correlated well with the hydroxyproline content assay, with the highest level at days 3 and 7. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) showed greater amount of new microvasculature formed in the EPO-treated group, while moderate improvement occurs in the LO and OO groups. EPO increased both the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors in the early stage of healing and declined at the later stage of healing. LO modulates the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine but did not affect the growth factors. In contrast, OO induced the expression of growth factors rather than proinflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that LO, EPO, and OO emulsions promote wound healing but they accomplish this by different mechanisms.

  8. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters+{alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) III. H{sub m}{sup E}andV{sub m}{sup E} for 20 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}C{sub 4}H{sub 9}+(1-x){alpha},{omega}-ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl{r_brace}, where u=1 to 4, {alpha}=1 and v={omega}=2 to 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)]. E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Marrero, E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Toledo, F.J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    In this article, the experimental data of excess molar enthalpies H{sub m}{sup E} and excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E} are presented for a set of 20 binary mixtures comprised of the first four butyl alkanoates (methanoate to butanoate) and five {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes (1,2-dichloroethane to 1,6-dichlorohexane), obtained at atmospheric pressure and at a temperature of 298.15K. The results indicate the existence of specific interactions between both kinds of compounds resulting in exothermic processes for most mixtures, except for those containing butyl methanoate which give rise to net endo/exothermic effects. The V{sub m}{sup E} are positive for mixtures of (butyl esters+1,2-dichloroethane or 1,3-dichloropropane) and negative for the remaining ones. The change in H{sub m}{sup E} with the dichloroethane chain length for a same ester is regular although the V{sub m}{sup E} presents an irregular variation. It can, therefore, be deuced from this that the mixing process involves both effects, exothermic/endothermic and expansion/contraction, simultaneously. The behaviour of the mixtures is interpreted on the basis of the results observed and attributed to different effects taking place among the molecules studied. To improve application of the UNIFAC model using the version of Dang and Tassios, average values were recalculated again for parameters of the ester/chloride interaction, distinguishing, during its application, the functional group of the acid part of the ester. In spite of this, the model does not adequately reproduce the systems' behaviour.

  9. Polyunsaturated fatty acids intake, omega-6/omega-3 ratio and mortality: Findings from two independent nationwide cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pan; Wang, Wenqiao; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Jiao, Jingjing

    2018-03-03

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been reported to exert pleiotropic protective effects against various chronic diseases. However, epidemiologic evidence linking specific PUFA intake to mortality has been limited and contradictory. We aim to assess the associations between specific dietary PUFA and mortality among adults in China and America, respectively. Participants from China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS, n = 14,117) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES (n = 36,032)] were prospectively followed up through the year 2011. Cox regression models were used to investigate hypothesized associations. A total of 1007 and 4826 deaths accrued over a median of 14 and 9.1 years of follow-up in CHNS and NHANES, respectively. Dietary marine omega-3 PUFA was robustly associated with a reduced all-cause mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) comparing extreme categories: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.61-0.89; P omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 6-10 was associated with a lower risk of death in CHNS. Intakes of different specific PUFA show distinct associations with mortality and these relationships also vary between Chinese and US populations. These findings suggest maintaining an omega-6/omega-3 balance diet for overall health promotion outcomes (NCT03155659). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. On topological groups admitting a base at identity indexed with $\\omega^\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Leiderman, Arkady G.; Pestov, Vladimir G.; Tomita, Artur H.

    2015-01-01

    A topological group $G$ is said to have a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base if the neighbourhood system at identity admits a monotone cofinal map from the directed set $\\omega^\\omega$. In particular, every metrizable group is such, but the class of groups with a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base is significantly wider. The aim of this article is to better understand the boundaries of this class, by presenting new examples and counter-examples. Ultraproducts and non-arichimedean ordered fields lead to natur...

  11. High-Intensity Laser Diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Junquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP is a new high-energy petawatt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from <1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy petawatt laser at full energy

  12. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  13. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  14. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters + {alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) VII. H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E} for 20 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}C{sub 3}H{sub 7} + (1 - x){alpha},{omega}-ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl{r_brace}, where u = 1 to 4, {alpha} = 1 and v = {omega} = 2 to 6. An analysis of behavior using the COSMO-RS methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos (www.thermo.ulpgc.es), Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos (www.thermo.ulpgc.es), Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)], E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Palomar, J. [Seccion de Ingenieria Quimica, Dpto. de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Summary: Excess enthalpies H{sub m}{sup E} and excess volumes V{sub m}{sup E} obtained at a temperature of 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure are presented for a set of 20 binary mixtures comprised of the first four propyl esters, C{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}COOC{sub 3}H{sub 7} (u = 1 to 4), and five {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes, ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl (v = 2 to 6). All the mixtures are exothermic except for those corresponding to propyl methanoate with v {>=} 4. The V{sub m}{sup E} are positive in most mixtures except for those where v = 4, 5, 6, for V{sub m}{sup E}<0. There is a regular rise in H{sub m}{sup E} with v, while the increase in u produces a greater exothermicity in the mixing process, which becomes inverted for propyl butanoate. The variation in V{sub m}{sup E} with the chain length of the compounds of the mixtures studied is not regular since both the enthalpic and the volumetric effects are due to interactions of different nature, positive and negative. Interpretation of the behavior was assisted by applying the quantum-chemistry method COSMO-RS. This method describes qualitatively and quantitatively the contribution of the different types of interactions, electrostatic, van der Waals, and those due to the (Cl, Cl) bond in the dihalide, and the influence of the ester and dichloroalkane chains. This information was also useful to adequately modify the application of the UNIFAC group contribution model, proposing parameters for the Cl, Cl/carboxylate interaction that vary with the chain length of the compounds involved. With this modification, the results estimated by UNIFAC model can be considered good.

  15. Readily Available Sources of Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils: Is Farmed Australian Seafood a Better Source of the Good Oil than Wild-Caught Seafood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Nichols

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Seafood consumption enhances intake of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (termed LC omega-3 oils. Humans biosynthesize only small amounts of LC-omega-3, so they are considered semi-essential nutrients in our diet. Concern has been raised that farmed fish now contain lower LC omega-3 content than wild-harvested seafood due to the use of oil blending in diets fed to farmed fish. However, we observed that two major Australian farmed finfish species, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and barramundi (Lates calcifer, have higher oil and LC omega-3 content than the same or other species from the wild, and remain an excellent means to achieve substantial intake of LC omega-3 oils. Notwithstanding, LC omega-3 oil content has decreased in these two farmed species, due largely to replacing dietary fish oil with poultry oil. For Atlantic salmon, LC omega-3 content decreased ~30%–50% between 2002 and 2013, and the omega-3/omega-6 ratio also decreased (>5:1 to <1:1. Australian consumers increasingly seek their LC omega-3 from supplements, therefore a range of supplement products were compared. The development and future application of oilseeds containing LC omega-3 oils and their incorporation in aquafeeds would allow these health-benefitting oils to be maximized in farmed Australian seafood. Such advances can assist with preventative health care, fisheries management, aquaculture nutrition, an innovative feed/food industry and ultimately towards improved consumer health.

  16. Chronic Treatment with Ang-(1-7 Reverses Abnormal Reactivity in the Corpus Cavernosum and Normalizes Diabetes-Induced Changes in the Protein Levels of ACE, ACE2, ROCK1, ROCK2 and Omega-Hydroxylase in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam H. M. Yousif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] may have beneficial effects in diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMIED but its molecular actions in the diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC are not known. We characterized the effects of diabetes and/or chronic in vivo administration of Ang-(1-7 on vascular reactivity in the rat corpus cavernosum (CC and on protein expression levels of potential downstream effectors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2, and omega-hydroxylase, the cytochrome-P450 enzyme that metabolizes arachidonic acid to form the vasoconstrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Streptozotocin-treated rats were chronicically administered Ang-(1-7 with or without A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, during weeks 4 to 6 of diabetes. Ang-(1-7 reversed diabetes-induced abnormal reactivity to vasoactive agents (endothelin-1, phenylepherine, and carbachol in the CC without correcting hyperglycemia. Six weeks of diabetes led to elevated ACE, ROCK1, ROCK 2, and omega-hydroxylase and a concomitant decrease in ACE2 protein expression levels that were normalized by Ang-(1-7 treatment but not upon coadministration of A779. These data are supportive of the notion that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7 in DMIED involve counterregulation of diabetes-induced changes in ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases, and omega-hydroxylase proteins in the diabetic CC via a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

  17. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  18. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters + {alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) VI. H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E} for 20 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}CH{sub 3} + (1 - x){alpha},{omega}-BrCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Br{r_brace}, where u = 1 to 5, {alpha} = 1, and v = {omega} = 2 to 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navas, A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)], E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Nuez, I. de la [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    This work shows the experimental values obtained for H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E} at the temperature of 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure, for a set of 20 binary mixtures comprised of the first four butyl esters (methanoate to butanoate) with five {alpha},{omega}-dibromoalkanes (1,2-dibromoethane to 1,6-dibromohexane). The H{sub m}{sup E} are endothermic for mixtures with butyl methanoate, while for the other esters the H{sub m}{sup E} adopt a sigmoidal shape. The V{sub m}{sup E} are positive for mixtures with low molecular weight dibromoalkanes, becoming negative with contractive effects in the final mixture, as the dihalide chain increases. The results indicate that the mixtures present specific interactions, with simultaneous expansion/contraction and exothermic/endothermic effects, and an explanation is given for the different types of interaction taking place. Experimental data are correlated with a polynomial equation used in previous works with satisfactory results. Modelling of the experimental results of the mixtures is carried out on the H{sub m}{sup E} values, giving rise to an adequate definition of the different interactions taking place. Two versions of the UNIFAC method were used, and for Dang and Tassios' version different possibilities were considered for the interaction parameters of the ester (G)/dibromide (G'). The best estimations were obtained when the pair of interaction parameters, type a{sub G/G{sup '}}, depended on the number of carbon atoms in the compounds constituting the mixture.

  19. Effect of fast neutron irradiation upon the omega transformation process in zirconium--niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, B.W.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of fast neutrons (E greater than 1 MeV) upon the beta-omega transformation was investigated. Irradiation-produced vacancies promoted the omega transformation by migrating to the regions of high compressive stress associated with the one-dimensional omega embryos, thereby allowing rearrangement of the strain fields. This rearrangement allows the omega embryos to attain large sizes. Growth of these embryos is diffusion controlled. However, irradiation produced no increase in growth rate. It is concluded the vacancies are effectively trapped by these strain fields even at the aging temperature, 400 0 C. The omega hardening mechanism is shown to be related solely to lattice misfit, independent of irradiation, and to saturate when the magnitude of the strain causes a breakdown of the coherent interface, thereby creating one or two interfacial dislocations. Aging at 400 0 C results in alpha growth into the interomega beta phase, producing an additional hardness increase additive to that resulting from the omega phase. At higher aging temperatures 500 0 C, the omega is rapidly replaced by alpha. The alpha microstructure consists of ultra-fine grains, 1000 A, each composed of one 12 interrelated crystallographic variants. Fast neutron irradiation has no effect upon the omega metastable equilibrium phase diagram

  20. Study of the Rare Hyperon Decay (Omega)#-+# → Ξ#-+# π+π-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaev, O.; Solomey, N.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a new measurement of the decay (Omega) - → Ξ - π + π - with 76 events and a first observation of the decay (bar (Omega)) + → (bar Ξ) + π + π - with 24 events, yielding a combined branching ratio (3.74 -0.56 +0.67 ) x 10 -4 . This represents a factor 25 increase in statistics over the best previous measurement. No evidence is seen for CP violation, with Β((Omega) - → Ξ - π + π - ) = 4.04 -0.71 +0.83 x 10 -4 and Β((bar (Omega)) + → (bar Ξ) + π + π - ) = 3.15 -0.89 +1.12 x 10 -4 . Contrary to theoretical expectation, they see little evidence for the decays (Omega) - → Ξ* 1530 0 π - and (bar (Omega)) + → (bar Ξ)* 1530 0 π + and place a 90% C.L. upper limit on the combined branching ratio Β((Omega) - ((bar (Omega)) + ) → Ξ* 1530 0 ((bar Ξ)* 1530 0 )π # -+#) -5 .

  1. Stability and Stabilization of Omega-3 Oils as such and in Selected Foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    The application of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in foods has increased dramatically during the last decade due to the increasing awareness about the health beneficial effects of these fatty acids. Due to their polyunsaturated nature omega-3 PUFA are highly susceptible to lipid...... oxidation, which will lead to formation of undesirable fishy and rancid off-flavours. Such off-flavours can lead to consumer rejection of omega-3 enriched foods. Important issues to address in order to avoid lipid oxidation are 1) processing conditions and product composition, 2) omega-3 PUFA source...... and delivery system, and 3) addition of antioxidants. This presentation will summarize our current knowledge about these issues in a range of different omega-3 enriched foods....

  2. Omega-X micromachining system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    A micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nonometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS. The omega axis, named for the angular measurement of the rotation of an eccentric mechanism supporting one end of a tool bar, enables the pulse increments of the tool toward the workpiece to be as little as 0 to 4.4 nm. A dedicated computer coordinates motion in the two axes to produce the workpiece contour. Inertia is reduced by reducing the mass pulsed toward the workpiece to about one-fifth of its former value. The tool system includes calibration instruments to calibrate the micromachining tool system. Backlash is reduced and flexing decreased by using a rotary table and servomotor to pulse the tool in the omega-axis instead of a ball screw mechanism. A thermally-stabilized spindle roates the workpiece and is driven by a motor not mounted on the micromachining tool base through a torque-smoothing pulley and vibrationless rotary coupling. Abbe offset errors are almost eliminated by tool setting and calibration at spindle center height. Tool contour and workpiece contour are gaged on the machine; this enables the source of machining errors to be determined more readily, because the workpiece is gaged before its shape can be changed by removal from the machine

  3. First Observation of An Excited Charm Baryon Decaying to Omega Charm Baryon at the BaBar Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bula, Rahmi; SUNY, Albany

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out a search for a charmed baryon (Omega) * c decaying to (Omega) 0 c and a γ where (Omega) c candidates are reconstructed using decay modes (Omega) - π + (c1), (Omega) - π + π 0 (c2), (Omega) - π + π - π + (c3) and Ξ - K - π + π + (c4). This search is performed by analyzing integrated luminosity of 230.7 fb -1 data collected by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In decay channel (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + )γ (C1), we observe a signal yield of 39.2 +9.8 -9.1 (stat)±6.0(syst) events with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations. In decay channels (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + π 0 )γ (C2) and (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c (Ξ - K - π + π + )γ (C4), we observe signal yields of 55.2 16.1 -15.2 ± 5.6 and 20.2 +9.3 -8.5 ± 3.1 with significances of 3.4 and 2.0 σ, respectively. As for the (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + π - π + )γ (C3) decay channel, we observe signal yields of -5.1 +5.3.8 -4.7 ±1.0 without a positive significance. We assume the same production mechanism for the four decay channels of (Omega) * c studied. By combining these four channels, the fit results in a signal yield of 105.3 +21.2 -20.5 ± 6.0 events with a significance of 5.2 σ. We report the mass difference (Omega) * c - (Omega) 0 c ((delta)m) of the singly charmed baryon (Omega) * c to be 70.8 +1.0 -1.0 ± 1.1 MeV. Finally, the ratios of production cross sections are calculated: σ(e + e - →C1)/σ(e + e - →c1) = 0.71 +0.19 -0.18 ±0.11, σ(e + e - →C2)/σ(e + e - →c2) = 1.76 +0.71 -0.69 ±0.19, σ(e + e - →C3)/σ(e + e - →c3) = -0.66 +0.74 -0.66 ±0.13, σ(e + e - →C4)/σ(e + e - →c4) = 1.70 +1.0 -1.0 ±0.27 and σ(e + e - →(Omega) * c (combined))/σ(e + e - →(Omega) 0 c ) = 1.0 +0.23 -0.22 ±0.11

  4. Double shell planar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H.; Ping, Y.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Amendt, P. A.

    2017-10-01

    The double shell project is aimed at fielding neutron-producing capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in which an outer low-Z ablator collides with an inner high-Z shell to compress the fuel. However, understanding these targets experimentally can be challenging when compared with conventional single shell targets. Halfraum-driven planar targets at OMEGA are being used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions outside of a convergent geometry. Both VISAR and radiography through a tube have advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. A number physics issues are being studied with this platform that include 1-d and higher dimensional effects such as defect-driven hydrodynamic instabilities from engineering features. Additionally, the use of novel materials with controlled density gradients require study in easily diagnosed 1-d systems. This work ultimately feeds back into the NIF capsule platform through manufacturing tolerances set using data from OMEGA. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-17-25386.

  5. Meat-based functional foods for dietary equilibrium omega-6/omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglero, Guillermo; Frial, Paloma; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Risco, Mónica R; Jaime, Laura; Marin, Francisco R; Palanca, Vicente; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Santoyo, Susana; Señoráns, Francisco J; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Torres, Carlos; Ibañez, Elena

    2008-10-01

    Nutritionists encourage improving the diet by combining meat products with fish or other sea-related foods, in order to equilibrate the omega-6/omega-3 ratio. Strong scientific evidence supports the beneficial health effects of a balanced omega-6/omega-3 PUFA (poly unsaturated fatty acids) diets. In the present work, the scientific bases of new functional meat products with both a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio and a synergic combination of antioxidants are discussed. The aim is to contribute to the dietary equilibrium omega-6/omega-3 and to increase the antioxidant intake. Conventional meat products supplemented with a specific fatty acids and antioxidants combination led to functional foods with healthier nutritional parameters.

  6. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  7. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  8. Thermodynamic study of (alkyl esters+{alpha},{omega}-alkyl dihalides) V. H{sub m}{sup E}andV{sub m}{sup E} for 25 binary mixtures {l_brace}xC{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}CO{sub 2}CH{sub 3}+(1-x){alpha},{omega}-ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl{r_brace}, where u=1 to 5, {alpha}=1 and v={omega}=2 to 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)]. E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Marrero, E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    The experimental data of excess molar enthalpies H{sub m}{sup E} and excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E} are presented for a set of 25 binary mixtures comprised of the first five methyl esters C{sub u-1}H{sub 2u-1}COOCH{sub 3} (u=1 to 5) and five {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes, ClCH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub v-2}CH{sub 2}Cl (v=2 to 6), obtained at a temperature of 298.15K and atmospheric pressure. Except for the mixtures with u=1 and v=2 to 6, which are all endothermic and with u=5 and v=2 to 6, which are all exothermic, the others present net endo/exothermic effects and these mixing effects evolve quasiregularly, from endothermic to exothermic, depending on the dichloroalkane present. However, the V{sub m}{sup E} are positive in most mixtures except for those corresponding to u=4,5 and v=5,6, which present contraction effects. These results indicate a set of specific interactions with simultaneous effects for V{sub m}{sup E} of expansion/contraction and for exothermic/endothermic H{sub m}{sup E} for this set of mixtures. The change in V{sub m}{sup E} with the chain length of the compounds is irregular. To achieve a good application of the UNIFAC model using the version of Dang and Tassios, parameters of the ester (G)/dichloride (G') interaction were calculated again, making a distinction, during its application, dependent on the acid part of the ester u. Hence, interaction parameters are presented as a function of u, and of the dichloroalkane chain length v. The most appropriate general expression was of the type:a{sub G/G{sup '}}={phi}(u,v)={sigma}sub(i=0)sup(n)a{sub i-1}u{sup i-1}+{sigma}sub(i=0= )sup(n)b{sub i-1}v{sup i-1}and with this proposal good estimations of enthalpies were obtained with the UNIFAC model.

  9. Comparison of Omega-2 and Omega-3 calibration explosions basing on regional seismic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlova, N.N.; Sokolova, I.N.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of different parameters of seismic records of Omega-2 and Omega-3 calibration explosions was performed. It was shown that despite the equal charge the level of seismic oscillations was lower during the Omega-3 explosion than during Omega-2. Spectral composition, polarization of oscillations, wave picture is identical at a given station for both explosions. Assumptions were made on the reason of such difference in seismic effect. (author)

  10. Synthesis of the omega-brominated alpha-trifluoroacetylcycloalkanones and their isoxazole derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Alex F. C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of a serie of the 2-trifluoroacetyl-1-methoxy-1-cycloalkenes (1a-1e and 2-trifluoroacetylcycloalkanones (2a-2e with molecular bromine to obtain omega-bromo-alpha-trifluoroacetylcycloalkanones (3a-3e, 4a is reported. Was determined that 2-trifluoroacetyl group have established the C-omega as reactive site. The 2-trifluoroacetylcycloalkanones and omega-bromo-alpha-trifluoroacetylcycloalkanones were reacted with hydroxylamine hydrochloride leading to respective 5-trifluoromethyl-5-hydroxy-4,5-dihydro-3,4-polimethyleneisoxazole derivatives (5c-5e and 6c-6e.

  11. An astrometric standard field in omega Cen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Rosemary

    2003-07-01

    We propose to obtain a high-precision astrometric standard in a two-step procedure. First, we will create a ground-based astrometric standard field around omega Cen down to V=22 with a 3 mas accuracy in positions and better than 0.5 mas/yr in proper motions. This standard will be used to obtain precise absolute plate solutions for selected WFPC2 CCD frames and refine the self-calibrated mean distortion solution for the WFPC2 CCD chips. This will eliminate systematic errors inherent in the self-calibration techniques down to the rms=0.3 mas level, thus opening new opportunities to perform precision astrometry with WFPC2 alone or in combination with the other HST imaging instruments. We will also address the issue of the distortion's variation which has a paramount significance for space astrometry such as spearheaded by the HST or being under development {SIM, GAIA}. Second, all reduced WFPC2 CCD frames will be combined into the two field catalogs {astrometric flat fields} of positions in omega Cen of unprecedented precision {s.e.=0.1 mas} down to V=22 and will be available to the GO community and readily applicable to calibrating the ACS.

  12. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins in active Crohn’s disease treated with omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids and corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eivindson, Martin; Grønbæk, Henning; Nielsen, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    of the present study was to examine the effects of enteral nutrition, Impact Powder, as adjuvant therapy to corticosteroid treatment on changes in the GH/IGF-I axis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The patients were randomized to 3-IP (omega-3-fatty acid (FA), 3 g/day) or 6-IP (omega...... with previously published studies and may be explained by corticosteroid treatment; however, we cannot exclude an additional effect of omega3-/omega6 FA as adjuvant enteral nutrition.......-6-FA, 9 g/day). Changes in total IGF-I (tIGF-I) and total IGF-II (tIGF-II), free IGF-I (fIGF-I), IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3), IGFBP-3 protease activity and insulin levels were examined in 31 patients with active CD (CDAI: 186-603) during treatment with prednisolone (40 mg for 1 week...

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were ...

  14. Omega System Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    For example, as shown above, P( B1 ) w P(TI) This can be understood by noting that event B1 specifies that stations 2-8 are on-air whereas event T1...The VLF Communications Station Network STATION LOCATION LATITUDE LONGITUDE FREQUENCY POWER ID (kHz) (kW) GBR* Rugby , U.K. 520 22’N I 11’W 16.0 65 JXZ4...STATION LOCATION LATITUDE LONGITUDE FREQUENCY POWER ID (kHz) (kW) GBR* Rugby , U.K. 520 22’N 10 11’W 16.0 65 JXZ* Noviken, Norway 660 58’N 130 53’E 16.4

  15. Inclusive Production of the $\\omega$ and $\\eta$ Mesons in Z Decays, and the Muonic Branching Ratio of the $\\omega$

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    The inclusive production of the omega(782) vector meson in hadronic Z decays is measured and compared to model predictions. The analysis is based on 4 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector between 1991 and 1995. The production rate for x_p = p_meson/p_beam > 0.05 is measured in the omega -> pi^+ pi^- pi^0 decay mode and found to be 0.585 +- 0.019_stat +- 0.033_sys per event. Inclusive eta meson production is also measured in the same decay channel for x_p > 0.10, obtaining 0.355 +- 0.011_stat +- 0.024_sys per event. The branching ratio for omega -> mu^+ mu^- is investigated. A total of 18.1 +- 5.9 events are observed, from which the muonic branching ratio is measured for the first time to be BR(omega -> mu^+ mu^-) = (9.0 +- 2.9_stat +- 1.1_sys)*10^-5.

  16. Influence of selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid on serum mineral profile and nutrient utilization of broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the effect of selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid on serum mineral profile and nutrient utilization of broiler chicken. Materials and Methods: The present study was a 2×3 factorial arrangement of two levels of selenomethionine (0 and 0.3 ppm and three levels of omega-3 fatty acid (0, 0.5 and 1%. Day-old Vencobb broiler chicks (n=180, were randomly assigned in six treatment groups. The experiment lasted for 42 days. Treatment groups followed of: Group I was a control. Group II, III, IV, V and VI were supplemented with 0 ppm selenomethionine with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid, 0 ppm selenomethionine with 1% omega-3 fatty acid, 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 0% omega-3 fatty acid, 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid and 0.3 ppm selenomethionine with 1% omega-3 fatty acid, respectively. Linseed oil was used as a source of omega-3 fatty acid while sel-plex is used for selenomethionine supplementation. Results: Significant (p<0.05 interaction exist between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for serum zinc and iron concentration whereas, it was non-significant for serum calcium and copper. Significantly (p<0.05 increased concentration of selenium, zinc, iron and phosphorus was observed in birds fed 0.3 ppm selenomethionine whereas, significantly (p<0.05 increased zinc and iron was observed in birds fed 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid. There was significant (p<0.05 interaction exist between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for calcium and phosphorus retention percentage. The maximum retention of calcium and phosphorus was recorded in birds supplemented with 0.3 ppm selenomethionine in combination with 0.5% omega-3 fatty acid. There was marked interaction between selenomethionine and omega-3 fatty acid for hemoglobin (Hb, total erythrocytic count, total leukocytic count and platelets (p<0.05 however, it was non-significant for mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb, MCH concentration

  17. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid attenuates the inflammatory response by modulating microglia polarization through SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of the HMGB1/NF-κB pathway following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangrong; Chen, Chunnuan; Fan, Sining; Wu, Shukai; Yang, Fuxing; Fang, Zhongning; Fu, Huangde; Li, Yasong

    2018-04-20

    Microglial polarization and the subsequent neuroinflammatory response are contributing factors for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced secondary injury. High mobile group box 1 (HMGB1) mediates the activation of the NF-κB pathway, and it is considered to be pivotal in the late neuroinflammatory response. Activation of the HMGB1/NF-κB pathway is closely related to HMGB1 acetylation, which is regulated by the sirtuin (SIRT) family of proteins. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are known to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. We previously demonstrated that ω-3 PUFA inhibited TBI-induced microglial activation and the subsequent neuroinflammatory response by regulating the HMGB1/NF-κB signaling pathway. However, no studies have elucidated if ω-3 PUFA affects the HMGB1/NF-κB pathway in a HMGB1 deacetylation of dependent SIRT1 manner, thus regulating microglial polarization and the subsequent neuroinflammatory response. The Feeney DM TBI model was adopted to induce brain injury in rats. Modified neurological severity scores, rotarod test, brain water content, and Nissl staining were employed to determine the neuroprotective effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Assessment of microglia polarization and pro-inflammatory markers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and HMGB1, were used to evaluate the neuroinflammatory responses and the anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis were used to detect HMGB1 nuclear translocation, secretion, and HMGB1/NF-κB signaling pathway activation to evaluate the effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. The impact of SIRT1 deacetylase activity on HMGB1 acetylation and the interaction between HMGB1 and SIRT1 were assessed to evaluate anti-inflammation effects of ω-3 PUFAs, and also, whether these effects were dependent on a SIRT1-HMGB1/NF-κB axis to gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the

  18. Observation of the (Omega)b- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Ξb- and (Omega)b- Baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon (Omega) b - through the decay chain (Omega) b - → J/ψ(Omega) - , where J/ψ → μ + μ - , (Omega) - → ΛK - , and Λ → p π - , using 4.2 fb -1 of data from p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10 -8 , or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The (Omega) b - mass is measured to be 6054.4 ± 6.8(stat.) ± 0.9(syst.) MeV/c 2 . The lifetime of the (Omega) b - baryon is measured to be 1.13 -0.40 +0.53 (stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the Ξ b - baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 ± 2.6(stat.) ± 0.8(syst.) MeV/c 2 and a lifetime of 1.56 -0.25 +0.27 (stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) ps.

