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Sample records for olivia libby potterton

  1. Kena kingitus emale / Olivia Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Olivia

    2008-01-01

    Tutvustus: Laulud emast / [koostanud Olivia Saar]. Tallinn : TEA Kirjastus, 2007 ; Seitse paid : laulud emale / [Kalju Kangur, Ira Lember, Kersti Merilaas ... jt. ; koostanud Olivia Saar] ; pildid joonistanud Kirke Kangro. Tallinn : TEA Kirjastus, 2007

  2. Olivia Records: The Production of a Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at the early years of Olivia Records, setting the context for the historic release of the album Where Would I Be Without You. From its origins as a Washington, D.C.-based activist collective in 1973, Olivia became a hugely successful recording company, marketing radical lesbian recordings and performances that soon defined the "women's music" movement. Both artistically and politically, Olivia's woman-identified albums became the soundtrack for a generation awakening to lesbian activism. Pat Parker and Judy Grahn's 1976 spoken-word recording is a unique demonstration of Olivia's radical production values and expanding catalog.

  3. Assessment and Next Generation Standards: An Interview with Olivia Gude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a transcript of an interview with Olivia Gude, member of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Writing Team. In the interview, Gude provides an overview of the process for writing the new visual arts standards.

  4. Socializing with Olivia, the Youngest Robot Receptionist Outside the Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus; Limbu, Dilip Kumar; See, Swan Lan; Wong, Alvin Hong Yee; Ge, S.S.; Li, H.; Cabibihan, J.-J.; Tan, Y.K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the evaluation results of an exploratory study performed in an open environment with the robot receptionist Olivia. The main focus of the study was to analyze relationships between the robot’s social skills and the perceived overall interaction quality, as well as to

  5. Noor naine süüdistab kirikuisa enda ahistamises / Olivia Elise ; intervjueerinud Kristi Leppik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elise, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Vestlus Olivia Elisega, kes esitas Eesti Karismaatilise Episkopaalkiriku peavikaari Heigo Ritsbeki kohta süüdistuse seksuaalses ahistamises. Sisaldab katkendit O. Elise ja H. Ritsbeki telefonivestlusest

  6. Willard Libby, Radiocarbon, and Carbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    age determination in archaeology, geology, geophysics, and other branches of science". 1 Edited of California, Los Angeles,2 where he founded the UCLA Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE Libby, Chemistry: Berkeley and Los Angeles 3 Edited excerpt from Environmental Science and Engineering

  7. An Interview with Olivia Gude about Connecting School and Community Arts Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglin, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Olivia Gude has a long and distinguished career as both a public artist and an art educator. She is currently the Angela Gregory Paterakis Professor and Chair of Art Education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), where she works with graduate and undergraduate students to prepare for working as artist educators in school and…

  8. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries

  9. L’expérimentation du dispositif chez Olivia Rosenthal : Les Larmes hors le livre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Murzilli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La question des rapports du sujet et de l’art en littérature, loin de se limiter à des enjeux d’ordre thématique, s’étend également à la façon dont le sujet est affecté par le croisement des pratiques d’écriture avec d’autres pratiques artistiques. Cette étude se propose de montrer comment le travail réalisé par Olivia Rosenthal autour de Ils ne sont pour rien dans mes larmes met en relation de façon originale les deux aspects de cette question dans la mise en place de dispositifs expérimentaux conduisant à une extension de la pratique littéraire hors du livre. Cette pratique est ici interrogée à travers une mise en regard du texte Les Larmes avec sa mise en performance et son adaptation cinématographique en collaboration avec Laurent Larivière. Ces différentes déclinaisons du dispositif littéraire ne soulignent pas seulement l’intermodalité des pratiques artistiques mais, en mettant le sujet au centre du dispositif, elles rappellent également que le dialogue entre ces pratiques possède un enjeu humain : celui de la diversification des accès que le sujet peut avoir à la compréhension des autres et de lui-même.The question of the relationship between the subject and art in literature, far from being limited to stakes of a thematic nature, also extens to the way in which the subject is affected by the intersection of writing practices with other artistic practices. This study aims to show how the work done by Olivia Rosenthal around Ils ne sont pour rien dans mes larmes originally connects the two aspects of this issue through the development of experimental devices that lead to an extension of the literary practice beyond the book. This practice is examined here through a comparison of the text Les Larmes with the performance and the film by the same name made in collaboration with Laurent Larivière. These different versions of the literary device not only highlight intermodal artistic practices, but

  10. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservior Fisheries, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Bradley B.

    1985-06-01

    We are evaluating the potential impacts of Libby Reservoir operation on the fishery in Libby Reservoir. The sampling program has been tested and modified to provide data for developing an understanding of how reservoir operation impacts the reservoir fishery. Temperature appears to be an important variable influenced by reservoir operation which regulates fish and fish food production and distribution. 39 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to

  12. A Socratic Dialogue with Libby Larsen on Music, Musical Experience in American Culture, and Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Katherine; Larsen, Libby

    2011-01-01

    This article represents conversations with the American composer Libby Larsen in which she described her beliefs about music, music education, and the dilemmas that our current system faces as we seek to provide relevant and meaningful music education to our students. Our conversation explores such topics as cognitive psychology, music theory,…

  13. Journal Article: Localized Pleural Thickening: Smoking and Exposure to Libby Vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is limited research on the combined effects of smoking and asbestos exposure on risk of localized pleural thickening (LPT). This analysis uses data from the Marysville cohort of workers occupationally exposed to Libby amphibole asbestos (LAA). Workers were interviewed to ...

  14. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  15. The dispersion of fibrous amphiboles by glacial processes in the area surrounding Libby, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Adams, David T.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Mining operations began at a world-class vermiculite deposit at Vermiculite Mountain near Libby, Montana, circa 1920 and ended in 1990. Fibrous and asbestiform amphiboles intergrown with vermiculite ore are suspected to be a causative factor in an abnormally high number of cases of respiratory diseases in former mine and mill workers, and in residents of Libby. The question addressed in this report is whether some of the amphibole from Vermiculite Mountain could have been dispersed by Pleistocene glacial processes rather than by human activity after vermiculite mining began. The history of Pinedale glaciation in the Libby area provides a framework for estimating the presence and distribution of asbestiform amphiboles derived from Vermiculite Mountain and found in naturally occurring sediments of Glacial Lake Kootenai that underlie the Libby Valley area. There were two situations where sediments derived from Vermiculite Mountain were deposited into Glacial Lake Kootenai: (1) as lake-bottom sediments derived from meltwater flowing down Rainy Creek when the valley south of Vermiculite Mountain was free of ice but active ice still covered Vermiculite Mountain; and (2) as lake-bottom sediments eroded from the Rainy Creek outwash and re-deposited during a re-advance of the Purcell Trench Glacier lobe near Moyie Springs, Idaho.

  16. Mortality from asbestos-associated disease in Libby, Montana 1979-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Samantha Lampert; Lewin, Michael; Young, Rand; Dearwent, Steve M; Lee, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Research on asbestos exposure in Libby, MT, has focused on occupational exposure in vermiculite mining and processing, but less attention has been paid to asbestos-related mortality among community members without vermiculite mining occupational history. Our study reports on asbestos-related mortality in Libby over 33 years (1979-2011) while controlling for occupational exposure. We calculated sex-specific 33-year standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for Libby residents who died from 1979 to 2011 with an asbestos-related cause of death. Decedent address at time of death was geocoded to confirm inclusion in the Libby County Division. We controlled for past W.R. Grace employment by including and then removing them from the SMR analysis. Six hundred and ninety-four decedents were identified as having at least one asbestos-related cause of death and residing in our study area boundary. Statistically significant (Pdiseases, female COPD, and asbestosis for both sexes combined. Eighty-five men and two women were matched to employment records. We observed elevated asbestos-related mortality rates among males and females. SMR results for asbestosis were high for both sexes, even after controlling for past W.R. Grace employment. These results suggest that the general population may be experiencing asbestos-related effects, not just former vermiculite workers. Additional research is needed to determine whether SMRs remain elevated after controlling for secondary exposure, such as living with vermiculite workers.

  17. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1988-1996 Methods and Data Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalbey, Steven Ray

    1998-03-01

    The Libby Reservoir study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. This report summarizes the data collected from Libby Reservoir during 1988 through 1996.

  18. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  19. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2004-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  20. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannahan, Jonathan H. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora [Proteomics Core, Research Core Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schladweiler, Mette C. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ghio, Andrew J. [Clinical Research Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Gavett, Stephen H. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Kodavanti, Urmila P., E-mail: Kodavanti.Urmila@epa.gov [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  1. El impacto de la Educación Sexual Integral en la conducta de adolescentes de las escuelas secundarias de Caleta Olivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesica Paola Aguilar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El desarrollo del presente trabajo indaga acerca de cómo la implementación de la ley 26.150, ha contribuido a una concepción y ejercicio de la sexualidad de manera más asertiva en los adolescentes de las escuelas secundarias. Para realizar esta investigación se hizo un relevamiento de encuestas a una muestra de 1115 estudiantes, hombres y mujeres de las escuelas secundarias públicas de Caleta Olivia. Dando como resultado que un gran porcentaje de la población de estudiantes afirma que la educación sexual que han recibido hasta el momento, a 9 años de promulgación de la ley, sigue siendo biologicista/ academicista y heteronormativa. Por lo tanto, se propone un cambio paradigmático en el cual la modificación de las concepciones sobre lo que es la/las sexualidad/es, que implica una deconstrucción de las categorías en las que los/las propios docentes hemos sido formados.

  2. 75 FR 55713 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Montana; Attainment Plan for Libby, MT PM2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... community, is located in Lincoln County in the northwestern part of the State. Libby sits in the narrow... standards and natural turnover rates of the local vehicle fleet made additional measures for mobile sources... any credit for potential emission reductions that may have been available from fleet turnover and the...

  3. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  4. Particle Size Characterization of Water-Elutriated Libby Amphibole 2000 and RTI International Amosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data on particle characterization analyzed by scanning electron microscopy on Libby amphibole collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2000 (LA2000) and amosite material collected by RTI International (RTI amosite). The particle characterization data were generated to support a portion of the Libby Action Plan. Prior to analysis, the raw LA2000 and RTI amosite materials were subjected to a preparation step. Each sample was water-elutriated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park using the methods generally described in another published report and then delivered to the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory for analysis. Data presented here represent analyses performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory and USEPA National Enforcement Investigations Center. This report consists of two Excel spreadsheet files developed by USEPA, Region 8 Superfund Technical Assistance Unit and describe the particle size characterization of the LA2000 and RTI amosite, respectively. Multiple tabs and data entry cells exist in each spreadsheet and are defined herein.

  5. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2002-09-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

  6. Early Onset of Atypical Proliferative Lesions in the Lungs of a Libby Amphibole (LA) Exposed Rat Model of Cardiovascular Disease-Associated Iron Overlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Miners and residents of Libby, Montana have increased incidences of asbestos-related diseases associated with exposure to amphibole contaminated vermiculite. Amphiboles have been shown to bind endogenous iron and modulate fiber induced inflammatory response. We hypoth...

  7. Exposure to Sumas Mountain chrysotile induces similar gene expression changes as Libby Amphibole but has greater effect on long-term pathology and lung function

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to provide understanding of the toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) including Libby amphibole (LA), Sumas Mountain chrysotile (SM), El Dorado Hills tremolite (ED) and Ontario ferroactinolite cleavage fragments (ON). Rat-respirable fractions (aer...

  8. Impact of the Libby Zion case on graduate medical education in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brensilver, J M; Smith, L; Lyttle, C S

    1998-09-01

    Residency training in New York State was substantially altered by the Libby Zion case. Work-hour limitations and augmented supervisory requirements changed the patterns of training--particularly in internal medicine--but with uncertain impacts on the quality of education and patient care. In this historical analysis, we review another major effect of the case: a substantial augmentation of the number of trainees. The need to maintain adequate inpatient staffing--within the ground rules of the Residency Review Committee, and in consideration of the reimbursement formulae and financial climate of New York State--conspired to promote substantial residency program expansion. Similar forces contributed to a national trend to increase the number of trainees. The history, cost and impact of these personnel changes are reviewed.

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the MONTE OLIVIA and Rio Blanco in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2009-01-18 to 2009-12-23 (NODC Accession 0117337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117337 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MONTE OLIVIA and Rio Blanco in the English Channel, North...

  10. Asbestos-related radiographic findings among household contacts of workers exposed to Libby vermiculite: impact of workers' personal hygiene practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Timothy J; Franzblau, Alfred; Dunning, Kari K; Borton, Eric K; Rohs, Amy M; Lockey, James E

    2013-11-01

    To explore the potential impact of worker hygiene by determining the prevalence of radiographic changes consistent with asbestos exposure among household contacts of workers exposed to Libby vermiculite that contained amphibole fibers. Workers and household contacts had chest radiographs and completed questionnaires regarding hygiene and potential exposure pathways. Participants included 191 household contacts of 118 workers. One household contact (0.5%) had localized pleural thickening, and three (1.6%) had irregular opacities at profusion category 1/0 or greater. Worker radiographs demonstrated pleural changes in 45% and irregular opacities at profusion category 1/0 or greater in 8%. Libby vermiculite-exposed workers demonstrated an elevated prevalence of pleural and interstitial chest radiographic changes. There was, however, no increased prevalence of similar changes among household contacts, likely because of personal hygiene measures taken by the majority of workers.

  11. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1989-12-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of asbestos exposures during firewood-harvesting simulations in Libby, MT, USA--preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Julie F; Ward, Tony J; Spear, Terry M; Crispen, Kelly; Zolnikov, Tara R

    2007-11-01

    Research was conducted in order to assess potential exposure to asbestos while harvesting firewood from amphibole-contaminated trees near Libby, MT, USA. Three firewood-harvesting simulations took place in the summer and fall of 2006 in the Kootenai Forest inside the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) restricted zone surrounding the former W.R. Grace vermiculite mine. Another simulation was conducted near Missoula, MT, USA, which served as the control. The work practices following each simulation were consistent throughout each trial. Personal breathing zone (PBZ) asbestos concentrations were measured by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface wipe samples of personal protective clothing were measured by TEM. The mean (n = 12) PBZ PCM sample time-weighted average (TWA) concentration was 0.29 fibers per milliliter, standard deviation (SD = 0.54). A substantial portion (more than five fibers per sample) of non-asbestos fibers (cellulose) was reported on all PBZ samples (excluding field blanks) when analyzed by TEM. The mean (n = 12) PBZ TEM sample TWA concentration for amphibole fibers 5-microm long was 0.07 fibers per milliliter (SD = 0.08). Substantial amphibole fiber concentrations were revealed on Tyvek clothing wipe samples. The mean concentration (n = 12) was 29 826 fibers per square centimeter (SD = 37 555), with 91% (27 192 fibers per square centimeter) comprised fibers firewood-harvesting activities in asbestos-contaminated areas and that the potential for exposure exists during such activities.

  13. Libby/Hungry Horse Dams Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Interim Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1991-04-01

    The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program identified mitigation goals for Hungry Horse and Libby dams (1987). Specific programs goals included: (1) protect and/or enhance 4565 acres of wetland habitat in the Flathead Valley; (2) protect 2462 acres of prairie habitat within the vicinity of the Tobacco Plains Columbian sharp-tailed grouse; (3) protect 8590 acres riparian habitat in northwest Montana for grizzly and black bears; and (4) protect 11,500 acres of terrestrial furbearer habitat through cooperative agreements with state and federal agencies and private landowners. The purpose of this project is to continue to develop and obtain information necessary to evaluate and implement specific wildlife habitat protection actions in northwestern Montana. This report summarizes project work completed between May 1, 1990, and December 31, 1990. There were three primary project objectives during this time: obtain specific information necessary to develop the mitigation program for Columbian sharp-tailed grouse; continue efforts necessary to develop, refine, and coordinate the mitigation programs for waterfowl/wetlands and grizzly/black bears; determine the opportunity and appropriate strategies for protecting terrestrial furbearer habitat by lease or management agreements on state, federal and private lands. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Determining Satisfaction with Access and Financial Aspects of Care for Persons Exposed to Libby Amphibole Asbestos: Rural and National Environmental Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene A. Winters

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Libby, Montana is a Superfund site and epicenter of one of the worst environmental disasters in the USA history in terms of asbestos-related mortality and morbidity. Perceptions of access and financial aspects of care were explored among a national cohort of persons postasbestos exposure and prior to a 2009 Public Health Emergency Declaration. Our findings indicated the Libby cohort was significantly less satisfied with access and financial aspects of care as measured by two PSQ-III scales when compared to an adult, chronically ill patient sample. Participants with higher levels of respiratory morbidity and depression had significantly lower satisfaction scores.

  15. Determining Satisfaction with Access and Financial Aspects of Care for Persons Exposed to Libby Amphibole Asbestos: Rural and National Environmental Policy Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Ch.A.; Kuntz, S.W.; Hill, W.; Weinert, C.; Rowse, K.

    2011-01-01

    Libby, Montana is a Superfund site and epicenter of one of the worst environmental disasters in the USA history in terms of asbestos-related mortality and morbidity. Perceptions of access and financial aspects of care were explored among a national cohort of persons post asbestos exposure and prior to a 2009 Public Health Emergency Declaration. Our findings indicated the Libby cohort was significantly less satisfied with access and financial aspects of care as measured by two PSQ-III scales when compared to an adult, chronically ill patient sample. Participants with higher levels of respiratory morbidity and depression had significantly lower satisfaction scores

  16. Characterization of Libby, MT amphibole (LA) elongated particles for toxicology studies: Field Collection, sample preparation, dose characterization, and particle counting methods using SEM/EDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1999, the US EPA and USGS have been studying the chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology of the amphiboles from the Rainy Creek Complex of Libby, MT (LA), following an increased incidence of lung and pleural diseases. LA material collected in 2000 (LA2000) was described in M...

  17. Development of a residential wood smoke reduction plan in a wood burning community: A case study in Libby, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.J.; Manderino, L.; Lyons, C.E.; Morris, A.L.; Anderson, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Libby, Montana depends on wood as a heating fuel. Libby exceeded the 24-hour federal PM10 ambient air quality standard every year since monitoring began in 1987. Residential wood smoke significantly contributes to its air pollution. To decrease residential wood smoke's contribution to air pollution, residents have to modify their heating habits. County officials sponsored the development of a comprehensive community-oriented plan to reduce wood smoke. This paper describes how the plan was developed and the components of the air pollution reduction strategies. The plan was developed using community input and tailored to local conditions. Four specific strategies were developed to reduce residential wood smoke pollution. Development of strategies required analysis of home heating habits and potential alternatives. Economic conditions were also considered. Expensive control strategies would be worthless unless alternative funding methods were provided. Thus, the plan included an array of funding sources to facilitate implementation. The development and implementation techniques are applicable to other communities with similar air pollution challenges

  18. La conformación de asentamientos informales en Caleta Olivia: un estudio particular a partir del análisis de las teorías de la exclusión social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Moraga

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se inscribe dentro de un proyecto más amplio, denominado “Exclusión Social, sociabilidad y empleo en el Golfo San Jorge”, cuyo objetivo principal consiste en indagar las virtudes y los límites epistemológicos inherentes a las teorías sobre la exclusión social en el análisis de los fenómenos de precariedad social que afectan a una zona tan particular como es la cuenca del golfo San Jorge. La articulación entre ambos proyectos de investigación supone realizar un análisis crítico del corpus teórico proporcionado por las teorías antes mencionadas a partir de un caso empírico concreto, el cual se vincula con los fenómenos de segregación territorial que afectan a la localidad de Caleta Olivia.De tal modo, la investigación que he comenzado a desarrollar supone dar cuenta de los procesos de gestación y conformación de asentamientos informales como consecuencia de las tomas de tierras que tuvieron lugar en la ciudad durante los últimos años. Mediante un enfoque etnográfico, he tomado como punto de análisis las voces y las prácticas de las agrupaciones que ocuparon tierras en la zona Norte de la provincia de Santa Cruz, más precisamente en el barrio denominado “Zona de Chacras, Sección 2” de la localidad de Caleta Olivia.En concreto, prioricé, fue y es objeto de mi investigación, el estudio de las prácticas y los discursos de quienes protagonizaron la conformación del asentamiento, examinando el modo en que se fueron construyendo los lazos sociales, la forma en que se organizaron los habitantes del lugar y el arraigo territorial, en tanto factor que incide en el nacimiento, el desarrollo y la consolidación de este tipo de asentamiento informal.

