WorldWideScience

Sample records for omaha veterans triga-mk-1

  1. NAACP Suit Challenges Breakup of Omaha Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    The nation's best-known civil rights group has jumped into the fray over a controversial Nebraska law that would divide the 45,000-student Omaha school system into three separate districts, largely along racial and ethnic lines. In a lawsuit filed May 16 in US District Court in Omaha, Nebraska, the Omaha branch of the National Association for the…

  2. Lincoln-Lancaster and Omaha TV facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer shows the location of all Lincoln-Lancaster and Omaha Title V sources (Clean Air Act major sources) in the State of Nebraska. Source information is from...

  3. Omaha Language Preservation in the Macy, Nebraska Public School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Catherine

    A native language renewal program at the Macy, Nebraska Public School is described that is designed to preserve Omaha, a native American Indian language that is only a generation away from extinction. At the time of this research, only about 100 fluent Omaha speakers lived on the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska. The language and culture program,…

  4. Lessons Learned from "The Oracle of Omaha" Warren Buffett

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkle, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    This article documents a trip that was made by students from the University of Akron's College of Business to visit Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway and the second richest man in the world at his Global Headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. Every year, Buffett invites a select number of schools to Omaha to visit with him and tour…

  5. The computerized OMAHA system in microsoft office excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaobin; Wong, Frances K Y; Zhang, Peiqiang; Leung, Carenx W Y; Lee, Lai H; Wong, Jessica S Y; Lo, Yim F; Ching, Shirley S Y

    2014-01-01

    The OMAHA System was adopted as the documentation system in an interventional study. To systematically record client care and facilitate data analysis, two Office Excel files were developed. The first Excel file (File A) was designed to record problems, care procedure, and outcomes for individual clients according to the OMAHA System. It was used by the intervention nurses in the study. The second Excel file (File B) was the summary of all clients that had been automatically extracted from File A. Data in File B can be analyzed directly in Excel or imported in PASW for further analysis. Both files have four parts to record basic information and the three parts of the OMAHA System. The computerized OMAHA System simplified the documentation procedure and facilitated the management and analysis of data.

  6. Effective Teaching-Learning Strategies for the Omaha System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Martin, Karen S; Johnson, Karen E; Garcia, Alexandra A

    2016-02-01

    Home healthcare clinicians can benefit from the use of interprofessional standardized terminologies to more efficiently document and assess patient problems, describe and present clinician interventions, and measure the outcomes of care. The Omaha System is a research-based, comprehensive standardized terminology that can enable users to describe and measure the impact of nursing and healthcare services on patient care and outcomes. In this article, we (1) describe effective strategies for teaching the Omaha System to home healthcare agency staff, and (2) illustrate those strategies' effectiveness by presenting an example from an Omaha System Basic Workshop conducted in 2015. The 12 participants included home healthcare nursing administrators and clinicians, software developers from several companies, nursing educators, and nursing researchers. The role-playing and unfolding case studies that we report here represent teaching strategies that can provide opportunities for home healthcare users to practice using the Omaha System. Quantitative evaluation consisted of comparing the participants' pretest and posttest scores on the survey. Qualitative evaluation involved analyzing participants' feedback and comments on a form distributed at the end of the workshop. Participants found the workshop beneficial in improving their understanding of the Omaha System and its application to their practice.

  7. Omaha Survival: A Vanishing Indian Tribe that Would Not Vanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridington, Robin

    1987-01-01

    The Omaha have kept themselves together as a people throughout the century when they were expected to have vanished. They are strong today precisely because they have remained emotionally bound to an Indian identity, taking elements of white culture that are of benefit while retaining the traditional cultural spirit. (JHZ)

  8. Activate Omaha: the journey to an active living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Jennifer L; Dodge, Tammie; Peterson, Kerri; Balluff, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Omaha, an urban Nebraska community, represents 26% of the state's population. Activate Omaha, formed in 2003, addressed the obesity epidemic caused by physical inactivity and poor infrastructure to support active living in the community. Activate Omaha's efforts focused on a strategic social-marketing campaign, using baseline and annual data for guidance. Complementary programming was implemented parallel to the marketing campaigns. Safe Routes to School infrastructure projects were federally funded, and 20 miles of on-street bicycle facilities were funded privately. The mayor's Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee was formed, including directors from city planning and public works. The initiative became recognized by the community as the lead resource promoting physical activity. This enabled the initiative to be instrumental in infrastructure changes and programming targeting the underserved. The initiative leveraged an additional $1,475,000 over 5 years. These funds created opportunities to invest in shared community resources such as providing bicycles for underserved youth, building infrastructure through Safe Routes to School initiatives, and successful worksite programming. Partners should be utilized in a strategic manner, where they are engaged purposefully and serve a role in assuring successful outcomes. Community readiness should determine the focus on policy, physical projects, and promotional and programmatic strategies, as well as the integration of these strategies. Activate Omaha grew into a credible organization moving public policy and leveraging new public-private relationships through multilevel strategies. This approach ultimately led to sustainable changes in the community infrastructure and the behavior of its citizens.

  9. Megan Terry's Plays for Youth at the Omaha Magic Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jeanne

    Nebraska's Omaha Magic Theatre (OMT) and playwright Megan Terry are concerned with producing socially relevant, issue-oriented musical plays, focusing on young people and the adults who influence their emotional lives. OMT's "Theatre of Process" focuses upon the performing artist to develop and test ways to make theater more meaningful,…

  10. Omaha District Final Cultural Resource Site Monitoring Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Game , Fish, Parks and Recreation FINAL CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE MONITORING PLAN U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OMAHA DISTRICT JUNE 2014 Page | 2...to collect routine monitoring data, which is uploaded into CR-DMS. Pathfinder Office is utilized for pre and post processing of data. Detailed...collecting. The data dictionary is created in Pathfinder office and transferred to the unit. The data dictionary is utilized to collect information

  11. 78 FR 66385 - Omaha Public Power District Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Omaha Public Power District Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Omaha Public Power District (OPPD, the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR-40, which authorizes operation of Fort Calhoun Station...

  12. 78 FR 37592 - Omaha Public Power District, Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Omaha Public Power District, Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Omaha Public Power District (OPPD, the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License, which authorizes operation of Fort Calhoun Station (FCS), Unit 1....

  13. 75 FR 15744 - Omaha Public Power District; Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Omaha Public Power District; Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Omaha Public Power District (OPPD, the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR-40 which authorizes operation of the Fort...

  14. Biblioteca W. Dale Clark Omaha - Nebraska - EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, George

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available The W. Dale Clark Library, a very popular institution since it was opened, has become a landmark in the urban renewal plan of the City of Omaha. The building, in a square plan and totally symetric, projects its functionality to the outside. Hence, the two large solid walls on opposite façades express the non-public uses while the other two glazed façades express the public areas. A central interior court creates a vast space visually connecting the four upper floors while affords natural lighting through a skylight in the roof.

    La Biblioteca W. Dale Clark, por la aceptación pública que ha tenido desde su apertura, marca un hito importante en el plan de revitalización de la ciudad de Omaha. El edificio, de planta cuadrada y de total simetría, muestra su funcionalidad al exterior, y así, los dos grandes paños ciegos en fachadas opuestas, delimitan los usos cerrados, mientras que las otras dos fachadas, con sus muros totalmente acristalados, manifiestan e iluminan las zonas de uso público. En el interior, un espacio central que cruza los cuatro niveles superiores, enlaza visualmente a, todas las plantas entre sí, al tiempo que permite su iluminación natural por el lucernario de la cubierta.

  15. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Administration » Health Programs for Veterans Veterans Health Administration Health Programs for Veterans Beyond the doctors and nurses who ... Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents Adaptive Sports Program ... Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration National Cemetery ...

  16. Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here VA » Veterans Health Administration Veterans Health Administration Robotic Brace for Veterans of Spinal Cord Injury ... Read more » VA Medical Centers The Veterans Health Administration is home to the United States’ largest integrated ...

  17. Women Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report summarizes the history of women Veterans in the military and as Veterans. It profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2015, and illustrates how...

  18. 76 FR 63668 - Omaha Public Power District; Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... [Federal Register Volume 76, Number 198 (Thursday, October 13, 2011)] [Notices] [Pages 63668-63670] [FR Doc No: 2011-26488] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-285; NRC-2011-0239] Omaha Public... Reactor Regulation. [FR Doc. 2011-26488 Filed 10-12-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  19. 77 FR 15450 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Chicago, Illinois, to Omaha, Nebraska, Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... system that offers business and leisure travelers shorter travel times, additional train frequencies, and... between Chicago and Omaha to help meet current and future demand for travel in the study area. The... service and would meet the need for a rail travel option by: Decreasing travel times Increasing...

  20. Veterans Crisis Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The caring responders at the Veterans Crisis Line are specially trained and experienced in helping Veterans of all ages and circumstances. Some of the responders are...

  1. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Claims Representation RESOURCES Careers at VA Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents ...

  2. Veterans and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    health care of veterans, operates all but one of the programs for homeless veterans. The Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ), which is responsible...Robert Rosenheck and Alan Fontana, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation,” The American Journal of Psychiatry...151, no. 3 (March 1994): 421-427 (hereinafter, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation”). 45 See, for example

  3. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  4. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  5. Toward Improving Quality of End-of-Life Care: Encoding Clinical Guidelines and Standing Orders Using the Omaha System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipka, Allison F; Monsen, Karen A

    2017-07-29

    End-of-life care (EOLC) relieves the suffering of millions of people around the globe each year. A growing body of hospice care research has led to the creation of several evidence-based clinical guidelines for EOLC. As evidence for the effectiveness of timely EOLC swells, so does the increased need for efficient information exchange between disciplines and across the care continuum. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the Omaha System as a framework for encoding interoperable evidence-based EOL interventions with specified temporality for use across disciplines and settings. Four evidence-based clinical guidelines and one current set of hospice standing orders were encoded using the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme and Intervention Scheme, as well as Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). The resulting encoded guideline was entered on a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and made available for public use on the Omaha System Guidelines website. The resulting EOLC guideline consisted of 153 interventions that may enable patients and their surrogates, clinicians, and ancillary providers to communicate interventions in a universally comprehensible way. Evidence-based interventions from diverse disciplines involved in EOLC are described within this guideline using the Omaha System. Because the Omaha System and clinical guidelines are maintained in the public domain, encoding interventions is achievable by anyone with access to the Internet and basic Excel skills. Using the guideline as a documentation template customized for unique patient needs, clinicians can quantify and track patient care across the care continuum to ensure timely evidence-based interventions. Clinical guidelines coded in the Omaha System can support the use of multidisciplinary evidence-based interventions to improve quality of EOLC across settings and professions. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Paralyzed Veterans of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have Served Attend an Event Host an Event Sports Events Volunteer Opportunities We Are #UNSTOPPABLE Get Sports Sports ... Vehicle Donate Clothing or Housegoods Host an Event Sports Events Attend an Event Veterans Day Veterans Day Poster ...

  7. Master Veteran Index (MVI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As of June 28, 2010, the Master Veteran Index (MVI) database based on the enhanced Master Patient Index (MPI) is the authoritative identity service within the VA,...

  8. Rural Veterans by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  9. Minority Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  10. Minority Veteran Report 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  11. Introducing Veteran Critical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Glenn A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2017-01-01

    Research on student veterans is in an infant state. As veterans continue to enroll in institutions of higher education, researchers must explore new ways of "knowing" student veterans. It is not enough to only describe and model this growing demographic, researchers must also have a tool for criticism and question. The next in an…

  12. The Omaha system and meaningful use: applications for practice, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karen S; Monsen, Karen A; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2011-01-01

    Meaningful use has become ubiquitous in the vocabulary of health information technology. It suggests that better healthcare does not result from the adoption of technology and electronic health records, but by increasing interoperability and informing clinical decisions at the point of care. Although the initial application of meaningful use was limited to eligible professionals and hospitals, it incorporates complex processes and workflow that involve all nurses, other healthcare practitioners, and settings. The healthcare community will become more integrated, and interdisciplinary practitioners will provide enhanced patient-centered care if electronic health records adopt the priorities of meaningful use. Standardized terminologies are a necessary component of such electronic health records. The Omaha System is an exemplar of a standardized terminology that enables meaningful use of clinical data to support and improve patient-centered clinical practice, education, and research. It is user-friendly, generates data that can be shared with patients and their families, and enables healthcare providers to analyze and exchange patient-centered coded data. Use of the Omaha System is increasing steadily in diverse practice, education, and research settings nationally and internationally.

  13. Omaha Soil Mixing Study: Redistribution of Lead in Remediated Residential Soils Due to Excavation or Homeowner Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban soils within the Omaha Lead Superfund Site have been contaminated with lead (Pb) from atmospheric deposition of particulate materials from lead smelting and recycling activities. In May of 2009 the Final Record of Decision stated that any residential soil exceeding the pre...

  14. 78 FR 13015 - Designation for the Sandusky, MI; Davenport, IA; Enid, OK; Keokuk, IA; Marshall, MI; and Omaha...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... the September 13, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 56608), GIPSA requested applications for designation to... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Sandusky, MI; Davenport, IA; Enid, OK; Keokuk, IA; Marshall, MI; and Omaha, NE Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers...

  15. Wearable Technology Surveillance Data for the Personal Health Record Using the Omaha System: Noise Exposure, Cardiovascular and Stress Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Madeleine J; Chin, Dal Lae; Monsen, Karen A; Hong, OiSaeng

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes a method to prepare noise and health data from wearable technology for standardized representation in the electronic personal health record thus enabling individuals to identify noise-related health risks. Using a case study approach, the authors demonstrate transformation of data to the Omaha System standardized terminology in order to depict the data graphically in a personal health record.

  16. Water Quality of Combined Sewer Overflows, Stormwater, and Streams, Omaha, Nebraska, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jason R.; Frankforter, Jill D.; Rus, David L.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Moser, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Omaha, investigated the water quality of combined sewer overflows, stormwater, and streams in the Omaha, Nebraska, area by collecting and analyzing 1,175 water samples from August 2006 through October 2007. The study area included the drainage area of Papillion Creek at Capeheart Road near Bellevue, Nebraska, which encompasses the tributary drainages of the Big and Little Papillion Creeks and Cole Creek, along with the Missouri River reach that is adjacent to Omaha. Of the 101 constituents analyzed during the study, 100 were detected in at least 1 sample during the study. Spatial and seasonal comparisons were completed for environmental samples. Measured concentrations in stream samples were compared to water-quality criteria for pollutants of concern. Finally, the mass loads of water-quality constituents in the combined sewer overflow discharges, stormwater outfalls, and streams were computed and compared. The results of the study indicate that combined sewer overflow and stormwater discharges are affecting the water quality of the streams in the Omaha area. At the Papillion Creek Basin sites, Escherichia coli densities were greater than 126 units per 100 milliliters in 99 percent of the samples (212 of 213 samples analyzed for Escherichia coli) collected during the recreational-use season from May through September (in 2006 and 2007). Escherichia coli densities in 76 percent of Missouri River samples (39 of 51 samples) were greater than 126 units per 100 milliliters in samples collected from May through September (in 2006 and 2007). None of the constituents with human health criteria for consumption of water, fish, and other aquatic organisms were detected at levels greater than the criteria in any of the samples collected during this study. Total phosphorus concentrations in water samples collected in the Papillion Creek Basin were in excess of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposed

  17. Surficial geologic map of the greater Omaha area, Nebraska and Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroba, R.R.; Brandt, T.R.; Blossom, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Geologic mapping, in support of the USGS Omaha-Kansas City Geologic Mapping Project, shows the spatial distribution of artificial-fill, alluvial, eolian, and glacial deposits and bedrock in and near Omaha, Nebraska. Artificial fill deposits are mapped chiefly beneath commercial structures, segments of interstate highways and other major highways, railroad tracks, airport runways, and military facilities, and in landfills and earth fills. Alluvial deposits are mapped beneath flood plains, in stream terraces, and on hill slopes. They include flood-plain and stream-channel alluvium, sheetwash alluvium, and undivided sheetwash alluvium and stream alluvium. Wind-deposited loess forms sheets that mantle inter-stream areas and late Wisconsin terrace alluvium. Peoria Loess is younger of the two loess sheets and covers much of the inter-stream area in the map area. Loveland Loess is older and is exposed in a few small areas in the eastern part of the map area. Glacial deposits are chiefly heterogeneous, ice-deposited, clayey material (till) and minor interstratified stream-deposited sand and gravel. Except for small outcrops, glacial deposits are covered by eolian and alluvial deposits throughout most of the map area. Bedrock is locally exposed in natural exposures along the major streams and in quarries. It consists of Dakota Sandstone and chiefly limestone and shale of the Lansing and Kansas City Groups. Sand and gravel in flood plain and stream-channel alluvium in the Platte River valley are used mainly for concrete aggregate. Limestone of the Lansing and Kansas City Groups is used for road-surfacing material, rip rap, and fill material.

  18. Characteristics of Rural Veterans: 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report uses data from the 2010 American Community Survey to compare the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans and non-Veterans who live in...

  19. Veterans Administration Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  20. The association of tobacco marketing with median income and racial/ethnic characteristics of neighbourhoods in Omaha, Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahpush, Mohammad; Jones, Pamela R; Singh, Gopal K; Timsina, Lava R; Martin, Judy

    2010-06-01

    To examine the association of point-of-sale tobacco marketing with median income and racial/ethnic composition at the neighbourhood level in Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. Fieldworkers collected comprehensive tobacco marketing data from all of the stores that were licensed to sell tobacco in 84 randomly selected neighbourhoods in the Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. An increase of $10,000 in median household income was associated with a decrease of 14.3% in the number of tobacco marketing items per square mile in a neighbourhood (p=0.021). There was very little evidence that the percentages of African-American and Hispanic populations in the neighbourhoods were related to tobacco marketing. Banning tobacco marketing, as recommended by the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, is likely to reduce tobacco use disparities.

  1. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  2. Student Veterans Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  3. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  4. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  5. For Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher. More Information Compensated Work ... residential treatment services to help Veterans transition from living on the street or in institutions to stable ...

  6. Veterans Choice Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — If you are already enrolled in VA health care, the Choice Program allows you to receive health care within your community. Using this program does NOT impact your...

  7. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  8. Veterans Health Administration (VHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is for SSA to verify SSNs and other identifying information for the Department of Veterans Affairs, VHA. DVA will use the information...

  9. Suicide among War Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Vsevolod Rozanov; Vladimir Carli

    2012-01-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to ex...

  10. Creating Interdisciplinary STEM Environments at the University of Nebraska at Omaha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, R. D.; Grandgenett, N. F.

    2010-12-01

    Effective, integrated and interdisciplinary STEM environments depend upon strong faculty collaboration. During the past decade, the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) has put an emphasis on STEM faculty working together across departments, colleges, and the university system, as well as with local school systems. Supported by a University-wide Content and Pedagogy Committee and a new Office of STEM Education, faculty members have aggressively undertaken and evaluated various interdisciplinary STEM activities. This presentation will briefly describe three of these projects, including evaluation-related data and UNO support mechanisms. First, an interdisciplinary student research project has been developed involving our introductory geology and chemistry courses. The project includes collecting drinking water samples from around Omaha by geology students, the chemical analysis of drinking water by chemistry students, followed by water quality analysis of the chemical data by the geology students. Students learn about the scientific method, potential problems with project design, and limitations of interpretation of real data, while also applying knowledge learned in the class to this real world problem. This project reaches ~600 undergraduate students each year and requires close cooperation between faculty of the Chemistry and Geology programs. Evaluation data indicates that this project has had a positive impact on student attitude towards science in general and towards geology and chemistry in particular. The second project highlighted will be the Silicon Prairie Initiative for Robotics in Information Technology (SPIRIT). The SPIRIT project is a NSF funded collaboration between the UNO College of Education, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln College of Engineering, and local school systems. It strives to integrate the use of educational robotics and sensors in the teaching of STEM topics, particularly at the middle school and high school levels. The project

  11. Clinical application of the Omaha system with the Nightingale Tracker: a community health nursing student home visit program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Helen L; Delahoussaye, Carolyn P

    2003-01-01

    The application of computer use in the clinical and educational arena needs to be emphasized for both the improved management of patient data and nursing knowledge. Faculty commitment to automation of home visit documentation records was essential to sustain the trial of implementing the Nightingale Trackers in the clinical area. The Nightingale Tracker is a software program that automates the Omaha system, a community-friendly nursing language that encourages a focus on health promotion. A team approach involving students, faculty, and technical support enabled the automation of the patient record of a home visiting program in a community health nursing course.

  12. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  13. Veteran Religious Affiliation by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset provide a count of Veteran by their religious affiliation and state of residence. The dataset set covers all 50 states, District of Columbia and other...

  14. Rural Veterans by State (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This spreadsheet contains data from the 2015 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  15. Rural Veterans by State (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  16. Veterans' Employment and Training Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Careers Women Who Served Programs & Services Transition GPS Frequently Asked Questions Hire a Veteran Find qualified Veterans Policy & Compliance Employer Toolkit Strengthening Military Families Apprenticeships Service Providers Grants & Opportunities Compliance Assistance ...

  17. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  18. Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Welcome to the Veterans ...

  19. Veteran Stereotypes: A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    All Americans, however, should have an interest in veteran reintegration . The success with which we reintegrate our veterans and their families as... successful reintegration through simple coaching and mentoring that assists veterans in navigating reintegration challenges. As explained above, most...already living in the civilian community can have a profound effect on a veteran’s reintegration success . Veterans do not need a hand-out, but a

  20. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  1. Data on Vietnam Era Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC. Office of the Controller.

    Statistical data are presented on Vietnam era veterans for the following topics: employment status, medical status, compensation and pension, education, housing assistance, expenditures, and demographic information. The estimated number and age of veterans in civil life, categorized by sex and state, and the educational attainment of veterans at…

  2. Flood-inundation maps for a 12.5-mile reach of Big Papillion Creek at Omaha, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Kellan R.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Anderson, Kayla J.

    2016-03-22

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 12.5-mile reach of the Big Papillion Creek from 0.6 mile upstream from the State Street Bridge to the 72nd Street Bridge in Omaha, Nebraska, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Big Papillion Creek at Fort Street at Omaha, Nebraska (station 06610732). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site.

  3. Distribution of albumin variants Naskapi amd Mexico among Aleuts, Frobisher Bay Eskimos, and Micmac, Naskapi, Mohawk, Omaha, and Apache Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, L M; Agarwal, S S; Blumberg, B S; Levy, H; Bennett, P H; Laughlin, W S; Martin, J P

    1978-07-01

    In order to help define the boundaries of the distribution of the albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico which are polymorphic among several American Indian groups, we examined sera from Micmac, Mohawk, Northwest River Naskapi, Omaha and Apache Indians, and from Aleuts and Eskimos. Sera from a total of 1,524 individuals were examined. Using a cellulose acetate membrane electrophoretic system with Tris-Citric acid at pH 5.4 we were able to distinguish normal albumin and both variants in the same run. Naskapi and Mexico variants were absent from Aleut, Eskimo, Micmac, Mohawk and Omaha samples. The albumin Naskapi variant was present in an allele frequency of 0.03 in the Naskapi Indian sample. Albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico were found in the Apache sample at frequencies of 0.016 and 0.037, respectively. This report supersedes that previously published by Schell and Agarwal ('76). Generally, within an area there is a correspondence between changes in the frequency of albumin variants and changes in the ethnic background and history of the area's populations. At the same time, when viewing widely separated areas, relationships between distant groups based on linguistic and cultural similarities are paralleled on a biologic level by the distribution of normal albumin and variant albumins.

  4. Water balance monitoring for two bioretention gardens in Omaha, Nebraska, 2011–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Kellan R.; Rus, David L.; Holm, Kent E.

    2016-01-29

    Bioretention gardens are used to help mitigate stormwater runoff in urban settings in an attempt to restore the hydrologic response of the developed land to a natural predevelopment response in which more water is infiltrated rather than routed directly to urban drainage networks. To better understand the performance of bioretention gardens in facilitating infiltration of stormwater in eastern Nebraska, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Douglas County Environmental Services and the Nebraska Environmental Trust, assessed the water balance of two bioretention gardens located in Omaha, Nebraska by monitoring the amount of stormwater entering and leaving the gardens. One garden is on the Douglas County Health Center campus, and the other garden is on the property of the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging.For the Douglas County Health Center, bioretention garden performance was evaluated on the basis of volume reduction by comparing total inflow volume to total outflow volume. The bioretention garden reduced inflow volumes from a minimum of 33 percent to 100 percent (a complete reduction in inflow volume) depending on the size of the event. Although variable, the percent reduction of the inflow volume tended to decrease with increasing total event rainfall. To assess how well the garden reduces stormwater peak inflow rates, peak inflows were plotted against peak outflows measured at the bioretention garden. Only 39 of the 255 events had any overflow, indicating 100 percent peak reduction in the other events. Of those 39 events having overflow, the mean peak reduction was 63 percent.No overflow events were recorded at the bioretention garden at the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging; therefore, data were not available for an event-based overflow analysis.Monitoring period summary of the water balance at both bio-retention gardens indicates that most of the stormwater in the bioretention gardens is stored in the subsurface.Evapotranspiration was attributed

  5. 75 FR 22164 - Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... training, and skills training) to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor...

  6. The Veteran's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    In one important way, student-veterans are like all other students. They need supportive relationships to achieve their academic goals. Serving these students well means learning their stories and helping them succeed. In the process, some of these people may change one's life. In this article, the author shares the touching stories of some of the…

  7. Using Google Flu Trends data in forecasting influenza-like-illness related ED visits in Omaha, Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Ozgur M; Bentley, Dan; Muelleman, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Emergency department (ED) visits increase during the influenza seasons. It is essential to identify statistically significant correlates in order to develop an accurate forecasting model for ED visits. Forecasting influenza-like-illness (ILI)-related ED visits can significantly help in developing robust resource management strategies at the EDs. We first performed correlation analyses to understand temporal correlations between several predictors of ILI-related ED visits. We used the data available for Douglas County, the biggest county in Nebraska, for Omaha, the biggest city in the state, and for a major hospital in Omaha. The data set included total and positive influenza test results from the hospital (ie, Antigen rapid (Ag) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) tests); an Internet-based influenza surveillance system data, that is, Google Flu Trends, for both Nebraska and Omaha; total ED visits in Douglas County attributable to ILI; and ILI surveillance network data for Douglas County and Nebraska as the predictors and data for the hospital's ILI-related ED visits as the dependent variable. We used Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average and Holt Winters methods with3 linear regression models to forecast ILI-related ED visits at the hospital and evaluated model performances by comparing the root means square errors (RMSEs). Because of strong positive correlations with ILI-related ED visits between 2008 and 2012, we validated the use of Google Flu Trends data as a predictor in an ED influenza surveillance tool. Of the 5 forecasting models we have tested, linear regression models performed significantly better when Google Flu Trends data were included as a predictor. Regression models including Google Flu Trends data as a predictor variable have lower RMSE, and the lowest is achieved when all other variables are also included in the model in our forecasting experiments for the first 5 weeks of 2013 (with RMSE = 57.61). Google Flu Trends data

  8. Comparison of consumer derived evidence with an omaha system evidence-based practice guideline for community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruinelli, Lisiane; Fu, Helen; Monsen, Karen A; Westra, Bonnie L

    2014-01-01

    Consumer involvement in healthcare is critical to support continuity of care for consumers to manage their health while transitioning from one care setting to another. Validation of evidence-based practice (EBP) guideline by consumers is essential to achieving consumer health goals over time that is consistent with their needs and preferences. The purpose of this study was to compare an Omaha System EBP guideline for community dwelling older adults with consumer-derived evidence of their ongoing needs, resources, and strategies after home care discharge. All identified problems were relevant for all patients except for Neglect and Substance use. Ten additional problems were identified from the interviews, five of which affected at least 10% of the participants. Consumer derived evidence both validated and expanded EBP guidelines; thus further emphasizing the importance of consumer involvement in the delivery of home healthcare.

  9. Veterans Benefits: Federal Employment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Heart recipients; • the spouse of a veteran unable to work because of a service-connected disability; • the unmarried widow of certain deceased...veterans; and • certain mothers of veterans who died in service or who are permanently and totally disabled.12...12 To receive the 10-point preference, the mother must be either: (1) married with a husband who is totally disabled; or (2

  10. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  11. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  12. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Violence Intimate Partner Violence Domestic Abuse Sexual Trauma Culture Change Culture Change I'm One Proud Veteran Women Veterans ... online at www.va.gov/directory ). During normal business hours, you can contact the Veterans Health Administration ( ...

  13. Danish Gulf War Veterans Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian; Nielsen, Anni B Sternhagen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the assumption that postdeployment incidence of sickness and other absence from work are higher among Gulf War Veterans compared with nonveterans. METHODS: A prospective registry study including a cohort of 721 Danish Gulf War Veterans and a control cohort of 3,629 nonveterans...... and nonveterans in the incidence rate of long-term sickness absence. After an initial short period (3 months) with elevated incidence rate of long-term absence from work among veterans, there was no difference between the cohorts. CONCLUSION: Among Danish Gulf War Veterans, no postdeployment increased risk...