  19. Rare Nonleptonic Decays of the Omega Hyperon: Measurement of the Branching Ratios for Omega-+ --> Xi*0(1530) (anti-Xi*0(1530)) pi-+ and Omega-+ --> Xi-+ pi+- pi-+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaev, Oleg; IIT, Chicago

    2007-01-01

    A clean signal of 78 (24) events has been observed in the rare nonleptonic particle (antiparticle) decay modes (Omega) # -+# → Ξ # -+π# ± π # -+# using data collected with the HyperCP spectrometer during Fermilab's 1999 fixed-target run. We obtain B((Omega) - → Ξ - π + π - ) = [4.32 ± 0.56(stat) ± 0.28(syst)] x 10 -4 and B((Omega) + → Ξ + π - π + ) = 3.13 ± 0.71(stat) ± 0.20(syst) x 10 -4 . This is the first observation of the antiparticle mode. Our measurement for the particle mode agrees with the previous experimental result and has an order-of-magnitude better precision. We extract the contribution from the resonance decay mode (Omega) # -+# → Ξ* 1530 0 ((ovr Ξ* 1530 0 ))π # -+# to the final state Ξ # -+π# ± π # -+#. This the first actual measurement of the resonance-mode branching ratios, gives B((Omega) - → Ξ* 1530 0 π - ) = [4.55 ± 2.33(stat) ± 0.38(syst)] x 10 -5 , B((Omega) + → (ovr Ξ* 1530 0 )π + ) = [1.40 ± 2.83(stat) ± 0.12(syst)] x 10 -5 and disagrees with the current Particle Data Group review value, being ∼ 14 times smaller. Since the central value of the resonance-mode branching ratio is less than two standard deviations away from zero, we also calculate branching ratio upper limits at 90% confidence level: B((Omega) - → Ξ* 1530 0 π - ) -5 and B((Omega) + → (ovr Ξ* 1530 0 ) π + ) -5 . This analysis provides new data on nonleptonic hyperon decays which allows studies of how weak interaction processes occur in the presence of strong interactions

  20. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  1. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Ali, S. J.; Benstead, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Coppari, F.; Eggert, J.; Erskine, D.; Panella, A. F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Hua, R.; Huntington, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Jiang, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; LePape, S.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J. S.; Rubery, M.; Sio, H.; Smith, R. F.; Swadling, G. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2016-01-01

    In FY16, LLNL's High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  2. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté). Moreover...

  3. The least-action method, cold dark matter, and omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A. M.; Laflamme, R.

    1995-01-01

    Peebles has suggested an interesting technique, called the least-action method, to trace positions of galaxies back in time. This method applied on the Local Group galaxies seems to indicate that we live in an omega approximately = 0.1 universe. We have studied a cold dark matter (CDM) N-body simulation with omega = 0.2 and H = 50 km/s/Mpc and compared trajectories traced back by the least-action method with the ones given by the center of mass of the CDM halos. We show that the agreement between these sets of trajectories is at best qualitative. We also show that the line-of-sight peculiar velocities of halos are underestimated. This discrepancy is due to orphans, i.e., CDM particles which do not end up in halos. We vary the value of omega in the least-action method until the line-of-sight velocities agree with the CDM ones. The best value for this omega underestimates one of the CDM simulations by a factor of 4-5.

  4. The potential role of omega-3 fatty acids supplements in increasing athletic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Șerban GLIGOR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that cannot be produced by the body itself and therefore must be provided through nutrition. Omega-6 and particularly omega-3 fatty acids have important roles in the organism, contributing to the maintenance and promotion of health. The optimal proportion of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is 2:1, or even better 1:1. They are involved in normal growth and development, play a role in the prevention of coronary and cardiovascular diseases, of diabetes mellitus, of arterial hypertension, arthritis and cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids mainly have an anti-inflammatory effect, but also act as hypolipidemic and antithrombotic agents. A potential role of omega-3 fatty acids is that of increasing physical performance. Their role in the physical activity refers on one side to the global health of athletes and on the other side to their anti-inflammatory effect, as high intensity physical exercise induces increased free-radical production and microtraumas, with the induction of an inflammatory status. The anti-inflammatory effect of these fatty acids manifests through an increased production of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, through decreasing the production of prostaglandins metabolites, decreasing the production of leukotriene B4, etc. They are also effective on reducing muscle pain post eccentric exercise and on decreasing the severity of bronchoconstriction induced by exercise, as well as improving pulmonary function variables. In conclusion it seems that supplementing diets with omega-3 fatty acids, apart from having benefic effects on health and on the prevention and management of certain affections, proves to be a beneficial for physical activity and athletic performance.

  5. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given.......There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take...

  6. Effect of omega-3 on auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Omega-3 fatty acid have structural and biological roles in the body 's various systems . Numerous studies have tried to research about it. Auditory system is affected a s well. The aim of this article was to review the researches about the effect of omega-3 on auditory system.Methods: We searched Medline , Google Scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SID search engines with the "auditory" and "omega-3" keywords and read textbooks about this subject between 19 70 and 20 13.Conclusion: Both excess and deficient amounts of dietary omega-3 fatty acid can cause harmful effects on fetal and infant growth and development of brain and central nervous system esspesially auditory system. It is important to determine the adequate dosage of omega-3.

  7. Omega-3 Index of Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Kellie; Ratnayake, Walisundera M N

    2015-11-01

    Cardioprotective properties have been associated with two fatty acids-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The Omega-3 Index indicates the percentage of EPA+DHA in red blood cell fatty acids. Omega-3 Index levels of the Canadian population have not been directly measured. Data for respondents aged 20 to 79 from cycle 3 (2012/2013) of the Canadian Health Measures Survey were used to calculate means and the prevalence of Omega-3 Index coronary heart disease (CHD) risk cut-offs-high (4% or less), moderate (more than 4% to less than 8%), and low (8% or more)-by sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, including fish consumption and use of omega-3 supplements. Associations between the Omega-3 Index and CHD-related factors including biomarkers, risk factors, and previous CHD events, were examined in multivariate regression models. The mean Omega-3 Index level of Canadians aged 20 to 79 was 4.5%. Levels were higher for women, older adults, Asians and other non-white Canadians, omega-3 supplement users, and fish consumers; levels were lower for smokers and people who were obese. Fewer than 3% of adults had levels associated with low CHD risk; 43% had levels associated with high risk. No CHD-related factor was associated with the Omega-3 Index when control variables were taken into account. Omega-3 Index levels among Canadian adults were strongly related to age, race, supplement use, fish consumption, smoking status and obesity. Fewer than 3% of adults had Omega-3 Index levels associated with low risk for CHD.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  9. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and ursodeoxycholic acid have an additive effect in attenuating diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kwan Sik; Lee, Dong Ki; Lee, Su Yeon; Chang, Hye Young; Choi, Junjeong; Lee, Jung Il

    2014-12-19

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can progress into liver cirrhosis; however, no definite treatment is available. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (omega-3) has been reported to alleviate experimental NASH, although its beneficial effect was not evident when tested clinically. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the additive effect of omega-3 and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on diet-induced NASH in mice. C57BL/6 mice were given a high-fat diet (HFD) for 24 weeks, at which point the mice were divided into three groups and fed HFD alone, HFD with omega-3 or HFD with omega-3 in combination with UDCA for another 24 weeks. Feeding mice an HFD and administering omega-3 improved histologically assessed liver fibrosis, and UDCA in combination with omega-3 further attenuated this disease. The assessment of collagen α1(I) expression agreed with the histological evaluation. Omega-3 in combination with UDCA resulted in a significant attenuation of inflammation whereas administering omega-3 alone failed to improve histologically assessed liver inflammation. Quantitative analysis of tumor necrosis factor α showed an additive effect of omega-3 and UDCA on liver inflammation. HFD-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was attenuated by omega-3 and adding UDCA accentuated this effect. In accordance with this result, the expression of sterol regulatory binding protein-1c decreased after omega-3 administration and adding UDCA further diminished SREBP-1c expression. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which may reflect oxidative stress-induced tissue damage, was suppressed by omega-3 administration and adding UDCA further attenuated iNOS expression. These results demonstrated an additive effect of omega-3 and UDCA for alleviating fibrosis, inflammation and steatosis in diet-induced NASH.

  10. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of V vs B-V, V vs V-I, and V vs B-I have been constructed based on 179 BVRI CCD frames of two adjoining 4x2.5-arcmin fields in Omega Cen (NGC 5139) obtained with the 1.54-m Danish La Silla telescope. The spread in the main sequences noted in the three CMDs indicates that the wide range in chemical composition among the evolved stars in this cluster persists as well in the unevolved stars. This result suggests that the abundance variations are primordial. A difference in magnitude between the turnoff and the horizontal branch of 3.8 + or - 0.15 is found which is greater than a previous value. 38 references

  11. Measurement of the $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ baryon lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Using a data sample of pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3~ \\rm fb^{-1}$, the $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ baryons are reconstructed in the $\\Xi_b^- \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Xi^-$ and $\\Omega_b^- \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Omega^-$ decay modes and their lifetimes measured to be $\\tau (\\Xi_b^-) = 1.55\\, ^{+0.10}_{-0.09}~{\\rm(stat)} \\pm 0.03\\,{\\rm(syst)}$ ps, $\\tau (\\Omega_b^-) = 1.54\\, ^{+0.26}_{-0.21}~{\\rm(stat)} \\pm 0.05\\,{\\rm(syst)}$ ps. These are the most precise determinations to date. Both measurements are in good agreement with previous experimental results and with theoretical predictions.

  12. The Omega-3 Index and relative risk for coronary heart disease mortality: Estimation from 10 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William S; Del Gobbo, Liana; Tintle, Nathan L

    2017-07-01

    A recent 19-cohort meta-analysis examined the relationships between biomarkers of omega-3 fatty acids and risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). That study did not, however, report hazard ratios (HRs) specifically as a function of erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic (DHA) levels, a metric called the Omega-3 Index in which EPA + DHA content is expressed as a percent of total fatty acids. The Omega-3 Index has been used in several recent studies and is a validated biomarker of omega-3 fatty acid tissue levels, but additional data are needed to confirm (or refute) the originally-proposed clinical cut-points of Omega-3 Index and median quintile values for this metric across 10 of the cohorts for which the needed data were available. The overall mean (SD) for the Omega-3 Index in these 10 cohort studies was 6.1% (2.1%), and the HR for a 1-SD increase was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.91). Median quintile 1 and 5 levels were 4.2% vs. 8.3%, respectively. Based on these values, we estimate that risk for fatal CHD would have been reduced by about 30% moving from an Omega-3 Index of 4%-8%. These findings support the use of 8% as reasonable therapeutic targets for the Omega-3 Index. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-01-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, ''warm'' targets with and without the use of an equatorial ''Saturn-like'' toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core

  14. Omega-6/Omega-3 and PUFA/SFA in Colossoma macropomum Grown in Roraima, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves Melho Filho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study was evaluated the fatty acids composition of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum fillet, fish species cultivated in Roraima State, Brazil. For the extraction of tambaqui oil was used Sohxlet device and then it was methylated. The oil  was identified using a gas chromatograph and were identified 24 acids and these were divided into characteristic groups such as: saturated fatty acids (SFA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and series fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. The ratios obtained were PUFA/SFA and omega-6/omega-3. The results of chromatographic analysis were subjected to tests by variance ANOVA and multiple comparisons of Tukey at 5%. The ratios omega-6/omega-3 and PUFA/SFA showed values ​​of 8.58 and 0.75 respectively.

  15. Estudo da Polarizacao dos Hiperons $\\Xi^-$ E $\\Omega^-$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho De Gouvea, Andre Luiz [Pontifical Catholic Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1995-01-01

    ln this thesis the polarization of the $\\Xi^-$ hyperon and the $\\Xi^+$ antihyperon produced in the Fermilab Experiment E791 was determined by the analysis of the weak decay $\\Xi^- \\to \\Lambda^0 + \\pi^-$. For $\\Xi^-$ produced in the interaction between a 500 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam and a unpolarized carbon (platinum) target in the region $p_t$ > 0.8 GeV/c and $X_F$ > 0, -10.9% ± 1.5% (-14.7% ± 3.1%) polarization was obtained perpendicular to the production plane and -5.92% ± 1.69% (-2.41%±3.53% $\\approx O$) polarization was measured for $\\Xi^+$. Evidence was also found for a polarized $\\Omega^-$ hyperon produced in the same experiment in the region $X_F$ >0, after analysis of the weak decay $\\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda^0 + K^-$.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids and the genetic risk of early onset acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Yinko, S S L; Thanassoulis, G; Stark, K D; Avgil Tsadok, M; Engert, J C; Pilote, L

    2014-11-01

    Recent gene-environment interaction studies suggest that diet may influence an individual's genetic predisposition to cardiovascular risk. We evaluated whether omega-3 fatty acid intake may influence the risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) conferred by genetic polymorphisms among patients with early onset ACS. Our population consisted of 705 patients of white European descent enrolled in GENESIS-PRAXY, a multicenter cohort study of patients aged 18-55 years and hospitalized with ACS. We used a case-only design to investigate interactions between the omega-3 index (a validated biomarker of omega-3 fatty acid intake) and 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with ACS. We used logistic regression to assess the interaction between each SNP and the omega-3 index. Interaction was also assessed between the omega-3 index and a genetic risk score generated from the 30 SNPs. All models were adjusted for age and sex. An interaction for increased ACS risk was found between carriers of the chromosome 9p21 variant rs4977574 and low omega-3 index (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.07-2.32, p = 0.02), but this was not significant after correction for multiple testing. Similar results were obtained in the adjusted model (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.05-2.29, p = 0.03). We did not observe any interaction between the genetic risk score or any of the other SNPs and the omega-3 index. Our results suggest that omega-3 fatty acid intake may modify the genetic risk conferred by chromosome 9p21 variation in the development of early onset ACS and requires independent replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Properties of Weakly-decaying Bottom Baryons, Ξb- and (Omega)b-, at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behari, Satyajit

    2009-01-01

    We present properties of weakly decaying bottom baryons, Ξ b - and (Omega) b - , using 4.2 fb -1 of data from p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeVf, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They report the observation of the (Omega) b - through the decay chain (Omega) b - → J/ψω - , where J/ψ → μ + μ - , (Omega) - → ΛK - , and Λ → pπ - . Significance of the observed signal is estimated to be 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The (Omega) b - mass and lifetime are measured to be 6054.4 ± 6.8(stat.) ± 0.9(syst.) MeV/c 2 and 1.13 -0.40 +0.53 (stat.) ± 0.02(syst). ps, respectively. In addition, the mass and lifetime of the Ξ b - baryon are measured to be 5790.9 ± 2.6(stat.) ± 0.8(syst.) MeV/c 2 and 1.56 -0.25 +0.27 (stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) ps, respectively. Under the assumption that the Ξ b - and (Omega) b - are produced with similar kinematic distributions as the Λ b 0 baryon, we measure σ(Ξ b - )Β(Ξ b - ) → J/ψ(Ξ - )/σ(Λ b 0 )Β(Λ b 0 → J/ψ Λ) = 0.167 -0.025 +0.037 (stat.) ± 0.012(syst.) and σ(ω b - )Β((Omega) b - J/ψ (Omega) - )/σ(Λ b 0 )Β(Λ b 0 ) → J/ψ Λ = 0.045 0.012 +0.017 (stat.) ± 0.004(syst.) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c

  18. Metabolites derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kim; Malick, Mandy; Madingou, Ness; Touchette, Charles; Bourque-Riel, Valérie; Tomaro, Leandro; Rousseau, Guy

    2015-12-15

    Although controversial, some data suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are beneficial to cardiovascular diseases, and could reduce infarct size. In parallel, we have reported that the administration of Resolvin D1 (RvD1), a metabolite of docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 PUFA, can reduce infarct size. The present study was designed to determine if the inhibition of two important enzymes involved in the formation of RvD1 from omega-3 PUFA could reduce the cardioprotective effect of omega-3 PUFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a diet rich in omega-3 PUFA during 10 days before myocardial infarction (MI). Two days before MI, rats received a daily dose of Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, PD146176, an inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase, both inhibitors or vehicle. MI was induced by the occlusion of the left coronary artery for 40min followed by reperfusion. Infarct size and neutrophil accumulation were evaluated after 24h of reperfusion while caspase-3, -8 and Akt activities were assessed at 30min of reperfusion. Rats receiving inhibitors, alone or in combination, showed a larger infarct size than those receiving omega-3 PUFA alone. Caspase-3 and -8 activities are higher in ischemic areas with inhibitors while Akt activity is diminished in groups treated with inhibitors. Moreover, the study showed that RvD1 restores cardioprotection when added to the inhibitors. Results from this study indicate that the inhibition of the metabolism of Omega-3 PUFA attenuate their cardioprotective properties. Then, resolvins seem to be an important mediator in the cardioprotection conferred by omega-3 PUFA in our experimental model of MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of oxygen on omega phase stability in the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hendrickson, Mandana; Nandwana, Peeyush; Alam, Talukder; Choudhuri, Deep; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on stability of isothermal omega precipitates in Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr was examined using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. Two alloys with 0.1 and 0.4 mass% oxygen were subjected to single step, and two-step annealing heat-treatments to respectively promote omega and alpha formation. After second step annealing, large volume fraction of omega precipitates was retained in 0.4 mass% O alloy while mainly alpha phase was observed in TNTZ-0.1O. The enhanced stability of omega in the higher oxygen containing TNTZ alloys questions the conventionally accepted understanding that oxygen destabilizes the omega phase in titanium alloys.

  20. Enhancements to the timing of the OMEGA laser system to improve illumination uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, W. R.; Katz, J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Kelly, J. H.; Hill, E. M.; Bahr, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    Two diagnostics have been developed to improve the uniformity on the OMEGA Laser System, which is used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The first diagnostic measures the phase of an optical modulator (used for the spectral dispersion technique employed on OMEGA to enhance spatial smoothing), which adds bandwidth to the optical pulse. Setting this phase precisely is required to reduce pointing errors. The second diagnostic ensures that the arrival times of all the beams are synchronized. The arrival of each of the 60 OMEGA beams is measured by placing a 1-mm diffusing sphere at target chamber center. By comparing the arrival time of each beam with respect to a reference pulse, the measured timing spread of the OMEGA Laser System is now 3.8 ps.

  1. Effects of dietary omega-3 and -6 supplementations on phospholipid fatty acid composition in mice uterus during window of pre-implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Amir; Darabi, Masoud; Farzadi, Laya; Salmassi, Ali; Latifi, Zeinab; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shaaker, Maghsood; Ghasemnejad, Tohid; Roshangar, Leila; Nouri, Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Since fatty acid composition of uterus phospholipids is likely to influence embryo implantation, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary omega-3 and -6 fatty acids on implantation rate as well as uterine phospholipid fatty acids composition during mice pre-implantation period. Sixty female mice were randomly distributed into:1) control (standard pellet), 2) omega-3 (standard pellet + 10% w/w of omega-3 fatty acids) and 3) omega-6 (standard pellet + 10% w/w of omega-6 fatty acids). Uterine phospholipid fatty acid composition during the pre-implantation window (days 1-5 of pregnancy) was analyzed using gas-chromatography. The implantation rate on the fifth day of pregnancy was also determined. Our results showed that on days 1, 2 and 3 of pregnancy, the levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) as well as total omega-6 fatty acids were significantly higher and the levels of linolenic acid and total omega-3 fatty acids were statistically lower in the omega-6 group compared to the omega-3 group (p omega-6 fatty acids, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids levels were significantly different between the two dietary supplemented groups (p omega-6 fatty acids, especially ARA, with the implantation rate. The present study showed that diets rich in omega-3 and -6 fatty acids could differently modify uterine phospholipid fatty acid composition and uterine levels of phospholipid ARA, and that the total omega-6 fatty acids had a positive association with the implantation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurements of NH3 linestrengths and collisional broadening coefficients in N2, O2, CO2, and H2O near 1103.46cm-1

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2013-01-01

    , oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide at room temperature in an optical cell. These data are going to aid in the development of quantitative ammonia sensors utilizing this strong absorption feature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Empirical determination of low J values of 13CH4 transitions from jet cooled and 80 K cell spectra in the icosad region (7170-7367 cm-1)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votava, O.; Mašát, Milan; Pracna, P.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Liu, A. W.; Hu, S. M.; Campargue, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 149, Dec (2014), s. 64-71 ISSN 0022-4073 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 13CH4 * methane * cold spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.645, year: 2014

  4. Time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy of Ag in the (1300-3600)-cm(-1) region: Transitions involving f and g states and oscillator strengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Kubelík, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 022502 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * transitions * oscillator strengths Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2010

  5. OMEGA for the Future of Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    OMEGA: Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. To develop a photobioreactor (PBR) for growing algae (Oil, food, fertilizer) that does not compete with agriculture for land (deployed offshore), water or fertilizer (uses/treats wastewater).

  6. Production of structured lipid with a low omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio by enzymatic interesterification; Producción de lípidos estructurados con una baja relación de ácidos grasos omega-6/omega-3 mediante interesterificación enzimática.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyasoglu, H.

    2017-07-01

    A structured lipid (SL) constituting omega fatty acids was synthesized by using linseed and grape seed oils as substrates via a lipase-catalyzed reaction. Lipozyme® TL IM was used as a biocatalyst. Good quadratic models predicting the incorporation of omega fatty acids were achieved via the Response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal conditions for targeted omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio (2:1) were obtained at a substrate molar ratio 1.4, time 8.4 h, and enzyme amount 6.4%. The SL contained linoleic acid (43 g 100g-1), which was mainly located in the sn-2 position (40 g 100g-1). α-Linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid at the sn-2 position were 22 g 100g-1, and 11 g 100g-1, respectively. The oxidative stability of the SL, and SL with antioxidants was also investigated. The produced SL may be proposed as a source of a balanced intake of omega fatty acids and an ingredient in functional food formulations. [Spanish] Se sintetizaron lípidos estructurados (SL), formados por ácidos grasos omega, utilizando aceites de linaza y semillas de uva como sustratos a través de una reacción catalizada por lipasa. Se utilizó Lipozyme® TL IM como biocatalizador. Los buenos modelos cuadráticos que predecían la incorporación de los ácidos grasos omega se lograron a través de la metodología de superficie de respuesta (RSM). Se obtuvieron las condiciones óptimas para una proporción de ácidos grasos omega-6/omega-3 (2:1) con una relación molar de sustrato 1:4, tiempo de 8,4 h, y cantidad de enzima 6,4%. El SL contenía ácido linoleico (43 g·100 g-1), que se localizaba principalmente en la posición sn-2 (40 g·100 g-1). El ácido α-linoleico y el ácido α-linolénico en la posición sn-2 fueron de 22 g·100 g-1y 11 g·100 g-1, respectivamente. También se investigó la estabilidad oxidativa del SL y SL con antioxidantes. El SL producido puede ser propuesto como una fuente para una ingesta equilibrada de ácidos grasos omega y un ingrediente en las formulaciones

  7. Efficacies of vitamin D and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on experimental endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Alpaslan; Şimşek, Memet; İlhan, Raşit; Can, Behzat; Baspinar, Melike; Akyol, Hadice; Gül, H Fatih; Gürsu, Ferit; Kavak, Burçin; Akın, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3 (vitamin D) and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA) on experimentally induced endometriosis in a rat model. A prospective, single-blind, randomized, controlled experimental study was performed on 30 Wistar female rats. Endometriosis was surgically induced by implanting endometrial tissue on the abdominal peritoneum. Four weeks later, a second laparotomy was performed to assess pre-treatment implant volumes and cytokine levels. The rats were randomized into three groups: vitamin D group (42 μg/kg/day), omega-3 PUFA group (450 mg/kg/day), and control group (saline 0.1 mL/rat/day). These treatments were administered for 4 weeks. At the end of treatment, a third laparotomy was performed for the assessment of cytokine levels, implant volumes (post-treatment) and implants were totally excised for histopathologic examination. Pre- and post-treatment volumes, cytokine levels within the groups, as well as stromal and glandular tissues between the groups were compared. The mean post-treatment volume was statistically significantly reduced in the omega-3 PUFA group (p=0.02) and the level of the interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the peritoneal fluid were significantly decreased at the end of treatment in the omega-3 PUFA group (p=0.02, p=0.03, and p=0.03, respectively). In the vitamin D group, only IL-6 levels were significantly decreased. In the histopathologic examination, the glandular tissue and stromal tissue scores of the implants were significant lower in the omega-3 PUFA group (p=0.03 and p=0.02). Omega-3 PUFA caused significant regression of endometriotic implants. Vitamin D has not been as effective as omega-3 PUFA on endometriosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Omega-3 Supplementation and Loneliness-Related Memory Problems: Secondary Analyses Of A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Derry, Heather M.; Bornstein, Robert; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Peng, Juan; Belury, Martha A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Malarkey, William B.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Loneliness enhances risk for episodic memory declines over time. Omega-3 supplementation can improve cognitive function for people experiencing mild cognitive difficulties. Accordingly, we explored whether omega-3 supplementation would attenuate loneliness-related episodic memory problems. Methods Participants (N=138) from a parent randomized controlled trial (RCT) were randomized to the placebo, 1.25 grams/day of omega-3, or 2.50 grams/day of omega-3 conditions for a 4-month period. They completed a baseline loneliness questionnaire and a battery of cognitive tests both at baseline and at the end of the RCT. Results Controlling for baseline verbal episodic memory scores, lonelier people within the placebo condition had poorer verbal episodic memory post-supplementation, as measured by immediate (b = −0.28, t(117) = −2.62, p = .010) and long-delay (b = −.06, t(116) = −2.07, p = .040) free recall, than their less lonely counterparts. This effect was not observed in the 1.25 grams/day and 2.50 grams/day supplementation groups, all p values > .10. The plasma omega-6:omega-3 ratio data mirrored these results. There were no loneliness-related effects of omega-3 supplementation on short-delay recall or the other cognitive tests, all p values > .32. Conclusion These results suggest that omega-3 supplementation attenuates loneliness-related verbal episodic memory declines over time and support the utility of exploring novel interventions for treating episodic memory problems among lonely people. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00385723 PMID:25264972

  9. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetland Harald

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle. The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5, DPA (22:5 and DHA (22:6, thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle.

  10. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid blood biomarkers increase linearly in men and women after tightly controlled intakes of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/d of EPA + DHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ashley C; Chalil, Alan; Aristizabal Henao, Juan J; Streit, Isaac T; Stark, Ken D

    2015-12-01

    Blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been related to coronary heart disease risk. Understanding the response of EPA + DHA in blood to dietary intake of EPA + DHA would facilitate the use of blood measures as markers of adherence and enable the development of dietary recommendations. The objective of this study is examine the blood response to intakes of EPA + DHA ≤1 g/d with an intervention designed for dietary adherence. It was hypothesized this relationship would be linear and that intakes of EPA + DHA DHA intake of men and women (n = 20) was determined by food frequency questionnaire and adherence was monitored by weekly fingertip blood sampling for fatty acid determinations. Participants consumed nutraceuticals to achieve intakes of 0.25 g/d and 0.5 g/d EPA + DHA for successive four-week periods. A subgroup (n = 5) had intakes of 1.0 g/d EPA + DHA for an additional 4 weeks. Fatty acid composition of whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma phospholipids were determined at each time point. Blood levels of EPA and DHA increased linearly in these pools. A comprehensive review of the literature was used to verify the blood-intake relationship. Blood levels of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reached blood levels associated with the highest levels of primary cardiac arrest reduction and sudden cardiac death risk only with intakes of 1.0 g/d of EPA + DHA. The blood biomarker response to intakes of EPA + DHA ≤1 g/d is linear in a small but highly adherent study sample and this information can assist in determining adherence in clinical studies and help identify dietary intake targets from associations between blood and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthy omega-3 enhancement in Echium acanthocarpum transformed hairy roots by overexpression of a 6-desaturase gene from Primula vialli.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárate, R.; Cequier-Sánchez, E.; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; Rodríguez, C.; Dorta-Guerra, R.; Ravelo, Á.G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-40 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Omega-3 * Primula vialii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  12. Measurements of B Meson Decays to omega K* and omega rho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2005-02-14

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K* and {omega}{rho} in 89 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV.

  13. Omega-3 Index and Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Omega-3 PUFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribulova, Narcis; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Egan Benova, Tamara; Knezl, Vladimir; Barancik, Miroslav; Slezak, Jan

    2017-10-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are permanent subjects of interest in relation to the protection of cardiovascular health and the prevention of the incidence of both ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. The purpose of this updated review is to focus on the novel cellular and molecular effects of omega-3 PUFAs, in the context of the mechanisms and factors involved in the development of cardiac arrhythmias; to provide results of the most recent studies on the omega-3 PUFA anti-arrhythmic efficacy and to discuss the lack of the benefit in relation to omega-3 PUFA status. The evidence is in the favor of omega-3 PUFA acute and long-term treatment, perhaps with mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. However, for a more objective evaluation of the anti-arrhythmic potential of omega-3 PUFAs in clinical trials, it is necessary to monitor the basal pre-interventional omega-3 status of individuals, i.e., red blood cell content, omega-3 index and free plasma levels. In the view of evidence-based medicine, it seems to be crucial to aim to establish new approaches in the prevention of cardiac arrhythmias and associated morbidity and mortality that comes with these conditions.

  14. Assembly of the T-cell antigen receptor. Participation of the CD3 omega chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, A; Vangsted, A; Zeuthen, J

    1993-01-01

    The human TCR is composed of the Ti alpha beta heterodimer in association with the CD3 chains CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta 2. Another chain, referred to as CD3 omega, has recently been described in T cells. CD3 omega is an intracellular protein transiently associated with the CD3 complex during...... the assembly of the TCR in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and it is not expressed on the cell surface. The function of CD3 omega is unknown but it has been suggested that it plays an important role in the assembly of the TCR. We have studied the possible function of CD3 omega in the human leukemic T-cell line...... Jurkat and different variants of this cell line. Cells were metabolically labeled, subjected to lysis, immunoprecipitated, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The results indicate that: 1) CD3 omega associates primarily with the CD3 delta epsilon complex; 2) CD3 omega is not associated with single Ti alpha or Ti...

  15. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things To Know About Omega-3s for Heart Disease Share: Omega-3 fatty acids are a group ... shows omega-3s have a protective effect against heart disease. Experts agree that fish rich in omega-3 ...

