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Sample records for oligotrophic pine fen

  1. Reconstruction of annual carbon dynamics and balance for an oligotrophic pine fen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J; Silvola, J; Aaltonen, H [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Talanov, A; Ikkonen, E [Karelian Research Centre of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biology; Nykaenen, H; Martikainen, P J [National Public Health Inst. Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1997-12-31

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is bound by mire vegetation in photosynthesis during the growing season, and is re-released by respiration of plants, soil animals and microorganisms consuming dead organic matter. A small proportion of annual primary production may fall below the water table to anoxic conditions and thus escapes the oxidative decomposition. Also from anoxic peat, carbon is released with clear seasonal and spatial variation as methane (CH{sub 4}.). The rate of carbon accumulation in peat depends on the annual inbalance of plant production and litter decomposition. Exchange of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} between peat, vegetation and the atmosphere thus reflects the dynamics of carbon flows in the ecosystem. Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange (PN), total CO{sub 2} release (RTOT) and CH{sub 4} release (D) from different treeless surfaces of low-sedge Sphagnum papillosum pine fen was studied in eastern Finland. (8 refs.)

  2. Reconstruction of annual carbon dynamics and balance for an oligotrophic pine fen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J.; Silvola, J.; Aaltonen, H. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Talanov, A.; Ikkonen, E. [Karelian Research Centre of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biology; Nykaenen, H.; Martikainen, P.J. [National Public Health Inst. Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is bound by mire vegetation in photosynthesis during the growing season, and is re-released by respiration of plants, soil animals and microorganisms consuming dead organic matter. A small proportion of annual primary production may fall below the water table to anoxic conditions and thus escapes the oxidative decomposition. Also from anoxic peat, carbon is released with clear seasonal and spatial variation as methane (CH{sub 4}.). The rate of carbon accumulation in peat depends on the annual inbalance of plant production and litter decomposition. Exchange of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} between peat, vegetation and the atmosphere thus reflects the dynamics of carbon flows in the ecosystem. Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange (PN), total CO{sub 2} release (RTOT) and CH{sub 4} release (D) from different treeless surfaces of low-sedge Sphagnum papillosum pine fen was studied in eastern Finland. (8 refs.)

  3. Phylogenetic comparison of the methanogenic communities from an acidic, oligotrophic fen and an anaerobic digester treating municipal wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Lisa M; Regan, John M

    2008-11-01

    Methanogens play a critical role in the decomposition of organics under anaerobic conditions. The methanogenic consortia in saturated wetland soils are often subjected to large temperature fluctuations and acidic conditions, imposing a selective pressure for psychro- and acidotolerant community members; however, methanogenic communities in engineered digesters are frequently maintained within a narrow range of mesophilic and circumneutral conditions to retain system stability. To investigate the hypothesis that these two disparate environments have distinct methanogenic communities, the methanogens in an oligotrophic acidic fen and a mesophilic anaerobic digester treating municipal wastewater sludge were characterized by creating clone libraries for the 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes. A quantitative framework was developed to assess the differences between these two communities by calculating the average sequence similarity for 16S rRNA genes and mcrA within a genus and family using sequences of isolated and characterized methanogens within the approved methanogen taxonomy. The average sequence similarities for 16S rRNA genes within a genus and family were 96.0 and 93.5%, respectively, and the average sequence similarities for mcrA within a genus and family were 88.9 and 79%, respectively. The clone libraries of the bog and digester environments showed no overlap at the species level and almost no overlap at the family level. Both libraries were dominated by clones related to uncultured methanogen groups within the Methanomicrobiales, although members of the Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales were also found in both libraries. Diversity indices for the 16S rRNA gene library of the bog and both mcrA libraries were similar, but these indices indicated much lower diversity in the 16S digester library than in the other three libraries.

  4. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  5. Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Plomion; D. Chagne; D. Pot; S. Kumar; P.L. Wilcox; R.D. Burdon; D. Prat; D.G. Peterson; J. Paiva; P. Chaumeil; G.G. Vendramin; F. Sebastiani; C.D. Nelson; C.S. Echt; O. Savolainen; T.L. Kubisiak; M.T. Cervera; N. de Maria; M.N. Islam-Faridi

    2007-01-01

    Pinus is the most important genus within the Family Pinaceae and also within the gymnosperms by the number of species (109 species recognized by Farjon 2001) and by its contribution to forest ecosystems. All pine species are evergreen trees or shrubs. They are widely distributed in the northern hemisphere, from tropical areas to northern areas in America and Eurasia....

  6. Carbon budget of oligotrophic mires in the Southern Taiga of Western Siberia under anthropogenic impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatskaya, Eugenia; Dyukarev, Egor

    2010-05-01

    Role of peatlands in the global greenhouse gases budget is highly relevant. According to present estimates peatlands in undisturbed conditions act as a sink for the atmospheric carbon. Anthropogenic impact on peatlands (melioration, changes in land use, influence of underground water catchments) results in water table lowering, changing in vegetation cover, and degradation of peat deposit. Peatlands could provide a significant positive feedback for climate changes if warming and peatlands drying stimulates bulk soil organic matter decomposition which enhances CO2 release to the atmosphere. Western Siberian peatlands usually represented big bog massifs. Big peatlands have higher stability to external influence. Small peatlands have all signs of big bogs but react on changes in environmental variables more quickly. The present study is devoted to investigation of primary carbon fluxes (CO2 emission and net primary productivity) and carbon balance at oligotrophic bogs in native condition (key area "Bakchar") and under anthropogenic impact (key area "Ob'-Tom'"). The key area "Bakchar" is located between the Iksa and Bakchar rivers (56o58`N 82o36`E) at the Bakcharskoe bog (area 1400 km2). The key area "Ob'-Tom'"is located in the northern part of Ob' and Tom' interfluve (56o21`N 82o31`E). The "Bakchar" key area includes the following ecosystems: pine- shrub-sphagnum community, a similar community with stunted (low) pine trees, and sedge-sphagnum fen. Two small peatlands were studied at Ob' and Tom' interfluve. Kirsanovskoe bog includes pine- shrub-sphagnum community and sedge fen. Timiryazevskoe bog was represented by pine- shrub-sphagnum (TPSS) community and sedge fen. An infrared gas analyzer OPTOGAS 500.4 (OPTEC Corp., St.-Petersburg, Russia) attached to a static opaque plastic been used for carbon dioxide emission measurements. The net primary productivity was measured by clipping method (Golovatskaya and Dyukarev, Plant Soil 2009). Peatlands at "Ob'-Tom'" key area

  7. Oligotrophic bacteria isolated from clinical materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Y; Ihmori, M; Yamaguchi, J

    1995-01-01

    Oligotrophic bacteria (oligotrophs) are microorganisms that grow in extremely nutritionally deficient conditions in which the concentrations of organic substances are low. Many oligotrophic bacteria were isolated from clinical materials including urine, sputum, swabbings of the throat, vaginal discharges, and others. Seventy-seven strains of oligotrophic bacteria from 871 samples of clinical material were isolated. A relatively higher frequency of isolation of oligotrophic bacteria was shown ...

  8. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  9. Prospects for fen meadow restoration on severely degraded fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Diggelen, Rudy Van; Grootjans, Ab P.; Kotowski, Wiktor

    2010-01-01

    The majority of fens in Europe have been transformed for agricultural purposes and have disappeared or become degraded. Fen meadows that developed under low-intensity management of fens also have become degraded. In this paper, we consider the available restoration methods, biotic constraints for

  10. N and P addition inhibits growth of rich fen bryophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Riis, Tenna

    2016-01-01

    vernicosus and paludella squarrosa) rich fen bryophytes were grown in mixed culture and subjected to rainwater or groundwater and three levels of N (0, 1 and 3 mg N L-1) and P (0, 0.05 and 0.1 mg P NL-1). All species responded negatively to higher N-levels and three of four species responded negatively...... to rainwater and higher P-levels. C. cuspidata had highest relative growth rate in all treatments, and the infrequently occurringrare species had lower relative growth rate and were more negatively affected by high levels of N than the frequently occurringcommon species. A negative effect of rainwater seemed...... to be caused by higher background levels of N in rainwater compared to groundwater rather than a pH-effect per se. We found a negative effect of high initial bryophyte density in three of four species indicating density dependent inhibition between species.We suggest that maintenance of oligotrophic conditions...

  11. Calcareous Fens - Source Feature Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Pursuant to the provisions of Minnesota Statutes, section 103G.223, this database contains points that represent calcareous fens as defined in Minnesota Rules, part...

  12. Incidental oligotrophication of North American Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mary Anne; Fahnenstiel, Gary; Scavia, Donald

    2011-04-15

    Phytoplankton production is an important factor in determining both ecosystem stability and the provision of ecosystem goods and services. The expansive and economically important North American Great Lakes are subjected to multiple stressors and understanding their responses to those stresses is important for understanding system-wide ecological controls. Here we show gradual increases in spring silica concentration (an indicator of decreasing growth of the dominant diatoms) in all basins of Lakes Michigan and Huron (USA and Canadian waters) between 1983 and 2008. These changes indicate the lakes have undergone gradual oligotrophication coincident with and anticipated by nutrient management implementation. Slow declines in seasonal drawdown of silica (proxy for seasonal phytoplankton production) also occurred, until recent years, when lake-wide responses were punctuated by abrupt decreases, putting them in the range of oligotrophic Lake Superior. The timing of these dramatic production drops is coincident with expansion of populations of invasive dreissenid mussels, particularly quagga mussels, in each basin. The combined effect of nutrient mitigation and invasive species expansion demonstrates the challenges facing large-scale ecosystems and suggest the need for new management regimes for large ecosystems.