  14. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  15. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  16. Understanding Student Veterans in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    In this research report the author details a phenomenological study documenting identity development in student veterans making the transition from active military service to higher education. This study took place at a doctoral granting proprietary university with a significant veteran population and consisted of in-depth interviews. This…

  17. VA Is Here for the People Who Support Our Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidential Homeless Veterans Chat and see resources for homeless Veterans . Network of Support The Veterans Crisis Line can put you in touch with VA ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard ... Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line ...

  18. XML technologies for the Omaha System: a data model, a Java tool and several case studies supporting home healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorini, Pierpaolo; Tarquinio, Antonietta; di Orio, Ferdinando

    2009-03-01

    The eXtensible markup language (XML) is a metalanguage which is useful to represent and exchange data between heterogeneous systems. XML may enable healthcare practitioners to document, monitor, evaluate, and archive medical information and services into distributed computer environments. Therefore, the most recent proposals on electronic health records (EHRs) are usually based on XML documents. Since none of the existing nomenclatures were specifically developed for use in automated clinical information systems, but were adapted to such use, numerous current EHRs are organized as a sequence of events, each represented through codes taken from international classification systems. In nursing, a hierarchically organized problem-solving approach is followed, which hardly couples with the sequential organization of such EHRs. Therefore, the paper presents an XML data model for the Omaha System taxonomy, which is one of the most important international nomenclatures used in the home healthcare nursing context. Such a data model represents the formal definition of EHRs specifically developed for nursing practice. Furthermore, the paper delineates a Java application prototype which is able to manage such documents, shows the possibility to transform such documents into readable web pages, and reports several case studies, one currently managed by the home care service of a Health Center in Central Italy.

  19. 2015 Veteran Economic Opportunity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and data analysis to the VBA and stakeholders. PA&I developed the VBA Enterprise Data Warehouse to enable the generation of recurring and ad hoc...reports in response to VBA decision-making and business needs. PA&I will be a primary source of information on Veteran education, vocational...competitiveness from preliminary analyses pre- sented in this document. 4. Build predictive models through analysis of individual-level stakeholder data on Veteran

  20. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Suicide Prevention PSA for Military Families see more videos ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does ...

  1. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  2. 38 CFR 3.401 - Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation payable by reason of need for aid and attendance or housebound status shall also be awarded for... claim additional disability compensation payable to a veteran by reason of the veteran's spouse's need....) (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 5110 (f), (n)) (c) Divorce of veteran and spouse. See § 3.501(d). (d)...

  3. 77 FR 20849 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Veterans' Reintegration Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS), Department of...: Section 2021 of Title 38 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) reauthorizes the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) through fiscal year (FY) 2012 and indicates: ``the Secretary of Labor shall...

  4. Gender, race & the veteran wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Brandon; Fontanella, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes earnings outcomes of Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans. We utilize the 2009-2013 American Community Survey and a worker-matching methodology to decompose wage differences between veteran and non-veteran workers. Among fully-employed, 25-40 year-olds, veteran workers make 3% less than non-veteran workers. While male veterans make 9% less than non-veterans, female and black veterans experience a wage premium (2% and 7% respectively). Decomposition of the earnings gap identifies some of its sources. Relatively higher rates of disability and lower rates of educational attainment serve to increase the overall wage penalty against veterans. However, veterans work less in low-paying occupations than non-veterans, serving to reduce the wage penalty. Finally, among male and white subgroups, non-veterans earn more in the top quintile due largely to having higher educational attainment and greater representation in higher-paying occupations, such as management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. D-Day for Veterans' Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Robert R.

    1977-01-01

    Focuses on the unemployment problem among Vietnam veterans and on the various Federal and private employment programs open to these veterans. Discussion also covers labor force statistics, readjustment to civilian life, changes in the American economy, and the role of the Department of Defense and civilian employers in helping veterans to find…

  6. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  7. Veteran Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jacqueline A; Moore, Randy L; Selleck, Cynthia S

    2015-01-01

    Military Veterans comprise approximately 10% of the US population. Most Veterans do not receive their health care through Veterans Affairs facilities, are seen across the health care system, and their prior military service and associated health issues often go unrecognized. In this study, a modified Delphi design was used to develop a set of 10 Veteran Care Competencies and associated knowledge, skills, and attitudes for Undergraduate Nursing Education: Military and Veteran Culture, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Amputation and Assistive Devices, Environmental/Chemical Exposures, Substance Use Disorder, Military Sexual Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury, Suicide, Homelessness, and Serious Illness Especially at the End of Life.

  8. The Veteran Student in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Anthony M.; Jackson, Robert; Lindsay, Douglas R.; McCabe, Damian G.; Sanders, Joseph E., III

    2010-01-01

    The President of the United States promises to return servicemen and servicewomen back home from the war in the Middle East by 2011. This raises important questions about how the people in higher education will view and serve those who have worn the military uniform. As they watch the veterans who are making the transition from the battlefield to…

  9. La experiencia de la guerra en la pantalla: El desembarco en la playa de Omaha de Saving Private Ryan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Montero-Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El cine de Hollywood ha dado un testimonio informal de las guerras, particularmente de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998 rompió el modelo naturalista y romántico del subgénero. Se basó en el testimonio de los veteranos de guerra y se orientó no hacia el desarrollo de una operación bélica, sino a la reproducción hiperrealista del combate y la cotidianidad de la guerra. Dio forma audiovisual a una memoria y experiencia individuales, las del veterano, que habitualmente no habían tenido cabida en el relato institucional de la guerra o en su reflejo cinematográfico anterior. Este artículo presenta un análisis estilístico de su secuencia más aplaudida por su efecto y valor artístico: el desembarco en la playa de Omaha. Atiende a la descripción de sus recursos de planificación, sonido y montaje. Muestra que, a través del recurso a técnicas estilísticas expresivas formuladas por S. M. Eisenstein, la secuencia busca introducir al espectador en el combate, hacerle participar de las sensaciones y razonamientos del soldado –en este caso el capitán Miller–, y lograr así su inmersión en la acción bélica, su compromiso con él y la comprensión del origen de su trauma. Para ello se ha recurrido a una vía de análisis inspirada en el proceso metodológico que S. M. Eisenstein empleaba en dos de sus artículos para explicar el valor del planteamiento estilístico de El acorazado Potemkin (1925 a sus detractores. Consiste en la descripción del esquema expresivo que configura el diseño de planos y fragmentos de montaje y su comparación con los que los preceden o suceden. Mediante esta metodología dialéctica, se describe el estilo general de la secuencia y sus pretensiones expresivas, así como se localizan momentos de contraste y ruptura que acusan su servicio a un motivo emocional: traducir el trauma del combatiente.

  10. 38 CFR 21.155 - Services to a veteran's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... family. 21.155 Section 21.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.155 Services to a veteran's family. (a) General. VA shall provide services to a veteran's family which are necessary to the implementation of the veteran's...

  11. 38 CFR 3.454 - Veterans disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans disability pension. 3.454 Section 3.454 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.454 Veterans...

  12. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from ... Administration Commitments PSA see more videos from Veterans Health Administration The Veterans Crisis Line: Gun Safety see more videos from Veterans ...

  13. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  14. 75 FR 14633 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Veterans' Employment and Training Service Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... placement services (including job readiness and literacy and skills training) to expedite the...

  15. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in crisis, find a facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and ... from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ...

  16. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  17. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see ...

  18. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... videos about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard ...

  19. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see ...

  20. An Exploration of Transition Experiences Shaping Student Veteran Life Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Brian Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer transformative opportunities for veterans transitioning from military service. Veteran-specific cultural supports in educational environments offer participation in occupations and development of skills needed to complete educational goals. However, veterans experience complex life circumstances atypical from…

  1. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be There: ... a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more ...

  2. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... videos about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard ...

  3. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  4. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration Lost: The Power of One Connection see more videos from Veterans Health Administration The Power of 1 PSA see more videos from Veterans ...

  5. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in crisis, find a facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and ... from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ...

  6. More Research on Veteran Employment Would Show What’s Good for Business and for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    to programs and processes. Research that adds structure and data to the business case for veteran employment efforts can demonstrate the value of...empirical data to confirm this assertion. Building the business case for hiring veterans is critical to sustaining veteran employment efforts over... data collection effort, stakeholders must determine ways to effectively share quantitative and qualita- tive data . Improved data sharing would

  7. 75 FR 78807 - Agency Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration... Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control... should be reduced or terminated when he or she is incarcerated in a penal institution in excess of...

  8. Psychotropic Medication Prescribing in Iraq/Afghanistan Veterans and Vietnam Era Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvoda, Dolores; Stefanovics, Elina A; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-09-26

    A new generation of veterans from Iraq/Afghanistan wars is seeking psychotropic pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from the Veterans Health Administration, but little is known about differences in prescribing practices between this group and Vietnam era veterans with the same diagnosis. The Veterans Health Administration administrative data for fiscal year 2012 were used to compare prescribing for 155,631 Iraq/Afghanistan veterans and for 327,634 Vietnam era veterans diagnosed with PTSD. The proportion of veterans who were prescribed psychotropic medications (altogether and within five of seven medication classes) were not substantially different between veteran groups. Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were more frequently prescribed prazosin (p < 0.0001, relative risk = 1.51). However, the number of prescriptions for anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics as well as prazosin and opiates filled by this younger group was lower by a small magnitude (Cohen's d < 0.2). Iraq/Afghanistan veterans have good access to psychopharmacological treatment for PTSD but fill somewhat fewer prescriptions than Vietnam era veterans.

  9. Veterans' use of Department of Veterans Affairs care and perceptions of outsourcing inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine veterans' perceptions of problems and benefits of outsourcing inpatient care from Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to private sector hospitals. Primary data were collected from a cross-section of 42 veterans who were VA users and nonusers using focus groups. Focus group discussion examined reasons patients use VA care, differences between VA and civilian care, positive and negative impacts of outsourcing, and special needs of veterans. Analyses revealed five domains related both to use of VA services and perceptions of outsourcing: costs, access, quality of care, contract (i.e., a covenant between veterans and the U.S. government), veteran milieu, and special needs. Participants identified a variety of potential positive and negative impacts. In general, veterans perceived more advantages than disadvantages to outsourcing VA care but still expressed significant concerns related to outsourcing. These issues should be considered in the development of future policy toward outsourcing VA care to the private sector.

  10. Caring for veterans in the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Maggie Leonard; Coplan, Bettie

    2015-11-01

    Veterans have several significant healthcare needs that can be addressed in the primary care setting. Within the private sector, clinicians can use military and nonmilitary resources to provide care to this unique population. Recommendations for several veteran healthcare needs also are addressed.

  11. 75 FR 69327 - Veterans Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ....) [FR Doc. 2010-28609 Filed 11-9-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... her warriors. In an unbroken line of valor stretching across more than two centuries, our veterans..., as Veterans Day. I encourage all Americans to recognize the valor and sacrifice of our...

  12. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 24/7) Department of Veterans Affairs Military & Veterans Crisis Line 800-273-8255, press 1 National Headquarters 1335 East-West Highway, Ste. 6-100 Silver Spring, MD 20910 800-870-9244 TBI & Psychological Health Information DCoE Outreach Center (24/7) 866- ...

  13. Faculty Attitudes and Behaviors towards Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carlene A.; Elliott, Marta

    2016-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Education (2013), approximately 11% of undergraduate students reported having a disability in the 2007-2008 academic year. Of these students, veterans reported having disabilities more than their non-veteran counterparts (5% vs. 3%). This study investigates faculty members' attitudes and behaviors toward student…

  14. Veterans as Adult Learners in Composition Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre Cleary, Michelle; Wozniak, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Considering veterans in the context of research on adult and nontraditional students in college writing classes, this article proposes Malcolm Knowles's six principles for adult learning as an asset-based heuristic for investigating how writing programs and writing teachers might build upon existing resources to support veteran students.

  15. 75 FR 14633 - Veterans Workforce Investment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...' Employment and Training Service Veterans Workforce Investment Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and...' Workforce Investment Program (VWIP) for Program Year (PY) 2010, as authorized under section 168 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. This Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) notice contains...

  16. 38 CFR 21.276 - Incarcerated veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31...)) (b) Definition. The term incarcerated veteran means any veteran incarcerated in a Federal, State, or... pursuing a rehabilitation program under Chapter 31 while residing in a halfway house or participating in...

  17. Veterans with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Miller, Wayne K., II; Vance, Mary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, veterans with disabilities have been a catalyst in the development of services for students with disabilities in higher education. Current converging factors, including anticipated large numbers of veterans with disabilities enrolling in postsecondary education, Office for Civil Rights directives, and the passage of the…

  18. Defining "Rural" for Veterans' Health Care Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alan N.; Lee, Richard E.; Shambaugh-Miller, Michael D.; Bair, Byron D.; Mueller, Keith J.; Lilly, Ryan S.; Kaboli, Peter J.; Hawthorne, Kara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) devised an algorithm to classify veterans as Urban, Rural, or Highly Rural residents. To understand the policy implications of the VHA scheme, we compared its categories to 3 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and 4 Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) geographical categories. Method: Using…

  19. Symptom Patterns Among Gulf War Registry Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, William K.; Kipen, Howard M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Boyd, Kendal; Kang, Han; Leventhal, Howard; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We identify symptom patterns among veterans who believe they suffer from Gulf War–related illnesses and characterize groups of individuals with similar patterns. Methods. A mail survey was completed by 1161 veterans drawn from the Gulf War Health Registry. Results. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 symptom factors. A K-means cluster analysis revealed 2 groups: (1) veterans reporting good health and few moderate/severe symptoms, and (2) veterans reporting fair/poor health and endorsing an average of 37 symptoms, 75% as moderate/severe. Those in Cluster 2 were more likely to report having 1 or more of 24 medical conditions. Conclusions. These findings are consistent with previous investigations of symptom patterns in Gulf War veterans. This multisymptom illness may be more fully characterized by the extent, breadth, and severity of symptoms reported. PMID:12660208

  20. Faith-Based Organizations and Veteran Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, Laura; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rudnick, Mollie; Harrell, Margaret C.; Naranjo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are an important community-based resource for veterans as they readjust to civilian life. Through interviews with both national-level and smaller, local FBOs, the authors sought to understand better the current and potential roles for FBOs in veteran reintegration. Interviewees suggested that veterans may look to FBOs for support because they offer privacy and confidentiality, two features that may be especially critical when a potential stigma is involved. Some FBOs have also developed a reputation as safe places for veterans, providing supportive, judgment-free environments. FBOs not only help veterans with spiritual matters but address diverse areas of veteran health and wellness, including vocation, education, financial and legal stability, shelter, access to goods and services, mental health, access to health care, physical health, family, and social networks. In some cases, the support is offered to veterans directly; in other instances, the support is indirect, via training individuals to help veterans or educating the public about them. In the process of providing support, FBOs interact with varied organizations, including government entities, private nonprofits, and one another, for training, outreach, referrals, information exchange, obtaining donations, and collaboration. Yet challenges exist, including insufficient connections with chaplains working in different settings and others in the web of support, resource and capacity constraints, lack of awareness of experience with veterans, issues related to religious philosophy or orientation, and characteristics of veterans themselves. To move forward, the authors offer recommendations for policymakers, organizations that interact with FBOs, and FBOs themselves to help FBOs engage fully in the web of reintegration support. PMID:28083391

  1. A description of teaching methods using an on-site instructor versus a distant site instructor to train laryngoscopy to medical students in Hanoi, Vietnam, from Omaha, Nebraska, by video communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeger, Wesley G; Branecki, Chad E; Nguyen, Thang T; Hall, Todd; Boedeker, Ben; Boedeker, David; Wadman, Michael C

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrated a method to train medical students at Hanoi Medical School in airway management from Omaha, Nebraska, using tele-mentoring techniques. Correct placement of the endotracheal tube was documented by tele-broncoscopy following intubation. This technology may increase medical training capabilities in remote or developing areas of the world. Medical care delivery could be performed using this technology by tele-mentoring a lesser trained medical provider at a distant site enabling them to accomplish complex medical tasks.

  2. 38 CFR 21.272 - Veteran-student services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by the Chapter 30 rate; (2) Motivation of the veteran; and (3) Compatibility of the work assignment...), 3485) (f) Veteran reduces rate of training. In the event the veteran reduces his or her training to... training. If the veteran terminates all training before completing an agreement, VA: (1) Will permit him...

  3. 76 FR 33788 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ...' Employment and Training Service Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... Veterans Reintegration Program through fiscal year (FY) 2011 and indicates: ``The Secretary of Labor shall... training) to expedite the reintegration of homeless veterans into the labor force.'' HVRP grants...

  4. 38 CFR 21.328 - Two veteran cases-dependents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Two veteran cases-dependents. 21.328 Section 21.328 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Authorization of Subsistence Allowance and Training and Rehabilitation Services § 21.328 Two...

  5. Supporting Student Veteran Transition to College and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Veterans enrolled in college face unique challenges compared with those of traditional students. Their experiences and perspectives, coupled with battling stereotypes and entering an unstructured college setting, contribute toward what can be a difficult transition. Student veteran organizations, veteran resource centers, veteran-specific…

  6. 78 FR 28292 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  7. 76 FR 65321 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  8. 75 FR 16577 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. The VA is inviting public comments...

  9. 78 FR 59861 - VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and Veteran-Owned Small Business Status...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... (definition service-disabled Veteran)''. Upon rendering a decision, new VAAR 819.307(g) provides that the... AFFAIRS 48 CFR Part 819 RIN 2900-AM92 VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and... Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSB) and Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (VOSB)...

  10. Systematic review of women veterans' mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, Jennifer J; Garovoy, Natara; McCutcheon, Susan J; Robbins, Allison T; Mann-Wrobel, Monica C; Elliott, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    Given recent, rapid growth in the field of women veterans' mental health, the goal of this review was to update the status of women veterans' mental health research and to identify current themes in this literature. The scope of this review included women veterans' unique mental health needs, as well as gender differences in veterans' mental health needs. Database searches were conducted for relevant articles published between January 2008 and July 2011. Searches were supplemented with bibliographic reviews and consultation with subject matter experts. The database search yielded 375 titles; 32 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. The women veterans' mental health literature crosses over several domains, including prevalence, risk factors, health care utilization, treatment preferences, and access barriers. Studies were generally cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed-gender, and examined Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users from all service eras. Results indicate higher rates of specific disorders (e.g., depression) and comorbidities, with differing risk factors and associated medical and functional impairment for female compared with male veterans. Although satisfaction with VA health care is generally high, unique barriers to care and indices of treatment satisfaction exist for women. There is a breadth of descriptive knowledge in many content areas of women veterans' mental health; however, the research base examining interventional and longitudinal designs is less developed. Understudied content areas and targets for future research and development include certain psychiatric disorders (e.g., schizophrenia), the effects of deployment on woman veterans' families, and strategies to address treatment access, attrition, and provision of gender-sensitive care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Variation in Veteran Identity as a Factor in Veteran-Targeted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Samantha M; DeForge, Bruce R; Lucksted, Alicia

    2017-03-01

    The sociocultural identities that people self-assign or accept influence their interpersonal interactions and decision making. Identity-based interventions attempt to influence individuals by associating healthy behaviors with in-group membership. Outreach and educational efforts aimed at veterans may rely on "typical" veteran identity stereotypes. However, as discussed in this Open Forum, there is evidence that veteran identity is not monolithic but rather fluctuates on the basis of personal characteristics and individual military service experiences. Overall, the impact of veteran identity on veterans' health behaviors and use of health care is not known and has been understudied. A major limiting factor is the lack of a standardized measure of veteran identity that can assess variations in salience, prominence, and emotional valence.

  12. Our favorite tips for interviewing veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James; Boehnlein, James

    2007-06-01

    Like many mental health patients, veterans often come to psychiatrists with their defenses raised by past experience with caregivers whom they perceive as lacking in understanding. Although health care professionals' own veteran and combat status sometimes can afford instant credibility, not all providers have wartime experience to use in developing rapport with their patients. To connect rapidly and effectively with their sometimes suspicious patients, they must find other ways to speed rapport. This article discusses the issues of establishing rapport, keeping an open mind, and dealing with questions about the clinician's own opinions that arise in interviewing veterans.

  13. Psychosocial function and health in veteran families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mai Tødsø; Karmsteen, Kirstine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    During the last 25 years Denmark has regularly contributed to international missions through the deployment of Danish soldiers. From 1992 till 2014 32,000 Danish women and men have been deployed. With this mapping of publications we aim to contribute with an overview of publications within...... the research field of psychosocial functioning and health among relatives living with a veteran, including potential gaps within this research field. We have found 103 publications. Most of them are American, 7 are from Europe and none from Scandinavia. Most publications focus on the partner’s relationship...... to the veteran or the mental health of the partner while relatively few publications deal with the veteran family as a whole or its members social relations outside the primary family. Furthermore, there are relatively few publications focusing on relatives to veterans deployed other places than Iraq...

  14. 78 FR 67285 - Veterans Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... should be forgotten, and no veteran should be overlooked. Let us always remember our wounded, our missing, our fallen, and their families. And as we continue our responsible drawdown from the war...

  15. Sexual Trauma: Women Veterans Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Health Awareness Campaigns: Sexual Trauma Sexual Trauma Women Veterans Health ... abuse drugs or alcohol or engage in risky sexual behavior. In some cases, anger and stress stemming from ...

  16. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans Gulf War ... and be at least 10 percent disabling. About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CFS is an unexplained, severe and ...

  17. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us: ncptsd@va.gov Also see: VA Mental Health Connect with us return to top CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  18. Suicide assessment and action for women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-04-01

    Many deployed women Veterans, as described in a previous article, have experienced similar combat exposure as their male counterparts in wars since 1990. Upon reintegration, many Veterans visit civilian health facilities with behavioral health issues, sometimes voicing and/or attempting suicide. Effective nursing assessment and actions are needed to specifically care for this unique population. Any suicide variables (e.g., ideation, attempts, completed) are concerning; therefore, all women Veterans from the Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars should be assessed. The first priority is always patient safety. Timely and frequent screening for a variety of risk factors, documented for both men and women Veterans, and women specifically, are important. Symptomology may not become evident for 3 to 15 months into reintegration. Applicable dialogue can recognize changing thoughts, judgment, and behavior patterns. Health promotion efforts, interventions, and resourceful referrals are provided.

  19. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    employees receiving preventative occupational immunizations such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. 49 Department of Veterans Affairs, FY2011...such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 20 Formulation of VHA’s...1,977,000 1,225,000 Emergency appropriations- Gulf Coast Hurricanes (P.L. 109-148) — — — — 198,265 — — 198,265 Emergency appropriations- Avian Flu

  20. Long-Term Care Services for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-14

    VHA is statutorily required to conduct medical research into the special health care needs of veterans, to train health care professionals, to serve...also required the VA to provide non-institutional care, such as home-based care and adult day health care, to all enrolled veterans. In his signing...The Veterans’ Health Care Eligibility Reform Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-262) required the establishment of a national enrollment system to manage the

  1. Initial Results of On-Line Earth System Science Course Offerings at the University of Nebraska-Omaha Through the Earth System Science Education Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, R. D.; Grandgenett, N. F.; Schnase, W. L.; Hamersky, S.; Moshman, R.

    2008-12-01

    The University of Nebraska at Omaha has been offering on-line Earth System Science coursework to teachers in Nebraska since 2002. UNO was one of the initial members in the Earth Systems Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) and has offered three different ESSEA courses, with nearly 200 students having taken ESSEA courses at UNO for graduate credit. Our experiences in delivering this coursework have involved both teachers who have received a stipend to take the course and those who have paid their own tuition and fees and received graduate credit for the course. We will report on the online behavior of teachers from both populations and also discuss pros and cons of each approach. UNO has also experimented with different approaches in the support and management of the course, including using undergraduate majors as content experts. This improves access of teachers to content-related feedback and is a positive experience for the undergraduate major. Feedback surveys from earlier ESSEA offerings indicate a strongly positive perception of the courses by the teachers enrolled in the coursework. Project impact has been documented in teacher projects, quotes, and lessons associated with the coursework activities. We will also describe online course modules being developed within the UNO online course efforts, including one focusing on the global amphibian crisis.

  2. Emergency preparedness of veterans and nonveterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Joseph F Iii

    This study examined statistical differences in levels of disaster preparedness between former members of the US Armed Forces (veterans) and civilians (nonveterans). It was hypothesized that veterans would exhibit a higher degree of disaster preparedness as compared to their nonveteran counterparts as a consequence of their training and life experience. Furthermore, if this were proven to be valid, the finding would identify this cohort as an ideal target audience for emergency and disaster preparedness education efforts. A four-page survey consisting principally of closed-ended questions about emergency preparedness was written to measure these differences. Most of the questions required respondents to rank their answers according to a five-step Likert Scale. The survey could be completed either in hard copy or online from September 2014 to January 2015. Ultimately, 113 surveys were returned for evaluation. Of those respondents, 62 were veterans and 51 were nonveterans. The responses were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance tests for statistical significance using the 95 percent confidence standard for each tested value. The results support that veterans are more prepared for domestic emergencies than nonveterans. In addition, veterans were more willing to provide leadership and direction to others in an effort to assist emergency managers in responding to domestic disasters. It is for these reasons that emergency managers should consider targeting veterans for disaster preparedness training to help ensure effective and efficient responses to emergencies.

  3. Barriers to Psychosocial Services among Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Poza, Ines; Hines, Vivian; Washington, Donna L

    2012-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, CA, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women described three primary, proximal (current) barriers: lack of information about services, limited access to services, and lack of coordination across services. Compared to non-veteran homeless women, women veterans potentially face additional challenges of trauma exposure during military service, post-military readjustment issues, and few services specific to women veterans. Understanding their service needs and experiences is critical to the development of relevant and appropriate services that move homeless women veterans away from vulnerability, into safety.

  4. PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs In a Crisis? If you are in crisis dial 911 or ... Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving ...

  5. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Dennis Adrian; Passannante, Marian; Helmer, Drew; Holland, Bart K; Halperin, William E

    2017-02-01

    Authors comparatively analyzed health and social isolation between U.S. military veterans denied Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and veterans awarded VA disability compensation. The 2001 National Survey of Veterans was used to create a sample of 4,522 veterans denied or awarded VA disability compensation. Using the Andersen health services utilization model as a conceptual framework, multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess relationships between VA disability compensation award status, three separate domains of health, and correlates of social isolation. Results indicate that denied applicants were more likely than those awarded to have poor overall health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23, 1.70), and limitations in activities of daily living (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21). Denied applicants' physical functioning (40.3) and mental functioning (41.2) composite summary scores were not clinically different from those of awarded applicants (39.0 and 40.1, respectively), indicating that both were comparably impaired. Veterans denied VA disability compensation had poor health and functional impairments. They also experienced poverty and isolation, suggesting that they may be in need of additional supportive services. Connecting veterans to community resources could be a vital service to provide to all veterans applying for disability compensation. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  6. An Analysis of Selected Characteristics of Napa College Veteran and Non-Veteran Male Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, George; And Others

    In April 1973, it was proposed that Napa College implement a special remedial program designed to serve the needs of soon-to-be-discharged military personnel and veterans. This study was conducted to determine the need for such a program. The overriding hypothesis was that there was no significant difference between male veterans and non-veterans…

  7. 78 FR 37278 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Veteran (VOV) measurement program for their lines of business: Compensation Service, Pension Service... services and ] will provide VA/VBA leadership with actionable and timely Veteran feedback on how VBA is... sample size, as approved and reviewed by VBA Leadership and statistician. Affected Public:...

  8. 76 FR 4152 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ...: Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV) Pilot Surveys. a. Compensation and... a decision on a compensation or pension benefit claim within 30 days prior to the fielding period. The sample will be stratified as follows: (1) Type of benefit (i.e., Compensation, Pension), (2...

  9. Gender disparities in Veterans Health Administration care: importance of accounting for veteran status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Susan M; Yano, Elizabeth M; Nguyen, Vu Q; Yu, Wei; Ananth, Lakshmi; Chiu, Victor Y; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2008-05-01

    In an effort to assess and reduce gender-related quality gaps, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has promoted gender-based research. Historically, such appraisals have often relied on secondary databases, with little attention to methodological implications of the fact that VHA provides care to some nonveteran patients. To determine whether conclusions about gender differences in utilization and cost of VHA care change after accounting for veteran status. Cross-sectional. All users of VHA in 2002 (N = 4,429,414). Veteran status, outpatient/inpatient utilization and cost, from centralized 2002 administrative files. Nonveterans accounted for 50.7% of women (the majority employees) but only 3.0% of men. Among all users, outpatient and inpatient utilization and cost were far lower in women than in men, but in the veteran subgroup these differences decreased substantially or, in the case of use and cost of outpatient care, reversed. Utilization and cost were very low among women employees; women spouses of fully disabled veterans had utilization and costs similar to those of women veterans. By gender, nonveterans represent a higher proportion of women than of men in VHA, and some large nonveteran groups have low utilization and costs; therefore, conclusions about gender disparities change substantially when veteran status is taken into account. Researchers seeking to characterize gender disparities in VHA care should address this methodological issue, to minimize risk of underestimating health care needs of women veterans and other women eligible for primary care services.