  17. OMEGA ICF experiments and preparations for direct drive on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, R.L.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct-drive laser-fusion ignition experiments rely on detailed understanding and control of irradiation uniformity, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and target fabrication. LLE is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct-drive NIF ignition target based on an 'all-DT' design: a spherical target of ∼3.4-mm diameter, 1 to 2 μm of CH wall thickness, and an ∼340-μm DT-ice layer near the triple point of DT (∼19 K). OMEGA experiments are designed to address the critical issues related to direct-drive laser fusion and to provide the necessary data to validate the predictive capability of LLE computer codes. The cryogenic targets to be used on OMEGA are hydrodynamically equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address the essential components of direct-drive laser fusion: irradiation uniformity and laser imprinting, Rayleigh-Taylor growth and saturation, compressed core performance and shell fuel mixing, laser plasma interactions and their effect on target performance, and cryogenic target fabrication and handling. (author)

  18. Exclusive $\\omega$ meson muoproduction on transversely polarised protons

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buechele, M.; Chang, W. -C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S. -U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Duennweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmueller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; dHose, N.; Hsieh, C. -Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Joerg, P.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Koenigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kraemer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y. -S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, F.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schoenning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive production of $\\omega$ mesons was studied at the COMPASS experiment by scattering $160~\\mathrm{GeV}/\\mathit{c}$ muons off transversely polarised protons. Five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries were measured in the range of photon virtuality $1~(\\mathrm{GeV}/\\mathit{c})^2 < Q^2 < 10~(\\mathrm{GeV}/\\mathit{c})^2$, Bjorken scaling variable $0.003 < x_{\\mathit{Bj}} < 0.3$ and transverse momentum squared of the $\\omega$ meson $0.05~(\\mathrm{GeV}/\\mathit{c})^2 < p_{T}^{2} < 0.5~(\\mathrm{GeV}/\\mathit{c})^2$. The measured asymmetries are sensitive to the nucleon helicity-flip Generalised Parton Distributions (GPD) $E$ that are related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks, the chiral-odd GPDs $H_{T}$ that are related to the transversity Parton Distribution Functions, and the sign of the $\\pi\\omega$ transition form factor. The results are compared to recent calculations of a GPD-based model.

  19. Omega-3 supplementation on inflammatory markers in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Simplício da; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio da; Brito, Patricia Dias de; Cardoso, Claudia Santos de Aguiar; Almeida, Cristiane Fonseca de; Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do; Sousa, Andrea Silvestre de

    2017-06-09

    Several studies have been focusing on the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on modulation of inflammatory markers in several cardiopathies. Although immunoregulatory dysfunction has been associated to the chronic cardiac involvement in Chagas disease, there is no study examining the effects of omega-3 supplementation in these patients. We investigated the effects of omega-3 PUFAs on markers of inflammation and lipid profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients. The present study was a single-center double-blind clinical trial including patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive omega-3 PUFAs capsules (1.8g EPA and 1.2g DHA) or placebo (corn oil) during an 8-week period. Cytokines, fasting glucose, lipid, and anthropometric profiles were evaluated. Forty-two patients (23 women and 19 men) were included in the study and there were only two losses to follow-up during the 8-week period. Most of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were similar between the groups at baseline, except for the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17α, and IFNγ. The omega-3 PUFAs group demonstrated greater improvements in serum triglycerides (-21.1 vs. -4.1; p = 0.05) and IL-10 levels (-10.6 vs. -35.7; p = 0.01) in comparison to controls after 8 weeks of intervention. No further differences were observed between groups. Omega-3 PUFAs supplementation may favorably affect lipid and inflammatory profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, demonstrated by a decrease in triglycerides and improvements on IL-10 concentration. Further studies examining the clinical effects of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy are necessary. NCT01863576.

  20. The effect of omega-3 supplementation on pregnancy outcomes by smoking status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Spencer G; Abramovici, Adi R; Jauk, Victoria C; Harper, Lorie M; Biggio, Joseph R; Tita, Alan T

    2017-10-01

    nonsmokers. Omega-3 supplementation was associated with a lower risk of spontaneous preterm delivery in smokers (relative risk, 0.56, 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.87) but not in nonsmokers (relative risk 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.29); P value for interaction = 0.013. Low birth weight was also less frequent in smokers receiving omega-3 supplementation (relative risk 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.36-0.90) compared with nonsmokers (relative risk 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.71-1.24); P value for interaction = 0.047. The effect on other secondary outcomes did not differ significantly between smokers and nonsmokers. Omega-3 supplementation in smokers may have a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous preterm delivery and low birth weight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Observation of scattered light between omega/2 and 3/2 omega in short wavelength laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, L.M.; Seka, W.; Tanaka, K.; Simon, A.; Short, R.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive measurements have been carried out on scattered radiation in the spectral region between omega/2 and 3/2 omega from plasmas produced by 351 nm lasers. The relative intensities of the continuum radiation relative to the line features at omega/2 and 3/2 omega will be shown. A new spectral feature has been observed between 3/2 omega and omega which may be interpreted as an upscattered component produced by ordinary Raman scattering. The overall experimental evidence for ordinary Raman scattering vs stimulated Raman scattering will be discussed

  2. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-01-01

    The semileptonic decays of (Omega) c and (Omega) b are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy Λ baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For (Omega) b to (Omega) c the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured Λ c + → Λe + ν rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of (Omega) b to pairs of ground and excited (Omega) c states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of (Omega) Q vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 ± 2%) for the fraction of (Omega) c → Ξ (*) decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of (Omega) c → (Omega) (*) decays to the ground state (Omega). The elastic fraction of (Omega) b → (Omega) c ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models

  3. Rare B Meson Decays With Omega Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; /Colorado U.

    2006-04-24

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are particularly interesting because of their importance in understanding the CP violation, which is essential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe, and of their roles in testing the ''effective'' theory of B physics. The study has been done with the BABAR experiment, which is mainly designed for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons, and secondarily for rare processes that become accessible with the high luminosity of the PEP-II B Factory. In a sample of 89 million produced B{bar B} pairs on the BABAR experiment, we observed the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup +} for the first time, made more precise measurements for B{sup +} {yields} {omega}h{sup +} and reported tighter upper limits for B {yields} {omega}K* and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup 0}.

  4. Efficacy of Omega-3 Treatment for Vasomotor Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Freeman, Marlene; Carpenter, Janet S.; Learman, Lee A.; Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Caan, Bette; Freeman, Ellen W.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Tinker, Lesley F.; LaForce, Cathryn Booth; Larson, Joseph C.; Anderson, Garnet L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy and tolerability of omega-3 fatty acids in reducing VMS frequency and bother in peri- and postmenopausal women. Methods Three-by-two factorial, randomized, controlled 12-week trial. Eligible women were randomized to double-blind comparison of omega-3s (n=177) or placebo (n=178) capsules, and simultaneously to yoga (n=107), aerobic exercise (n=106), or their usual physical activity (n=142). Participants received 12 weeks of omega-3 dosage at a dose of 1.8 grams daily. Each capsule contained ethyl eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 425 mg) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 100 mg) and other omega-3s (90mg). Primary outcomes were VMS frequency and bother. Secondary outcomes included sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index), depressive symptoms (Physician's Health Questionnaire-8), and anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7). Results The mean baseline frequency of VMS/day was 7.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0, 8.2). After 12 weeks, reduction in VMS frequency for omega-3 (−2.5, 95% CI −3.0, −1.9) did not differ significantly from that in placebo (−2.7, 95% CI −3.3, −2.2), with a relative difference of 0.3 fewer hot flashes per day (95% CI −0.5, 1.0, p=0.28). Changes in VMS bother at 12 weeks were also similar between groups, with no relative difference on a 4-point scale (95% CI −0.1, 0.2, p=0.36). Omega-3s compared with placebo showed no improvement in self-reported sleep or mood (p>0.09 for all comparisons). Conclusion Among healthy peri- and postmenopausal sedentary women, 12 weeks of omega-3 treatment compared with placebo did not improve VMS frequency, VMS bother, sleep, or mood compared to placebo. PMID:23982113

  5. Omega-3 supplementation effects on polycystic ovary syndrome symptoms and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Khani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common female endocrine disorder with unknown etiology and with different complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 supplementation on PCOS symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial was performed in 2015 in Alzahra and Shahid Beheshti Hospitals, Isfahan, Iran, on 88 patients with PCOS. Intervention group took omega-3 supplements with dose of 2 g/day for 6 months (two capsules, but control group received two olive oil capsules. Finally, ultrasound and laboratory findings and the recovery rate of menstrual disorders in both groups were compared. Results: After 6 months' intervention, waist circumference (WC was significantly lower in omega-3 as compared to control (81.18 ± 2.87 vs. 84.22 ± 2.61 cm, respectively,P< 0.0001. High-density lipoprotein was increased (47.2 ± 1.37 vs. 41.56 ± 1.34 mg/dl, respectively,P< 0.0001 while low-density lipoprotein (107.79 ± 1.68 vs. 117.4 ± 1.57 mg/dl, respectively, triglyceride (116.02 ± 3.13 vs. 125.06 ± 2.91 mg/dl, respectively, and cholesterol (180.34 ± 6.34 vs. 189.56 ± 5.93 mg/dl, respectively in omega-3 were significantly lower than control (P < 0.0001. The interval between periods in omega-3 was significantly shorter than control (29.83 ± 4.68 vs. 47.11 ± 8.72 days, respectively,P< 0.001. Conclusion: Omega-3 decrease lipid profiles, WC, and interval between periods while weight, hip circumference, fasting blood sugar, number of ovarian follicle, size of ovary, bleeding volume, menstrual bleeding, and hirsutism score did not change by administration of omega-3.

  6. Effects of Diets Enriched in Omega-9 or Omega-6 Fatty Acids on Reproductive Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Neda Mousavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal type and amounts of dietary fatty acids affect on reproductive process in the mice. The present study investigated the effects of maternal supplementation with different amounts of omega-6 or omega-9 during pregnancy on the number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of gestation.Materials and methods: Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into four dietary groups including low omega-6 (16%; LO6, low omega-9 (16%; LO9, high omega-6 (45%; HO6 and high omega-9 (45%; HO9 during gestation. Number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of pregnancy were compared among four dietary groups.Results: There was significant difference between LO6 and HO6 (p < 0.0001, LO9 and HO9 (p < 0.0001 groups in total number of pups. The number of female and male offspring were significantly different between LO6 and LO9 (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001, respectively, LO9 and HO9 (p = 0.01 and p = 0.025 groups. Duration of pregnancy was significantly higher in low fat diet than high fat diet groups (< 0.001.Conclusion: High fat diet reduced number of pups, gestation duration and lead to early labor. Omega-9 fatty acids shifted sex of offspring to females.

  7. Omega-Harmonic Functions and Inverse Conductivity Problems on Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berenstein, Carlos A; Chung, Soon-Yeong

    2003-01-01

    .... To do this, they introduce an elliptic operator DELTA omega and an omega-harmonic function on the graph, with its physical interpretation being the diffusion equation on the graph, which models an electric network...

  8. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations.......Growing consumer awareness of functional foods and understanding of their positive nutritional effects have led to the need of specific studies and have captured more attention than ever before. In Europe, Danish consumers have been found to be relatively negative towards the concept of functional...

  9. Kolesterol dan Omega 9 Kuning Telur Ayam Petelur yang Mendapat Udang Mantis (Squilla empusa Fermentasi dalam Pakan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Suhermiyati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol and omega-9 fatty acid eggs yolks affected by mantis crustacean (squilla empusa fermentation as a fish meal substitution in the diet of layer. ABSTRACT. The experiment was conducted to determine the effect of Squilla empusa fermentation as fish meal substitute in diet layer on cholesterol and omega-9 fatty acid yolk eggs. This research was conducted by completely randomized design (CRD with 4 treatment and 5 replications. The treatments are P0 = 0% fermented Squilla empusa + 15% fish meal; P1 = 5% fermented Squilla empusa + 10% fish meal; P2 = 10% fermented Squilla empusa + 15% fish meal; and P3 = 15% fermented Squilla empusa + 0% fish meal. Cholesterol, Omega-9 fatty acid yolk eggs responding variables measured. The results of this study shows that the yolk cholesterol and omega - 9 was non significant (P<0.05. Average of yolk cholesterol (ppm and omega - 9 (gram for P0; P1; P2; and P3 were 7.622; 9.200; 9.198; and 9.442; and omega – 9 fatty acid yolk (% were 18.404; 17.520; 19.230 and 19.456 respectively. Conclusion of this study (i there are possibility using fermented Squilla empusa until 15% as fish meal substitute in diet of layers, (ii there are good effect on eggs quality in term of cholesterol and Omega – 9 fatty yolk.

  10. The OMEGA system for marine bioenergy, wastewater treatment, environmental enhancement, and aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    OMEGA is an acronym for Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. The OMEGA system consists of photobioreactors (PBRs) made of flexible, inexpensive clear plastic tubes attached to floating docks, anchored offshore in naturally or artificially protected bays [1]. The system uses domestic wastewater and CO2 from coastal facilities to provide water, nutrients, and carbon for algae cultivation [2]. The surrounding seawater maintains the temperature inside the PBRs and prevents the cultivated (freshwater) algae from becoming invasive species in the marine environment (i.e., if a PBR module accidentally leaks, the freshwater algae that grow in wastewater cannot survive in the marine environment). The salt gradient between seawater and wastewater is used for forward osmosis (FO) to concentrate nutrients and facilitate algae harvesting [3]. Both the algae and FO clean the wastewater, removing nutrients as well as pharmaceuticals and personal-care products [4]. The offshore infrastructure provides a large surface area for solar-photovoltaic arrays and access to offshore wind or wave generators. The infrastructure can also support shellfish, finfish, or seaweed aquaculture. The economics of the OMEGA system are supported by a combination of biofuels production, wastewater treatment, alternative energy generation, and aquaculture. By using wastewater and operating offshore from coastal cities, OMEGA can be located close to wastewater and CO2 sources and it can avoid competing with agriculture for water, fertilizer, and land [5]. By combining biofuels production with wastewater treatment and aquaculture, the OMEGA system provides both products and services, which increase its economic feasibility. While the offshore location has engineering challenges and concerns about the impact and control of biofouling [6], large OMEGA structure will be floating marine habitats and will create protected 'no-fishing' zones that could increase local biodiversity and fishery

  11. Internet-Based, Randomized Controlled Trial of Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Hyperactivity in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Stephen; Hendren, Robert L.; Zandi, Tara; Law, Kiely; Choi, Jae-Eun; Widjaja, Felicia; Kalb, Luther; Nestle, Jay; Law, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preliminary evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may reduce hyperactivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We sought to examine the feasibility of a novel, internet-based clinical trial design to evaluate the efficacy of this supplement. Method E-mail invitations were sent to parents of children aged 5-8 enrolled in the Interactive Autism Network. All study procedures, including screening, informed consent, and collection of outcome measures took place over the internet. The primary outcome measures were parent- and teacher-rated changes in hyperactivity on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. Results During the 6-week recruitment period, 57 children from 28 states satisfied all eligibility criteria and were randomly assigned to 1.3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids or an identical placebo daily for 6 weeks. Outcome assessments were obtained from all 57 participants and 57 teachers, and the study was completed in 3 months. Children in the omega-3 fatty acid group had a greater reduction in hyperactivity (-5.3 points) compared to the placebo group (-2.6 points), but the difference was not statistically significant (1.9 point greater improvement in the omega-3 group, 95% CI -2.2 to 5.2). Side effects were rare and not associated with omega-3 fatty acids. Participant feedback was positive. Conclusion Internet-based randomized controlled trials of therapies in children with ASD are feasible and may lead to marked reductions in the time and cost of completing trials. A larger sample size is required to definitively determine the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids. Clinical trial registration information—Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Hyperactivity Treatment in Autism Spectrum Disorder; http://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01694667. PMID:24839884

  12. Developmentally dependent and different roles of fatty acids OMEGA-6 and OMEGA-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourek, J; Mourek, J

    2011-01-01

    The developmentally-dependent differences in the biological significances and effects of PUFA-OMEGA-6 (namely of arachidonic acid) and PUFA-OMEGA-3 (namely of docosahexaenoic acid) are discussed. The clinical results as well as developmental experiences are indicating a hypothesis of the evolution...... that created mutual relationship between those two substances (with immunological basis and following recuperation). The anti-inflammatory actions of PUFA-OMEGA-3 are the most visible (and significant) contrasts as compared with the large affects of namely arachidonic acid and its metabolites....

  13. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  14. Hierarchical Analysis of the Omega Ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Paulson, Patrick R.

    2009-12-01

    Initial delivery for mathematical analysis of the Omega Ontology. We provide an analysis of the hierarchical structure of a version of the Omega Ontology currently in use within the US Government. After providing an initial statistical analysis of the distribution of all link types in the ontology, we then provide a detailed order theoretical analysis of each of the four main hierarchical links present. This order theoretical analysis includes the distribution of components and their properties, their parent/child and multiple inheritance structure, and the distribution of their vertical ranks.

  15. Induction of rabbit lung cytochrome P450 prostaglandin in omega-hyroxylase during pregnancy: evidence for regulation at the genetic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Master, B.S.S.; Muerhoff, A.S.; Jackson, V.; Williams, D.E.; Waterman, M.R.; Johnson, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of a cytochrome P450 prostaglandin omega-hydroxylase (P450/sub PG omega/) isolated from pregnant rabbit lung has been shown by Western blots to be concomitant with an increase in the amount of P450 protein. Peaks in enzyme activity and P450/sub PG omega/ protein occur between the 20th and 28th days of gestation with increases of more than 100-fold compared to nonpregnant rabbits. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling induction, total cellular RNA was extracted from rabbit lungs at various days of gestation, translated in vitro using 35 S-met, and the newly synthesized P450/sub PG omega/ immunoprecipitated from the lysate. Utilizing an immunopurified goat IgG to P450/sub PG omega/, immunopellets of in vitro translation reactions charged with RNA from lungs at 6,11,19,22,25, or 28-days gestation were isolated. A single band corresponding to P450/sub PG omega/ was seen in autoradiographs of SDS-PAGE gels containing these immunopellets, but no band was visible in lanes containing immunopellets from reactions charged with RNA from nonpregnant or 1-day post-partum animals. The gestational time-dependent increase in in vitro-translated P450/sub PG omega/ suggests that control of its induction during pregnancy is at the transcriptional level. A monoclonal antibody to the P450/sub PG omega/ has been produced for the isolation of the P450/sub PG omega/ mRNA for cDNA production

  16. Probiotics Supplemented with Omega-3 Fatty Acids are More Effective for Hepatic Steatosis Reduction in an Animal Model of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobyliak, Nazarii; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana; Bodnar, Petro; Beregova, Tetyana

    2017-06-01

    Today probiotics have been suggested as a treatment for the prevention of NAFLD. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may have beneficial effects in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, adipose tissue function and inflammation. The present study was designed to determine whether probiotics plus omega-3 are superior to probiotics alone on the monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced NAFLD model in rats. We included 60 rats divided into four groups, 15 animals in each. Rats of group I were intact. Newborn rats of groups II-IV were injected with MSG. The III (Symbiter) group received 2.5 ml/kg of multiprobiotic "Symbiter" containing concentrated biomass of 14 probiotic bacteria genera. The IV (Symbiter-Omega) groups received "Symbiter-Omega" combination of probiotic biomass supplemented with flax and wheat germ oil (250 mg of each, concentration of omega-3 fatty acids 1-5 %). In both interventional groups reduction in total NAS score was observed. Supplementation of alive probiotic mixture with omega-3 fatty acids lead to 20 % higher decrease in steatosis score (0.73 ± 0.11 vs 0.93 ± 0.22, p = 0.848) and reduction by 16.6 % of triglycerides content in liver as compared to probiotic alone. Our study demonstrated more pronounced reduction in hepatic steatosis and hepatic lipid accumulation after treatment with combination of alive probiotics and omega-3 as compared to probiotics alone.

  17. Hubungan Asupan Asam Lemak Omega-3 dan Omega-6 dengan Tekanan Darah Wanita Usia 30 – 50 Tahun

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Mega Lucyta; Probosari, Enny; Wijayanti, Hartanti Sandi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Decreased intake of omega-3 and increased intake of omega-6 can increase the risk of hypertension. Hypertension cases in Indonesia are highest in women especially aged 30 - 50 years. This study aimed to determine correlation of omega-3 and omega-6 intake with blood pressure in women aged 30-50 years.Method : This was an observational research with cross-sectional study design. Fifty four subjects were select...

  18. Effects of omega-3 supplementation on interleukin and neurotrophin levels in an animal model of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA I. ZUGNO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNew studies suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as omega-3, may reduce the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study evaluated the preventive effect of omega-3 on interleukines (IL and neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in the brains of young rats subjected to a model of schizophrenia. Treatment was performed over 21 days, starting on the 30th day of rat's life. After 14 days of treatment with omega-3 or vehicle, a concomitant treatment with saline or ketamine (25 mg/kg was started and maintained until the last day of the experiment. BDNF levels in the rat's prefrontal cortex were decreased at 1 h and 24 h after the last administration of ketamine, whereas the group administered with ketamine and omega-3 showed a decrease in BDNF levels only after 24 h. In contrast, both interventions induced similar responses in levels of IL-1β and IL6. These findings suggest that the similarity of IL-1β and IL6 levels in our experimental groups is due to the mechanism of action of ketamine on the immune system. More studies have to be carried out to explain this pathology. In conclusion, according to previous studies and considering the current study, we could suggest a prophylactic role of omega-3 against the outcome of symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and cognitive function: are smaller dosages more beneficial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakari AR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdul-Razak Abubakari,1 Mohammad-Mahdi Naderali,2 Ebrahim K Naderali3 1School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, London, UK; 2Blue Coat School, Liverpool, UK; 3School of Health Sciences, Liverpool Hope University, Hope Park Campus, Liverpool, UK Abstract: As longevity increases, so does the global prevalence of cognitive dysfunction. Numerous lifestyle and/or dietary interventions such as omega-3 fatty acids have been suggested to improve memory. Therefore, this study examined the consistency and strength of the impact of supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids on overall cognitive function using systematic reviews and meta-analytic methods. Of 905 studies retrieved from all searches, 12 randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. There were differences between studies reporting outcomes for single memory function parameters. Subgroup analysis of doses used (low versus high indicated that subjects receiving low (<1.73 g/day doses of omega-3 fatty acids had a significant reduction in cognitive decline rate (-0.07, 95% confidence interval -0.01, -0.02 but there was no evidence for beneficial effects at higher doses (+0.04, 95% confidence interval -0.06, +0.14 compared with the placebo group. This study suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in preventing memory decline at lower doses. Keywords: cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, dietary fatty acids, omega-3, docosahexaenoic acid

  20. Measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$, $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ baryon masses

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Bottom baryons decaying to a $J/\\psi$ meson and a hyperon are reconstructed using $\\rm 1.0~fb^{-1}$ of data collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. Significant $\\Lambda_b^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda$, $\\Xi_b^-\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Xi^-$ and $\\Omega_b^- \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Omega^-$ signals are observed and the corresponding masses are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray} M(\\Lambda_b^0) = 5619.53 \\pm 0.13 (stat) \\pm 0.45 (syst) MeV/c^2, \\cr M(\\Xi_b^-) = 5795.8 \\pm 0.9 (stat) \\pm 0.4 (syst) MeV/c^2, \\cr M(\\Omega_b^-) = 6046.0 \\pm 2.2 (stat) \\pm 0.5 (syst) MeV/c^2,\\end{eqnarray} while the diffierences with respect to the $\\Lambda_b^0$ mass are \\begin{eqnarray} M(\\Xi_b^-) - M(\\Lambda_b^0) = 176.2 \\pm 0.9 (stat) \\pm 0.1 (syst) MeV/c^2, \\cr M(\\Omega_b^-) - M(\\Lambda_b^0) = 426.4 \\pm 2.2 (stat) \\pm 0.4 (syst) MeV/c^2.\\end{eqnarray} These are the most precise mass measurements of the $\\Lambda_b^0$, $\\Xi_b^-$ and $\\Omega_b^-$ baryons to date. Averaging the above $\\Lambda_b^0$ mass measurement with that published...

  1. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavakkoli-Kakhki, Mandana; Motavasselian, Malihe; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Esfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Nematy, Mohsen; Eslami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM).

  2. Exclusive Backward-Angle Omega Meson Electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenliang, Li [Univ. of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2017-10-01

    Exclusive meson electroproduction at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2 , and at different four-momentum transfers, t and u, can be used to probe QCD's transition from hadronic degrees of freedom at the long distance scale to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at the short distance scale. Backward-angle meson electroproduction was previously ignored, but is anticipated to offer complimentary information to conventional forward-angle meson electroproduction studies on nucleon structure. This work is a pioneering study of backward-angle ω cross sections through the exclusive 1H(e, e'p)ω reaction using the missing mass reconstruction technique. The extracted cross sections are separated into the transverse (T), longitudinal (L), and LT, TT interference terms. The analyzed data were part of experiment E01-004 (Fπ-2), which used 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C. The primary objective was to detect coincidence π in the forward-angle, where the backward-angle omega events were fortuitously detected. The experiment has central Q2 values of 1.60 and 2.45 GeV2 , at W = 2.21 GeV. There was significant coverage in phi and epsilon, which allowed separation of σT,L,LT,TT . The data set has a unique u coverage of -u ~ 0, which corresponds to -t > 4 GeV2 . The separated σT result suggest a flat ~ 1/Q1.33±1.21 dependence, whereas sigma_L seems to hold a stronger 1/Q9.43±6.28 dependence. The σL/σT ratio indicate σT dominance at Q2 = 2.45 GeV2 at the ~90% confidence level. After translating the results into the -t space of the published CLAS data, our data show evidence of a backward-angle omega electroproduction peak at both Q2 settings. Previously, this phenomenon showing both forward and backward-angle peaks was only observed in the meson

  3. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    OpenAIRE

    Brenna, Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku; Berkley, James; Calder, Phillip; Jones, Kelsey; Liu, Lei; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Briend, André

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in neurocognitive and immune development led two independent groups to evaluate RUTFs. Jones et al. (BMC Med 13:93, 2015), in a study in BMC Medicine, and Hsieh et al. (J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nu...

  4. Blood omega-3 and trans fatty acids in middle-aged acute coronary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William S; Reid, Kimberly J; Sands, Scott A; Spertus, John A

    2007-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that lower blood omega-3 (omega-3) fatty acids (FAs) and/or higher trans FAs are associated with the risk of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Higher levels of omega-3 FA have been associated with decreased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, their association with ACS risk is unclear. Although higher self-reported intakes of trans FAs have been linked to increased coronary risk, the association between blood levels of trans FA and ACS risk is also unknown. We analyzed the FA composition of whole blood from 94 subjects with ACS and 94 age-, gender-, and race-matched controls. Omega-3 and trans FA associations with ACS were assessed using multivariable models after adjusting for smoking status, alcohol use, diabetes, body mass index, serum lipids, and history of myocardial infarction or revascularization. Subjects' mean age was 47 years, 54% were men, and 80% were Caucasian. Whole blood long-chain omega-3 FA (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] plus docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) content was 29% lower in patients than in controls (1.7 +/- 0.9% vs 2.4 +/- 1.4%, p ACS, but higher blood trans FA content is not. Blood EPA + DHA may serve as a new, modifiable risk factor for ACS.

  5. Cerenkov counters at the Omega Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    P. Petroff on the left. Here one sees both the gas Cerenkov counters sitting in front of the magnet to select forward emitted particles. The smaller one, working at high pressure, sits nearest to the Omega magnet (see photo 7505073X), the other (see photo 7505071X) works at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  7. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  8. Photoproduction of omega mesons off the proton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, A.; Crede, V.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Brinkmann, K. T.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Jude, T.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Loehner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J.G; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Sparks, N.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Wiedner, U.

    2015-01-01

    The differential cross sections and unpolarized spin-density matrix elements for the reaction gamma rho -> rho omega were measured using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment for initial photon energies ranging from the reaction threshold to 2.5GeV. These observables were measured from the radiative decay of

  9. An $ omega $-complete equational specification of interleaving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Fokkink (Wan); S.P. Luttik (Bas)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the process theory $PA$ that includes an operation for parallel composition, based on the interleaving paradigm. We prove that the standard set of axioms of $PA$ is not $omega$-complete by providing a set of axioms that are valid in $PA$, but not derivable from the

  10. Results of measurements with the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer onboard Mars Express: Clouds and dust at the end of southern summer. A comparison with OMEGA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L. V.; Formisano, V.; Moroz, V. I.; Bibring, J.-P.; Grassi, D.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Giuranna, M.; Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Blecka, M.; Gnedykh, V. N.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Lellouch, E.; Mattana, A.; Maturilli, A.; Moshkin, B. E.; Nikolsky, Yu. V.; Patsaev, D. V.; Piccioni, G.; Ratai, M.; Saggin, B.; Fonti, S.; Khatuntsev, I. V.; Hirsh, H.; Ekonomov, A. P.