  19. Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

  20. Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, Chis

    1990-06-01

    The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

  1. Characterization of channel substrate, and changes in suspended-sediment transport and channel geometry in white sturgeon spawning habitat in the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, Idaho, following the closure of Libby Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    Many local, State, and Federal agencies have concerns over the declining population of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in the Kootenai River and the possible effects of the closure and subsequent operation of Libby Dam in 1972. In 1994, the Kootenai River white sturgeon was listed as an Endangered Species. A year-long field study was conducted in cooperation with the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho along a 21.7-kilometer reach of the Kootenai River including the white sturgeon spawning reach near Bonners Ferry, Idaho, approximately 111 to 129 kilometers below Libby Dam. During the field study, data were collected in order to map the channel substrate in the white sturgeon spawning reach. These data include seismic subbottom profiles at 18 cross sections of the river and sediment cores taken at or near the seismic cross sections. The effect that Libby Dam has on the Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning substrate was analyzed in terms of changes in suspended-sediment transport, aggradation and degradation of channel bed, and changes in the particle size of bed material with depth below the riverbed. The annual suspended-sediment load leaving the Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning reach decreased dramatically after the closure of Libby Dam in 1972: mean annual pre-Libby Dam load during 1966–71 was 1,743,900 metric tons, and the dam-era load during 1973–83 was 287,500 metric tons. The amount of sand-size particles in three suspended-sediment samples collected at Copeland, Idaho, 159 kilometers below Libby Dam, during spring and early summer high flows after the closure of Libby Dam is less than in four samples collected during the pre-Libby Dam era. The supply of sand to the spawning reach is currently less due to the reduction of high flows and a loss of 70 percent of the basin after the closure of Libby Dam. The river's reduced capacity to transport sand out of the spawning reach is compensated to an unknown extent by a reduced load of sand entering the

  2. Influence of exposure assessment and parameterization on exposure response. Aspects of epidemiologic cohort analysis using the Libby Amphibole asbestos worker cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Thomas F; Kopylev, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of occupational epidemiology studies identified two important exposure data quality factors in predicting summary effect measures for asbestos-associated lung cancer mortality risk: sufficiency of job history data and percent coverage of work history by measured exposures. The objective was to evaluate different exposure parameterizations suggested in the asbestos literature using the Libby, MT asbestos worker cohort and to evaluate influences of exposure measurement error caused by historically estimated exposure data on lung cancer risks. Focusing on workers hired after 1959, when job histories were well-known and occupational exposures were predominantly based on measured exposures (85% coverage), we found that cumulative exposure alone, and with allowance of exponential decay, fit lung cancer mortality data similarly. Residence-time-weighted metrics did not fit well. Compared with previous analyses based on the whole cohort of Libby workers hired after 1935, when job histories were less well-known and exposures less frequently measured (47% coverage), our analyses based on higher quality exposure data yielded an effect size as much as 3.6 times higher. Future occupational cohort studies should continue to refine retrospective exposure assessment methods, consider multiple exposure metrics, and explore new methods of maintaining statistical power while minimizing exposure measurement error.

  3. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2009-04-03

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to

  4. The role of social toxicity in responses to a slowly-evolving environmental disaster: the case of amphibole asbestos exposure in Libby, Montana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Rebecca J W; Orom, Heather; Chung, Jae Eun; Hernandez, Tanis

    2014-09-01

    Experiencing a disaster has significant negative effects on psychological adjustment. Case study accounts point to two consistent trends in slowly-evolving environmental disasters: (a) patterns of negative social dynamics, and (b) relatively worse psychological outcomes than in natural disasters. Researchers have begun to explicitly postulate that the social consequences of slowly-evolving environmental disasters (e.g., community conflict) have their own effects on victims' psychological outcomes. This study tested a model of the relationship between those social consequences and psychological adjustment of victims of a slowly-evolving environmental disaster, specifically those whose health has been compromised by the amphibole asbestos disaster in Libby, MT. Results indicate that experiencing greater community conflict about the disaster was associated with greater family conflict about the disaster which, in turn, was associated with greater social constraints on talking with others about their disease, both directly and indirectly through experiencing stigmatization. Experiencing greater social constraints was associated with worse psychological adjustment, both directly and indirectly through failed social support. Findings have implications for understanding pathways by which social responses create negative effects on mental health in slowly-evolving environmental disasters. These pathways suggest points for prevention and response (e.g., social support, stigmatization of victims) for communities experiencing slowly-evolving environmental disasters.

  5. Ehe ja elamuslik jutulooming : [eessõna] / Olivia Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Olivia 1931-

    2010-01-01

    "Eesti lastejuttude kuldraamat" on järjeks "Eesti lasteluule kuldraamatule", "Eesti muinasjuttude kuldraamatule", "Eesti muinasjuttude kuldraamatule" ja sisaldab 60 lugu nii endisaegade kui tänapäeva autoritelt

  6. 1 WOMEN ND VIOLENT CONFLICTS IN ND daobi Olivia Ihueze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    power relationship, including threats and intimidation, neglect or acts of .... Nevertheless, it also constitutes a very volatile issue in national discourse ... behaviour. ... This type of situation brings out the beast in man that .... better man pass all your rebel brothers. .... The personality of Kainene makes a strong statement on.

  7. Kootenai Canyon Archaeology. The 1979 LAURD (Libby Additional Units and Reregulating Dam) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    of the writing of this descriptive report fell to him. Marilyn Bailey was assistant laboratory director for the duration, her persistence and... writing the final reports. The field effort involved an archaeological team that averaged about 42 people (26 field, 9 laboratory, 3 administrative, and 2...been derived from ielting icebergs. It is also possible that the poorly sorted gravels are a result of mass wasting. In either case a localized ice

  8. Libby/Hungry Horse Dams Wildlife Mitigation : Montana Wildlife Habitat Protection : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and obtain information necessary to evaluate and undertake specific wildlife habitat protection/enhancement actions in northwest Montana as outlined in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Three waterfowl projects were evaluated between September 1989 and June 1990. Weaver's Slough project involved the proposed acquisition of 200 acres of irrigated farmland and a donated conservation easement on an additional 213 acres. The proposal included enhancement of the agricultural lands by conversion to upland nesting cover. This project was rated the lowest priority based on limited potential for enhancement and no further action was pursued. The Crow Creek Ranch project involved the proposed acquisition of approximately 1830 acres of grazing and dryland farming lands. The intent would be to restore drained potholes and provide adjacent upland nesting cover to increase waterfowl production. This project received the highest rating based on the immediate threat of subdivision, the opportunity to restore degraded wetlands, and the overall benefits to numerous species besides waterfowl. Ducks Unlimited was not able to participate as a cooperator on this project due to the jurisdiction concerns between State and tribal ownership. The USFWS ultimately acquired 1,550 acres of this proposed project. No mitigation funds were used. The Ashley Creek project involved acquisition of 870 acres adjacent to the Smith Lake Waterfowl Production Area. The primary goal was to create approximately 470 acres of wetland habitat with dikes and subimpoundments. This project was rated second in priority due to the lesser threat of loss. A feasibility analysis was completed by Ducks Unlimited based on a concept design. Although adequate water was available for the project, soil testing indicated that the organic soils adjacent to the creek would not support the necessary dikes. The project was determined not feasible for mitigation implementation. Although no waterfowl/wetland projects were implemented using mitigation funds, 1,550 acres were protected based on work done under this project.

  9. Examination of Susceptibility to Libby Amphibole Asbestos-Induced Injury in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects, no studies have been done assessing the influence of the disease on the development of lung injury induced by asbestos exposure. In this study we examined lung ...

  10. 77 FR 30528 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole Asbestos...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Science Advisory Board (SAB... information concerning the EPA Science Advisory Board can be found at the EPA SAB Web site at http://www.epa... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9675-4] Notification of a Public Teleconference of the...

  11. 77 FR 18808 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Science Advisory Board (SAB... Science Advisory Board can be found at the EPA SAB Web site at http://www.epa.gov/sab . SUPPLEMENTARY... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9653-1] Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the...

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  13. Fort Huachuca, Libby AAF, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-22

    AAF AZ 61-70 APP STATION STATIOq NA&W YEARS UNCT PAGE 1 0900-1100 MsI" IL. S. T.) T..p.WET &ULD TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL I TTL "/ 0 1-2 53 -6 I 9...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY P2 AP WEATHER SERVICE/"AC 722730 FT MUACI4UCA/LhSU VLAF AZ 6-0JUL 19 PAGE 1 c90o-11jo WET WULM TUMPERATUItE DEPRESION (P) _____TOTAL...STATIO’ STATION NAME YEARS MO.T. PAGE 1 09S0-11anHO0URS L. S. T.) WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL ( (Fl 0 1-2 3.4 5.6 It7.8 10 11112 13

  14. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Libby Amphibole Asbestos Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9610-8] Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Science Advisory Board (SAB) [email protected] . General information concerning the EPA Science Advisory Board can be found at the EPA SAB...

  15. SUBCHRONIC PULMONARY PATHOLOGY, IRON-OVERLOAD AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY AFTER LIBBY AMPHIBOLE EXPOSURE IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Surface-available iron (Fe) is proposed to contribute to asbestos-induced toxicity through the production of reactive oxygen species.Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that rat models of cardiovascular disease with coexistent Fe overload would be incre...

  16. 76 FR 30939 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations of Experts for SAB Libby Amphibole...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... all racial and ethnic groups. The EPA SAB Staff Office will acknowledge receipt of nominations. The... financial conflicts of interest; (d) absence of an appearance of a lack of impartiality; and (e) skills... expertise and viewpoints. The SAB Staff Office's evaluation of an absence of financial conflicts of interest...

  17. The War Cry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nancy Brinker, World Health Organization Goodwill Ambassador for Cancer Control, spoke with the IAEA's Louise Potterton about the Agency's role in tackling the cancer crisis in developing countries. The IAEA is playing a significant role by using nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and more people need to know that the IAEA has been providing radiation medicine and technology for over 30 years to the developing world.

  18. Cultural Resources Investigations for Libby Reservoir, Lincoln County, Northwest, Montana. Volume 1. Environment, Archaeology, and Land Use Patterns in the Middle Kootenai River Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Childrens grow fat upon, mothers like, and physicians recommend Castoria. It regulates the bowels, cures wind colic , allays feverishness and destroys worms...from a smooth lightweight drinking glass (with a raised, irregular shaped, point design in cream color on the exterior surface), and a thick, flat

  19. Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences. OLIVIA X M YAO. Articles written in Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences. Volume 127 Issue 3 June 2017 pp 393-410 Research Article. New modular relations involving cubes of the Göllnitz–Gordon functions · OLIVIA X M YAO · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  20. A f(e)rmidable family

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    At the beginning of October, Olivia Fermi, granddaughter of Physics Nobel prize-winner Enrico Fermi, stopped off at CERN on the second stage of her "nuclear pilgrimage", using the opportunity to meet CERN physicists…whom she compared to rare, exotic birds.   Olivia Fermi, photographed outside the Globe of Science and Innovation while visiting the Organization. Olivia Fermi is tracking neutrons. She featured her project called "On the Neutron Trail" by a visit to Italy on 29 September, for the 110th anniversary of Enrico Fermi's birth. Her project, inspired by her grandparents, Enrico and Laura Fermi, takes her on a pilgrimage through the history of nuclear physics. Olivia's long journey started at the site of the future Fermi centre (currently under construction) in Rome, where Enrico Fermi made some of his most important discoveries, and will include Hiroshima, where the first atom bomb was dropped, Fermilab and, of course, CER...

  1. Kirjandusteosed läbisid esimese sõelumise / Inna Grünfeldt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Grünfeldt, Inna, 1961-

    2006-01-01

    Virumaa selle aasta kirjandusauhinnale kandideerivad Ave Alavainu "Minekulaulud", Toomas Haugi "Troojamäe tõotus", Enn Nõu "Mõtusekuke viimne kogupauk", Olavi Ruitlase "Kroonu", Olivia Saare "Humalapuu", Indrek Hargla "French ja Koulu" ja Eevi Taeli "Lapse silmadega Narvast"

  2. Aed, imelise rahu paik / Merilen Mentaal

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mentaal, Merilen, 1972-

    2008-01-01

    Chelsea Flower Show 2008 võistelnud aedadest. Kujundajateks Philip Nash, Andy Sturgeon, Buono Gazerwitz, Trevor Tooth, Philip Nixon, Thomas Hoblyn, Robert Myers, Tom Stuart-Smith, Yvonne Innes ja Olivia Harrison. 11 värv. ill

  3. 77 FR 37801 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... 17, Amdt 6 Fort Huachuca Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni-Libby AAF, ILS OR LOC RWY 26, Amdt 4 Fort Huachuca Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni-Libby AAF, VOR RWY 26, Amdt 5 Willcox, AZ, Cochise... 35, Amdt 1 La Grange, TX, Fayette Rgnl Air Center, RNAV (GPS) RWY 16, Amdt 2 La Grange, TX, Fayette...

  4. 77 FR 22475 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ..., Orig, CANCELLED Fort Huachuca Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni-Libby AAF, RADAR-1, Orig Fort Huachuca Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni-Libby AAF, RADAR-2, Orig Lake Havasu City, AZ, Lake Havasu... Opelousas, LA, St Landry Parish-Ahart Field, NDB RWY 18, Amdt 3 Opelousas, LA, St Landry Parish-Ahart Field...

  5. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking warfarin (Coumadin) References Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Mitral Valve Prolapse Read more A. ...

  6. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery - discharge Images Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 69. Otto CM, Bownow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ...

  7. ALTERATIONS OF FE HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MODELS AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO CARDIOPULMONARY TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Fe homeostasis can be disrupted in human cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We addressed how dysregulation of Fe homeostasis affected the pulmonary inflammation/oxidative stress response and disease progression after exposure to Libby amphibole (LA), an asbestifonn mine...

  8. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  9. 75 FR 49886 - Notice of Lincoln County Resource Advisory Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Public Law 92-463) and under the Secure Rural Schools and... Office in Libby, Montana for a business meeting. The meeting is open to the public. DATES: August 17...

  10. 75 FR 81211 - Notice of Lincoln County Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Self-Determination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-393) the Kootenai National Forest's Lincoln County... Office in Libby, Montana for a business meeting. The meeting is open to the public. DATES: January 5...

  11. Mössbauer Spectral Data of Vermiculite Ore

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Data are provide for four samples of unexpanded vermiculite ore from mines near Enoree, South Carolina; Libby, Montana; Louisa, Virginia; Palabora, and South Africa....

  12. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Pretend Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and summarizes recent resources related to pretend play in the early childhood classroom. These include "Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education" by Olivia N. Sarachoe and Bernard Spodek; "Dramatic Play: Bring It Back" by Tammy Benson; and "The Importance of Being Playful" by Elena Bodrova and Deborah…

  14. Making social robots more attractive: the effects of voice pitch, humor and empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.; Ge, S.S.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus; Li, Haizhou; See, Swan Lan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore how simple auditory/verbal features of the spoken language, such as voice characteristics (pitch) and language cues (empathy/humor expression) influence the quality of interaction with a social robot receptionist. For our experiment two robot characters were created: Olivia,

  15. Analysis of the Potential Impact of Additive Manufacturing on Army Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    10 2. Dentistry ..............................................................................................11 3...our children , Zoe Zimmerman and Olivia and Mitchell Allen for their tremendous love, support, and encouragement in our writing of this MBA project...illustrates how AM can reduce the number of parts required for assembly, reduce weight, and improve performance. 2. Dentistry Johnston (2011) describes

  16. No Child Is an Island: Character Development and the Rights of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Olivia Newman critically examines two opposing rights claims: the liberal claim that children have a right to become liberal choosers and the fundamentalist claim that children have a right to not become liberal choosers. These positions reflect differing views regarding the value of critically choosing, rather than simply accepting,…

  17. Den menneskelige plet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerkegaard, Stefan

    endog en selvstigmatisering, hvor selvfortællingen ikke hænger sammen. Der er tale om en menneskelig henvendelse inkorporeret i det, som litteraturen gør, snarere end i det, den siger. I den nye danske litteratur af eksempelvis Yahya Hassan, Asta Olivia Nordenhof eller Bjørn Rasmussen oplever man...

  18. 99 AA.VV. Gendered Contexts. New Perspectives in Italian Cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    L'analisi delle poesie di guerra delle poetesse dello stesso periodo, oggetto dello studio di Olivia E. Sears, “Choosing Battles? Women's. War Poetry in Renaissance Italy” mette in luce una parallela ambivalenza femminile: se quando scrive d'amore la poetessa appare la protagonista diretta, nei componimenti di guerra ...

  19. 78 FR 19267 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... indirectly retain voting shares of First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company, both in Raleigh, North Carolina. B... Byrd Street, Richmond, Virginia 23261-4528: 1. Olivia Britton Holding, Raleigh, North Carolina; to... First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company, both in Raleigh, North Carolina. 2. Frank Brown Holding, Jr...

  20. 78 FR 26032 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ..., North Carolina; Frank B. Holding, Sr., Smithfield, North Carolina; Ella Ann Holding, Smithfield, North..., individually and together with Olivia Britton Holding, Raleigh, North Carolina; Frank B. Holding, Sr... Brown Holding, Jr., Raleigh, North Carolina; Frank B. Holding, Sr., Smithfield, North Carolina; Ella Ann...

  1. Malvolio

    OpenAIRE

    Boyne, John (Irish draftsman, watercolorist, and etcher, ca. 1750-1810)

    2008-01-01

    'Malvolio is the steward of Olivia's household in William Shakespeare's comedy, Twelfth Night, or What You Will. In the play, Malvolio is defined as a Puritan. He despises all manner of fun and games, and wishes his world to be completely free of human sin.' (en.wikipedia.org) This may be a self-portrait of the artist, dressed as the character.

  2. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 4, No 3 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increase of nisin production by Lactococcus lactis in different media · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Angela Faustino Jozala, Letícia Célia de Lencastre Novaes, Olivia Cholewa, Thereza Christina Vessoni Penna, 262-265 ...

  3. Youth and the New Economy=Les jeunes et la nouvelle economie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Perspectives Series, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This Community Perspective Series document includes statements about young people in the new economy of Toronto made by three participants in the October 2000 annual general meeting of the Toronto Training Board. "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the New Economy" (Olivia Chow) suggests that training programs available to young people are…

  4. Weight-of-Evidence Concepts: Introduction and Application to Sediment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Application to Sediment Management En vi ro nm en ta l L ab or at or y Matthew E. Bates, Olivia C. Massey, and Matthew D. Wood March 2018...Program ERDC/EL SR-18-1 March 2018 Weight-of-Evidence Concepts: Introduction and Application to Sediment Management Matthew E. Bates and Matthew D...Program Manager was Dr. Todd S. Bridges (CEERD-EMD). The work was performed by the Environmental Risk Branch (CEERD- EPR) of the Environmental

  5. Extinction Archive

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chloe

    2011-01-01

    This publication considers six of Sheffield’s Brutalist buildings and explores the place that these buildings hold in the city today. Twenty-five artists and writers from London, Sheffield and Berlin were invited to contribute. Three notable writers on the urban landscape and architecture give a historical and social context and speculations of their own. Project conceived by Julie Westerman.\\ud \\ud Artists:\\ud Christl Mudrak, Dominique Hurth, Olivia Reynolds with Jon Moscow, Ines Lechleitner...

  6. Short outlines of books by Estonian authors / Rutt Hinrikus, Janika Kronberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hinrikus, Rutt, 1946-

    1997-01-01

    Traat, Mats. Peremees võtab naise; Raudam, Toomas. Muusika kuum sai; Baturin, Nikolai. Ringi vangid; Õunapuu, Ervin. Olivia. Meistriklass; Mattheus, Ülo. Läheb ega peatu; Nõu, Enn. Kojutulek; Valton, Arvo. Väike ilus vangimaja; Unt, Mati. Brecht ilmub öösel; Alliksaar, Artur. Päikesepillaja; Kareva, Doris. Hingring; Kaplinski, Jaan. See ja teine; Hellerma, Kärt. Alkeemia

  7. Prevalence and natural history of ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer and the clinical impact of targeted therapy with ALK inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Puey Ling; John,Thomas; Dobrovic,Alex; Mitchell,Paul

    2014-01-01

    Puey Ling Chia,1 Paul Mitchell,1 Alexander Dobrovic,2–4 Thomas John1,2,4 1Department of Medical Oncology, Olivia-Newton John Cancer and Wellness Centre, Victoria, Australia; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Austin Health, Victoria, Australia; 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 4School of Cancer Medicine, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Improved understanding of molecular drivers of carcinogenesis has led to significant p...

  8. Activité féminine, prestations familiales et redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Olivia Ekert

    1983-01-01

    Ekert Olivia. ? Women's Work, Family Allowances and Redistribution. The system of family allowances may be looked at from two different points of view : the contributions paid throughout working life, and the benefits received when there are dependant children. The aim of this study is to determine who are the net beneficiaries of the system. A balance sheet extending over the lifetime of couples classified by their completed family size and their social group is drawn up. A model is construc...

  9. Field Artillery And Fire Support At The Operational Level: An Analysis Of Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    assistance with editing and for supporting this endeavor, and to our two wonderful children , Olivia and Theodore. Our time here at Fort Leavenworth has been...Baathist regime. 7 Mary Kaldor, New and Old Wars: Organized Violence in a Global Era, 3d ed...II, 165. 33 television several hours later, denouncing the strike as a “criminal act” and calling on the Iraqi people to draw their swords

  10. Prevention of Stimulant-Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    that could lead to low self esteem , substance abuse, criminality and accidents [1]. ADHD also affects veterans. Upon returning to civilian life...Broadcast emails, images and text for Facebook advertising , and a Facebook Ad Landing Page (the internet webpage that will open if potential subject...clicks on the Facebook advertisement ). AME 15 IRB Approval: 9/19/13 Added: Olivia Bogucki, Stephannie Furtak, Brittany Hughes, Tara

  11. 76 FR 43580 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ..., Amdt 2 Fort Huachuca Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni-Libby AAF, RNAV (GPS) RWY 8, Amdt 1 Tucson, AZ... RWY 11, Amdt 4 Springhill, LA, Springhill, NDB RWY 36, Orig, CANCELLED Springhill, LA, Springhill, RNAV (GPS) RWY 18, Orig Springhill, LA, Springhill, RNAV (GPS) RWY 36, Orig Springhill, LA, Springhill...

  12. 77 FR 51894 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... RWY 20, Orig-A Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, ILS OR LOC RWY 22R, Amdt 11 Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, RNAV (GPS) RWY 4L, Amdt 2 Baton Rouge, LA, Baton... Fort Huachuca/Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni/Libby AAF, RADAR 1, Amdt 5, CANCELLED [FR Doc. 2012...