  10. Distance to Veterans Administration Medical Centers as a Barrier to Specialty Care for Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Lori M; Pettey, Warren B P; Redd, Andrew M; Suo, Ying; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2017-01-01

    Homeless women Veterans have a high prevalence of chronic mental and physical conditions that necessitate frequent healthcare visits, but travel burdens to specialty services may be overwhelming to navigate for this population, especially for those in rural settings. Access to specialty care is a key priority in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and understanding the geographic distribution and rural designation of this population in relation to medical centers (VAMC) can assist in care coordination. We identified 41,747 women Veterans age 18-44y with administrative evidence of homelessness in the VHA anytime during 2002-2015. We found 7% live in rural settings and 29% live >40miles from a VAMC. The mean travel distance for homeless women Veterans with a rural designation to a VAMC specialty center was 107 miles. Developing interventions to overcome this travel burden and engage vulnerable Veterans in necessary care can improve overall health outcomes for this high-risk population.

  11. Veterans on Campus: A Handbook for Programs, Services, Staffing and Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lee John, Ed.

    A handbook to provide information that will aid in establishing bondage between veterans and those professional people providing service for returning servicemen and women is presented. Topics discussed include: Vietnam veteran; organizing to serve the veteran; a veterans Outreach Program; veterans with special needs--minority veterans, academic…

  12. Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) training program: the effect of community outreach workers on American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans access to and utilization of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Buck Richardson, W J; Floyd, James; Shore, Jay

    2014-10-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives serve at the highest rate of any US race or ethnic group, yet are the most underserved population of Veterans and do not take advantage of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits and services. Barriers to seeking care include stigma, especially for mental health issues; distance to care; and lack of awareness of benefits and services they are entitled to receive. In response to this underutilization of the VA, an innovative program--the Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) program--was developed within the VA to work with American Indians and Alaska Natives in rural and remote areas. The TVR goes through extensive training every year; is a volunteer, a Veteran and tribal community member who seeks out unenrolled Native Veterans, provides them with information on VA health care services and benefits, and assists them with enrollment paperwork. Being from the community they serve, these outreach workers are able to develop relationships and build rapport and trust with fellow Veterans. In place for over a decade in Montana, this program has enrolled a countless number of Veterans, benefiting not only the individual, but their family and the community as well. Also resulting from this program, are the implementation of Telemental Health Clinics treating Veterans with PTSD, a transportation program helping Veterans get to and from distant VA facilities, a Veteran Resource Center, and a Veteran Tribal Clinic. This program has successfully trained over 800 TVRs, expanded to other parts of the country and into remote areas of Alaska.

  13. Review of American Indian veteran telemental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Jay; Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Brooks, Elizabeth; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Richardson, W J Buck; Floyd, James; Lowe, Jeff; Nagamoto, Herbert; Phares, Robert; Manson, Spero

    2012-03-01

    Rural American Indian veterans have unique healthcare needs and face numerous barriers to accessing healthcare services. Over the past decade, the Department of Veterans Affairs in conjunction with the University of Colorado Denver has turned to the promising field of telemental health to develop a series of videoconferencing-based clinics to reach this vulnerable population and improve mental healthcare services. The ongoing development, implementation, and expansion of these clinics have been assessed as part of a program improvement. The outcomes of these assessments have been documented in a series of published articles, controlled studies, program and case reports, and model descriptions. This article summarizes a decade of experience with the American Indian Telemental Health Clinics, the clinic model, and the literature arising from these clinics and presents lessons learned while establishing, maintaining, and evaluating these clinics. The ability to tailor the clinics to individual sites and cultures and to provide various services has been critical to the operation of the clinics. Culturally specific care through culturally knowledgeable providers, onsite tribal outreach workers, and collaboration with community services has proven essential in operating the clinics, as well as building rapport, trust, and engagement with the target patient population. It is hoped that the lessons learned and practices presented here can not only assist others working to improve the care for rural Native veterans but also serve as a model in the use of telemental health services for improving care and access to rural veteran and non-veteran populations.

  14. 78 FR 26698 - Report: Strategies for Serving Our Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... depression-screening for female Veterans and to identify innovative approaches and best practices to reduce... identify root-causes of identified problems and track women Veterans across ``the life-cycle of...

  15. Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA and Medicare Fee-For-Service, 1999-2004 According to findings in Service Utilization of Veterans Dually...

  16. For-Profit Institutions and Student Veteran Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Fox Garrity, Bonnie K.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores the lack of data about student veterans and reasons this lack of data raises particular concerns about for-profit institutions, which enroll a large percentage of student veterans.

  17. Exploring Veteran Success through State-Level Administrative Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Tod; Gogia, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the benefits and challenges of state-level longitudinal data collection on student veterans and offers recommendations for optimizing collection and reporting for the advocacy of student veteran success.

  18. The Post-Military Earnings of Female Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    if an occupation change is also involved. 5 To estimate veteran-nonveteran wage differentials among women, earnings functions are specified using the...unadjusted veteran wage differentials is small, but as indicated in column 2, veterans have substantially larger earnings endowments than do nonveterans. The...When veteran wage differentials are examined by schooling group, as shown in line 3, women with high school diplomas (or less) and those with some

  19. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Veterans Crisis Line Skip to Main Content SuicidePreventionLifeline.org Get Help Materials Get Involved Crisis Centers About Be There ... see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from ...

  20. 38 CFR 21.400 - Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Committee on Rehabilitation. 21.400 Section 21.400 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation § 21.400...

  1. Military Veterans' Midlife Career Transition and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Heather C.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2014-01-01

    Many military veterans face the challenging transition to civilian employment. Military veteran members of a national program, Troops to Teachers, were surveyed regarding life satisfaction and related internal/external career transition variables. Participants included military veterans who were currently or had previously transitioned to K-12…

  2. 38 CFR 12.1 - Designee cases; competent veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may not be an employee of the Department of Veterans Affairs unless such employee be the wife (or husband), child, grandchild, mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, brother, or sister of the veteran... the Department of Veterans Affairs in Personal Funds of Patients which were derived from...

  3. Veteran-Students in Transition at a Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Vincent; Gentry, Debra

    2014-01-01

    One of the fastest-growing subpopulations of nontraditional college students is military veterans who enroll in institutions of higher education following their returns from deployment. Although much research has been conducted on veteran-students, much of that work has focused on issues such as veterans' finances or academic achievement, rather…

  4. Coming Home: Student Veterans' Articulation of College Re-Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Wade G.; Havice, Pamela A.; Cawthon, Tony W.; Fleming, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study described student veterans' navigation of college re-enrollment. Fifteen participants interviewed at one institution were less likely to seek academic support and more inclined to pursue social support in the form of associating with fellow veterans with whom they felt more comfortable. They downplayed or hid their veteran status from…

  5. Understanding Transition Experiences of Combat Veterans Attending Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of research concerning student veterans has been conducted at the university level, with minimum analysis performed at the level where the vast majority of returning veterans attend school: the community college. While some research has discussed what services colleges and universities should offer returning veterans, little research…

  6. Use of Psychotherapy by Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Jameson, John P.; Phillips, Laura L.; Kunik, Mark E.; Fortney, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether differences exist between rural and urban veterans in terms of initiation of psychotherapy, delay in time from diagnosis to treatment, and dose of psychotherapy sessions. Methods: Using a longitudinal cohort of veterans obtained from national Veterans Affairs databases (October 2003 through September 2004), we extracted…

  7. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration I'm Good. But are you ready to listen? see more ...

  8. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with Reintegration Problems: Differences by Veterans Affairs Healthcare User Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Orazem, Robert J; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Gravely, Amy; Frazier, Patricia; Carlson, Kathleen F; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather

    2015-07-01

    We studied 1,292 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who participated in a clinical trial of expressive writing to estimate the prevalence of perceived reintegration difficulty and compare Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare users to nonusers in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. About half of participants perceived reintegration difficulty. VA users and nonusers differed in age and military background. Levels of mental and physical problems were higher in VA users. In multivariate analysis, military service variables and probable traumatic brain injury independently predicted VA use. Findings demonstrate the importance of research comparing VA users to nonusers to understand veteran healthcare needs.

  9. Prevalence of probable mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among veteran and non-veteran community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, John C; Curran, Geoffrey M; Hunt, Justin B; Cheney, Ann M; Lu, Liya; Valenstein, Marcia; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of disadvantaged youth and returning veterans are enrolled in community colleges. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among community college students. Veterans (n=211) and non-veterans (n=554) were recruited from 11 community colleges and administered screeners for depression (PHQ-9), generalized anxiety (GAD-7), posttraumatic stress disorder (PC-PTSD), non-lethal self-injury, suicide ideation and suicide intent. The survey also asked about the perceived need for, barriers to and utilization of services. Regression analysis was used to compare prevalence between non-veterans and veterans adjusting for non-modifiable factors (age, gender and race/ethnicity). A large proportion of student veterans and non-veterans screened positive and unadjusted bivariate comparisons indicated that student veterans had a significantly higher prevalence of positive depression screens (33.1% versus 19.5%, Pveterans were significantly more likely than non-veterans to screen positive for depression (OR=2.10, P=.01) and suicide ideation (OR=2.31, P=.03). Student veterans had significantly higher odds of perceiving a need for treatment than non-veterans (OR=1.93, P=.02) but were more likely to perceive stigma (beta=0.28, P=.02). Despite greater need among veterans, there were no significant differences between veterans and non-veterans in use of psychotropic medications, although veterans were more likely to receive psychotherapy (OR=2.35, P=.046). Findings highlight the substantial gap between the prevalence of probable mental health disorders and treatment seeking among community college students. Interventions are needed to link community college students to services, especially for student veterans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The Post-9/11 GI Bill: Insights from Veterans Using Department of Veterans Affairs Educational Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Geri L.; Boland, Elizabeth A.; Dudgeon, Brian; Johnson, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Because the Post-9/11 GI Bill was implemented in August of 2009, increasing numbers of veterans returning from the Global War on Terror (GWT) have drawn on Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits. Based on the findings of a mixed-methods study, quantitative and qualitative survey responses from veterans enrolled at a major…

  11. Department of Veterans Affairs, Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses Task Force to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    Rates of adverse reproductive outcomes are similar among GW- exposed and non-exposed pregnancies . 14. Do Gulf War Veterans report more pulmonary...lymphoma, prostate cancer and respiratory cancer. Other diseases, such as osteoporosis , have been presumptively service connected for some former

  12. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA

  13. Mindfulness as a Weight Loss Treatment for Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vicente Stanton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial evidence for their effectiveness in treating disordered eating and obesity, mindfulness-based treatments have not been broadly implemented among Veterans. A number of reviews have reported mindfulness to be beneficial in promoting healthy eating behaviors and weight loss among non-Veteran samples. We discuss this approach in the context of the Veterans Affairs system, the largest integrated healthcare provider in the United States and in the context of Veterans, among whom obesity is at epidemic proportions. In this article, we discuss what is known about treating obesity using a mindfulness approach, mindfulness interventions for Veterans, a new pilot mindfulness-based weight loss program designed for Veterans, and future directions for this type of obesity treatment in Veterans. We conclude that this population may be uniquely poised to benefit from mindfulness-based treatments.

  14. Department of Veterans Affairs compensation and medical care benefits accorded to veterans with major limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Flohr, Brad; Guagliardo, Tony A; Martin, Chris H; McFarland, Lynne V; Pruden, Jonathan D; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Veterans injured in theaters of combat operations are eligible for benefits, including medical care and compensation. This article describes veterans with service-connected disability for major lower- and/or upper-limb loss resulting from combat-field-associated injuries sustained in the Vietnam war, Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Using the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Compensation and Pension Mini-Master file, we identified 2,690 veterans who in August 2007 received compensation for loss of one or more limbs. More than 97% sustained their injuries in Vietnam; most were young men who served in the U.S. Army or Marine Corps. All but 5% had at least 50% combined service-connected disability and nearly half had a 100% rating. In addition to limb loss, one of the most prevalent compensable conditions was posttraumatic stress disorder, present in 46% of OIF/OEF and 20% of Vietnam veterans. Of these veterans, 82% visited VA outpatient clinics in 2007, although only 4% were hospitalized. A special obligation exists to those who have sustained serious injuries related to combat; this responsibility extends for the life of the servicemember and beyond to his or her spouse and dependents.

  15. 77 FR 67533 - Veterans Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ...'s veterans. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby... in peace, their service has been selfless and their accomplishments have been extraordinary. Even... thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-27630 Filed 11-9-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3...

  16. MINDFULNESS BEHANDLING AF DANSKE VETERANER - ET PILOTSTUDIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone

    2015-01-01

    I foråret 2014 mødtes en gruppe på 12 danske veteraner en gang om ugen i 9 uger for at deltage i programmet Mindfulness Baseret Stress Reduktion (MBSR). Deltagerne havde meldt sig frivilligt, og gruppen var blandet mht. alder, køn, antal udsendelser og diagnoser. Det, de havde til fælles, var...

  17. 38 CFR 3.501 - Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Disappearance of veteran. See § 3.656. (d) Divorce or annulment (38 U.S.C. 5112(b)(2)): (1) Divorce or annulment prior to October 1, 1982: last day of the calendar year in which divorce or annulment occurred. (2) Divorce or annulment on or after October 1, 1982: last day of the month in which divorce or...

  18. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NAMI to 741741 Find Help Living with a Mental Health Condition Family Members and Caregivers Teens and Young Adults Veterans & Active Duty Diverse Communities LGBTQ NAMI Programs Discussion Groups NAMI HelpLine Get Involved stigma free Learn how you can help replace stigma ...

  19. 5 CFR 315.707 - Disabled veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....707 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT Conversion to Career or Career-Conditional Employment From Other Types of... disabled veteran who meets the conditions below to career or career-conditional employment from a time...

  20. Adapted Sport Programs for Veterans with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    The Paralympic games began as a way for World War II veterans to take part in elite-level competition. Thanks to various disability-sport organizations, men and women who have served in the military are still using sport as a form of rehabilitation and a way to transition into their new life.

  1. Why helping war veterans, at all?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beara Vladan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available "The society for the protection of mental health of the war veterans and victims of the 1991 - 1999 wars" was founded in 1999, as a non-governmental non-partite and non-profit association of citizens whose basic aim is the preservation of mental health of refugees and displaced persons, war veterans (persons who have undergone the experience of war, usually against their will, members of their families and all persons who have been traumatized by the wars in the area of the former SFRY in the period between 1991 and 1999. The current projects involve: 1. The Trauma Center in Novi Sad, which provides psychological and legal assistance to war veterans and all citizens who were endangered by war operations; 2. Counseling services for trauma in Leskovac, Vranje and Bujanovac, whose primary aims are remobilization and treatment of the traumatized participants and casualties of the wars, as well as the decrease of social, political and interethnic tensions; 3. Education of war veterans for the leaders of self-help peer groups and 4. Educational experience seminars for REBT psychotherapeutic work with psychological trauma with the aim to educate experts for more efficient work with traumatized clients.

  2. Veteran’s Health Care Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-30

    consists of a Rehabilitation Physician, Rehabilitation Nurses, Physical Therapists , Occupational Therapists , Speech and Language Pathologists, Recreation...51 Chiropractic Care Available to All Veterans Act (H.R. 1470) . . . . . . 51...colonial settlements of America, the nation has provided benefits in varying degrees to those who have worn the uniform and suffered physical

  3. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  4. Beijing Tour Helps Veterans Realize Their Dreams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN GUOZHEN

    2011-01-01

    @@ It was November 10, 2010.The MU (Harmony) train rolled off the railway station from Changchun of Jilin Province in Northeast China and was fast moving down southward.In the train, 11 veterans were so excited that they were singing, chatting and laughing like a pack of children.

  5. Alcohol and drug abuse among U.S. veterans: comparing associations with intimate partner substance abuse and veteran psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark W; Reardon, Annemarie F; Wolf, Erika J; Prince, Lauren B; Hein, Christina L

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the relative influences of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other psychopathology, and intimate partner alcohol and drug use on substance-related problems in U.S. veterans (242 couples, N = 484). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that partner alcohol and drug use severity explained more variance in veteran alcohol use and drug use (20% and 13%, respectively) than did veteran PTSD, adult antisocial behavior, or depression symptoms combined (6% for veteran alcohol use; 7% for veteran drug use). Findings shed new light on the influence of relationship factors on veteran alcohol and drug use and underscore the importance of couples-oriented approaches to treating veterans with comorbid PTSD and substance abuse.

  6. 75 FR 29366 - ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) National Technical Assistance Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration... the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) to include the Homeless Female Veterans and... to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor force. In order to assist the...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1310 - Who is a World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a World War II veteran. 404.1310... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1310 Who is a World War II veteran. You are a World War II veteran if you were in the...

  8. Assessment of Service Members Knowledge and Trust of the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom VA Department of Veterans Affairs VA OIG Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General VBA Veterans Benefits...Figure 3. The Decision Trust Model ...............................................................................20 Figure 4. Demographics-Age...reorganization into the three administrations: Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) and National Cemetery

  9. 38 CFR 13.57 - Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran. 13.57 Section 13.57 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES § 13.57 Payment to the wife...

  10. Military-Veteran Students' Perceptions of College Transition and Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphile, Murielle F.

    2013-01-01

    Military veterans preparing for new careers in the civilian world are pursuing higher educational degrees to fulfill career goals. The real-life experiences of veterans in the military are beneficial tools that can effectively enhance student veterans' academic performance and success. As veterans' enrollment continues to rise, veteran's academic…

  11. VHA chaplaincy contact with veterans at increased risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; McCarten, Janet M; Pollitt, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    To examine the extent to which chaplains interact with military veterans at increased risk of suicide and select characteristics related to those at-risk veterans who present for chaplaincy services. The nationwide network of chaplains affiliated with the Veterans Health Administration (n = 990) was e-mailed a letter inviting those who have contact with at-risk veterans to complete a survey. This letter included an Internet link, connecting respondents to an online survey collection service. One hundred eighteen chaplains (11.91%) responded to the survey. More than half of the respondents reported that veterans at increased risk of suicide constitute either 1 chaplain, and present at a moderate-to-high level of risk. The present study finds that some at-risk veterans look to chaplains for supportive services. The findings also allow for opportunities for future research.

  12. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    medical services such as: medical, surgical, and mental health care, including care for substance abuse; prescription drugs, including over-the- counter...travel payments to eligible veterans were paid when specialized modes of transportation, such as ambulance or wheelchair van, were medically required...reimbursement who are traveling by special modes of transportation such as ambulance, air ambulance, wheelchair van, or to receive a compensation and pension

  13. Cancer incidence in Australian Vietnam veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Horsley, K. [Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs (Australia); Hoek, R. van der [Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel participated in the Vietnam Conflict from 1962 to 1973, involving nearly 60,000 personnel, of whom over 500 died during service and 3131 were severely physically wounded. Service in the Vietnam conflict presented distinct health challenges. Besides the hazards of combat conditions for extended periods, herbicides and other toxic chemicals were used extensively. The United States military sprayed more than 76,000,000L of herbicide over Vietnam in their Air Force Ranch Hand and Operation Trail Dust programs. The most heavily used herbicide was Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Since the Vietnam conflict, ex-Service organisations (ESOs) have maintained that Vietnam service adversely affected the health of veterans. Initial studies showed no excess risk attributable to their service. However, more recent studies have shown that Vietnam veterans have excess incidence and mortality rates from several conditions such as cancers and heart disease. This paper describes the first cancer incidence study for all ADF Vietnam veterans.

  14. Veterans’s Medical Care: FY2014 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ), and the National Cemetery Administration (NCA). This report focuses on funding for the VHA. The VHA is primarily...administrations and the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA).9 The Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) is responsible for, among other things, providing...Congress begins with the formulations of the budget based on the Enrollee Health Care Projection Model (EHCPM).31 The model estimates the amount of

  15. Accuracy of Veterans Affairs Databases for Diagnoses of Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiologic studies usually use database diagnoses or patient self-report to identify disease cohorts, but no previous research has examined the extent to which self-report of chronic disease agrees with database diagnoses in a Veterans Affairs (VA) health care setting. Methods All veterans who had a medical care visit from October 1, 1996, through May 31, 1998, at any of the Veterans Integrated Service Network 13 facilities were surveyed about physician diagnosis of chronic ob...

  16. First-generation student veterans: implications of poverty for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Kristin G; Rinaldi, Anthony P; Woods, Tamara S; Liu, William Ming

    2013-02-01

    Student veterans are arriving at university and college campuses and many counselors may not be prepared. Multiple and intersecting identities complicate the student's integration and matriculation into higher education. We review literature on first-generation college students and issues pertinent to student veterans. Using the revised Social Class Worldview Model, this article offers a case example to illustrate how counselors may best work with student veterans. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Veterans’ Disability Compensation: Trends and Policy Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    veterans to claim benefits, the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and difficult labor market conditions during the past several years. Spending...Than the Full Retirement Age for Social Security All veterans 17 Phased in for veterans age 65 or younger in 2015 8 Option 5: Supplement Payments to...available to service members who do not qualify for a DoD-approved medi - cal separation. The difference between the two programs is in the time frame

  18. 75 FR 37776 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... responsibility is to coordinate the model program; monitoring the rates of veteran student enrollment... document the applicant's current activities to support veteran student enrollment, persistence, and... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student...

  19. 76 FR 24571 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to maintain Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance accounts. DATES: Written comments and... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  20. 77 FR 3842 - Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... members, especially service members with disabilities are informed about their life insurance...

  1. 77 FR 20886 - Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of... Evaluation of the Conversion Privilege from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) to Veterans'...

  2. 78 FR 36829 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  3. America's Women Veterans: Military Service History and VA Benefit Utilization Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This comprehensive report chronicles the history of women in the military and as Veterans, profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2009, illustrates how...

  4. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) is a health care benefit program designed for the dependents of certain Veterans....

  5. 76 FR 72243 - Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... facilities for returning Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans and their families... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans.... Title: Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans Health Needs Assessment, VA Form 10...

  6. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 to 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This chart summarizes Veteran employment in the federal government using data from the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) report, Employment of Veterans in the...

  7. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed.

  8. 29 CFR 778.600 - Veterans' subsistence allow- ances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION... subsistence allowances provided by Public Law 346 for payment to veterans are not paid as compensation...

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and suicide in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Braquehais, María Dolores; Casas, Miquel

    2012-02-01

    Suicidal behavior is a critical problem in war veterans. Combat veterans are not only more likely to have suicidal ideation, often associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, but they are more likely to act on a suicidal plan. Especially since veterans may be less likely to seek help from a mental health professional, non-mental-health physicians are in a key position to screen for PTSD, depression, and suicidal ideation in these patients. The authors discuss the association of PTSD, depression, and suicide in veterans, keys to assessment of suicide risk, and interventions.

  10. Critical concerns in Iraq/Afghanistan war veteran-forensic interface: veterans treatment court as diversion in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Daniel E; McGuire, James; Garrick, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Shoba; Dow, Daniel; Woehl, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The veteran-forensic interface is an emerging area of relevance to forensic clinicians assessing or treating returning Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans facing criminal sanctions. Veterans' Treatment Court (VTC) represents a recent diversion mechanism for low-level offenses that is based on a collaborative justice model. Thirty-nine percent of veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and receiving VA services reside in rural areas. Rural veterans facing criminal justice charges may be at a disadvantage due to limited access to forensic psychiatrists with relevant expertise in providing veterans services for diversion. Therefore, widening the pool of forensic clinicians who have such expertise, as well as knowledge of the signature wounds of the wars as related to aggression and reckless behavior is necessary. This article presents an overview of VTCs and discusses the role of forensic clinicians as stakeholders in this process.

  11. Perspectives of family and veterans on family programs to support reintegration of returning veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ellen P; Sherman, Michelle D; McSweeney, Jean C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Owen, Richard R; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-08-01

    Combat deployment and reintegration are challenging for service members and their families. Although family involvement in mental health care is increasing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, little is known about family members' preferences for services. This study elicited the perspectives of returning Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and their families regarding family involvement in veterans' mental health care. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 veterans receiving care for posttraumatic stress disorder at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System or Oklahoma City VA Medical Center and 36 veteran-designated family members. Interviews addressed perceived needs related to veterans' readjustment to civilian life, interest in family involvement in joint veteran/family programs, and desired family program content. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Both groups strongly supported inclusion of family members in programs to facilitate veterans' postdeployment readjustment and reintegration into civilian life. Both desired program content focused on information, practical skills, support, and gaining perspective on the other's experience. Although family and veteran perspectives were similar, family members placed greater emphasis on parenting-related issues and the kinds of support they and their children needed during and after deployment. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on preferences regarding VA postdeployment reintegration support that incorporates the perspectives of returning male and female veterans and those of their families. Findings will help VA and community providers working with returning veterans tailor services to the needs and preferences of this important-to-engage population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. 75 FR 68007 - Office of the Assistant Secretary; The Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... Office of the Assistant Secretary; The Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer.... McWilliam, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Operations and Management, Veterans' Employment and...

  13. Fibromyalgia syndrome care of Iraq- and Afghanistan-deployed Veterans in Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, April F; Helmer, Drew A; Muthukutty, Anusha; McAndrew, Lisa M; Carter, Marjorie E; Judd, Joshua; Garvin, Jennifer H; Samore, Matthew H; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) care among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND) Veterans. Current recommendations include interdisciplinary, team-based combined care approaches and limited opioid use. In this study of OIF/OEF/OND Veterans who accessed Veterans Health Administration services between 2002 and 2012, we hypothesized that combined care (defined as at least 4 primary care visits/yr with visits to mental health and/or rheumatology) versus Hispanic, and never/currently married. Combined primary, mental health, and rheumatology care was associated with at least 2 opioid prescriptions (RR [95% CI] for males 2.2 [1.1-4.4] and females 2.8 [0.4-18.6]). Also, combined care was associated with at least 2 nonopioid pain-related prescriptions, a practice supported by evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. In tandem, these results provide mixed evidence of benefit of combined care for FMS. Future studies of healthcare encounter characteristics, care coordination, and benefits for Veterans with FMS are needed.

  14. An Analysis of Homeless Veterans Participating in the Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katrina Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis on ex post facto data of the federal grant supported Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) administered at Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina. Pre-existing data on variables such as performance goals, training activities, support services, and demographics from program years…

  15. 75 FR 61247 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of...

  16. 78 FR 46420 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of Review: Extension of...

  17. Disability Among Veterans: Analysis of the National Survey of Veterans (1997-2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Lynn H; Weinstein, Ali A; Frankenfeld, Cara L; Huynh, Minh

    2016-03-01

    This manuscript assesses whether the Veterans Administration Rating System (VADR) correlates with self-reported activities of daily living (ADL) used in the National Survey of Veterans and likelihood of employment. Veterans' disability benefits are determined based on a single-index standardized rating scheme, measured at time of discharge. The primary aim of this study was to assess how this single-index rating of disability for veterans compares to multidimensional measures of disability (ADL and instrumental activities of daily living [IADL]). The relationship between disability ratings and labor market outcomes such as job search behavior and the likelihood of being employed was assessed. Successful labor market reintegration requires both physical/mental well-being, we examined the extent that VADR can capture the relationship between job market behavior and measures of mental/physical health. Kernel regression estimates were obtained of the likelihood of working/looking for work. Mean numbers of IADL and ADL difficulties and medical conditions were positively associated with VADR (p-trend trend 4 ADL/IADL deficits and mental health diagnosis increased the likelihood of not working. The probability of not working correlated with VADR when VADR was greater than 40%.

  18. An Analysis of Homeless Veterans Participating in the Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katrina Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis on ex post facto data of the federal grant supported Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) administered at Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina. Pre-existing data on variables such as performance goals, training activities, support services, and demographics from program years…

  19. Comparison of health related quality of life between two groups of veteran and non-veteran spinal cord injured patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; Rostami, Reza; Saadat, Soheil; Taheri, Taher; Tajabadi, Maryam; Ranjbari, Ghazale; Naji, Zohrehsadat; Jafarpour, Saba; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a lower health related quality of life (HRQOL) compared to both healthy controls and the normal population. The aim of this study was to compare HRQOL between two groups of veteran and non-veteran SCI patients. Methods: All male paraplegic non-veterans who had sustained complete SCI before 1988 and were residents of Tehran province (Iran), and a similar group of SCI veterans who consecutively participated in a health screening program were enrolled in this study. Patients fewer than 35 and older than 65 years of age were not included in this study. The participants were interviewed based on the Persian version of SF-36 questionnaire by two psychologists. Eight sub-scales and two physical and mental component summaries of the instrument were assessed. We used chi-square, odds ratio, Mann-Whitney U, independent t-test and linear regression for analysis. Results: Overall, 25 veterans and 22 non-veterans were enrolled in the study. The mean age, time since injury and the presence of comorbid illnesses were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). A greater number of veterans were married (p= 0.003) and employed (p= 0.047). On average, veterans had more years of formal education than non-veterans (p= 0.001). The mean (SD) bodily pain sub-scale was 72.73(31.253) for non-veterans and 49.7 (28.287) for veterans (p=0.011). Absence of comorbid illnesses was associated with a better physical component summary (p< 0.001). Employment was associated with a better mental component summary (p= 0.022). Conclusion: We did not find any differences in HRQOL between the two groups except for the bodily pain sub-scale. Further studies with larger sample sizes are recommended. PMID:26157716

  20. Post-Service Earnings of Veterans: Evidence from the Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    Security Administration Records," American Economic Review (June): 80: 313-336. (1989). "Why Do World War II Veterans Earn More Than Nonveterans...Relations Research Association, pp. 422-431. DeTray, Dennis (1982). "Veteran Status as a Screening Device," American Economic Review (March) 72: 133-142

  1. Writing War: Veterans in the College Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, D. Alexis; Thompson, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As writing classrooms may be the primary locations where students' military experiences are shared, writing instructors bear special ethical responsibility when teaching veterans. A discussion of research conducted with the support of a Conference on College Composition and Communications (CCCC) Research Initiative Grant, investigating the demographics of Post-9/11 military veterans who are entering college writing courses.