  13. Hydrological landscape settings of base-rich fen mires and fen meadows : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Adema, E.B.; Bleuten, W.; Joosten, H.; Madaras, M.; Janáková, M.; Middleton, B.

    2006-01-01

    Question: Why do similar fen meadow communities occur in different landscapes? How does the hydrological system sustain base-rich fen mires and fen meadows? Location: Interdunal wetlands and heathland pools in The Netherlands, percolation mires in Germany, Poland, and Siberia, and calcareous spring

  14. Unravelling hydrological mechanisms behind fen deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Low-productive fens are wetland ecosystems that have strongly declined in number and size in temperate regions of Western Europe since World War II. This fen type has significant conservation value in many countries because of its high species diversity and the presence of endangered plant species.

  15. BOREAS TF-10 NSA-Fen Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J. Harry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Jelinski, Dennis E.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-10 team collected tower flux and meteorological data at two sites, a fen and a young jack pine forest, near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada, as part of BOREAS. A preliminary data set was assembled in August 1993 while field testing the instrument packages, and at both sites data were collected from 15-Aug to 31-Aug. The main experimental period was in 1994, when continuous data were collected from 08-Apr to 23-Sep at the fen site. A very limited experiment was run in the spring/ summer of 1995, when the fen site tower was operated from 08-Apr to 14-Jun in support of a hydrology experiment in an adjoining feeder basin. Upon examination of the 1994 data set, it became clear that the behavior of the heat, water, and carbon dioxide fluxes throughout the whole growing season was an important scientific question, and that the 1994 data record was not sufficiently long to capture the character of the seasonal behavior of the fluxes. Thus, the fen site was operated in 1996 in order to collect data from spring melt to autumn freeze-up. Data were collected from 29-Apr to 05-Nov at the fen site. All variables are presented as 30-minute averages. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  16. compuestos fenólicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda González García

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta una revisión bibliográfica que tiene como objetivo identificar y analizar alternativas de aprovechamiento del bagazo de Agave tequilana Weber var. Azul. Se proponen dos líneas de investigación para obtener productos de valor agregado a partir de este residuo: 1utilización como fuente de carbono de bajo costo para la producción de biopolímeros y carbohidrasas, con bacterias celulolíticas del género Microbulbifer, Marinobacterium y Sagittula; 2obtención de compuestos fenólicos a partir de la lignina presente en sus fibras. Se concluye, que el bagazo de agave tequilero es un material viable para ser usado como substrato en procesos fermentativos, por lo que existen grandes oportunidades de investigación para desarrollar procesos de bioconversión técnicamente factible, eficiente y económicamente atractivo

  17. Evaluating stocking efficacy in an ecosystem undergoing oligotrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chun; Rogers, Mark W.; Bunnell, David B.

    2017-01-01

    Oligotrophication has negatively affected fisheries production in many freshwater ecosystems and could conceivably reduce the efficacy of stockings used to enhance fisheries. In Lake Michigan, offshore oligotrophication has occurred since the 1970s, owing to reductions in total phosphorus (TP) inputs and nearshore sequestration of TP by nonindigenous dreissenid mussels. We evaluated simultaneous effects of stock enhancement and oligotrophication on salmonine species (Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, and steelhead O. mykiss) that support valuable recreational fisheries. We employed a novel application of an Ecopath with Ecosim model by conducting a full factorial simulation experiment. Our design included multiple levels of salmonine stocking, consumption by invasive quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis), and TP that were informed by manager interests. Under all levels of TP and quagga mussel consumption, our results showed that stock enhancement could still increase salmonine biomass, but positive responses were stronger for lake trout and steelhead than Chinook salmon. Simulations showed that quagga mussel consumption has deleterious effects on pelagic-oriented prey fishes and Chinook salmon, which feed almost exclusively on the pelagic-oriented alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). In summary, results from our simulation experiment suggested that lake trout and steelhead are better suited to the current ecosystem than Chinook salmon, and therefore, stock enhancement provides the highest gains for these two species. Furthermore, simulated biomass of all recreational salmonine species increased with increasing TP, indicating the need for managers to consider how potential future oligotrophication will limit the carrying capacity of salmonine biomass in Lake Michigan

  18. Effect of Groundwater Abstraction on Fen Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ole; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Jensen, Jacob Birk

    2011-01-01

    within a distance of 1.5 km to a planned well field. In the river valley the interaction between groundwater and surface water is strongly affected by low permeable sediments. These sediments reduce the direct discharge to the river and have a large impact on the functioning and presence of the rich fen......Quantifying the effects of groundwater abstraction on fen ecosystems located in discharge areas can be complicated. The water level in fens is close to the terrain surface most of the year and it is controlled by a relatively constant groundwater exfiltration. It is difficult to measure...... the exfiltration fluxes and thus water level data is typically used to evaluate if the ecosystem is affected. The paper presents collected data and analysis from a case study, where the hydrological effect of groundwater abstraction on rich fens and springs in a Danish river valley has been studied. The natural...

  19. Geochemistry and hydrology of a calcareous fen within the Savage Fen wetlands complex, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komor, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Savage Fen is a wetlands complex at the base of north-facing bluffs in the Minnesota River Valley. The complex includes 27.8 hectares of calcareous fen that host rare calciphile plants whose populations are declining in Minnesota. Water and sediment compositions in the calcareous fen were studied to gain a better understanding of the hydrologie System that sustains the rare vegetation. Groundwater in the fen is a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate type with circumneutral pH values. The groundwater composition is the resuit of interactions among water, dissolved and gaseous carbon species, carbonates, and ion exchangers. Shallow groundwater is distinguished from deep groundwater by smaller concentrations of chloride, sulfate, magnesium, and sodium, and larger concentrations of calcium, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonium. Magnesian calcite is the prevalent carbonate in unconsolidated sedimentary fill beneath the fen and is an important source and sink for dissolved calcium, magnesium, and inorganic carbon. Calcite concentrations just below the water table are small because aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of organic matter increase the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), decrease pH, and cause calcite to dissolve. Thick calcite accumulations just above the water table, in the root zone of calciphile plants, result from water table fluctuations and attendant changes in PCO2. Groundwater beneath Savage Fen recharges in lakes and ponds south of the fen and upwells to the surface within the fen. Water at the water table is a mixture of upwelling groundwater and water near the surface that flows downslope from higher elevations in the fen. Changes in oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of shallow groundwater indicate that the proportion of upwelling groundwater in shallow groundwater decreases downgradient in the calcareous fen. Encroachment of reed grasses into the calcareous fen may reflect human-caused disturbances in the recharge area.

  20. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G.; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterised. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria, alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of just a few bacterial and viral genes can predict most of the variability in carbon export in these regions. PMID:26863193

  1. High resistance of some oligotrophic bacteria to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, D.I.; Tashtemirova, M.A.; Pitryuk, I.A.; Sorokin, V.V.; Oranskaya, M.S.; Nikitin, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    The resistance of seven cultures of eutrophic and oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation (at doses up to 360 Gy) was investigated. The bacteria under study were divided into three groups according to their survival ability after irradiation. Methylobacterium organophilum and open-quotes Pedodermatophilus halotoleransclose quotes (LD 50 = 270 Gy) were highly tolerant. By their tolerance, these organisms approached Deinococcus radiodurans. Aquatic ring-shaped (toroidal) bacteria Flectobacillus major and open-quotes Arcocella aquaticaclose quotes (LD 5 = 173 and 210 Gy, respectively) were moderately tolerant. Eutrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli (LD 50 = 43 and 38 Gy, respectively) were the most sensitive. X-ray microanalysis showed that in tolerant bacteria the intracellular content of potassium increased and the content of calcium decreased after irradiation. No changes in the element composition of the eutrophic bacterium E. coli were detected. Possible mechanisms of the resistance of oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation are discussed

  2. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  3. The paradox of algal blooms in oligotrophic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhyay, S.; Abessa, M. B.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2010-12-01

    Nutrient inputs to streams and lakes, primarily from anthropogenic sources, lead to eutrophic conditions that favor algal blooms with undesirable consequences. In contrast, low nutrient or oligotrophic waters rarely support algal blooms; such ecosystems are typically lower in productivity. Since the mid-1980’s however, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has dramatically expanded its range colonizing oligotrophic rivers worldwide with blooms appearing as thick benthic mats. This recent global occurrence of Didymosphenia geminata blooms in temperate rivers has been perplexing in its pace of spread and the paradoxical nature of the nuisance growths. The blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic flowing waters, where phosphorus (P) availability often limits primary production. We present a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats adsorb both P and iron (Fe) from flowing waters and make P available for cellular uptake. The adsorbed P becomes bioavailable through biogeochemical processes that occur within the mat. The biogeochemical processes observed here while well accepted in benthic systems are novel for algal blooms in lotic habits. Enzymatic and bacterial processes such as Fe and sulfate reduction can release the adsorbed P and increase its bioavailability, creating a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and nutrient availability. Stalk affinity for Fe, Fe-P biogeochemistry, and interaction between watershed processes and climatic setting explain the paradoxical blooms, and the recent global spread of this invasive aquatic species. At a broader scale the study also implies that such algal blooms in oligotrophic environments can fundamentally alter the retention and longitudinal transfer of important nutrients such as P in streams and rivers.