  13. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 9. Symmetry Principles and Conservation Laws in Atomic and Subatomic Physics – 1. P C Deshmukh J Libby. General Article Volume 15 Issue 9 September 2010 pp 832-842 ...

  14. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 10. Symmetry Principles and Conservation Laws in Atomic and Subatomic Physics – 2. P C Deshmukh J Libby. General Article Volume 15 Issue 10 October 2010 pp 926-940 ...

  15. 77 FR 50160 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Lincoln County Coram Hotel, The, 302 California Ave., Libby, 12000593 NEW JERSEY Essex County Woman's Club of Upper Montclair, (Clubhouses of New Jersey Women's Clubs), 200 Cooper Ave., Montclair, 12000594... bounded by Louella Ct., West, & S. Wayne Aves. (Radnor Township), Wayne, 12000607 Lebanon County Mt...

  16. Only, Not Lonely: Reflections of an Only Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Libby

    2006-01-01

    Libby Zimmerman, an early childhood consultant, explores the negative stereotypes of only children and reflects on her experiences being an only child and raising an only child. Despite decades of research pointing to the contrary, there is still a lingering suspicion that only children are spoiled, asocial, and maladjusted. The author traces the…

  17. Utility Assessment Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Raiffa (831, LaValle [891, and other books on decision analysis. 4.2 Risk Attitudes Much recent research has focused on the investigation of various risk...Issacs, G.L., Hamer, R., Chen, J., Chuang, D., Woodworth, G., Molenaar , I., Lewis C., and Libby, D., Manual for the Computer-Assisted Data Analysis (CADA

  18. Experimental Studies of CADA-Based Utility Assessment Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Trabajos de Estadistica, in press, 1981. Novick, M. R., Isaacs, G. L., Hamer, R., Chen, J., Chuang, D., Woodworth, G., Molenaar , I., Lewis, C., & Libby...Hill Book Co., Inc., 1959. Slovic, P. From Shakespeare to Simo: Spoculatie - and sm evidence - about man’s ability to process Imfotmatiea. Or&&n

  19. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serve, Kinta M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile…

  20. 75 FR 62415 - Nomans Land Island National Wildlife Refuge, Town of Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Libby Herland, Project Leader, Eastern Massachusetts NWR Complex, 73 Weir Hill Road, Sudbury, MA 01776; phone: 413-443-4661, or Carl Melberg, Planning Team Leader, phone: 978... including intertidal, freshwater wetland, grassland, and shrubland habitats, it serves an important role for...

  1. Spatial distribution of impacts to channel bed mobility due to flow regulation, Kootenai River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Burke; Klaus Jorde; John M. Buffington; Jeffrey H. Braatne; Rohan Benjakar

    2006-01-01

    The regulated hydrograph of the Kootenai River between Libby Dam and Kootenay Lake has altered the natural flow regime, resulting in a significant decrease in maximum flows (60% net reduction in median 1-day annual maximum, and 77%-84% net reductions in median monthly flows for the historic peak flow months of May and June, respectively). Other key hydrologic...

  2. Kootenai River Biological Baseline Status Report : Annual Report, 1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Diana [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, Bonners Ferry, ID (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem in Idaho, Montana and British Columbia (B.C.) Canada has been severely degraded during the past 50 years. This aquatic ecosystem has changed from one that was culturally eutrophic, to one that is oligotrophic due to channelization, diking, impoundment (construction and operation of Libby Dam), and pollution abatement measures in the watershed. As a result of these influences, flow regimes, temperature patterns, and water quality were altered, resulting in changes in primary production and aquatic insect and fish populations. Construction of Libby Dam (creation of Lake Koocanusa) and closure of Cominco`s fertilizer plant resulted in decreased phosphorus load to the Kootenai River to below historical levels. Dissolved orthophosphorus concentrations averaged 0.383 mg/L in 1970 as compared to 0.039 mg/L in 1979. Total phosphorus concentrations followed a similar pattern. Both total phosphorus and soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations remained below 0.05 mg/L from 1976 to 1994, characterizing the river as oligotrophic. Post Libby Dam primary productivity levels in the river represent an ultra-oligotrophic to mesotrophic system. Since the construction and operation of Libby Dam, invertebrate densities immediately downstream from the dam increased, but species diversity decreased. Insect diversity increased with increasing distance from the dam, but overall species diversity was lower than would be expected in a free-flowing river. Fish species composition and abundance has also changed as a result of the changes in the river and its watershed.

  3. An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of the Anchor and Adjustment Heuristic on the Audit Judgment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Pe ~ ** . . . ’ S .- ..% - - -- - - An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of the Anchor and Adjustment Heuristic on the Audit Judgment Process A...1 Introduction ....... ............... 1 Audit Opinion Process ... ............ 2 Professional Judgment ..... ........... 5 Heuristics in the Audit Process...to evaluating the results of analytic reviews and internal control compliance tests (Felix and Kinney 1982, also Libby 1981). Decomposing the audit opinion

  4. U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Remote Sensing Symposium, 29 - 31 October 1979 Held at Sheraton International Conference Center, Reston, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-31

    length for seismic evaluation of Libby Dam and its proposed companion reregulating dam. A paucity of regional structural mapping prior to this study...to miss them is to miss the whole meaning of an epoch. Space is such a challenge. It is the kind of challenge William Shakespeare sensed nearly 400

  5. Passive Coherent Detection and Target Location with Multiple Non-Cooperative Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Qinling Jeanette Olivia Tan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000...8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...UHF TV (analogue) ~550 MHz Vestigial -Sideband AM (vision); FM(sound), 5.5 MHz 1 MW -51 dBW m -2 at r1 = 100 km Digital audio broadcast ~220

  6. Interface Móvil para el Sitio Web de la UACO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Moyano

    2016-04-01

    En este trabajo nos enfocamos en desarrollar un prototipo para el sitio Web móvil de la Unidad Académica Caleta Olivia (UACO de la Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral (UNPA considerando al usuario como el centro del diseño y desarrollo. Con esta filosofía en mente, se define un marco de trabajo para el desarrollo del prototipo incorporando recomendaciones de Usabilidad y Accesibilidad Web de referentes internacionales y aplicando herramientas para el diseño inclusivo dirigido a dispositivos móviles.

  7. Chelsea aiaparaad / Lylian Meister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meister, Lylian, 1966-

    2008-01-01

    Muljeid Briti Kuningliku Aiandusseltsi korraldatavalt Chelsea Flower Show'lt. Vaadeldud aiad: Lloyds TSB aed (kujundas Trevor Tooth), The Savills Garden (Philip Nixon, pälvis ühe kuldmedalitest), George Harrisoni mälestuseks kujundatud aed "From Life to Life" (abikaasa Olivia ja Yvonne Innes), The Daily Telegraph'i aed (Arabella Lennox-Boyd), Austraalia aed (Jamie Durie), Laurent-Perrier aed (Tom Stuart-Smith, parim showaed), söödav mänguväljak - parim maa-aed, Bennett Garden

  8. Diagnóstico de las necesidades de un grupo de madres de jóvenes adictos. Aportes a la perspectiva del desarrollo a escala humana

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Pablo De Lisio; Mario Arturo Palma Godoy

    2014-01-01

    El presente escrito es producto de un plan de investigación como becario de postgrado. El estudio se realizó en una asociación civil llamada ALuCA (Asociación de Lucha Contra las Adicciones) ubicada en la ciudad de Caleta Olivia. Ante la particularidad del contexto patagónico se propone el grupo como dispositivo específico para intervenir sobre problemáticas sociales complejas tales como las adicciones. Desde una metodología cualitativa basada en la triangulación de métodos y teorías provenie...

  9. 75 FR 55961 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    .../1/10 LOC RWY 8, AMDT 5A. 21-Oct-10 AZ FORT HUACHUCA/ SIERRA VISTA MUNI- 0/5486 8/30/10 TAKEOFF MINIMUMS AND OBSTACLE DP, AMDT 2. SIERRA VISTA. LIBBY AAF. 21-Oct-10 LA LAKE CHARLES..... LAKE CHARLES RGNL... LOC/DME RWY 14, AMDT 8. 21-Oct-10 LA SLIDELL SLIDELL 0/7403 8/30/10 NDB RWY 36, ORIG-D. 21-Oct-10 FL...

  10. Index of Oral Histories Relating to Naval Research, Development, and Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Mentioned: Byrnes, CAPT James Parsons, RADIA William S. Lauritsen, Dr. Charles C. Sabin , Palmer Aubjects: China Lake pilot plant Michelson Laboratory...119 Seiler, Karl 30 Saalfeld, Dr. Frederick 355, 358 Selwyn, Dr. Philip 355, 358 Sabin , Palmer 266 Senter, Frank 31 Sagdahl, John 266 Sette, Dr...research 157 Lehman, John 222 Libby Board 47, 128 Jaimming devices 210 Life cycle support function 69 Jet Propulsion 308 Light airborne ASW vehicle 235 Jet

  11. Properties of LaCo{sub 1-t}Cr{sub t}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilset, Bente Gilbu

    1997-12-31

    The interest in perovskite-like oxides as catalysts has increased rapidly since 1971, when Libby suggested using LaCoC{sub 3} as an auto exhaust catalyst. This thesis studies various properties of the sample: (1) the crystal structure and phase transition, (2) low-temperature magnetic susceptibility and magnetic ordering, (3) reduction and reoxidation, and (4) catalytic activity for CO oxidation. 48 refs., 47 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A Typology of Communication Dynamics in Families Living a Slow-Motion Technological Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Cline, Rebecca J W; Hernandez, Tanis; Berry-Bobovski, Lisa; Schwartz, Ann G; Ruckdeschel, John C

    2012-10-01

    With increasing numbers of communities harmed by exposures to toxic substances, greater understanding of the psychosocial consequences of these technological disasters is needed. One community living the consequences of a slow-motion technological disaster is Libby, Montana, where, for nearly 70 years, amphibole asbestos-contaminated vermiculite was mined and processed. Former mine employees and Libby area residents continue to cope with the health consequences of occupational and environmental asbestos exposure and with the psychosocial challenges accompanying chronic and often fatal asbestos-related diseases (ARD). Nine focus groups were conducted with Libby area residents. Transcripts were analyzed to explore patterns of family communication about ARD. The following five patterns emerged: Open/Supportive, Silent/Supportive, Open/Conflictual, Silent/Conflictual, and Silent/Denial. Open/Supportive communication included encouragement to be screened for ARD, information about ARD and related disaster topics, and emotional support for people with ARD. In contrast, communication patterns characterized by silence or conflict have the potential to hinder health-promoting communication and increase psychological distress.

  13. Analysis of Production and Delivery Center Hydrogen Applied to the Southern Patagonian Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Fernando Medina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Desire department of the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, presents the greatest potential electrolytic Hydrogen Production Country, From Three primary sources of sustainable energy: wind, solar, biomass. There, the Hydrogen Plant of Pico Truncado has capacity central production of hydrogen 100m3 of H2 / day, enough to supply 353 vehicles with hybrid fuel called HGNC, made by cutting 12% V / V of hydrogen in CNG (in situ at each station. Puerto Deseado, Fitz Roy, Caleta Olivia, Las Heras, Comodoro Rivadavia, Sarmiento and the Ancients: From the production cost, the cost of delivering hydrogen to the Southern Patagonian circuit comprised analyzed. Considering various local parameters are determined as a way of delivering more profitable virtual pipeline, with total cost of hydrogen estimated 6.5 USD / kg H2 and HGNC shipped in the station at 0.50 USD / Nm3.

  14. Minor Characters in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa Adnan Baqer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the role of the minor characters in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night's Dream. The study assumes that without the first group of minor characters, associated with Olivia, the play Twelfth Night would lose much of its humor, and without the second group, associated with Sebastian, the play would fall apart. On the other hand, in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream minor characters play important roles, without them, the action dose not ran smoothly, or does not ran at all. The paper falls into three sections. Section one deals with the role of each minor character in Twelfth Night.  Section two focuses on the minor characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Section three is a conclusion which sums up the findings of the study.

  15. Structural response of existing spatial truss roof construction based on Cosserat rod theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Mikołaj

    2018-04-01

    Paper presents the application of the Cosserat rod theory and newly developed associated finite elements code as the tools that support in the expert-designing engineering practice. Mechanical principles of the 3D spatially curved rods, dynamics (statics) laws, principle of virtual work are discussed. Corresponding FEM approach with interpolation and accumulation techniques of state variables are shown that enable the formulation of the C0 Lagrangian rod elements with 6-degrees of freedom per node. Two test examples are shown proving the correctness and suitability of the proposed formulation. Next, the developed FEM code is applied to assess the structural response of the spatial truss roof of the "Olivia" Sports Arena Gdansk, Poland. The numerical results are compared with load test results. It is shown that the proposed FEM approach yields correct results.

  16. Software engineering techniques applied to agricultural systems an object-oriented and UML approach

    CERN Document Server

    Papajorgji, Petraq J

    2014-01-01

    Software Engineering Techniques Applied to Agricultural Systems presents cutting-edge software engineering techniques for designing and implementing better agricultural software systems based on the object-oriented paradigm and the Unified Modeling Language (UML). The focus is on the presentation of  rigorous step-by-step approaches for modeling flexible agricultural and environmental systems, starting with a conceptual diagram representing elements of the system and their relationships. Furthermore, diagrams such as sequential and collaboration diagrams are used to explain the dynamic and static aspects of the software system.    This second edition includes: a new chapter on Object Constraint Language (OCL), a new section dedicated to the Model-VIEW-Controller (MVC) design pattern, new chapters presenting details of two MDA-based tools – the Virtual Enterprise and Olivia Nova, and a new chapter with exercises on conceptual modeling.  It may be highly useful to undergraduate and graduate students as t...

  17. Rescate y registro del patrimonio cultural del noreste santacruceño en la primera mitad del siglo XX, en su proceso de transformación como recurso-producto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Renée Tagliorette

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desde una perspectiva ambiental y socialmente sustentable del desarrollo socioeconómico, se propuso rescatar el patrimonio cultural perteneciente al ámbito rural, incluyendo las vías de comunicación, estafetas postales y telegráficas, estaciones de ferrocarril, boliches, faros, balizas y las industrias de principios del siglo XX (loberías y salinas del área comprendida en las secciones I, II y III de la Zona Catastral de Cabo Blanco del Departamento de Deseado en el noreste de la provincia de Santa Cruz. Asimismo, se incluyeron en su análisis aspectos referidos a las localidades de Fitz Roy, Jaramillo y Caleta Olivia. Para el logro de este objetivo, se inició la conformación de un inventario de bienes patrimoniales buscando contribuir al diseño futuro de propuestas de producción alternativas o complementarias a la original.

  18. The first steps of isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.

    1995-01-01

    The author narrated on his personal experience of the past forty years of the development of isotope hydrology as an independent scientific branch. He started with the basic research work of for example Dansgaard and Libby and went on to the recent world-wide recording and interpreting isotopic data network. The IAEA organisation has accompanied the scientific development in an exemplary manner and, thus brought forward the isotope hydrological research activities to the high standard reached presently. This is documented by the great number of publications promoted by the IAEA throughout this time. 4 figs, 24 refs

  19. Probing Androgen Receptor Signaling in Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Writing , review, and/or revision of the manuscript: D.T. Miyamoto, R.J. Lee, S.L. Stott, N.H. Bander, C.-L. Wu, L.V. Sequist, M.R. Smith, M. Toner, S...Maheswaran, D.A. Haber Administrative, technical , or material support (i.e., reporting or organizing data, constructing databases): D.T. Miyamoto...The authors thank J. Walsh, F. Floyd, G. Korir, C. Koris, and L. Libby for technical support. In memory of Charles Evans and in recognition of

  20. Standard Operating Procedures and Field Methods Used for Conducting Ecological Risk Assessment Case Studies. Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island, and Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Kittery, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Studies by Craig et al. 20 have chloride extraction/Grignard derivatization method. shown that significant evaporative losses of TBT + Methylene...and Craig . P1J Anahiw. 1987. 112: 1781 available from IEEE Service Center. 445 Hoes tLane. 21/ Aue. W A and Flinn. C G J Cltroinato-er.. 1977, 142 145...Environmental Research Laboratory Narragansett, Narragansett, RI. Keith, L.H., W. Crummett, J. Deegan , Jr, R.A. Libby, J.K. Taylor, and B. Wentler, 1983. Annal

  1. Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Bonners

    2009-02-19

    The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a

  2. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: from ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14 C had not had the 'wrong' half-life - a fact that delayed its discovery. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to W. F. Libby that 14 C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere (ca. 230 Bq/kg) lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14 C measurement from a crude, bulk (8 g carbon) dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for 'molecular dating' at the 10 μg to 100 mg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the 'bomb effect', that spawned new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from cosmic ray physics to oceanography to the reconstruction of environmental history. (author)

  3. The impact of small irrigation diversion dams on the recent migration rates of steelhead and redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Dana E.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Powell, Madison S.

    2013-01-01

    Barriers to migration are numerous in stream environments and can occur from anthropogenic activities (such as dams and culverts) or natural processes (such as log jams or dams constructed by beaver (Castor canadensis)). Identification of barriers can be difficult when obstructions are temporary or incomplete providing passage periodically. We examine the effect of several small irrigation diversion dams on the recent migration rates of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in three tributaries to the Methow River, Washington. The three basins had different recent migration patterns: Beaver Creek did not have any recent migration between sites, Libby Creek had two-way migration between sites and Gold Creek had downstream migration between sites. Sites with migration were significantly different from sites without migration in distance, number of obstructions, obstruction height to depth ratio and maximum stream gradient. When comparing the sites without migration in Beaver Creek to the sites with migration in Libby and Gold creeks, the number of obstructions was the only significant variable. Multinomial logistic regression identified obstruction height to depth ratio and maximum stream gradient as the best fitting model to predict the level of migration among sites. Small irrigation diversion dams were limiting population interactions in Beaver Creek and collectively blocking steelhead migration into the stream. Variables related to stream resistance (gradient, obstruction number and obstruction height to depth ratio) were better predictors of recent migration rates than distance, and can provide important insight into migration and population demographic processes in lotic species.

  4. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: From ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14C had not had the “wrong” half-life—a fact that delayed its discovery [1]. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to W. F. Libby that 14C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere [ca. 230 Bq/kg] lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for “molecular dating” at the 10 μg to 100 μg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the “bomb effect,” that spawned new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from cosmic ray physics to oceanography to the reconstruction of environmental history.

  5. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  6. Simulation of flame surface density and burning rate of a premixed turbulent flame using contour advection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, B.H.Y.; Chan, C.K. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2006-10-15

    In this paper, a 2-dimensional rod-stabilized V-shaped flame is simulated using contour advection with surgery as well as the random vortex method. Effects of turbulence on various quantities, such as flame brush thickness and flame surface density, are investigated. The flame surface density S is estimated using the Bray-Moss-Libby formulation, which involves the use of a mean orientation factor {sigma}{sub c}. As a comparison, values of S are also obtained using Shepherd's model, which employs the values of mean flame surface area and mean flame length. Local flame structure is characterized in terms of turbulent flame brush, orientation factor, and flame surface density. Profiles of S obtained using the two different models are compared and show that discrepancy is more evident with increasing turbulence intensity. (author)

  7. The ghost of public health journalism: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Glinda S; Brown, Rebecca C

    2010-03-01

    The news industry is undergoing shrinking newspaper circulations, cuts in science and health coverage, and expansion of Internet news sources. We examine the impact of these changes using a case study set in Libby, Montana. In 1999, a Seattle newspaper story focused attention on asbestos exposure and related diseases in this small town. In 2009, that newspaper became an online-only newspaper, just as coverage of a related criminal trial began. Later that year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a public health emergency. Online newspaper archives and a collaboration between the University of Montana's journalism and law schools contributed to coverage of these developments. Continued efforts to promote interest in and skills needed for high-quality public health and environmental reporting are needed.

  8. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  9. Plan for mass accelerator spectrometry at Gif-sur-Yvette and Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.; Bianchi, L.; Delibrias, G.; Koechlin, Y.