  2. Natural Medicine: Wilderness Experience Outcomes for Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Zachary Clayborne; Joye, Shauna Wilson; Garcia, Joseph Amos

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) have been shown to enhance psychological well-being for numerous populations. However, among veteran populations, these studies have historically evaluated programs that are short-term experiences, usually less than 1 week. The current research sought to evaluate a WEP for post-9/11 combat veterans engaging in…

  3. Veterans Affairs: Presumptive Service Connection and Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    requirements that a veteran must show diagnosis by a medical examination conducted by a medical officer of the then Veterans Bureau or duly qualified...to include a “medically unexplained chronic multisymptom illness (such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia , and irritable bowel syndrome) that

  4. 77 FR 73312 - Technical Revisions-State Veterans Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... structure. Under VHA's new organizational structure, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has delegated... must be updated because of recent changes to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) organizational structure, which reassigned certain administrative duties of the Chief Consultant of the Office of...

  5. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... serious mental illness or some other kind of disability. The commenter argues this has been replaced with..., including halfway houses)'' to ``veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are... who are homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder. Many of the...

  6. Pittsburgh Student Veterans' Experience with Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to understand how student veteran's experienced using social media in the context of higher education. It also explored how they used it for peer bonding and how student veterans perceived the benefits of using social media. This was a qualitative research study that used a phenomenological approach to data collection and…

  7. Challenges on the Front Lines: Serving Today's Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander; Parks, Rodney; Edwards, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, veterans have enrolled at higher education institutions in vastly increasingly numbers to utilize their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. In response to this influx, universities have established a variety of resources and support systems designed to serve the needs of student veterans. There has also been heightened attention toward…

  8. Promoting College and Career Success: Portfolio Assessment for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Active service members and veterans are pursuing postsecondary degrees in record numbers today, due in large part to the GI Bill education benefits that can cover much or all of the cost. An important tool for helping service members and veterans succeed in postsecondary education is prior learning assessment (PLA). PLA is a process that includes…

  9. "It's Not One Size Fits All": Diversity "among" Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Veterans are a growing subpopulation of students on college campuses. While writing proliferates about best practices and veteran-friendly suggestions (e.g., Carr, 2010; Cook & Kim, 2009; Lokken, Pfeffer, McAuley & Strong, 2009; McBain, Kim, Cook & Snead, 2013), only a small body of empirical research about contemporary student…

  10. Do Military Veteran and Civilian Students Function Differently in College?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James G.; Vilhauer, Ruvanee P.; Chafos, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to assess military veterans' functioning in college by comparing their experience with that of civilian students. Participants: The study, conducted from April 2012 to February 2013, included 445 civilian and 61 student service member/veteran (SSM/V) undergraduates, drawn from a community college and two 4-year…

  11. Examining the Development of Self-Authorship among Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sharon L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The literature has shown that student veterans arrive in college with unique characteristics and also face unique challenges (Black et al., 2007; Bonar & Domenici, 2011; Church, 2009; DiRamio & Jarvis, 2011). There is also some evidence that student veterans develop complex ways of making meaning at younger ages than students in the…

  12. Exploring the Challenges of Academic Advising for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Rodney; Walker, Erin; Smith, Carol

    2015-01-01

    As troops return to the United States from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, many student veterans are expected to utilize their education benefits and enroll in higher education. A key element in their success in college will be the quality of academic advising they receive. Student veterans are much more likely than traditional students to drop…

  13. Pittsburgh Student Veterans' Experience with Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to understand how student veteran's experienced using social media in the context of higher education. It also explored how they used it for peer bonding and how student veterans perceived the benefits of using social media. This was a qualitative research study that used a phenomenological approach to data collection and…

  14. Transformations: Working with Veterans in the Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardy, Galen

    2009-01-01

    Veterans make up a fair number of potential students. It is important to understand them, even if teachers do not agree with the politics of the War on Terror, Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). In working with the veterans at Black Hawk College and other two-year and four-year institutions, the author has learned…

  15. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations about reaching out for help. Bittersweet More Videos ... Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard Signs of Crisis Identifying ...

  16. An Examination of Family Adjustment among Operation Desert Storm Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Casey T.; Schumm, Jeremiah A.; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in…

  17. Natural Medicine: Wilderness Experience Outcomes for Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Zachary Clayborne; Joye, Shauna Wilson; Garcia, Joseph Amos

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) have been shown to enhance psychological well-being for numerous populations. However, among veteran populations, these studies have historically evaluated programs that are short-term experiences, usually less than 1 week. The current research sought to evaluate a WEP for post-9/11 combat veterans engaging in…

  18. Did Massachusetts Health Reform Affect Veterans Affairs Primary Care Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Hebert, Paul L; Batten, Adam; Nelson, Karin M; Fihn, Stephan D; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2016-09-20

    Massachusetts Health Reform (MHR), implemented in 2006, introduced new health insurance options that may have prompted some veterans already enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System (VA) to reduce their reliance on VA health services. This study examined whether MHR was associated with changes in VA primary care (PC) use. Using VA administrative data, we identified 147,836 veterans residing in Massachusetts and neighboring New England (NE) states from October 2004 to September 2008. We applied difference-in-difference methods to compare pre-post changes in PC use among Massachusetts and other NE veterans. Among veterans not enrolled in Medicare, VA PC use was not significantly different following MHR for Massachusetts veterans relative to other NE veterans. Among VA-Medicare dual enrollees, MHR was associated with an increase of 24.5 PC visits per 1,000 veterans per quarter (p = .048). Despite new non-VA health options through MHR, VA enrollees continued to rely on VA PC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... published the report in the Federal Register (76 FR 65321) and posted it on a social media Web site created... over 450 comments from over 500 registered users through the social media Web site. VA sincerely thanks... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs....

  20. Bridging the Gap: Technology and Veteran Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, David; Hammond, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two unique yet confluent perspectives regarding the use of technology to support student veterans in college, and is meant to ignite discussion of the blending of high impact practices with technology to promote their academic success. The authors highlight the historical trends of student veterans in the academy and discuss…

  1. Employing Our Veterans. Part 2. Service Member Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    one common website that will consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service...consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service providers should be used to enhance the

  2. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Competencies and Teaching Strategies to Enhance the Care of the Veteran Population: Perspectives of Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Judy

    2016-01-01

    It is critical that faculty competencies, teaching strategies, and the essential knowledge relating to the care of our veterans be delineated and taught to health care professionals in order for our Veterans to receive optimal care. The purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain from nursing faculty members who have worked extensively with veterans, the necessary faculty competencies, essential knowledge, and teaching strategies needed to prepare baccalaureate level nurses to provide individualized, quality, and holistic care to veterans. Six Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy faculty members participated in two 2-hour focus group sessions. There were a total of 12 multidimensional major concepts identified: 5 faculty competencies, 4 essential knowledge areas, and 3 teaching strategies specifically related to veteran care. The information generated can be used for faculty, staff, and or nurse development. Having a comprehensive understanding of veteran health care needs enable effective patient-centered care delivery to veterans, which is the gold standard in health care our veterans deserve.

  3. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: A national study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain under-investigated. Further, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of persons in recovery (N = 3,208) we compare addiction and recovery experiences among veterans (N = 481) and non veterans. Vets’ addiction phase was 4 years longer than non vets and they experienced significantly more financial and legal problems. Dramatic improvements in functioning were observed across the board in recovery with subgroup differences leveling off. We discuss possible strategies to address the specific areas where vets are most impaired in addiction and note study limitations including the cross-sectional design. PMID:24783976

  4. 20 CFR 1001.110 - Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans... SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES FOR VETERANS Federal Responsibilities § 1001.110 Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET). (a) As...

  5. 78 FR 55777 - Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event... Events, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of National Veterans Sports... Service Application, VA Form 0927f. k. National Veterans Summer sports Clinic Event Application, VA...

  6. 78 FR 58611 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0212.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance... collection. Abstract: Veterans complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI)...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  8. VA Puget Sound Telemental Health Service to rural veterans: a growing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Sara V Smucker; Juretic, Meghan A; Hoerster, Katherine D; Van de Plasch, Richard; Felker, Bradford L

    2012-05-01

    The VA Puget Sound Health Care System Telemental Health program connects veterans with psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers via live clinical video teleconferencing. Providers deliver care to veterans in rural Veteran Affairs medical centers, community-based outpatient clinics and residences, and thus, increase access to specialty mental health care for rural and medically underserved veteran communities.

  9. 38 CFR 3.453 - Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay. 3.453 Section 3.453 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation...

  10. 76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... better understand Veterans and their families' awareness of VA's suicide prevention and mental health... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys.... Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513. b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c....

  11. 76 FR 64184 - Advisory Committee on Women Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ...; overviews of the Veterans Health Administration, the Veterans Benefits Administration, and the Women Veterans Health Strategic Health Care Group; and briefings on mental health, women Veterans' legislative... of the Secretary. Vivian Drake, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 8320-01-P...

  12. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Naranjo, Diana; Marshall, Grant N

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the feasibility of using Facebook as a platform to recruit and retain young adult veteran drinkers into an online-alcohol use intervention study. Facebook's wide accessibility and popularity among the age group that comprises the majority of veterans from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make it a compelling resource through which research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment. In doing so, we recruited 793 valid veteran participants in approximately two weeks for an advertising cost of $4.53 per obtained participant. The study sample consisted primarily of male veterans, between 19 and 34 years of age, who were drinking at moderate to heavy levels. Although about half of the sample reported mental health comorbidity, few had received any mental health or substance use treatment in the past year. Facebook appears to be a valuable mechanism through which to recruit young veterans with unmet behavioral health needs, although more specific efforts may be needed to engage certain types of veterans after initial study enrollment.

  13. Transfer component skill deficit rates among Veterans who use wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Koontz, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to quantify the deficit rates for transfer component skills in a Veteran cohort and explore the relationship between deficit rates and subject characteristics. Seventy-four men and 18 women performed up to four transfers independently from their wheelchair to a mat table while a therapist evaluated their transfer techniques using the Transfer Assessment Instrument. The highest deficit rates concerned the improper use of handgrips (63%. Other common problems included not setting the wheelchair up at the proper angle (50% and not removing the armrest (58%. Veterans over 60 yr old and Veterans with moderate shoulder pain were more likely to set up their wheelchairs inappropriately than younger Veterans (p = 0.003 and Veterans with mild shoulder pain (p = 0.004. Women were less likely to remove their armrests than men (p = 0.03. Subjects with disabilities other than spinal cord injury were less inclined to set themselves up for a safe and easy transfer than the subjects with spinal cord injury (p Veterans and will inform the development of future transfer training programs both within and outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  14. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Naranjo, Diana; Marshall, Grant N.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the feasibility of using Facebook as a platform to recruit and retain young adult veteran drinkers into an online-alcohol use intervention study. Facebook’s wide accessibility and popularity among the age group that comprises the majority of veterans from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make it a compelling resource through which research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment. In doing so, we recruited 793 valid veteran participants in approximately two weeks for an advertising cost of $4.53 per obtained participant. The study sample consisted primarily of male veterans, between 19 and 34 years of age, who were drinking at moderate to heavy levels. Although about half of the sample reported mental health comorbidity, few had received any mental health or substance use treatment in the past year. Facebook appears to be a valuable mechanism through which to recruit young veterans with unmet behavioral health needs, although more specific efforts may be needed to engage certain types of veterans after initial study enrollment. PMID:28249027

  15. Homelessness and money mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Sullivan, Connor P; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean C

    2013-12-01

    We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009-2011. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n = 1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one's credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR] = 4.09, 95% CI = 1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.26, 5.33), and income (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.71). Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness.

  16. Examination of Veterans Affairs disability compensation as a disincentive for employment in a population-based sample of Veterans under age 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Concerns that disability benefits may create disincentives for employment may be especially relevant for young American military veterans, particularly veterans of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who are facing a current economic recession and turning in large numbers to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability compensation. This study describes the rate of employment and VA disability compensation among a nationally representative sample of veterans under the age of 65 and examines the association between levels of VA disability compensation and employment, adjusting for sociodemographics and health status. Data on a total of 4,787 veterans from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans were analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions to compare employed veterans with two groups that were not employed. Two-thirds of veterans under the age of 65 were employed, although only 36 % of veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of 50 % or higher were employed. Veterans who received no VA disability compensation or who were service-connected 50 % or more were more likely to be unemployed and not looking for employment than veterans who were not service-connected or were service-connected less than 50 %, suggesting high but not all levels of VA disability compensation create disincentives for employment. Results were similar when analyses were limited to veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Education and vocational rehabilitation interventions, as well as economic work incentives, may be needed to maximize employment among veterans with disabilities.

  17. 20 CFR 404.1320 - Who is a post-World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a post-World War II veteran. 404.1320... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1320 Who is a post-World War II veteran. You are a post-World War II veteran if...

  18. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Health Care Letter 1 Background 6 VHA Lacks Complete and Accurate Data on VAMC Compliance with Environment of Care Requirements for Women Veterans...of Care Requirements 40 Appendix IV Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Gynecologist Availability 44 Appendix V Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinics...Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Requirements Related to the Outpatient Environment of Care for Women Veterans, December 2015-March 2016 40 Table

  19. Veterans Health Care: Veterans Health Administration Processes for Responding to Reported Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    evaluation, a clinician is given an opportunity to improve his or her clinical competence over a period of time as determined by the VAMC director. At... competence by a peer. GAO-12-827R Veterans Health Administration Response to Reported Adverse Events 8 concerns about clinical competence remain...the discretion of the VAMC director, this evaluation can include progressive training or proctoring aimed at helping the clinician improve clinical

  20. Military and Veterans’ Benefits: Analysis of VA Compensation Levels for Survivors of Veterans and Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    pensions , and life insurance. Lastly, GAO interviewed officials from VA and groups representing veterans, servicemembers, and their survivors. GAO is...in our analysis other sources of income survivors may receive, such as Social Security, private pensions , or life insurance. For additional context...with survivors receiving a percentage of the employee’s calculated retirement annuity .31 FERS offers similar survivor benefits, but the maximum is 50

  1. Sleep disturbances in veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul; Masoudi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder is related to a wide range of medical problems, with a majority of neurological, psychological, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes, as well as sleep disorders. Although the majority of studies reveal the association between PTSD and sleep disturbances, there are few studies on the assessment of sleep disruption among veterans with PTSD. In this review, we attempt to study the sleep disorders including insomnia, nightmare, sleep-related breathing disorders, sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias among veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD. It is an important area for further research among veterans with PTSD. PMID:27093088

  2. Caring for veterans returning home from Middle Eastern wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wands, Lisa Marie

    2011-04-01

    After serving at war, veterans work to resume a normal life at home. For some, the difficulties of reintegration are compounded by significant physical injury or psychological trauma, such as traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. It is equally important to attend to the all-encompassing experience of reintegration for any veteran. The transition is deeply embedded in the context of relationships and, as such, nurses can provide support. Nurses can find guidance on how to better connect with veterans returning home from war in Swanson's work on caring.

  3. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. The Veterans Choice Act: A Qualitative Examination of Rapid Policy Implementation in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Mengeling, Michelle; Sadler, Anne; Baldor, Rebecca; Bastian, Lori

    2017-07-01

    Congress enacted the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 [Veterans Choice Act (VCA)] to improve access to timely, high-quality health care for Veterans. Although Congress mandated that VCA must begin within 90 days of passage of the legislation, no guidelines were provided in the legislation to ensure that Veterans had access to an adequate number of community providers across different specialties of care or distinct geographic areas, including rural areas of the country. To examine VCA policy implementation across a sampling of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Centers. We conducted a qualitative study of 43 VHA staff and providers by conducting in-person interviews at 5 VA medical centers in the West, South, and Midwest United States. Interview questions focused on perceptions and experiences with VCA and challenges related to implementation for VHA staff and providers. We identified 3 major themes to guide description of choice implementation: (1) VCA implemented too rapidly with inadequate preparation; (2) community provider networks insufficiently developed; and (3) communication and scheduling problems with subcontractors may lead to further delays in care. Our evaluation suggests that VCA was implemented far too rapidly, with little consideration given to the adequacy of community provider networks available to provide care to Veterans. Given the challenges we have highlighted in VCA implementation, it is imperative that the VHA continue to develop care coordination systems that will allow the Veterans to receive seamless care in the community.

  5. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  6. Perceived Stigma, Discrimination, and Disclosure of Sexual Orientation Among a Sample of Lesbian Veterans Receiving Care in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Sullivan, J Cherry; Bertrand, Christina; Kinney, Rebecca L; Sherman, Michelle D; Gustason, Carolyn

    2015-06-01

    Many lesbian women experience stigma and discrimination from their healthcare providers as a result of their sexual orientation. Additionally, others avoid disclosure of their sexual orientation to their providers for fear of mistreatment. With the increasing number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans seeking care from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is important to understand lesbian veterans' experiences with stigma, discrimination, and disclosure of sexual orientation. This article examines lesbian veterans' experiences with perceived stigma and discrimination in VHA healthcare, their perspectives on disclosure of sexual orientation to VHA providers, and their recommendations for improvements in VHA healthcare to create a welcoming environment for lesbian veterans. This is a mixed methods study of twenty lesbian veterans at four VHA facilities. The women veterans participated in a one-hour interview and then completed an anonymous survey. Ten percent of lesbian veterans had experienced mistreatment from VHA staff or providers, but nearly 50% feared that their Veterans Affairs (VA) providers would mistreat them if they knew about their sexual orientation. A majority of lesbian veterans (70%) believed that VHA providers should never ask about sexual orientation or should only ask if the veteran wanted to discuss it. A majority (80%) believed the VHA had taken steps to create a welcoming environment for LBGT veterans. Though many lesbian veterans have fears of stigma and discrimination in the context of VHA care, few have experienced this. Most lesbian veterans believed the VHA was trying to create a welcoming environment for its LGBT veterans. Future research should focus on expanding this study to include a larger and more diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender veterans receiving care at VA facilities across the country.

  7. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric R Pedersen; Diana Naranjo; Grant N Marshall

    2017-01-01

    ... research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment...

  8. Delegation of Chinese Advisers And Veterans Visits Vietnam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Vietnam Union of Friendship Organizations (VUFO),Jing Dunquan, vice president of the CPAFFC, led the delegation of Chinese advisers and veterans who had participated in China’s aid mission to help

  9. 75 FR 45035 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... and vibrant economy in South Korea, forging a bond between our people that stands strong today. As we... at Panmunjom, let us raise our flags high to honor the service and valor of our veterans, to reflect...

  10. Helping Veterans Transition into Academic Life through the Creation of a University Veteran Support Group: So We Can Better Serve Those Who Served Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Wesley M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a significant rise in the number of veterans who are being treated for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and the number of veterans who are completing suicide. In the next couple of years, there will be an increase in the number of veterans who will be attending institutions of higher education; therefore, it is essential that…

  11. Male combat veterans' narratives of PTSD, masculinity, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddick, Nick; Smith, Brett; Phoenix, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    This article uniquely examines the ways a group of male combat veterans talk about masculinity and how, following post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), they performed masculinities in the context of a surfing group, and what effects this had upon their health and wellbeing. Participant observations and life history interviews were conducted with a group of combat veterans who belonged to a surfing charity for veterans experiencing PTSD. Data were rigorously explored via narrative analysis. Our findings revealed the ways in which veterans enacted masculinities in accordance with the values that were cultivated during military service. These masculine performances in the surfing group had important effects both on and for the veterans' wellbeing. Significantly, the study highlights how masculine performances can be seen alternately as a danger and as a resource for health and wellbeing in relation to PTSD. The article advances knowledge on combat veterans and mental health with critical implications for the promotion of male veterans' mental health. These include the original suggestion that health-promoting masculine performances might be recognised and supported in PTSD treatment settings. Rather than automatically viewing masculinity as problematic, this article moves the field forward by highlighting how hegemonic masculinities can be reconstructed in positive ways which might improve veterans' health and wellbeing. A video abstract of this article can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaYzaOP1kAY. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A sailor's pain: Veterans' musculoskeletal disorders, chronic pain, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Chiasson, Roland; Loisel, Patrick; Besemann, Lt Col Markus; Pranger, Tina

    2009-11-01

    A few years after leaving the navy, a 50-year-old Veteran* presents to a new family physician with chronic knee and back pain. He is seeking a new physician for opioid and benzodiazepine refills, referrals for ongoing acupuncture and massage therapy, and completion of Veteran Affairs Canada (VAC) disability claim forms for his back. He was medically released at the rank of Petty Officer owing to knee impairment secondary to a fracture sustained aboard ship. He twice strained his back on deployments, but did not develop chronic low back pain until after leaving the Canadian Forces (CF). On release from the CF he completed comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and vocational rehabilitation in the VAC Rehabilitation Program for disability related to his knee impairment. Lately, chronic low back pain prevents him from continuing civilian employment and enjoying life.The physician takes the Veteran's history, performs appropriate physical examination and diagnostic investigations, and obtains previous medical records. The physician diagnoses chronic mechanic allow back pain and knee osteoarthritis, and is concerned about the Veteran's mental health. When the family physician tries to explore the mental health differential diagnosis, the Veteran initially becomes upset,but he responds to motivational interviewing. The physician books follow-up appointments to develop a therapeutic relationship with the Veteran and completes the VAC forms. With consent, the physician also sends a referral letter to the VAC district office, outlining the Veteran's health issues. The client is found to be eligible to re-enter the VAC Rehabilitation Program to manage disability related to his back pain. The Veteran is ultimately able to withdraw from chronic opiate and benzodiazepine medications and optimize his participation in life.

  13. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Ping Tan; Lin-Qi Zhu; Jun Zhang; Shi-Min Zhang; Xiao-Yang Lan; Bo Cui; Yu-Cheng Deng; Ying-Hao Li; Guang-Hua Ye; Lu-Ning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: The awareness, treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China, whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years. Therefore, investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general populatio...

  14. Veteran, Primary Care Provider, and Specialist Satisfaction With Electronic Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Access to specialty care is challenging for veterans in rural locations. To address this challenge, in December 2009, the Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System (VAPHS) implemented an electronic consultation (e-consult) program to provide primary care providers (PCPs) and patients with enhanced specialty care access. Objective The aim of this quality improvement (QI) project evaluation was to: (1) assess satisfaction with the e-consult process, and (2) identify perceive...

  15. In-Home Exposure Therapy for Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    and complete the therapy “homework” assigned by the therapists (such as doing feared activities around the house or the neighborhood). We have now...these Veterans because it will help Veterans attend each session and complete the therapy “homework” assigned by the therapists (such as doing feared ...have our study advertised on the TV screens around the VA hospital and community-based outpatient clinics, and that has generated many self-referrals

  16. A Story for All Americans: Vietnam, Victims, and Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Grzyb, Frank L.; Kerry, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Story for All Americans: Vietnam, Victims, and Veterans (formerly titled, Touched by the Dragon) details wartime accounts of average servicemen and women-some heroic, some frightening, some amusing, some nearly unbelievable. The work is a historical compendium of fascinating and compelling stories woven together in a theme format. What makes this book truly unique, however, is its absence of literary pretentiousness. Relating oral accounts, the veterans speak in a no-nonsense, matter-of-fact ...

  17. The Post-Military Earnings of Female Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen L. Mehay; Hirsch, Barry T.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The civilian labor market performance of women veterans is examined, using both traditional data sets and a special survey of reservists that facilitates control for selection by the military and enlistees. Evidence from all data sets indicates that female veterans possess a higher level of measured earnings endowments than do nonveterans. Moreover, evidence from the reservist survey supports the hypothesis that unobserved ability and...

  18. Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Page 1 of 14 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0216 TITLE: Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...30 Jun 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...cholinesterases and acetylcholine, which could affect activity at the neuromuscular junction of skeletal muscle, muscarinic receptors affecting vascular smooth

  19. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Kosovo Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoza Shahini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD at veterans 8 years after war, to find out relation of PTSD with other demographic and health related variables and discover the impact of depression and trauma on PTSD on 687 veterans from six municipalities in Kosovo. Method: Participants were 687 war veterans selected from six regions of Kosovo during 2008. The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ-40, was administered to measure PTSD and Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25 for depression and anxiety. Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Results: Results indicated that 11.2 % of veterans even 8 years after the war ended were suffering from PTSD. Six percent of veterans with PTSD did not seek medical help. They reported to have had emotional problems and physical problems, but they did not seek medical help. The findings suggest that self-medication may be one way of veterans dealing with PTSD symptoms. Veterans with PTSD symptoms were more concerned with “family issues” than those without PTSD symptoms. Conclusions: The study found that 8 years after the war the veterans of the war in Kosovo suffer PTSD symptoms and that a good number of them do not seek help for this problem. The establishment of adequate services by the state would transform these veterans’ dealing with PTSD not into a moral challenge but into a fundamental right to equal and high-quality services.

  20. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N=12 also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations.

  1. Older Military Veteran Care: Many Still Believe They Are Forgotten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cathy; Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Lacy, Darlene

    2017-06-01

    Almost 44% of our nation's 23 million men and women veterans are 65 years of age or older. Most are proud of their service, yet many believe their services for our country were forgotten, especially those in combat between 1950 and 1975. Further information to ultimately assist their holistic well-being will be important for nursing practice as countless older veterans are beginning to obtain more care within civilian facilities. Using the Korean War (1950-1953) as a backdrop to illustrate the interconnectiveness of older veteran physical, emotional, and spiritual concerns that can occur from a military deployment, the major purposes of this article are to provide a brief historical snapshot of that war and discuss prior-era military environmental situations that now are producing the lingering effects from their combat exposure. Relevant literature about the Korean War and Veterans was compiled. Some of these health risks for both the Korean men and women veterans are cold exposure, neurologic, and posttraumatic stress disorder concerns, as well as the need for hepatitis C and suicide assessments. To ultimately improve their bio-psycho-socio-spiritual well-being, prompt identification of the older military veteran, their lingering combat effects, and reminiscing will be important.

  2. New women veterans in the VHA: a longitudinal profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sarah A; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Schmitt, Susan K; Hayes, Patricia M; Herrera, Laura; Frayne, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The number of women veterans using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services has increased rapidly, but the characteristics of women joining VHA are not well understood. We sought to describe sociodemographic characteristics, utilization, and retention of new and returning women VHA patients over a 7-year period. We identified women veterans who used VHA outpatient services from VHA Enrollment and Utilization files for fiscal years 2003 through 2009. "New" patients in a given year had no outpatient use within the prior 3 years. Patients were "retained" if they continued to use VHA in subsequent years. Of the 287,447 women veteran VHA outpatients in 2009, 40,000 (14%) were new to VHA in that year and over half had joined VHA since 2003. Nearly two thirds of these new patients were younger than 45, and 43% carried a service-connected disability status. Most new patients (88%) received primary care services in 2008, and 40% used mental health services. Repeated use of mental health services (at least three visits per year) nearly doubled among new patients (from 11% in 2003 to 20% in 2008). Among those using VHA primary care in 2006, 68% of new patients versus 91% of returning patients were retained in either of the subsequent 2 years. The influx of new women veterans seeking VHA services in recent years, combined with their high rate of retention within VHA, contribute to the marked increase in numbers of women veterans using VHA. Many require fairly intensive VHA services. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Alcohol and drug misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Katherine J; Jamison, Andrea L; Lehavot, Keren; Cucciare, Michael A; Timko, Christine; Simpson, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on substance misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans, including National Guard/reserve members. We identified 837 articles published between 1980 and 2013. Of 56 included studies, 32 reported rates of alcohol misuse, binge drinking, or other unhealthy alcohol use not meeting diagnostic criteria for abuse or dependence, and 33 reported rates of drug misuse or diagnosed alcohol or drug use disorders. Rates ranged from 4% to 37% for alcohol misuse and from 7% to 25% for binge drinking; among Veterans Health Administration (VA) health-care system outpatients, rates ranged from 3% to 16% for substance use disorder. Studies comparing women veterans and civilians reported no clear differences in binge or heavy drinking. Substance misuse rates were generally lower among women veterans than men veterans. Substance misuse was associated with higher rates of trauma, psychiatric and medical conditions, and increased mortality and suicide rates. Most studies included only VA patients, and many used only VA medical record data; therefore, the reported substance misuse rates likely do not reflect true prevalence. Rates also varied by assessment method, source of data, and the subgroups studied. Further efforts to develop epidemiologically valid prevalence estimates are needed to capture the true health burden of substance misuse in women veterans, particularly those not using VA care.

  4. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Fen; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Sales, Anne EB

    2005-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS), a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans. PMID:15836789

  5. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18-44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty.