  4. BOREAS TGB-6 Soil Methane Oxidation and Production from NSA BP and Fen Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Bruce; Wahlen, Martin; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-6) team collected soil methane measurements at several sites in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains soil methane consumption (bacterial CH4 oxidation) and associated C-13 fractionation effects in samples that were collected at various sites in 1994 and 1996 from enclosures (chambers). Methane C-13 data in soil gas samples from the NSA Young Jack Pine (YJP) and Old Jack Pine (OJP) sites for 1994 and 1996 are also given. Additional data on the isotopic composition of methane (carbon and hydrogen isotopes) produced in the NSA beaver ponds and fen bog in 1993 and 1994 are given as well. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  5. Picocyanobacteria success in oligotrophic lakes: fact or fiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana CALLIERI

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches may be utilized to explain the predominance of picocyanobacteria (Pcy in oligotrophic lakes: the analysis of their interannual evolution in one single lake and their relative importance in different lakes along a trophic gradient. Here we discuss results from field data on picocyanobacteria over several seasons from a deep oligotrophic subalpine lake - Lago Maggiore, and variables influencing their abundance. Comparing data from lakes along a trophic gradient, no simple relationship emerges between lake’s trophic state and picocyanobacteria abundance and contribution to total phytoplanktonic biomass. That is, trophic state alone cannot explain the success/absence of picocyanobacteria that appear to be favored under P limitation, but seem more sensitive to grazing pressure and light. In some oligotrophic lakes, if light climate, grazing, and competition are favorable, picocyanobacteria can grow rapidly, out-compete competitors and become very abundant, but there are a host of factors that can influence the outcome of this competition, and ultimately influence Pcy success in lakes of all trophic types.

  6. Conservation and Biodiversity of Rich Fens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel

    2014-01-01

    Rich fen is a habitat type dependent on a constant supply of nutrient poor, calcium rich groundwater. A high, stable groundwater table, relatively high pH combined with nutrient poor conditions support a special and very species rich vegetation including many rare and threatened plant species. In...

  7. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on how phosphorus and carbon control pelagic bacteria in lakes over a gradient of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from 6.7 to 29.5 mg C L(-1)) and phosphorus (P-tot from 5 to 19 mu g L(-1)). Five oligotrophic lakes in southern Sweden were sampled in late autumn. Phosphate...... carbon mineralization in this kind of system during autumn is conditioned by the combined availability of labile carbon and phosphorus, with the assimilated carbon mainly transformed to inorganic carbon in respiration, contributing to CO(2) supersaturation in these systems....

  8. Formalized classification of European fen vegetation at the alliance level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterka, Tomáš; Hájek, Michal; Jiroušek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aims Phytosociological classification of fen vegetation (Scheuchzerio palustris-Caricetea fuscae class) differs among European countries. Here we propose a unified vegetation classification of European fens at the alliance level, provide unequivocal assignment rules for individual vegetation plot...

  9. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Callieri

    Full Text Available Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena, a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  10. Novel fen ecosystems in western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Western North Carolina is mountainous, and groundwater flows from hillslope recharge zones to valley stream and spring discharge zones. Depending on surface topography and geologic conditions, the water table may approach or intersect the ground surface to form seepage wetlands, or fens. Fen ecosystems can be very sensitive to changes in land use, groundwater pumping, and upslope development. This presentation will focus on two sites where historical land use and human activity played important roles in creating or preserving fen ecosystems. Both sites now support—and are being managed to protect—federally endangered flora and fauna. The first site is home to Sarracenia oreophilia, an endangered pitcher plant that thrives on saturated soils with low nutrient content. The site's early history includes tree clearing, drain tile installation, and cattle grazing, while more recent management activities have included drain tile excavation, manual invasive removal, and prescribed burns. A 15-year water-level record indicates seasonal artesian conditions wet a 3m clay unit (K=2E-5 cm/sec) beneath the site, which is able to retain moisture during drier periods. Shorter "clay wetting periods" during drought years (1999-2000; 2007-2008) correspond to reduced clump counts in pitcher-plant surveys. The second site is a former aggregate quarry that now supports over 60 bog turtles (Clemmys muhlenbergii). The biggest threat to this site is encroachment of non-native and invasive multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) and other large woody species. Management activities include manual removal and prescribed goat herbivory. Current efforts to characterize the springs, water-table, and surface-water flows will be used to detect changes in the future to the hydrologic regime in the fen.

  11. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S. A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large “blooms” in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers.

  12. High bacterial diversity in epilithic biofilms of oligotrophic mountain lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2012-11-01

    Benthic microbial biofilms attached to rocks (epilithic) are major sites of carbon cycling and can dominate ecosystem primary production in oligotrophic lakes. We studied the bacterial community composition of littoral epilithic biofilms in five connected oligotrophic high mountain lakes located at different altitudes by genetic fingerprinting and clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. Different intra-lake samples were analyzed, and consistent changes in community structure (chlorophyll a and organic matter contents, and bacterial community composition) were observed along the altitudinal gradient, particularly related with the location of the lake above or below the treeline. Epilithic biofilm genetic fingerprints were both more diverse among lakes than within lakes and significantly different between montane (below the tree line) and alpine lakes (above the tree line). The genetic richness in the epilithic biofilm was much higher than in the plankton of the same lacustrine area studied in previous works, with significantly idiosyncratic phylogenetic composition (specifically distinct from lake plankton or mountain soils). Data suggest the coexistence of aerobic, anaerobic, phototrophic, and chemotrophic microorganisms in the biofilm, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria being the most important bacterial taxa, followed by Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia. The degree of novelty was especially high for epilithic Bacteroidetes, and up to 50 % of the sequences formed monophyletic clusters distantly related to any previously reported sequence. More than 35 % of the total sequences matched at <95 % identity to any previously reported 16S rRNA gene, indicating that alpine epilithic biofilms are unexplored habitats that contain a substantial degree of novelty within a short geographical distance. Further research is needed to determine whether these communities are involved in more biogeochemical pathways than

  13. Suspended marine particulate proteins in coastal and oligotrophic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Maxime C.; Neibauer, Jaqui; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Nunn, Brook L.; Keil, Richard G.

    2015-03-01

    Metaproteomic analyses were performed on suspended sediments collected in one coastal environment (Washington margin, Pacific Ocean, n = 5) and two oligotrophic environments (Atlantic Ocean near BATS, n = 5, and Pacific Ocean near HOTS, n = 5). Using a database of 2.3 million marine proteins developed using the NCBI database, 443 unique peptides were detected from which 363 unique proteins were identified. Samples from the euphotic zone contained on average 2-3x more identifiable proteins than deeper waters (150-1500 m) and these proteins were predominately from photosynthetic organisms. Diatom peptides dominate the spectra of the Washington margin while peptides from cyanobacteria, such as Synechococcus sp. dominated the spectra of both oligotrophic sites. Despite differences in the exact proteins identified at each location, there is good agreement for protein function and cellular location. Proteins in surface waters code for a variety of cellular functions including photosynthesis (24% of detected proteins), energy production (10%), membrane production (9%) and genetic coding and reading (9%), and are split 60-40 between membrane proteins and intracellular cytoplasmic proteins. Sargasso Sea surface waters contain a suite of peptides consistent with proteins involved in circadian rhythms that promote both C and N fixation at night. At depth in the Sargasso Sea, both muscle-derived myosin protein and the muscle-hydrolyzing proteases deseasin MCP-01 and metalloprotease Mcp02 from γ-proteobacteria were observed. Deeper waters contain peptides predominately sourced from γ-proteobacteria (37% of detected proteins) and α-proteobacteria (26%), although peptides from membrane and photosynthetic proteins attributable to phytoplankton were still observed (13%). Relative to surface values, detection frequencies for bacterial membrane proteins and extracellular enzymes rose from 9 to 16 and 2 to 4% respectively below the thermocline and the overall balance between

  14. Experimental restoration of a fen plant community after peat mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobbaert, D.; Rochefort, L.; Price, J.S. [Univ. Laval, Sainte-Foy (Canada). Dept. de Phytologie

    2004-11-01

    Methods: The effectiveness of introducing fen plants with the application of donor diaspore material was tested. The donor diaspore material, containing seeds, rhizomes, moss fragments, and other plant propagules, was collected from two different types of natural fens. We tested whether the application of straw mulch would increase fen species cover and biodiversity compared to control plots without straw mulch. Terrace levels of different peat depths (15 cm, 40 cm, and 56 cm) were created to test the effects of different environmental site conditions on the success of re-vegetation. Results: Applying donor seed bank from natural fens was found to significantly increase fen plant cover and richness after the two growing seasons. Straw mulch proved to significantly increase fen plant richness. The intermediate terrace level (40 cm) had the highest fen plant establishment. Compared to reference sites, the low terrace level (15 cm) was richer in base cations, whereas the high terrace level (56 cm) was much drier. Conclusions: The application of donor diaspore material was demonstrated as an effective technique for establishing vascular fen plants. Further rewetting measures are considered necessary at the restoration site to create a fen ecosystem rather than simply restoring some fen species (Location: Riviere-du-Loup peatland, southern Quebec, Canada at 100 m a.s.l.)