    2006-07-01

    We discuss the results of measurements made with the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard the Mars Express spacecraft. The data were obtained in the beginning of the mission and correspond to the end of summer in the southern hemisphere of Mars ( L s ˜ 340°). Three orbits are considered, two of which passed through volcanoes Olympus and Ascraeus Mons (the height above the surface is about +20 km), while the third orbit intersects lowland Hellas (-7 km). The influence of the relief on the properties of the aerosol observed is demonstrated: clouds of water ice with a visual optical thickness of 0.1-0.5 were observed above volcanoes, while only dust was found during the observations (close in time) along the orbit passing through Hellas in low and middle latitudes. This dust is homogeneously mixed with gas and has a reduced optical thickness of 0.25±0.05 (at v = 1100 cm-1). In addition to orographic clouds, ice clouds were observed in this season in the northern polar region. The clouds seen in the images obtained simultaneously by the mapping spectrometer OMEGA confirm the PFS results. Temperature inversion is discovered in the north polar hood below the level 1 mbar with a temperature maximum at about 0.6 mbar. This inversion is associated with descending movements in the Hadley cell.

  11. Overweight consumers' salient beliefs on omega-3-enriched functional foods in Australia's Illawarra region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, Craig S; Tapsell, Linda C; Williams, Peter G

    2005-01-01

    To determine consumer salient beliefs toward functional foods enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Focus group interviews with adult consumers using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework. Community-based residents living in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. Forty-two overweight participants (29 female, 13 male) aged 30 to 80 years recruited by advertisement and attending 1 of 6 focus groups, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis was carried out, and subcategories were developed to capture the emerging themes according to the TPB model. Most participants were aware of a range of potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, but they had reservations about the ability of omega-3-enriched foods to deliver a health benefit. They were concerned about whether these foods were labeled clearly and about the possibility of overdosing. Family and friends were viewed as important in introducing participants to novel foods on the market. Participants regarded dietitians as a credible source and were least trusting of food companies and scientists. Overall, participants reported that cost was a major barrier, and that they would not necessarily trade taste for health benefits. Adding omega-3 fatty acids to foods regarded as less healthful was viewed more as a gimmick rather than a real health benefit. The consumer attitudes and purchase intentions identified in this study will be helpful to educators as they plan messages and strategies to guide dietary choices related to products enriched with omega-3 fatty acids.

  12. Inclusive Production of the $\\omega(782)$ Vector Meson in Hadronic Decays of the Z

    CERN Document Server

    Beddall, A

    1995-01-01

    The inclusive production of the omega(782) vector meson in hadronic Z decays is studied and compared to model predictions. The analysis is based on 1,005,535 hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector in the 1992 and 1993 running periods of LEP. Decays of the omega -> pi^+ pi^- pi^0 are reconstructed for x_p > 0.05, where x_p = p/p_{beam}. For this momentum range the omega production rate is measured to be 0.633 +- 0.025(stat) +- 0.056(sys) per event. An extrapolation to x_p = 0 yields a total production rate of 1.061 +- 0.041(stat) +- 0.093(sys) +- 0.042(extrap) per event.

  13. Omega-3 fatty acid monotherapy for pediatric bipolar disorder: a prospective open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Janet; Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Waxmonsky, James; Hantsoo, Liisa; Best, Catherine; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E; Laposata, Michael

    2007-01-01

    To test the effectiveness and safety of omega-3 fatty acids (Omegabrite(R) brand) in the treatment of pediatric bipolar disorder (BPD). Subjects (N=20) were outpatients of both sexes, 6 to 17 years of age, with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score of >15 treated over an 8-week period in open-label trial with omega-3 fatty acids 1290 mg-4300 mg combined EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Subjects experienced a statistically significant but modest 8.9+/-2.9 point reduction in the YMRS scores (baseline YMRS=28.9+/-10.1; endpoint YMRS=19.1+/-2.6, pDHA increased in treated subjects. As only 35% of these subjects had a response by the usual accepted criteria of >50% decrease on the YMRS, omega-3 fatty acids treatment was associated with a very modest improvement in manic symptoms in children with BPD.

  14. Measurement of Inclusive $\\omega$ and $\\eta$' Production in Hadronic Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the inclusive $\\omega$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}$ production based on 3.1 million hadronic Z decays recorded with the L3 detector at LEP during 1991--1994. The production rates per hadronic Z decay have been measured to be $1.17 \\pm 0.17 $ $\\omega$ mesons and $0.25 \\pm 0.04 $ $\\eta^{\\prime}$ mesons. The production rates and the differential cross sections have been compared with predictions of the JETSET and the HERWIG Monte Carlo models. We have observed that the differential cross sections can be described by an analytical quantum chromodynamics calculation. \\end{document}

  15. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V N; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Boehly, T R; Campbell, E M; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Froula, D H; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Radha, P B

    2016-01-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR< 17 and fuel adiabat α > 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production. (paper)

  16. The Effects of Probiotic Soymilk Fortified with Omega-3 on Blood Glucose, Lipid Profile, Haematological and Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Parameters in Streptozotocin Nicotinamide-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mohammadi Sartang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of probiotic soymilk fortified with omega-3 in diabetic rats. Methods. Soymilk (SM, fermented soymilk (FSM, and fermented soymilk fortified with omega-3 (FSM + omega-3 were prepared. Rats were randomly assigned to five groups of 13 animals per group. Diabetes was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ 15 min after the intraperitoneal administration of nicotinamide (NA. Normal control (NC and diabetic control (DC rats received 1 mL/day of distilled water and three groups of diabetic rats were given 1 mL/day of SM, FSM, and FSM + omega-3 products by oral gavage for 28 days. Results. Three products significantly (P<0.05 reduced blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and malondialdehyde (MDA concentrations compared to the DC group, with the maximum reduction seen in the FSM + omega-3 group. Body weight, red blood cells (RBC, haemoglobin (Hb, haematocrit, and superoxide dismutase (SOD also significantly increased in the FSM + omega-3 group. In the FSM + omega-3 group, MDA level compared with the SM and FSM groups and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP concentrations compared with the DC and FSM groups were significantly lower (P<0.05. Conclusion. Fermented soymilk fortified with omega-3 may be beneficial in diabetes.

  17. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data

  18. Omega-3 attenuates high fat diet-induced kidney injury of female rats and renal programming of their offsprings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldeen, Asmaa Mohammed; Ali Eshra, Mohammed; Ahmed Rashed, Laila; Fathy Amer, Marwa; Elham Fares, Amal; Samir Kamar, Samaa

    2018-05-09

    Maternal diet composition could influence fetal organogenesis. We investigated effects of high fat diet (HFD) intake alone or combined with omega 3 during pregnancy, lactation and early days of weaning on nephrogenesis of pups and maternal renal function and morphology. Mothers and their pups included in each group were supplied with the same diet composition. Rats were divided into group I, II and III supplied with chow of either 10 kcal%, 45 kcal% or 45 kcal% from fat together with omega-3 respectively. Group II showed increased serum urea and creatinine, renal TNF-α, IL1β. Structural injury was observed in mothers and their pups as Bowman's capsule and tubular dilatation and increased expression of PCNA that were decreased following omega-3 supplementation added to down regulation of Wnt4, Pax2 gene and podocin expression. Omega-3 supplementation improves lipid nephrotoxicity observed in mothers and their pups.

  19. A measurement of Omega from the North American test flight of Boomerang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchiorri, A.; Ade, P.A.R.; De Bernardis, P.; Bock, J.J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Crill, B.P.; De Troia, G.; Farese, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Gasperis, G. de; Giacometti, M.; Hristov, V.V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Masi, S.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Miglio, L.; Netterfield, C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Vittorio, N.

    1999-01-01

    We use the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background, measured during the North American test flight of the BOOMERANG experiment, to constrain the geometry of the universe. Within the class of Cold Dark Matter models, we find the overall fractional energy density of the universe, Omega, is constrained to be 0.85 < or = Omega < or = 1.25 at the 68 percent confidence level. Combined with the COBE measurement and the high redshift supernovae data we obtain new constraints on the fractional matter density and the cosmological constant

  20. A measurement of $\\Omega$ from the North American test flight of BOOMERANG

    CERN Document Server

    Melchiorri, A; De Bernardis, P; Bock, J J; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Crill, B P; De Troia, G; Farese, P; Ferreira, P G; Ganga, K; De Gasperis, G; Giacometti, M; Hristov, V V; Jaffe, A H; Lange, A E; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Miglio, L; Netterfield, C B; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Romeo, G

    2000-01-01

    We use the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background, measured during the North American test flight of the BOOMERANG experiment, to constrain the geometry of the universe. Within the class of Cold Dark Matter models, we find that the overall fractional energy density of the universe, Omega, is constrained to be 0.85 < Omega < 1.25 at the 68% confidence level. Combined with the COBE measurement and the high redshift supernovae data we obtain new constraints on the fractional matter density and the cosmological constant.

  1. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (CM) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide CM energy bins, each subdivided into cos(theta_CM) bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive omega photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  2. Is Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enriched Nutrition Support Safe for Critical Ill Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the effects of omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (FA enriched nutrition support on the mortality of critically illness patients. Methods: Databases of Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedicine Database were searched and randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified. We enrolled RCTs that compared fish oil enriched nutrition support and standard nutrition support. Major outcome is mortality. Methodological quality assessment was conducted based on Modified Jadad’s score scale. For control heterogeneity, we developed a method that integrated I2 test, nutritional support route subgroup analysis and clinical condition of severity. RevMan 5.0 software (The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark was used for meta-analysis. Results: Twelve trials involving 1208 patients that met all the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity existed between the trials. A random model was used, there was no significant effect on mortality RR, 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI (0.62, 1.09, p = 0.18. Knowing that the route of fish oil administration may affect heterogeneity, we categorized the trials into two sub-groups: parenteral administration (PN of omega-3 and enteral administration (EN of omega-3. Six trials administered omega-3 FA through PN. Pooled results indicated that omega-3 FA had no significant effect on mortality, RR 0.76, 95% CI (0.52, 1.10, p = 0.15. Six trials used omega-3 fatty acids enriched EN. After excluded one trial that was identified as source of heterogeneity, pooled data indicated omega-3 FA enriched EN significant reduce mortality, RR=0.69, 95% CI [0.53, 0.91] (p = 0.007. Conclusion: Omega-3 FA enriched nutrition support is safe. Due to the limited sample size of the included trials, further large-scale RCTs are needed.

  3. Association between omega-3 fatty acids consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cai; Yang, Yan; Yu, Xuefeng; Hu, Shuhong; Shao, Shiying

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence for the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of type 2 diabetes is controversial. A meta-analysis based on prospective cohorts was carried out to evaluate this issue. Pooled diabetic risk was calculated using a fixed or random effects model. The dose-response relationship was assessed by meta-regression analysis. The study showed that consumption of single omega-3 was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (relative risk [RR] = 1.45, P omega-3 was statistically insignificant. The dose-response curve presented an inverted U-shape of diabetes risk corresponding to the dose of omega-3 consumption. Subanalysis showed that omega-3 was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes risk in Asians (RR = 0.82, P omega-3 intake. The present findings suggest that dosage and composition of omega-3, ethnicity, trial duration, and age could influence the effect of omega-3 on type 2 diabetes progression. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akadiri Yessoufou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases.

  5. The outline of the OMEGA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umesawa, Hirokazu

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the Japanese commitment to establish an environmentally friendly technology for the separation and utilization of radioactive stable nuclides in high-level radioactive wastes. The development of OMEGA (Options Making Extra Gains of Actinides and Fission Products) group partitioning/annihilation disposal is proposed to allow an effective utilisation of uranium resources. There will be information exchange with the OECD/NEA. (UK)

  6. Omega: A 24-beam UV irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Beich, W.; Delettrez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on the characterization and performance of the 24-beam Omega laser facility under full third harmonic (351-nm) upconversion. This system provides for the first time a multibeam laser facility for the illumination of spherical targets with UV laser light in symmetric irradiation conditions with energies in the kilojoule range. This facility is capable of providing sufficient irradiation uniformity to test concepts of direct drive laser fusion with UV-driven ablation targets. The results of initial studies of ablatively driven DT-fueled glass microballoon targets will be described. The 24-beam Omega Nd:phosphate glass facility is capable of providing at 1054 nm output powers in excess of 10 TW in short ( 10 4 full system shots to date) irradiation facility with beam synchronism of approx. =3 psec, beam placement accuracy on target of 10 μm, and interbeam energy variance of approx. =2%. From measured target plane intensity distributions, overall illumination uniformity with tangentially focused beams is estimated to be approx. =5%. In 1984, a symmetric set of six beams was upconverted to 351-nm radiation using the polarization-mismatch scheme developed by Craxton. Monolithic cells of 20-cm clear aperture containing both frequency and doubler and tripler type II KDP crystals in index-matching propylene carbonate liquid were incorporated to output of six of the Omega beams with a full set of UV beam diagnostics

  7. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Blomhoff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. Objective : To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. Design : A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C and time (25 minutes resembling conditions typically used during cooking. Results : The peroxide values were in the range 1.04–10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60–5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23–932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24–119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9–11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. Conclusions : The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed.

  8. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Bente Lise; Blomhoff, Rune

    2011-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C) and time (25 minutes) resembling conditions typically used during cooking. The peroxide values were in the range 1.04-10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60-5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23-932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24-119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9-11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed.

  9. Potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant-like effects with low non-antidepressant doses of fluoxetine and mirtazapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Fonseca, Cristina; Sterin-Speziale, Norma; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2010-12-01

    Despite the advances in psychopharmacology, the treatment of depressive disorders is still not satisfactory. Side effects and resistance to antidepressant drugs are the greatest complications during treatment. Based on recent evidence, omega-3 fatty acids may influence vulnerability and outcome in depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to further characterize the omega-3 antidepressant-like effect in rats in terms of its behavioral features in the depression model forced swimming test either alone or in combination with antidepressants fluoxetine or mirtazapine. Ultimately, we prompted to determine the lowest dose at which omega-3 fatty acids and antidepressant drugs may still represent a pharmacological advantage when employed in combined treatments. Chronic diet supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids produced concentration-dependent antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test displaying a behavioral profile similar to fluoxetine but different from mirtazapine. Fluoxetine or mirtazapine at antidepressant doses (10 and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively) rendered additive effects in combination with omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (720 mg/kg/day). Beneficial effects of combined treatment were also observed at sub-effective doses (1 mg/kg/day) of fluoxetine or mirtazapine, since in combination with omega-3 fatty acids (720 mg/kg/day), antidepressants potentiated omega-3 antidepressant-like effects. The antidepressant-like effects occurred in the absence of changes in brain phospholipid classes. The therapeutic approach of combining omega-3 fatty acids with low ineffective doses of antidepressants might represent benefits in the treatment of depression, especially in patients with depression resistant to conventional treatments and even may contribute to patient compliance by decreasing the magnitude of some antidepressant dose-dependent side effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of the $\\Omega_{c}^{0}$ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Yu.A.; Barberis, D.; Beck, M.; Berat, C.; Beusch, W.; Boss, M.; Brons, S.; Bruckner, W.; Buenerd, M.; Buscher, C.; Charignon, F.; Chauvin, J.; Chudakov, E.A.; Dropmann, F.; Engelfried, J.; Faller, F.; Fournier, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Godbersen, M.; Grafstrom, P.; Haller, T.; Heidrich, M.; Hurst, R.B.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konorov, I.; Martens, K.; Martin, P.; Masciocchi, S.; Michaels, R.; Muller, U.; Newsom, C.; Paul, S.; Povh, B.; Ren, Z.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, L.; Rudolph, H.; Schmitt, L.; Siebert, H.W.; Simon, A.; Smith, V.J.; Thilmann, O.; Trombini, A.; Vesin, E.; Volkemer, B.; Vorwalter, K.; Walcher, T.; Walder, G.; Werding, R.; Wittmann, E.; Zavertyaev, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    We present the measurement of the lifetime of the Omega_c we have performed using three independent data samples from two different decay modes. Using a Sigma- beam of 340 GeV/c we have obtained clean signals for the Omega_c decaying into Xi- K- pi+ pi+ and Omega- pi+ pi- pi+, avoiding topological cuts normally used in charm analysis. The short but measurable lifetime of the Omega_c is demonstrated by a clear enhancement of the signals at short but finite decay lengths. Using a continuous maximum likelihood method we determined the lifetime to be tau(Omega_c) = 55 +13-11(stat) +18-23(syst) fs. This makes the Omega_c the shortest living weakly decaying particle observed so far. The short value of the lifetime confirms the predicted pattern of the charmed baryon lifetimes and demonstrates that the strong interaction plays a vital role in the lifetimes of charmed hadrons.

  11. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10{sup 13} and ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  12. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; McCrory, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10 13 and ∼0.3 g/cm 2 , respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA

  13. Influence of omega-3 fatty acids from the flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) on the brain development of newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi Almeida, K C; Teles Boaventura, G; Guzmán Silva, M A

    2011-01-01

    The importance of essential fatty acids, in particular the omega-3 family, in the central nervous system development of newborns is well documented. The flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) is considered one of the best vegetable sources of omega-3 fatty acids. The influence of omega-3 fatty acids from flaxseed on the brain development of newborn rats was evaluated. Pups of the F1 generation were obtained from 18 female Wistar rats divided in 3 groups (n=6), FG: fed with diet based on Flaxseed added with casein, CG: Casein, and MCG: Modified Casein supplemented with fibers and soybean oil. Newborn pups were weighted and submitted to euthanasia; brains were collected for evaluation of weight and lipid profile through gaseous chromatography. Significant increase in brain weight (39%) and relative brain weight (37%) was verified in pups from mothers fed with flaxseed diet. The omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids from the flaxseed were found in abundance in the diet made with this oleaginous and also significant increase in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (38%), as well as in total of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (62%). Maternal diet of flaxseed during pregnancy influences the incorporation of omega-3 fatty acid in the composition of brain tissue, assuring a good development of this organ in newborn rats.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation can improve both symptoms and signs of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jae-Woo Kwon,1 Sang Beom Han2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuncheon, South Korea We read with great interest the article by Gatell-Tortajada1 entitled “Oral supplementation with a nutraceutical formulation containing omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants in a large series of patients with dry eye symptoms: results of a prospective study”. The prospective large-scale study was undoubtedly well designed and conducted, and the authors should be congratulated for successfully demonstrating that oral omega-3 fatty acid supplementation can be an effective treatment for dry eye symptoms.1The authors showed that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids improved dry eye signs, such as corneal erosion, tear film breakup time, and conjunctival hyperemia, suggesting that they can reduce ocular surface inflammation and also alleviate dry eye symptoms.1 Rashid et al2 also demonstrated that topical application of omega-3 fatty acids led to a decrease in dry eye signs and inflammatory changes at both cellular and molecular levels.  View original paper by Gatell-Tortajada

  15. MULTI-KEV X-Ray Yields From High-Z Gas Targets Fielded At Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.O.; Fournier, K.B.; May, M.J.; Colvin, J.D.; Thomas, C.A.; Marrs, R.E.; Compton, S.M.; Moody, J.D.; Bond, E.J.; Davis, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on modeling of x-ray yield from gas-filled targets shot at the OMEGA laser facility. The OMEGA targets were 1.8 mm long, 1.95 mm in diameter Be cans filled with either a 50:50 Ar:Xe mixture, pure Ar, pure Kr or pure Xe at ∼ 1 atm. The OMEGA experiments heated the gas with 20 kJ of 3ω (∼ 350 nm) laser energy delivered in a 1 ns square pulse. the emitted x-ray flux was monitored with the x-ray diode based DANTE instruments in the sub-keV range. Two-dimensional x-ray images (for energies 3-5 keV) of the targets were recorded with gated x-ray detectors. The x-ray spectra were recorded with the HENWAY crystal spectrometer at OMEGA. Predictions are 2D r-z cylindrical with DCA NLTE atomic physics. Models generally: (1) underpredict the Xe L-shell yields; (2) overpredict the Ar K-shell yields; (3) correctly predict the Xe thermal yields; and (4) greatly underpredict the Ar thermal yields. However, there are spreads within the data, e.g. the DMX Ar K-shell yields are correctly predicted. The predicted thermal yields show strong angular dependence.

  16. Simulationen zur Optimierung der omega-Rekonstruktion in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2239688; Khoukaz, Alfons

    In this thesis pp-collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV are simulated using PYTHIA and the produced omega-mesons are reconstructed via the $\\omega \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ decay-channel. By using further simulations of single omega-mesons, kinematic angle cuts are extracted and applied to the simulation data in order to check, whether or not the reconstruction can be improved.

  17. Effects of dietary omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid ratios on reproduction in the young breeder rooster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yun; Ding, Yu; Liu, Juan; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanzhou; Guan, Shuluan; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-03-21

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are necessary for the body's metabolism, growth and development. Although PUFAs play an important role in the regulation of reproduction, their role in testis development in the rooster is unknown. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of omega-3/omega-6 (n-3/n-6, PUFAs) ratios on reproductive performance in young breeder roosters. Plasma levels of reproductive hormones, testis development, and reproductive hormone receptor and StAR mRNA expression were also assessed. Although PUFAs (n-3/n-6: 1/4.15) had no significant effect on the testis index (P > 0.05), the spermatogonial development and germ cell layers were increased. Moreover, serum levels of hormones (GnRH, FSH, LH and T) on day 35 were also significantly increased by PUFAs (n-3/n-6: 1/4.15). To investigate whether PUFAs regulate the expression of hormone receptors and StAR, real time-PCR was used to measure GnRHR, FSHR, LHR and StAR mRNA levels. PUFAs significantly increased the mRNA levels of all of these genes. These results indicate that PUFAs enhance the reproductive performance of young roosters by increasing hormone secretion and function, the latter by up-regulating receptor expression. These findings provide a sound basis for a balanced n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio being beneficial to young rooster reproduction.

  18. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Levick, Scott P.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin). Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT. PMID:27213332

  19. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of OMEGA implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Michel, D. T.; Shah, R. C.; Campbell, E. M.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲ 10) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming), target offset, and variation in target-layer thickness were investigated using the low-noise, three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Simulations indicate that these asymmetries can significantly degrade the implosion performance. The most important sources of the asymmetries are the target offsets ( ˜10 to 20 μm), beam-power imbalance ( σrms˜10 %), and variations ( ˜5 %) in target-layer thickness. Large-scale asymmetries distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of implosion targets. The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra is influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to an ˜1 -keV increase in apparent temperature. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires a reduction in large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing highly efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs, which mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids and schizophrenia: evidences and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, G; Traversi, G; Nannarelli, C; Mazza, S; Mazza, M

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a brain disease that represents a not rare condition, in fact the lifetime risk of developing schizophrenia is widely accepted to be around 1 in 100. Schizophrenia clinically manifests with acute episodes which are associated with hallucinations, delirium, behavioral disorders and a variable range of chronic persistent symptoms, which can be debilitating. The causes of schizophrenia are not clearly understood. It seems that genetic factors may produce a vulnerability to schizophrenia, along with environmental factors that contribute in a different way from individual to individual. In this context schizophrenia constitutes the outcome of a complex interaction between multiple genes and environmental risk factors, none of which on its own causes the disorder itself. Antipsychotic medications represent the first line of psychiatric treatment for schizophrenia. But there is a growing body of evidence that omega-3 fatty acids can prevent the disease or at least mitigate the course and symptoms. Probably, an appropriate dietary supplementation can play a partially therapeutic effect, even in more severe patients, improving some behavioral aspects and, mainly, reducing the cognitive deterioration. In this context the role of omega-3 fatty acids as a treatment for schizophrenia will strengthen the thrust of researchers and clinicians to the integrated approach to the prevention and cure of a disease that for more than a century challenging researchers.

  1. Heterologous Reconstitution of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of nonnative, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana was undertaken. The introduction of three primary biosynthetic activities to cells requires the stable coexpression of multiple proteins within the same cell. Herein, we report that C22 VLC-PUFAs were synthesized from C18 precursors by reactions catalyzed by Δ6-desaturase, an ELOVL5-like enzyme involved in VLC-PUFA elongation, and Δ5-desaturase. Coexpression of the corresponding genes (McD6DES, AsELOVL5, and PtD5DES under the control of the seed-specific vicilin promoter resulted in production of docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3 and docosatetraenoic acid (22:4 n-6 as well as eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3 and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6 in Arabidopsis seeds. The contributions of the transgenic enzymes and endogenous fatty acid metabolism were determined. Specifically, the reasonable synthesis of omega-3 stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3 could be a useful tool to obtain a sustainable system for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in seeds of a transgenic T3 line 63-1. The results indicated that coexpression of the three proteins was stable. Therefore, this study suggests that metabolic engineering of oilseed crops to produce VLC-PUFAs is feasible.

  2. effects of standard and/or glutamine dipeptide and/or omega-3 fatty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... effects of these to neutrophil functions and IL-8 levels are compared. Methods: ... acid solution to S-O group and TPN with omega 3 fatty acids solution and glutamine to S-D-O group ..... exudation involving multiple cell types.

  3. Thermogravimetry of alpha, omega-diaminoalkanes used in synthesizing zsm-5

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Howden, MG

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermogravimetry was determined on a series of alpha, omega-diaminoalkanes, in which the alkane chain contained from three to eight carbon atoms that were located in zeolite ZSM-5 during synthesis. Of the series, 1, 6-diaminohexane functions best...

  4. Diets Rich in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids With Different Omega-6/Omega-3 Ratio Decrease Liver Content of Saturated Fatty Acids Across Generations of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Halfen

    Full Text Available Our study evaluated how the consumption of diets with low (LOW group - 0.4/1 or high (CON group - 13.6/1 omega-6/omega-3 ratio across generations (F1 and F2 can modulate liver fatty acid (FA profile and blood biomarkers. Liver content of α-linolenic acid was higher in animals always fed with LOW diet than animals that changed from CON to LOW diet, which by your time was higher than animals always fed with CON diet. Liver saturated FA concentration decreased in both groups from F1 to F2. In conclusion, both diets were efficient in decreasing the saturated FA liver content across generations, the LOW ratio diet was more effective in reducing blood triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids, and there was a multigenerational effect of the LOW ratio diet, improving the FA profile even when the offspring start receiving the CON diet.

  5. Impact of the long chain omega-acylceramides on the stratum corneum lipid nanostructure. Part 1: Thermotropic phase behaviour of CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Doreen; Brezesinski, Gerald; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, is the main skin barrier. Ceramides (CERs) as the major constituent of the SC lipid matrix are of particular interest. At the moment, 11 classes of CERs are identified, but the effect of each single ceramide species is still not known. Therefore in this article, the thermotropic behaviour of the long chain omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] was studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] do not show a pronounced polymorphism which is observed for shorter chain ceramides as a significant feature. The phase behaviour of both ceramides is strongly influenced by the extremely long acyl-chain residue. The latter has a much stronger influence compared with the structure of the polar head group, which is discussed as extremely important for the appearance of a rich polymorphism. Despite the strong influence of the long chain, the additional OH-group of the phyto-sphingosine type CER[EOP] influences the lamellar repeat distance and the chain packing. The less polar sphingosine type CER[EOS] is stronger influenced by the long acyl-chain residue. Hydration is necessary for the formation of an extended hydrogen-bonding network between the polar head groups leading to the appearance of a long-periodicity phase (LPP). In contrast, the more polar CER[EOP] forms the LPP with densely packed alkyl chains already in the dry state.

  6. Oral omega-3 fatty acids promote resolution in chemical peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Alexander C; Phillips, Brett E; Chacon, Miranda A; Brunke-Reese, Deborah; Kelleher, Shannon L; Soybel, David I

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that purified omega-3 fatty acids may attenuate acute inflammation and hasten the transition to healing. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with omega-3-rich fish oil (FO) would promote resolution of peritoneal inflammation through production of specific lipid mediators. C57/BL6 mice were given a daily 200-μL oral gavage of saline (CTL) or FO (1.0-1.5 g/kg/d docosahexaenoic acid and 1.3-2.0 g/kg/d eicosapentaenoic acid) for 7 d before chemical peritonitis was induced with thioglycollate. Peritoneal lavage fluid was collected before induction and at days 2 and 4 after peritonitis onset. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), Resolvin D1 (RvD1), and the composition of immune cell populations were examined in peritoneal lavage exudates. Cells harvested from the peritoneum were assessed for macrophage differentiation markers, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion profiles (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, IL-1β, TNFα). The ratio of RvD1 to pro-inflammatory PGE2 and LTB4 was increased in the peritoneal cavity of FO-supplemented animals. FO induced a decrease in the number of monocytes in the lavage fluid, with no change in the number of macrophages, neutrophils, or lymphocytes. Macrophage phagocytosis and M1/M2 messenger RNA markers were unchanged by FO with the exception of decreased PPARγ expression. FO increased ex vivo TNFα secretion after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our findings provide evidence that nutraceutically relevant doses of FO supplements given before and during chemical peritonitis shift the balance of lipid mediators towards a proresolution, anti-inflammatory state without drastically altering the number or phenotype of local innate immune cell populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression and serum adiponectin and adipose omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalakis, George; Kiriakakis, Michael; Tsibinos, George; Hatzis, Christos; Flouri, Sofia; Mantzoros, Christos; Kafatos, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate for a possible relationship between depression and serum adiponectin and adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA. The sample consisted of 90 healthy adolescent volunteers from the island of Crete. There were 54 girls and 36 boys, aged 13 to 18. The mean age was 15.2 years. Subjects were examined by the Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic of the University of Crete. Depression was assessed through the use of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in adipose tissue. CES-D correlated with dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that BDI was negatively associated with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), while CES-D was positively associated with DGLA in adipose tissue. Serum adiponectin was not significantly associated with depression. The negative relationship between adipose EPA and depression in adolescents, is in line with findings of previous studies involving adult and elderly subjects, demonstrating negative relations between depression and adipose omega-3 PUFA. This is the first literature report of a relationship between depression and an individual omega-3 fatty acid in adolescents. The inverse relationship between adipose EPA and depression indicates that a low long-term dietary intake of EPA is associated with an increased risk for depression in adolescents.