  6. The Veterans Health Administration’s Treatment of PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury Among Recent Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Boxes1. Eligibility for VHA’s Services 22. Suicide and Mental Illness Among OCO Veterans 12 SummaryMore than 2 million service members have deployed...likely to be prescribed for patients receiving a diagnosis in a mental health clinic than for those diagnosed in a general medical or PSTD clinic.11...common within the OCO veteran population. (For a brief description of other mental health conditions and suicide in that popu- lation, see Box 2.) The

  7. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenick M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Olenick,1 Monica Flowers,1 Valerie J Diaz1,21Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies

  8. Suicide in Scottish military veterans: a 30-year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, B P; Mackay, D F; Smith, D J; Pell, J P

    2017-07-01

    Although reassuring data on suicide risk in UK veterans of the 1982 Falklands conflict and 1991 Gulf conflict have been published, there have been few studies on long-term overall suicide risk in UK veterans. To examine the risk of suicide in a broad population-based cohort of veterans in Scotland, irrespect ive of length of service or exposure to conflict, in comparison with people having no record of military service. A retrospective 30-year cohort study of 56205 veterans born 1945-85 and 172741 matched non-veterans, using Cox proportional hazard models to compare the risk of suicide and fatal self-harm overall, by sex, birth cohort, length of service and year of recruitment. There were 267 (0.48%) suicides in the veterans compared with 918 (0.53%) in non-veterans. The difference was not statistically significant overall [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.13]. The incidence was lower in younger veterans and higher in veterans aged over 40. Early service leavers were at non-significantly increased risk (adjusted HR 1.13; 95% CI 0.91-1.40) but only in the older age groups. Women veterans had a significantly higher risk of suicide than non-veteran women (adjusted HR 2.44; 95% CI 1.32-4.51, P < 0.01) and comparable risk to veteran men. Methods of suicide did not differ significantly between veterans and non-veterans, for either sex. The Scottish Veterans Health Study adds to the emerging body of evidence that there is no overall difference in long-term risk of suicide between veterans and non-veterans in the UK. However, female veterans merit further study.

  9. Adaptation of Lean Six Sigma Methodologies for the Evaluation of Veterans Choice Program at 3 Urban Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry L; Stevenson, Lauren D; Ladebue, Amy C; McCreight, Marina S; Lawrence, Emily C; Oestreich, Taryn; Lambert-Kerzner, Anne C

    2017-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is adapting to meet the changing needs of our Veterans. VHA leaders are promoting quality improvement strategies including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). This study used LSS tools to evaluate the Veterans Choice Program (VCP), a program that aims to improve access to health care services for eligible Veterans by expanding health care options to non-VHA providers. LSS was utilized to assess the current process and efficiency patterns of the VCP at 3 VHA Medical Centers. LSS techniques were used to assess data obtained through semistructured interviews with Veterans, staff, and providers to describe and evaluate the VCP process by identifying wastes and defects. The LSS methodology facilitated the process of targeting priorities for improvement and constructing suggestions to close identified gaps and inefficiencies. Identified key process wastes included inefficient exchange of clinical information between stakeholders in and outside of the VHA; poor dissemination of VCP programmatic information; shortages of VCP-participating providers; duplication of appointments; declines in care coordination; and lack of program adaptability to local processes. Recommendations for improvement were formulated using LSS. This evaluation illustrates how LSS can be utilized to assess a nationally mandated health care program. By focusing on stakeholder, staff, and Veteran perspectives, process defects in the VCP were identified and improvement recommendations were made. However, the current LSS language used is not intuitive in health care and similar applications of LSS may consider using new language and goals adapted specifically for health care.

  10. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  11. Changes in Suicide Mortality for Veterans and Nonveterans by Gender and History of VHA Service Use, 2000–2010

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmire, Claire A; Kemp, Janet E; Bossarte, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    ... less is known regarding differences by history of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) service use. This study directly compared veteran and nonveteran suicide risk while for the first time differentiating veterans by VHA service...

  12. 76 FR 11935 - Death of Army Corporal Frank W. Buckles, the Last Surviving American Veteran of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Surviving American Veteran of World War I By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As... veteran of World War I, and in remembrance of the generation of American veterans of World War I, I hereby...

  13. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  14. Ensuring Appropriate Care for LGBT Veterans in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Virginia Ashby; Uchendu, Uchenna S

    2014-09-01

    Within health care systems, negative perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons have often translated into denial of services, denial of visitation rights to same-sex partners, reluctance on the part of LGBT patients to share personal information, and failure of workers to assess and recognize the unique health care needs of these patients. Other bureaucratic forms of exclusion have included documents, forms, and policies that fail to acknowledge a patient's valued relationships because of, for example, a narrow definition of "spouse," "parent," or "family." Bureaucratic exclusion has taken a particularly prominent form in the U.S. military. Until its repeal and termination in 2011, the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy had for eighteen years barred openly gay men and lesbians from serving in the military. Among the effects of DADT is a dearth of information about the number and needs of LGBT service members who transition to the Veterans Health Administration for health care at the end of their military service. The long-standing social stigma against LGBT persons, the silence mandated by DADT, and the often unrecognized bias built into the fabric of bureaucratic systems make the task of creating a welcoming culture in the VHA urgent and challenging. The VHA has accepted a commitment to that task. Its Strategic Plan for fiscal years 2013 through 2018 stipulates that "[v]eterans will receive timely, high quality, personalized, safe, effective and equitable health care irrespective of geography, gender, race, age, culture or sexual orientation." To achieve this goal, the VHA undertook a number of coordinated initiatives to create an environment and culture that is informed, welcoming, positive, and empowering for the LGBT veterans and families whom the agency serves.

  15. Correlates of institutionalized senior veterans' quality of life in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Shinn-Jang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senior veterans living in government sponsored, long-term care (LTC facilities, known as veterans' homes (VHs, are a special minority group in Taiwan. These seniors came from different provinces of mainland China during their teenage years at the end of civil wars in 1945. The situation of institutionalized senior veterans shares many characteristics with the concept of "total institution". Very little quality of life (QOL research has involved senior veterans. This study aimed to explore the QOL and related factors of VH-dwelling senior veterans in Taiwan. Methods Chronic conditions and socio-demographic characteristics of 260 male VH residents were recorded. The Brief Form of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF, Taiwanese version; Short-Form 36; Inventory of Socially Supportive Behavior questionnaire; Geriatric Depression Scale-short form; Barthel Index; and instrumental activities of daily living were used. Data analyses including descriptive and inferred statistics were performed using SPSS, version 17. Results WHOQOL-BREF showed acceptable reliability in this study. Compared to Taiwanese male norms, WHOQOL-BREF physical, psychological, and social relationship domain scores were around the 25th percentile, and the environment domain was about the 75th percentile. Our participants scored low in all concepts of SF-36. Although these residents rated the social support of their children, relatives, friends, social and medical staff as low, they gave high satisfaction ratings to their social supports. On multiple stepwise linear regression analysis, depressive symptoms, number of chronic conditions, retired military rank, and relatives' support correlated with QOL in both the physical and psychological domains. Friends' support and depressive symptoms correlated with the social relationships domain. Friends' support and instrumental activities of daily living correlated with the

  16. Management of Bacteriuria in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Emily S; Burk, Muriel; Zhang, Rongping; Jones, Makoto M; Neuhauser, Melinda M; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Cunningham, Francesca E

    2017-09-15

    Bacteriuria contributes to antibiotic overuse through treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and long durations of therapy for symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs), yet large-scale evaluations of bacteriuria management among inpatients are lacking. Inpatients with bacteriuria were classified as asymptomatic or symptomatic based on established criteria applied to data collected by manual chart review. We examined frequency of treatment of ASB, factors associated with treatment of ASB, durations of therapy, and frequency of complications including Clostridium difficile infection, readmission, and all-cause mortality within 28 days of discharge. Among 2225 episodes of bacteriuria, 64% were classified as ASB. After excluding patients with non-UTI indications for antibiotics, 72% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. When evaluating only patients not meeting SIRS criteria, 68% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. The mean (±SD) days of antibiotic therapy for ASB, cystitis, CA-UTI and pyelonephritis were 10.0 (4.5), 11.4 (4.7), 12.0 (6.1), and 13.6 (5.3), respectively. In sum, 14% of patients with ASB were treated for greater than 14 days, and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used empiric antibiotic for ASB [245/691 (35%)]. Complications were rare but more common among patients with ASB treated with antibiotics. The majority of bacteriuria among inpatient veterans is due to ASB with high rates of treatment of ASB and prolonged durations of therapy for ASB and symptomatic UTIs.

  17. Venture capitalism at the Veterans Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, G H

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a venture capitalism program in a 519-bed Veterans Administration tertiary care medical center. Venture capitalism at the VA West Side Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois is realized through a pool of capital within the budget, for the trial implementation of various ideas and programs that demonstrate a potential to reduce costs or increase revenues. Through this adaptation of venture capitalism, the principles of entrepreneurship can be applied. Employees submit a proposal to management that describes what they wish to accomplish. The proposal includes the time schedule required for implementation and how much capital will be needed to make the proposal operational. If the proposal is successful and becomes self-sufficient, the original venture capital is returned to the pool and used for other ventures. If the proposal does not meet expectations, support is withdrawn and the remaining capital is returned to the venture capital pool. In conclusion, several successful ventures are described to demonstrate the practicality of using the concepts of entrepreneurship and venture capitalism within the budget constraints of the federal government.

  18. Arthritis, comorbidities, and care utilization in veterans of operations enduring and Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jessica C; Amuan, Megan E; Morris, Ruth M; Johnson, Anthony E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2017-03-01

    Veteran populations are known to have frequencies of arthritis higher than civilian populations. The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of arthritis among a cohort of veterans from ongoing U.S. military operations. A retrospective cohort study using Veterans Administration data sources for service connected disability, comorbidities, clinic utilization, and pharmacy utilization was conducted including veterans who deployed in service to operations in Afghanistan or Iraq, comparing veterans with a diagnosis of arthritis, arthritis plus back pain, and veterans with no pain diagnoses. The frequency of arthritis was 11.8%. Veterans with arthritis and arthritis plus back pain had greater frequencies of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity compare to veterans with no pain diagnosis. Veterans with arthritis plus back pain had the highest pain clinic utilization and prescription use of opioids and anti-inflammatories. Veterans with no pain diagnosis had higher frequencies of diagnosis and clinic utilization for mental health disorders. Arthritis is prevalent among the latest generation of combat veterans and is associated with diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. The need for arthritis care and associated comorbidities is expected to increase as the Veterans Administration and the civilian health care sector assumes care of these veterans. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:682-687, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Role of Combat Exposure and Insomnia in Student Veterans' Adaptation to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, James J; Riggs, Shelley A; Taylor, Daniel J

    2017-08-04

    Since 2002, the number of college student veterans has nearly doubled, although 30-40% of veterans fail to complete their degree. Few research efforts to understand the challenges veterans face transitioning to college in recent years have looked beyond the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder. Insomnia is the most frequently reported symptom of combat veterans and can have serious implications for college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of insomnia in student veteran adaptation to college relative to civilian students. College students (N = 588), including 154 veterans, participated in a large online study examining the psychological, relational, and academic functioning of college students. Approximately 61% of the veteran subsample reported combat exposure. Students were administered a Background Information Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, and the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of covariance and regression to test for direct and indirect effects. Student veterans reported better academic and personal-emotional adaptation than civilian students, while civilians reported better social adjustment than veterans. However, follow-up analyses revealed that these effects might be explained by group differences in gender, income, and marital status. Although combat veterans without insomnia had better academic adjustment than noncombat veterans and civilian students, insomnia seemed to have a greater negative effect on combat veterans' academic adjustment relative to civilian students. Furthermore, insomnia mediated the relationship between combat exposure and veterans' personal-emotional adjustment to college.

  20. Military veteran mortality following a survived suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conigliaro Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a global public health problem. Recently in the U.S., much attention has been given to preventing suicide and other premature mortality in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A strong predictor of suicide is a past suicide attempt, and suicide attempters have multiple physical and mental comorbidities that put them at risk for additional causes of death. We examined mortality among U.S. military veterans after hospitalization for attempted suicide. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted with all military veterans receiving inpatient treatment during 1993-1998 at United States Veterans Affairs (VA medical facilities following a suicide attempt. Deaths occurring during 1993-2002, the most recent available year at the time, were identified through VA Beneficiary and Records Locator System data and National Death Index data. Mortality data for the general U.S. adult population were also obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics. Comparisons within the veteran cohort, between genders, and against the U.S. population were conducted with descriptive statistics and standardized mortality ratios. The actuarial method was used estimate the proportion of veterans in the cohort we expect would have survived through 2002 had they experienced the same rate of death that occurred over the study period in the U.S. population having the age and sex characteristics. Results During 1993-1998, 10,163 veterans were treated and discharged at a VA medical center after a suicide attempt (mean age = 44 years; 91% male. There was a high prevalence of diagnosed alcohol disorder or abuse (31.8%, drug dependence or abuse (21.8%, psychoses (21.2%, depression (18.5%, and hypertension (14.2%. A total of 1,836 (18.1% veterans died during follow up (2,941.4/100,000 person years. The cumulative survival probability after 10 years was 78.0% (95% CI = 72.9, 83.1. Hence the 10-year cumulative mortality risk was 22

  1. Coping, family social support, and psychological symptoms among student veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Daniel H; Riggs, Shelley A; Ruggero, Camilo

    2015-04-01

    With rising numbers of student veterans on today's college campuses, multicultural competence in college counseling centers increasingly includes an understanding of military culture and its relation to the psychological health and functioning of student veterans. Research on interpersonal and intrapersonal factors associated with college student veterans' mental health is scarce. The current study examines the contributions of coping style and family social support on symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress in a student veteran sample. We also tested the moderating role of family social support in the relationship between coping style and psychological symptoms. Data from 136 student veterans were analyzed by using path analysis. Results revealed that avoidant coping and family social support significantly predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms. Avoidant coping also significantly predicted posttraumatic stress symptoms. In addition, findings indicated that family social support moderated the relationship between problem-focused coping and depression, as well as between avoidant coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression but not posttraumatic stress. Implications of results for college and university counselors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Sex differences between Veterans participating in interdisciplinary chronic pain rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Murphy, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The improved management of pain among the growing number of female Veterans receiving care through the Veterans Health Administration has been established as a priority, but studies suggest that females may respond differently to pain treatment. This study explored differences between female and male Veterans engaged in a Chronic Pain Rehabilitation Program and determined how female and male Veterans change following participation. Veterans (N = 324 in a 3 wk inpatient program completed self-report measures at admission, discharge, and 3 mo follow-up. Participants were 21% female (n = 67 and 79% male (n = 257. Compared with males, females were younger and less likely to be white or married/partnered. Females reported shorter pain duration and were more likely to have primary head or limb pain. At admission, fewer females were prescribed opioids than males and at lower doses. After opioid cessation in the program, however, there were no significant differences in use between the sexes at follow-up. Improvements in a range of domains were sustained at follow-up for both sexes, but females did not maintain gains in pain intensity or sleep while males reported more pain-related fear at discharge and follow-up. This study adds to the literature on sex-specific variations in chronic pain and implications for treatment.

  3. 77 FR 69549 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans.... This notice solicits comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension... on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 45 - State Directors of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., App. D Appendix D to Part 45—State Directors of Veterans Affairs Alabama Director, Department of..., Trenton, NJ 08608. New Mexico Director, Veterans Service Commission, P.O. Box 2324, Santa Fe, NM 87503...

  5. 76 FR 24570 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement... Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement, VA Form...

  6. 76 FR 70470 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Evaluation of the Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... of strategies to prevent veterans from becoming homeless'' (Senate Report No. 110-418). The Senate... which VHPD services and activities meet the needs of veterans experiencing a housing crisis and...

  7. Sexual Self-Esteem and Psychosocial Functioning in Military Veterans After Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Syme, Maggie L.; Delaney, Eileen; Moye, Jennifer; Gosian, Jeffrey; Wachen, Jennifer Schuster

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the sexual well-being of male Veteran cancer survivors, or the relationship of sexual concerns to psychosocial adaptation postcancer. This study examined the association between sexual self-esteem and psychosocial concerns in male Veteran cancer survivors. Forty-one male survivors were recruited from a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital to participate in a pilot study addressing cancer survivorship care for Veterans. Sixty- to 90-minute interviews were conducted, assessing s...

  8. Accessing Skills: Assisting Military Veteran Students in the Traditional Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Through Post-911 GI Bill benefits, military veterans are flooding college admissions offices and writing classes at rates not seen since the World War II era. According to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, over 1 million veterans attended colleges and universities between 2009 and 2013; and 53.6 percent of veteran students using benefits applied them toward completing undergraduate work at a college or vocational/technical school (“Annual Benefits Report,” 2011). Clearly, many...

  9. Do medical house officers value the health of veterans differently from the health of non-veterans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhaupt Sara

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available regarding medical residents' perceptions of patients' health-related quality of life. Patients cared for by residents have been shown to receive differing patterns of care at Veterans Affairs facilities than at community or university settings. We therefore examined: 1 how resident physicians value the health of patients; 2 whether values differ if the patient is described as a veteran; and 3 whether residency-associated variables impact values. Methods All medicine residents in a teaching hospital were asked to watch a digital video of an actor depicting a 72-year-old patient with mild-moderate congestive heart failure. Residents were randomized to 2 groups: in one group, the patient was described as a veteran of the Korean War, and in the other, he was referred to only as a male. The respondents assessed the patient's health state using 4 measures: rating scale (RS, time tradeoff (TTO, standard gamble (SG, and willingness to pay (WTP. We also ascertained residents' demographics, risk attitudes, residency program type, post-graduate year level, current rotation, experience in a Veterans Affairs hospital, and how many days it had been since they were last on call. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses using the RS, TTO, SG and WTP as dependent variables. Results Eighty-one residents (89.0% of eligible participated, with 36 (44.4% viewing the video of the veteran and 45 (55.6% viewing the video of the non-veteran. Their mean (SD age was 28.7 (3.1 years; 51.3% were female; and 67.5% were white. There were no differences in residents' characteristics or in RS, TTO, SG and WTP scores between the veteran and non-veteran groups. The mean RS score was 0.60 (0.14; the mean TTO score was 0.80 (0.20; the mean SG score was 0.91 (0.10; and the median (25th, 75th percentile WTP was $10,000 ($7600, $20,000 per year. In multivariable analyses, being a resident in the categorical program was

  10. Physical activity in postdeployment Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine R. Buis, PhD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Veteran activity levels may decrease between Active Duty and postdeployment. We examined attitudes and changes in self-reported activities between the two in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA services. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey (June-August 2008 of postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans registered with the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Descriptive statistics summarized demographic data and attitudes, while regression analyses compared physical activities during Active Duty with physical activities postdeployment. Participants (n = 319, 15.6% response rate reported that they believe staying physically fit is important, they worry about gaining weight, and they believe exercise will keep them healthy (77%, 72%, and 90% agree or strongly agree, respectively. Running (30.0%, Exercise with Gym Equipment (21.5%, Occupational Activities (14.9%, and Walking (13.0% were the most frequently reported Active Duty physical activities. The most frequently reported postdeployment physical activities included Walking (21.1%, Running (18.5%, and Exercise with Gym Equipment (17.9%. Health problems (39% and chronic pain (52% were common barriers to physical activity. Postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans using the VA believe physical activity is beneficial, yet many report health problems and/or chronic pain that makes exercise difficult. Physical activity promotes health, and strategies are needed to facilitate physical activity in this population.

  11. 奥马哈问题分类系统在慢性阻塞性肺疾病住院患者评估中的应用%Application of Omaha System in Assessment of Inpatients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉仪; 王梅; 段鸿露; 刘雪琴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the application of Omaha problem classification system on assessment of inpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Based on Omaha problem classification system, nursing problems of 41 inpatients with COPD were analyzed and summarized. Results Nursing problems of hospitalized COPD patients with the incidence more than 50%were respiration, neuro-musculo-skeletal function, digestion-hydration, circulation, medication regimen and bowel function. Conclusion Omaha problem classification system can promote nursing assessment and the implementation of integrated care.%  目的探讨奥马哈问题分类系统在慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)住院患者评估中的应用。方法以奥马哈问题分类系统为依据,对41例慢性阻塞性肺疾病住院患者的主要护理问题进行分析、归类,找出患者存在的主要护理问题,为临床护理提供依据。结果慢性阻塞性肺疾病患者住院期间护理问题发生率超过50%的为呼吸、神经-肌肉-骨骼功能、消化-水合、药物治疗方案、循环、排便。结论奥马哈问题分类系统在慢性阻塞性肺疾病住院患者评估中的应用,能够促进临床护理的评估和整体护理的实施。

  12. Understanding the student veterans' college experience: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Timothy; Badger, Karen; McCuddy, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Students with active duty military experience are a unique and growing population on college campuses in the United States. This study explores student veterans' perceptions of their transition to and experience in higher education. This mixed methods study used a sample of 10 active military and reserve component student veterans to explore their perceptions of their personal strengths, challenges, factors impacting participation in university resource programs, and suggestions for ideal resources to support their academic success. Content analysis yielded primary themes such as the strength of self-discipline, the challenge of social interactions, and the desire for programs that connect student-veterans and assist with social integration. Implications for education, retention, and transition from active duty are discussed.

  13. An examination of family adjustment among Operation Desert Storm veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Casey T; Schumm, Jeremiah A; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P

    2008-08-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in turn were associated with poorer family adjustment, although these indirect effects did not reach statistical significance. The model for female veterans evidenced a significant direct negative association between combat exposure and family adjustment when it statistically accounted for PTSD symptoms. When the relative impacts of separate PTSD symptom groupings were examined, those reflecting withdrawal/numbing symptoms and arousal/lack of control symptoms significantly and indirectly accounted for the negative effects of combat exposure on family adjustment. Study findings indicate a number of possible pathways through which war-zone deployments negatively impact military families and suggest several avenues for future research. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Veterans' Perspectives on Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie G Minick

    Full Text Available Poor retention in HIV medical care is associated with increased mortality among patients with HIV/AIDS. Developing new interventions to improve retention in HIV primary care is needed. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA is the largest single provider of HIV care in the US. We sought to understand what veterans would want in an intervention to improve retention in VA HIV care. We conducted 18 one-on-one interviews and 15 outpatient focus groups with 46 patients living with HIV infection from the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC (MEDVAMC. Analysis identified three focus areas for improving retention in care: developing an HIV friendly clinic environment, providing mental health and substance use treatment concurrent with HIV care and encouraging peer support from other Veterans with HIV.

  15. Update on TBI and Cognitive Impairment in Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in military life. Interest in military TBI has increased recently due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Certain types of TBI are relatively unique to the military, the most prominent being blast-related TBI. Blast-related mild TBI has been of particular concern in veterans from the most recent conflicts although controversy remains concerning its separation from post-traumatic stress disorder. TBI is also a risk factor for the later development of neurodegenerative diseases in which cognitive impairment is prominent putting veterans at risk for disorders including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Recent evidence associating TBI with chronic cognitive impairment is reviewed in the context of its relevance to military veterans.

  16. Comfort Theory: Unraveling the Complexities of Veterans' Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudiab, Lina Daou; Kolcaba, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    The health care needs of veterans, especially those who have served in combat zones and their families are complicated, challenging, and interrelated. Physical limitations impact mental health, and mental health problems affect every aspect of adjustment to civilian life. Comfort theory offers a simple and holistic pattern for identifying needs, creating interventions to meet those needs, and evaluating the effects of those interventions. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how comfort theory has been applied throughout 1 Veterans Administration System to fulfill the goal of providing quality veteran-centric care. The application of comfort theory to daily patient and family care, discharge planning, and follow-up in various settings, as well as ways to enhance institutional integrity and branding are discussed.

  17. 77 FR 76170 - Presumption of Exposure to Herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Not Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD). Numerous adverse health effects in veterans who served in... Brown Water Navy Veterans had qualitatively more pathways of exposure to Agent Orange-associated TCDD... to Agent Orange-associated TCDD and, therefore, that exposure of Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans...

  18. 78 FR 77204 - Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys... ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys)'' in any... National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW (VA...

  19. 5 CFR 335.106 - Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... veterans under merit promotion. 335.106 Section 335.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROMOTION AND INTERNAL PLACEMENT General Provisions § 335.106 Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion. Preference eligibles or veterans who...

  20. 76 FR 40451 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-- Change of Address Statement.... 2900-0503.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address... continued ownership of property issued under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance when an address change for...

  1. 78 FR 58264 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life... Insurance (SGLI), Family SGLI, SGLI Traumatic Injury Protection, and Veterans' Group Life Insurance (all...-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information...

  2. 75 FR 68038 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control... complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) or to provide information...

  3. 76 FR 40455 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry, VA Form 29-0543. OMB Control Number: 2900-0501... insured under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) completes VA Form 29-0543 to report any...

  4. 75 FR 68040 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  5. 75 FR 52065 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  6. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0811 TITLE: Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Members and Veterans with SCI PRINCIPAL...criteria to include all veterans as well as civilians. 8 Products DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PAPER Long-term community reintegration ...2014 Presentation on rehabilitation outcomes and community reintegration experiences of servicemembers and veterans with extremity amputation or

  7. Unruly Bodies: The Rhetorical Domestication of Twenty-First-Century Veterans of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Veterans of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with visually identifiable injuries possess "unruly" bodies that render the story of war in efficient, emotional terms. The injured veteran's explicit connection of war with injury motivates state and mainstream news discourse that domesticates veterans' bodies, managing representations of injured veterans…

  8. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  9. 78 FR 50145 - Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Freedom House, patient aligned care teams, and the Women's Health Center of Excellence. On August 21, the... Veterans with respect to health care, rehabilitation, compensation, outreach, and other programs and... Veteran Program, the Women Veterans Health Committee, the Women's Health Collaborative Workgroup,...

  10. 75 FR 26683 - Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released From Incarceration to Transitional Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...-26685] [FR Doc No: 2010-11177] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN41 Hospital and... its regulations to authorize VA to provide hospital and outpatient care to a veteran in a program that... 2900-AN41 Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released from Incarceration to Transitional...

  11. The Disappeared Ones: Female Student Veterans at a Four-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzman, Amy Claire; Somers, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the military draft in 1973, women have entered military service in greater numbers: Women currently account for 16 percent of active-duty service personnel; by 2035, they will account for 15 percent of the total veteran population (National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics 2011). The profile of female veterans differs…

  12. Online Training for Working with Student Veterans: A Social Work Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Wright, Micah C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one school of social work's innovative online elective course to prepare Masters of Social Work (MSW) students for practice with the military, veterans and their families. Developed as part of a university-wide Veterans Initiative, this online course keeps the focus on the student veteran and uses the best practices of…

  13. Considering Student Veterans on the Twenty-First-Century College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The new GI Bill offers the best educational benefits for veterans in the history of the nation. While many campus officials believe a surge of student veterans is under way, 2012 is the first year of college eligibility for veterans who enlisted specifically for the Post 9-11 GI Bill benefits signed into law in the summer of 2008. Further, the…

  14. 78 FR 36309 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... diagnosing and treating Gulf War Veterans, and a drug treatment trial which is underway. On June 18, the... AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting The Department of... Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on June 17 and 18, 2013, in room...

  15. A Longitudinal Analysis of Rural and Urban Veterans' Health-Related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Amy E.; Lee, Richard; MacKenzie, Todd A.; West, Alan N.; Wright, Steven; Booth, Brenda M.; Hawthorne, Kara; Weeks, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Cross-sectional studies have identified rural-urban disparities in veterans' health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) scores. Purpose: To determine whether longitudinal analyses confirmed that these disparities in veterans' HRQOL scores persisted. Methods: We obtained data from the SF-12 portion of the veterans health administration's…

  16. 75 FR 8789 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Carnegie Hotel, 1216 West State of Franklin Road, Johnson City, Tennessee. The sessions will begin at 8...

  17. 77 FR 58913 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee will hold a meeting on October 25-26, 2012, at the Waterfront Place Hotel,...

  18. 76 FR 60965 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Hotel, 363 Maine Mall Road, Portland, ME. The sessions will begin at 8 a.m. each day and adjourn at 4...

  19. The Comorbidity of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Suicidality in Vietnam Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Teresa L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 232 Vietnam veterans for suicidal thinking and behaviors and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Findings support notion that suicidal thoughts are prevalent in this group, with veterans in psychotherapy reporting greater likelihood of such symptoms than veterans in community or those seeking assistance through…

  20. Military Veterans Bring Many Positives--and Some Needs--into Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Janis Newby; Gordon, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Public schools have hired over 17,000 veterans who have participated in Troops to Teachers (TTT), a federal program designed to assist those leaving careers in the military to transition into teacher careers. Despite some educators' bias against former service members, the advantages of hiring veterans as teachers are manifold. Veterans typically…

  1. 20 CFR 404.1360 - Veterans Administration pension or compensation payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterans Administration pension or... Veterans Administration pension or compensation payable. (a) Before we determine and certify payment. If we are informed by the Veterans Administration that a pension or compensation is payable to you before we...

  2. 38 CFR 3.712 - Improved pension elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. 3.712 Section 3.712 Pensions, Bonuses, and... spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. (a) General. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War... and attendance. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War veteran who is receiving or entitled...

  3. 48 CFR 852.203-71 - Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Veterans Affairs hotline poster. 852.203-71 Section 852.203-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 852.203-71 Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster. As prescribed in 803.7001, insert the following clause: Display of Department of Veterans Affairs Hotline Poster...

  4. 38 CFR 21.402 - Responsibilities of the Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities of the Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation. 21.402 Section 21.402 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans..., United States Code. (b) Submission of an annual report. The committee shall: (1) Submit to the...