  15. Oligotrophication and Metabolic Slowing-Down of a NW Mediterranean Coastal Ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana

    2017-12-22

    Increased oligotrophication is expected for oligotrophic areas as a consequence of ocean warming, which reduces diffusive vertical nutrient supply due to strengthened stratification. Evidence of ocean oligotrophication has been, thus far, reported for the open ocean. Here we reported oligotrophication and associated changes in plankton community metabolism with warming in a pristine, oligotrophic Mediterranean coastal area (Cap Salines, Mallorca Island, Spain) during a 10 years time series. As a temperate area, there were seasonal patterns associated to changes in the broad temperature range (12.0–28.4°C), with a primary phytoplankton bloom in late winter and a secondary one in the fall. Community respiration (R) rates peaked during summers and showed higher rates relative to gross primary production (GPP) with a prevalence of heterotrophic metabolism (2/3\\'s of net community production (NCP) estimates). Chlorophyll a concentration significantly decreased with increasing water temperature in the coastal site at a rate of 0.014 ± 0.003 μg Chla L−1 °C−1 (P < 0.0001). The study revealed a significant decrease with time in Chlorophyll a concentration and nutrients concentration, indicating oligotrophication during the last decade. Community productivity consistently decreased with time as both GPP and R showed a significant decline. Warming of the Mediterranean Sea is expected to increase plankton metabolic rates, but the results indicated that the associated oligotrophication must lead to a slowing down of the community metabolism.

  16. Oligotrophication and Metabolic Slowing-Down of a NW Mediterranean Coastal Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Agusti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased oligotrophication is expected for oligotrophic areas as a consequence of ocean warming, which reduces diffusive vertical nutrient supply due to strengthened stratification. Evidence of ocean oligotrophication has been, thus far, reported for the open ocean. Here we reported oligotrophication and associated changes in plankton community metabolism with warming in a pristine, oligotrophic Mediterranean coastal area (Cap Salines, Mallorca Island, Spain during a 10 years time series. As a temperate area, there were seasonal patterns associated to changes in the broad temperature range (12.0–28.4°C, with a primary phytoplankton bloom in late winter and a secondary one in the fall. Community respiration (R rates peaked during summers and showed higher rates relative to gross primary production (GPP with a prevalence of heterotrophic metabolism (2/3's of net community production (NCP estimates. Chlorophyll a concentration significantly decreased with increasing water temperature in the coastal site at a rate of 0.014 ± 0.003 μg Chla L−1 °C−1 (P < 0.0001. The study revealed a significant decrease with time in Chlorophyll a concentration and nutrients concentration, indicating oligotrophication during the last decade. Community productivity consistently decreased with time as both GPP and R showed a significant decline. Warming of the Mediterranean Sea is expected to increase plankton metabolic rates, but the results indicated that the associated oligotrophication must lead to a slowing down of the community metabolism.

  17. Deep silicon maxima in the stratified oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Crombet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The silicon biogeochemical cycle has been studied in the Mediterranean Sea during late summer/early autumn 1999 and summer 2008. The distribution of nutrients, particulate carbon and silicon, fucoxanthin (Fuco, and total chlorophyll-a (TChl-a were investigated along an eastward gradient of oligotrophy during two cruises (PROSOPE and BOUM encompassing the entire Mediterranean Sea during the stratified period. At both seasons, surface waters were depleted in nutrients and the nutriclines gradually deepened towards the East, the phosphacline being the deepest in the easternmost Levantine basin. Following the nutriclines, parallel deep maxima of biogenic silica (DSM, fucoxanthin (DFM and TChl-a (DCM were evidenced during both seasons with maximal concentrations of 0.45 μmol L−1 for BSi, 0.26 μg L−1 for Fuco, and 1.70 μg L−1 for TChl-a, all measured during summer. Contrary to the DCM which was a persistent feature in the Mediterranean Sea, the DSM and DFMs were observed in discrete areas of the Alboran Sea, the Algero-Provencal basin, the Ionian sea and the Levantine basin, indicating that diatoms were able to grow at depth and dominate the DCM under specific conditions. Diatom assemblages were dominated by Chaetoceros spp., Leptocylindrus spp., Pseudonitzschia spp. and the association between large centric diatoms (Hemiaulus hauckii and Rhizosolenia styliformis and the cyanobacterium Richelia intracellularis was observed at nearly all sites. The diatom's ability to grow at depth is commonly observed in other oligotrophic regions and could play a major role in ecosystem productivity and carbon export to depth. Contrary to the common view that Si and siliceous phytoplankton are not major components of the Mediterranean biogeochemistry, we suggest here that diatoms, by persisting at depth during the stratified period, could contribute to a

  18. Phytoplankton biovolume is independent from the slope of the size spectrum in the oligotrophic atlantic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Blanco, José Marí a; Agusti, Susana; Lubiá n, Luis M.; Rodrí guez, Valeriano; Palomino, Roberto L.; Llabré s, Moira; Rodrí guez, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    high phytoplankton biovolume in productive regions with flatter spectrum slope and the opposite in oligotrophic ecosystems. Rather than this, the relationship between high biovolume phytoplankton assemblages and flatter size-abundance spectra does

  19. Interaction between APC and Fen1 during breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Law, Brian K; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant DNA base excision repair (BER) contributes to malignant transformation. However, inter-individual variations in DNA repair capacity plays a key role in modifying breast cancer risk. We review here emerging evidence that two proteins involved in BER - adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) - promote the development of breast cancer through novel mechanisms. APC and Fen1 expression and interaction is increased in breast tumors versus normal cells, APC interacts with and blocks Fen1 activity in Pol-β-directed LP-BER, and abrogation of LP-BER is linked with cigarette smoke condensate-induced transformation of normal breast epithelial cells. Carcinogens increase expression of APC and Fen1 in spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cells, human colon cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Since APC and Fen1 are tumor suppressors, an increase in their levels could protect against carcinogenesis; however, this does not seem to be the case. Elevated Fen1 levels in breast and lung cancer cells may reflect the enhanced proliferation of cancer cells or increased DNA damage in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor functions of APC and Fen1 is due to their interaction, which may act as a susceptibility factor for breast cancer. The increased interaction of APC and Fen1 may occur due to polypmorphic and/or mutational variation in these genes. Screening of APC and Fen1 polymorphic and/or mutational variations and APC/Fen1 interaction may permit assessment of individual DNA repair capability and the risk for breast cancer development. Such individuals might lower their breast cancer risk by reducing exposure to carcinogens. Stratifying individuals according to susceptibility would greatly assist epidemiologic studies of the impact of suspected environmental carcinogens. Additionally, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of APC and Fen1 may provide the basis for developing new and

  20. Ponderosa pine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa B. Jain

    2005-01-01

    Ponderosa pine is a wide-ranging conifer occurring throughout the United States, southern Canada, and northern Mexico. Since the 1800s, ponderosa pine forests have fueled the economies of the West. In western North America, ponderosa pine grows predominantly in the moist and dry forests. In the Black Hills of South Dakota and the southern portion of its range, the...

  1. Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth; Oscar J. Dooling

    1984-01-01

    Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum Nutt. ex Engelm.) is a native, parasitic, seed plant that occurs essentially throughout the range of lodgepole pine in North America. It is the most damaging disease agent in lodgepole pine, causing severe growth loss and increased tree mortality. Surveys in the Rocky Mountains show that the parasite is found in...

  2. A Novel Roseosiphophage Isolated from the Oligotrophic South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlan Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Roseobacter clade is abundant and widespread in marine environments and plays an important role in oceanic biogeochemical cycling. In this present study, a lytic siphophage (labeled vB_DshS-R5C infecting the strain type of Dinoroseobacter shibae named DFL12T, which is part of the Roseobacter clade, was isolated from the oligotrophic South China Sea. Phage R5C showed a narrow host range, short latent period and low burst size. The genome length of phage R5C was 77, 874 bp with a G+C content of 61.5%. Genomic comparisons detected no genome matches in the GenBank database and phylogenetic analysis based on DNA polymerase I revealed phylogenetic features that were distinct to other phages, suggesting the novelty of R5C. Several auxiliary metabolic genes (e.g., phoH gene, heat shock protein and queuosine biosynthesis genes were identified in the R5C genome that may be beneficial to the host and/or offer a competitive advantage for the phage. Among siphophages infecting the Roseobacter clade (roseosiphophages, four gene transfer agent-like genes were commonly located with close proximity to structural genes, suggesting that their function may be related to the tail of siphoviruses. The isolation and characterization of R5C demonstrated the high genomic and physiological diversity of roseophages as well as improved our understanding of host–phage interactions and the ecology of the marine Roseobacter.

  3. Large deficiency of polonium in the oligotrophic ocean's interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guebuem

    2001-09-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclide 210Po is typically deficient relative to its parent 210Pb in the surface ocean due to preferential removal by biota, while in near equilibrium or excess below the surface mixed layer due to rapid regeneration from sinking organic matter. However, a strikingly large deficit of 210Po is observed in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea's interior. This argues against the general concept that the removal of reactive elements depends on the population of settling particles. A 210Po mass balance model suggests that rather than downward transport, polonium (proxy for S, Se, and Te) is taken up efficiently by bacteria (i.e., cyanobacteria) and transferred to higher trophic levels (i.e., nekton) in this environment. In contrast, in productive areas of the ocean, sulfur group elements seem to reside in the subsurface ocean for much longer periods as taken up by abundant free-living bacteria (non-sinking fine particles). This study sheds new light on global biogeochemical cycling of sulfur group elements in association with microbial roles, and suggests that 210Po may be useful as a tracer of nitrogen fixation in the ocean.