  8. Needs in omega 3 and ocular pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bretillon Lionel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy at birth has regularly increased decade after decade, especially since the beginning of the 20th century: 15 years have been gained over the past 50 years. Changes in living and dietary habits during this time period have been associated with the development of various pathologies which represent a growing socioeconomic burden. Among age-related disorders, ocular diseases are the second most prevalent ones after 65 years. Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of visual impairment after the age of 50 years. Age is the prominent risk factor for AMD and is accompanied with both endogenous (including genetics and environmental factors, such as smoking habits and dietary factors (diet rich in cholesterol and saturated fatty acids. AMD is characterized by the loss of cells at the most central area of the retina, called macula. The neural retina is a highly structured neurosensory tissue that is responsible for the transduction pathway. The transduction pathway is initiated in photoreceptors where the light stimulus is coded into an electrical signal. This signal is transmitted to neighboured neurons and transferred to the brain via the optic nerve. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is the cellular and metabolic interface between the neural retina and choriocapillaris through Bruch’s membrane. The close association between RPE and photoreceptors is one of the factors that promote the efficacy of RPE to, in the one hand, provide nutrients and oxygen to photoreceptors and, in the other hand, eliminate the metabolic debris originating from shedding of the outer segments. Epidemiological data suggest that dietary habits privileging the consumption of omega- 3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids participate to prevent from the development of AMD (Sangiovanni et al., 2009. The mechanisms underlying the effects of omega-3 fatty acids remain unclear until now. The purpose of the present paper is to give a review on

  9. Developmental and growth temperature regulation of two different microsomal omega-6 desaturase genes in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppard, E P; Kinney, A J; Stecca, K L; Miao, G H

    1996-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid content is one of the major factors influencing the quality of vegetable oils. Edible oils rich in monounsaturated fatty acid provide improved oil stability, flavor, and nutrition for human and animal consumption. In plants, the microsomal omega-6 desaturase-catalyzed pathway is the primary route of production of polyunsaturated lipids. We report the isolation of two different cDNA sequences, FAD2-1 and FAD2-2, encoding microsomal omega-6 desaturase in soybeans and the characterization of their developmental and temperature regulation. The FAD2-1 gene is strongly expressed in developing seeds, whereas the FAD2-2 gene is constitutively expressed in both vegetative tissues and developing seeds. Thus, the FAD2-2 gene-encoded omega-6 desaturase appears to be responsible for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids within membrane lipids in both vegetative tissues and developing seeds. The seed-specifically expressed FAD2-1 gene is likely to play a major role in controlling conversion of oleic acid to linoleic acid within storage lipids during seed development. In both soybean seed and leaf tissues, linoleic acid and linolenic acid levels gradually increase as temperature decreases. However, the levels of transcripts for FAD2-1, FAD2-2, and the plastidial omega-6 desaturase gene (FAD 6) do not increase at low temperature. These results suggest that the elevated polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in developing soybean seeds grown at low temperature are not due to the enhanced expression of omega-6 desaturase genes. PMID:8587990

  10. The Omega spectrometer in the West Hall.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    Inside the hut which sits on top of the superconducting magnet are the TV cameras that observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet gap below. On the background the two beam lines feeding the spectrometer target, for separated hadrons up to 40 GeV, on the right, for 80 GeV electrons, on the left, respectively. The latter strikes a radiator thus sending into Omega tagged photons up to 80 GeV. On the foreground, the two sections of the large gas Cerenkov counter working at atmospheric pressure, used for trigger purpose.

  11. Progress of Rugby Hohlraum Experiments on Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Casner, Alexis; Gauthier, Pascal; Seytor, Patricia; Monteil, Marie-Christine; Park, Hye-Sook; Robey, Harry; Ross, Steven; Amendt, Peter; Girard, Frederic; Villette, Bruno; Reverdin, Charles; Loiseau, Pascal; Caillaud, Tony; Landoas, Olivier; Li, Chi Kang; Petrasso, Richard; Seguin, Fredrick; Rosenberg, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept is predicted to enable better coupling and higher gains in the indirect drive approach to ignition. A collaborative experimental program is currently pursued on OMEGA to test this concept in preparation for future megajoule-scale ignition designs. A direct comparison of gas-filled rugby hohlraums with classical cylinders was recently performed, showing a significant (up to ~40%) observed x-ray drive enhancement and neutron yields that are consistently higher in the rugby case. This work extends and confirms our previous findings in empty rugby hohlraums.

  12. Blood docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in vegans: Associations with age and gender and effects of an algal-derived omega-3 fatty acid supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, Barbara; Kelsey, Kristine S; Schwartz, Todd A; Harris, William S

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that vegetarians and vegans have much lower plasma concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids) when compared to those who eat fish. The purposes of this study were 1) to define the age and/or sex-specific docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids levels in red blood cell membranes (expressed as a percent of total fatty acids; hereafter the omega-3 index) in long-term vegans, and 2) to determine the effects of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement (254 mg docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids/day for 4 months) on the omega-3 index. A sample (n = 165) of vegans was recruited, and their omega-3 index was determined using a dried blood spot methodology. A subset of 46 subjects with a baseline omega-3 index of vegan cohort, the index was significantly higher in females than males (3.9 ± 1.0% vs. 3.5 ± 1.0%; p = 0.026) and was directly related to age (p for trend = 0.009). The omega-3 index increased from 3.1 ± 0.6% to 4.8 ± 0.8% (p = 0.009) in the supplementation study. We conclude that vegans have low baseline omega-3 levels, but not lower than omnivores who also consume very little docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. The vegans responded robustly to a relatively low dose of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracting the Omega- electric quadrupole moment from lattice QCD data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena

    2011-03-01

    The Omega- has an extremely long lifetime, and is the most stable of the baryons with spin 3/2. Therefore the Omega- magnetic moment is very accurately known. Nevertheless, its electric quadrupole moment was never measured, although estimates exist in different formalisms. In principle, lattice QCD simulations provide at present the most appropriate way to estimate the Omega- form factors, as function of the square of the transferred four-momentum, Q2, since it describes baryon systems at the physical mass for the strange quark. However, lattice QCD form factors, and in particular GE2, are determined at finite Q2 only, and the extraction of the electric quadrupole moment, Q_Omega= GE2(0) e/(2 M_Omega), involves an extrapolation of the numerical lattice results. In this work we reproduce the lattice QCD data with a covariant spectator quark model for Omega- which includes a mixture of S and two D states for the relative quark-diquark motion. Once the model is calibrated, it is used to determine Q_Omega. Our prediction is Q_Omega= (0.96 +/- 0.02)*10^(-2) efm2 [GE2(0)=0.680 +/- 0.012].

  14. Lipid profile and levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids especially omega-3 is projected to be way below the recommended intake in Kenya. Thus, there is need to find other sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). This study screened for the lipid profile and levels of omega-3 PUFAs in jackfruit and explored the variation in lipid ...

  15. Dual-shank attachment design for omega seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattinger, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process is disclosed for attaching welded omega seal segments to reactor heads, standpipes, mechanisms, and plugs which comprises a first shank in combination with a second shank to attach an omega seal at a metal-to-metal interface

  16. The Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector readout system user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallewell, G.

    1984-11-01

    The manual describes the electronic readout system of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The system is described in its configuration of September 1984 after the Rich readout system had been used in two Omega experiments. (U.K.)

  17. Modification of the omega-meson lifetime in nuclear matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotulla, M.; Trnka, D.; Muehlich, P.; Anton, G.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Ehmanns, A.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Essig, K.; Funke, Ch.; Gothe, R.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Hoessl, J.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kopf, B.; Krusche, B.; Langheinrich, J.; Loehner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mertens, T.; Metag, V.; Mosel, U.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Radkov, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Suft, G.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Suele, A.; Thoma, U.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wendel, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Information on hadron properties in the nuclear medium has been derived from the photoproduction of omega mesons on the nuclei C, Ca, Nb, and Pb using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS detector at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The dependence of the omega-meson cross section on the nuclear mass

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Could Alleviate the Risks of Traumatic Brain Injury – A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathy R. Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an acquired brain trauma that occurs when any sudden trauma/injury causes damage to the brain. TBI is characterized by tissue damage and imbalance in the cerebral blood flow and metabolism. It has been established through laboratory experiments that the dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs could reduce the oxidative stress developed in brain due to TBI. The inclusion of omega-3 FA in diet could normalize the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and thus, it could restore the survival of neuronal cells. BDNF improves the synaptic transmission by regulating synapsin 1 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP response element binding protein. The brain tissue analysis of TBI models supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs showed significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, nucleic acid and protein oxidation, thereby promoting neuronal and glial cell survival. Thus, omega-3 FA intake could be considered as a therapeutic option to reduce the secondary neuronal damages initiated by TBI.

  19. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Diets with Improved Omega-3 Fatty Acid Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla R V Coelho

    Full Text Available A high incidence of cardiovascular disease is observed worldwide, and dietary habits are one of the risk factors for these diseases. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet help to prevent cardiovascular disease. We used life cycle assessment to analyse the potential of two strategies to improve the nutritional and environmental characteristics of French diets: 1 modifying diets by changing the quantities and proportions of foods and 2 increasing the omega-3 contents in diets by replacing mainly animal foods with equivalent animal foods having higher omega-3 contents. We also investigated other possibilities for reducing environmental impacts. Our results showed that a diet compliant with nutritional recommendations for macronutrients had fewer environmental impacts than the current average French diet. Moving from an omnivorous to a vegetarian diet further reduced environmental impacts. Increasing the omega-3 contents in animal rations increased Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA in animal food products. Providing these enriched animal foods in human diets increased their EPA and DHA contents without affecting their environmental impacts. However, in diets that did not contain fish, EPA and DHA contents were well below the levels recommended by health authorities, despite the inclusion of animal products enriched in EPA and DHA. Reducing meat consumption and avoidable waste at home are two main avenues for reducing environmental impacts of diets.

  20. Does perinatal omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid deficiency increase appetite signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Michael L; Soueid, Mona; Chen, Nora; Jayasooriya, Anura P; Sinclair, Andrew J; Wlodek, Mary E; Weisinger, Harrison S; Weisinger, Richard S

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the effect of maternal dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deficiency and repletion on food appetite signaling. Sprague-Dawley rat dams were maintained on diets either supplemented with (CON) or deficient in (DEF) omega-3 PUFA. All offspring were raised on the maternal diet until weaning. After weaning, two groups remained on the respective maternal diet (CON and DEF groups), whereas a third group, born of dams fed the DEF diet, were switched to the CON diet (REC). Experiments on food intake began when the male rats reached 16 weeks of age. Food intake was stimulated either by a period of food restriction, by blocking glucose utilization (by 2-deoxyglucose injection), or by blocking beta-oxidation of fatty acids (by beta-mercaptoacetate injection). DEF animals consumed more than CON animals in response to all stimuli, with the greatest difference (1.9-fold) demonstrated following administration of 2-deoxyglucose. REC animals also consumed more than CON animals in response to food restriction and 2-deoxyglucose but not to beta-mercaptoacetate. These findings indicate that supply of omega-3 PUFA, particularly during the perinatal period, plays a role in the normal development of mechanisms controlling food intake, especially glucoprivic (i.e. reduced glucose availability) appetite signaling. Dietary repletion of omega-3 PUFA from 3 weeks of age restored intake responses to fatty acid metabolite signaling but did not reverse those in response to food restriction or glucoprivic stimuli.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Improves Heart Rate Variability in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Baumann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obese children and adolescents are at high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases later in life. We hypothesized that cardiovascular prophylaxis with omega-3 fatty acids could benefit them. In our study, 20 children and adolescents (mean body mass index percentile: 99.1; mean age: 11.0 years underwent two ambulatory 24 h Holter electrocardiography (ECG recordings (before and after at least 3 months of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Time domain heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate (HR were examined for these patients. As a control, we used 24 h Holter ECG recordings of 94 nonobese children and adolescents. Time domain HRV parameters, which are indicators of vagal stimulation, were significantly lower in obese patients than in healthy controls, but HR was higher (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal [SDNN] interbeat intervals: −34.02%; root mean square of successive differences [RMSSD] between normal heartbeats: −40.66%; percentage of consecutive RR intervals [pNN50]: −60.24%; HR: +13.37%. After omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, time domain HRV parameters and HR of obese patients were similar to the values of healthy controls (SDNN interbeat intervals: −21.73%; RMSSD: −19.56%; pNN50: −25.59%; HR: +3.94%. Therefore, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may be used for cardiovascular prophylaxis in obese children and adolescents.

  2. KARAKTERISTIK MIKROKAPSUL MINYAK KAYA ASAM LEMAK OMEGA-3 DARI HASIL SAMPING PENEPUNGAN LEMURU [Characteristics of Microcapsule of omega-3 Fatty Acids Enriched Oil from Lemuru Meal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teti Estiasih 1

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids enriched fish oil from lemuru fishmeal processing met the quality standard of food grade fish oil, but it was susceptible to oxidation. Microencapsulation by spray drying was one method that could protect this oil against oxidation and the microcapsule could be applied more widely and easier to handle. The important factor that affected microencapsulation process by spray drying method was encapsulant to core ratio. The objective of research was to elucidate the effect of encapsulant to core ratio (2:1; 3:1; 4:1; 5:1; and 6:1 (w/w on characteristics of omega-3 fatty acids enriched fish oil microcapsule. The increase of microencapsulation efficiency and the decrease of surface oil proportion were related to better emulsion stability prior to spray drying and film forming ability around oil globule as the sodium caseinate proportion increased. Emulsification and heating during spray drying could induce hydrolysis of triglycerides in fish oil. Therefore, the quantity of free fatty acids relatively unchanged although the proportion of encapsulated oil decreased. The decrease of oxidation degree is caused by better protective effect of sodium caseinate during emulsification and spray drying due to better film forming ability as proportion of encapsulant increased. However, it was followed by the decrease of omega-3 fatty acids content that related to decreasing proportion of fish oil. This phenomenon was supported by unchanging omega-3 fatty acids retention that showed protective effect of sodium caseinate on oxidation during microencapsulation. Different encapsulant to core ratio did not change yield of microcapsule. Different proportion of surface oil did not affect microcapsule recovery.

  3. Omega-oxidation is the major pathway for the catabolism of leukotriene B4 in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S; Goldstein, I M

    1984-08-25

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), formed by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), may be an important mediator of inflammation. Recent studies suggest that human leukocytes can convert LTB4 to products that are less biologically active. To examine the catabolism of LTB4, we developed (using high performance liquid chromatography) a sensitive, reproducible assay for this mediator and its omega-oxidation products (20-OH- and 20-COOH-LTB4). With this assay, we have found that human PMN (but not human monocytes, lymphocytes, or platelets) convert exogenous LTB4 almost exclusively to 20-OH- and 20-COOH-LTB4 (identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Catabolism of exogenous LTB4 by omega-oxidation is rapid (t1/2 approximately 4 min at 37 degrees C in reaction mixtures containing 1.0 microM LTB4 and 20 X 10(6) PMN/ml), temperature-dependent (negligible at 0 degrees C), and varies with cell number as well as with initial substrate concentration. The pathway for omega-oxidation in PMN is specific for LTB4 and 5(S),12(S)-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (only small amounts of other dihydroxylated-derivatives of arachidonic acid are converted to omega-oxidation products). Even PMN that are stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate to produce large amounts of superoxide anion radicals catabolize exogenous leukotriene B4 primarily by omega-oxidation. Finally, LTB4 that is generated when PMN are stimulated with the calcium ionophore, A23187, is rapidly catabolized by omega-oxidation. Thus, human PMN not only generate and respond to LTB4, but also rapidly and specifically catabolize this mediator by omega-oxidation.

  4. OMEGA EP high-energy petawatt laser: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maywar, D N; Kelly, J H; Waxer, L J; Morse, S F B; Begishev, I A; Bromage, J; Dorrer, C; Edwards, J L; Folnsbee, L; Guardalben, M J; Jacobs, S D; Jungquist, R; Kessler, T J; Kidder, R W; Kruschwitz, B E; Loucks, S J; Marciante, J R; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Okishev, A V

    2008-01-01

    OMEGA EP (extended performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. It will enable high-energy picosecond backlighting of high-energy-density experiments and inertial confinement fusion implosions, the investigation of advanced-ignition experiments such as fast ignition, and the exploration of high-energy-density phenomena. The OMEGA EP short-pulse beams have the flexibility to be directed to either the existing OMEGA target chamber, or the new, auxiliary OMEGA EP target chamber for independent experiments. This paper will detail progress made towards activation, which is on schedule for completion in April 2008

  5. Recent advances in the field of omega-3-lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    During the last 15-20 years the use of fish and algae oils for human applications has received increasing attention from academia, industry and consumers. This is due to the fact that a growing body of evidence supports that marine omega-3 lipids have a wide range of health beneficial effects......, and at the same time the intake of these healthy lipids is far below the recommendable level in many parts of the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of recent advances in the body of knowledge about the health benefits of omega-3 lipids. For many years fish oil produced from wild fish has been...... the most important source of marine omega-3 fatty acids. However, the production of fish oil has been stable during the last decade. Therefore, to meet the increased demand for omega-3 lipids new sources are available. The presentation will discuss possible future sources of omega-3 lipids for human...

  6. Marine lipids and the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    of omega-3 fatty acids has been reported to be affected by several factors; among the important factors were the digestion and absorption processes of omega-3 containing lipids in the gastrointestinal tract. Both lipid structures and food structures can affect the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids....... In vitro studies provided a mechanistic understanding on the varied bioavailability caused by different lipid structures, the lower relative bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from FAEE formulation was closely related to the slower digestion rate of FAEE. Microencapsulated fish oil has often been used...... as a food additive because of its better chemical stability; studies showed that microencapsulation did not affect the bioavailability significantly. Even though food structures also affect the digestion and absorption of omega-3 containing lipids, several studies have shown that long-term intake of fish...

  7. Fatty acid composition of Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp. and Chaetoceros sp. microalgae and introduction as potential new sources to extinct omega 3 and omega 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Gorjzdadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out to determine the oil fatty acids from two special species of microalgae; Spirulina sp.,Chlorella sp. and also Chaetoceros sp. collected from Bahmanshir River. Materials and Methods: Sampling of microalgae Chaetoceros sp. from Bahmanshir River was under taken using bottle samplers during spring season of 2013. Microalgae Spirulina sp. and Chlorella sp. were supplied from Shrimp Research Institute of Iran in Bushehr Province. Samples then were cultured under controlled laboratory conditions and mass culture for 100 liters was undertaken. Isolation of microalgae species from water of cultured media was carried out using filtration and centrifugation methods. The fatty acid compositions were determined by Gas – FID chromatography. Results: Results showed that regarding Saturated Fatty Acids (SFA obtained from purified culture of Chaetoceros sp., Spirulina sp. and Chlorella sp. the maximum amount of total fatty acids were belonged to palmitic acids (C16:0 with 15.21%, 30.1% and 25.17% of total fatty acids  respectively. Analysis of Mono Unsaturated Fatty Acids (MUFA showed that in the Oleic acid was maximum amount of 34% in Spirulina sp. In addition the amount of MUFA in Chlorella sp. was 16.37% of total fatty acids. On the other hand the amount of palmeotic acid in purified culture of Chaetoceros sp. was 30.33% from total content of fatty acids. Analysis of Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA, Linoleic acid (C18:2 (Omega 6, revealed maximum percentage in Spirulina sp. with 18.8%. Results of Alpha linoleic acid (C18:3 (Omega3 analysis showed maximum amount of 9.66% in Chlorella sp. compared to other microalgae with lower omega 3 contents. Spirulina sp. contained maximum amount of Linoleic acid (C18:2 with 18.8% of total fatty acids. Therefore, Spirulina sp. can be considered as a rich source of omega 6 for the purpose of fatty acid extractions. The presence of PUFA in Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. was

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs is suppressed by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Taguchi

    Full Text Available Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs are responsible for tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 secreted from cancer stroma populated by CAFs is a prerequisite for cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA have been reported to have anti-tumor effects on diverse types of malignancies. Fat-1 mice, which can convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFA independent of diet, are useful to investigate the functions of endogenous omega-3 PUFA. To examine the effect of omega-3 PUFA on tumorigenesis, TC-1 cells, a murine epithelial cell line immortalized by human papillomavirus (HPV oncogenes, were injected subcutaneously into fat-1 or wild type mice. Tumor growth and angiogenesis of the TC-1 tumor were significantly suppressed in fat-1 compared to wild type mice. cDNA microarray of the tumors derived from fat-1 and wild type mice revealed that MMP-9 is downregulated in fat-1 mice. Immunohistochemical study demonstrated immunoreactivity for MMP-9 in the tumor stromal fibroblasts was diffusely positive in wild type whereas focal in fat-1 mice. MMP-9 was expressed in primary cultured fibroblasts isolated from fat-1 and wild type mice but was not expressed in TC-1 cells. Co-culture of fibroblasts with TC-1 cells enhanced the expression and the proteinase activity of MMP-9, although the protease activity of MMP-9 in fat-1-derived fibroblasts was lower than that in wild type fibroblasts. Our data suggests that omega-3 PUFAs suppress MMP-9 induction and tumor angiogenesis. These findings may provide insight into mechanisms by which omega-3 PUFAs exert anti-tumor effects by modulating tumor microenvironment.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Greg M.; Ma, Qiu-Lan; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    More than a dozen epidemiological studies have reported that reduced levels or intake of omega-3 fatty acids or fish consumption is associated with increased risk for age-related cognitive decline or dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased dietary consumption or blood levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) appear protective for AD and other dementia in multiple epidemiological studies; however, three studies suggest that the ApoE4 genotype limits protection. DHA is broadly neuroprotective via multiple mechanisms that include neuroprotective DHA metabolites, reduced arachidonic acid metabolites, and increased trophic factors or downstream trophic signal transduction. DHA is also protective against several risk factors for dementia including head trauma, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. DHA is specifically protective against AD via additional mechanisms: It limits the production and accumulation of the amyloid β peptide toxin that is widely believed to drive the disease; and it also suppresses several signal transduction pathways induced by Aβ, including two major kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule associated protein tau and promote neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Based on the epidemiological and basic research data, expert panels have recommended the need for clinical trials with omega-3 fatty acids, notably DHA, for the prevention or treatment of age-related cognitive decline—with a focus on the most prevalent cause, AD. Clinical trials are underway to prevent and treat AD. Results to-date suggest that DHA may be more effective if it is begun early or used in conjunction with antioxidants. PMID:19523795

  10. OMEGA polar-drive target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium–tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (∼7 × 10 14 W/cm 2 at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser–plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR ∼ 22 or at lower intensity (∼3 × 10 14 W/cm 2 ) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR ∼ 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

  11. Backward omega /sup 0/ and eta /sup 0/ production in pi p interactions at 9 and 12 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Benkheiri, P; D'Almagne, B; De Rosny, G; Eisenstein, B I; Ferrer, A; Fleury, P; Grossetête, B; Jacholkowski, A; Nguyen, H; Petroff, P; Richard, F; Rivet, P; Roudeau, P; Rougé, A; Six, J; Treille, D; Volte, A; Yiou, T P; Yoshida, H

    1979-01-01

    The backward production of omega /sup 0/ mesons in the u-channel I/sub u/=/sup 1///sub 2/ exchange reaction pi /sup -/p to N/sup 0/ (1680) omega /sup 0/ has been studied at 9 GeV/c and 12 GeV/c incident momenta. The data comes from an experiment performed at the CERN Omega Spectrometer using a fast proton trigger device. The backward production of the eta /sup 0/ meson has also been observed and the coupling constant ratio g/sub eta NN//g/sub pi NN/ has been estimated. (21 refs).

  12. Exclusive {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production with muons at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinelli, Massimo Maria

    2010-02-02

    In the present thesis the exclusive reaction {mu}+N{yields}{mu}'+{omega}{pi}{sup 0}+N is studied from collisions of a polarized muon beam (160 GeV/c momentum) with a polarized {sup 6}LiD target. The goal is the quantitative determination of the spin-parity (J{sup P}) 1{sup -} contribution in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} signal, which is in theoretical models identified as the first radial excitation of the {rho}(770) meson with mass {proportional_to}1250 MeV/c{sup 2}. The concurring 1{sup +} in this mass region is the known b{sub 1}(1235) with dominant {omega}{pi}{sup 0} decay. The power of the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL2 was studied by means of exclusive {omega} and the existence of crystals detected. It was shown that the contribution of the energy calibration of a single crystal to the observed {pi}{sup 0} width is small. The {omega}{pi}{sup 0} selection for the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} gives the kinematical range of the reaction: Squared mass of the virtual photon ({gamma}{sup *}): left angle Q{sup 2} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -1} (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2}; Bjorken variable left angle x{sub B} right angle {proportional_to}10{sup -3}; energy in the photon-nucleon c. m. rest system: left angle W right angle {proportional_to}13.5 GeV; inclination of the exponential t-distribution: b=5.27{+-}0.29 GeV{sup -2}. The background was determined by means of a fit of the accociated {lambda} distribution in a height of 19{+-}4% (<11% in the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} peak for incoherent scattering). The spin-parity was studied by the consideration of numerous angular distributions for the relative orientations of muon scattering, {omega}{pi}{sup 0} production, and decay planes. Acceptance corrections were calculated by means of a self-developed Monte-Carlo generator. We observed a 42.1{+-}29.2% strong J{sup P}=1{sup -} contribution (77.2{sub -35.2}{sup 22.8}% for incoherent scattering), compatible with theoretical prediction. For this contribution the conservation of the

  13. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Handmade cloned transgenic sheep rich in omega-3 Fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT has been adapted worldwide to generate transgenic animals, although the traditional procedure relies largely on instrumental micromanipulation. In this study, we used the modified handmade cloning (HMC established in cattle and pig to produce transgenic sheep with elevated levels of omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids. Codon-optimized nematode mfat-1 was inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector and was transferred into the genome of primary ovine fibroblast cells from a male Chinese merino sheep. Reverse transcriptase PCR, gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select nuclear donor cells capable of converting omega-6 (n-6 into n-3 fatty acids. Blastocysts developed after 7 days of in vitro culture were surgically transplanted into the uterus of female ovine recipients of a local sheep breed in Xinjiang. For the HMC, approximately 8.9% (n  =925 of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Four recipients became pregnant after 53 blastocysts were transplanted into 29 naturally cycling females, and a total of 3 live transgenic lambs were produced. Detailed analyses on one of the transgenic lambs revealed a single integration of the modified nematode mfat-1 gene at sheep chromosome 5. The transgenic sheep expressed functional n-3 fatty acid desaturase, accompanied by more than 2-folds reduction of n-6/n-3 ratio in the muscle (p<0.01 and other major organs/tissues (p<0.05. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transgenic sheep produced by the HMC. Compared to the traditional SCNT method, HMC showed an equivalent efficiency but proved cheaper and easier in operation.

  15. Early-time measurements of soft x-ray emission in an omega-upgrade laser-produced plasma. Semi-annual report, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.; Welch, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in January 1997 (following arrival of the FY-97 funding) we have been preparing for our first series of experiments under this grant at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) on the Omega Upgrade laser facility, now scheduled to commence June 2, 1997. For these experiments we have purchased (just arrived) a four-channel gated-stripline microchannel plate (MCP) detector to be coupled to our soft x-ray flat-field grazing incidence spectrograph used previously at LLE. This will permit time-resolved 'snapshots' of the complete spectra with a resolution to times as short as 180 ps per strip. An advantage of this technique over the streak camera used previously is the lack of any carbon absorbers such as in the thin plastic cathode required for the streak camera. This eliminates absorption in the 30-44 angstrom spectral region in which we are interested for intermediate-Z target materials such as Mg, Al and Si. An auxiliary turbomolecular-drag pump has also been installed in order to obtain the necessary vacuum for optimum MCP operation

  16. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation can improve both symptoms and signs of dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon,Jae-Woo; Han,Sang Beom

    2017-01-01

    Jae-Woo Kwon,1 Sang Beom Han2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuncheon, South Korea We read with great interest the article by Gatell-Tortajada1 entitled “Oral supplementation with a nutraceutical formulation containing omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants in a large series of patients with dry eye symptoms: results of a prosp...

  17. Omega Hawaii Antenna System: Modification and Validation Tests. Volume 2. Data Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-19

    a benchmark because of potential hotel construction . DS 5-1 DATA SHEET 5 (DS-5) RADIO FIELD INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS OMEGA STATION: HAWAII SITE NO. C 1A...27.5 1008 11.05 26.5 1007 Ft 11.80 28.1 COMMENT Not considered for a benchmark because of potential hotel construction . DS 5-5 DATA SHEET 5 (DS-5) RADIO

  18. Antiarrhythmogenic effect of omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters in a patient treated with Omacor after a non-Q-wave myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Ardashev

    2014-02-01

    The patient agreed to add omega-3 fatty acid ethyl ester supplementation (1 g/day to his treatment regimen. Pacemaker analyses 3 months later demonstrated no NSVT and only 215 PVBs daily. In more than 1 year of follow-up, the patient has remained well and has had no further ventricular arrhythmias. We conclude that omega-3 fatty acid ethyl ester supplementation may be beneficial in post-MI patients with pacemakers who develop ventricular arrhythmias.