  5. 76 FR 15055 - Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... updates on the roles of the advisory committee, ethics, ] Center for Minority Veterans, Office of Policy... Administration. In the morning on April 6, the Committee will have a panel discussion with Center for Women... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs...

  6. 76 FR 78569 - Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO05 Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans... to provide certain health care services to a newborn child of a woman veteran who is receiving... woman veteran who is receiving maternity care furnished by for not more than seven days after the...

  7. 38 CFR 3.20 - Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surviving spouse's... General § 3.20 Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death. (a) Where the veteran died on or... indemnity compensation otherwise payable for the surviving spouse for the month in which the death...

  8. Veterans Health Administration: Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long standing Human Capital Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    required by the Choice Act: the Independent Assessment of the Health Care Delivery Systems and Management Processes of the Department of Veterans...VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long-standing Human Capital...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-17-30, a report to congressional requesters December 2016 VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

  9. Department of Veterans Affairs' Implementation of Information Security Education Assistance Program. GAO-10-170R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshusen, Gregory C.; Melvin, Valerie C.

    2009-01-01

    The Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006 authorizes the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to establish an educational assistance program for information security. The Information Security Education Assistance Program is envisioned as a means for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to attract and retain individuals…

  10. 38 CFR 21.6519 - Eligibility of qualified veterans for employment and counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... veterans for employment and counseling services. 21.6519 Section 21.6519 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... employment and counseling services. (a) General. A qualified veteran for whom vocational rehabilitation and achievenment of a vocational goal are reasonably feasible may be provided the employment and...

  11. Case-control study: posttraumatic stress disorder and habits of war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalihić, Amra; Skobić, Helena; Pejanović-Skobić, Natasa

    2008-03-01

    To correlate habits (abuse of tobacco, alcohol, psychoactive substances and drugs) of war veterans and the frequency of symptoms in persons with PTSD and those without it. We have carried out a prospective research (case-control study) over the period between September of 2005 and June 2006. The sample consisted of two groups of examinees: 60 males, war veterans with PTSD and 60 males, war veterans without PTSD. The group of war veterans without PTSD was formed using matching criteria (same age, level of education). Both groups included married males. Research was performed using a questionnaire designed for this study. A higher number of war veterans without PTSD were employed compared to war veterans with PTSD (chi2=45.753; df=4; pwar veterans with PTSD used psychoactive substances during the war period compared to war veterans without PTSD (18.3% vs. 3.3%). We have observed that 85% of examinees with PTSD have used anxiolitic drugs in the period of research, compared to only 5% of those without PTSD (chi2=77.576; df=1; Pwar veterans without PTSD had employment in comparison to the group of war veterans with PTSD. A higher number of war veterans with PTSD had some form of sleeping disorder, used psychoactive substances and anxiolitic drugs during the war period, and had alcohol abuse in comparison to the group of war veterans without PTSD.

  12. Using a Cognitive Information Processing Approach to Group Career Counseling with Visually Impaired Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lauren K.

    2014-01-01

    Unemployment continues to be a growing concern among both civilian and veteran populations. As 14% of the veteran population currently identify as disabled because of service, this population's need for specialized vocational rehabilitation is increasing. Specifically in Veterans Affairs (VA) Blind Rehabilitation Centers (BRC) where holistic…

  13. 奥马哈系统在社区脑卒中溶栓患者康复护理中的应用%Omaha System in the Community Stroke Rehabilitation Care in Patients with Thrombolytic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯梅; 何倩; 杜洁

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨奥马哈系统在社区脑卒中溶栓患者康复护理中的应用。方法:收集2012年3月-2014年5月因脑卒中在本社区附近三甲医院进行溶栓治疗的本社区患者95例,患者出院后1个月内在本社区医院社康中心进行康复护理干预,均行3次社区家庭访视,采用奥马哈系统评估护理问题,并在实施针对性干预后对患者从认知方面进行结局评价。结果:脑卒中溶栓患者经家庭访视得知,在认知结局中,住宅、排便功、营养以及药物治疗方面,首次家访和第三次家访差异并不显著,在其他项目方面差异均比较显著(P0.05),while the differences were relatively significant in other projects(P<0.05).Conclusion:After the rehabilitation nursing intervention is performed in stroke thromboysis patients within one month after the discharge,the Omaha system makes evaluations of patient’s cognition. This method can clearly definite the intervention effect and provide a basis for evaluating the rehabilitation nursing intervention.

  14. Disabled Veteran Leave and Other Miscellaneous Changes. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    The Office of Personnel Management is issuing final regulations to implement the Wounded Warriors Federal Leave Act of 2015, which establishes a separate new leave category, to be known as "disabled veteran leave," available during a 12-month period beginning on the first day of employment to be used by an employee who is a veteran with a service-connected disability rated at 30 percent or more for purposes of undergoing medical treatment for such disability. We are also rescinding two obsolete leave-related regulations.

  15. Variations in Health Communication Needs Among Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Aaron I.; Lincoln, Andrew E.; Curbow, Barbara; Kang, Han K.

    2004-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study of US military combat veterans, we assessed the helpfulness of different media for providing health risk communication messages. We have provided preliminary results from a postal survey of 5000 veterans sampled because of their deployment to Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, or Bosnia–Kosovo. Respondents endorsed the primary care provider as the most helpful source of health information. Access to the Internet and use of this medium for seeking health information differed by race, age, and cohort. PMID:15569954

  16. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ping Tan; Lin-Qi Zhu; Jun Zhang; Shi-Min Zhang; Xiao-Yang Lan; Bo Cui; Yu-Cheng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background:The awareness,treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China,whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years.Therefore,investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general population.Methods:A cross-sectional survey was conducted among veterans ≥60 years old in veteran communities in Beijing.The awareness of preventive strategies against dementia,Alzheimer's disease (AD),Parkinson's disease (PD),sleep disorders,cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and CCD such as hypertension,and the approaches used to access this information,including media,word of mouth (verbal communication among the elderly) and health care professionals,were investigated via face-to-face interviews.Results:The awareness rates for CCD and CVD were approximately 100%,but that forAD was the lowest at <10%.The awareness rates for sleep disorders,PD and dementia,were 51.0-89.4%.Media was the most commonly selected mode of communication by which veterans acquired knowledge about CCD and CVD.Media was used by approximately 80% of veterans.Both health care professionals and word of mouth were used by approximately 50% of veterans.With respect to the source of information about CDND excluding AD,the rates of the use of health care professionals,word of mouth and media were 10.6-28.2%,56.5-76.5%,and approximately 50%,respectively.Conclusions:The awareness of CDND among elderly veterans was significantly lower than that of CCD.More information about CDND should be disseminated by health care professionals.Appropriate guidance will promote the rapid and extensive dissemination of information about the prevention of CDND by media and word-of-mouth peer education.

  17. Mindfulness meditation for veterans---implications for occupational health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2008-08-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

  18. The Association Between Primary Source of Healthcare Coverage and Colorectal Cancer Screening Among US Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Folasade P; Yano, Elizabeth M; Provenzale, Dawn; Neil Steers, W; Washington, Donna L

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a deadly but largely preventable disease. Screening improves outcomes, but screening rates vary across healthcare coverage models. In the Veterans Health Administration (VA), screening rates are high; however, it is unknown how CRC screening rates compare for Veterans with other types of healthcare coverage. To determine whether Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (VA, military, TRICARE) have higher rates of CRC screening than Veterans with alternate sources of healthcare coverage. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of Veterans 50-75 years from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We examined CRC screening rates and screening modalities. We performed multivariable logistic regression to identify the role of coverage type, demographics, and clinical factors on screening status. The cohort included 22,138 Veterans. Of these, 76.7% reported up-to-date screening. Colonoscopy was the most common screening modality (83.7%). Screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (82.3%), as was stool-based screening (10.8%). The adjusted odds of up-to-date screening among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage were 83% higher than among Veterans with private coverage (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.52-2.22). Additional predictors of screening included older age, black race, high income, access to medical care, frequent medical visits, and employed or married status. CRC screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage. High CRC screening rates among US Veterans may be related to system-level characteristics of VA and military care. Insight to these system-level characteristics may inform mechanisms to improve CRC screening in non-VA settings.

  19. 38 CFR 74.4 - Who does CVE consider to control a veteran-owned small business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the applicant or participant. (h) Non-veterans who transfer majority stock ownership or control of the... control a veteran-owned small business? 74.4 Section 74.4 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... does CVE consider to control a veteran-owned small business? (a) Control means both the day-to-day...

  20. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult...

  1. Rooted in the Community: Assessing the Reintegration Impacts of Agriculture on Rural Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterman-Dahan, Karen; Chavez, Margeaux; Njoh, Eni

    2017-08-23

    To assess the impact of a Veteran-oriented community agricultural initiative (CAI) on transitioning rural Veterans. Convergent mixed-method program evaluation. A Veteran-oriented farm-to-market CAI in rural Washington State. Veterans who were members of the CAI. Health, well-being, and reintegration were assessed by self-reported data from interview, demographic survey, validated health quality of life measure (Veterans RAND-12 -VR-12), validated reintegration measure (Military to Civilian Questionnaire -M2C-Q), and general satisfaction survey. Veteran participants were primarily Caucasian (88.4%, n=38) and male (74.4%, n=32) and most had a service-connected disability rating (58.2%, n=25). Qualitative and quantitative data revealed that the veterans participating in this CAI experienced health and reintegration benefits. Results on the M2C-Q, VR-12, and the satisfaction survey suggest that participating in this CAI contributed to improved mental, physical, and emotional health and vocational skills, community connectedness, and interpersonal communication. Qualitative interviews supported quantitative findings and revealed that participating in the CAI provided Veterans with a sense of satisfaction, belonging, and helped decrease the stigma surrounding their Veteran status. Veterans who participate in this CAI reported general improvements in physical and mental health, including improvements in sleep, nutrition, exercise, and decreases in anxiety, pain, depression and medication and substance use, all known factors which impact Veteran reintegration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Racial differences in veterans' satisfaction with examination of disability from posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Marc I; Afshartous, David R; Nwosu, Samuel; Scott, Melanie C; Jackson, James C; Marx, Brian P; Murdoch, Maureen; Sinnott, Patricia L; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-04-01

    The examination that determines if a veteran has service-connected posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects veterans' lives for years. This study examined factors potentially associated with veterans' perception of their examination's quality. Veterans (N=384) being evaluated for an initial PTSD service-connection claim were randomly assigned to receive either a semistructured interview or the examiner's usual interview. Immediately after the interview, veterans completed confidential ratings of the examinations' quality and of their examiners' interpersonal qualities and competence. Extensive data characterizing the veterans, the 33 participating examiners, and the examinations themselves were collected. Forty-seven percent of Caucasian veterans and 34% of African-American veterans rated their examination quality as excellent. African Americans were less likely than Caucasians to assign a higher quality rating (odds ratio=.61, 95% confidence interval=.38-.99, p=.047). Compared with Caucasians, African Americans rated their examiners as having significantly worse interpersonal qualities but not lower competence. Ratings were not significantly related to the veterans' age, gender, marital status, eventual diagnosis of PTSD, Global Assessment of Functioning score, the examiner's perception of the prevalence of malingering, or the presence of a third party during the examination. Ratings of disability examinations were generally high, although ratings were less favorable among African-American veterans than among Caucasian veterans.

  3. An innovative approach to treating combat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    Suicide rates among military personnel had a significant drop in 2013, but there is no evidence of a drop among veterans. The problem of suicide among combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a source of concern. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs are now calling for innovative treatment approaches to the problem. A short-term psychodynamic therapy presented here may be able to fill that need by dissipating the guilt from veterans' combat-related actions that leads to suicidal behavior. The treatment showed promise of success with veterans of the war in Vietnam. Preliminary work with combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates that it may be equally successful in treating them. Basic aspects of the psychodynamic approach could be incorporated into current therapies and should improve their ability to treat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

  4. Telerehabilitation for Veterans with Combat Related TBI/PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    signed by a proxy. Veterans and/or care givers must also possess basic computer literacy such as being able to access a web page and making entrees in...with Combat Related TBI/PTSD RTO-MP-HFM-205 15 - 7 or intervention ( diabetes , CHF, dementia etc), our cohort exhibits a very diverse population in

  5. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ping Tan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The awareness of CDND among elderly veterans was significantly lower than that of CCD. More information about CDND should be disseminated by health care professionals. Appropriate guidance will promote the rapid and extensive dissemination of information about the prevention of CDND by media and word-of-mouth peer education.

  6. How Military Service Affects Student Veteran Success at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Patrick C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly more service members are separating from the military as the United States draws down the force and moves towards a post-war era. Tens of thousands of these veterans will leverage their GI Bill tuition and housing benefits in an attempt to access Southern California community colleges and bolster their transition into mainstream…

  7. Millennial Combat Veterans: How Identity Shapes Experience in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Shane Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build upon the growing foundational base of knowledge on the academic and social transitions of student combat veterans and contribute to a greater theoretical understanding of this population and how their perception of identity may influence their experience as college students. The researcher conducted a…

  8. Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottley, Alford H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

  9. Personalized Medicine in Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    the altered regulation of select small nucleo - lar RNA and miRNA that we ob- served in PBMCs of veteran mTBI cases might have implica- tions in the...Sullivan JM. Mi- croRNA132 modulates short-term synaptic plasticity but not basal release probability in hippocampal neurons. PLoS One 2010; 5: e15182

  10. Abuse of war zone detainees: veterans' perceptions of acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William C; Gariti, Katherine O; Sadeghi, Leila; Joisa, Sowmya D

    2007-02-01

    We assessed detainee abuse acceptance and variables associated with it. Outpatients from a veterans' hospital were administered questionnaires with three increasingly severe scenarios of a U.S. soldier abusing a detainee. Three questionnaire versions differed in the final line of each version's scenarios, describing abuse either as: soldier initiated, superior ordered, or wrong by a "whistleblower" soldier. Three hundred fifty-one veterans participated, 80% with service during the Vietnam War. Zero tolerance for abuse--"completely unacceptable" regardless of who the detainee was--increased with abuse severity (16% for exposure, 31% for humiliation, and 48% for rape of detainee) and with soldier initiation. The strongest, most consistently significant odds were of depressed veterans, veterans with comorbid depression/post-traumatic stress disorder, and men being approximately 2, 3, and 4 to 20 times more tolerant of abuse than those without depression/post-traumatic stress disorder and women, respectively. There may be potential value to using similar scenario-based questionnaires to study active duty military perceptions of detainee abuse. Results may inform prevention policies.

  11. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 724 - Veterans' Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (1) of this subsection, such personal shall be entitled to an appearance before the... effect of, (1) providing any unique or special advantage to veterans awarded general or honorable... not make any claim to recover the value of any benefits provided to such person prior to such earliest...

  12. Supporting Military Veteran Students: Early Lessons from Kohlberg Prize Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Klempin, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education participation is critical for military-connected individuals as they transition back to civilian life. The Kisco Foundation's Kohlberg Prize, a competitive grant awarded in 2015 and 2016, is aimed at making community colleges more welcoming and better able to meet the needs of veteran students. This review details the early…

  13. Veteran Transfer Students and Concealed Weapons on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesetski, Christine; Ofstein, Jennifer; Outlaw, Stacy; Brooks, Racheal

    2014-01-01

    This case details the challenges faced by various members of a 4-year university regarding Kathryn, a non-traditional transfer student and military veteran who recently returned from a traumatic deployment in Afghanistan. Precisely, this study identifies ambiguities pertaining to (a) threat assessment, (b) university weapons policies, (c) transfer…

  14. A Proactive Approach to Serving Military and Veteran Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Tracey L.; Schma, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post 9/11 GI Bill in August 2009, Veterans Affairs anticipated a 25% increase in the number of service members who would enroll in higher education (Student Affairs Leadership Council, 2009). Between fall 2005 and spring 2010 semesters, Western Michigan University (WMU; Kalamazoo, MI) experienced a 43% boom, from just…

  15. How Military Service Affects Student Veteran Success at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Patrick C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly more service members are separating from the military as the United States draws down the force and moves towards a post-war era. Tens of thousands of these veterans will leverage their GI Bill tuition and housing benefits in an attempt to access Southern California community colleges and bolster their transition into mainstream…

  16. Academic Advisors of Military and Student Veterans: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, there is an influx of active-duty military and student veterans enrolling in postsecondary and graduate-level education. The role of an academic advisor increases significantly with this influx of enrollment. The purpose of this study was to determine how a graduate-level academic advisor perceives…

  17. Psychosocial and Moral Development of PTSD-Diagnosed Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John G.; Baker, Stanley B.

    2007-01-01

    Two related studies were conducted in order to investigate whether psychosocial and moral development appeared to have been disrupted and arrested in veterans diagnosed as having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 was devoted to developing a measure of late adolescence, early adulthood, and adulthood stages of psychosocial…

  18. Improving Performance through Knowledge Translation in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Joseph; Perlin, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) provides a case study for linking performance measurement, information technology, and aligned research efforts to facilitate quality improvement in a large, complex health system. Dialogue between clinical researchers and VA leaders occurs through structured activities (e.g., the Quality Enhancement…

  19. Trauma and Substance Use Disorders in Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David L.; Wilkinson, Jamie; Paradis, Bryce; Kelley, Stephanie; Naseem, Ahsan; Grant, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Disparities in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of multiple mental health conditions have been described between rural and urban populations. However, there is limited information regarding differences in exposure to trauma and trauma-related mental health conditions in these populations. Given the number of veterans who are…

  20. 77 FR 45477 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... the defining moments of the Cold War. Today, on the 59th anniversary of the Military Armistice Agreement signed at Panmunjom, we honor all who served in the Korean War, and we pay lasting tribute to the... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8844 of July 27, 2012 National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2012 By...

  1. The formation of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the substantiation of the algorithm of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity formation, each of its steps. Purposeful formation of judoka technical actions individual arsenal using the proposed algorithm (7 stages is implemented on the basis of the identification, a subsequent in-depth development and improvement of the best techniques.

  2. Veteran Transfer Students and Concealed Weapons on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesetski, Christine; Ofstein, Jennifer; Outlaw, Stacy; Brooks, Racheal

    2014-01-01

    This case details the challenges faced by various members of a 4-year university regarding Kathryn, a non-traditional transfer student and military veteran who recently returned from a traumatic deployment in Afghanistan. Precisely, this study identifies ambiguities pertaining to (a) threat assessment, (b) university weapons policies, (c) transfer…

  3. Combat veterans and the death penalty: a forensic neuropsychiatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortzel, Hal S; Arciniegas, David B

    2010-01-01

    With our nation's present conflicts, a new generation of veterans are returning home, many of whom have substantial psychopathology and are encountering significant barriers in accessing care. Headlines from around the nation reflect that some of these wounded warriors go on to commit offenses that are potentially punishable by death. Existing circumstances speak to the urgency with which the subject of combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both facing capital crimes ought to be addressed. This publicity has led to a recent call for a legislatively or judicially enacted, narrow, categorical exclusion for combat veterans who were affected by either PTSD or TBI at the time of their capital offenses. In the present article, we illustrate the reality that combat veterans who commit capital offenses may face execution, summarize legal arguments offered in favor of a categorical exclusion, and provide a neuropsychiatric perspective on PTSD, TBI, and aggression, to help inform further dialogue on this weighty subject.

  4. Trauma and Substance Use Disorders in Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David L.; Wilkinson, Jamie; Paradis, Bryce; Kelley, Stephanie; Naseem, Ahsan; Grant, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Disparities in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of multiple mental health conditions have been described between rural and urban populations. However, there is limited information regarding differences in exposure to trauma and trauma-related mental health conditions in these populations. Given the number of veterans who are…

  5. 78 FR 46245 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... prosperous peace. In six decades, the Republic of Korea has become one of the world's largest economies and... ago, and the men and women who preserve it today. So as we mark this milestone, let us offer a special salute to our Korean War veterans. Let us renew the sacred trust we share with all who have served. And...

  6. Optimizing strategies to improve interprofessional practice for veterans, part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya SB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shelley B Bhattacharya,1–3 Michelle I Rossi,1,2 Jennifer M Mentz11Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC, Veteran's Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, 2University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Albert Schweitzer Fellowship Program, Pittsburgh, PA, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional patient care is a well-recognized path that health care systems are striving toward. The Veteran's Affairs (VA system initiated interprofessional practice (IPP models with their Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM programs. GEM programs incorporate a range of specialties, including but not limited to, medicine, nursing, social work, physical therapy and pharmacy, to collaboratively evaluate veterans. Despite being a valuable resource, they are now faced with significant cut-backs, including closures. The primary goal of this project was to assess how the GEM model could be optimized at the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania VA to allow for the sustainability of this important IPP assessment. Part 1 of the study evaluated the IPP process using program, patient, and family surveys. Part 2 examined how well the geriatrician matched patients to specialists in the GEM model. This paper describes Part 1 of our study.Methods: Three strategies were used: 1 a national GEM program survey; 2 a veteran/family satisfaction survey; and 3 an absentee assessment.Results: Twenty-six of 92 programs responded to the GEM IPP survey. Six strategies were shared to optimize IPP models throughout the country. Of the 34 satisfaction surveys, 80% stated the GEM clinic was beneficial, 79% stated their concerns were addressed, and 100% would recommend GEM to their friends. Of the 24 absentee assessments, the top three reasons for missing the appointments were transportation, medical illnesses, and not knowing/remembering about the appointment. Absentee rate diminished from 41% to 19% after instituting a reminder phone call policy.Discussion: Maintaining the

  7. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Matthew L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS, a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans.

  8. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients’ military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty. PMID:26664252

  9. Changes in Suicide Mortality for Veterans and Nonveterans by Gender and History of VHA Service Use, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmire, Claire A; Kemp, Janet E; Bossarte, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Veterans are believed to be at high risk of suicide. However, research comparing suicide rates between veterans and nonveterans is limited, and even less is known regarding differences by history of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) service use. This study directly compared veteran and nonveteran suicide risk while for the first time differentiating veterans by VHA service use. The cross-sectional study analyzed data from 173,969 adult suicide decedents from 23 states (2000-2010) included in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs suicide data archive. Annual standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for veterans compared with nonveterans and for veterans who used VHA services compared with veterans who did not, overall and separately for males and females. After the analysis controlled for age and gender differences, the number of observed veteran suicides was approximately 20% higher than expected in 2000 (SMR=1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.28), and this increased to 60% higher by 2010 (SMR=1.63, CI=1.58-1.68). The elevated risk for female veterans (2010 SMR=5.89) was higher than that observed for male veterans (2010 SMR=1.54). Trends for non-VHA-utilizing veterans mirrored those of the veteran population as a whole, and the SMR for VHA-utilizing veterans declined. Since 2003, the number of suicides among VHA-utilizing veterans was less than expected when compared directly with the suicide rate among non-VHA-utilizing veterans. Veterans are members of the community and, as such, are an important part of observed increases in U.S. suicide rates. Not all veterans are at equal or increasing risk of suicide, however. VHA-utilizing veterans appear to have declining absolute and relative suicide rates.

  10. Reproductive health and pregnancy outcomes among French gulf war veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bégassat Marion

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1993, many studies on the health of Persian Gulf War veterans (PGWVs have been undertaken. Some authors have concluded that an association exists between Gulf War service and reported infertility or miscarriage, but that effects on PGWV's children were limited. The present study's objective was to describe the reproductive outcome and health of offspring of French Gulf War veterans. Methods The French Study on the Persian Gulf War (PGW and its Health Consequences is an exhaustive cross-sectional study on all French PGWVs conducted from 2002 to 2004. Data were collected by postal self-administered questionnaire. A case-control study nested in this cohort was conducted to evaluate the link between PGW-related exposures and fathering a child with a birth defect. Results In the present study, 9% of the 5,666 Gulf veterans who participated reported fertility disorders, and 12% of male veterans reported at least one miscarriage among their partners after the PGW. Overall, 4.2% of fathers reported at least one child with a birth defect conceived after the mission. No PGW-related exposure was associated with any birth defect in children fathered after the PGW mission. Concerning the reported health of children born after the PGW, 1.0% of children presented a pre-term delivery and 2.7% a birth defect. The main birth defects reported were musculoskeletal malformations (0.5% and urinary system malformations (0.3%. Birth defect incidence in PGWV children conceived after the mission was similar to birth defect incidence described by the Paris Registry of Congenital Malformations, except for Down syndrome (PGWV children incidence was lower than Registry incidence. Conclusion This study did not highlight a high frequency of fertility disorders or miscarriage among French PGW veterans. We found no evidence for a link between paternal exposure during the Gulf War and increased risk of birth defects among French PGWV children.

  11. Comparing strategies for United States veterans' mortality ascertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asch Steven M

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to determine optimal strategies for complete mortality ascertainment comparing death certificates and United States (US Veterans Administration (VA records. Methods We constructed a cohort of California veterans who died in fiscal year (FY 2000 and used VA services the year before death. We determined decedent status using California death certificates linked to VA utilization data and the VA Beneficiary Identification and Records Locator System (BIRLS death file. We compared the characteristics of decedents who would not have been identified by either single source (e.g., VA BIRLS alone or California death certificates alone with the rest of the cohort. Results A total of 8,813 veteran decedents were identified from both VA decedent files and death certificates. Of all decedents, 5,698 / 8,813 (65% veterans were identified in both source files, but 2,426 / 8,813 (28% decedents were not identified in VA BIRLS, and 689 / 8,813 (8% were not identified in death certificates. Compared to the rest of the cohort, decedents whose mortality status was ascertained through either single source differed by race / ethnicity, marital status, and California residence. Clinically, veterans identified from either single source had less comorbidity and were less likely to have been users of VA inpatient or long term care, but equally or more likely to have been users of VA outpatient services. Conclusion As single sources, VA decedent files and death certificates each provided an incomplete record, and death ascertainment was improved by using both source files. Potential bias may vary depending on analytic interest.

  12. Effect of center-based counseling for veterans and veterans' families on long-term mental health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Meaghan; Varker, Tracey; Perry, Desmond; Phelps, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS), established by the Australian government, plays a pivotal role in providing mental health services to veterans and their families. This research explored the impact of center-based psychological counseling on depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use severity. A stratified sample of VVCS clients were invited to participate in this study. Data were collected on intake to the program, at the fifth counseling session, and 12 months after the commencement of counseling. Repeated-measures general linear model analyses were conducted to examine the impact of center-based counseling on depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol severity over time. VVCS center-based counseling resulted in a significant reduction in depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use severity after five sessions, and these improvements were maintained over the next 12 months. Despite these improvements, however, participants continued to report moderate-to-severe levels of mental health problems. VVCS center-based counseling successfully reduced depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use symptom severity of veterans and their families. However, the clinical profiles of this population are often complex and challenges remain in terms of addressing the mental health needs of this group.

  13. Are Student Veterans a Traditional, Nontraditional, or Special Population? A Study of Veterans on the Auburn University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, Stephen Prescott

    2011-01-01

    This non-experimental study used, with the Educational Testing Service's permission, an updated 1946 Student Opinion Questionnaire (originally designed to compare WWII veterans and nonveterans) to collect data regarding student backgrounds, attitudes and motives, worries and concerns, use of time, and perceptions of respect concerning nonveterans,…

  14. Comparison Study of Memory Status in War-PTSD Veterans With Depression and Non- Veterans Depressed Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvari SS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive problems in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD include poor concentration and impaired memory. Prevalence of PTSD in all aspects of life is 8% in USA. Regarding the importance of memory in functional levels, this study was performed to review memory status in these patients. Methods: Fifty male war veterans with PTSD and major depression and 50 male non-veterans with depression participated in this study performed at psychiatric outpatient ward in Baqiyatallah hospital during 2008-2009. The patients met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Depression severity, sex, age, educational level, and marital status were matched in both groups. A psychologist completed demographic and Mississippi questionnaires, PTSD checklist (PCL, beck depression Inventory and wechsler memory scale. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 11.0. A P-value smaller than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: The mean age of the veterans and non-veterans was 43.9±4.7 and 42±9.4 years, respectively. Memory status did not differ between the two groups (P>0.05. There was no statistically significant correlation between duration and severity of PTSD with memory impairment (P>0.05. A negative correlation was found between personal and general information with re-experiencing in the veterans (P<0.05. Impaired memory was correlated with age greater than 45, educational level lower than high school diploma, severity of depression and longer participation in war. Conclusion: Although both PTSD and major depression affected memory, but memory status did not differ between patients with PTSD and depression and patients with chronic depression.

  15. Exploring Rural Disparities in Medical Diagnoses Among Veterans With Transgender-related Diagnoses Utilizing Veterans Health Administration Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Leigh A; Blosnich, John; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Gordon, Adam J

    2017-09-01

    Research shows transgender individuals experience pronounced health disparities compared with their nontransgender peers. Yet, there remains insufficient research about health differences within transgender populations. This study seeks to fill this gap by exploring how current urban/rural status is associated with lifetime diagnosis of mood disorder, alcohol dependence disorder, illicit drug abuse disorder, tobacco use, posttraumatic stress disorder, human immunodeficiency virus, and suicidal ideation or attempt among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. This study used a retrospective review of The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data for transgender patients who received VA care from 1997 through 2014. Transgender patients were defined as individuals that had a lifetime diagnosis of any of 4 International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis codes associated with transgender status. Independent multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations of rural status with medical conditions. Veterans with transgender-related diagnoses residing in small/isolated rural towns had increased odds of tobacco use disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.39; 95% confidence intervals, 1.09-1.78) and posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.33; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03-1.71) compared with their urban transgender peers. Urban/rural status was not significantly associated with other medical conditions of interest. This study contributes the first empirical investigations of how place of residence is associated with medical diagnoses among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. The importance of place as a determinant of health is increasingly clear, but for veterans with transgender-related diagnoses this line of research is currently limited. The addition of self-reported sex identity data within VA electronic health records is one way to advance this line of research.