  4. Biochemical processes of oligotrophic peat deposits of Vasyugan Mire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Sergeeva, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of peat and mire ecosystems functioning and their rational use is the main problem of biosphere study. This problem also refers to forecasting of biosphere changes results which are global and anthropogenic. According to many scientists' research the portion of mires in earth carbon balance is about 15% of world's stock. The aim of this study is to investigate biochemical processes in oligotrophic deposits in North-eastern part of Vasyugan Mire. The investigations were made on the territory of scientific-research ground (56˚ 03´ and 56˚ 57´ NL, 82˚ 22´ and 82˚ 42´ EL). It is situated between two rivers Bakchar and Iksa (in outskirts of the village Polynyanka, Bakchar region, Tomsk oblast). Evolution of investigated mire massif began with the domination of eutrophic phytocenosis - Filicinae, then sedge. Later transfer into oligotrophic phase was accompanied by formation of meter high-moor peat deposit. The age of three-meter peat deposit reaches four thousand years. Biochemical processes of carbon cycle cover the whole peat deposit, but the process activity and its direction in different layers are defined by genesis and duration of peat formation. So, the number of cellulose-fermenting aerobes in researched peat deposits ranges from 16.8 to 75.5 million CFU/g, and anaerobic bacteria from 9.6 to 48.6 million CFU/g. The high number of aerobes is characteristic for high water levels, organizing by raised bog peats. Their number decreases along the profile in 1.7 - 2 times. The number of microflora in peat deposit is defined by the position in the landscape profile (different geneses), by the depth, by hydrothermic conditions of years and individual months. But microflora activity shows along all depth of peat deposit. We found the same in the process of studying of micromycete complex structure. There was revealed either active component micromycete complex - mycelium, or inert one - spores in a meter layer of peat deposit. If mushrooms

  5. CO dissociation on magnetic Fen clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Jedidi, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This work theoretically investigates the CO dissociation on Fen nanoparticles, for n in the range of 1-65, focusing on size dependence in the context of the initial step of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. CO adsorbs molecularly through its C-end on a triangular facet of the nanoparticle. Dissociation becomes easier when the cluster size increases. Then, the C atom is bonded to a square facet that is generated as a result of the adsorption if it does not yet exist in the bare cluster, while the O atom is adsorbed on a triangular facet. In the most stable situation, the two adsorbed atoms remain close together, both having in common one shared first-neighbor iron atom. There is a partial spin quenching of the neighboring Fe atoms, which become more positively charged than the other Fe atoms. The shared surface iron atom resembles a metal-cation from a complex. Despite the small size of the iron cluster considered, fluctuations due to specific configurations do not influence properties for n > 25 and global trends seem significant.

  6. Fens As Ecohydrologic Gauges of Climate Change in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J. Z.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Knifong, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of montane groundwater-fed peatlands called fens as gauges for changes in groundwater recharge through time. Due to their consistent groundwater flows, fens remain saturated during the growing season, thus serving as ecological refugia for a range of sensitive biota including the federally threatened Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus). In this project, five fens in the Sierra Nevada and two in the southern Cascade Mountains were studied over a 50-80 year period using historic aerial photography and GIS analysis. Fen areas were delineated using vegetation distributions and site wetness as visual keys to fen areal extent. In addition, a climate analysis of precipitation, snowpack, evapotranspiration, and mean minimum monthly temperature (Tmin) was carried out for the years 1950 - 2010 using a distributed parameter water-balance model called the Basin Characterization Model. Over the study period, all five Sierra fens decreased by 10-15% in delineated area, but little change occurred in the Cascade fens. The climate analysis revealed major changes through time in Tmin and the frequency of June months with zero snowpack (snowpack longevity) at the five Sierra sites. At the Cascade sites, increases in Tmin occurred more recently and decreases in snowpack longevity were more subtle. The different behavior of fens in the Cascades versus the Sierra Nevada suggests that underlying geology, particularly hydraulic conductivity, rock porosity, and size of groundwater reservoirs, may be an important buffer to change. These results show that fens in the Sierra Nevada are highly responsive ecohydrologic gauges that can be used to track reductions in groundwater recharge due to climate change. Further studies using isotopic and/or geochemical approaches are needed to quantify the changes in groundwater recharge that were identified with fens. Because fens provide critical habitat for sensitive species, major changes in hydrology

  7. Mountain Pine Beetle Fecundity and Offspring Size Differ Among Lodgepole Pine and Whitebark Pine Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Donovan

    2008-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelmann) is a treeline species in the central Rocky Mountains. Its occupation of high elevations previously protected whitebark pine from long-term mountain pine beetle outbreaks. The mountain pine beetle, however, is currently reaching outbreaks of record magnitude in high-elevation whitebark pine. We used a factorial laboratory experiment to compare mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) life history characteristics between a typical host, ...

  8. On the non-closure of particle backscattering coefficient in oligotrophic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ZhongPing; Huot, Yannick

    2014-11-17

    Many studies have consistently found that the particle backscattering coefficient (bbp) in oligotrophic oceans estimated from remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) using semi-analytical algorithms is higher than that from in situ measurements. This overestimation can be as high as ~300% for some oligotrophic ocean regions. Various sources potentially responsible for this discrepancy are examined. Further, after applying an empirical algorithm to correct the impact from Raman scattering, it is found that bbp from analytical inversion of Rrs is in good agreement with that from in situ measurements, and that a closure is achieved.

  9. Hurricane Katrina winds damaged longleaf pine less than loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Johnsen; John R. Butnor; John S. Kush; Ronald C. Schmidtling; C. Dana. Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that longleaf pine might be more tolerant of high winds than either slash pine (Pinus elliotii Englem.) or loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). We studied wind damage to these three pine species in a common garden experiment in southeast Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina,...

  10. Pine weevil (Hylobius abietis) antifeedants from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, K; Sunnerheim, K; Nordenhem, H; Nordlander, G; Langström, B

    2001-11-01

    Pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) fed less on bark of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) than on bark of Scots pine (P. sylvestris). Two pine weevil antifeedants, ethyl trans-cinnamate and ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenyl-propanoate, were isolated from bark of lodgepole pine. These two compounds significantly reduced pine weevil feeding in a laboratory bioassay. In field assays, the second compound significantly decreased pine weevil damage on planted seedlings. Ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenylpropanoate has not previously been reported as a natural product.

  11. Whitebark pine planting guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward McCaughey; Glenda L. Scott; Kay L. Izlar

    2009-01-01

    This article incorporates new information into previous whitebark pine guidelines for planting prescriptions. Earlier 2006 guidelines were developed based on review of general literature, research studies, field observations, and standard US Forest Service survival surveys of high-elevation whitebark pine plantations. A recent study of biotic and abiotic factors...

  12. Causes of change in nitrophytic and oligotrophic lichen species in a Mediterranean climate: Impact of land cover and atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, P.; Augusto, S.; Martins-Loucao, M.A. [Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Ecologia e Biologia Vegetal, Universidade de Lisboa, edificio C4, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Pereira, M.J.; Soares, A. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Cerena, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maguas, C. [Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Ecologia e Biologia Vegetal, Universidade de Lisboa, edificio C4, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Branquinho, C. [Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Ecologia e Biologia Vegetal, Universidade de Lisboa, edificio C4, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Antiga Fabrica da Polvora de Barcarena, Universidade Atlantica, 2745-615 Barcarena (Portugal)], E-mail: cmbranquinho@fc.ul.pt

    2008-08-15

    With the aim of determining the main drivers of changes in nitrophytic and oligotrophic macro-lichen communities in an industrial region with a Mediterranean climate, we considered both land-cover types and atmospheric pollutants. We determined the relation between the abundance of nitrophytic and oligotrophic species with environmental factors considering the distance of influence of land-cover types. The results showed that oligotrophic species decreased in the proximity of artificial areas, barren land and agricultural areas, associated with higher concentrations of NO{sub 2} and Zn, and Ti, probably dust of industrial and agricultural origin. Nitrophytic species were positively related to all the mentioned land-cover types, and with higher concentrations of Fe and N. Magnesium, probably from ocean aerosols, was negatively related to oligotrophic species and positively to nitrophytic. - Causes of change in nitrophytic and oligotrophic lichen species.