  19. A Study of Spin Alignment of $\\rho(770)^{\\pm}$ and $\\omega(782)$ Mesons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; De Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The helicity density matrix elements rho[00] of rho(770)+- and omega(782) mesons produced in Z decays have been measured using the OPAL detector at LEP. Over the measured meson energy range, the values are compatible with 1/3, corresponding to a statistical mix of helicity -1, 0 and +1 states. For the highest accessible scaled energy range 0.3 < x_E < 0.6, the measured rho[00] values of the rho(770)+- and the omega are 0.373 +- 0.052 and 0.142 +- 0.114, respectively. These results are compared to measurements of other vector mesons.

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  1. EFEK SUPLEMENTASI OMEGA-3 PADA PENDERITA ARTRITIS REUMATOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviana Christiani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Omega-3 Supplementation on Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.A study on omega-3 supplementation was conducted to women of 55-90 years old with active rheumatoid arthritis who stay at home for elderly (in six nursing home in Bogor. The objective of this study is to see the effects of omega-3 supplementation on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Sixty subjects (respondents were devided into two groups. The first group, 30 respondents, were given an omega-3 capsuls (180 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA every day for two months; the second group, also 30 respondents, were given placebo capsules (equal. Data collected including identity of respondents, anthropometric, clinical status, radiology (rontgen, and blood sample analysis (LED and ARF. The results of this study showed that omega-3 supplementation proportionally decreased the quantity of patients with morning stiffness significantly, decreased the quantity of patients with joint swelling (not significant, failed inreducing the quantity of patients with joint pain, and failed in changing the value of RF (from + to - of patients. The omega-3 supplementation on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis also failed in decreasing the average of LED of the patients, and failed in changing the result of rontgen.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, EPA & DHA omega-3, supplementtaion, elderly.

  2. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Fieseler, K V; Fettman, M J; Zabel, S; Rosychuk, R A W; Ogilvie, G K; Greenwalt, T L

    2004-06-01

    Twenty-nine dogs were included in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised trial and were orally supplemented for 10 weeks with either flax oil (200 mg/kg/day), eicosapentaenoic acid (50 mg/kg/day) and docosahexaenoic acid (35 mg/kg/day) in a commercial preparation, or mineral oil as a placebo. For each dog, clinical scores were determined based on a scoring system developed prior to the trial. Total omega-6 and omega-3 intake and the ratio of omega-6:omega-3 (omega-6:3) were calculated before and after the trial. The dogs' clinical scores improved in those supplemented with flax oil and the commercial preparation, but not in the placebo group. No correlation was identified between total fatty acid intake or omega-6:3 ratio and clinical scores. Based on the results of this study, the total intake of fatty acids or the omega-6:3 ratio do not seem to be the main factors in determining the clinical response.

  3. Cataclysmic Variables and Active Binary Stars in Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, T.; Brochmann, M.; Dorfman, J. L.; White, M. V.; Cool, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    We report findings from our ongoing research on the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using a 3x3 mosaic of Wide Field Camera pointings with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The data consist of F435W (B435), F625W (R625), and F658N (Hα ) images and cover roughly 10x10 arcminutes, out to beyond the cluster's half-mass radius. Our current work is a search for cataclysmic variables (CVs) and active binaries (ABs) (e.g., RS CVn and BY Dra stars) as counterparts to X-ray point sources previously detected with Chandra. The ACS field encompasses 109 of the Chandra sources, 20-50 of which are likely to be cluster members according to our statistical estimates (the rest being primarily active galaxies). Using DAOPHOT to obtain photometry in 20x20 arcsecond patches surrounding each X-ray source, we are constructing color-magnitude diagrams to search for stars with Hα -R625 and/or B435-R625 colors indicative of CVs or ABs in ˜ 1 arcsecond Chandra error circles. With roughly half of the patches analyzed, several AB candidates and only a small number of CV candidates have emerged. Our tentative conclusion is that CVs may be significantly rarer in Omega Cen than in 47 Tuc, in contrast to the comparable numbers ( ˜100) predicted for these two clusters from tidal capture theory (Di Stefano and Rappaport 1994). Alternatively, the CVs could be strongly concentrated toward the cluster center, and thus not yet appear in our sample. To date, most of the patches we have analyzed are 3-4 arcminutes from the cluster center and thus are outside the cluster core (radius 2.6 arcminutes). Our continuing work should soon enable us to resolve this question. This work is supported by NASA grant GO-9442 from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  4. Erythrocyte Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content in Elite Athletes in Response to Omega-3 Supplementation: A Dose-Response Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Félix; Pons, Victoria; Banquells, Montserrat; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Supplementation of Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) in athletes is related to the anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect and consequently its action on all the processes of tissue restoration and adaptation to physical stress. Objective Evaluate the Omega-3 Index (O3Ix) response, in red blood cells, to supplemental EPA + DHA intake in the form of high purity and stable composition gums (G), in elite summer athletes. Method Twenty-four summer sport athletes of both sexes, pertaining to the Olympic Training Center in Spain, were randomized to two groups (2G = 760 or 3G = 1140 mg of n-3 FA in Omegafort OKids, Ferrer Intl.) for 4 months. Five athletes and four training staff volunteers were control group. Results The O3Ix was lower than 8% in 93.1% of all the athletes. The supplementation worked in a dose-dependent manner: 144% for the 3G dose and 135% for the 2G, both p < 0.001, with a 3% significant decrease of Omega-6 FAs. No changes were observed for the control group. Conclusions Supplementation with n-3FA increases the content of EPA DHA in the red blood cells at 4 months in a dose-dependent manner. Athletes with lower basal O3Ix were more prone to increment their levels. The study is registered with Protocol Registration and Results System (ClinicalTrials.gov) number NCT02610270. PMID:28656110

  5. Effects of omega-3 fatty acid plus alpha-tocopherol supplementation on malnutrition-inflammation score, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Zatollah; Soleimani, Alireza; Shakeri, Hossein; Mazroii, Navid; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    The current study was carried out to assess the effects of omega-3 fatty acid and alpha-tocopherol co-supplementation on malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 120 patients with chronic HD were included. Patients were randomly allocated into four groups to receive: (1) 1250 mg/day omega-3 fatty acid containing 600 mg EPA and 300 mg DHA + alpha-tocopherol placebo (n = 30); (2) 400 IU/day alpha-tocopherol + omega-3 fatty acids placebo (n = 30); (3) 1250 mg omega-3 fatty acids/day + 400 IU/day alpha-tocopherol (n = 30); and (4) omega-3 fatty acids placebo + alpha-tocopherol placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of intervention, all three groups of alpha-tocopherol only, individual omega-3 fatty acids, and combined omega-3 fatty acids and alpha-tocopherol experienced a significant improvements in MIS compared with the placebo group; however, improvements were much greater in the individual omega-3 fats (-1.4 ± 1.4) and combined omega-3 fats and alpha-tocopherol (-1.1 ± 2.3) groups compared with alpha-tocopherol group alone (-0.5 ± 1.7, P = 0.004). Furthermore, both individual and combined intervention with omega-3 fats and alpha-tocopherol led to a significant increase in plasma nitric oxide (NO) (combined group: +17.6 ± 29.3; alpha-tocopherol: +43.1 ± 36.3; omega-3 fats: +31.0 ± 40.0; and placebo: -0.5 ± 18.5 µmol/L, respectively, P acids and alpha-tocopherol co-supplementation for 12 weeks among HD patients improved MIS, plasma NO and TAC levels. Future studies with longer duration of the intervention are needed to confirm the validity of our findings. CLINICAL REGISTRATION: www.irct.ir as IRCT201410245623N28.

  6. Long Duration Backlighter Experiments at Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reighard, A; Glendinning, S; Young, P; Hsing, W; Foord, M; Schneider, M; Lu, K; Dittrich, T; Wallace, R; Sorce, C

    2008-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a 7.5 ns-duration pinhole-apertured backlighter at the Omega laser facility. Pinhole-apertured point-projection backlighting for 8 ns will be useful for imaging evolving features in experiments at the National Ignition Facility. The backlighter consisted of a 20 (micro)m diameter pinhole in a 75 (micro)m thick Ta substrate separated from a Zn emitter (9 keV) by a 400 (micro)m thick high-density carbon piece. The carbon prevented the shock from the laser-driven surface from reaching the substrate before 8 ns and helped minimize x-ray ablation of the pinhole substrate. Grid wires in x-ray framing camera images of a gold grid have a source-limited resolution significantly smaller than the pinhole diameter due to the high aspect ratio of the pinhole, but do not become much smaller at late times

  7. FY17 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doeppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gumbrell, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krygier, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marley, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Saunders, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-26

    The Capseed campaign goal is to measure shock front velocity non-uniformities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator materials and quantify the level of non-uniformity caused by intrinsic effects. This is done using the Omega High Resolution Velocimeter (OHRV) to obtain velocity maps of the optically reflecting shock front following release of the ablator material into either PMMA for the warm experiments or cryogenic deuterium for the cryo experiments. For the three half-days in FY17 the focus was twofold: complete measurements on the impact of oxygen heterogeneity and oxygen mitigation layers for glow discharge polymer (GDP), and begin measuring velocity non-uniformities on deep release from Be, GDP, and highdensity carbon (HDC) into D2 with improved velocity sensitivity.

  8. The double main sequence of Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Anderson, J.; King, I. R.; Cassisi, S.; Momany, Y.

    Recent, high precision photometry of Omega Centauri, the biggest Galactic globular cluster, has been obtained with Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The color magnitude diagram reveals an unexpected bifurcation of colors in the main sequence (MS). The newly found double MS, the multiple turnoffs and subgiant branches, and other sequences discovered in the past along the red giant branch of this cluster add up to a fascinating but frustrating puzzle. Among the possible explanations for the blue main sequence an anomalous overabundance of helium is suggested. The hypothesis will be tested with a set of FLAMES@VLT data we have recently obtained (ESO DDT program), and with forthcoming ACS@HST images. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  10. 10 distinct stellar populations in omega Centauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Andrea; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Cool, Adrienne; King, Ivan R.; van der marel, roeland p.

    2015-08-01

    We are constructing the most comprehensive catalog of photometry and proper motions ever assembled for a globular cluster. The core of omega Centauri has been imaged over 600 times through WFC3’s UVIS and IR channels for the purposes of detector calibration. There exist ~30 exposures each for 26 filters, stretching uniformly from F225W in the UV to F160W in the infrared. Furthermore, the 12-year baseline between this data and a 2002 ACS survey will more than triple both the accuracy and the number of well-measured stars compared to previous studies.This totally unprecedented complete spectral coverage for over 400,000 stars, from the red-giant branch down to the white dwarfs, provides the best chance yet to understand the multiple-population phenomenon in any globular cluster. A preliminary analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams in different bands already allows us to identify 10 distinct sequences.

  11. Omega spectrometer ready for SPS beams

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    Two different beams arrive into the Omega magnet: - a tagged photon beam for a charm search - experiment WA4 by the Bonn-CERN-Daresbury-Ecole Polytechnique-Glasgow-Lancaster-Manchester-Orsay-Sheffield Collaboration; - a separated hadron beam, at first for a beam-dump experiment - WA12 by the Birmingham-CERN-Ecole Polytechnique-MPI, Munich-Neuchâtel Collaboration. Beams of either negative or positive pions or kaons, protons or antiprotons, all at an energy around 40 GeV were made to impinge on a copper target where a shower of hadrons was produced and, on occasion, two muons which before detection passed through an iron absorber (not visible here). WA12 was completed in February 1977. At the centre, on top of the superconducting magnet, the hut containing the TV cameras, These observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet below.

  12. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  13. Photoproduction of {omega} mesons on nuclei near the production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanova, M.; Friedrich, S.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M.; Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Novotny, R.; Pant, L.M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Weil, J.; Mosel, U. [Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Giessen (Germany); Anton, G.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Hoessl, J.; Suft, G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Shende, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Institut, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartholomy, O.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klempt, E.; Lotz, J.; Pee, H. van; Schmidt, C.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bayadilov, D. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, Y.A.; Gridnev, A.B.; Lopatin, I.V.; Radkov, A.; Sumachev, V.V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Gothe, R.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Konrad, M.; Menze, D.; Morales, C.; Ostrick, M.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Suele, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Jaegle, I.; Krusche, B.; Mertens, T. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Kopf, B. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany); Langheinrich, J. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    The photoproduction of {omega} mesons on LH{sub 2}, C and Nb has been measured for incident photon energies from 900 to 1300MeV using the CB/TAPS detector at ELSA. The {omega} lineshape does not show any significant difference between the LH{sub 2} and the Nb targets. The experiment was motivated by transport calculations that predicted a sensitivity of the {omega} lineshape to in-medium modifications near the production threshold on a free nucleon of E{sub {gamma}}{sup lab}=1109 MeV. A comparison with recent calculations is given. (orig.)

  14. OMEGA: a short-wavelength laser for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soures, J.M.; Hutchison, R.J.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lund, L.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The OMEGA, Nd:glass laser facility was constructed for the purpose of investigating the feasibility of direct-drive laser fusion. With 24 beams producing a total energy of 4 kJ or a peak power of 12 TW, OMEGA is capable of nearly uniform illumination of spherical targets. Six of the OMEGA beams have recently been converted to short-wavelength operation (351 nm). In this paper, we discuss details of the system design and performance, with particular emphasis on the frequency-conversion system and multi-wavelength diagnostic system

  15. Prevention of postcoronary angioplasty restenosis by omega-3 fatty acids: main results of the Esapent for Prevention of Restenosis ITalian Study (ESPRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresta, Aleardo; Balduccelli, Marco; Varani, Elisabetta; Marzilli, Mario; Galli, Claudio; Heiman, Franca; Lavezzari, Maurizio; Stragliotto, Eduardo; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2002-06-01

    Previous trials of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FA) for restenosis prevention after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) have yielded conflicting results. We tested the hypothesis that long-term administration of omega-3 FA before PTCA may have significant effects on restenosis. We randomized 339 patients in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of omega-3 FA (as an ethyl ester preparation given as 6 1-g capsules providing 3 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 2.1 g docosahexaenoic acid/d started 1 month before PTCA and given for 1 month thereafter, then continued at half-dose for 6 months) versus an olive oil placebo. Of these, 257 patients (125 on omega-3 FA, 132 on placebo) well matched for risk factors underwent successful balloon-only PTCA (280 total lesions) and were evaluable at 6 months with repeat angiography. Restenosis was defined at quantitative angiography as a recurrence of >50% diameter stenosis in the dilated vessel (Definition I) and as >50% loss of the short-term gain immediately after PTCA (Definition II). Restenosis rates per vessel were 29.4% and 31.6% in the omega-3 FA group, and 39.6% and 35.4% in the placebo group according to Definitions I (P =.04) and II (P = not significant), respectively. Restenosis rates per patient were 31.2% and 33.6% in the omega-3 FA group, and 40.9% and 37.1% in the placebo group according to Definitions I (P =.05) and II (P = not significant), respectively. With a long treatment before PTCA, omega-3 FA produced a small but significant decrease in the restenosis rate compared with placebo.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2017-11-02

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and CVDs has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of CVDs, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese/overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of CVD risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in CVDs and metabolic syndrome.

  17. Cardiovascular diseases, depression disorders and potential effects of omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebatická, J; Dukát, A; Ďuračková, Z; Muchová, J

    2017-07-18

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depressive disorders (DD) are two of the most prevalent health problems in the world. Although CVD and depression have different origin, they share some common pathophysiological characteristics and risk factors, such as the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, blood flow abnormalities, decreased glucose metabolism, elevated plasma homocysteine levels, oxidative stress and disorder in vitamin D metabolism. Current findings confirm the common underlying factors for both pathologies, which are related to dramatic dietary changes in the mid-19th century. By changing dietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids from 1:1 to 15-20:1 some changes in metabolism were induced, such as increased pro-inflammatory mediators and modulations of different signaling pathways following pathophysiological response related to both, cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders.

  18. Study of e(+)e(-) -> omega chi(cJ) at Center of Mass Energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, Cheng; Li, C. H.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Based on data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider at nine center of mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV, we search for the production of e(+)e(-) -> omega chi(cJ) (J = 0, 1, 2). The process e(+)e(-) -> omega chi(c0) is observed for the first time, and the Born cross

  19. Use of Liberia Omega Transmissions for Frequency Calibration in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuel, Safaa

    1986-01-01

    .... Frequency comparisons with different transmissions has been going on for several years. In this paper, the measuring method used for frequency comparison by means of Omega transmission system between Liberia (12 kHz...

  20. Transport behaviour of commercially available 100-Omega standard resistors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schumacher, B

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Several types of commercial 100-Omega resistors can be used with the cryogenic current comparator to maintain the resistance unit, derived from the Quantized Hall Effect (QHE), and to disseminate this unit to laboratory resistance standards. Up...

  1. Omega 3 mastné kyseliny v diabetologii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, Suppl.B (2011), B60-B64 ISSN 1212-7299 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Omega-3 PUFA * sea fish * cardiovascular disease Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  2. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini

    2018-03-25

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) include α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 ω-3), stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 ω-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 ω-3), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5 ω-3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 ω-3). In the past few decades, many epidemiological studies have been conducted on the myriad health benefits of omega-3 PUFAs. In this review, we summarized the structural features, properties, dietary sources, metabolism, and bioavailability of omega-3 PUFAs and their effects on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, dementia, depression, visual and neurological development, and maternal and child health. Even though many health benefits of omega-3 PUFAs have been reported in the literature, there are also some controversies about their efficacy and certain benefits to human health.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders, from the biochemical rationale for their use to the growing body of data supporting their clinical efficacy.

  4. Y*, Xi * and Omega /sup -/ in production experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hemingway, R J

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of all production experiment data relevant to the spectroscopy of Y*, Xi * and Omega /sup -/ since the previous Baryon Resonances Conference at Purdue in 1973. A short look at future prospects is appended. (27 refs).

  5. Ambiguity resolution in systems using Omega for position location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, G.; Gan, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The lane ambiguity problem prevents the utilization of the Omega system for many applications such as locating buoys and balloons. The method of multiple lines of position introduced herein uses signals from four or more Omega stations for ambiguity resolution. The coordinates of the candidate points are determined first through the use of the Newton iterative procedure. Subsequently, a likelihood function is generated for each point, and the ambiguity is resolved by selecting the most likely point. The method was tested through simulation.

  6. Relations between distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, Juan Luis Garcia [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/Paseo Alfonso XIII, 30203-Cartagena (Region de Murcia) (Spain)]. E-mail: juan.garcia@upct.es; Lampart, Marek [Mathematical Institute at Opava, Silesian University at Opava, Na Rybnicku 1, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: marek.lampart@math.slu.cz

    2006-05-15

    The forcing relations between notions of distributional, Li-Yorke and {omega} chaos were studied by many authors. In this paper we summarize all known connections between these three different types of chaos and fulfill the results for general compact metric spaces by the construction of a selfmap on a compact perfect set which is {omega} chaotic, not distributionally chaotic and has zero topological entropy.

  7. The CERN omega spectrometer. 25 years of physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.; Quercigh, E.

    1997-01-01

    The OMEGA spectrometer facility was closed down at the end of 1996. This was a necessary sacrifice in order to free resources for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider, which is now so closely associated with CERN's future. On December 10th, a symposium was organized at CERN to review physics at OMEGA. This report brings together the talks which were presented on that occasion. It starts with an introduction and a list of all the experiments at the facility. (orig.)

  8. Dynamical coupled channel approach to omega meson production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Paris

    2007-09-10

    The dynamical coupled channel approach of Matsuyama, Sato, and Lee is used to study the $\\omega$--meson production induced by pions and photons scattering from the proton. The parameters of the model are fixed in a two-channel (\\omega N,\\pi N) calculation for the non-resonant and resonant contributions to the $T$ matrix by fitting the available unpolarized differential cross section data. The polarized photon beam asymmetry is predicted and compared to existing data.

  9. Update on the management of severe hypertriglyceridemia – focus on free fatty acid forms of omega-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirillo A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Pirillo,1,2 Alberico Luigi Catapano2,3 1Center for the Study of Atherosclerosis, Bassini Hospital, Cinisello Balsamo, Italy; 2IRCCS Multimedica, Milan, Italy; 3Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy Abstract: High levels of plasma triglycerides (TG are a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, often associated with anomalies in other lipids or lipoproteins. Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG, particularly at very high levels, significantly increases also the risk of acute pancreatitis. Thus, interventions to lower TG levels are required to reduce the risk of pancreatitis and cardiovascular disease. Several strategies may be adopted for TG reduction, including lifestyle changes and pharmacological interventions. Among the available drugs, the most commonly used for HTG are fibrates, nicotinic acid, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (usually a mixture of eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA. These last are available under different concentrated formulations containing high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, including a mixture of EPA and DHA or pure EPA. The most recent formulation contains a free fatty acid (FFA form of EPA and DHA, and exhibits a significantly higher bioavailability compared with the ethyl ester forms contained in the other formulations. This is due to the fact that the ethyl ester forms, to be absorbed, need to be hydrolyzed by the pancreatic enzymes that are secreted in response to fat intake, while the FFA do not. This higher bioavailability translates into a higher TG-lowering efficacy compared with the ethyl ester forms at equivalent doses. Omega-3 FFA are effective in reducing TG levels and other lipids in hypertriglyceridemic patients as well as in high cardiovascular risk patients treated with statins and residual HTG. Currently, omega-3 FFA formulation is under evaluation to establish whether, in high cardiovascular risk

  10. Intake of total omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and risk of coronary heart disease in the Spanish EPIC cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiano, P; Machón, M; Dorronsoro, M; Chirlaque, M Dolores; Barricarte, A; Sánchez, M-J; Navarro, C; Huerta, J M; Molina-Montes, E; Sánchez-Cantalejo, E; Urtizberea, M; Arriola, L; Larrañaga, N; Ardanaz, E; Quirós, J R; Moreno-Iribas, C; González, C A

    2014-03-01

    The evidence about the benefits of omega-3 fatty acid intake on coronary heart disease (CHD) is not consistent. We thus aimed to assess the relation between dietary intake of total omega-3 fatty acids (from plant and marine foods) and marine polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on the risk of CHD in the Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The analysis included 41,091 men and women aged 20-69 years, recruited from 1992 to 1996 and followed-up until December 2004. Omega-3 fatty acid intake was estimated from a validated dietary questionnaire. Only participants with definite incident CHD event were considered as cases. Cox regression models were used to assess the association between the intake of total omega-3 fatty acids, EPA or DHA and CHD. A total of 609 participants (79% men) had a definite CHD event. Mean intakes of total omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA were very similar in the cases and in the cohort, both in men and women. In the multivariate adjusted model, omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA were not related to incident CHD in either men or women. The hazard ratios (HR) for omega-3 were 1.23 in men (95% CI 0.94-15.9, p = 0.20); and 0.77 in women (95% CI 0.46-1.30, p = 0.76). In the Spanish EPIC cohort, with a relatively high intake of fish, no association was found between EPA, DHA and total omega-3 fatty acid intake and risk of CHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved measurements of branching fractions for eta(c) -> phi phi and omega phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using (223.7 +/- 1.4) x 10(6) J / Psi events accumulated with the BESIII detector, we study eta(c) decays to phi phi and omega phi final states. The branching fraction of n(c) -> phi phi is measured to be Br(eta(c) -> phi phi) = (2.5 +/- 0(-0.7)(+0.3) +/- 0.6) X 10(-3,) where the first uncertainty

  12. Approximate $w_\\phi\\sim\\Omega_\\phi$ Relations in Quintessence Models

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Mingxing; Su, Qiping

    2007-01-01

    Quintessence field is a widely-studied candidate of dark energy. There is "tracker solution" in quintessence models, in which evolution of the field $\\phi$ at present times is not sensitive to its initial conditions. When the energy density of dark energy is neglectable ($\\Omega_\\phi\\ll1$), evolution of the tracker solution can be well analysed from "tracker equation". In this paper, we try to study evolution of the quintessence field from "full tracker equation", which is valid for all spans...

  13. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu GH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo Hao Wu,1 Jian Gao,2 Chun Yan Ji,2 Lorenzo Pradelli,3 Qiu Lei Xi,1 Qiu Lin Zhuang1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Nutrition, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3AdRes Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Piazza Carlo Emanuele II, Torino, Italy Background and objectives: Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN for intensive care unit (ICU patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. Methods: We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. Results: The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven® 10% fish oil emulsion would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB, mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days. The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Conclusion: Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN. Keywords: omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipids, ICU patients, total costs, microsimulation, external validation, length of hospital stay

  14. Worldwide OMEGA and Very Low Frequency (VLF) Transmitter Outages, January to December 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    WORLDWIDE OMEGA AND VERY LOW FREQUENCY IVLF) TRANSMITTER OUTAGE--ETC, MAY 81 L RZONCA ,’,L.ASSI LED FAA-CT-81-26 FAA-RD- B1 -29 UL7 A-I’ l15FDRL AIO...computer for the time period GBR - Rugby , England (16.00 kHz) January to December 1980. (For the purposes of this report, any downtime NA - Cutler, Maine

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Jeromson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  16. FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Petr; Kohoutková, Alena; Jedlinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam. Omega beam is a precast prestressed high-performance concrete element with the shape of Greek letter omega. Omega beam was designed as a self-supporting permanent formwork member for construction of girder bridges. FEM program ATENA Science was exploited for simulation of load-bearing test of the beam. The numerical model was calibrated using the data from both static loading test and tests of material properties. Comparison of load-displacement diagrams obtained from the experiment and the model was conducted. Development of cracks and crack patterns were compared. Very good agreement of experimental data and the FEM model was reached. The calibrated model can be used for design of optimized Omega beams in the future without the need of expensive loading tests. The calibrated material model can be also exploited in other types of FEM analyses of bridges constructed with the use of Omega beams, such as limit state analysis, optimization of shear connectors, prediction of long-term deflections or prediction of crack development.

  17. Silencing of omega-5 gliadins in transgenic wheat eliminates a major source of environmental variability and improves dough mixing properties of flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenbach, Susan B; Tanaka, Charlene K; Seabourn, Bradford W

    2014-12-24

    The end-use quality of wheat flour varies as a result of the growth conditions of the plant. Among the wheat gluten proteins, the omega-5 gliadins have been identified as a major source of environmental variability, increasing in proportion in grain from plants that receive fertilizer or are subjected to high temperatures during grain development. The omega-5 gliadins also have been associated with the food allergy wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). Recently, transgenic lines with reduced levels of omega-5 gliadins were developed using RNA interference (RNAi). These lines make it possible to determine whether changes in the levels of omega-5 gliadins in response to environmental conditions and agronomic inputs may be responsible for changes in flour end-use quality. Two transgenic wheat lines and a non-transgenic control were grown under a controlled temperature regimen with or without post-anthesis fertilizer and the protein composition of the resulting flour was analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). In one transgenic line, all 2-DE spots identified as omega-5 gliadins were substantially reduced without effects on other proteins. In the other transgenic line, the omega-5 gliadins were absent and there was a partial reduction in the levels of the omega-1,2 gliadins and the omega-1,2 chain-terminating gliadins as well as small changes in several other proteins. With the exception of the omega gliadins, the non-transgenic control and the transgenic plants showed similar responses to the fertilizer treatment. Protein contents of flour were determined by the fertilizer regimen and were similar in control and transgenic samples produced under each regimen while both mixing time and mixing tolerance were improved in flour from transgenic lines when plants received post-anthesis fertilizer. The data indicate that omega-5 gliadins have a negative effect on flour quality and suggest that changes in quality with the growth

  18. The Omega-3 Index Is Inversely Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Individuals with Elevated Oxidative Stress Biomarkers123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigornia, Sherman J; Falcón, Luis M; Ordovás, José M; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Omega-3 (n–3) fatty acid (FA) consumption is thought to improve depressive symptoms. However, current evidence is limited, and whether this association exists among Puerto Ricans, a population burdened by depression, remains uncertain. Objectives: We examined the association between ω-3 FA biomarkers and depressive symptoms as well as the potential influence of oxidative stress. Methods: Baseline and longitudinal analyses were conducted in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study (n = 787; participants aged 57 ± 0.52 y, 73% women). Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, and erythrocyte FA composition were collected at baseline. We calculated the omega-3 index as the sum of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, expressed as a percentage of total FAs. Baseline and 2-y depressive symptoms were characterized by using the Center for Epidemiological Studies–Depression Scale (CES-D). Statistical analyses included linear and logistic regression. Results: Urinary 8-OHdG concentration tended to modify the relation between the erythrocyte omega-3 index and baseline CES-D score (P-interaction = 0.10). In stratified analyses, the omega-3 index was inversely associated with CES-D score (β = −1.74, SE = 0.88; P = 0.02) among those in the top quartile of 8-OHdG concentration but not among those in the lower quartiles. The relation between the omega-3 index and CES-D at 2 y was more clearly modified by 8-OHdG concentration (P-interaction = 0.04), where the omega-3 index was inversely associated with CES-D at 2 y, adjusted for baseline (β = −1.66, SE = 0.66; P = 0.02), only among those with elevated 8-OHdG concentrations. Among individuals not taking antidepressant medications and in the top tertile of urinary 8-OHdG concentration, the omega-3 index was associated with significantly lower odds of a CES-D score ≥16 at baseline (OR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.96) but not at 2 y (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.60, 1

  19. A comparative study of the DG-OMEGA (DG Omega), DGII, and GAT method for the structure elucidation of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, A. H. C.; Beckers, M. L. M.; Buydens, L. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    This research continues the investigation of the properties of the recently developed structure elucidation method DG-OMEGA (DG Omega). Towards this end it was applied for the structure determination of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide. The performance of DG Omega was compared to the

  20. High potency fish oil supplement improves omega-3 fatty acid status in healthy adults: an open-label study using a web-based, virtual platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Jay K; Ritz, Barry W

    2013-08-08

    The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids from fish are well known, and fish oil supplements are used widely in a preventive manner to compensate the low intake in the general population. The aim of this open-label study was to determine if consumption of a high potency fish oil supplement could improve blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and impact SF-12 mental and physical health scores in healthy adults. A novel virtual clinical research organization was used along with the HS-Omega-3 Index, a measure of EPA and DHA in red blood cell membranes expressed as a percentage of total fatty acids that has been shown to correlate with a reduction in cardiovascular and other risk factors. Briefly, adult subjects (mean age 44 years) were recruited from among U.S. health food store employees and supplemented with 1.1 g/d of omega-3 from fish oil (756 mg EPA, 228 mg DHA, Minami Nutrition MorEPA Platinum) for 120 days (n = 157). Omega-3 status and mental health scores increased with supplementation (p < 0.001), while physical health scores remained unchanged. The use of a virtual, web-based platform shows considerable potential for engaging in clinical research with normal, healthy subjects. A high potency fish oil supplement may further improve omega-3 status in a healthy population regularly consuming an omega-3 supplement.