    1981-05-01

    From early 50', a carbon 14 dating laboratory was created at the Centre des Faibles Radioactivites de Gif-sur-Yvette (C.F.R.). From this time, more than 5,000 archaeological and geological samples were measured with the Libby method by this laboratory. C.F.R. is in the way to actualize its dating activities with the new accelerator method. A 3 MV General Ionex Tandetron is planed to be located at Gif-sur-Yvette next year and shared with Orsay University for 14 C. 10 Be and 36 Cl mass spectroscopy measurement. During the same time attempts have been made to adapt the Super FN Tandem of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay for 14 C dating

  10. Partially premixed prevalorized kerosene spray combustion in turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrigui, M.; Ahmadi, W.; Sadiki, A.; Janicka, J. [Institute for Energy and Powerplant Technology, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Moesl, K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A detailed numerical simulation of kerosene spray combustion was carried out on a partially premixed, prevaporized, three-dimensional configuration. The focus was on the flame temperature profile dependency on the length of the pre-vaporization zone. The results were analyzed and compared to experimental data. A fundamental study was performed to observe the temperature variation and flame flashback. Changes were made to the droplet diameter, kerosene flammability limits, a combustion model parameter and the location of the combustion initialization. Investigations were performed for atmospheric pressure, inlet air temperature of 90 C and a global equivalence ratio of 0.7. The simulations were carried out using the Eulerian Lagrangian procedure under a fully two-way coupling. The Bray-Moss-Libby model was adjusted to account for the partially premixed combustion. (author)

  11. Interns shall not sleep: the duty hours boomerang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan SF

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. On March 10, 2017, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME announced revisions to its common program requirements related to duty hours (1. Effective on July 1, 2017, the most important change will be an increase in the maximum consecutive hours that an intern may work. Interns will now be able to continuously perform patient care work up to a maximum of 24 hours with an additional 4 hours for managing care transitions. This reverses the controversial reduction to 16 hours that occurred in 2011 (2. The regulation of house staff duty hours formally began in the late 1980s. It was precipitated largely because of the publicity resulting from the 1984 death of Libby Zion in a New York teaching hospital that was attributed partly to poor decisions made by fatigued and overworked house staff (3. Consequently, the state of New York in 1989 passed laws restricting the …

  12. Duty hour reform in a shifting medical landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Anupam B; Prasad, Vinay

    2013-09-01

    The circumstances that led to the death of Libby Zion in 1984 prompted national discussions about the impact of resident fatigue on patient outcomes. Nearly 30 years later, national duty hour reforms largely motivated by patient safety concerns have demonstrated a negligible impact of duty hour reductions on patient mortality. We suggest that the lack of an impact of duty hour reforms on patient mortality is due to a different medical landscape today than existed in 1984. Improvements in quality of care made possible by computerized order entry, automated medication checks, inpatient pharmacists, and increased resident supervision have, among other systemic changes, diminished the adverse impact that resident fatigue is able to have on patient outcomes. Given this new medical landscape, advocacy towards current and future duty hour reforms may be best justified by evidence of the impact of duty hour reform on resident wellbeing, education, and burnout.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of a premixed flame stabilized by a rectangular section cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailly, P.; Garreton, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Bruel, P.; Champion, M. et al. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d`Aerotechnique (ENSMA), 86 - Poitiers (France)

    1996-12-31

    A numerical and experimental study of a turbulent reactive zone stabilized by a rectangular cross-section cylinder positioned in a fully developed turbulent channel flow of a propane-air mixture is presented. Such a flow geometry has been chosen because it features most of the phenomena (recirculation zones, flame stabilization, wall-flame interactions) present in systems of practical interest. The flow is experimentally investigated with a 2-D laser Doppler velocimeter and thin compensated thermocouples. The modelling of the reactive flow is based on a modified Bray-Moss-Libby combustion model associated with a Reynolds-Stress turbulence model. The resulting set of equations is solved by a finite difference Navier-Stokes code on a rectilinear mesh. The comparison between numerical nd experimental results shows that the use of a full second-order model with dedicated equations for both the Reynolds stresses and the scalar turbulent flux does not lead to a significant improvement of the numerical results. Indeed, although the longitudinal scalar turbulent flux exhibits a non-gradient behaviour, the evolution of the mean progress variable introduced by the Bray-Moss-Libby model appears to be mainly controlled by the transverse scalar gradient which follows in all cases a gradient like behaviour. Additional measurements and calculations are required to precise the exact range of mass flow rate, equivalence ratio and obstacle bluffness over which such a tendency can be observed. Nevertheless, the tentative conclusion of this study is that, as soon as a refinement of the modelling of reactive flows in combustors which involve flameholders similar to the one investigated in this study is needed, the use of a Reynolds-Stress model should be the first necessary step. Then, depending on the exact nature of the flow geometry, a second phase should consist in evaluating the need for the use of a full second order model like the one presented in this study. (authors) 25 refs.

  14. Sequence analysis and typing of Saprolegnia strains isolated from freshwater fish from Southern Chinese regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siya Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Saprolegniasis, caused by Saprolegnia infection, is one of the most common diseases in freshwater fish. Our study aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics of saprolegniasis in Chinese regions of high incidence. Saprolegnia were isolated and identified by morphological and molecular methods targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS ribosomal DNA (rDNA and building neighbor-joining (NJ and maximum parsimony (MP phylogenetic trees. The ITS sequences of eight isolated strains were compared with GenBank sequences and all strains fell into three clades: CLADE1 (02, LP, 04 and 14, CLADE2 (S1, and CLADE3 (CP, S2, L5 and the reference ATCC200013. Isolates 02 and LP shared 80% sequence similarity with S. diclina, S. longicaulis, S. ferax, S. mixta, and S. anomalies. Further, isolates 04 and 14 shared 80% similarity with S. bulbosa and S. oliviae. Finally, extremely high ITS sequence similarities were identified between isolates S1 and S. australis (100%; CP and S. hypogyna (96%; and S2, L5, ATCC200013 and S. salmonis (98%. This research provides insights into the identification, prevention and control of saprolegniasis pathogens and the potential development of effective drugs.

  15. Prevalence and natural history of ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer and the clinical impact of targeted therapy with ALK inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia PL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Puey Ling Chia,1 Paul Mitchell,1 Alexander Dobrovic,2–4 Thomas John1,2,4 1Department of Medical Oncology, Olivia-Newton John Cancer and Wellness Centre, Victoria, Australia; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Austin Health, Victoria, Australia; 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 4School of Cancer Medicine, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Improved understanding of molecular drivers of carcinogenesis has led to significant progress in the management of lung cancer. Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene rearrangements constitute about 4%–5% of all NSCLC patients. ALK+ NSCLC cells respond well to small molecule ALK inhibitors such as crizotinib; however, resistance invariably develops after several months of treatment. There are now several newer ALK inhibitors, with the next generation of agents targeting resistance mutations. In this review, we will discuss the prevalence and clinical characteristics of ALK+ lung cancer, current treatment options, and future directions in the management of this subset of NSCLC patients. Keywords: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK, gene rearrangements, lung cancer, kinase inhibitors, lung adenocarcinoma

  16. Evolution of the clonogenic potential of human epidermal stem/progenitor cells with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobiri O

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Zobiri, Nathalie Deshayes, Michelle Rathman-JosserandDepartment of Biological Research, L'Oréal Advanced Research, Clichy Cedex, FranceAbstract: A number of clinical observations have indicated that the regenerative potential and overall function of the epidermis is modified with age. The epidermis becomes thinner, repairs itself less efficiently after wounding, and presents modified barrier function recovery. In addition, the dermal papillae flatten out with increasing age, suggesting a modification in the interaction between epidermal and dermal compartments. As the epidermal regenerative capacity is dependent upon stem and progenitor cell function, it is naturally of interest to identify and understand age-related changes in these particular keratinocyte populations. Previous studies have indicated that the number of stem cells does not decrease with age in mouse models but little solid evidence is currently available concerning human skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clonogenic potential of keratinocyte populations isolated from the epidermis of over 50 human donors ranging from 18 to 71 years old. The data indicate that the number of epidermal cells presenting high regenerative potential does not dramatically decline with age in human skin. The authors believe that changes in the microenvironment controlling epidermal basal cell activity are more likely to explain the differences in epidermal function observed with increasing age.Keywords: skin, epidermal stem cells, aging, colony-forming efficiency test

  17. Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide in magnetic resonance imaging of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirrat CG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Colin G Stirrat,1 Alex T Vesey,1 Olivia MB McBride,1 Jennifer MJ Robson,1 Shirjel R Alam,1 William A Wallace,2 Scott I Semple,1,3 Peter A Henriksen,1 David E Newby1 1British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Department of Pathology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 3Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO are iron-oxide based contrast agents that enhance and complement in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by shortening T1, T2, and T2* relaxation times. USPIO can be employed to provide immediate blood pool contrast, or to act as subsequent markers of cellular inflammation through uptake by inflammatory cells. They can also be targeted to specific cell-surface markers using antibody or ligand labeling. This review will discuss the application of USPIO contrast in MRI studies of cardiovascular disease. Keywords: cardiac, aortic, MRI, USPIO, carotid, vascular, molecular imaging

  18. An Assessment of Oil Pollution in the Coastal Zone of Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commendatore, Marta Graciela; Esteves, José Luis

    2007-11-01

    The Patagonian coast is considered a relatively pristine environment. However, studies conducted along coastal Patagonia have showed hydrocarbon pollution mostly concentrated at ports that have fishing, oil loading, general merchant, and/or tourist activities. A high value of total aliphatic hydrocarbons (TAH) was found at the Rawson fishing port (741 μg/g dw). In other ports with and without petroleum-related activities, hydrocarbon values were approximately 100 μg/g dw. The highest values for TAH and total aromatic hydrocarbons (TArH) were found in Faro Aristizábal, north of San Jorge gulf (1304 and 737 μg/g dw, respectively). This is very likely the result of petroleum-related activities at the Comodoro Rivadavia, Caleta Cordova, and Caleta Olivia ports located within this gulf. In other coastal areas away from potential anthropogenic sources, hydrocarbon values were less than 2 and 3 μg/g dw for TAH and TArH, respectively. This review of published and unpublished information suggests that ports are important oil pollution sources in the Patagonian coast. More detailed studies are needed to evaluate the area affected by port activities, to understand the mechanisms of hydrocarbon distribution in surrounding environments, and to assess bioaccumulation in marine organisms. Despite that some regulations exist to control oil pollution derived from port and docked vessel activities, new and stricter management guidelines should be implemented.

  19. Une affaire de femmes : la chanson comique en France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbelle Marc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available French female artists over the last century, including Yvette Guibert, Brigitte Fontaine, Colette Renard and Clarika, among many others, have successfully used different forms of humour in their songs. This article aims to study how feminine humour is created in the French chanson and how it evolves throughout time. Considering humour both as a means and as a consequence of feminine agency, it will explore symbolic and aesthetic issues related to humoristic chanson as regard to the creation of feminine identity in the French context. For that purpose, it will first address the specificities of the relation between women and music and between women and humour. Then, it will analyse several representative songs in this respect, such as Fais-moi mal, Johnny by Magali Noël, Déshabillez-moi by Juliette Gréco and Les crêpes aux champignons by Olivia Ruiz, among others. Drawing from these examples, humour will be regarded both as a means and as a consequence of feminine agency.

  20. Molecular effects of bioactive fraction of Curcuma mangga (DLBS4847 as a downregulator of 5α-reductase activity pathways in prostatic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsono AH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agung Heru Karsono, Olivia Mayasari Tandrasasmita, Raymond R TjandrawinataSection of Molecular Pharmacology, Research Innovation and Invention, Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences, Dexa Medica, Cikarang, IndonesiaAbstract: DLBS4847 is a standardized bioactive fraction of Curcuma mangga. In this study, we used prostate cancer (PC-3 as the cell line to study the effects of DLBS4847 on prostatic cell viability, as well as related molecular changes associated with the decreased cell number. The observation revealed that DLBS4847 inhibited the growth of PC3 cells through downregulation of the 5α-reductase (5AR pathway. At the transcription level, 5AR1 and androgen-receptor gene expressions were downregulated in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 5AR-1 and dihydrotestosterone expression were also downregulated at the protein level. A microarray study was also performed to see the effects of DLBS4847 on differential gene expressions in prostate cancer 3 cells. Among others, DLBS4847 downregulated genes related to prostate growth and hypertrophy. Our results suggested that DLBS4847 could potentially become an alternative treatment for prostate disorders, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this regard, DLBS4847 exerts its growth inhibition partially through downregulation of the 5AR pathway.Keywords: DLBS4847, Curcuma mangga, 5α-reductase inhibitor, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, prostate cancer

  1. La escritura en alumnos de 3º año de EGB. Zona Golfo San Jorge - Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Raiter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Este proyecto tuvo como fin reconocer, describir, sistematizar e interpretar los problemas que manifiestan los alumnos de tercer año de EGB de Caleta Olivia y de Comodoro Rivadavia en el dominio de la escritura en el ámbito escolar. El enfoque teórico combinó aportes de la psicopedagogía, la psicolingüística y la sociolingüística. Se seleccionaron 4 escuelas públicas: 2 de cada ciudad. A la vez, en cada ciudad, se escogió 1 escuela de clase media y 1 de clase baja. Los datos fueron recolectados mediante un test suministrado por los docentes a cargo de cada grupo de alumnos, el que consistió en tres tareas: dictado, copia de texto y escritura espontánea a partir de un disparador (viñeta. Los resultados alcanzados son satisfactorios para una investigación exploratoria como esta y para un equipo de investigación conformado en su mayoría por investigadores noveles.

  2. "How to stop choking to death": Rethinking lesbian separatism as a vibrant political theory and feminist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enszer, Julie R

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary feminist discourses, lesbian separatism is often mocked. Whether blamed as a central reason for feminism's alleged failure or seen as an unrealistic, utopian vision, lesbian separatism is a maligned social and cultural formation. This article traces the intellectual roots of lesbian feminism from the early 1970s in The Furies and Radicalesbians through the work of Julia Penelope and Sarah Lucia Hoagland in the 1980s and 1990s, then considers four feminist and lesbian organizations that offer innovative engagements with lesbian separatism. Olivia Records operated as a separatist enterprise, producing and distributing womyn's music during the 1970s and 1980s. Two book distributors, Women in Distribution, which operated in the 1970s, and Diaspora Distribution, which operated in the 1980s, offer another approach to lesbian separatism as a form of economic and entrepreneurial engagement. Finally, Sinister Wisdom, a lesbian-feminist literary and arts journal, enacts a number of different forms of lesbian separatism during its forty-year history. These four examples demonstrate economic and cultural investments of lesbian separatism and situate its investments in larger visionary feminist projects. More than a rigid ideology, lesbian separatism operates as a feminist process, a method for living in the world.

  3. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Bonners Ferry, ID; Anders, Paul [Cramer Fish Sciences; Moscow, ID; Shafii, Bahman [Statistical Consulting Services; Clarkston, WA

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach

  4. A search for Potential Impact Sites in Southern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, M. C. L.

    The Southern part of Argentina is composed of five Provinces; Tierra del Fuego, Santa Cruz, Chubut, Rio Negro and Neuquen. A search for potential impact sites was performed by the author through the examination of 76 color LANDSAT satellite images ( 1:250,000 - resolution = 250 meters ) at the Instituto Geografico Militar ( IGM ) of Buenos Aires city. When a potential candidate was found a more detailed study of the site was done. If available the radar X-SAR satellite images of the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Luft-und Raumfahrt, (DLR), Berlin, Germany , were also examined. The final step was to perform a review of the available published geologic information of each site at the Servicio Geologico y Minero Argentino ( SEGEMAR ), ( =Geological Survey of Argentina ), in Buenos Aires. The resulting catalogue contains information about sites where possible simple crater or complex impact structures could be present. Each case demands future detailed and `in situ' research by an impact cratering specialist. --Tierra del Fuego: TF1 ) Ushuaia 5569-II, No 218. Cerro Taarsh, Estancia San Justo. Possible complex structure. Semi-circular area of concentric low ridges. Estimated diameter : 12 km. Probably very eroded. --Santa Cruz: SC1 ) Gobernador Gregores 4969-I, No 127. Estancia La Aragonesa Possible eroded complex structure. Circular area of low ridges, estimated diameter: 10 km.. Bull's eye like morphology. SC2 ) Gobernador Gregores 4969-I, No 127. Gran Altiplanicie Central. Possible simple crater in basalts. Diameter: 1 km.. SC3 ) Tres Lagos 4972-IV, No 106. Meseta del Bagual Chico. Possible perfectly circular simple crater in basalts. Diameter: 1.0 km.. SC4 )Paso Rio Bote 5172-II, No 20. Rio Pelque, Ruta Provincial No 5. A circular bowl-shaped structure is present on fluvial deposits of pleistocenic age. Diameter: 3.5 km.. SC5 ) Caleta Olivia 4769-II, No 28. North of Cerro Doce Grande. Possible complex structure of concentric circular rings of ridges. SC6 ) Caleta

  5. Epioptics-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cricenti, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Preface -- Ab-initio theories for the calculation of excited states properties / O. Pulci ... [et al.] -- Theory of surface second harmonic generation / W. Luis Mochán, Jesś A. Maytorena -- Exitation of multiple plasmon in optical second-harmonic generation / K. Pedersen, T. G. Pedersen, P. Morgen -- Non-linear optical probes of biological surfaces / Mischa Bonn, Volker Knecht, Michiel Müller -- Ab initio study of the Ge(111): Sn surface / Paola Gori, Olivia Pulci, Antonio Cricenti -- Lifetime of excited states / B. Hellsing -- Soliton dynamics in non-commensurate surface structure / Alexander S. Kovalev, Igor V. Gerasimchuk -- Raman scattering as an epioptic probe for low dimensional structures / E. Speiser, K. Fleischer, W. Richter -- Calculation of reflectance anisotropy for semiconductor surface exploration / W. G. Schmidt -- Molecular assembly at metal surfaces studied by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy / David S. Martin -- Study of solid/liquid interfaces by optical techniques / Y. Borensztein -- Surface preparation of Cu(110) for ambient environments / G. E. Isted, N. P. Blanchard, D. S. Martin -- Micro-radiographs stored in lithium fluoride films show strong optical contrast with no topographical contribution / A. Ustione ... [et al.] -- Metal nanofilms studied with infrared spectroscopy / Gerhard Fahsold, Andreas Priebe, Annemarie Pucci -- An AFM investigation of oligonucleotides anchored on an unoxidized crystalline silicon surface / G. Longo ... [et al.] -- A new approach to characterize polymeric nanofilters contamination using scanning near-field optical microscopy / C. Oliva ... [et al.] -- Magnetization reversal processes in Fe/NiO/Fe(001) trilayers studied by means of magneto-optical Kerr effect / P. Biagioni -- Laser-induced band bending variation for ZnTe (110)1x1 surface / S. D. Thorpe ... [et al.] -- Optical properties of materials in an undergraduate physics curriculum / Julio R. Blanco.

  6. Description of extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Steven G.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Morton, Robert A.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Gelfencaum, Guy

    2010-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the origins of extreme-wave deposits and to help assess the potential risk of future overwash events, a field mapping survey was conducted in November 2006 on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Deposits were mapped and analyzed to help develop a systematic sedimentological approach to distinguish the type of extreme-wave event (tsunamis or storms) or combination of events that formed and modified the deposits over time. Extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire between Boka Onima and Boka Olivia have formed sand sheets, poly-modal ridge complexes, and boulder fields on a Pleistocene limestone platform 3?8 meters above sea level. The deposits exhibit characteristics that are consistent with both large storm and tsunami processes that often overlap one another. Sand sheets occur as low-relief features underlying and incorporated with boulder field deposits. The seaward edge of ridge complexes are deposited up to 70 m from the shoreline and can extend over 200 m inland. Over 600 clasts were measured in fields and range in size from coarse gravel to fine block, weigh up to 165 metric tons, and are placed over 280 m from the shoreline. Our analyses indicate that the deposits may have been produced by a combination of hurricane and tsunami events spanning 10s to 1000s of years. Comparing the different deposit morphologies between study sites highlights the importance of shoreline orientation to the distribution of extreme-wave deposits onshore. However, further investigation is required to fully understand the processes that have produced and modified these deposits over time.

  7. The Strategic Environment Assessment bibliographic network: A quantitative literature review analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caschili, Simone; De Montis, Andrea; Ganciu, Amedeo; Ledda, Antonio; Barra, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Academic literature has been continuously growing at such a pace that it can be difficult to follow the progression of scientific achievements; hence, the need to dispose of quantitative knowledge support systems to analyze the literature of a subject. In this article we utilize network analysis tools to build a literature review of scientific documents published in the multidisciplinary field of Strategic Environment Assessment (SEA). The proposed approach helps researchers to build unbiased and comprehensive literature reviews. We collect information on 7662 SEA publications and build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) employing the basic idea that two publications are interconnected if one cites the other. We apply network analysis at macroscopic (network architecture), mesoscopic (sub graph) and microscopic levels (node) in order to i) verify what network structure characterizes the SEA literature, ii) identify the authors, disciplines and journals that are contributing to the international discussion on SEA, and iii) scrutinize the most cited and important publications in the field. Results show that the SEA is a multidisciplinary subject; the SEABN belongs to the class of real small world networks with a dominance of publications in Environmental studies over a total of 12 scientific sectors. Christopher Wood, Olivia Bina, Matthew Cashmore, and Andrew Jordan are found to be the leading authors while Environmental Impact Assessment Review is by far the scientific journal with the highest number of publications in SEA studies. - Highlights: • We utilize network analysis to analyze scientific documents in the SEA field. • We build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) of 7662 publications. • We apply network analysis at macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic network levels. • We identify SEABN architecture, relevant publications, authors, subjects and journals

  8. The Strategic Environment Assessment bibliographic network: A quantitative literature review analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caschili, Simone, E-mail: s.caschili@ucl.ac.uk [UCL QASER Lab, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Montis, Andrea; Ganciu, Amedeo; Ledda, Antonio; Barra, Mario [Dipartimento di Agraria, University of Sassari, viale Italia, 39, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Academic literature has been continuously growing at such a pace that it can be difficult to follow the progression of scientific achievements; hence, the need to dispose of quantitative knowledge support systems to analyze the literature of a subject. In this article we utilize network analysis tools to build a literature review of scientific documents published in the multidisciplinary field of Strategic Environment Assessment (SEA). The proposed approach helps researchers to build unbiased and comprehensive literature reviews. We collect information on 7662 SEA publications and build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) employing the basic idea that two publications are interconnected if one cites the other. We apply network analysis at macroscopic (network architecture), mesoscopic (sub graph) and microscopic levels (node) in order to i) verify what network structure characterizes the SEA literature, ii) identify the authors, disciplines and journals that are contributing to the international discussion on SEA, and iii) scrutinize the most cited and important publications in the field. Results show that the SEA is a multidisciplinary subject; the SEABN belongs to the class of real small world networks with a dominance of publications in Environmental studies over a total of 12 scientific sectors. Christopher Wood, Olivia Bina, Matthew Cashmore, and Andrew Jordan are found to be the leading authors while Environmental Impact Assessment Review is by far the scientific journal with the highest number of publications in SEA studies. - Highlights: • We utilize network analysis to analyze scientific documents in the SEA field. • We build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) of 7662 publications. • We apply network analysis at macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic network levels. • We identify SEABN architecture, relevant publications, authors, subjects and journals.