  13. Causes of change in nitrophytic and oligotrophic lichen species in a Mediterranean climate: Impact of land cover and atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinho, P.; Augusto, S.; Martins-Loucao, M.A.; Pereira, M.J.; Soares, A.; Maguas, C.; Branquinho, C.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of determining the main drivers of changes in nitrophytic and oligotrophic macro-lichen communities in an industrial region with a Mediterranean climate, we considered both land-cover types and atmospheric pollutants. We determined the relation between the abundance of nitrophytic and oligotrophic species with environmental factors considering the distance of influence of land-cover types. The results showed that oligotrophic species decreased in the proximity of artificial areas, barren land and agricultural areas, associated with higher concentrations of NO 2 and Zn, and Ti, probably dust of industrial and agricultural origin. Nitrophytic species were positively related to all the mentioned land-cover types, and with higher concentrations of Fe and N. Magnesium, probably from ocean aerosols, was negatively related to oligotrophic species and positively to nitrophytic. - Causes of change in nitrophytic and oligotrophic lichen species

  14. Sugar pine and its hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. B. Critchfield; B. B. Kinloch

    1986-01-01

    Unlike most white pines, sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) is severely restricted in its ability to hybridize with other species. It has not been successfully crossed with any other North American white pine, nor with those Eurasian white pines it most closely resembles. Crosses with the dissimilar P. koraiensis and P....

  15. Characterization of Fen-Daqu Through Multivariate Statistical Analysis of H-1 NMR Spectroscopic Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van-Diep, L.; Zheng, X.; Ma, K.; Chen, J.Y.; Han, B.Z.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2011-01-01

    J. Inst. Brew. 117(4), 516-522, 2011 Fen liquor is typical of Chinese light-flavour liquor (alcoholic spirit), which is fermented from sorghum with Fen-Daqu powder. Fen-Daqu is a saccharifying agent and fermentation starter in this fermentation process and in Fen traditional vinegar. To investigate

  16. Fens and their rare plants in the Beartooth Mountains, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnie Heidel; Walter Fertig; Sabine Mellmann-Brown; Kent E. Houston; Kathleen A. Dwire

    2017-01-01

    Fens are common wetlands in the Beartooth Mountains on the Shoshone National Forest, Clarks Fork Ranger District, in Park County, Wyoming. Fens harbor plant species found in no other habitats, and some rare plants occurring in Beartooth fens are found nowhere else in Wyoming. This report summarizes the studies on Beartooth fens from 1962 to 2009, which have contributed...

  17. Warm summer nights and the growth decline of shore pine in Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick F.; Mulvey, Robin L.; Brownlee, Annalis H.; Barrett, Tara M.; Pattison, Robert R.

    2015-12-01

    Shore pine, which is a subspecies of lodgepole pine, was a widespread and dominant tree species in Southeast Alaska during the early Holocene. At present, the distribution of shore pine in Alaska is restricted to coastal bogs and fens, likely by competition with Sitka spruce and Western hemlock. Monitoring of permanent plots as part of the United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis program identified a recent loss of shore pine biomass in Southeast Alaska. The apparent loss of shore pine is concerning, because its presence adds a vertical dimension to coastal wetlands, which are the richest plant communities of the coastal temperate rainforest in Alaska. In this study, we examined the shore pine tree-ring record from a newly established plot network throughout Southeast Alaska and explored climate-growth relationships. We found a steep decline in shore pine growth from the early 1960s to the present. Random Forest regression revealed a strong correlation between the decline in shore pine growth and the rise in growing season diurnal minimum air temperature. Warm summer nights, cool daytime temperatures and a reduced diurnal temperature range are associated with greater cloud cover in Southeast Alaska. This suite of conditions could lead to unfavorable tree carbon budgets (reduced daytime photosynthesis and greater nighttime respiration) and/or favor infection by foliar pathogens, such as Dothistroma needle blight, which has recently caused widespread tree mortality on lodgepole pine plantations in British Columbia. Further field study that includes experimental manipulation (e.g., fungicide application) will be necessary to identify the proximal cause(s) of the growth decline. In the meantime, we anticipate continuation of the shore pine growth decline in Southeast Alaska.

  18. Bivalve nutrient cycling : nutrient turnover by suspended mussel communities in oligotrophic fjords

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a range of eco-physiological processes (i.e filtration, growth, excretion,

    faeces production) and feedback mechanisms with the aim to investigate the contribution of

    suspended mussel Mytilus edulis communities to nutrient cycling in oligotrophic

  19. Brevibacterium siliguriense sp nov., a facultatively oligotrophic bacterium isolated from river water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, A.; Ince, I.A.; Kati, A.; Chakraborty, R.

    2013-01-01

    A Gram-positive-staining, rod-shaped, facultatively oligotrophic bacterial strain, designated MB18(T), was isolated from a water sample collected from the River Mahananda at Siliguri (26 degrees 44' 23.20' N, 88 degrees 25' 22.89' a West-Bengal, India. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence

  20. Unprecedented slow growth and mortality of the rare colonial cyanobacterium, Nostoc zetterstedtii, in oligotrophic lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand; Møller, Claus Lindskov

    2011-01-01

    Centimeter-large colonies of Nostoc zetterstedtii from a Swedish oligotrophic lake had the lowest growth and mortality rates of any studied temperate macrophyte. Annual growth rates at two shallow sites averaged 0.57– 0.73 3 1023 d21, corresponding to doubling times of colony dry weight in 2...

  1. El fenómeno de envejecimiento de los asfaltos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiomara Vargas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta una revisión actualizada a los resultados del estudio de los procesos de envejecimiento de los asfaltos, encontrados por diversos investigadores, con el fin de profundizar en la comprensión de este fenómeno complejo. Los antecedentes demuestran la evolución del estudio del fenómeno de envejecimiento de los asfaltos, considerado inicialmente como un proceso de endurecimiento físico y progresivamente reconocido como un fenómeno complejo con repercusiones en la durabilidad y las propiedades fisicoquímicas del asfalto. Este documento pretende ser una guía para el emprendimiento de futuras investigaciones relacionadas con el desarrollo de nuevos asfaltos y mezclas asfálticas con propiedades mejoradas.

  2. The hydrological functioning of a constructed fen wetland watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcheson, Scott J; Price, Jonathan S; Sutton, Owen; Sutherland, George; Kessel, Eric; Petrone, Richard M

    2017-12-15

    Mine reclamation requires the reconstruction of entire landforms and drainage systems. The hydrological regime of reclaimed landscapes will be a manifestation of the processes operating within the individual landforms that comprise it. Hydrology is the most important process regulating wetland function and development, via strong controls on chemical and biotic processes. Accordingly, this research addresses the growing and immediate need to understand the hydrological processes that operate within reconstructed landscapes following resource extraction. In this study, the function of a constructed fen watershed (the Nikanotee Fen watershed) is evaluated for the first two years following construction (2013-2014) and is assessed and discussed within the context of the construction-level design. The system design was capable of sustaining wet conditions within the Nikanotee Fen during the snow-free period in 2013 and 2014, with persistent ponded water in some areas. Evapotranspiration dominated the water fluxes from the system. These losses were partially offset by groundwater discharge from the upland aquifer, which demonstrated strong hydrologic connectivity with the fen in spite of most construction materials having lower than targeted saturated hydraulic conductivities. However, the variable surface infiltration rates and thick placement of a soil-capping layer constrained recharge to the upland aquifer, which remained below designed water contents in much of the upland. These findings indicate that it is possible to engineer the landscape to accommodate the hydrological functions of a fen peatland following surface oil sands extraction. Future research priorities should include understanding the storage and release of water within coarse-grained reclaimed landforms as well as evaluating the relative importance of external water sources and internal water conservation mechanisms for the viability of fen ecosystems over the longer-term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  3. Fenómeno de Raynaud. Revisión

    OpenAIRE

    Jairo Alonso Rodríguez-Criollo; Daniel Jaramillo-Arroyave

    2014-01-01

    El fenómeno de Raynaud es una respuesta vascular exagerada al frio o al estrés que se manifiesta por cambios de coloración de la piel en diversas localizaciones, característicamente mostrando tres fases distintas que comprenden palidez, cianosis y rubor. La fisiopatología tiene varios componentes y puede tener varias etiologías, que comprenden vasoconstricción, agregación plaquetaria, trombosis y proliferación vascular. Dependiendo de la ausencia o la presencia de enfermedad de base, el fenóm...

  4. Actividad antioxidante de los compuestos fenólicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maestro Durán, R.

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the oxidation processes induced by light and atmospheric oxygen, as well as the protective action on antioxidant compounds. The available data on the synthetic antioxidants and the problems associated to their use, together with the presence of natural phenolic antioxidants in plants, have been revised. These phenolic antioxidants have been classified in families: phenolic alcohols and acids, cinnamic acids, coumarins, favonoids (flavones and isoflavones, flavonols, flavanones and other phenolic compounds.

    Este trabajo recoge los estudios sobre los mecanismos de oxidación producida por la luz y el oxígeno del aire y sobre la protección de los compuestos antioxidantes contra esta oxidación. Se han revisado los datos existentes sobre los inconvenientes de los antioxidantes sintéticos, que aconsejan sustituirlos por otros naturales y sobre la presencia de antioxidantes naturales de carácter fenólico en las plantas. Los antioxidantes fenólicos se han agrupado por familias: alcoholes y ácidos fenólicos, ácidos cinámicos, cumarinas, flavonoides (flavonas e isoflavonas, flavonoles, flavanonas y otros compuestos fenólicos.

  5. Water level influences on body condition of Geophagus brasiliensis (Perciformes: Cichlidae in a Brazilian oligotrophic reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Filippo Gonzalez Neves dos Santos

    Full Text Available Effects of water level fluctuations on body condition of Geophagus brasiliensis were studied in a 30 km² Brazilian oligotrophic reservoir. Physiological condition (K and gonadosomatic index (GSI were compared according to water level (low and high. Females' best conditions were associated to higher resources availability during high water, since gonad development did not change between low and high water. Males' condition did not change between water levels, while the highest gonad development occurred in low water. Females presented higher reproductive investment than males, which allocated most of energy for somatic development. This strategy could be a mechanism to undergo the stress caused by oligotrophic characteristics of the reservoir enhanced during low water level.