  1. A study of the $\\omega\\omega$ channel produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D.; Close, F.E.; Danielsen, K.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Earl, B.C.; Evans, D.; French, B.R.; Hino, T.; Inaba, S.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobsen, T.; Khaustov, G.V.; Kinson, J.B.; Kirk, A.; Kondashov, A.A.; Lednev, A.A.; Lenti, V.; Minashvili, I.; Peigneux, J.P.; Romanovsky, V.; Russakovich, N.; Semenov, A.; Shagin, P.M.; Shimizu, H.; Singovsky, A.V.; Sobol, A.; Stassinaki, M.; Stroot, J.P.; Takamatsu, K.; Tsuru, T.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Votruba, M.F.; Yasu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction pp -> pf (omega omega) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c and a spin analysis of the omega omega channel has been performed for the first time in central production. Evidence is found for the f2(1910) in the JPC = 2++ wave with spin projection JZ = 2. This is the only state observed in central production with spin projection JZ = 2. Its dPT and phi dependencies are similar to those observed for other glueball candidates. In addition, evidence is found for a state with JPC = 4++ consistent with the f4(2300). The f0(2000), previously observed in the rho rho final state, is confirmed.

  2. Omega-3 carboxylic acids monotherapy and combination with statins in the management of dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benes LB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lane B Benes1, Nikhil S Bassi2, Michael H Davidson1 1Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, 2Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on cholesterol management placed greater emphasis on statin therapy given the well-established benefits in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Residual risk may remain after statin initiation, in part because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol. Several large trials have failed to show benefit with non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications in the reduction of cardiovascular events. Yet, subgroup analyses showed a benefit in those with hypertriglyceridemia and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, a high-risk pattern of dyslipidemia. This review discusses the benefits of omega-3 carboxylic acids, a recently approved formulation of omega-3 fatty acid with enhanced bioavailability, in the treatment of dyslipidemia both as monotherapy and combination therapy with a statin. Keywords: omega-3 carboxylic acids, non-HDL-C, hypertriglyceridemia, residual risk, statin

  3. Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer: Implication of two-state focal zooming on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froula, D. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Huang, H.; Hu, S. X.; Hill, E.; Kelly, J. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Shvydky, A.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA low-adiabat cryogenic experiments reduces the hydrodynamic efficiency by ∼35%, which lowers the calculated one-dimensional (1-D) yield by a factor of 7. CBET can be mitigated by reducing the diameter of the laser beams relative to the target diameter. Reducing the diameter of the laser beams by 30%, after a sufficient conduction zone has been generated (two-state zooming), is predicted to maintain low-mode uniformity while recovering 90% of the kinetic energy lost to CBET. A radially varying phase plate is proposed to implement two-state zooming on OMEGA. A beam propagating through the central half-diameter of the phase plate will produce a large spot, while a beam propagating through the outer annular region of the phase plate will produce a narrower spot. To generate the required two-state near-field laser-beam profile, a picket driver with smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) would pass through an apodizer, forming a beam of half the standard diameter. A second main-pulse driver would co-propagate without SSD through its own apodizer, forming a full-diameter annular beam. Hydrodynamic simulations, using the designed laser spots produced by the proposed zooming scheme on OMEGA, show that implementing zooming will increase the implosion velocity by 25% resulting in a 4.5× increase in the 1-D neutron yield. Demonstrating zooming on OMEGA would validate a viable direct-drive CBET mitigation scheme and help establish a pathway to hydrodynamically equivalent direct-drive–ignition implosions by increasing the ablation pressure (1.6×), which will allow for more stable implosions at ignition-relevant velocities

  4. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Tavakkoli-Kakhki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Materials and Methods: Firstly, reliable sources of Iranian Traditional Medicine were reviewed in order to identify the prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients. Afterwards, according to the online database of United States Department of Agriculture (URL: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list, the ratio of linoleic acid to alpha linolenic acid (as representatives of omega-6 and omega-3, respectively was identified in each foodstuff. Finally, the ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 were compared between seven food groups of vegetables, fruits, dry goods, high protein products, dairies, breads, and spices. Results: Based on the resources of Iranian Traditional Medicine, the following foods are prescribed for depressed patients: basil, coriander, spinach, lettuce, squash, peppermint, dill, chicory, celery, beet, quince, cucumber, watermelon, grape, peach, pomegranate, banana, apple, currant, pistachio, dried fig, almond, egg, chicken, lamb, trout, milk, bread without bran,saffron, oregano, and coriander seeds. On the other hand, cabbage, eggplant, onion, garlic, broad beans, lentils, beef, whole wheat bread, and mustard are prohibited. It should be noted that omega-3 content in some prescribed foods is more than that of the prohibited ones. Conclusion: The present study showed that mint, basil, spinach, lettuce, squash, lamb, saffron, oregano, cucumber, pistachio, milk, and also wild trout can be considered as medicinal foods for depressed patients.

  5. Direct-drive high-convergence-ratio implosion studies on the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.

    2000-01-01

    A series of direct-drive implosion experiments, using room-temperature, gas-filled CH targets, are performed on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The target performance at stagnation and its dependence on beam smoothing and pulse shaping is investigated. Compressed core conditions are diagnosed using x-ray and neutron spectroscopy, and x-ray imaging. The individual beams of OMEGA are smoothed by spectral dispersion in two dimensions (2D SSD) with laser bandwidths up to ∼0.3 THz, with 1 ns square to 2.5 ns shaped pulses. A clear dependence of target performance on pulse shape and beam smoothing is seen, with the target performance (yield, areal density, and shell integrity) improving as SSD bandwidth is applied. (c)

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Evidence of efficacy and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorletti, Eleonora; Byrne, Christopher D

    2018-03-22

    For many years it has been known that high doses of long chain omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in the treatment of hypertriglyceridaemia. Over the last three decades, there has also been a wealth of in vitro and in vivo data that has accumulated to suggest that long chain omega-3 fatty acid treatment might be beneficial to decrease liver triacylglycerol. Several biological mechanisms have been identified that support this hypothesis; notably, it has been shown that long chain omega-3 fatty acids have a beneficial effect: a) on bioactive metabolites involved in inflammatory pathways, and b) on alteration of nuclear transcription factor activities such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), involved in inflammatory pathways and liver lipid metabolism. Since the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) begins with the accumulation of liver lipid and progresses with inflammation and then several years later with development of fibrosis; it has been thought in patients with NAFLD omega-3 fatty acid treatment would be beneficial in treating liver lipid and possibly also in ameliorating inflammation. Meta-analyses (of predominantly dietary studies and small trials) have tended to support the assertion that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in decreasing liver lipid, but recent randomised controlled trials have produced conflicting data. These trials have suggested that omega-3 fatty acid might be beneficial in decreasing liver triglyceride (docosahexanoic acid also possibly being more effective than eicosapentanoic acid) but not in decreasing other features of steatohepatitis (or liver fibrosis). The purpose of this review is to discuss recent evidence regarding biological mechanisms by which long chain omega-3 fatty acids might act to ameliorate liver disease in NAFLD; to consider the recent evidence from randomised

  7. Impact of Biological Feedback and Incentives on Blood Fatty Acid Concentrations, Including Omega-3 Index, in an Employer-Based Wellness Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. McBurney

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3 are important fatty acids for the retina and brain. More than 95% of Americans have suboptimal EPA + DHA blood concentrations. This cross-sectional employer-based study assessed whole blood fatty acid levels of volunteers participating in an onsite wellness biometric screening program and was designed to determine if an incentive, a $5 coupon for a 90-day supply of fish oil supplement typically costing $18–30, stimulated incremental dietary behavior change relative to nutritional status assessment alone to increase EPA + DHA concentrations. Volunteers completed a dietary survey and finger stick blood samples were collected to be analyzed for fatty acid composition. In addition, 636 individuals participated in the initial onsite biometric screening. Three months later, and without prior knowledge, all employees were invited to a second screening. At the second screening, 198 employees volunteered for the first time and 149 employees had a second test (17.9%. At baseline, the average age (n = 834 was 45 year and omega-3 index was 5.0% with 41% female. EPA + DHA concentration, i.e., omega-3 index, was significantly lower in men (4.8% than women (5.2%, as were DHA and linoleic acid (LA concentrations (p < 0.05. Baseline omega-3 index was positively and linearly associated with omega-3 intake. Only 4% of volunteers had an omega-3 index >8% on initial screening. Among the 149 individuals with two measurements, omega-3 intake from supplements, but not food, increased significantly from 258 to 445 mg/d (p < 0.01 at the second test as did the omega-3 index (+0.21, p < 0.02. In this employed population, only 1% redeemed a coupon for an omega-3 supplement.

  8. Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids Act as Inhibitors of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Eleonora; Sinibaldi, Federica; Sannino, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Giuseppina; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Cozza, Paola; Santucci, Roberto; Piro, Maria Cristina

    2017-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been reported to play a protective role in a wide range of diseases characterized by an increased metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. The recent finding that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids exert an anti-inflammatory effect in periodontal diseases has stimulated the present study, designed to determine whether such properties derive from a direct inhibitory action of these compounds on the activity of MMPs. To this issue, we investigated the effect exerted by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes that actively participate to the destruction of the organic matrix of dentin following demineralization operated by bacteria acids. Data obtained (both in vitro and on ex-vivo teeth) reveal that omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids inhibit the proteolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, two enzymes present in dentin. This observation is of interest since it assigns to these compounds a key role as MMPs inhibitors, and stimulates further study to better define their therapeutic potentialities in carious decay.

  9. Contribution of Golden Apple Snail Flour to Enhance Omega- 3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids Contents in Weaning Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsyha, D. D.; Wijayanti, H. S.; Nuryanto; Anjani, G.

    2018-02-01

    The case of undernourished children in Grobogan District (15.3%) is caused by children nutrients intake less than the Recommendation Dietary Allowance (RDA). To enhance children nutrients intake, be required formulation of weaning food using high-nutrient local food such as golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata). Golden apple snail flour contains high contents of zinc, iron, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. This study aims to analyze the effect of golden apple snail flour substitution on nutrients content and organoleptic properties of weaning food (baby porridge). This is an experimental research by substitution of golden apple snail flour in the making of weaning food with four treatments of substitution (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%). Substitution of golden apple snails flour could affect the nutrient content levels of fat, zinc, iron (p=0.0001), carbohydrate (p=0.011), water (p=0.003), ash (p=0.001), omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Whereas, it could not affect the content of energy (p=0.678), protein (p=0.129) and fiber (p=0.482). Furthermore, the substitution could affect the organoleptic properties include color, texture and taste (p=0.0001) while not for the aroma (p=0.798). Based on nutrient content analysis, substitution of golden apple snail flour could enhance the zinc, iron, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids contents of weaning food.

  10. The Effect of Omega-3 on Circulating Adiponectin in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Mehdi; Ramezani, Amir-Hossein; Shishehbor, Farideh; Mansoori, Anahita

    2018-01-04

    Whether consumption of omega-3 affects circulating adiponectin has not been established. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 (food or supplement) on circulating adiponectin in patients with type 2 diabetes through a systematic review of meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were searched for relevant studies through May 2016. Two researchers screened and abstracted the literature independently. Pooled estimates were obtained using the random-effects models. Overall, omega-3 increased adiponectin by 0.57 µg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15 to 1.31; p=0.01, I-square=74.2% p for heterogeneity omega-3 for more than 8 weeks. This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials suggests that omega-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes increases circulating adiponectin. These findings support the potentially beneficial effects of dietary omega-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes on pathways related to adiponectin metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CONTENT OF LONG CHAIN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACID COMPOSITION IN SOME IRANIAN CANNED FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    BACKGROUND: Ecological studies have found a negative correlation between the risk of developing heart disease and fish consumption because of their long chain omega-3 fatty acids. This study was undertaken to determine the amounts of the common fatty acid content of several commercial canned fish marketing in Iran, with particular attention to long chain omega-3 fatty acids.    METHODS: The most consumed available brands of canned fish were randomly selected seven times from products available in supermarkets. Total lipids were extracted by using the Folch method and prepared for fatty acid analysis. Individual fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography (GC with 60 meter capillary column and flame ionization detector.    RESULTS: The most common saturated fatty acids (SFA in Iranian canned fish was palmitic acid (C16:0 followed by stearic acid (C18:0. The amount of all trans fatty acids (TFAs except elaidic acid (C18:1 9t was 0%. The highest amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs related to long chain omega-3 fatty acids include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. The most abundant monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs were oleic acid (C18:1 9c.     CONCLUSION: This study showed higher contents of EPA and DHA in Iranian commercially available canned fish compared to the canned fish in other countries.      Keywords: Iranian canned fish, fatty acids, long chain omega-3 fatty acids, gas chromatography.  

  12. THE EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 INTAKE ON DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORNESS IN NON-ATHLET MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rajabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is classified as a muscle strain that presents with tenderness and stiffness one to two days after exercise. At present there are multiple proposed methods for treating DOMS, including anti-inflammatory medication, stretching, homeopathy, L-carnitine, rest and light exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigation of the effects of omega-3 intake on delayed onset muscle soreness in non-athlete men. 20 healthy subjects (age: 20.5±1.8 years participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control. In the experimental group, subjects consume daily 2000 mg of omega-3; 2 times per day for 1 month before and 48 hours after perform leg press exercise with eccentric pattern. Similarly, the was taking in the control group. The results showed significant decrease in severity of DOMS (CK and LDH levels and decreased knee's range of motion in experimental group in comparison with control group (p<0.05. As a result of our study it is suggested that the use of omega-3 supplement can effectively reduce DOMS caused by eccentric exercise.

  13. Thermal conductivity of organic semi-conducting materials using 3omega and photothermal radiometry techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reisdorffer Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic semiconductors for opto-electronic devices show several defects which can be enhanced while increasing the operating temperature. Their thermal management and especially the reduction of their temperature are of great interest. For the heat transfer study, one has to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic materials. However the major difficulty for this measurement is the very low thickness of the films which needs the use of very specific techniques. In our work, the 3-omega and photothermal radiometric methods were used to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic semiconducting material (Alq3. The measurements were performed as function of the thin film thickness from 45 to 785 nm and also of its temperature from 80 to 350 K. With the 3 omega method, a thermal conductivity value of 0.066 W.m−1K−1 was obtained for Alq3 thin film of 200 nm at room temperature, in close agreement with the photothermal value. Both techniques appear to be complementary: the 3 omega method is easier to implement for large temperature range and small thicknesses down to a few tens of nanometers whereas the photothermal method is more suitable for thicknesses over 200nm since it provides additional information such as the thin film volumetric heat capacity.

  14. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIKROO, A; CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; PONTELANDOLFO, JM

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 (micro)m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 (micro)m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, ∼ 1.5 (micro)m thick, 900 (micro)m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 (micro)m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition

  15. Omega 3 Fatty Acids Supplementation and Oxidative Stress in HIV-Seropositive Patients. A Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Amador-Licona

    Full Text Available HIV-seropositive patients show high incidence of coronary heart disease and oxidative stress has been described as relevant key in atherosclerosis development. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of omega 3 fatty acids on different markers of oxidative stress in HIV-seropositive patients. We performed a randomized parallel controlled clinical trial in The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, a public health hospital. 70 HIV-seropositive patients aged 20 to 55 on clinical score A1, A2, B1 or B2 receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART were studied. They were randomly assigned to receive omega 3 fatty acids 2.4 g (Zonelabs, Marblehead MA or placebo for 6 months. At baseline and at the end of the study, anthropometric measurements, lipid profile, glucose and stress oxidative levels [nitric oxide catabolites, lipoperoxides (malondialdehyde plus 4-hydroxialkenals, and glutathione] were evaluated. Principal HAART therapy was EFV/TDF/FTC (55% and AZT/3TC/EFV (15% without difference between groups. Treatment with omega 3 fatty acids as compared with placebo decreased triglycerides (-0.32 vs. 0.54 mmol/L; p = 0.04, but oxidative stress markers were not different between groups.

  16. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  17. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  18. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M.J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.; Schneider, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  19. Modulation of cardiac connexin-43 by omega-3 fatty acid ethyl-ester supplementation demonstrated in spontaneously diabetic rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radošinská, J.; Kurahara, L. H.; Hiraishi, K.; Viczenczová, C.; Egan Beňová, T.; Szeiffová Bačová, B.; Dosenko, V.; Navarová, J.; Obšitník, B.; Imanaga, I.; Soukup, Tomáš; Tribulová, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2015), s. 795-806 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK123 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : diabetes * omega-3 fatty acids * cardiac connexin-43 * PKC * ultrastructure Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  20. Evaluation of the tau-omega model for passive microwave soil moisture retrieval using SMAPEx data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parameters used for passive soil moisture retrieval algorithms reported in the literature encompass a wide range, leading to a large uncertainty in the applicability of those values. This paper presents an evaluation of the proposed parameterizations of the tau-omega model from 1) SMAP ATBD for ...

  1. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions of Xic0 Decays to Xi- pi+ and to Omega- K+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B

    2004-01-01

    The authors have analyzed 116 fb -1 of data collected by the BABAR detector for Ξ c 0 production. In this paper they describe the observations of Ξ c 0 production from c(bar c) continuum and from B decays, with the Ξ c 0 decaying into Ξ - π + and (Omega) - K + modes

  2. Milk Chemical Composition of Dairy Cows Fed Rations Containing Protected Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Fermented Rice Bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudibya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to investigate the effect of ration containing protected omega-3 and fermented rice bran on chemical composition of dairy milk. The research employed 10 female PFH dairy cows of 2-4 years old with body weight 300-375 kg. The research was assigned in randomized complete block design. The treatment consisted of P0= control ration, P1= P0 + 20% fermented rice bran, P2= P1 + 4% soya bean oil, P3= P1 + 4% protected tuna fish oil and P4= P1 + 4% protected lemuru fish oil. The results showed that the effects of fish oil supplementation in the rations significantly (P<0.01 decreased feed consumption, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, lipids, and saturated fatty acids. Meanwhile, it increased milk production, content of high density lipoprotein, omega-3, omega-6 and unsaturated fatty acids in the dairy cows milk. It is concluded that the inclusion of 4% protected fish oil in the rations can produce healthy milk by decreasing milk cholesterol and increasing omega-3 fatty acids content.

  3. Nutritional evaluation of structured lipid containing omega 6 fatty acid synthesized from coconut oil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Reena; Lokesh, Belur R

    2003-06-01

    Coconut oil is rich in medium chain fatty acids, but deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Structured lipids (SL) enriched with omega 6 PUFA were synthesized from coconut oil triglycerides by employing enzymatic acidolysis with free fatty acids obtained from safflower oil. Rats were fed a diet containing coconut oil, coconut oil-safflower oil blend (1:0.7 w/ w) or structured lipid at 10% levels for a period of 60 days. The SL lowered serum cholesterol levels by 10.3 and 10.5% respectively in comparison with those fed coconut oil and blended oil. Similarly the liver cholesterol levels were also decreased by 35.9 and 26.6% respectively in animals fed structured lipids when compared to those fed on coconut oil or the blended oil. Most of the decrease observed in serum cholesterol levels of animals fed structured lipids was found in LDL fraction. The triglyceride levels in serum showed a decrease by 17.5 and 17.4% while in the liver it was reduced by 45.8 and 23.5% in the structured lipids fed animals as compared to those fed coconut oil or blended oil respectively. Differential scanning calorimetric studies indicated that structured lipids had lower melting points and solid fat content when compared to coconut oil or blended oils. These studies indicated that enrichment of coconut oil triglycerides with omega 6 fatty acids lowers its solid fat content. The omega 6 PUFA enriched structured lipids also exhibited hypolipidemic activity.

  4. Study of the decay B {yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0} at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chobanova, Veronika [MPI Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The study of CP Violation in the decays of the B meson is important for constraining the CKM unitarity triangle in the Standard Model (SM). Second order b {yields} s loop (''penguin'') decays such as B{sup 0} {yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0} are sensitive to CKM angle {phi}{sub 1} and provide a consistency check for the CP violation found in first order weak b {yields} c anti cs transitions (e.g. B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}/K{sub S}{sup 0}). Considering corrections from other SM contributions, CP violation in b {yields} s modes are predicted to be larger than that found in b {yields}c, however the experimental tendency is for the measurements to be smaller. We present an updated measurement of the branching fraction of the decay B{sup 0} {yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0} using a new approach. We plan to update the measurement of CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0} with the final Belle data set which will enhance our understanding of CP violation in penguin dominated decays. We demonstrate that the method used by us provides a smaller statistical uncertainty than the previous Belle analysis.

  5. Omega experiments and preparation for moderate-gain direct-drive experiments on Nif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr Crory, R.L.; Bahr, R.E.; Boehly, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Direct-drive laser-fusion ignition experiments rely on detailed understanding and control of irradiation uniformity, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and target fabrication. LLE is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct-drive NIF ignition target based on an 'all-DT' design: a spherical target of ∼ 3.5 mm diameter, 1 to 2 μm if CH wall thickness, and a ∼ 350 μm DT-ice layer near the triple point of DT (μ19K). OMEGA experiments are designed to address the critical issues related to direct-drive laser fusion and to provide the necessary data to validate the predictive capability of LLE computer codes. The future cryogenic targets used on OMEGA are hydrodynamically equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address all of the essential components of direct-drive laser fusion: irradiation uniformity and laser imprinting, Rayleigh-Taylor growth and saturation, compressed core performance and shell-fuel mixing, laser-plasma interactions and their effect on target performance, and cryogenic target fabrication and handling. (authors)

  6. Dietary Changes with Omega-3 Fatty Acids Improves the Blood Lipid Profile of Wistar Albino Rats with Hypercholesterolaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida A Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid profile is a reasonably reliable parameter for the assessment of cardiovascular risk, besides the anthropometric measurements. Serum lipid dysfunctions in the HDL and LDL components are commonly observed in cardiac patients. Omega-3 fatty acids exhibit a hypolipidemic potential which could be exploited in preventing the onset of this alarmingly increasing problem globally. Aims: To evaluate and compare the effects of different sources of omega-3 fatty acids, on the lipid profile parameters in rats induced with hyperlipidaemia. Methods and material: In our present study, we supplemented omega-3 oils from the plant source as well as the fish source to hypocholesteraemia induced Wistar albino rats for a period of three months. Wistar albino rats were fed normal chow along with 1% cholesterol for a period of three months to induce hypocholesteraemia. To this 1% flax oil and 0.1% fish oil were mixed separately and fed to two groups of rats for another period of three months to check for hypolipidemic effects if any. Results and conclusions: A significant reduction in total cholesterol, LDL, and glucose levels with increases in HDL levels in the flax oil as well as fish oil groups is observed. Also, a noticeable change though not significant was observed in the plasma triglyceride concentrations after the supplementation period. This significant hypolipemic effect by omega-3 fatty acids from both the sources, demonstrates their possible therapeutic use in patients with cardiac risk.

  7. Omega-3 dietary supplements and the risk of cardiovascular events: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marik, Paul E; Varon, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish oil reduce cardiovascular disease. The clinical benefit of dietary fish oil supplementation in preventing cardiovascular events in both high and low risk patients is unclear. To assess whether dietary supplements of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decrease cardiovascular events across a spectrum of patients. MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and citation review of relevant primary and review articles. Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials that evaluated clinical cardiovascular end points (cardiovascular death, sudden death, and nonfatal cardiovascular events) and all-cause mortality in patients randomized to EPA/DHA or placebo. We only included studies that used dietary supplements of EPA/DHA which were administered for at least 1 year. Data were abstracted on study design, study size, type and dose of omega-3 supplement, cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and duration of follow-up. Studies were grouped according to the risk of cardiovascular events (high risk and moderate risk). Meta-analytic techniques were used to analyze the data. We identified 11 studies that included a total of 39 044 patients. The studies included patients after recent myocardial infarction, those with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator, and patients with heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, and hypercholesterolemia. The average dose of EPA/DHA was 1.8 +/- 1.2 g/day and the mean duration of follow-up was 2.2 +/- 1.2 years. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids significantly reduced the risk of cardiovascular deaths (odds ratio [OR]: 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79-0.95, p = 0.002), sudden cardiac death (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.76-0.99, p = 0.04), all-cause mortality (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85-0.99, p = 0.02), and nonfatal cardiovascular events (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85-0.99, p = 0.02). The mortality benefit was

  8. DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  10. Omega-3 polyunsaturated Fatty acids suppress the cystic lesion formation of peritoneal endometriosis in transgenic mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Tomio

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs play a role in controlling pathological inflammatory reactions. Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue on the peritoneum and an exaggerated inflammatory environment around ectopic tissues. Here peritoneal endometriosis was reproduced using a mouse model in which murine endometrial fragments were inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Fat-1 mice, in which omega-6 can be converted to omega-3 PUFAs, or wild type mice, in which it cannot, were used for the endometriosis model to address the actions of omega-3 PUFAs on the development of endometriotic lesions. The number and weight of cystic endometriotic lesions in fat-1 mice two weeks after inoculation were significantly less than half to those of controls. Mediator lipidomics revealed that cystic endometriotic lesions and peritoneal fluids were abundant in 12/15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (12/15-HEPE, derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and their amount in fat-1 mice was significantly larger than that in controls. 12/15-Lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX-knockout (KO and control mice with or without EPA administration were assessed for the endometriosis model. EPA administration decreased the number of lesions in controls but not in 12/15-LOX-KO mice. The peritoneal fluids in EPA-fed 12/15-LOX-KO mice contained reduced levels of EPA metabolites such as 12/15-HEPE and EPA-derived resolvin E3 even after EPA administration. cDNA microarrays of endometriotic lesions revealed that Interleukin-6 (IL-6 expression in fat-1 mice was significantly lower than that in controls. These results suggest that both endogenous and exogenous EPA-derived PUFAs protect against the development of endometriosis through their anti-inflammatory effects and, in particular, the 12/15-LOX-pathway products of EPA may be key mediators to suppress endometriosis.

  11. Omega-3 polyunsaturated Fatty acids suppress the cystic lesion formation of peritoneal endometriosis in transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Kensuke; Kawana, Kei; Taguchi, Ayumi; Isobe, Yosuke; Iwamoto, Ryo; Yamashita, Aki; Kojima, Satoko; Mori, Mayuyo; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Arimoto, Takahide; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Taketani, Yuji; Kang, Jing X; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arita, Makoto; Kozuma, Shiro; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) play a role in controlling pathological inflammatory reactions. Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue on the peritoneum and an exaggerated inflammatory environment around ectopic tissues. Here peritoneal endometriosis was reproduced using a mouse model in which murine endometrial fragments were inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Fat-1 mice, in which omega-6 can be converted to omega-3 PUFAs, or wild type mice, in which it cannot, were used for the endometriosis model to address the actions of omega-3 PUFAs on the development of endometriotic lesions. The number and weight of cystic endometriotic lesions in fat-1 mice two weeks after inoculation were significantly less than half to those of controls. Mediator lipidomics revealed that cystic endometriotic lesions and peritoneal fluids were abundant in 12/15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (12/15-HEPE), derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and their amount in fat-1 mice was significantly larger than that in controls. 12/15-Lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX)-knockout (KO) and control mice with or without EPA administration were assessed for the endometriosis model. EPA administration decreased the number of lesions in controls but not in 12/15-LOX-KO mice. The peritoneal fluids in EPA-fed 12/15-LOX-KO mice contained reduced levels of EPA metabolites such as 12/15-HEPE and EPA-derived resolvin E3 even after EPA administration. cDNA microarrays of endometriotic lesions revealed that Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in fat-1 mice was significantly lower than that in controls. These results suggest that both endogenous and exogenous EPA-derived PUFAs protect against the development of endometriosis through their anti-inflammatory effects and, in particular, the 12/15-LOX-pathway products of EPA may be key mediators to suppress endometriosis.