  9. Utilization of technology relevant to radiation and isotope in the archaeological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Kawamura, Hidehisa

    2005-01-01

    Many kinds of scientific technology have been used in the archaeological research. Especially the methodologies relevant to radiation and isotope have contributed to archaeology, giving a lot of scientific information. Among these methodologies, the radiocarbon dating, proposed by Willard Libby, has the greatest contribution since 1950. In Japan some scientists introduced this dating method immediately after Libby's proposal. As the result, the start of the Jomon period, in which the rope pattern was applied for decoration of earthenware, was reconsidered to be about 10,000 years ago. Yoshimasa Takashima mastered this technique and did the dendrochronological study at University of Washington, Seattle, from 1960 to 1961. After that he started the radiocarbon dating in Kyushu University, Fukuoka. First he employed the proportional gas counter to measure 14 C, requiring the complicated and time-consuming preparation of sample. When he restarted the radio-carbon dating with the authors in 1994 at Kyushu Environmental Evaluation Association (KEEA), he adopted the liquid scintillation counting method combined with the benzene synthesis from sample. Because this method is so convenient, many laboratories have adopted it as the conventional method in Japan. Since 1994, almost 100 samples have been treated every year in KEEA by this method. However this requires considerably much amount of sample, for example 20g in the case of wood. So that, in case of only small amount of sample can be obtained or a valuable sample is subjected to measurement, this method cannot be applicable. To resolve this problem, the accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) has been used widely. In this method the atoms of 14 C are counted directly, getting the high sensitivity and requiring very small amount of sample (order of mg). Recently, in KEEA, the radiocarbon dating using AMS was started under the cooperation with Center for Applied Isotope Studies (CAIS), University of Georgia. Another work of

  10. The 14C record in bristlecone pine wood of the past 8000 years based on the dendrochronology of the late C.W. Ferguson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, H.E.; Linick, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    When, in 1950, Willard Libby and his coworkers obtained their first radiocarbon ( 14 C) dates, C W Ferguson at the University of Arizona Tree Ring Laboratory was working on establishing a continuous tree ring series for the newly discovered bristlecone pine Pinus aristata. Before his untimely death in 1986, he had extended the series nearly 8000 years into the past. From the Ferguson series I obtained for 14 C determinations wood samples grown at various times. Also, two other laboratories obtained such samples. For B.C. times in particular, our measured 14 C-values that deviated consistently from those calculated from tree rings, and the deviations increased with age. This general trend was observed by other laboratories, but the presence of deviations from these trends, of the so-called 'wiggles', was questioned by other workers. To me these wiggles indicated the existence of a most interesting geophysical parameter valid for the whole terrestrial atmosphere. Fourier spectra obtained at my request by Kruse in 1972, and by Neftel, demonstrated the consistency of the results, and supported my contention that the secular variations of 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 are related to variations of solar activity. (author)

  11. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gena Kanas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Gena Kanas1, Libby Morimoto1, Fionna Mowat1, Cynthia O’Malley2, Jon Fryzek3, Robert Nordyke21Exponent, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 3MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry, clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes, and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.Keywords: medical informatics, health care, policy, outcomes

  12. Passive Flora? Reconsidering Nature’s Agency through Human-Plant Studies (HPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Charles Ryan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been—and, for reasons of human sustenance and creative inspiration, will continue to be—centrally important to societies globally. Yet, plants—including herbs, shrubs, and trees—are commonly characterized in Western thought as passive, sessile, and silent automatons lacking a brain, as accessories or backdrops to human affairs. Paradoxically, the qualities considered absent in plants are those employed by biologists to argue for intelligence in animals. Yet an emerging body of research in the sciences and humanities challenges animal-centred biases in determining consciousness, intelligence, volition, and complex communication capacities amongst living beings. In light of recent theoretical developments in our understandings of plants, this article proposes an interdisciplinary framework for researching flora: human-plant studies (HPS. Building upon the conceptual formations of the humanities, social sciences, and plant sciences as advanced by Val Plumwood, Deborah Bird Rose, Libby Robin, and most importantly Matthew Hall and Anthony Trewavas, as well as precedents in the emerging areas of human-animal studies (HAS, I will sketch the conceptual basis for the further consideration and exploration of this interdisciplinary framework.

  13. Estimating NOA Health Risks from Selected Construction Activities at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project (CDRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    The CDRP is a major construction project involving up to 400 workers using heavy earth moving equipment, blasting, drilling, rock crushing, and other techniques designed to move 7 million yards of earth. Much of this material is composed of serpentinite, blueschist, and other rocks that contain chrysotile, crocidolite, actinolite, tremolite, and Libby-class amphiboles. To date, over 1,000 personal, work area, and emission inventory related samples have been collected and analyzed by NIOSH 7400, NIOSH 7402, and CARB-AHERA methodology. Data indicate that various CDRP construction activities have the potential to generate significant mineral fibers and structures that could represent elevated on site and off site health risks. This presentation will review the Contractors air monitoring program for this major project, followed by a discussion of predictive methods to evaluate potential onsite and offsite risks. Ultimately, the data are used for planning control strategies designed to achieve a Project Action Level of 0.01 f/cc (one tenth the Cal/OSHA PEL) and risk-based offsite target levels.

  14. Transport of inertial particles in a turbulent premixed jet flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, F; Picano, F; Casciola, C M; Troiani, G

    2011-01-01

    The heat release, occurring in reacting flows, induces a sudden fluid acceleration which particles follow with a certain lag, due to their finite inertia. Actually, the coupling between particle inertia and the flame front expansion strongly biases the spatial distribution of the particles, by inducing the formation of localized clouds with different dimensions downstream the thin flame front. A possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called Clustering Index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle distribution from the Poissonian, which would correspond to a purely random spatial arrangement. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, which is spanned by the fluctuating instantaneous flame front. The effect is significant also for very light particles. In this case a simple model based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect is found to increases and persist well within the region of burned gases. The effect is maximum when the particle relaxation time is of the order of the flame front time scale. The evidence of this peculiar source of clustering is here provided by data from a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent premixed jet flame and confirmed by experimental data.

  15. Stratigraphy and uranium potential of early proterozoic metasedimentary rocks in the Medicine Bow Mountains, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain an eight mile (13 km) thick section of Early Proterozoic (2500 to 1700 My b.p.) metasedimentary rocks which is subdivided into three successions: the Phantom Lake Metamorphic Suite (oldest), Deep Lake Group, and Libby Creek Group. The most promising units are the basal conglomerate of the upper Phantom Lake Suite, which appears to unconformably overlie metavolcanics of the lower Phantom Lake Suite, and the Magnolia Formation, which unconformably overlies the upper Phantom Lake Suite. Outcrops of the former have yielded assays of up to 141 ppM U and 916 ppM Th, with no appreciable gold. Outcrops of the Magnolia Formation have yielded up to 8.4 ppM U and 38 ppM Th. Several factors indicate that these units deserve further study. First, the lithologies of the radioactive and nonradioactive units are remarkably similar to those found in known uranium fossil-placers. Second, the paleogeography was favorable for placer accumulation if the conglomerates are fluvial sediments in an epicontinental clastic succession which was deposited during several transgressive-regressive cycles, as interpreted to be, Third, the age of the conglomerates may be similar to the age of other known uranium placers-i.e., more than 2000 My b.p. And fourth, geological and geochemical studies indicate that both uranium and pyrite have been strongly leached from outcrops and that subsurface rocks contain more uranium than surface rocks do

  16. Space Flight and Re-Entry Trajectories : International Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Libby, Paul A

    1962-01-01

    In this and a following issue (Vol. VIII, 1962, Fasc. 2-3) of "Astronautica Acta" there will appear the papers presented at the first international symposium sponsored by the International Academy of Astronautics of the International Astronautical Federation. The theme of the meeting was "Space Flight and Re-Entry Trajectories." It was held at Louveciennes outside of Paris on June 19-21, 1961. Sixteen papers by authors from nine countries were presented; attendees numbered from 80 to 100. The organizing committee for the symposium was as follows: Prof. PAUL A. LIBBY, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, U.S.A., Chairman; Prof. LuiGI BROGLIO, University of Rome, Italy; Prof. B. FRAEIJS DE VEUBEKE, University of Liege, Belgium; Dr. D. G. KING-HELE, Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, Rants, United Kingdom; Prof. J. M. J. KooY, Royal Military School, Breda, Netherlands; Prof. JEAN KovALEVSKY, Bureau des Longitudes, Paris, France; Prof. RuDOLF PESEK, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia. The detailed ...

  17. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications.

  18. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  19. Kootenai River fisheries investigation: Stock status of burbot. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paragamian, V.L.; Whitman, V.

    1996-11-01

    The main theme of the 1996 burbot Lota lota study was to test the hypothesis that winter discharge for power production/flood control inhibits burbot migration to spawning tributaries. There were to be two to three minimum discharge (113 m 3 /s) periods from Libby Dam of approximately five days duration during December 1995 and January 1996. However, exceptionally heavy precipitation and an excessive amount of water stored in Lake Koocanusa created near flood conditions in the Kootenai River. These high flows prevented a controlled test. But the authors captured 27 burbot in the Kootenai River, Idaho and the Goat River, British Columbia, Canada. Burbot catch from November 1995 through March 1996 averaged 0.055 fish/net-day. Captured burbot ranged from 396 to 830 mm total length and weighed from 400 to 2,800 g (mean = 1,376 g). One burbot was captured at rkm 170 (the Idaho-Canada border) in mid-March after the spawning season. Nine burbot were implanted with sonic transmitters and released at the Goat River capture location. Two additional burbot had active transmitters from the previous season. Telemetry of burbot during the pre-spawn, spawning, and post-spawning periods was conducted. Burbot were located a total of 161 times from September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996. Ripe burbot were captured at the mouth of the Goat River during February

  20. Kootenai River fisheries investigation: Stock status of burbot and rainbow trout and fisheries inventory. Annual progress report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paragamian, V.L.

    1995-11-01

    The author sampled 33 burbot Lota lota in the Kootenay River in British Columbia, Canada. Burbot catch from November 1994 to February 1995 averaged 0.047 fish/net-day. Total length ranged from 3854 mm to 958 mm and weighed from 272 g to 4,086 g (mean = 982 g). Twelve burbot were implanted with sonic transmitters and released at capture sites. Two additional burbot had active transmitters from the previous season. Telemetry of burbot during the pre-spawn, spawning, and post-spawning periods was conducted. Burbot were located a total of 203 times from November 1994 through August 8, 1995. Ripe burbot were captured and they appeared to have an affinity to water <2C. The author believes burbot spawned in the Goat River, British Columbia. Burbot with sonic transmitters did not reach Idaho until after the spawning period. Statistical analysis of burbot movement and discharge from Libby Dam indicated there was a significant relation between winter power production and spawning migration of burbot. A controlled test is needed to verify this relation. Zooplankton samples from the Kootenai River were substantially lower than the delta of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, Canada

  1. Decay counting in the age of AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Up to the advent of AMS, all the accomplishments of 14 C dating, and the studies of 10 Be and other long-lived radionuclides, were made by low-level decay counting, the technique pioneered by W.F. Libby. It will hardly be news to people at this conference that, while much was accomplished in the three decades when counting prevailed, the world has now changed decisively. I will try to give an account of where low-level counting was 'before the revolution', and of what its usefulness is today. There are still some remarkable examples of its application, the best being the neutrino experiment of Raymond Davis, and its potential successors. Some cosmogenic nuclides, whose half-lives are less than 10 3 yr, are still best measured by decay; this will continue unless the overall ion yield of AMS systems rises markedly from present levels. One long-lived nuclide, 53 Mn, is still best measured by neutron activation as 312-day 54 Mn, but this may not continue. (orig.)

  2. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  3. Decay counting in the age of AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Up to the advent of AMS, all the accomplishments of 14 C dating, and the studies of 10 Be and other long-lived radionuclides, were made by low-level decay counting, the technique pioneered by W.F. Libby. It will hardly be news to people at this conference that, while much was accomplished in the three decades when counting prevailed, the world has now changed decisively. He will try to give an account of where low-level counting was before the revolution, and of what its usefulness is today. There are still some remarkable examples of its application, the best being the neutrino experiment of Raymond Davis, and its potential successors. Some cosmogenic nuclides, whose half-lives are less than 10 3 yr, are still best measured by decay; this will continue unless the overall ion yield of AMS systems rises markedly from present levels. One long-lived nuclide, 53 Mn, is still best measured by neutron activation as 312-day 54 Mn, but this may not continue

  4. Abstract processing and observer vantage perspective in dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Smith, Ly; Moulds, Michelle L

    2018-05-07

    processing and observer vantage perspective have been associated with negative consequences in depression. We investigated the relationship between mode of processing and vantage perspective bidirectionally in high and low dysphoric individuals, using abstract and concrete descriptions of experimenter-provided everyday actions. When vantage perspective was manipulated and processing mode was measured (Study 1a), participants who adopted a field perspective did not differ from those who adopted an observer perspective in their preference for abstract descriptions, irrespective of dysphoria status. When processing mode was manipulated and vantage perspective was measured (Study 1b), participants provided with abstract descriptions had a greater tendency to adopt an observer perspective than those provided with concrete descriptions, irrespective of dysphoria status. These results were replicated in larger online samples (Studies 2a and 2b). Together, they indicate a unidirectional causal relationship, whereby processing mode causally influences vantage perspective, in contrast to the bidirectional relationship previously reported in an unselected sample (Libby, Shaeffer, & Eibach, 2009). Further, these findings demonstrate that abstract processing increases the likelihood of adopting an observer perspective, and support targeting abstract processing in the treatment of depression to address the negative consequences associated with both abstract processing and recalling/imagining events from an observer perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Chemical Effects of Nuclear Recoil in Organic Halide Systems: A New Theoretical Treatment and Experimental Verification of the Theory; Effets Chimiques du Recul Nucleaire dans des Systemes Organiques Halogenes: Nouveau Traitement Theorique et Verification Experimentale de la Theorie; Khimicheskie vozdejstviya yadernoj otdachi v organicheskikh galoidnykh sistemakh: novoe teoreticheskoe tolkovanie i ehksperimental'noe podtverzhdenie teorii; Efectos Quimicos del Retroceso Nuclear en Sistemas de Haluros Organicos: Nuevo Tratamiento Teorico y Verificacion Experimental de la Teoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontis, S. S.; Sanitwongs, P.; Weston, M. [Londonderry Laboratory for Radiochemistry, University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    Methods have been developed for calculating the organic retention of radiohalogen to be expected following neutron activation of mixtures of two organic halides and the corresponding free halogen. The methods are based on the concepts of the Libby ''billiard-ball'' process of hot-atom labelling and retentions are expressed in terms of two types of parameters: (1) the fractional chance that collision of a hot radiohalogen atom with a particular molecule will lead to retention of the hot atom in that molecule; (2) the upper and lower energy limits for what is termed a hot bromine atom. It is shown how the former type of parameter may be derived from experiments with binary mixtures of an organic halide and the corresponding free halogen: the second type of parameter must be deduced from nuclear and chemical data. These methods have been tested by studies on the systems C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br/CCl{sub 4}/Br{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br/C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Br/Br{sub 2}. The calculated retentions (using parameters derived from studies of the systems C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br/Br{sub 2}, CCl{sub 4}/Br{sub 2} and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Br/Br{sub 2}) are in good agreement with those found experimentally in mixtures with a bromine mole-fraction greater than about 0.1. It is therefore considered that the Libby mechanism is adequate to explain the observed organic retentions in such mixtures. As the bromine mole-fraction is reduced, below 0.1 the observed retentions become progressively higher than calculated values. This is attributed to there being additional modes of hot-atom labelling which become operative when the bromine concentration is not high enough to give adequate radical scavenging. (author) [French] Lesauteuts ont mis au point des methodes pour calculer la retention organique du radiohalogene a laquelle on peut s'attendre apres activation par les neutrons de melanges de deux halogenures organiques et de l'halogene libre correspondant. Ces methodes sont basees sur les principes du

  6. Associations of self-reported and objectively measured sleep disturbances with depression among primary caregivers of children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orta OR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Olivia R Orta,1 Clarita Barbosa,1 Juan Carlos Velez,2 Bizu Gelaye,1 Xiaoli Chen,1 Lee Stoner,3 Michelle A Williams,1 1Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA; 2Worker's Hospital, The Chilean Safety Association, Santiago, Chile; 3School of Sport and Exercise, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the association between sleep and depression using both self-reported (subjective and actigraphic (objective sleep traits. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 175 female primary caregivers of children with disabilities receiving care at a rehabilitation center in Punta Arenas, Chile. The eight-item Patient Health Questionnaire was used to ascertain participants' depression status. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to define subjective, or perceived, sleep quality. Wrist-worn actigraph monitors, worn for seven consecutive nights, were used to characterize objective sleep quality and disturbances. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to collect information on sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Linear regression models were fit using continuous sleep parameters as the dependent variables and depression status as the independent variable. Multivariable models were adjusted for body mass index, marital status, smoking status, education level, and children's disabilities. Results: Using an eight-item Patient Health Questionnaire score ≥10, 26.3% of participants presented with depression. Depressed women were more likely to self-report overall poorer (subjective sleep compared to non-depressed women; however, differences in sleep were not consistently noted using actigraphic (objective sleep traits. Among the depressed, both sleep duration and total time in bed were significantly underestimated. In multivariable models, depression was negatively associated with sleep duration using both subjective (β=–0

  7. Landscapes of Central Italy through Science, Poetry and Music. A perspective for educating to the planet sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Olivia; Valentini, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Born from a desire to promote the Italian landscape by integrating its physical aesthetic with its cultural and artistic heritage, we develop a story about the landscape told in popular science, and supported by visual stimulations, poetry and ancient music. Our work proceeds through two different routes. The first route analyzes the landscape from the scientific point of view trying to understand how it evolves and responds in response to changes in independent variables. The second path examines the landscape from a perspective more closely related to the visual and emotional impact that a place evokes, its history, its cultural significance, and perception of its fragility. The latter is perhaps a more complex path, more intimate, which develop fully only through the intersection of different forms of language, linked to specific arts. Three different disciplines focused on the same site, the combination of which results in an emotional experience where the encounter between different languages becomes an expression of the place. Among the many amazing landscapes of Italy, we focus on three known sites from the hystorical region of Montefeltro, in central Italy: "The flatiron of Petrano Mount", "The Stones of Montefeltro", "The sea-cliff of San Bartolo". Since a few years we have created a team of five researchers-artists, called "TerreRare" (Rare Earth Elements), whose mission is the desire to promote the gorgeous Italian landscape. Olivia Nesci, geomorphologist, begins this story analyzing the processes and the "forces" that have created and modified the landscape over time. Laura Valentini, a geologist and a musician, through the musical language, try to reproduce the emotional impact of the site, by searching for a piece of ancient music, composed for harpsichord. The choice of the musical instrument and the historical period is not accidental: the harpsichord has a punchy and gritty tone that clearly expresses the "strength" of the landscape; early music

  8. The impact of anxiety and catastrophizing on interleukin-6 responses to acute painful stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaridou A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Asimina Lazaridou,1 Marc O Martel,1 Christine M Cahalan,1 Marise C Cornelius,1 Olivia Franceschelli,1 Claudia M Campbell,2 Jennifer A Haythornthwaite,2 Michael Smith,2 Joseph Riley,3 Robert R Edwards1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Objective: To examine the influence of anxiety and pain-related catastrophizing on the time course of acute interleukin-6 (IL-6 responses to standardized noxious stimulation among patients with chronic pain.Methods: Data were collected from 48 participants in the following demographically matched groups: patients with chronic pain (n=36 and healthy controls (n=12. Participants underwent a series of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST procedures assessing responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli during two separate visits, in a randomized order. One visit consisted of standard, moderately painful QST procedures, while the other visit involved nonpainful analogs to these testing procedures. Blood samples were taken at baseline, and then for up to 2 hours after QST in order to study the time course of IL-6 responses.Results: Results of multilevel analyses revealed that IL-6 responses increased across assessment time points in both visits (p<0.001. While patients with chronic pain and healthy controls did not differ in the magnitude of IL-6 responses, psychological factors influenced IL-6 trajectories only in the chronic pain group. Among patients, increases in catastrophizing over the course of the QST session were associated with elevated IL-6 responses only during the painful QST session (p<0.05. When controlling for anxiety, results indicated that the main multilevel model among patients remained significant

  9. Barriers to and enablers of physical activity in patients with COPD following a hospital admission: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe O