  6. Specific-activity and concentration model applied to cesium movement in an oligotrophic lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Booth, R.S.; Clark, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    A linear systems-analysis model was derived to simulate the time-dependent dynamics of specific activity and concentration of radionuclides in aquatic systems. Transfer coefficients were determined for movement of 137 Cs in the components of an oligotrophic lake. These coefficients were defined in terms of basic environmental and ecological data so that the model can be applied to a wide variety of sites. Simulations with a model that ignored sediment--water interactions predicted much higher 137 Cs specific activities in the lake water and biota than did those with the complete model. Comparing 137 Cs concentrations predicted by the model with concentrations reported for the biota of an experimentally contaminated oligotrophic lake indicated that the transfer coefficients derived for the biota are adequate

  7. Should ponderosa pine be planted on lodgepole pine sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.H. Cochran

    1984-01-01

    Repeated radiation frosts caused no apparent harm to the majority of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) seedlings planted on a pumice flat in south-central Oregon. For most but not all of the ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) seedlings planted with the lodgepole pine, however, damage from radiation frost resulted in...

  8. Comparative studies of the nitrogen metabolism of phytoplankton and periphyton in oligotrophic lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axler, R.P.; Goldman, C.R.; Reuter, J.E.; Loeb, S.L.; Priscu, J.C.; Carlton, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary data of limnological research at the meso-oligotrophic Castle Lake, CA and at the ultratrophic Lake Tahoe, CA-NEV, USA, during 1980 to 1981. The areas of study were effects of nutrients enrichment and deficiency on primary producers; nitrogen cycling and nitrogen metabolism of benthic and planktonic algae and whole-epilimnion enrichment with ammonium nitrate. Tracer techniques using 14 C- and 15 N-labelled compounds were employed in the study

  9. Saharan dust inputs and high UVR levels jointly alter the metabolic balance of marine oligotrophic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Marco J.; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; González-Olalla, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2016-10-01

    The metabolic balance of the most extensive bioma on the Earth is a controversial topic of the global-change research. High ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels by the shoaling of upper mixed layers and increasing atmospheric dust deposition from arid regions may unpredictably alter the metabolic state of marine oligotrophic ecosystems. We performed an observational study across the south-western (SW) Mediterranean Sea to assess the planktonic metabolic balance and a microcosm experiment in two contrasting areas, heterotrophic nearshore and autotrophic open sea, to test whether a combined UVR × dust impact could alter their metabolic balance at mid-term scales. We show that the metabolic state of oligotrophic areas geographically varies and that the joint impact of UVR and dust inputs prompted a strong change towards autotrophic metabolism. We propose that this metabolic response could be accentuated with the global change as remote-sensing evidence shows increasing intensities, frequencies and number of dust events together with variations in the surface UVR fluxes on SW Mediterranean Sea. Overall, these findings suggest that the enhancement of the net carbon budget under a combined UVR and dust inputs impact could contribute to boost the biological pump, reinforcing the role of the oligotrophic marine ecosystems as CO2 sinks.

  10. Ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lamy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria are photoheterotrophic prokaryotes able to use both light and organic substrates for energy production. They are widely distributed in coastal and oceanic environments and may contribute significantly to the carbon cycle in the upper ocean. To better understand questions regarding links between the ecology of these photoheterotrophic bacteria and the trophic status of water masses, we examined their horizontal and vertical distribution and the effects of nutrient additions on their growth along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a and AAP bacterial abundance decreased from the western to the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea and were linked with concentrations of chlorophyll-a, nutrient and dissolved organic carbon. Inorganic nutrient and glucose additions to surface seawater samples along the oligotrophic gradient revealed that AAP bacteria were nitrogen- and carbon-limited in the ultraoligotrophic eastern basin. The intensity of the AAP bacterial growth response generally differed from that of the total bacterial growth response. BChl-a quota of AAP bacterial communities was significantly higher in the eastern basin than in the western basin, suggesting that reliance on phototrophy varied along the oligotrophic gradient and that nutrient and/or carbon limitation favors BChl-a synthesis.

  11. Whitebark pine mortality related to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreak, and water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Erin; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thoma, David P.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Ray, Andrew; Legg, Kristin; Shovic, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in the western United States have been adversely affected by an exotic pathogen (Cronartium ribicola, causal agent of white pine blister rust), insect outbreaks (Dendroctonus ponderosae, mountain pine beetle), and drought. We monitored individual trees from 2004 to 2013 and characterized stand-level biophysical conditions through a mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Specifically, we investigated associations between tree-level variables (duration and location of white pine blister rust infection, presence of mountain pine beetle, tree size, and potential interactions) with observations of individual whitebark pine tree mortality. Climate summaries indicated that cumulative growing degree days in years 2006–2008 likely contributed to a regionwide outbreak of mountain pine beetle prior to the observed peak in whitebark mortality in 2009. We show that larger whitebark pine trees were preferentially attacked and killed by mountain pine beetle and resulted in a regionwide shift to smaller size class trees. In addition, we found evidence that smaller size class trees with white pine blister rust infection experienced higher mortality than larger trees. This latter finding suggests that in the coming decades white pine blister rust may become the most probable cause of whitebark pine mortality. Our findings offered no evidence of an interactive effect of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust infection on whitebark pine mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Interestingly, the probability of mortality was lower for larger trees attacked by mountain pine beetle in stands with higher evapotranspiration. Because evapotranspiration varies with climate and topoedaphic conditions across the region, we discuss the potential to use this improved understanding of biophysical influences on mortality to identify microrefugia that might contribute to successful whitebark pine conservation

  12. Responses of fen plant species to groundwater level and light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotowski, W; van Andel, J; van Diggelen, R; Hogendorf, J.

    Characteristic species of sedge-moss fen communities occur in constantly wet, nutrient-poor sites with a high penetration of light through the vegetation canopy. We studied the effects of water table depth and differences in light intensity on the performance of fen species. Three fen species (Carex

  13. Characterization of volatile compounds in Fen-Daqu - a traditional Chinese liquor fermentation starter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van-Diep, L.; Zheng, X.; Chen, J.Y.; Han, B.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Fen-Daqu is a saccharifying agent and fermentation starter for the production of Chinese liquor Fen (alcoholic spirit) and Fen traditional vinegar. The volatile compounds produced at seven incubation steps were analysed by HS-SPME-GC-MS. A total of 83 major volatile compounds were identified,

  14. Stand structure and vegetation dynamics of a subalpine treed fen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1997-06-01

    The tree population size structure and relationship between tree diameter and age were examined in a subalpine fen and surrounding Picea-Abies forest in northern Colorado. The fen grades from a sedge fen, through an ecotone, to a treed fen (i.e. fen colonized by trees). Tree growth rate varies across the vegetational gradient, with the sedge fen having the slowest growth, and the upland forest having the fastest growth. Differences in growth rate are related to the average size of peat hummocks, with areas containing tall hummocks exhibiting the highest tree growth rates. Size structures display the characteristic reverse-J distribution generally indicative of stable populations, but forest vegetation is expanding into the open regions of the fen, and within the treed fen an increase in Abies lasiocarpa is occurring. These changes are primarily attributed to a positive feedback situation wherein the fen`s surface is built up by peat accumulation. Distinct hummocks form first on the open fen but then coalesce to form raised peat islands in the treed fen. This new substrate provides habitat with a comparatively low water table and allows the growth of mesophytic forest vegetation. A pathway for this vegetational development is proposed. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Decomposition of Carex and Sphagnum litter in two mesotrophic fens differing in dominant plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R.A.; Van Logtestijn, R. S P; Verhoeven, J. T A

    2001-01-01

    Peatlands can be classified into fens and bogs based on their hydrology. Development of fens to bogs is accompanied by the invasion of Sphagnum species. The purpose of this study was to determine how the decomposition process in fens is influenced by the transition from a vascular plant-dominated

  16. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  17. From groundwater abstraction to vegetative response in fen ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ole Munch; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Pedersen, Morten Lauge

    2014-01-01

    Hydrological effects of groundwater abstraction near a Danish river valley have been assessed by integrated hydrological modelling. The study site contains groundwater-dependent terrestrial ecosystems in terms of fen and spring habitats that are highly dependent on regional and local scale...... hydrology. Fens are rare and threatened worldwide due to pressures from agriculture, to lack of appropriate management and to altered catchment hydrology. A solid foundation for hydrological modelling was established based on intensive monitoring at the site, combined with full-scale pumping tests...... in the area. A regional groundwater model was used to describe the dynamics in groundwater recharge and the large-scale discharge to streams. A local grid refinement approach was then applied in a detailed assessment of damage in order to balance the computational effort and the need for a high spatial...