  16. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  17. The use of VA Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance among working-aged veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Janet M; London, Andrew S; Heflin, Colleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although there is substantial disability among veterans, relatively little is known about working-aged veterans' uptake of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). This study identifies levels of veteran participation in VA disability and/or DI benefit programs, examines transitions into and out of VA and DI programs among veterans, and estimates the size and composition of the veteran population receiving VA and/or DI benefits over time. Data from the 1992, 1993, 1996, 2001, 2004, and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) are used to describe VA and DI program participation among veterans under the age of 65. The majority of working-aged veterans do not receive VA or DI benefits and joint participation is low, but use of these programs has increased over time. A higher percentage of veterans receive VA compensation, which ranges from 4.9% in 1992 to 13.2% in 2008, than DI compensation, which ranges from 2.9% in 1992 to 6.7% in 2008. The rate of joint participation ranges from less than 1% in 1992 to 3.6% in 2008. Veterans experience few transitions between VA and DI programs during the 36-48 months they are observed. The number of veterans receiving benefits from VA and/or DI nearly doubled between 1992 and 2008. There have been substantial shifts in the composition of veterans using these programs, as cohorts who served prior to 1964 are replaced by those who served after 1964. The findings suggest potential gaps in veterans' access to disability programs that might be addressed through improved coordination of VA and DI benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Report to Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs and Joint Standing Committee on Veteran and Legal Affairs: Student Veterans (PL 2015, Chapter 465)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhauser, Derek P.

    2017-01-01

    Because The Maine Community College System (MCCS) is aware of that fact that student veterans and those veterans seeking to enroll in college have specific needs, each of the colleges in the MCCS system is working to develop and strengthen target responses to meet those needs. The Maine Community College System is therefore providing this report…

  19. Nightmare reduction in a Vietnam veteran using imagery rehearsal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Kate L; Means, Melanie K; Edinger, Jack D

    2010-10-15

    Following exposure to traumatic events, approximately 19% of combat veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder. One of the main symptoms of this mental illness is reexperiencing the trauma, which is commonly expressed in the form of chronic trauma-related nightmares. In these patients, nightmares can fragment sleep, decrease sleep quality, and even cause fear about going to sleep. One promising psychological treatment for chronic nightmares is imagery rehearsal therapy. Imagery rehearsal therapy presumes that nightmares are a learned behavior and that activating the visual imagery system may facilitate emotional processing of the trauma. This treatment involves deliberately rewriting a nightmare and mentally rehearsing images from the newly rescripted scenario while awake. Imagery rehearsal therapy has been found to reduce nightmares and associated distress. We present a case study demonstrating the use of imagery rehearsal therapy in a Vietnam-era veteran with posttraumatic stress disorder and chronic nightmares. Nightmares were considerably reduced and the quality of sleep greatly improved after treatment.

  20. The Veterans Health Administration: an American success story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Adam

    2007-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides health care for U.S. military veterans. By the early 1990s, the VHA had a reputation for delivering limited, poor-quality care, which led to health care reforms. By 2000, the VHA had substantially improved in terms of numerous indicators of process quality, and some evidence shows that its overall performance now exceeds that of the rest of U.S. health care. Recently, however, the VHA has started to become a victim of its own success, with increased demands on the system raising concerns from some that access is becoming overly restricted and from others that its annual budget appropriations are becoming excessive. Nonetheless, the apparent turnaround in the VHA's performance offers encouragement that health care that is both financed and provided by the public sector can be an effective organizational form.

  1. Implementation and early utilization of a Suicide Hotline for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kerry L; Kemp, Janet; McKeon, Richard; Katz, Ira R

    2012-03-01

    Suicide crisis lines have a respected history as a strategy for reducing deaths from suicide and suicidal behaviors. Until recently, however, evidence of the effectiveness of these crisis lines has been sparse. Studies published during the past decade suggest that crisis lines offer an alternative to populations who may not be willing to engage in treatment through traditional mental health settings. Given this promising evidence, in 2007, the Department of Veterans Affairs in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration implemented a National Suicide Hotline that is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by Veterans Affairs clinical staff. We report here on the implementation of this suicide hotline and our early observations of its utilization in a largely male population.

  2. Breast Cancer in Transgender Veterans: A Ten-Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George R

    2015-03-01

    All known cases of breast cancer in patients with a diagnosis consistent with transgender identification were identified in the Veterans Health Administration (1996-2013). Ten cases were confirmed: seven birth sex females and three birth sex males. Of the three birth sex males, two identified as gender dysphoric male-to-female and one identified as transgender with transvestic fetishism. The birth sex males all presented with late-stage disease that proved fatal, whereas most of the birth sex female transgender veterans presented with earlier stage disease that could be treated. These cases support the importance of screening for breast cancer using standard guidelines in birth sex males and females. Family history of breast cancer should be obtained from transgender people as part of routine care. This report expands the known cases of breast cancer in transgender persons from 5 to 12 (female-to-male) and from 10 to 13 (male-to-female).

  3. Lesions esportives en competició en atletes veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Alvero-Cruz, José

    2008-01-01

    Introducció i objectius: Hi ha pocs estudis que revelin la incidència de lesions esportives en atletes veterans. L'objectiu principal és descriure el nombre i el tipus de lesions durant el Campionat d'Espanya d'Atletisme 2005 per a atletes veterans. Mètodes: S'ha fet un estudi estadístic descriptiu per causa de lesió. D'un total de 996 atletes participants, es va fer un total de 40 visites mèdiques (4,01%) i 26 assistències de fisioteràpia (2,61%). Resultats: De 40 assistències mèdiques, un 8...

  4. Prospective prediction of functional difficulties among recently separated Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald E. Larson, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reports of functional problems are common among Veterans who served post-9/11 (more than 25% report functional difficulties in at least one domain. However, little prospective work has examined the risk and protective factors for functional difficulties among Veterans. In a sample of recently separated Marines, we used stepwise logistic and multiple regressions to identify predictors of functional impairment, including work-related problems, financial problems, unlawful behavior, activity limitations due to mental health symptoms, and perceived difficulty reintegrating into civilian life. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms assessed both before and after military separation significantly predicted functional difficulties across all domains except unlawful behavior. Certain outcomes, such as unlawful behavior and activity limitations due to mental health symptoms, were predicted by other or additional predictors. Although several forms of functioning were examined, the list was not exhaustive. The results highlight a number of areas where targeted interventions may facilitate the reintegration of military servicemembers into civilian life.

  5. Military and veteran health behavior research and practice: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibach, Jeffrey P; Haibach, Michael Ann; Hall, Katherine S; Masheb, Robin M; Little, Melissa A; Shepardson, Robyn L; Dobmeyer, Anne C; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Hunter, Christopher L; Dundon, Margaret; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Trynosky, Stephen K; Goodrich, David E; Kilbourne, Amy M; Knight, Sara J; Talcott, Gerald W; Goldstein, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    There are 2.1 million current military servicemembers and 21 million living veterans in the United States. Although they were healthier upon entering military service compared to the general U.S. population, in the longer term veterans tend to be of equivalent or worse health than civilians. One primary explanation for the veterans' health disparity is poorer health behaviors during or after military service, especially areas of physical activity, nutrition, tobacco, and alcohol. In response, the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs continue to develop, evaluate, and improve health promotion programs and healthcare services for military and veteran health behavior in an integrated approach. Future research and practice is needed to better understand and promote positive health behavior during key transition periods in the military and veteran life course. Also paramount is implementation and evaluation of existing interventions, programs, and policies across the population using an integrated and person centered approach.

  6. Preparing staff to care for veterans in a way they need and deserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2015-03-01

    More than 2.5 million military veterans have been deployed for service in Iraq and/or Afghanistan, whereas another 20 million veterans currently reside in the United States. For various reasons, increasing numbers of military and associated personnel from various wars could go to civilian population-based care facilities for their rest-of-life health care. Therefore, educational activities are important to prepare nursing staff for the culturally sensitive care that veterans, their dependents, and civilian contractor personnel need. This article (a) provides rationale for veterans' admissions, (b) summarizes some common health situations that veterans are likely to encounter, (c) stresses major educational goals, and (d) emphasizes the use of the universal assessment question: Have you ever served in the military? Several educational implications and challenges are discussed, including war zone physiology, reintegration, military culture and pride, ethical challenges, educational speakers, simulation, veteran individuality, and compassion fatigue. Available resources to accompany this content are provided.

  7. Applying behavior change theory to technology promoting veteran mental health care seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealin, Julia M; Kuhn, Eric; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Despite the availability of effective mental health interventions, the vast majority of veterans with a mental disorder underutilize psychological services. Contemporary research has revealed that several factors such as low education, stigma, stoicism, lack of knowledge, and negative beliefs about mental health services are associated with veterans' underutilization of services. In this article, the authors provide an overview of factors that affect symptomatic veterans' decisions about whether to seek mental health services. Second, they describe the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), a useful model for understanding mental health care seeking that can inform the development of technology-based interventions designed to increase veterans' willingness to seek psychological services. Third, the authors describe the development of Considering Professional Help, a personalized web-based tool developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has been designed to promote mental health care seeking in veterans with mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Military Veterans’ Experiences in For-Profit Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    committees; gov commissions an review and over RAND Corporat research organi objective analys solutions that ad facing the public around the worl do not... order RAND documents or to obtain additional information, contact Distribution Services: Telephone: (310) 451-7002; Email: order @rand.org 1...military veterans. The HELP Committee noted that in the first year after the new , Post 9/11 GI Bill took effect in August 2009, 36.5 percent of the

  9. Predicting violence in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Jovanović Aleksandar A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Frequent expression of negative affects, hostility and violent behavior in individuals suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were recognized long ago, and have been retrospectively well documented in war veterans with PTSD who were shown to have an elevated risk for violent behavior when compared to both veterans without PTSD and other psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical prediction of violence in combat veterans suffering from PTSD. Methods. The subjects of this study, 104 male combat veterans with PTSD were assessed with the Historical, Clinical and Risk Management 20 (HCR-20, a 20-item clinicianrated instrument for assessing the risks for violence, and their acts of violence during one-year follow-up period were registered based on bimonthly check-up interviews. Results. Our findings showed that the HCR-20, as an actuarial measure, had good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.82, excellent interrater reliability (Interaclass Correlation ICC = 0.85, as well as excellent predictive validity for acts of any violence, non-physical violence or physical violence in the follow-up period (AUC = 0.82-0.86. The HCR-20 also had good interrater reliability (Cohen's kappa = 0.74, and acceptable predictive accuracy for each outcome criterion (AUC = 0.73-0.79. Conclusion. The results of this research confirm that the HCR-20 may also be applied in prediction of violent behavior in the population of patients suffering from PTSD with reliability and validity comparable with the results of previous studies where this instrument was administered to other populations of psychiatric patients.

  10. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Partic...

  11. Nightmare Reduction in a Vietnam Veteran Using Imagery Rehearsal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, Kate L.; Means, Melanie K.; Edinger, Jack D.

    2010-01-01

    Following exposure to traumatic events, approximately 19% of combat veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder. One of the main symptoms of this mental illness is reexperiencing the trauma, which is commonly expressed in the form of chronic trauma-related nightmares. In these patients, nightmares can fragment sleep, decrease sleep quality, and even cause fear about going to sleep. One promising psychological treatment for chronic nightmares is imagery rehearsal therapy. Imagery rehearsal ...

  12. Beautiful Teams Inspiring and Cautionary Tales from Veteran Team Leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    What's it like to work on a great software development team facing an impossible problem? How do you build an effective team? Beautiful Teams takes you behind the scenes with some of the most interesting teams in software engineering history. You'll learn from veteran team leaders' successes and failures, told through a series of engaging personal stories -- and interviews -- by leading programmers, architects, project managers, and thought leaders.

  13. Preventing Risky Drinking in Veterans Treated with Prescription Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE April 2017 2. REPORT TYPE ANNUAL 3. DATES COVERED 1April2016 - 31March2017 4. TITLE AND...engaging in risky drinking are at heightened risk for drug interactions, including overdose and other negative effects, particularly if they are also...messages. We propose to conduct a study in which returning OEF/OIF individuals and other veterans receiving medical care at the Philadelphia VAMC (N

  14. Young Adult Veteran Perceptions of Peers’ Drinking Behavior and Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Marshall, Grant. N.; Schell, Terry L.; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    Social norms-based interventions have shown promise in reducing drinking behavior and resulting consequences in young adults. Although most research has focused on young civilians (i.e., college students), some studies have investigated social norms-based interventions with active duty military and veteran samples. Yet, research has not yet determined how to maximize the effectiveness of social norms-based intervention in this heavy drinking population. As an initial step toward this goal, th...

  15. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stecker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracy Stecker1,2, John Fortney3,4, Francis Hamilton1,2, Cathy D Sherbourne5, Icek Ajzen61Psychiatric Research Center, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA; 2VA Health Services Research and Development, White River Junction Veterans Administration, White River Junction, VT, USA; 3VA Health Services Research and Development (HR S&D, Center for Mental Health and Outcomes Research, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, North Little Rock, AR, USA; 4Division of Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 5RAND, Santa Monica, CA, USA; 6Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAObjectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq.Methods: Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior.Results: Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers.Keywords: treatment

  16. Benefits, Costs, and Harms of Osteoporosis Screening in Male Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis Screening in Male Veterans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, MD, MHS CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Institute...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 October 2012 – 30 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Benefits, Costs and Harms of Osteoporosis Screening in...to screen for and treat osteoporosis in men. The recommendations of clinical practice guidelines vary in how to select men to be screened, and the

  17. Insights from advanced analytics at the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fihn, Stephan D; Francis, Joseph; Clancy, Carolyn; Nielson, Christopher; Nelson, Karin; Rumsfeld, John; Cullen, Theresa; Bates, Jack; Graham, Gail L

    2014-07-01

    Health care has lagged behind other industries in its use of advanced analytics. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has three decades of experience collecting data about the veterans it serves nationwide through locally developed information systems that use a common electronic health record. In 2006 the VHA began to build its Corporate Data Warehouse, a repository for patient-level data aggregated from across the VHA's national health system. This article provides a high-level overview of the VHA's evolution toward "big data," defined as the rapid evolution of applying advanced tools and approaches to large, complex, and rapidly changing data sets. It illustrates how advanced analysis is already supporting the VHA's activities, which range from routine clinical care of individual patients--for example, monitoring medication administration and predicting risk of adverse outcomes--to evaluating a systemwide initiative to bring the principles of the patient-centered medical home to all veterans. The article also shares some of the challenges, concerns, insights, and responses that have emerged along the way, such as the need to smoothly integrate new functions into clinical workflow. While the VHA is unique in many ways, its experience may offer important insights for other health care systems nationwide as they venture into the realm of big data.

  18. Substance use disorders in military veterans: prevalence and treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeters JB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jenni B Teeters,1,2 Cynthia L Lancaster,1,2 Delisa G Brown,3 Sudie E Back1,2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Ralph H Johnson Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA, 3Department of Human Development and Psychoeducation, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Substance use disorders (SUDs are a significant problem among our nation’s military veterans. In the following overview, we provide information on the prevalence of SUDs among military veterans, clinical characteristics of SUDs, options for screening and evidence-based treatment, as well as relevant treatment challenges. Among psychotherapeutic approaches, behavioral interventions for the management of SUDs typically involve short-term, cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions. These interventions focus on the identification and modification of maladaptive thoughts and behaviors associated with increased craving, use, or relapse to substances. Additionally, client-centered motivational interviewing approaches focus on increasing motivation to engage in treatment and reduce substance use. A variety of pharmacotherapies have received some support in the management of SUDs, primarily to help with the reduction of craving or withdrawal symptoms. Currently approved medications as well as treatment challenges are discussed. Keywords: addiction, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy

  19. Race/Ethnicity and End-of-Life Care Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Smith, Dawn; Thorpe, Joshua; Del Rosario, Cindy; Ibrahim, Said; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have examined comprehensively racial/ethnic variations in quality of end-of-life care. Examine end-of-life care quality received by Veterans and their families, comparing racial/ethnic minorities to nonminorities. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of chart review and survey data. Nearly all deaths in 145 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers nationally (n=94,697) in addition to Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) data (n=51,859) from October 2009 to September 2014. Outcomes included 15 BFS items and 4 indicators of high-quality end-of-life care, including receipt of a palliative care consult, chaplain visit, bereavement contact, and death in hospice/palliative care unit. Veteran race/ethnicity was measured via chart review and defined as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or other. In adjusted models, no differences were observed by race/ethnicity in receipt of a palliative care consult or death in a hospice unit. Although black Veterans were less likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit, Hispanic Veterans were more likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit and to receive a bereavement contact. Less favorable outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities were noted on several BFS items. In comparison with family members of white Veterans, families of minority Veterans were less likely to report excellent overall care, and this difference was largest for black Veterans (48% vs. 62%). Bereaved family members of minority Veterans generally rate the quality of end-of-life care less favorably than those of white Veterans. Family perceptions are critical to the evaluation of equity and quality of end-of-life care.

  20. Intervening to Reduce Suicide Risk in Veterans with Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Assess cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between Veteran students ’ mental health symptoms, treatment, and academic performance . IIR13-310...T-BI, control) on subsequent alcohol consumption and alcohol consequences, including alcohol –related injury, mental and physical-health functioning...hazardous alcohol use, and levels of wellbeing among a representative sample of Veteran and comparison students . 2) Assess Veteran students ’ use of

  1. Beyond the Iron Triangle: Implications for the Veterans Health Administration in an Uncertain Policy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    VAMC VA Medical Center VBA Veterans Benefits Administration VFW Veterans of Foreign War of the United States VHA Veterans Health...However, this model is not necessarily applicable to HVAC, because few Members seek to serve on it and even fewer elect to remain on it as they accrue...Said C. Ibrahim, David S. Macpherson, and Michael E. Moreland, “VA Healthcare System: A Potential Model for a National Plan,” in The Praeger Handbook

  2. Firearm Ownership Among Military Veterans with PTSD: A Profile of Demographic and Psychosocial Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; Cohen, Nicole L.; Holleran, Lori; Alvarez, Jennifer A.; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a condition that disproportionately affects military veterans, is associated with heightened rates of aggression and suicide. Although experience with firearms is common among this population, virtually nothing is known regarding who is more likely to own a firearm and whether firearm ownership is differentially associated with psychological and behavioral risk factors among veterans with PTSD. Of 465 veterans (79% male) entering PTSD treatment, 28% owned...

  3. Peer Outdoor Support Therapy (POST) for Australian Contemporary Veterans: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Peer outdoor support therapy (POST) is one approach utilised in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom to address mental illness and distress amongst contemporary veterans. In the current paper several areas of veteran psychological therapeutic treatment are reviewed. Current standard practice and research studies for therapist-led treatments from Australia are summarised and critiqued and placed within the literature context examining military and veteran unique needs and ...

  4. VA Health Care: Actions Needed to Improve Newly Enrolled Veterans Access to Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    primary care provider and support staff—a nurse care manager, clinical associate, and administrative clerk. Letter Page 2 GAO-16-328...Health Eligibility Center, VHA central office—VHA’s Health Resource Center, Office of Primary Care, and Access and Clinical Administration Program ...newly enrolled veterans were able to access primary care from the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and others

  5. The struggle of the veterans of the French nuclear tests; La lutte des veterans des essais nucleaires francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The question debated in this article concerns the demand of compensation and recognition of the impact on their health of nuclear tests. The military personnel that worked during nuclear tests in French Polynesia and the Sahara sites, but also the inhabitants of the atolls of Moruroa and Fangataufa equally in French Polynesia. An observatory of the veterans health has been created in order to improve the medical management of military personnel and former military personnel. An association 'Moruroa e tatou' contains the Polynesian former workers of the Nuclear tests of the Pacific and the association A.V.E.N. contains the veterans of nuclear tests. numerous examples are detailed. The question is tackled too for the consequences on health of the British nuclear tests, in Australia, Christmas Islands, and New Zealand. (N.C.)

  6. Extension of the Presumptive Period for Compensation for Gulf War Veterans. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this interim final rule to amend its adjudication regulations regarding compensation for disabilities resulting from undiagnosed illnesses suffered by veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War. This amendment is necessary to extend the presumptive period for qualifying chronic disabilities resulting from undiagnosed illnesses that must become manifest to a compensable degree in order that entitlement for compensation be established. The intended effect of this amendment is to provide consistency in VA adjudication policy and preserve certain rights afforded to Persian Gulf War veterans and ensure fairness for current and future Persian Gulf War veterans.

  7. Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) no-health period extension. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this final rule that amends the regulations governing eligibility for Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) to extend to 240 days the current 120-day "no-health" period during which veterans can apply for VGLI without proving that they are in good health for insurance purposes. The purpose of this rule is to increase the opportunities for disabled veterans to enroll in VGLI, some of whom would not qualify for VGLI coverage under existing provisions. This document adopts as a final rule, without change, the proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 25, 2012.

  8. Cancer in US Air Force veterans not involved with spraying herbicides during the Vietnam War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuk, M. [SpecPro, Inc. (United States); Michalek, J.; Ketchum, N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, San Antonio, TX (United States); Akhtar, F. [The START Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year prospective study examining the health, mortality and reproductive outcomes in US Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand who sprayed herbicides in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971. Comparison veterans flew or serviced C-130 transport aircraft in Southeast Asia (SEA) during the same time period but did not spray herbicides. They were stationed mostly in Taiwan, the Philippines, Guam, Japan, and Thailand and spent on average less than 30% of their SEA service in Vietnam. Comparison veterans also spent approximately 30% more time in SEA than Ranch Hand veterans. No increases in Ranch Hand cancer mortality and morbidity were found in earlier investigations, but a recent study contrasting cancer rates in Air Force veterans and in the general US (white male) population reported increases in cancer at all SEER sites, prostate cancer and melanoma in Ranch Hand veterans and cancer at all SEER sites and prostate cancer in Comparison veterans. Associations between dioxin exposure category and cancer were found after restriction to Ranch Hand veterans who served in SEA no more than 2 years and to those who spent all of their SEA service in Vietnam. Overall cancer incidence in the general population in countries of SEA is about half of that in the United States, but cancers of the oral cavity/nasopharynx and liver are more prevalent in this region. Here we examine in more detail whether years served in SEA had any effect on the risk of cancer among Comparison veterans.

  9. Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans report symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness one year after deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. McAndrew, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Veterans returning from service in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF experience chronic pain. What is not known is whether for some OIF/OEF Veterans this pain is part of a larger condition of diffuse multisystem symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness (CMI. We use data from a prospective longitudinal study of OIF/OEF Veterans to determine the frequency of CMI. We found that 1 yr after deployment, 49.5% of OIF/OEF Veterans met criteria for mild to moderate CMI and 10.8% met criteria for severe CMI. Over 90% of Veterans with chronic pain met criteria for CMI. CMI was not completely accounted for either by posttraumatic stress disorder or by predeployment levels of physical symptoms. Veterans with symptoms consistent with CMI reported significantly worse physical health function than Veterans who did not report symptoms consistent with CMI. This study suggests that the presence of CMI should be considered in the evaluation of OIF/OEF Veterans. Further, it suggests that the pain management for these Veterans may need to be tailored to take CMI into consideration.

  10. Alcohol use and craving among Veterans with mental health disorders and mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A. Herrold, PhD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental health disorders (MHDs, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, and alcohol use disorder (AUD are endemic among recent Veterans, resulting in a population with heterogeneous, co-occurring conditions. While alcohol craving negatively affects rehabilitation and leads to relapse, no studies have examined alcohol craving among Veterans with co-occurring MHDs and mTBI. The purpose of this preliminary cohort study is to describe alcohol craving in a convenience sample of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans (n = 48, including those exposed to traumatic events and experiencing active symptoms. Veterans completed weekly telephone interviews that included the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, consumption questions (AUDIT-C (week 1 and the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (PACS (weeks 1–6. Sixty percent of the sample screened positive on the AUDIT-C for probable AUD. Using Rasch analysis, the person separation reliability of the PACS was strong (0.87 among AUDIT-C positive Veterans. Higher PACS scores were reported among AUDIT-C positive versus AUDIT-C negative Veterans (mixed effects analysis, p < 0.001. PACS scores were higher among AUDIT-C positive Veterans with MHDs with and without mTBI versus AUDIT-C positive combat comparison Veterans (pairwise comparison, p < 0.001. Rates of hazardous alcohol use are high among Iraq and Afghanistan conflict Veterans and suggest that alcohol craving is elevated among those with MHDs with and without mTBI.

  11. Student Veteran perceptions of facilitators and barriers to achieving academic goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sonya B; Rosen, Jay; Himmerich, Sara; Myers, Ursula S; Davis, Brittany; Browne, Kendall C; Piland, Neill

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, over 1 million Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans are utilizing the post-9/11 GI Bill to pursue higher education. Data collected by the Department of Defense suggests that greater than 17% of returning Veterans may suffer from mental and physical health disorders, which can negatively affect school performance. The current study explored student Veterans' perceived facilitators and barriers to achieving academic goals. Thirty-one student Veterans completed self-report measures and interviews. Results suggested that Veterans that were reporting problems or symptoms in one mental or physical health domain were likely to be reporting symptoms or problems in others as well. The interview data were coded, and three overarching themes related to barriers and facilitators emerged: person features (e.g., discipline and determination, symptoms and stressors), institutional structure (i.e., what schools and the Department of Veterans Affairs do that was perceived to help or hinder student Veteran success), and policy concerns (i.e., how the structure of the GI Bill affects student Veteran school experience). Results from this research indicate the need for larger studies and program development efforts aimed at enhancing academic outcomes for Veterans.

  12. An Exploratory Study of Student Service Members/Veterans' Mental Health Characteristics by Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelts, Michael D; Albright, David L

    2015-01-01

    Explore the mental health differences of student veterans by sexual orientation. Student service members/veterans (N = 702) from the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment. Descriptive statistics and 2-sample proportion and mean tests were used to compare mental health characteristics. Student veterans who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or unsure had higher levels of mental health symptoms and treatment. Results suggest a need for continued examination of student service members/veterans as related to disparities in mental health by sexual orientation.

  13. Quality of relationship between veterans with traumatic brain injury and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Laraine; Moriarty, Helene J

    2017-01-01

    The quality of the relationship between patients with many illnesses and their family members has been shown to affect the well-being of both. Yet, relationship quality has not been studied in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and giving and receiving aspects have not been distinguished. The present study of veterans with TBI examined associations between relationship quality and caregiver burden, satisfaction with caregiving, and veterans' competence in interpersonal functioning, rated by veterans and family members. In this cross-sectional study, 83 veterans and their family members were interviewed at home. Measures of quality of relationship, veterans' interpersonal competence and sociodemographics were collected for both, caregiver burden and satisfaction for family members only. As predicted, veteran-rated Qrel/Giving was associated with family-rated Qrel/Receiving, and veteran-rated Qrel/Receiving with family-rated Qrel/Giving. Lower caregiver burden and higher caregiving satisfaction were associated with higher Qrel/Receiving scores but not with Qrel/Giving scores. Veterans' interpersonal competence was associated with total Qrel as rated by either veterans or family members. Relationship quality should be included in family research in TBI, and giving and receiving aspects should be differentiated. Findings suggest that lower caregiver burden and greater satisfaction should be more achievable by increasing caregivers' sense of benefits received from the relationship.

  14. Enhancing health and independent living for veterans with disabilities by leveraging community-based resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale-Gallardo, Jennifer; Jia, Huanguang; Delisle, Tony; Levy, Charles E; Osorio, Valentina; Smith, Jennifer A; Hannold, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    The number of US veterans with disabilities has increased in recent years as service members have returned home with extensive injuries and veterans from previous wars acquire functional limitations as a consequence of aging with chronic diseases. Veterans with severe disabilities need assistance and support to maintain independence at home and to avoid institutionalization. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) strives to network with community organizations to achieve the best possible outcomes for veterans. Key community resources in the US for individuals with disabilities are Centers for Independent Living (CILs) that provide a wide range of services, promoting independent living and well-being for people across disabilities. The widespread availability and services of CILs nationwide suggest their potential as a community-based resource for veterans, particularly for those with limited access to VA care. In this article, we discuss long-term needs of veterans with disabilities, efforts to address veterans' rehabilitation needs at the VA and opportunities for leveraging the strengths of community-based organizations for veterans. More research is warranted to investigate CIL services and potential for CIL-VA partnerships.