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Thorpe, Saravana Kumar, Kylie JohnstonInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, The Samson Institute for Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow, prompting episodes of shortness of breath, commonly leading to hospitalization. Hospitalization may lead to a decline in physical activity following discharge. Physical activity has been shown to improve symptoms of COPD and reduce readmissions, and to decrease morbidity and mortality. This study aims to explore, from the perspectives of people with COPD, the barriers to and enablers of participation in physical activity following hospitalization for COPD.Methods: This study had a qualitative descriptive design and included semistructured interviews with 28 adult COPD patients who had been admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of exacerbation of COPD.Results: A plethora of barriers to but fewer enablers of participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation were identified for this cohort of people. The main barriers identified were health-related (comorbidities, COPD symptoms, and physical injury or illness environment-related (weather, transport, and finance, and self-related. The main enabling factors reported were access to health professionals and equipment, social support, routine and extracurricular activities, personal goals and motivation, and the effect of physical activity and "feeling better".Conclusion: This research provides a snapshot of the barriers to and enablers of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation in people with COPD. It is evident that there are significant barriers which hinder the ability of people with COPD to undertake and continue participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. While there are some enablers that may counter these barriers, it is

  10. Análisis de sistema de conversores fluido-dinámicos de energía renovable para la Patagonia Austral de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Victor Manuel Labriola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El potencial de energía en mares y océanos se puede clasificar de distintas formas, por ejemplo: * La energía de las mareas ó Mareomotriz * La energía de las corrientes marinas * La energía de las olas ó Undimotriz * La energía térmica oceánica (OTEC. De estas formas de energía oceánica, tres son posibles en la zona Atlántica de nuestra Patagonia Austral, la Mareomotriz, la Undimotriz y la de corrientes marinas. La Energía Mareomotriz se da desde Viedma hasta Tierra del Fuego con amplitudes de mareas de 4m hasta 20m, la Energía de las Olas se da en la costa de Chubut y Santa Cruz con potenciales de 10 a 30kW/m lineal de frente de ola y el aprovechamiento de las corrientes marinas se puede dar en lugares puntuales como ser la desembocadura del río Deseado o la de Río Gallegos. Para estas Fuentes de Energía se está realizando un banco de pruebas de modelos conversores de las mismas a Energía Eléctrica, en la Unidad Académica Caleta Olivia (UACO de la Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral (UNPA. Este banco dispondrá de dos canales de ensayos hidrodinámicos uno para energía de las corrientes marinas y otro para las olas. El primero dispondrá de una bomba de circulación con velocidad de fluido variable entre 0 y 4m/s. El banco para olas tendrá un sistema de batido del agua para producir ondas de amplitud y período variable. Además se están dimensionando dos modelos de conversores de energía oceánica. Uno es una turbina, tipo eólica sumergida y el otro modelo es de tubo electromecánico oscilante como conversor energético de las olas.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Farooq Naeem,1,2 Rupinder K Johal,1 Claire Mckenna,1 Olivia Calancie,1 Tariq Munshi,1,2 Tariq Hassan,1 Amina Nasar,3 Muhammad Ayub1 1Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2Addiction and Mental Health Services – Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington (AMHS-KFLA, Kingston, ON, Canada; 3Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format.Methods: This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36 consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU (treatment group or to TAU alone (control group. The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.Findings: Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005, anxiety and depression (P<0.005, and disability (P<0.005 at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion: A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis

  12. Immunization and chemical conjugation of Bm95 obtained from Pichia pastoris enhances the immune response against vaccinal protein and Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Valle M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Manuel Rodriguez-Valle,1 Leonardo Canan-Hadden,2 Olivia Niebla2 1Animal Biotechnology Division, 2Analytical Division, Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Havana, Cuba Abstract: The ectoparasite Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus causes severe economic losses to the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions, and transmits endoparasites, such as Babesia bovis. The glycoprotein Bm95 is homologous to Bm86, a surface membrane protein of gut epithelial cells in R. microplus, and has been shown to efficiently control this ectoparasite in regions of the Americas. The immunostimulant properties of Bm86 have already been demonstrated after its coinjection with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and the infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus. This study evaluated the carrier and immunostimulant properties of Bm95 using low immunogenic Neisseria meningitidis capsular C polysaccharide (Men CpS and HBsAg. We produced two polysaccharide-Bm95 conjugates by carbodiimide (MenCpSBm-c and reductive amination (MenCpSBm-ra methods. These conjugates were characterized and evaluated in mice. Antibody titers against Men CpS were significantly higher in mice immunized with MenCpSBm-ra (2,350±250, P<0.01 than in those immunized with MenCpSBm-c (250±75 or Men CpS (570±104. The study data indicate effective immunological memory after booster inoculation in mice immunized with MenCpSBm-ra. Additionally, significant humoral immunity against HBsAg was documented in mice coimmunized via the intranasal route with recombinant Bm95 (11,400±345 and HBsAg (128,000±250 compared with mice immunized only with HBsAg (400±40 or Bm95 (5,461±150, P<0.01. In conclusion, the immunostimulatory properties of recombinant Bm95 make it a useful element for developing safer conjugated vaccines against bacterial pathogens and for evaluation against ticks and tick-borne diseases in the context of a polyvalent veterinary vaccine. Keywords: glycoconjugate, Bm86

  13. Perception of weight and psychological variables in a sample of Spanish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera1,2, Patricia Bolaños-Ríos2, María José Santiago-Fernández2, Olivia Garrido-Casals2, Elsa Sánchez31Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; 2Behavioral Sciences Institute, Seville, Spain; 3Professional Schools Sagrada Familia, Écija, Seville, SpainBackground: This study explored the relationship between body mass index (BMI and weight perception, self-esteem, positive body image, food beliefs, and mental health status, along with any gender differences in weight perception, in a sample of adolescents in Spain.Methods: The sample comprised 85 students (53 females and 32 males, mean age 17.4 ± 5.5 years with no psychiatric history who were recruited from a high school in Écija, Seville. Weight and height were recorded for all participants, who were then classified according to whether they perceived themselves as slightly overweight, very overweight, very underweight, slightly underweight, or about the right weight, using the question “How do you think of yourself in terms of weight?”. Finally, a series of questionnaires were administered, including the Irrational Food Beliefs Scale, Body Appreciation Scale, Self Esteem Scale, and General Health Questionnaire.Results: Overall, 23.5% of participants misperceived their weight. Taking into account only those with a normal BMI (percentile 5–85, there was a significant gender difference with respect to those who perceived themselves as overweight (slightly overweight and very overweight; 13.9% of females and 7.9% of males perceived themselves as overweight (χ2 = 3.957, P < 0.05. There was a significant difference for age, with participants who perceived their weight adequately being of mean age 16.34 ± 3.17 years and those who misperceived their weight being of mean age 18.50 ± 4.02 years (F = 3.112, P < 0.05.Conclusion: Misperception of overweight seems to be more frequent in female adolescents, and mainly among

  14. Looking Forward, Looking Back: Future Challenges for Narrative Research An event commemorating the tenth anniversary of the Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Andrews

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Centre for Narrative Research was founded at the turn of the millenium. To commemorate its tenth anniversary, we organised an event which took place on November 10, 2010, at the Marx Memorial Library in London. The day had a very flexible format. We began with a few opening words from the three co-directors (Molly Andrews, Corinne Squire, and Maria Tamboukou and the Research Fellow (Cigdem Esin of CNR. This was followed by contributions from six leading narrative scholars (Jens Brockmeier, Michael Erben, Mark Freeman, Margareta Hydén, Margaretta Jolly, and Olivia Sagan to which Alexandra Georgakopoulou and Matti Hyvärinen then responded. Following lunch, the sixty participants were broken up into smaller groups, where they discussed issues raised in the morning session. The day concluded with a final discussion piece offered by Mike Rustin. The six presenters were faced with a formidable challenge. We invited them to write pieces of approximately 500 words on "the promise and challenges for future narrative research, including critiques of and hopes for our own scholarship." These were prepared in advance of the event, and sent to the discussants, who were asked not only to comment upon the set of issues raised, but also to provide a framework for looking at the problems as a whole set. Not only did the contributors and discussants come from a range of different backgrounds and geographical locations, but the range of intellectual interests represented by those who attended the day was very marked: poets, writers of fiction, policy makers, psychoanalysts, sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, social workers, and others. Perhaps the most outstanding feature of the day was the conversations which happened across boundaries, characterised by both a search for common ground as well as a recognition of the different intellectual standpoints represented by the people there. What follows are written versions of the prepared, spoken

  15. Herramienta evolutiva para la planificación del mantenimiento de locaciones petroleras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Azul Cossio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este documento es la presentación de una herramienta (PAE, Planificación basada en un Algoritmo Evolutivo que utiliza un algoritmo evolutivo generador de múltiples soluciones para la planificación dinámica del mantenimiento preventivo de locaciones petroleras. La explotación y el transporte de petróleo son actividades muy importantes para el desarrollo económico de la sociedad industrial moderna. Sin embargo, estas actividades son generadoras de riesgos que se traducen en contaminaciones accidentales o crónicas que afectan directamente al ecosistema. Es importante que las empresas petroleras realicen un correcto mantenimiento de sus locaciones. PAE es capaz de brindar en forma oportuna la planificación del recorrido. El beneficio debe observarse desde dos aspectos. Primero, una planificación es mejor que otra, si para un mismo número de locaciones a visitar el costo de recorrido e intervención planificada es menor. Segundo, si con un mismo tiempo de intervención es posible realizar el mantenimiento a más locaciones, reduciendo la probabilidad de caída al incrementar la cantidad de locaciones recorridas. Se han incorporado eventos externos que provocan la replanificación y restricciones al momento de la planificación, en estos casos los resultados obtenidos han sido satisfactorios ya que minimizan el tiempo total de una planificación y maximizan la cantidad de locaciones visitadas. Esta herramienta ha sido diseñada para operar a un bajo costo de desarrollo tanto desde el punto de vista de la tecnología hardware como la tecnología de software que la soporta, desarrollada por el Laboratorio de Tecnologías Emergentes de la Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral Unidad Académica Caleta Olivia, utiliza un algoritmo evolutivo que es el generador de múltiples soluciones al problema.

  16. Iron deficiency intravenous substitution in a Swiss academic primary care division: analysis of practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varcher M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Monica Varcher,1 Sofia Zisimopoulou,1 Olivia Braillard,1 Bernard Favrat,2 Noëlle Junod Perron1 1Department of Community, Primary and Emergency Care, Division of Primary Care, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, 2Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland Background: Iron deficiency is a common problem in primary care and is usually treated with oral iron substitution. With the recent simplification of intravenous (IV iron administration (ferric carboxymaltose and its approval in many countries for iron deficiency, physicians may be inclined to overutilize it as a first-line substitution.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate iron deficiency management and substitution practices in an academic primary care division 5 years after ferric carboxymaltose was approved for treatment of iron deficiency in Switzerland.Methods: All patients treated for iron deficiency during March and April 2012 at the Geneva University Division of Primary Care were identified. Their medical files were analyzed for information, including initial ferritin value, reasons for the investigation of iron levels, suspected etiology, type of treatment initiated, and clinical and biological follow-up. Findings were assessed using an algorithm for iron deficiency management based on a literature review.Results: Out of 1,671 patients, 93 were treated for iron deficiency. Median patients’ age was 40 years and 92.5% (n=86 were female. The average ferritin value was 17.2 μg/L (standard deviation 13.3 μg/L. The reasons for the investigation of iron levels were documented in 82% and the suspected etiology for iron deficiency was reported in 67%. Seventy percent of the patients received oral treatment, 14% IV treatment, and 16% both. The reasons for IV treatment as first- and second-line treatment were reported in 57% and 95%, respectively. Clinical and biological follow-up was planned in less than two-thirds of the

  17. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: from ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14 C had not had the 'wrong' half-life, a fact that delayed its discovery. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to Willard Libby that 14 C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere [ca. 230 Bq/kg] lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. The metrological history of radiocarbon was traced from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that brought 14 C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for 'molecular dating' at the 10-100 μg level. The first metrological revolution resulted from a combination of a major improvement in the 14 C beta particle detection efficiency and consequent improvement in precision, and the new science of dendrochronology which extended the radiocarbon dating calibration curve to some 8000 years before present (BP). The fine structure of the calibration function revealed natural and anthropogenic variations in the 14 C content of living matter, contrary to one of the basic assumptions of radiocarbon dating. This 'failure' of radiocarbon dating, however, spawned new multidisciplinary areas of environmental and geoscience. The most notable of the anthropogenic variations was that induced by atmospheric nuclear testing. The 'bomb pulse' of the mid-1960s gave rise to a global atmospheric and marine tracer experiment, and its by-product was an additional, short-term 14 C 'decay curve' that has allowed the dating of late 20th Century artifacts to the nearest year or two. The second major advance came in 1977-78 when 'atom counting' of 14 C was developed

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    2005-07-01

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage

  19. Defining asbestos: differences between the built and natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Mickey E

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos - while most think they know what this material is, few understand the current issues surrounding it. Few would also realize that asbestos is the form of a mineral, and even fewer would know that there are different types of asbestos, that not only had different industrial applications, but pose differing health risks when inhaled. Asbestos was in wide-spread use mid-last century in many consumer products, and no doubt saved thousands of lives, but by the latter part of last century concerns over its health risk caused its use to wane, to the point it was removed from many buildings. So in many ways the asbestos story was coming to an end in the 1990s, but two events in the USA - the vermiculite ore produced from Libby, Montana which contained amphibole asbestos and was used in a million homes in the USA as attic insulation and the concern for exposure to asbestos occurring in its natural setting in El Dorado Hills, California led to an increased concern of the potential for low-level environmental exposure to asbestos to the general public. The current dilemma we find ourselves in, especially in the USA, deals with the relationships between our knowledge of handling asbestos and an understanding of its risk potential in the built environment versus the natural environment. And one perfect metaphor for this is the term used by many non-geologists to differentiate asbestos in the built vs natural environment - 'naturally occurring asbestos'. Clearly a misstatement, but only one of many we must deal with as we struggle to understand the risk to humans of natural occurrences of asbestos. This paper will try and address some of these issues centering around those occurring in the USA.

  20. Kootenai River white sturgeon investigations. Chapter 1: Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning and recruitment evaluation; Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paragamian, V.L.; Kruse, G.; Wakkinen, V.

    1997-09-01

    Test flows for Kootenai River white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus spawning, scheduled for June 1996, were postponed until July. However, an estimated 126% snow pack and unusually heavy precipitation created conditions for sturgeon spawning that were similar to those occurring before construction of Libby Dam. Discharge in the Kootenai River at Bonners Ferry rose to nearly 1,204 m 3 /s (42,500 cfs) during May and water temperature ranged from 5.8 C to 8.4 C (42 F to 47 F). Migration of adult white sturgeon into spawning areas occurred in late May during a rising hydrograph. Discharge and water temperature were rising and had reached approximately 1,077 m 3 /s (38,000 cfs) and 8 C (46 F). Discharge at Bonners Ferry peaked at about 1,397 m 3 /s (49,300 cfs) on June 5. A total of 348 eggs (and one egg shell) were collected with 106,787 h of mat effort during the flow events. The first white sturgeon eggs were collected on June 8 and continued through June 30. Staging of eggs and back-calculating to spawning dates indicated there were at least 18 spawning episodes between June 6 and June 25. Discharge on June 6 was 1,196 m 3 /s (42,200 cfs) and decreased steadily to 850 m 3 /s (30,000 cfs) by June 26. Although sturgeon spawned in the same reach of river that they had during 1994 and 1995, the majority of eggs were found significantly (P = 0.0001) farther upstream than 1994 and 1995 and this in turn may be related to elevation of Kootenay Lake

  1. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todor, D.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  2. Wigwam River juvenile bull trout and fish habitat monitoring program: 2000 data report; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00)

  3. An update on gene therapy for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libby AE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrew E Libby, Hong Wang Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, School of Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL is responsible for clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the blood. Deficiency or defects in this enzyme result in profound hypertriglyceridemia and susceptibility to chronic, life-threatening pancreatitis. Management of LPL deficiency has traditionally been restricted to palliative care and strategies to reduce the risk of pancreatitis, including severe dietary restrictions of fat. Recently, the European Commission approved the first gene therapy treatment in the West to treat this rare disease. Alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera® was granted marketing authorization in November 2012 to treat LPL deficiency in a subset of patients that are at increased risk for pancreatitis. Designed as a one-time treatment, the drug uses adeno-associated virus (AAV1 delivery of transgenic LPL to muscle in patients lacking functional enzyme. Although statistically significant reduction of serum triglycerides was initially observed in trial subjects, this effect was found to be transient, with triglyceride levels eventually rebounding to basal levels by 26 weeks in all participants. Nevertheless, despite the return of triglycerides to pretreatment levels, alipogene tiparvovec was found to have a long-term impact on postprandial chylomicron metabolism by lowering the fraction of triglyceride found in this subset of lipoproteins. Furthermore, the drug led to a clinically significant reduction in the incidence of pancreatitis in LPL-deficient patients. The regulatory approval of alipogene tiparvovec was a historic process and serves as an example of the challenges that future orphan drugs will face. Keywords: lipoprotein lipase deficiency, gene therapy, AAV, chylomicron, pancreatitis

  4. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, K.J.

    1989-11-01

    Direct detection of 14 C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the ''cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of 14 C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring 14 C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting 14 C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10 4 . Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as 3 H, and 10 Be, and 26 Al, are discussed. 70 refs

  5. Influence of landscape features on variation of δ2H and δ18O in seasonal mountain snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, E. L.; Chapple, W.; Frank, J. M.; Traver, E.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Streamflow contributions from snowpack remain difficult to predict in snow dominated headwater catchments in the Rocky Mountains. There remains considerable uncertainty in how environmental change in mountain watersheds alter seasonal snowpack accumulation and development and how these relationships translate from gaged to ungaged catchments. Stable isotope analysis is a valuable tool for determining the contribution and changes of different source inputs to catchment water budgets. Stable isotope values in snowpack integrate source inputs and processes such as water vapor exchange, selective redistribution, and melt. For better understanding of how these physical processes vary at local and catchment scales, snowpack density, depth, snow water equivalence (SWE), δ2H and δ18O were examined at peak snowpack in spring 2013 and 2014 and at monthly time steps throughout the winter of 2013-2014. Distributed data and sample collection occurred between 2400 and 3300 m elevation across two pine beetle and spruce beetle impacted forest stands with variable canopy cover in the Libby Creek and Nash Fork Little Laramie River basins, Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming. Peak snowpack within these watersheds was 10% below historic average in 2013 and 50% above average in 2014 (NRCS Snotel data). Even with these contrasting peak snowpack patterns, elevation described less than 40% of the spatial variation of snow water equivalents (SWE) across the watersheds for both seasons. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratio values of snowpack sampled monthly in 2014 revealed early season separation from the local meteoric water line, suggesting some kinetic isotope effects. However, isotope ratio values at peak snowpack in 2013 reflected no such signal at any sampling location. The influence of landscape position and canopy cover will be modeled to detect and scale spatial and temporal changes in SWE and stable isotope composition of snowpack. Such an approach will provide increased understanding of

  6. Sleep Loss in Resident Physicians: The Cause of Medical Errors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton eKramer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review begins with the history of the events starting with the death of Libby Zion that lead to the Bell Commission, that the studied her death and made recommendations for improvement that were codified into law in New York state as the 405 law that the ACGME essentially adopted in putting a cap on work hours and establishing the level of staff supervision that must be available to residents in clinical situations particularly the emergency room and acute care units. A summary is then provided of the findings of the laboratory effects of total sleep deprivation including acute total sleep loss and the consequent widespread physiologic alterations, and of the effects of selective and chronic sleep loss. Generally the sequence of responses to increasing sleep loss goes from mood changes to cognitive effects to performance deficits. In the laboratory situation, deficits resulting from sleep deprivation are clearly and definitively demonstrable. Sleep loss in the clinical situation is usually sleep deprivation superimposed on chronic sleep loss. An examination of questionnaire studies, the literature on reports of sleep loss, studies of the reduction of work hours on performance as well as observational and a few interventional studies have yielded contradictory and often equivocal results. The residents generally find they feel better working fewer hours but improvements in patient care are often not reported or do not occur. A change in the attitude of the resident toward his role and his patient has not been salutary. Decreasing sleep loss should have had a positive effect on patient care in reducing medical error, but this remains to be unequivocally demonstrated.

  7. Seeing failure in your life: Imagery perspective determines whether self-esteem shapes reactions to recalled and imagined failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Lisa K; Valenti, Greta; Pfent, Alison; Eibach, Richard P

    2011-12-01

    The present research reveals that when it comes to recalling and imagining failure in one's life, changing how one looks at the event can change its impact on well-being; however, the nature of the effect depends on an aspect of one's self-concept, namely, self-esteem. Five studies measured or manipulated the visual perspective (internal first-person vs. external third-person) individuals used to mentally image recalled or imagined personal failures. It has been proposed that imagery perspective determines whether people's reactions to an event are shaped bottom-up by concrete features of the event (first-person) or top-down by their self-concept (third-person; L. K. Libby & R. P. Eibach, 2011b). Evidence suggests that differences in the self-concepts of individuals with low and high self-esteem (LSEs and HSEs) are responsible for self-esteem differences in reaction to failure, leading LSEs to have more negative thoughts and feelings about themselves (e.g., M. H. Kernis, J. Brockner, & B. S. Frankel, 1989). Thus, the authors predicted, and found, that low self-esteem was associated with greater overgeneralization--operationalized as negativity in accessible self-knowledge and feelings of shame--only when participants had pictured failure from the third-person perspective and not from the first-person. Further, picturing failure from the third-person, rather than first-person, perspective, increased shame and the negativity of accessible knowledge among LSEs, whereas it decreased shame among HSEs. Results help to distinguish between different theoretical accounts of how imagery perspective functions and have implications for the study of top-down and bottom-up influences on self-judgment and emotion, as well as for the role of perspective and abstraction in coping.