  12. The use of recombinant omega interferon therapy in canine atopic dermatitis: a double-blind controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, Didier Noël; Boulet, Marc; Ducret, Joël; Machicote, Gustavo; Jasmin, Pierre; Rème, Christophe A; Albouy, Maxime

    2009-10-01

    This double-blind controlled study assessed whether reduced doses of omega interferon (rFeIFN-omega) (Virbagen Omega) could improve the clinical signs of canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) over a 6-month period, in comparison with cyclosporin. Thirty-one dogs diagnosed with CAD were entered in the study. Complicating infections were treated prior to entry. Dogs received 10 injections of rFeIFN-omega (1-5 million units according to bodyweight) or placebo over 6 months, and placebo capsules or cyclosporin (5 mg/kg) once daily for 2 months and then twice weekly for 4 months in groups 1 and 2 respectively. Flea control, non-medicated shampooing and ear cleansing were performed regularly. If a bacterial infection or Malassezia overgrowth developed, it was treated with oral cephalexin or with 3% chlorhexidine shampoo respectively. Oral prednisolone was used before day 90 to relieve pruritus when required for humane reasons (1 mg/kg once daily for 7 days). The CADESI-03 and a pruritus index were evaluated on day (D) 0, D14, D35, D56, D90, D120 and D180. No significant difference was detected between the groups for the time courses of lesions or pruritus over 6 months. On D90, the proportions of dogs with > or =50% improvement of pruritus and lesion scores were 56% and 72% respectively with interferon, 75% and 75% respectively with cyclosporin. Five dogs from group 1 and two dogs from group 2 were withdrawn from the study for treatment failure. Both products were well tolerated. Treatment with rfeIFN-omega at low doses may help for the long-term management of CAD.

  13. The Supernova Legacy Survey: Measurement of Omega_M, Omega_Lambda,and w from the First Year Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astier, P.; Guy, J.; Regnault, N.; Pain, R.; Aubourg, E.; Balam,D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.G.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J.D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taillet, R.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Arsenijevic, V.; Balland, C.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Courtois, H.; Ellis, R.S.; Filiol, M.; Goncalves, A.C.; Goobar, A.; Guide, D.; Hardin, D.; Lusset, V.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.; Walton, N.

    2005-10-14

    We present distance measurements to 71 high redshift type Ia supernovae discovered during the first year of the 5-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-color light-curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshift. With this data set, we have built a Hubble diagram extending to z = 1, with all distance measurements involving at least two bands. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated making use of the multiband photometry obtained at CFHT. Cosmological fits to this first year SNLS Hubble diagram give the following results: {Omega}{sub M} = 0.263 {+-} 0.042 (stat) {+-} 0.032 (sys) for a flat {Lambda}CDM model; and w = -1.023 {+-} 0.090 (stat) {+-} 0.054 (sys) for a flat cosmology with constant equation of state w when combined with the constraint from the recent Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations.

  14. The Supernova Legacy Survey: Measurement of Omega_M, Omega_Lambda, and w from the First Year Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, P.; Guy, J.; Regnault, N.; Pain, R.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taillet, R.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Arsenijevic, V.; Balland, C.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Courtois, H.; Ellis, R. S.; Filiol, M.; Goncalves, A. C.; Goobar, A.; Guide, D.; Hardin, D.; Lusset, V.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.; Walton, N.

    2005-10-14

    We present distance measurements to 71 high redshift type Ia supernovae discovered during the first year of the 5-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-color light-curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshift. With this data set, we have built a Hubble diagram extending to z = 1, with all distance measurements involving at least two bands. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated making use of the multiband photometry obtained at CFHT. Cosmological fits to this first year SNLS Hubble diagram give the following results: {Omega}{sub M} = 0.263 {+-} 0.042 (stat) {+-} 0.032 (sys) for a flat {Lambda}CDM model; and w = -1.023 {+-} 0.090 (stat) {+-} 0.054 (sys) for a flat cosmology with constant equation of state w when combined with the constraint from the recent Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations.

  15. Vivisection au ralenti: Don DeLillo’s Point Omega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxanda BONTILĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading a Don DeLillo is like walking on glass, that is, you need hold your breath so that nothing could deter you from focusing on the mission, if you want to keep safe and mostly sound. The writer’s latest novel, Point Omega (2010, is no exception in that its author engages once more in the exercise of stripping away all surfaces so as to let us see into the terror of what he calls “makeshift reality”—his characters’ and ours. The claims I advance and substantiate in the essay, refer to (1 how a fluid chronology sustained by framing devices adds to the understanding of the construct of a novel/film in progress; (2 how the shifting narrative perspective ensures a vivisectionist’s look into the body of life/death/world. Don DeLillo’s novel is another terrifying X-ray of war/life/death as agonizing nothingness which literature in its ‘late-phase’ is meant to cure.

  16. Physiological and biochemical response to Omega-3 plus as a dietary supplement to growing goats under hot summer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Edrees Ibrahim Teama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation of Omega-3 plus on some the physiological and biochemical traits in growing Baladi goats under hot summer conditions. Thirty-four growing male goats (4-5 months old were randomly divided into two equal groups. Animals in group 1 were fed a concentrate feed mixture (CFM, which was the control group. Goats in group 2 (the experimental group were offered Omega-3 plus (1,000 mg/animal day-1 (30% fish oil, containing 18% eicosapentaenoic acid and 12% docosahexaenoic acid + 100 mg wheat germ oil (0.22% tocopherols daily in addition to the basal diet for four months (the experimental period during the hot summer season. Body weight (BW changes of both groups were recorded monthly during the experiment. Blood samples were collected monthly, and total protein, immunoglobulin G (IgG, total cholesterol, triglycerides, liver enzymes (AST and ALT, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 were estimated. A significant increase in the live BW of growing goats was recorded as a result of dietary supplementation of Omega-3 plus. Total protein, IgG, and T3 levels were higher than those obtained with control. In contrast, total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, ALT, and AST levels were significantly reduced. The serum concentration of creatinine and T4 levels was indistinguishable from those of control. Addition of Omega-3 plus as a dietary supplement to growing goats under hot summer conditions increases their daily weight gain and improves their general physiological and biochemical status by decreasing total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, ALT, and AST. It is thus suggested that Omega-3 plus should be used as a supplement in the growth period of goats.

  17. HIDROLISIS ENZIMATIK MINYAK IKAN UNTUK PRODUKSI ASAM LEMAK OMEGA-3 MENGGUNAKAN LIPASE DARI Aspergillus niger [Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Fish Oil for Production of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Using Lipase Derived from Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapta Raharja*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fish oil is the source of important fatty-acid, especially polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA omega-3, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Lipase catalysis activity of Aspergillus niger is low when it is used in fish oil hydrolysis. The activity of the lipase can be increased by adding organic solvent such as hexane into the media. This research aimed to determine temperature, pH and amount of water which produce the highest degree of hydrolysis of fish oil in the presence of hexane. Correlation between the highest degree of hydrolysis and the amount of omega-3 fatty acid was also investigated. The variables used in this research were temperatures (25-65 oC, pH (5-9, and water addition (1-5 %v/v. The highest degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of fish oil in the media without hexane was 28.07 % that was reached at 45oC and pH 5. In the presence of hexane, the highest degree of hydrolysis was 75.12 % which was reached at 5% water addition, temperature 45oC, and pH 5. GC-MS analysis showed that omega-3 fatty acid content especially EPA and DHA increased along with increase in the degree of hydrolysis. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acid produced without hexane addition was 18.42 % with EPA amounted to 12,17% and DHA 0,86%. Meanwhile omega-3 fatty acid content in the presence of hexane reached 21.93 % with EPA amounted to 17.75 % and DHA 1.21 %.

  18. The relationship between omega-3 and smoking habit: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Scaglia, N?ris; Chatkin, Jos?; Chapman, Kenneth R.; Ferreira, Ivone; Wagner, Mario; Selby, Peter; Allard, Johane; Zamel, Noe

    2016-01-01

    Background Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are related to several diseases, including smoking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between omega-3 intake and tobacco smoking, taking into account the qualitative differences in dietary intake between smokers and non-smokers, the amount of the ingested PUFA and their red blood (RBC) contents. We also looked for an association between omega-3 RBC content and smoking, and also between omega3 intake and the level of ni...

  19. Conventional methods fail to measure cp(omega) of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    thermal-wave method does not measure the isobaric frequency-dependent specific heat cp(omega). This method rather measures a "longitudinal" frequency-dependent specific heat, a quantity defined and detailed here that is in between cp(omega) and cV(omega). This result means that no reliable wide......-frequency measurements of cp(omega) on liquids approaching the calorimetric glass transition exist. We briefly discuss consequences for experiment....

  20. Hormonal and metabolic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid (omega-3 on polycystic ovary syndrome induced rats under diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Ouladsahebmadarek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome produces symptoms in approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age (12–45 years old. It is thought to be one of the leading causes of female subfertility. This study aimed to confirm the role of nutrition containing omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acid on control of experimental PCO induced by estradiol-valerat in rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar female rats (n=40 were allocated into control (n=10 and test groups (n= 30, test group was subdivided into 3 groups: G1, received omega-3 (240 mg/kg/orally/daily; G2 and G3 groups were induced PCO by single injection of estradiol-valerate (16 mg/kg/IM. Group 3 received omega-3 (240 mg/kg/orally/daily and low carbohydrate feeding for 60 subsequent days; on sixtieth day 5 ml blood samples and ovarian tissues of all rats in the group were removed and prepared for biochemical and hormonal analysis. Results: Catalase, GPX (Glutathione peroxidase, SOD (Superoxide dismutase in groups that received omega-3showed higher levels, but MDA (malondialdehyde level was significantly decreased (P

  1. The Omega RICH in the CERN hyperon beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Beusch, W; Boss, M; Engelfried, J; Gerassimov, S G; Klempt, W; Lennert, P; Martens, K; Newbold, D; Rieseberg, H; Siebert, H -W; Smith, V J; Thilmann, O; Waelder, G

    1999-08-21

    The Omega RICH, a large-aperture detector for identification of secondary pions, kaons, and (anti) protons was in operation at the CERN Omega spectrometer facility between 1984 and 1994. Cherenkov photons from a 5 m long radiator were detected in drift chambers with quartz windows, using TMAE-loaded counting gases. The RICH was used by experiments WA69 and WA82, until 1988. It was then equipped with new drift chambers and mirrors and was in use since 1990 in experiments WA89 and WA94. The setup in the WA89 hyperon beam experiment is described in more detail and efficiencies, resolutions, and physics results are discussed.

  2. Generation of auroral hectometer radio emission at the laser cyclotron resonance ([omega][sub p][>=][omega][sub H]). Generatsiya avroral'nogo gektometrovogo radioizlucheniya na mazernom tsiklotronnom rezonatore ([omega][sub p]>or approx. [omega][sub H])

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasov, V G [Irkutskij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    1992-06-01

    Generation of auroral hectometer (AHR) and kilometer (AKR) radio emission at a maser cyclotron resonance (MCR) in a relatively dense plasma ([omega][sub p][>=][omega][sub H]) is theoretically studied. The conclusion is made that availability of two-dimensional small-scale inhomogeneity of plasma density is the basic condition for the AHR generation at the MCR by auroral electron beams. The small-scale inhomogeneity of the auroral plasma, measured on satelites, meets by its parameters the conditions for the generation of auroral radio emission.

  3. Measurement of Omega_m, Omega_Lambda from a blind analysis of TypeIa supernovae with CMAGIC: Using color information to verify theacceleration of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Wang, L.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Commins, E.D.; Fadeyev, V.; Folatelli, G.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lidman, C.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain,R.; Perlmutter, S.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev, V.; Strovink,M.; Thomas, R.C.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2006-02-21

    We present measurements of {Omega}{sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} from a blind analysis of 21 high redshift supernovae using a new technique (CMAGIC) for fitting the multicolor lightcurves of Type Ia supernovae, first introduced in Wang et al. (2003). CMAGIC takes advantage of the remarkably simple behavior of Type Ia supernovae on color-magnitude diagrams, and has several advantages over current techniques based on maximum magnitudes. Among these are a reduced sensitivity to host galaxy dust extinction, a shallower luminosity-width relation, and the relative simplicity of the fitting procedure. This allows us to provide a cross check of previous supernova cosmology results, despite the fact that current data sets were not observed in a manner optimized for CMAGIC. We describe the details of our novel blindness procedure, which is designed to prevent experimenter bias. The data are broadly consistent with the picture of an accelerating Universe, and agree with a at Universe within 1.7{sigma}, including systematics. We also compare the CMAGIC results directly with those of a maximum magnitude fit to the same SNe, finding that CMAGIC favors more acceleration at the 1.6{sigma} level, including systematics and the correlation between the two measurements. A fit for w assuming a at Universe yields a value which is consistent with a cosmological constant within 1.2{sigma}.

  4. gamma-linolenic acid does not augment long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-3 status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, DAJ; Hettema, Y; van Doormaal, JJ; Muskiet, FAJ

    Augmentation of long chain polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acid (LCPUFA omega 3) status can be reached by consumption of fish oil or by improvement of the conversion of a-linolenic acid (ALA) to LCPUFA omega 3. Since gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) might activate the rate-limiting Delta-6 desaturation, we

  5. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hai Xie,1 Yan-na Chang2 1Department of Emergency, The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Hospital of Gansu University of Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate systematically the clinical efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer (CRC patients.Materials and methods: Published articles were identified by using search terms in online databases – PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library – up to March 2016. Only randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of omega-3 PUFAs in CRC were selected and analyzed through a meta-analysis. Subgroup, sensitivity, and inverted funnel-plot analyses were also conducted. Results: Eleven articles with 694 CRC patients were finally included. Compared with control, omega-3 PUFA-enriched enteral or parenteral nutrition during the perioperative period reduced infectious complications (risk ratio [RR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.86; P=0.004, tumor necrosis factor alpha (standard mean difference [SMD] -0.37, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.07; P=0.01, interleukin-6 (SMD -0.36, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.07; P=0.02, and hospital stay (MD -2.09, 95% CI -3.71 to -0.48; P=0.01. No significant difference was found in total complications, surgical site infection, or CD4+:CD8+ cell ratio. Conclusion: Short-term omega-3 PUFA administration was associated with reduced postoperative infectious complications, inflammatory cytokines, and hospital stay after CRC surgery. Due to heterogeneity and relatively small sample size, the optimal timing and route of administration deserve further study. Keywords: omega-3, fatty acids, fish oil, colorectal surgery, meta-analysis 

  6. Efectos y controversias de los ácidos grasos omega-3: effects and controversies Omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Manzur

    Full Text Available Gracias al descubrimieno del mecanismo de acción de los ácidos grasos omega-3 para disminuir las arritmias ventriculares, éstos han vuelto a cobrar importancia por su efecto cardio-protector. La ingestión de ácidos grasos omega-3 disminuye el riesgo de trombosis y accidentes cerebro-vasculares al disminuir los lípidos sanguíneos, mejorando en esta forma la función endotelial. Sin embargo, algunos estudios epidemiológicos no han encontrado una relación directa a este respecto y además hay controversia respecto a las dosis necesarias para lograr este efecto cardio-protector. Hay estudios que reportan que el contenido de metil-mercurio en peces afecta la disposición de los ácidos grasos omega-3. En el Caribe colombiano se ha encontrado contaminación de peces con metil-mercurio.Thanks to the discovery of omega-3 fatty acids’ mechanism of action, these have regained importance due to its cardio-protective effect. The ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids diminishes the risk of thrombosis and cerebro-vascular accidents by lowering serum lipids and improving endothelial function. Nevertheless, some epidemiological studies have not found a direct relationship with them and there is controversy with regard to the doses needed in order to achieve this cardio-protective effect. There are studies reporting that the methyl-mercury content in fish affects omega-3 fatty acids’ disposal. In the Colombian Caribbean region, fish contamination with methyl-mercury has been found.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid levels and general performance of commercial broilers fed practical levels of redfish meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulan, H W; Ackman, R G; Ratnayake, W M; Proudfoot, F G

    1989-01-01

    A total of 1,200 day-old Arbor Acre broiler chickens was randomly assigned to 12 pens (50 males and 50 females/pen) and divided into three blocks of four pens each. Each of four different diets was fed ad libitum to one pen of birds within each block to determine the effect of feeding practical levels of redfish meal (RFM) on performance and omega-3 fatty acid content of edible meat and skin lipids of broiler chickens. The four diets included (control) 0%, 4.0%, 8.0%, and 12.0% RFM. Feeding diets containing RFM had no effect on overall mortality or feed efficiency but resulted in decreased incidence of sudden death syndrome and lower body weight (P less than .01) and feed consumption (P less than .05). Additions of RFM to the diets resulted in a substantial dietary enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids (especially eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA or 20:5n-3, and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA or 22:6n-3). Analyses (wt/wt%) revealed that breast meat (less skin) was lower (P less than .001) in lipid and triglyceride but higher in free cholesterol (P less than .001) and phospholipid (P less than .001) than thigh meat (less skin). Dietary treatment had no effect on carcass lipid content or composition. Breast meat lipid contained more (P less than .001) omega-3 fatty acids (especially EPA and DHA), more docosapentaenoic acid, (DPA or 22:5n-3) and more total omega-3 polyunsaturated acids (n-3 PUFA) than thigh meat lipids. Feeding additional RFM resulted in an increased (P less than .001) accumulation of EPA, DPA, DHA, and total n-3 PUFA primarily at the expense of two omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic (18:2n-6) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). It can be calculated from the data presented that the consumption of 100 g of chicken that has been fed 12.0% RFM would contribute approximately 197 mg of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA + DPA + DHA) in contrast with the 138 mg of omega-3 fatty acids which would be realized from the consumption of 100 g of white fish such as cod.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids, phenolic compounds and antioxidant characteristics of chia oil supplemented margarine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Taj, Imran; Ajmal, Muhammad; Junaid, Muhammad

    2017-05-31

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) is known as power house of omega fatty acids which has great health benefits. It contains up to 78% linolenic acid (ω-3) and 18% linoleic acid (ω-6), which could be a great source of omega-3 fatty acids for functional foods. Therefore, in this study, margarines were prepared with supplementation of different concentrations of chia oil to enhance omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant characteristics and oxidative stability of the product. Margarines were formulated from non-hydrogenated palm oil, palm kernel and butter. Margarines were supplemented with 5, 10, 15 and 20% chia oil (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Margarine without any addition of chia oil was kept as control. Margarine samples were stored at 5 °C for a period of 90 days. Physico-chemical (fat, moisture, refractive index, melting point, solid fat index, fatty acids profile, total phenolic contents, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, free fatty acids and peroxide value) and sensory characteristics were studied at the interval of 45 days. The melting point of T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 developed in current investigation were 34.2, 33.8, 33.1 and 32.5 °C, respectively. The solid fat index of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were 47.21, 22.71, 20.33, 18.12 and 16.58%, respectively. The α-linolenic acid contents in T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 2.92, 5.85, 9.22, 12.29%, respectively. The concentration of eicosanoic acid in T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was 1.82, 3.52, 6.43 and 9.81%, respectively. The content of docosahexanoic acid in T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was present 1.26, 2.64, 3.49 and 5.19%, respectively. The omega-3 fatty acids were not detected in the control sample. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 samples were 0.27, 2.22, 4.15, 7.23 and 11.42 mg GAE/mL, respectively. DPPH free radical scavenging activity for control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 65.8, 5.37, 17.82, 24.95, 45.42 and 62.8%, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid

  9. The x-ray source application test cassette for radiation exposures at the OMEGA laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Rekow, V.; Emig, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D. [Fifth Gait Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States); Horton, R. [Gray Research, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama 35806 (United States); Davis, J. [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have designed a sample cassette that can be used to position up to six samples in the OMEGA laser chamber. The cassette accommodates round samples up to 38.1 mm (1.5{sup Double-Prime }) in diameter and square samples up to 27 mm on a side, any of which can be up to 12.7 mm thick. Smaller specimens are centered with spacers. The test cassette allows each sample to have a unique filter scheme, with multiple filter regions in front of each sample. This paper will present mechanical design considerations and operational aspects of the x-ray source application cassette.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Possible Neuroprotective Mechanisms in the Model of Global Ischemia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nobre, Maria Elizabeth Pereira; Correia, Alyne Oliveira; Mendon?a, Francisco Nilson Maciel; Uchoa, Luiz Ricardo Ara?jo; Vasconcelos, Jessica Tamara Nunes; de Ara?jo, Carlos Ney Alencar; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Siqueira, Rafaelly Maria Pinheiro; Cerqueira, Gilberto dos Santos; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Arida, Ricardo M?rio; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2016-01-01

    Background. Omega-3 (ω3) administration was shown to protect against hypoxic-ischemic injury. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective effects of ω3, in a model of global ischemia. Methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to carotid occlusion (30 min), followed by reperfusion. The groups were SO, untreated ischemic and ischemic treated rats with ω3 (5 and 10 mg/kg, 7 days). The SO and untreated ischemic animals were orally treated with 1% cremophor and, 1 h after the last administrati...

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-02-07

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stability and sensory characteristics of ice cream. Ice cream samples were prepared by partially replacing the milk fat with olein fraction of chia oil at 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentrations (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Ice cream prepared from 100% milk fat was kept as control. Ice cream samples stored at -18 °C for 60 days were analysed at 0, 30 and 60 days of the storage period. Fatty acid profile, total phenolic contents, total flavonoids, free fatty acids, peroxide value, anisidine value and sensory characteristics of ice cream samples was studied. Concentration of α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in T 4 was 13.24, 0.58, 0.42 and 0.31%, respectively. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were recorded 0.12, 1.65, 3.17, 5.19 and 7.48 mg GAE/mL, respectively. Total flavonoid content of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 0.08, 0.64, 1.87, 3.16 and 4.29 mg Quercetin Equivalent/mL. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 5.61, 17.43, 36.84, 51.17 and 74.91%, respectively. After 60 days of storage period, the highest peroxide value of 1.84 (MeqO 2 /kg) was observed in T 4 , which was much less than allowable limit of 10 (MeqO 2 /kg). Flavour score was non-significant after 30 days of storage period. Supplementation of ice cream with olein fraction of chia oil enhanced the concentration of

  12. Study of the near-threshold omega phi mass enhancement in doubly OZI-suppressed J/psi -> gamma omega phi decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, M.L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J.P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Liu, Cheng; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    A 2:25 x 10(8) J/psi event sample accumulated with the BESIII detector is used to study the doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-suppressed decay modes J/psi -> gamma omega phi, omega -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0), phi -> K+K-. A strong deviation (> 30 sigma) from three-body J/psi -> gamma omega phi phase space is

  13. Omega-3/Omega-6 Fatty Acids for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mats; Ostlund, Sven; Fransson, Gunnar; Kadesjo, Bjorn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess omega 3/6 fatty acids (eye q) in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: The study included a randomized, 3-month, omega 3/6 placebo-controlled, one-way crossover trial with 75 children and adolescents (8-18 years), followed by 3 months with omega 3/6 for all. Investigator-rated ADHD…

  14. Low-energy photoproduction of omega-mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, J; Glander, K H; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Klein, F; Lawall, R; Menze, D; Neuerburg, W; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wiegers, B; Ernst, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klempt, E; Link, J; Pee, H V; Klein, F J; Wieland, F W; Wisskirchen, J; Wu, C

    2003-01-01

    The photoproduction of the vector meson omega has been studied between threshold and W=2.4 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at the Bonn electron stretcher ring ELSA. Besides, the total cross-sections angular distributions in the CMS and decay angular distributions in the helicity and Gottfried-Jackson systems have been measured.

  15. New Synthesis of .alfa.,.omega.-Diiodoalkynes and Capped Iodobutadiynes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlavatý, Jaromír; Kavan, Ladislav; Štícha, M.

    - (2002), s. 705-706 ISSN 1472-7781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0634 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : .alfa.,. omega .-diiodoalkynes * capped iodobutadiynes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.181, year: 2002

  16. Carbonaceous Polymers and Nanotubes from .alfa., .omega.-Dialkali Hexatriynides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlavatý, Jaromír; Kavan, Ladislav; Okabe, K.; Oya, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 7 (2002), s. 1147-1150 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0634 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * chemically modified carbon * .alfa.,. omega .-dialkali hexatriynides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.048, year: 2002

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements for Chronic Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplements (lg EPA and 0.7g DHA daily) were used in the treatment of 58 patients with refractory epilepsy, in a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted by researchers at the UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements for Chronic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acid (FA supplements (lg EPA and 0.7g DHA daily were used in the treatment of 58 patients with refractory epilepsy, in a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted by researchers at the UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.

  19. Omega-6 fatty acid biomarkers and incident type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jason H.Y.; Marklund, Matti; Imamura, Fumiaki; Tintle, Nathan; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Goede, de Janette; Zhou, Xia; Yang, Wei Sin; Oliveira Otto, de Marcia C.; Kröger, Janine; Qureshi, Waqas; Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Bassett, Julie K.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Lankinen, Maria; Murphy, Rachel A.; Rajaobelina, Kalina; Gobbo, Del Liana C.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Kalsbeek, Anya; Veenstra, Jenna; Luo, Juhua; Hu, Frank B.; Lin, Hung Ju; Siscovick, David S.; Boeing, Heiner; Chen, Tzu An; Steffen, Brian; Steffen, Lyn M.; Hodge, Allison; Eriksdottir, Gudny; Smith, Albert V.; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Harris, Tamara B.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Berr, Claudine; Helmer, Catherine; Samieri, Cecilia; Laakso, Markku; Tsai, Michael Y.; Giles, Graham G.; Nurmi, Tarja; Wagenknecht, Lynne; Schulze, Matthias B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Chien, Kuo Liong; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Sun, Qi; Harris, William S.; Lind, Lars; Ärnlöv, Johan; Riserus, Ulf; Micha, Renata; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background: The metabolic effects of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) remain contentious, and little evidence is available regarding their potential role in primary prevention of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to assess the associations of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid biomarkers with

  20. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Treatment on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Insulin resistance (IR is a common pathogenic factor of several diseases: diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, etc. There are many therapeutic factors involved in decreasing IR. Among them we mention metformin, pioglitazone, physical activity, weight loss, diet, etc. In the last decade, there are more observations of the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on IR. The most powerful seem to be omega-3 fatty acids. In our study, we wanted to asses if the administration of omega-3 fatty acids is involved in modifying IR. Materials and methods: We evaluated 126 diabetic patients with IR from January 2011 until July 2014. The study was open-label and non-randomized. For the determination of IR we used the HOMA-IR method. Results: For both males and females there was a regression of HOMA-IR during the 4 weeks of treatment with omega-3 and also after 2 weeks after stopping the administration of these fatty acids. The decrease of HOMA-IR was statistically significant (p<0.05. The statistic result observed in the next 2 weeks after stopping administration of omega-3 was also significant (p<0.05.

  1. Golden Jubilee photos: The Alpha and the OMEGA

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In 1972, the OMEGA spectrometer was commissioned in the West Area and more than a million collisions were recorded that very first year. OMEGA was equipped with spark chambers - replaced at the end of the 1970s by electronic detectors - and a 15 000-tonne superconducting magnet. On this photo we can see the magnet's lower coil and, in the foreground, the support plate for the upper coil. No fewer than 48 experiments made use of this device, exploiting beams of various particles at various energies - from the PS at the beginning, and then from the highest energy beams of the SPS. OMEGA thus played a key role in many physics results and activities, notably the production of the J/psi particle, the study of particles carrying charm or beauty quarks, the study of «gluonia», and the CERN heavy ion programme. The OMEGA experiments ceased in 1996 when the facilities in the West Hall were shut down in preparation for the construction of the LHC.

  2. ORION-the Omega Remote Interactive On-line System

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, R D; Levratt, B; Lipps, H; Sparrman, P

    1974-01-01

    ORION is a system which permits the manipulation of files, records and characters, remote job submittal and retrieval of output files including the direct loading of remote on-line computers. The system uses the computer hardware of the OMEGA project at CERN and is designed to assist researchers in development and debugging of their programs. (10 refs).

  3. ORION - the OMEGA Remote Interactive On-line System

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, R D; Krieger, M

    1973-01-01

    ORION is a system which permits the manipulation of files, records and characters, remote job submittal and retrieval of output files including the direct loading of remote on-line computers. The system uses the computer hardware of the OMEGA project at CERN, and is designed to assist researchers in development and debugging of their programs.

  4. A PC version of the Monte Carlo criticality code OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, E.

    1996-05-01

    A description of the PC version of the Monte Carlo criticality code OMEGA is given. The report contains a general description of the code together with a detailed input description. Furthermore, some examples are given illustrating the generation of an input file. The main field of application is the calculation of the criticality of arrangements of fissionable material. Geometrically complicated arrangements that often appear inside and outside a reactor, e.g. in a fuel storage or transport container, can be considered essentially without geometrical approximations. For example, the real geometry of assemblies containing hexagonal or square lattice structures can be described in full detail. Moreover, the code can be used for special investigations in the field of reactor physics and neutron transport. Many years of practical experience and comparison with reference cases have shown that the code together with the built-in data libraries gives reliable results. OMEGA is completely independent on other widely used criticality codes (KENO, MCNP, etc.), concerning programming and the data base. It is a good practice to run difficult criticality safety problems by different independent codes in order to mutually verify the results. In this way, OMEGA can be used as a redundant code within the family of criticality codes. An advantage of