  15. Delivering Mental Health Services to OEF/OIF Veterans: A VHA Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoracci, Gina M; Bahraini, Nazanin H; Matarazzo, Bridget B; Olson-Madden, Jennifer H; Brenner, Lisa A

    2014-09-01

    Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health (MH) professionals are providing care to increasing numbers of veterans who served in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). This study aimed to describe MH clinicians' views of OEF/OIF veteran needs and how providers meet those needs within a large system of care. Qualitative research methodology, specifically qualitative description, was used to explore VHA MH clinicians' experiences providing MH services to OEF/OIF veterans. Thirteen VA MH providers participated in semistructured interviews, which included questions regarding the following areas: psychiatric needs of OEF/OIF veterans; collaboration and referral; needs and resources; and the personal/professional impact of providing services to this cohort. Themes emerged which highlighted complex challenges faced by OEF/OIF veterans, barriers associated with matching the unique needs of these veterans with existing treatments, and the challenges and rewards associated with providing care to members of this population. Capturing provider perspectives within MH services suggest potential areas for innovation aimed at providing patient-centered care to this cohort of veterans. Results may also inform future work aimed at meeting the needs of both OEF/OIF veterans and MH providers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Symptom attribution and symptom reporting in Australian Gulf War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Breanna K; McFarlane, Alexander C; Clarke, David M; Sim, Malcolm R; Kelsall, Helen L

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the consistent elevated symptom reporting by Gulf War veterans; we compared Australian Gulf War veterans and military-comparison group on symptom attributional styles and the relationship with total number and grouping of somatic and psychological symptoms. Postal questionnaires were completed by Australian Gulf War veterans (n=697) and military-comparison group (n=659) in 2000-2002 and 2011-2012. Data were collected on deployments, military-psychological stressors, symptom reporting, symptom factors and attributional style (normalising, psychologising, somatising, mixed-attribution). Gulf War veterans did not differ in attributional style from comparison group (p>0.05); normalising was the predominant style. Groups were combined for analyses. Psychologisers reported the highest overall symptoms (mean(M)=10.95, standard deviation(SD)=9.15), the most psychophysiological (M=1.71, SD=2.82), cognitive (M=5.79, SD=5.09) and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=1.53, SD=1.73). Psychologisers and somatisers reported significantly more symptoms across overall symptoms, all three symptom factors and psychological distress than normalisers. Normalisers consistently reported fewest overall symptoms (M=2.85, SD=4.49), psychophysiological (M=0.40, SD=0.98), cognitive (M=1.14, SD=2.22), and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=0.72, SD=1.31). Persistent symptoms, rather than remitted, between baseline and follow-up were associated with increased rates of psychologising and mixed-attribution compared with normalising. For incident symptoms a similar pattern was observed, some symptoms also showed increased rates of somatising. In veterans, psychologising was associated with higher symptom reporting, whilst somatisers and mixed-attribution also demonstrated higher reporting than normalisers. Symptom persistence and incidence were associated with symptom attribution. The findings indicate that attributional style is associated with patterns of symptom reporting and

  17. Residential placement for veterans with addiction: American Society of Addiction Medicine criteria vs. a veterans homeless program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Lee, Kathryn

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to compare placements of patients with addiction undertaken by a) a unidimensional, protocol-driven, independent "permanent" housing "wet" program versus b) a multidimensional, patient-individualized, contingency-based housing approach. The sample consisted of eight veterans in a single team's panel admitted to a housing program and eight matched veterans on the verge of homelessness placed by the team according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) criteria. The two groups (matched for sex, race-ethnicity, and age [SD, 5 years]) were similar on demography, substance disorder, and psychiatric comorbidity. Measures consisted of a) description of the placements, b) 12-month postplacement outcomes using a 12-item scale, and c) a Drug Abuse Research Project-based 10-item scale to assess recovery processes at two 6-month preplacement and two 6-month postplacement intervals. The veterans in the housing program escalated drinking and/or drug use; all were readdicted by the end of 12 months after placement. In the ASAM-criteria group, five of the eight patients had brief slips lasting 2 days or less, but none were readdicted at 12 months. The housing program group experienced five nontrivial outcomes: three imprisonments for felonies, one life-threatening medical complication, and one death. In conclusion, the findings support close monitoring and relevant contingencies using the ASAM criteria in the treatment of substance use disorder.

  18. Military to civilian questionnaire: a measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty among veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Frazier, Patricia; Orazem, Robert J; Murdoch, Maureen; Gravely, Amy; Carlson, Kathleen F; Hintz, Samuel; Noorbaloochi, Siamak

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the development, reliability, and construct validity of scores on the Military to Civilian Questionnaire (M2C-Q), a 16-item self-report measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty. We surveyed a national, stratified sample of 1,226 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who used U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care; 745 completed the M2C-Q and validated mental health screening measures. All analyses were based on weighted estimates. The internal consistency of the M2C-Q was .95 in this sample. Factor analyses indicated a single total score was the best-fitting model. Total scores were associated with measures theoretically related to reintegration difficulties including perception of overall difficulty readjusting back into civilian life (R(2) = .49), probable PTSD (d = 1.07), probable problem drug or alcohol use (d = 0.34), and overall mental health (r = -.83). Subgroup analyses revealed a similar pattern of findings in those who screened negative for PTSD. Nonwhite and unemployed veterans reported greater community reintegration difficulty (d = 0.20 and 0.45, respectively). Findings offer preliminary support for the reliability and construct validity of M2C-Q scores.

  19. Using Facebook to Recruit Young Adult Veterans: Online Mental Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. Objective In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Methods Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. Results We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more

  20. Using facebook to recruit young adult veterans: online mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Helmuth, Eric D; Marshall, Grant N; Schell, Terry L; PunKay, Marc; Kurz, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more than half screening positive for

  1. Effect of Omaha system - based training program on the recovery of nerve functions and muscle strength in patients with stroke%基于奥马哈系统的组合训练方案对脑卒中患者神经功能和肌力恢复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒卫丰

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨基于奥马哈系统的组合训练方案对脑卒中患者神经功能和肌力恢复的影响。方法:将117例脑卒中患者采用奥马哈分类中的子系统进行问题筛选,根据结果将存在神经-肌肉-骨骼功能方面异常的88例患者随机分为观察组45例和对照组43例,对照组采用常规训练,观察组采用组合训练,比较两组神经功能和肌力恢复状况。结果:观察组美国国立卫生院卒中(NIHSS)评分低于对照组(P ﹤0.05);观察组上肢、下肢肌力改善情况及膝和肘屈伸肌肌力水平均优于对照组(P ﹤0.05,P ﹤0.01)。结论:基于奥马哈系统的组合训练方案,可促进脑卒中患者神经功能和肌力恢复,从而改善其健康状况。%Objective:To explore the effect of Omaha system - based training program on the recovery of nerve functions and muscle strength in patients with stroke. Methods:117 patients with cerebral stroke were screened by Omaha classification subsystem,and then 88 of these patients were randomly divided into the observation group(n = 45)and the control group(n = 43)according to the screened results of abnormalities in nerve - muscle - bone functions. The routine training and exercise was implemented in the control group and the Omaha system - based training program was provided in the observation group,the recovery of nerve functions and muscle strength of the patients were compared between the two groups. Results:The scores of NIHSS were lower in the observation group than the control group(P ﹤ 0. 05);the improvement of muscle strength of the upper limb and lower extremity and knee,elbow flexor and extensor muscle strength were better in the observation group than the control group(P ﹤ 0. 05,P ﹤ 0. 01). Conclusion:The Omaha system - based training program can promote the recovery of nerve functions and muscle strength and improve the health status of patients with stroke.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Registry Veterans in VHA Care in 2015, for the Nation, by VISN and by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report describes the number of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) registry Veterans in VHA care in 2015 based on serologic evidence of HCV infection status (HCV Positive)...

  3. Health-related quality of life in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, J.A.; Sloan, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To study the HRQOL in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) and compare them with age- and gender-matched US population and control veteran population without these procedures.

  4. 77 FR 23128 - Rules Governing Hearings Before the Agency of Original Jurisdiction and the Board of Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities; (2) Create a... Disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces; 64.101, Burial Expenses Allowance for Veterans;...

  5. Veteran Students Received Similar Amounts of Title IV Aid as Nonveterans but More Total Aid with GI Benefits. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, Committee on Veterans' Affairs, House of Representatives. GAO-08-741

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, George A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported that veteran students were awarded similar amounts of Title IV aid as nonveteran students, and veterans' total federal aid was greater when Chapter 30 GI benefits were included. This report responds to request from the Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, Committee on Veterans' Affairs…

  6. 75 FR 2594 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans... comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension examination at individual CPEP... through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.Regulations.gov ; or to Mary...

  7. Traumatic brain injury, posttraumatic stress disorder, and pain diagnoses in OIF/OEF/OND Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David X. Cifu, MD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and pain in Veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND, Veterans who received any inpatient or outpatient care from Veterans Health Administration (VHA facilities from 2009 to 2011 were studied. A subset of Veterans was identified who were diagnosed with TBI, PTSD, and/or pain (head, neck, or back as determined by their International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision-Clinical Modification codes. Between fiscal years 2009 and 2011, 613,391 Veterans accessed VHA services at least once (age: 31.9 +/– 9.6 yr. TBI diagnosis in any 1 year was slightly less than 7%. When data from 3 years were pooled, 9.6% were diagnosed with TBI, 29.3% were diagnosed with PTSD, and 40.2% were diagnosed with pain. The full polytrauma triad expression (TBI, PTSD, and pain was diagnosed in 6.0%. Results show that increasing numbers of Veterans from OIF/OEF/OND accessed VHA over a 3 year period. Among those with a TBI diagnosis, the majority also had a mental health disorder, with approximately half having both PTSD and pain. While the absolute number of Veterans increased by over 40% from 2009 to 2011, the proportion of Veterans diagnosed with TBI and the high rate of comorbid PTSD and pain in this population remained relatively stable.

  8. Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Improvements Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-377)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Congress, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Improvements Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-377) was put in place to amend title 38, United States Code, to improve educational assistance for veterans who served in the Armed Forces after September 11, 2001, and for other purposes. The table of contents for this Act is as follows: (1) Sec. 1. Short…

  9. Plastic surgery within the Veterans Affairs Medical System: proposed modified indications for operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Detlev; Pradka, Sarah P; Similie, Ernest; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Moyer, Kurtis E; Shelburne, John D; Tyler, Douglas S; Levin, Scott L

    2009-07-01

    Many plastic surgery procedures span the divide between aesthetic ("cosmetic") and reconstructive surgery. However, definitions and guidelines may be inconsistent, which may decrease patients' access to legitimate procedures. The article aims to assist Veterans' Health Administration-affiliated plastic surgeons in continuing to provide optimal care to the Nation's Veterans and family members, and should be regarded as an open discussion.

  10. Driving distance eligibility for the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its medical regulations implementing section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014, which directed VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the Veterans Choice Program, or the "Program''). VA published an interim final rule implementing the Veterans Choice Program on November 5, 2014. Under current law, VA uses a straight-line or geodesic distance to determine eligibility based on place of residence. This interim final rule modifies how VA measures the distance from a veteran's residence to the nearest VA medical facility. This modified standard will consider the distance the veteran must drive to the nearest VA medical facility, rather than the straight-line or geodesic distance to such a facility.

  11. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  12. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Veterans. MEASUREMENTS: Women Veterans were queried about presence of diabetes , hypertension, obesity, tobacco use and physical activity. Four racial...prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk factors (e.g., diabetes , hypertension, obesity, tobacco use, and physical inactivity). For...factors, to identify five dependent variables: self-reported diabetes , hypertension, obesity, tobacco use and physical activity. Diabetes and hyperten

  13. 75 FR 6098 - VA Veteran-Owned Small Business Verification Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... direct result of a service-connected disability'' to be consistent with the statutory definition at 38 U... phrase ``same business area'' is synonymous with this definition. Service-disabled veteran is a veteran... disability or died as a direct result of a service-connected disability. Note to definition of...

  14. 38 CFR 3.23 - Improved pension rates-Veterans and surviving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... quality of life. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 501) Cross References: Improved pension. See § 3.1(w). Child. See... income of the veteran or surviving spouse. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1521, 1541) (c) Mexican border period and World War I veterans. The applicable maximum annual rate payable to a Mexican border period...

  15. Multimorbidity and Persistent Depression among Veterans with Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Patricia; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between multimorbidity and persistent depression among cohorts of veterans with diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension. The retrospective longitudinal analysis used national administrative data on around 1.38 million Veteran Health Administration clinic users merged with Medicare claims data.…

  16. 76 FR 50540 - Pilot Program of Enhanced Contract Care Authority for Veterans in Highly Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... AFFAIRS Pilot Program of Enhanced Contract Care Authority for Veterans in Highly Rural Areas AGENCY... implementing Sec. 403 of Public Law (Pub. L.) 110-387, ``Veterans' Mental Health and Other Care Improvements Act of 2008,'' which requires VA to establish a pilot program to contract with non-VA health...

  17. 20 CFR 408.216 - Are you a World War II veteran?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are you a World War II veteran? 408.216 Section 408.216 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification and Entitlement Military Service § 408.216 Are you a World War...

  18. Hearing Preservation Electrodes in Veterans and Military Servicemembers with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    feedback and input from veterans and the officials in the office of Student Veteran Services within the University of Iowa. We are in the process of...to provide training and professional development opportunities. However, Dr. Dunn has spoken on several occasions to Nancy Cambron, who is the Chair

  19. Assessing the Career-Development Needs of Student Veterans: A Proposal for Career Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Seth; Ledwith, Kathy; Dong, Shengli; Buzzetta, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Student veterans often encounter unique challenges related to career development. The significant number of student veterans entering postsecondary environments requires career-development professionals addressing the needs of this population to decide upon appropriate career intervention topics. This study utilized a career-needs assessment…

  20. 76 FR 74849 - Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... and significant increase in utility costs; f. Mental health and substance use issues; g. Physical... AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program AGENCY: Department of... availability of funds for supportive services grants under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families...

  1. Military and Veteran Student Perceptions of Military Friendliness on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchinos, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Over two million military personnel will leave the service over the next decade (Cook & Kim; 2009). The majority of these veterans will receive the most generous GI Bill since its inception (United States Department of Veterans Affairs [VA], 2011). Institutions will covet these students to offset discounting (Barr & McClellan, 2011; Basch,…

  2. Mortality and Revascularization following Admission for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Implication for Rural Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Thad E.; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Kaboli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Annually, over 3,000 rural veterans are admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet no studies of AMI have utilized the VA rural definition. Methods: This retrospective cohort study identified 15,870 patients admitted for AMI to all VA hospitals. Rural residence was identified…

  3. 76 FR 3017 - VA Veteran-Owned Small Business Verification Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... to one business has no foundation in law and that there is no compelling reason to limit... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 74 RIN 2900-AM78 VA Veteran-Owned Small Business Verification Guidelines AGENCY..., and Information Technology Act of 2006. This law requires the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)...

  4. Adverse reproductive outcomes in families of atomic veterans: the feasibility of epidemiologic studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Institute of Medicine Staff

    1995-01-01

    ... Veterans: The Feasibility of Epidemiologic Studies Committee to Study the Feasibility of, and Need for, Epidemiologic Studies of Adverse Reproductive Outcomes in the Families of Atomic Veterans Medical Follow-up Agency INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1995 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, ...

  5. Pregnancy and mental health among women veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Skanderson, Melissa; Goulet, Joseph L; Brandt, Cynthia; Womack, Julie; Krebs, Erin; Desai, Rani; Justice, Amy; Yano, Elizabeth; Haskell, Sally

    2010-12-01

    Veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) may experience significant stress during military service that can have lingering effects. Little is known about mental health problems or treatment among pregnant OEF/OIF women veterans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of mental health problems among veterans who received pregnancy-related care in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system. Data from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) deployment roster of military discharges from October 1, 2001, through April 30, 2008, were used to assemble an administrative cohort of female OEF/OIF veterans enrolled in care at the VHA (n = 43,078). Pregnancy and mental health conditions were quantified according to ICD-9-CM codes and specifications. Mental healthcare use and prenatal care were assessed by analyzing VHA stop codes. During the study period, 2966 (7%) women received at least one episode of pregnancy-related care, and 32% of veterans with a pregnancy and 21% without a pregnancy received one or more mental health diagnoses (p schizophrenia as those without a pregnancy. Women OEF/OIF veterans commonly experience mental health problems after military service. The burden of mental health conditions is higher among women with an identified instance of pregnancy than among those without. Because women do not receive pregnancy care at the VHA, however, little is known about ongoing concomitant prenatal and mental healthcare or about pregnancy outcomes among these women veterans.

  6. Multisymptom Illness in Gulf War Veterans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwini, Stella M; Forbes, Andrew B; Sim, Malcolm R; Kelsall, Helen L

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of multisymptom illness (MSI) in 1990 to 1991 Gulf/Afghanistan/Iraq War veterans. Electronic databases were searched from January 1990, June 2014 for studies on MSI prevalence in Gulf/Afghanistan/Iraq War veterans, based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention MSI case definition, and which included a military comparison group. Seven studies were identified among US, UK, and Australian Gulf War veterans; no studies were identified in Afghanistan/Iraq War veterans. MSI prevalence in Gulf War veterans and comparison groups ranged from 26 to 65% and from 12 to 37%, respectively. More recent studies were larger, with improved designs. The pooled odds ratio comparing Gulf War veterans to other military groups was 2.74 (95% confidence interval 2.15 to 3.51). The systematic review showed that MSI was most prevalent in Gulf War veterans, emphasizing the health burden of MSI in this veteran population.

  7. Coming Back to College: Middle East Veteran Student Involvement and Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carne, Glenda Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Increased veteran enrollment in universities warrants the examination of the challenges of students transitioning on campus. In this phenomenological, mixed methods study incorporating reverse culture shock theory and student engagement, four research questions are explored. "Do current Colorado veteran residents obtain degrees at the same…

  8. Characteristics of Telephone Applicants to a Residential Rehabilitation Program for Homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidner, Andrea L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Gathered descriptive data on 163 telephone applicants to residential rehabilitation program for homeless veterans and compared data with general veteran and homeless populations. Found subjects to be young, educated group of homeless men with histories of relatively high, stable functioning and high rates of medical, substance abuse, psychiatric,…

  9. From Camouflage to Classroom: Designing a Transition Curriculum for New Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of higher education necessitates that strategies be in place to meet the needs of an ever changing student population. Since 2009, the Post-9/11 GI Bill has spurred an increased enrollment of student veterans that is forecasted to rise. Students who are veterans have unique experiences related to their service, age, and work-life…

  10. The Higher Education Landscape for US Student Service Members and Veterans in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Stacie; Sternberg, Martina; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Vaughan, Joyce; Carlson, Rhiannon; Dansie, Elizabeth; Mohrbacher, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 or "New GI Bill" has resulted in rising enrollment and related demand for services by students in the USA. We examined current supports for student service members and veterans at institutions of higher education in Indiana in the context of this national trend. We employed…

  11. Student Veterans' College Experiences: Demographic Comparisons, Differences in Academic Experiences, and On-Campus Service Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, Chris Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background: The GI Bill has given United States military veterans the opportunity to afford and enroll in colleges and universities for nearly seventy years. In the Fall of 2009, the Post-9/11 GI Bill started helping a new generation of student veterans pay for their post-secondary education and earn degrees and certificates. The Post-9/11 GI Bill…

  12. Military and Veteran Student Perceptions of Military Friendliness on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchinos, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Over two million military personnel will leave the service over the next decade (Cook & Kim; 2009). The majority of these veterans will receive the most generous GI Bill since its inception (United States Department of Veterans Affairs [VA], 2011). Institutions will covet these students to offset discounting (Barr & McClellan, 2011; Basch,…

  13. Out from the Shadows: Female Student Veterans and Help-Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiRamio, David; Jarvis, Kathryn; Iverson, Susan; Seher, Christin; Anderson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities are devoting resources to support students who have military experience. However, evidence suggests veterans may not be using services. Since resources are available this begs the questions "why not?" and "what are the help-seeking attitudes of veterans for psychological and academic assistance?" It's…

  14. Experiences and Expectations of an African American Male Veteran Student in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole-Morton, Gladys S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the Post-9/11 GI Bill an increasing number of veterans and military students are seeking to complete degrees online and through enrollment at campuses across the nation (Brown 2011). The increased number of military students in postsecondary education settings presents challenges and opportunities for both the veteran student and institution…

  15. The Transition Experiences of Re-Enrolling Student Veterans at a Public Four-Year University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this constructivist grounded theory study was to describe and illuminate the transition experiences of re-enrolling student veterans. This research question guided the study: What are the barriers and strategies for resolution that re-enrolling student veterans face in their pre- and post-service transition experiences? I conducted…

  16. Engagement of Community College Student Veterans: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study focused on the engagement of student veterans at a community college and sought to understand the factors that contribute to the involvement and success of student veterans at a California community college. Using a sequential explanatory design, the methodology involved written surveys and focus group interviews to…

  17. Coming Back to College: Middle East Veteran Student Involvement and Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carne, Glenda Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Increased veteran enrollment in universities warrants the examination of the challenges of students transitioning on campus. In this phenomenological, mixed methods study incorporating reverse culture shock theory and student engagement, four research questions are explored. "Do current Colorado veteran residents obtain degrees at the same…

  18. Dual Mission: An Innovative Field Model for Training Social Work Students for Work with Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive article explores a collaborative model that blends the dual missions of training social work students to work with military personnel, veterans, and their families while serving student veterans on campus. The model consists of 2 main components: (1) a nationally recognized service component for providing academic, health and…

  19. High-Risk Drinking and Academic Performance among College Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbard, Joel R.; Widome, Rachel; Lust, Katherine; Simpson, Tracy L.; Lostutter, Ty W.; Saxon, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Heavy drinking and psychiatric symptoms pose challenges to college student Veterans and may undermine academic success. We used Boynton College Student Health Survey data to assess highrisk drinking (HRD), psychiatric symptoms, and psychosocial stressors among student Veterans (N = 1,679) with and without prior deployment. Rates of HRD and…

  20. The Impact of the Psychological Sequela of Trauma on Veterans Seeking Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, Joshua; Cheney, Ann M.; Abraham, Traci; Grubbs, Kathleen; Hunt, Justin; Lu, Liya; Fortney, John C.; Curran, Geoffery M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite evidence that mental health burden is associated with lower academic success and non-completion in college students, and the high incidence of combat-related trauma exposure in returning veterans, few studies exist regarding the intersection of these issues in student veterans. This paper presents findings from a study on the mental health…

  1. Identifying the Camouflage: Uncovering and Supporting the Transition Experiences of Military and Veteran Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Klotz, Denise N.; Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    This study summarizes the qualitative findings from a multi-institutional study about the college transition experiences of military and veteran students, specifically students' articulation of their needs. Findings reveal (a) a lack of inprocessing, (b) need for community, and (c) institutional invisibility. Using the Student Veteran Transition…

  2. An Emerging Population: Student Veterans in Higher Education in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkey, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores the transition experiences of Post-9/11 Era military veterans from active duty military service to college students for the purpose of adding to the body of knowledge about this student population. The subjects, who voluntarily offered to participate, were 15 community college student/veterans and…

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Suicide Attempt History among Veterans Receiving Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa A.; Betthauser, Lisa M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Villarreal, Edgar; Harwood, Jeri E. F.; Staves, Pamela J.; Huggins, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    History of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been found to increase risk of suicidal behavior. The association between suicide attempt history among veterans with PTSD and/or TBI was explored. Cases (N = 81) and 2:1 matched controls (N = 160) were randomly selected from a Veterans Affairs Medical Center…

  4. 77 FR 41472 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... 2nd floor. ADDRESSES: U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Washington, DC 20416... of Veterans Business Development, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW.,...

  5. 78 FR 7849 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... 2nd floor. ADDRESSES: U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Washington, DC 20416... Liaison, Office of Veterans Business Development, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  6. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  7. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  8. 20 CFR 404.1361 - Federal benefit payable other than by Veterans Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... on the veteran's World War II or post-World War II active service before we determine and certify... on the veteran's World War II or post-World War II active service after we determine and certify... Uniformed Services Effect of Other Benefits on Payment of Social Security Benefits and Payments § 404.1361...

  9. 76 FR 67557 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance... on population-based budget formulation, policy scenario testing, and strategic planning. Affected... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...

  10. Treating Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with PTSD Who Are at High Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupcak, Matthew; Varra, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans diagnosed with psychiatric disorders commit suicide at a higher rate than the general population (Kang & Bullman, 2008). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been identified as a risk factor for suicide in veterans (Bullman & Kang, 1994) and is the most common mental disorder among Iraq and Afghanistan…

  11. 77 FR 56710 - Proposed Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity: Comment Request... applicable, for compensation and/or pension benefit sought. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on... Compensation and/or Pension, VA Form 21-526. b. Veteran's Supplemental Claim Application, VA Form 21-526b. c...

  12. Current Knowledge and Training Needs of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors to Work Effectively with Veterans with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Michael; Bishop, Malachy; Tansey, Timothy; Sanchez, Jennifer; Wijngaarde, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Veterans with disabilities have gained national attention in recent years because of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This study examined certified rehabilitation counselors' (CRCs) knowledge and preparation for working with veterans with disabilities on their rehabilitation. Results indicate that CRCs report low levels of preparation in…

  13. Caregivers Create a Veteran-Centric Community in VHA Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverhals, Leah M; Manheim, Chelsea E; Gilman, Carrie V; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari

    2016-01-01

    The Veteran's Health Administration's Medical Foster Home program offers a unique long-term care option for veterans who require nursing-home- or assisted-living-level care. Veterans in a medical foster home reside with community-based caregivers who provide 24-hr-a-day care and monitoring. The veterans often remain in the medical foster home until end of life. Support and oversight is provided to the caregiver from the Veteran's Health Administration's community-based medical team. This qualitative descriptive study is based on secondary analysis of interviews with 20 medical foster home caregivers from 7 programs across the United States. The study's research aims are to describe and explain (a) the type of care backgrounds and skills these caregivers possess, (b) caregivers' primary motivations to open their homes to veterans who often have complex medical and social needs, and (c) how caregivers function in their role as primary caregiver for veterans. Findings indicated that caregivers interviewed had worked in long-term care settings and/or cared for family members. A strong desire to serve veterans was a primary motivation for caregivers, rather than financial gain. The caregivers' long-term care skills aided them in building and sustaining the unique medical foster home family-like community.

  14. Compensation and treatment: disability benefits and outcomes of U.S. veterans receiving residential PTSD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsher, Bradley E; Tiet, Quyen Q; Garvert, Donn W; Rosen, Craig S

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides specialized intensive posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) programs to treat trauma-related symptoms in addition to providing service-connected disability to compensate veterans for injury sustained while serving in the military. Given the percentage of veterans who are receiving treatment for PTSD, in addition to seeking compensation for PTSD, a debate has emerged about the impact of compensation on symptom recovery. This study examined the associations among status of compensation, treatment expectations, military cohort, length of stay, and outcomes for 776 veterans who were enrolled in 5 VA residential PTSD programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. Mixed model longitudinal analyses, with age, gender, and baseline symptoms nested within treatment site in the model, found that treatment expectations were modestly predictive of treatment outcomes. Veterans seeking increased compensation reported marginally lower treatment expectations (d = .008), and did not experience poorer outcomes compared to veterans not seeking increased compensation with the effect of baseline symptoms partialled out. Veterans from the era of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts reported lower treatment expectations (d = .020) and slightly higher symptoms at intake (d = .021), but had outcomes at discharge equivalent to veterans from other eras with baseline symptoms partialled out. These findings help further inform the debate concerning disability benefits and symptom changes across time. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  16. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  17. Evaluation of Cholesterol as a Biomarker for Suicidality in a Veteran Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Chuck; Caldwell, Barbara; Basehore, Heather

    2017-08-01

    A reduction in total cholesterol may alter the microviscosity of the brain-cell-membrane, reducing serotonin receptor exposure. The resulting imbalance between serotonin and dopamine may lead to an increased risk for suicidality. The objective of this research was to evaluate total cholesterol as a biological marker for suicidality in a sample of US military veterans. The study population consisted of veterans who received care at the Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) and were included in the Suicide Prevention Coordinator's database for having suicidal ideation with evidence of escalating intent, a documented suicide attempt, or committed suicide between 2009 and 2015. The veterans' medical data were obtained from the facility's computerized patient record system. The final sample was 188 observations from 128 unique veterans. Veterans with total cholesterol levels below 168 mg/dl appeared to have a higher suicide risk than those with higher levels. The cholesterol levels of veterans reporting suicidal ideation or attempt were significantly lower than the group reporting neither [F(2, 185) = 30.19, p cholesterol levels from an earlier visit in which they did not report suicidality. A latent class analysis revealed that among other differences, suicidal veterans were younger, leaner, and had more anxiety, sleep problems, and higher education than those being seen for an issue unrelated to suicidality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 78 FR 70414 - Agency Information Collection (Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program..., Department of Veterans Affairs, will submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of... information collection and its expected cost and burden and includes the actual data collection...

  19. Multimorbidity and Persistent Depression among Veterans with Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Patricia; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between multimorbidity and persistent depression among cohorts of veterans with diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension. The retrospective longitudinal analysis used national administrative data on around 1.38 million Veteran Health Administration clinic users merged with Medicare claims data.…

  20. Complex Perceptions of Identity: The Experiences of Student Combat Veterans in Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Shane Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study illustrates how complex perceptions of identity influence the community college experience for student veterans who have been in combat, creating barriers to their overall persistence. The collective experiences of student combat veterans at two community colleges in northwestern Massachusetts are presented, and a Combat…