  8. Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2002 Data Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, R.S. [Westslope Fisheries, Cranbrook, BC, Canada

    2003-03-01

    The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection (MWLAP), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenay they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MWLAP applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that were undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

  9. Conditional Monthly Weather Resampling Procedure for Operational Seasonal Water Resources Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, J.; Weerts, A.; Tijdeman, E.; Welles, E.; McManamon, A.

    2013-12-01

    To provide reliable and accurate seasonal streamflow forecasts for water resources management several operational hydrologic agencies and hydropower companies around the world use the Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) procedure. The ESP in its original implementation does not accommodate for any additional information that the forecaster may have about expected deviations from climatology in the near future. Several attempts have been conducted to improve the skill of the ESP forecast, especially for areas which are affected by teleconnetions (e,g. ENSO, PDO) via selection (Hamlet and Lettenmaier, 1999) or weighting schemes (Werner et al., 2004; Wood and Lettenmaier, 2006; Najafi et al., 2012). A disadvantage of such schemes is that they lead to a reduction of the signal to noise ratio of the probabilistic forecast. To overcome this, we propose a resampling method conditional on climate indices to generate meteorological time series to be used in the ESP. The method can be used to generate a large number of meteorological ensemble members in order to improve the statistical properties of the ensemble. The effectiveness of the method was demonstrated in a real-time operational hydrologic seasonal forecasts system for the Columbia River basin operated by the Bonneville Power Administration. The forecast skill of the k-nn resampler was tested against the original ESP for three basins at the long-range seasonal time scale. The BSS and CRPSS were used to compare the results to those of the original ESP method. Positive forecast skill scores were found for the resampler method conditioned on different indices for the prediction of spring peak flows in the Dworshak and Hungry Horse basin. For the Libby Dam basin however, no improvement of skill was found. The proposed resampling method is a promising practical approach that can add skill to ESP forecasts at the seasonal time scale. Further improvement is possible by fine tuning the method and selecting the most

  10. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todor, D. [Virginia Commonwealth University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  11. MO-E-BRD-03: Intra-Operative Breast Brachytherapy: Is One Stop Shopping Best?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  12. Instream Flows Incremental Methodology :Kootenai River, Montana : Final Report 1990-2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Greg; Skaar, Don; Dalbey, Steve (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2002-11-01

    Regulated rivers such as the Kootenai River below Libby Dam often exhibit hydrographs and water fluctuation levels that are atypical when compared to non-regulated rivers. These flow regimes are often different conditions than those which native fish species evolved with, and can be important limiting factors in some systems. Fluctuating discharge levels can change the quantity and quality of aquatic habitat for fish. The instream flow incremental methodology (IFIM) is a tool that can help water managers evaluate different discharges in terms of their effects on available habitat for a particular fish species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service developed the IFIM (Bovee 1982) to quantify changes in aquatic habitat with changes in instream flow (Waite and Barnhart 1992; Baldridge and Amos 1981; Gore and Judy 1981; Irvine et al. 1987). IFIM modeling uses hydraulic computer models to relate changes in discharge to changes in the physical parameters such as water depth, current velocity and substrate particle size, within the aquatic environment. Habitat utilization curves are developed to describe the physical habitat most needed, preferred or tolerated for a selected species at various life stages (Bovee and Cochnauer 1977; Raleigh et al. 1984). Through the use of physical habitat simulation computer models, hydraulic and physical variables are simulated for differing flows, and the amount of usable habitat is predicted for the selected species and life stages. The Kootenai River IFIM project was first initiated in 1990, with the collection of habitat utilization and physical hydraulic data through 1996. The physical habitat simulation computer modeling was completed from 1996 through 2000 with the assistance from Thomas Payne and Associates. This report summarizes the results of these efforts.

  13. Tracer chemistry in the laboratory and the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, F.S.

    1994-01-01

    The steady bombardment of the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic radiation induces numerous radioactive species in the atmosphere of which the best known are 14 C and T. Others of interest include 7 Be, 10 Be, and several isotopes of chlorine. The eventual formation of 14 CO 2 and its subsequent significance for archaeological dating were brilliantly established by Willard Libby in the 1940s. However, the initial reactions of nascent 14 C in a mixture of N 2 and O 2 produce 14 CO, as shown first in the lab. and then in the atmosphere. Because cosmic ray production rates are essentially constant in a given location, the observed concentration of 14 CO provides an excellent tool for studying the removal process, oxidation by HO to form 14 CO 2 . Because 14 CO 2 becomes incorporated into all living biological species, other molecules become labeled with 14 C as well, including 14 CH 4 . Measurement of the 14 C radioactivity of such molecules in the atmosphere allows apportionment of sources between biological and fossil fuel origins. Tritium atoms are also formed by cosmic radiation, and can subsequently be incorporated into the chemical forms HT and HTO. Although most T atoms from cosmic radiation are found as HTO, the much higher specific radioactivity of HT provides interesting insights into atmospheric processes. Lab. studies furnish important clues for understanding the atmospheric routes. The differences in radioactive half-lives cause the terrestrial locations of cosmic ray induced 7 Be and 10 Be to be primarily the atmosphere and the oceans, respectively. In a comparable manner, the chemistry of atmospheric radiochlorine divides between the very long-lived 36 Cl and three isotopes with half-lives less than an hour, 34m Cl, 38 Cl and 39 Cl

  14. Advancing Environmental Health: A Ballroom Dance Between Human Health and Earth Sciences Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.

    2016-12-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote healthier lives. Translation of this mission into a meaningful reality entails extensive interdisciplinary interactions, expertise, and collaborations between the traditional health and earth sciences communities. Efforts to advance our understanding of adverse effects and illness associated with environmental factors requires not only a refined understanding of the biological mechanisms and pathways (e.g., inflammation, epigenetic changes, oxidative stress, mutagenesis, etc.) related to function and disease, but also the incredibly broad and complex environmental exposures and systems that influence these processes. Further complicating efforts to understand such interactions is the need to take into account individual susceptibility to disease across the human life span. While it is clear that environmental exposures can be readily linked to disease in individuals and to disproportionate health disparities in populations, the underlying risk factors for such findings are often elusive. Health and earth scientists have a long tradition of crossing their scientific divides to work together on a wide range of problems and issues, including disasters. Emergency situations, such as the environmental asbestos contamination in Libby, Montana, the Gulf Oil Spill, numerous chemical releases into air and water, wildfires, the World Trade Center Attack, and responses to Ebola, and now Zika, demand the collective expertise of the "environmental health sciences enterprise" to protect the public's health, facilitate recovery, and improve future preparedness. Furthermore, such high visibility efforts stand as a clear example of what human and earth sciences research can accomplish when transformative interdisciplinary approaches and a diverse well-trained cadre of scientists dance together on the ballroom floor.

  15. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  16. Bookreview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Marcus Wood; Slavery, Empathy, and Pornography (Lynn M. Festa Michèle Praeger; The Imaginary Caribbean and Caribbean Imaginary (Celia Britton Charles V. Carnegie; Postnationalism Prefigured: Caribbean Borderlands (John Collins Mervyn C. Alleyne; The Construction and Representation of Race and Ethnicity in the Caribbean and the World (Charles V. Carnegy Jerry Gershenhorn; Melville J. Herskovits and the Racial Politics of Knowledge (Richard Price Sally Cooper Coole; Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology (Olivia Maria Gomes Da Cunha Maureen Warner Lewis; Central Africa in the Caribbean: Transcending Time, Transforming Cultures (Robert W. Slenes Gert Oostindie (ed.; Facing up to the Past: Perspectives on the Commemoration of Slavery from Africa, the Americas and Europe (Gad Heuman Gert Oostindie, Inge Klinkers; Decolonising the Caribbean: Dutch Policies in a Comparative Perspective (Paul Sutton Kirk Peter Meigho; Politics in a ‘Half-Made Society’: Trinidad and Tobago, 1925-2001 (Douglas Midgett Linden Lewis (ed.; The Culture of Gender and Sexuality in the Caribbean (David A.B. Murray Gertrude Aub-Buscher, Beverly Ormerod Noakes (eds.; The Francophone Caribbean Today: Literature, Language, Culture (Elizabeth Walcott-Hackshaw Sally Lloyd-Evans, Robert B. Potter; Gender, Ethnicity and the Iinformal Sector in Trinidad (Katherine E. Browne STeve Striffler, Mark Moberg (eds.; Banana Wars: Power, Production and History in the Americas (Peter Clegg Johannes Postma, Victor Enthoven (eds.; Riches from Atlantic Commerce: Dutch Transatlantic Trade and Shipping, 1585-1817 (Gert J. Oostindie Phil Davison; Volcano in Paradise: Death and Survival on the Caribbean Island of Montserrat (Bonham C. Richardson Ernest Zebrowski jr; The Last Days of St. Pierre: The Volcanic Disaster that Claimed Thirty Thousand Lives (Bernard Moitt Beverley A. Steele; Grenada: A History of Its People (Jay R. Mandle Walter C

  17. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available David Scott; Conscripts of Modernity: The Tragedy of Colonial Enlightenment (Shalina Puri Rebecca J. Scott; Degrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery (Olivia Maria Gomes da Cunha Patrick Bellegarde-Smith (ed.; Fragments of Bone: Neo-African Religions in a New World (Dianne M. Stewart Londa Schiebinger; Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World (J.D. La Fleur F. Abiola Irele, Simon Gikandi (eds.;The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature (A. James Arnold Sean X. Goudie; Creole America: The West Indies and the Formation of Literature and Culture in the New Republic (J. Bradford Anderson Doris Garraway; The Libertine Colony: Creolization in the Early French Caribbean (Charles Forsdick Adélékè Adéèkó; The Slave’s Rebellion: Fiction, History, Orature (Owen Robinson J. Brooks Bouson; Jamaica Kincaid: Writing Memory, Writing Back to the Mother (Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert Gary Wilder; The French Imperial Nation-State: Negritude and Colonial Humanism between the Two World Wars (Nick Nesbitt Fernando Picó; History of Puerto Rico: A Panorama of its People (Francisco A. Scarano Peter E. Siegel (ed.; Ancient Borinquen: Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Native Puerto Rico (William F. Keegan Magali Roy-Féquière; Women, Creole Identity, and Intellectual Life in Early Twentieth-Century Puerto Rico (Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel Katherine E. Browne; Creole Economics: Caribbean Cunning under the French Flag (David Beriss Louis A. Pérez, Jr; To Die in Cuba: Suicide and Society (Matt D. Childs John Lawrence Tone; War and Genocide in Cuba, 1895-1898 (Gillian McGillivray Frank Argote-Freyre; Fulgencio Batista: From Revolutionary to Strongman (Javier Figueroa-De Cárdenas Juanita de Barros, Audra Diptee, David V. Trotman (eds.; Beyond Fragmentation: Perspectives on Caribbean History (Bernard Moitt Matthew Mulcahy; Hurricanes and Society in the British Greater

  18. Efficacy of Seren@ctif, a Computer-Based Stress Management Program for Patients With Adjustment Disorder With Anxiety: Protocol for a Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Dominique; Leterme, Anne-Claire; Barasino, Olivia; Rougegrez, Laure; Duhamel, Alain; Vaiva, Guillaume

    2017-10-02

    : stress and stress reaction and assessment; deep respiration and relaxation techniques; cognitive restructuring, mindfulness, and acceptance; behavioral skills as problem solving; and time management, healthy behaviors, and emotion regulation. In the Internet-based group, patients have minimal contact with a medical professional before and after every session. In the first session, a flash memory drive is supplied containing videos, audio files, a self-help book portfolio in the form of an eGuide, and log books providing the exercises to be completed between 2 sessions. The patient is encouraged to practice a 20-minute daily exercise 5 or 6 times per week. In the face-to-face group, patients receive the same program from a therapist with 5 weekly sessions without digital support. Interviews and self-assessments were collected face-to-face with the investigator. The feasibility of this program is being tested, and results show good accessibility in terms of acceptance, understanding, and treatment credibility. Results are expected in 2018. To our knowledge, this is the first French study to examine the effectiveness of a computer-based stress management program for patients with ADA. The Seren@ctif program may be useful within the framework of a psychoeducative approach. It could also be advised for people suffering from other diseases related to stress and for people with a clinical level of perceived stress. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02621775; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02621775 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6tQrkPs1u). ©Dominique Servant, Anne-Claire Leterme, Olivia Barasino, Laure Rougegrez, Alain Duhamel, Guillaume Vaiva. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 02.10.2017.

  19. [Retracted] Rivaroxaban attenuates thrombosis by targeting the NF-κB signaling pathway in a rat model of deep venous thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junhao; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yang; Yang, Zhenwei; Luo, Jun

    2018-06-01

    Following the publication of this article, an interested reader made us aware that the authors of the above paper had misappropriated certain of the data that had been published previously in three different papers. Specifically, Fig. 2A, B and G in the above paper appeared to be derived from Figs. 2A, 3 and 1A, respectively, of the paper by CM Ripplinger, CW Kessinger, C Li, JW Kim, JR McCarthy, R Weissleder, PK Henke, CP Lin and FA Jaffer (Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 32: 2616‑2624, 2012). Figs. 2E, F, H, I and J in the above paper appeared to be derived from Figs. 1, 2A, 2D, 5E and 3F, respectively, of the paper by ML von Brühl, K Stark, A Steinhart, S Chandraratne, I Konrad, M Lorenz, A Khandoga, A Tirniceriu, R Coletti, M Köllnberger, et al (J Exp Med 209: 819‑835, 2012). Fig. 6C in the above paper appeared to be derived from Fig. 2D in the paper by CW Kessinger, JW Kim, PK Henke, B Thompson, JR McCarthy, T Hara, M Sillesen, RJ Margey, P Libby, R Weissleder, et al [PLoS One 10(2): e0116621, 2015], and Fig. 6H in the above paper appeared to be derived from Fig. 4 in the paper by von Brühl et al. Following an internal enquiry, the Editor of International Journal of Molecular Medicine has determined that the claim should be upheld; therefore, the Editorial Board has decided that the article should be retracted. All efforts were made to contact the corresponding author of the above article. The Editor apologizes to the readership of the Journal for any inconvenience caused. [the original article was published in the International Journal of Molecular Medicine 40: 1869‑1880, 2017; DOI: 10.3892/ijmm.2017.3166].

  20. Kootenai River White Sturgeon Investigations; White Sturgeon Spawning and Recruitment Evaluation, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust, Pete; Wakkinen, Virginia (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the environmental requirements for successful spawning and recruitment of the Kootenai River white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus population. Annual tasks include monitoring and evaluating the various life stages of Kootenai River white sturgeon. Sampling for adult Kootenai River white sturgeon in 2003 began in March and continued through April. Eighty-one adult white sturgeon were captured with 3,576 hours of angling and set-lining effort in the Kootenai River. Discharge from Libby Dam and river stage at Bonners Ferry in 2003 peaked in May and early June. Flows remained above 500 m{sup 3}/s throughout June, decreased rapidly through mid July, and increased back to near 500 m{sup 3}/s after mid July and through mid August. By late August, flows had decreased to below 400 m{sup 3}/s. We monitored the movements of 24 adult sturgeon in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia (BC) and the Kootenai River from March 15, 2003 to August 31, 2003. Some of the fish were radio or sonic tagged in previous years. Twelve adult white sturgeon were moved upstream to the Hemlock Bar reach (rkm 260.0) and released as part of the Set and Jet Program. Transmitters were attached to seven of these fish, and their movements were monitored from the time of release until they moved downstream of Bonners Ferry. Eight additional radio-tagged white sturgeon adults were located in the traditional spawning reach (rkm 228-240) during May and June. Sampling with artificial substrate mats began May 21, 2003 and ended June 30, 2003. We sampled 717 mat d (a mat d is one 24 h set) during white sturgeon spawning. Three white sturgeon eggs were collected near Shortys Island on June 3, 2003, and five eggs were collected from the Hemlock Bar reach on June 5, 2003. Prejuvenile sampling began June 17, 2003 and continued until July 31, 2003. Sampling occurred primarily at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.0) in an attempt to document any recruitment that might have occurred from

  1. Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review • Phase 1 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-07-01

    -determined annual operation to a “Called Upon” operation. 2. The year 2024 is the earliest date that either Canada or the U.S. can terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty, with a minimum 10-years advance written notice. Hence, September 16, 2014, is the latest date that either nation could provide notice of intent to terminate and still have the termination effective at its earliest possible date in 2024. While termination would end most Treaty obligations, Called Upon flood control and Libby coordination provisions will continue regardless of termination. However, it is important to note that the Treaty has no end date and absent either country using the termination option will continue indefinitely.

  2. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    The regulatory term "asbestos" groups only the six fibrous minerals that were commercially used among approximately 400. The carcinogenicity of these six regulated minerals has been largely demonstrated and is related to fiber structure, fiber length/diameter ratio, and bio-persistence. From a public perception, the generic term "asbestos" refers to the fibrous minerals that cause asbestosis, mesothelioma and other cancers. However, other non-regulated fibrous minerals are potentially as dangerous as the regulatory asbestos because they share similar physical and chemical properties, epidemiological studies have demonstrated their relationship with asbestos-related diseases, and both in vitro and in vivo experiments have established the toxicity of these minerals. For example, the non-regulated asbestiform winchite and richterite minerals that contaminated the vermiculite mined from Libby, Montana, (USA) were associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis observed among the area's residents and miners. Many other examples of non-regulated carcinogenic fibrous minerals include, but are not limited to, antigorite, arfvedsonite, balangeroite, carlosturanite, erionite, fluoro-edenite, hornblende, mordenite, palygorskite, and sepiolite. To propose a regulatory definition that would provide protection from all carcinogenic fibers, we have conducted an interdisciplinary literature review to compare the characteristics of "asbestos" and of non-regulated mineral fibers that relate to carcinogenicity. We specifically studied two non-regulated fibrous minerals that are associated with asbestos-related diseases: the serpentine antigorite and the zeolite erionite. Both examples underscore the problem of regulation based on commercial, rather than scientific principles: 1) the occurrence of fibrous antigorite in materials used to pave roads has been correlated with high mesothelioma rates in New Caledonia. Antigorite was also the cause of asbestosis in Poland, and in

  3. Erionite induces production of autoantibodies and IL-17 in C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebedeo, Christian Nash; Davis, Chad; Peña, Cecelia; Ng, Kok Wei; Pfau, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Erionite has similar chemical and physical properties to amphibole asbestos, which induces autoantibodies in mice. Current exposures are occurring in North Dakota due to the use of erionite-contaminated gravel. While erionite is known to cause mesothelioma and other diseases associated with asbestos, there is little known about its effects on the immune system. Objectives: We performed this study to determine whether erionite evokes autoimmune reactions in mice. Methods: Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were used to measure toxicity induced by erionite. Cytokine production by BMDM and splenocytes of C57BL/6 mice was examined by bead arrays and ELISA following exposure to erionite, amphiboles and chrysotile. Wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to saline, erionite, amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) or chrysotile through intratracheal instillations at equal mass (60 μg/mouse). Seven months after exposure, sera were examined for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and IL-17. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect immune complex deposition in the kidneys. Results: Erionite and tremolite caused increased cytokine production belonging to the T H 17 profile including IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β, and TNF-α. The frequency of ANA was increased in mice treated with erionite or amphibole compared to saline-treated mice. IL-17 and TNF-α were elevated in the sera of mice treated with erionite. The frequency of immune complex deposition in the kidneys increased from 33% in saline-treated mice to 90% with erionite. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that both erionite and amphibole asbestos induce autoimmune responses in mice, suggesting a potential for adverse effects in exposed communities. - Highlights: • Erionite, a fibrous mineral, is a current public health concern in the western USA. • Erionite exposure induces antinuclear autoantibodies in exposed mice. • Erionite induces a clear Th17 cytokine response in vitro and in vivo. • These responses were distinct

  4. Methow and Columbia Rivers studies: summary of data collection, comparison of database structure and habitat protocols, and impact of additional PIT tag interrogation systems to survival estimates, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Kyle D.; Tibbits, Wesley T.; Watson, Grace A.; Newsom, Michael A.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received funding from the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to provide monitoring and evaluation on the effectiveness of stream restoration efforts by Reclamation in the Methow River watershed. This monitoring and evaluation program is designed to partially fulfill Reclamation’s part of the 2008 Biological Opinion for the Federal Columbia River Power System that includes a Reasonable and Prudent Alternative (RPA) to protect listed salmon and steelhead across their life cycle. The target species in the Methow River for the restoration effort include Upper Columbia River (UCR) spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), UCR steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), which are listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Since 2004, the USGS has completed two projects of monitoring and evaluation in the Methow River watershed. The first project focused on the evaluation of barrier removal and steelhead recolonization in Beaver Creek with Libby and Gold Creeks acting as controls. The majority of this work was completed by 2008, although some monitoring continued through 2012. The second project (2008–2012) evaluated the use and productivity of the middle Methow River reach (rkm 65–80) before the onset of multiple off-channel restoration projects planned by the Reclamation and Yakama Nation. The upper Methow River (upstream of rkm 80) and Chewuch River serve as reference reaches and the Methow River downstream of the Twisp River (downstream of rkm 65) serves as a control reach. Restoration of the M2 reach was initiated in 2012 and will be followed by a multi-year, intensive post-evaluation period. This report is comprised of three chapters covering different aspects of the work completed by the USGS. The first chapter is a review of data collection that documents the methods used and summarizes the work done by the USGS from 2008 through 2012. This data summary was

  5. Erionite induces production of autoantibodies and IL-17 in C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebedeo, Christian Nash; Davis, Chad [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States); Peña, Cecelia [Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID (United States); Ng, Kok Wei [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States); Pfau, Jean C., E-mail: pfaujean@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Erionite has similar chemical and physical properties to amphibole asbestos, which induces autoantibodies in mice. Current exposures are occurring in North Dakota due to the use of erionite-contaminated gravel. While erionite is known to cause mesothelioma and other diseases associated with asbestos, there is little known about its effects on the immune system. Objectives: We performed this study to determine whether erionite evokes autoimmune reactions in mice. Methods: Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were used to measure toxicity induced by erionite. Cytokine production by BMDM and splenocytes of C57BL/6 mice was examined by bead arrays and ELISA following exposure to erionite, amphiboles and chrysotile. Wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to saline, erionite, amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) or chrysotile through intratracheal instillations at equal mass (60 μg/mouse). Seven months after exposure, sera were examined for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and IL-17. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect immune complex deposition in the kidneys. Results: Erionite and tremolite caused increased cytokine production belonging to the T{sub H}17 profile including IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β, and TNF-α. The frequency of ANA was increased in mice treated with erionite or amphibole compared to saline-treated mice. IL-17 and TNF-α were elevated in the sera of mice treated with erionite. The frequency of immune complex deposition in the kidneys increased from 33% in saline-treated mice to 90% with erionite. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that both erionite and amphibole asbestos induce autoimmune responses in mice, suggesting a potential for adverse effects in exposed communities. - Highlights: • Erionite, a fibrous mineral, is a current public health concern in the western USA. • Erionite exposure induces antinuclear autoantibodies in exposed mice. • Erionite induces a clear Th17 cytokine response in vitro and in vivo. • These responses were

  6. Naturally occurring asbestos-A recurring public policy challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.J.; Strohmeier, B.R. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Bunker, K.L. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)], E-mail: klbunker@rjlg.com; Van Orden, D.R. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  7. Heterogeneity of exposure and attribution of mesothelioma: Trends and strategies in two American counties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, B W; Abraham, J L

    2009-01-01

    As mesothelioma risk has begun to decline in the United States, two trends are gaining relative importance. 'Legacy' exposures causing this disease are most important in locales having past asbestos industry, shipyards, and/or local distribution of asbestos amphibole-containing material as a result. 'Future' exposures are of particular concern in relation to so-called 'naturally occurring asbestos' (NOA) areas which include unequivocally asbestiform amphibole. In this paper, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana is used as an example of the first trend, and El Dorado County, California as an example of the second. Available tumor registry, epidemiology, historical and mineralogical data, and lung-retained fibre content are used as indicators of disease and exposure. Jefferson Parish, LA was chosen as the prototype of 'legacy' exposures on the basis of historical evidence of asbestos plants with known mesotheliomas in the workforce, known shipyards in the same area, EPA records of distribution of crocidolite-containing scrap to and remediation of over 1400 properties, NIOSH published data on mesothelioma by county, and exposure data including lung-retained fibre analyses in victims, where available. El Dorado, CA was chosen as the prototype of NOA amphibole exposures on the basis of tumor registry data, activity-based EPA sampling data in one area, and lung-retained fibre analyses in area pets, and future risk assessment based on tremolite-specific modelling in Libby, Montana and elsewhere. As expected, the legacy exposure area was high in mesothelioma incidence and mortality. Lung-retained fibre content confirms crocidolite exposures in exposed plant-workers and those exposed to crocidolite-containing scrap, and amosite in shipyard workers. In contrast, to date, cancer registry data in the NOA-amphibole ('future') county does not show a clear increase in incidence or mortality, but grouped county data from the area show a shift in higher incidence rates to the NOA areas and

  8. Heterogeneity of exposure and attribution of mesothelioma: Trends and strategies in two American counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, B. W.; Abraham, J. L.

    2009-02-01

    As mesothelioma risk has begun to decline in the United States, two trends are gaining relative importance. "Legacy" exposures causing this disease are most important in locales having past asbestos industry, shipyards, and/or local distribution of asbestos amphibole-containing material as a result. "Future" exposures are of particular concern in relation to so-called "naturally occurring asbestos" (NOA) areas which include unequivocally asbestiform amphibole. In this paper, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana is used as an example of the first trend, and El Dorado County, California as an example of the second. Available tumor registry, epidemiology, historical and mineralogical data, and lung-retained fibre content are used as indicators of disease and exposure. Jefferson Parish, LA was chosen as the prototype of "legacy" exposures on the basis of historical evidence of asbestos plants with known mesotheliomas in the workforce, known shipyards in the same area, EPA records of distribution of crocidolite-containing scrap to and remediation of over 1400 properties, NIOSH published data on mesothelioma by county, and exposure data including lung-retained fibre analyses in victims, where available. El Dorado, CA was chosen as the prototype of NOA amphibole exposures on the basis of tumor registry data, activity-based EPA sampling data in one area, and lung-retained fibre analyses in area pets, and future risk assessment based on tremolite-specific modelling in Libby, Montana and elsewhere. As expected, the legacy exposure area was high in mesothelioma incidence and mortality. Lung-retained fibre content confirms crocidolite exposures in exposed plant-workers and those exposed to crocidolite-containing scrap, and amosite in shipyard workers. In contrast, to date, cancer registry data in the NOA-amphibole ("future") county does not show a clear increase in incidence or mortality, but grouped county data from the area show a shift in higher incidence rates to the NOA areas and

  9. Naturally occurring asbestos-A recurring public policy challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.J.; Strohmeier, B.R.; Bunker, K.L.; Van Orden, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  10. Naturally occurring asbestos: a recurring public policy challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R J; Strohmeier, B R; Bunker, K L; Van Orden, D R

    2008-05-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  11. The Medical Geochemistry of Dusts, Soils, and Other Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ziegler, T. L.

    2003-12-01

    "Town clenched in suffocating grip of asbestos"USA Today, article on Libby,Montana, February, 2000"Researchers find volcanoes are bad for your health… long after they finish erupting"University of WarwickPress Release, 1999"Toxic soils plague city - arsenic, lead in 5 neighborhoods could imperil 17,000 residents"Denver Post, 2002"Ill winds - dust storms ferry toxic agents between countries and even continents"Science News, 2002A quick scan of newspapers, television, science magazines, or the internet on any given day has a fairly high likelihood of encountering a story (usually accompanied by a creative headline such as those above) regarding human health concerns linked to dusts, soils, or other earth materials. Many such concerns have been recognized and studied for decades, but new concerns arise regularly.Earth scientists have played significant roles in helping the medical community understand some important links between earth materials and human health, such as the role of asbestos mineralogy in disease (Skinner et al., 1988; Ross, 1999; Holland and Smith, 2001), and the role of dusts generated by the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake in an outbreak of Valley Fever ( Jibson et al., 1998; Schneider et al., 1997).Earth science activities tied to health issues are growing (Skinner and Berger, 2003), and are commonly classified under the emerging discipline of medical geology (Finkelman et al., 2001; Selinus and Frank, 2000; Selinus, in press).Medical geochemistry (also referred to as environmental geochemistry and health: Smith and Huyck (1999), Appleton et al. (1996)) can be considered as a diverse subdiscipline of medical geology that deals with human and animal health in the context of the Earth's geochemical cycle ( Figure 1). Many medical geochemistry studies have focused on how chemical elements in rocks, soils, and sediments are transmitted via water or vegetation into the food chain, and how regional geochemical variations can result in disease

  12. NOA at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project (CDRP) - Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, B.

    2012-12-01

    correlate rock mineralogy at a location with the species of amphiboles identified on air samples using TEM. Using amphibole species as a fingerprinting tool, we have been successful in determining whether an exceedance of a trigger level was caused from onsite or offsite sources. In one case, multiple exceedances by an unusual mix of chrysotile and amphiboles (crocidolite, actinolite, tremolite, and Libby-class amphiboles in the same sample) narrowed the source to one of two locations: Disposal Site 3 where a mix of materials from the entire site is disposed of, and water recycled in the decontamination zone wheel wash equipment. Using perimeter air monitoring around and between each location it was possible to identify the wheel wash as the source. As a result, the wheel wash system, track out procedures, and road wetting protocol have been re-engineered to eliminate the potential for significant offsite emissions. These and other examples will describe how the SFPUC NOA team is managing the field determination of NOA, on-site control measures, and perimeter air monitoring to assure that construction is conducted in a safe manner and no offsite exposures to the public occur.

  13. Heterogeneity of exposure and attribution of mesothelioma: Trends and strategies in two American counties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, B W [Department of Pathology and School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abraham, J L, E-mail: bruce.case@mcgill.c [Department of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    As mesothelioma risk has begun to decline in the United States, two trends are gaining relative importance. 'Legacy' exposures causing this disease are most important in locales having past asbestos industry, shipyards, and/or local distribution of asbestos amphibole-containing material as a result. 'Future' exposures are of particular concern in relation to so-called 'naturally occurring asbestos' (NOA) areas which include unequivocally asbestiform amphibole. In this paper, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana is used as an example of the first trend, and El Dorado County, California as an example of the second. Available tumor registry, epidemiology, historical and mineralogical data, and lung-retained fibre content are used as indicators of disease and exposure. Jefferson Parish, LA was chosen as the prototype of 'legacy' exposures on the basis of historical evidence of asbestos plants with known mesotheliomas in the workforce, known shipyards in the same area, EPA records of distribution of crocidolite-containing scrap to and remediation of over 1400 properties, NIOSH published data on mesothelioma by county, and exposure data including lung-retained fibre analyses in victims, where available. El Dorado, CA was chosen as the prototype of NOA amphibole exposures on the basis of tumor registry data, activity-based EPA sampling data in one area, and lung-retained fibre analyses in area pets, and future risk assessment based on tremolite-specific modelling in Libby, Montana and elsewhere. As expected, the legacy exposure area was high in mesothelioma incidence and mortality. Lung-retained fibre content confirms crocidolite exposures in exposed plant-workers and those exposed to crocidolite-containing scrap, and amosite in shipyard workers. In contrast, to date, cancer registry data in the NOA-amphibole ('future') county does not show a clear increase in incidence or mortality, but grouped county data from the area show a

  14. Can the biogenicity of Europa's surfical sulfur be tested simultaneously with penetrators and ion traps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Bhattacherjee, A. B.; Dudeja, S.; Kumar, N.; Seckbach, J.

    2009-04-01

    We suggest a biogenic interpretation of the sulfur patches on the Europan icy surface. This hypothesis is testable by LAPLACE, or a later mission, in which the instrumentation on board are penetrators, or ion traps, with component selection including miniaturized mass spectrometry. The argument in favor of such instrumentation and component selection is as follows: Extreme environments with microbes can act as models for extraterrestrial life (Seckbach et al., 2008). Suggestions have ranged from Venusian environments (Sagan, 1967, Seckbach and Libby, 1970) to Mars (Grilli Caiola and Billi, 2007). Active photosynthetic microbial communities are found on Antarctica, both in and on ice, in fresh water, in saline lakes and streams and within rocks. In the dry valley lakes of Antarctica close to the McMurdo Base, microbial mats are known to selectively remove a huge quantity of sulfur (Parker et al., 1982). Lake Vostok in Antarctica possesses a perennially thick (3 to 4 km) ice-cover that precludes photosynthesis, thus making this subglacial environment a good model system for determining how a potential Europan biota might emerge, evolve and distribute itself. Jupiter's moon Europa may harbor a subsurface water ocean, which lies beneath an ice layer that might be too thick to allow photosynthesis, just as in Lake Vostok. However, disequilibrium chemistry driven by charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere could produce sufficient organic and oxidant molecules for an Europan biosphere (Chyba, 2000). We restrict our attention to microbial mats that could still be thriving in spite of the extreme conditions of radiation on Europa. We are especially concerned with sulfur patches discovered by the Galileo mission. In the near future there are technologies available to settle the question of habitability on Europa, such as penetrators that are currently being developed for preliminary trials nearer to the Earth—the Moon-Lite mission (Smith et al., 2008). If analogies

  15. Romanian Association of Balneology Conference – 2015, 28 – 31 May, Băile Tuşnad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU Constantin

    2015-05-01

    PERIODONTITIS TREATMENT 17.\tDr. Tatar Daniela Monica, Dr. Dogaru Gabriela, Dr. Ungur Rodica - INFLUENCE OF NATURAL FACTORS ON BRONCHIAL ASTHMA 18.\tIspas Alexandra, Gabriela Dogaru, Motricala Marieta - EFFECTS OF NATURAL THERAPEUTIC FACTORS IN BĂILE TUSNAD ON THE REHABILITATION OF POST-STROKE PATIENTS 19.\tMaria Daniela Crăciun - IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN CLIMAX WITH KINETOTHERAPY AND NATURAL FACTORS IN VATRA DORNEI RESORT 20.\tDenisa Muresan, Gabriela Dogaru, Motricala Marieta - EFFECTIVENESS OF NATURAL THERAPEUTIC FACTORS IN BĂILE TUSNAD FOR THE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE 21.\tGabriel Ranghiuc, Roxana Hodorogea, Asist.Dr.BioIng. Cătălina LUCA - STUDIUL TULBURĂRILOR MUSCULO-SCHELETALE UTILIZÂND ELECTROGONIOMETRIA ŞI ELECTROMIOGRAFIA 22.\tMonica Delia POP, Letitia Mihaela Morar - How do we protect ourselves of MALPRACTICE? MEDICAL MALPRACTICE - ACTUALITY, PERSPECTIVES AND SIGNIFICANTLY JURISPRUDENCE 23.\tOctavian D Olariu, Claudia Dascal, Ionut Cadar - REHABILITATION “KEY POINTS” IN ZONE V FLEXOR TENDONS INJURIES 24.\tSuceveanu Mihaela, Pop Dana, Suceveanu Paul, Sitar Tǎut Adela Viviana, Zdrenghea Dumitru, Hâncu Nicolae - EFFECTS OF CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION IN PATIENTS ADMITTED TO THE “Dr Benedek Geza” Hospital of Rehabilitation IN CARDIOVASCULAR Diseases, COVASNA 25.\tCadar D Ionut, Dogaru B Gabriela - THE PHYSICAL THERAPY ROLE IN FUNCTIONAL REHABILITATION AFTER TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY 26.\tDr. Glogojeanu Remus Relu, Dr. Bucur Ileana, Dr. Dogaru Gabriela, Kt. Glogojeanu Olivia Daniela - THE SIGNIFICANT RISKS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF OSTEOPOROSIS IN THE AERONAUTICAL PERSONNEL. PREVENTION AND TREATMENT 27.\tTatiana Bihari, Denes Marton, Doina Moldovan - SILICONE IMPLANT ARTHROPLASTY OF THE PROXIMAL INTERPHALANGEAL JOINT (PIPJ OF FINGER V OF THE RIGHT HAND – A THERAPEUTIC VARIANT IN POSTTRAUMATIC ARTHROSIS 28.\tPop Daniela Dogaru Gabriela, Stanescu Ioana, Pop Ioana - ROLE OF MEDICAL REHABILITATION TREATMENT IN POST

  16. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    -of-experiment schemes to shorten the optimization effort for new materials is presented at the end of this methodical section. Further, the issue contains original papers on other prominent PLD activities, such as dielectric SrTiO3 films, magnetic and spintronic La1-x Srx MnO3, and multiferroic BiFeO3. The role of cationic and anionic point defects and their control during PLD is discussed based on the examples of the simple perovskite SrMoO3 and the double perovskite Sr2CrWO6. The final paper in this thin-film-related section provides a good account of in situ high-temperature surface smoothing of Ba2TiSi2O8 fresnoite films and growth from glassy fresnoite targets with 100% theoretical density. The flexibility of the PLD technique has resulted in several schemes to grow nanostructures, which is unique in the nature of PLD. Okada's group succeeded in controlling the growth density of ZnO nanowires by varying the thickness of the ZnO buffer layer, and nanowalls could be patterned by interference phenomenon using laser irradiation. PLD-based methods are further used to grow metal nanoparticle plasmonic films with packing densities up to 1011 particles cm-2, and ZnO nanowires from screw dislocation driven two-dimensional hexagonal stacking on diamond substrates. Overall, this special issue provides an up-to-date overview on the current status, potential and the extraordinary success and development of PLD from a simple laboratory growth method to a viable industrial technique for fabrication of advanced oxide thin films. We thank all the authors and reviewers for their contributions to this special issue. We would like to place on record our gratitude for the timely help extended by the editorial team, Dr Olivia Roche, Dean Williams and Colin Adcock. References [1] Dijkkamp D, Venkatesan T, Wu X D, Shaheen S A, Jisrawi N, Min-Lee Y-H, McLean W L and Croft M 1987 Preparation of YBaCu oxide superconductor thin films using pulsed laser evaporation from high T c bulk material Appl. Phys. Lett

  17. PREFACE: International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Jens

    2011-09-01

    delegates as lecturers, but also gave a broad overview of the field of nuclear physics before the conference. In addition INPC 2010 teamed up with the publishing house of Nuclear Physics A to provide awards to the best student oral presentation and the three top poster presentations at the conference. An international panel of judges together with members from the editorial board of Nuclear Physics A finally decided on the following award winners among a very strong field of applicants: P Finlay (Guelph, Canada), oral presentation; Y J Kim (Indiana, USA), E Rand (Guelph, Canada), and T Brunner (Munich, Germany) for posters. A treat of a different kind was in store for delegates at the conference banquet at the Museum of Anthropology. Olivia Fermi, the granddaughter of nuclear physics 'royalty' Enrico Fermi, was among the guests and shared in the after-dinner speech some anecdotes from her life growing up in the Fermi household. This, together with the unique setting of the museum of First Nations' artefacts and art pieces and overlooking the Pacific Ocean and the skyline of Vancouver, was a perfect fit for a very special conference. The field of nuclear physics clearly presented itself in a healthy and dynamic state, with many young people eagerly anticipating the advent of new experiments, theory, and facilities. At the end of the conference IUPAP announced the selection of the host of the next INPC conference: it will be held in 2013 in Florence, Italy. On behalf of the Local Organizing Committee we would like to acknowledge the great work of the Program Committee and the Session Chairs, who were responsible for the excellent selection and execution of the Parallel Session Program, the International Advisory Program and the work for the Plenary Session selections, and the judges for the Student Awards. Moreover, we would like to acknowledge the support of TRIUMF as the host and main organizer of the conference. Additional support was provided by the Canadian Institute for

  18. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-02-01

    and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010

  19. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    the role of universities as content producers for credentialed learning to be questioned, prompting many educators to explore new ways of supporting online learning. The sixth article from Palitha Edirisingha (UK, Chiara Rizzi (Italy, Ming Nie (UK and Libby Rothwell (UK report on a study involving the use of podcasting (Curry, 2004 to provide teaching and learning support for an undergraduate module on English Language and Communication. The findings led to development of a model for integrating podcasts in on-campus blended learning, and which can have potential applications in distance learning contexts. The model is based on three main features of podcasts identified as facilitating student learning: learner choice and flexibility offered by podcasts; tacit knowledge and experience of peers conveyed in discussions; and a sense of informality brought into formal learning. Also from the implementation perspective, Penny de Byl and Janet Taylor (Australia describe a Web 2.0/Web3D hybrid e-learning platform, called the AliveX3D platform, which involves the application of the Web 2.0 ethos to an online 3D virtual environment. The platform and accompanying tools are designed to enable the creation of authentic learning experiences with a large degree of learner control, and to promote collaborative dialogue between learners. The immersion in the 3D worlds enables learners to negotiate meaning based on their own personal cognitive, affective and kinaesthetic experiences rather than relying merely on descriptions of others’ experiences. Last but not least, the “Notes to the Editor” section contains a contribution from Yavuz Akbulut and Mübin Kiyici (Turkey, on the instructional uses of blogs. And two book reviews from the field. We hope you enjoy reading this contributions, and welcome your feedback, rejoinders and reflections on the various articles contained within this special issue. Mark J. W. LEE and Hakan G. SENELGuest Editors, July 2007 Acknowledgements

  20. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2007-10-01

    , and they do not agree with the idea that distance education systems can support independent learning. The 4th articles arrived from Universitas Terbuka, INDONESIA, on “A Provision Of Student Learning Support Services In A Large-Scale Distance Education System At Universitas Terbuka, Indonesia”, which is written by Aminudin ZUHAIRI, Irma ADNAN and Dina THAIB. This paper addresses the practice and experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT in the provision of learning support services for students in a large-scale distance education system. The UT, which has a network of 37 regional offices and participating institutions, has challenges to provide and manage effective learning support system for more than 340,000 students, residing in various locations of Indonesia, a country with diverse level of the quality in terms of transportation, communication and technological infrastructure and facilities. The fifth article came from GANA, the subject is “Wıdenıng Access To Tertıary Educatıon For Women In Ghana Through Dıstance Educatıon”, written by Olivia Adwoa Tiwaah Frimpong KWAPONG, University of Ghana, Institute of Adult Education. This paper explores the unique nature of DE for widening access to tertiary education most especially for women in Ghana and the issues to consider in the process.by the baseon women, ICTs, distance education, tertiary education cohcepts. The sixth article which is entitled as “REMOTE RF LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS: Engineers’ and Technicians’ Perspective”, written by Dr. Nergiz Ercil CAGILTAY, Dr. Elif Uray AYDIN and Dr. Ali KARA from Atilim University, Ankara, TURKEY This study aims to find out requirements and needs to be fulfilled in developing remote Radio Frequency (RF laboratory. Remote laboratories are newly emerging solutions for better supporting of e-learning platforms and for increasing their efficiency and effectiveness in technical education. By this way, modern universities aim to provide lifelong learning