  18. El fenómeno de bullying en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Paola Contreras Álvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo describe el nefasto fenómeno de violencia y hostigamiento en ambientes escolares denominado bullying o matoneo escolar, el cual, aunque ha sido analizado desde finales de los años setenta en los países escandinavos, tuvo auge en Colombia en el año 2000, adquiriendo fuerza y permanencia con el uso de redes sociales, evidenciando la falta de políticas nacionales educativas para la atención e intervención del problema, al igual que el olvido de educación en derechos humanos y resolución pacífica de conflictos en los colegios. Esta problemática se desarrolla a través del significado del bullying, la descripción de sus antecedentes, descripción general del fenómeno, relación de los deberes del Estado frente al tema, la concepción del fenómeno desde la perspectiva de la Corte Constitucional, concluyendo en algunas sugerencias para abordar la problemática escolar.

  19. Does bristlecone pine senesce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.M Lanner; Kristina F. Connor

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated hypotheses of senscence in old trees by comparing putative biomarkers of aging in great basin bristlecone pine ( Pinus longaeva) ranging in age from 23 to 4713 years. To teast a hypothesis that water and nutrient conduction is impaired in old trees we examined cambial products in the xylem and phloem. We found no statiscally significant...

  20. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  1. Smoke hardiness of pines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelz, E

    1958-01-01

    It has been determined in East Germany that some species of pines are more susceptible to the damaging effects of sulfates than others. On sites that are deficient in nutrients, the trees were found to be more susceptible to injuries. Pinus nigra was the most resistant, then Pinus strobus was next, and Pinus sylvestris was the most sensitive.

  2. A caveat regarding diatom-inferred nitrogen concentrations in oligotrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Heather A.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr) has enriched oligotrophic lakes with nitrogen (N) in many regions of the world and elicited dramatic changes in diatom community structure. The lakewater concentrations of nitrate that cause these community changes remain unclear, raising interest in the development of diatom-based transfer functions to infer nitrate. We developed a diatom calibration set using surface sediment samples from 46 high-elevation lakes across the Rocky Mountains of the western US, a region spanning an N deposition gradient from very low to moderate levels (phosphorus, and hypolimnetic water temperature were related to diatom distributions. A transfer function was developed for nitrate and applied to a sedimentary diatom profile from Heart Lake in the central Rockies. The model coefficient of determination (bootstrapping validation) of 0.61 suggested potential for diatom-inferred reconstructions of lakewater nitrate concentrations over time, but a comparison of observed versus diatom-inferred nitrate values revealed the poor performance of this model at low nitrate concentrations. Resource physiology experiments revealed that nitrogen requirements of two key taxa were opposite to nitrate optima defined in the transfer function. Our data set reveals two underlying ecological constraints that impede the development of nitrate transfer functions in oligotrophic lakes: (1) even in lakes with nitrate concentrations below quantification (<1 μg L−1), diatom assemblages were already dominated by species indicative of moderate N enrichment; (2) N-limited oligotrophic lakes switch to P limitation after receiving only modest inputs of reactive N, shifting the controls on diatom species changes along the length of the nitrate gradient. These constraints suggest that quantitative inferences of nitrate from diatom assemblages will likely require experimental approaches.

  3. Substrate use of Pseudovibrio sp. growing in ultra-oligotrophic seawater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schwedt

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic bacteria often live in habitats with extremely low concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM. To study the use of trace amounts of DOM by the facultatively oligotrophic Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1, we investigated the composition of artificial and natural seawater before and after growth. We determined the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, free and hydrolysable amino acids, and the molecular composition of DOM by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS. The DOC concentration of the artificial seawater we used for cultivation was 4.4 μmol C L(-1, which was eight times lower compared to the natural oligotrophic seawater we used for parallel experiments (36 μmol C L(-1. During the three-week duration of the experiment, cell numbers increased from 40 cells mL(-1 to 2x10(4 cells mL(-1 in artificial and to 3x10(5 cells mL(-1 in natural seawater. No nitrogen fixation and minor CO2 fixation (< 1% of cellular carbon was observed. Our data show that in both media, amino acids were not the main substrate for growth. Instead, FT-ICR-MS analysis revealed usage of a variety of different dissolved organic molecules, belonging to a wide range of chemical compound groups, also containing nitrogen. The present study shows that marine heterotrophic bacteria are able to proliferate with even lower DOC concentrations than available in natural ultra-oligotrophic seawater, using unexpected organic compounds to fuel their energy, carbon and nitrogen requirements.

  4. A preliminary carbon budget for two oligotrophic hardwater lakes in the Forsmark area, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Eva [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology

    2001-06-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is responsible for management and disposal of Swedish radioactive waste. The company is planning to construct repositories that will keep radioactive waste away from humans for hundreds of thousands of years. In a safety assessment of the repositories hypothetical releases are used to evaluate the robustness of the repositories. It is important to know how the radioactive nuclides would react if they were released and by which way they could enter the living biota. SFR are responsible for the disposal of low radioactive waste and close to the nuclear plant in Forsmark there is a storage for low radioactive waste. At the moment this storage is located in the bedrock far below the sea level but due to land-rise in the area it will in the future be located above sea level. Hence, it is of importance to know how the surface ecosystems in the area are functioning. A carbon budget for the aquatic ecosystem above SFR in Oeresundsgrepen exist, but it is also important to have a carbon budget for the surface systems in the Forsmark area since SFR in the future will be situated above sea level. Carbon budgets can be used to get a picture of how an ecosystem functions. The carbon flow shows how carbon is transported through a food web from lower trophic levels, e.g. plants and bacteria to higher trophic levels such as fish. Oligotrophic hardwater lakes are the most important lakes in the Forsmark area. This report aims to give a picture of a potential flow of carbon through the ecosystem in two oligotrophic hard-water lakes, Lake Haellefjaerd and Lake Eckarfjaerden. Macrophyte, mainly Chara, were calculated to make up the largest part of the biomass and production in both lakes. Benthic bacteria and microphytobenthos (benthic photosynthesising microorganisms) were other large contributors to the production. Benthic bacteria were found responsible for a major part of respiration and, hence, consumption of carbon in the

  5. A preliminary carbon budget for two oligotrophic hardwater lakes in the Forsmark area, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Eva

    2001-06-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is responsible for management and disposal of Swedish radioactive waste. The company is planning to construct repositories that will keep radioactive waste away from humans for hundreds of thousands of years. In a safety assessment of the repositories hypothetical releases are used to evaluate the robustness of the repositories. It is important to know how the radioactive nuclides would react if they were released and by which way they could enter the living biota. SFR are responsible for the disposal of low radioactive waste and close to the nuclear plant in Forsmark there is a storage for low radioactive waste. At the moment this storage is located in the bedrock far below the sea level but due to land-rise in the area it will in the future be located above sea level. Hence, it is of importance to know how the surface ecosystems in the area are functioning. A carbon budget for the aquatic ecosystem above SFR in Oeresundsgrepen exist, but it is also important to have a carbon budget for the surface systems in the Forsmark area since SFR in the future will be situated above sea level. Carbon budgets can be used to get a picture of how an ecosystem functions. The carbon flow shows how carbon is transported through a food web from lower trophic levels, e.g. plants and bacteria to higher trophic levels such as fish. Oligotrophic hardwater lakes are the most important lakes in the Forsmark area. This report aims to give a picture of a potential flow of carbon through the ecosystem in two oligotrophic hard-water lakes, Lake Haellefjaerd and Lake Eckarfjaerden. Macrophyte, mainly Chara, were calculated to make up the largest part of the biomass and production in both lakes. Benthic bacteria and microphytobenthos (benthic photosynthesising microorganisms) were other large contributors to the production. Benthic bacteria were found responsible for a major part of respiration and, hence, consumption of carbon in the

  6. Diversity of picoeukaryotes at an oligotrophic site off the Northeastern Red Sea Coast.

    KAUST Repository

    Acosta, Francisco

    2013-08-20

    Picoeukaryotes are protists ≤ 3 μm composed of a wide diversity of taxonomic groups. They are an important constituent of the ocean\\'s microbiota and perform essential ecological roles in marine nutrient and carbon cycles. Despite their importance, the true extent of their diversity has only recently been uncovered by molecular surveys that resulted in the discovery of a substantial number of previously unknown groups. No study on picoeukaryote diversity has been conducted so far in the main Red Sea basin-a unique marine environment characterized by oligotrophic conditions, high levels of irradiance, high salinity and increased water temperature.

  7. Fenómenos de transporte : un curso introductorio

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt Grajales, Ramiro

    1991-01-01

    Fenómenos de transporte, es el nombre colectivo que se da al estudio sistemático e integrado de tres áreas clásicas de la ciencia de la Ingeniería : 1) Transporte de Energía o Calor, 2) Transporte de Masa o Difusión, y 3) Transporte de Cantidad de Movimiento o Impulso (Momentum en Inglés), o Dinámica de Fluidos. Debido a que con frecuencia el transporte de masa y de calor ocurren en un fluido, algunos planes de estudio incluyen estos procesos en su tratamiento de la mecánica de fluidos....

  8. Understanding the Groundwater Hydrology of a Geographically-Isolated Prairie Fen: Implications for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Prasanna Venkatesh; Liao, Hua-Sheng; Curtis, Zachary Kristopher; Doran, Patrick J; Herbert, Matthew E; May, Christopher A; Li, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The sources of water and corresponding delivery mechanisms to groundwater-fed fens are not well understood due to the multi-scale geo-morphologic variability of the glacial landscape in which they occur. This lack of understanding limits the ability to effectively conserve these systems and the ecosystem services they provide, including biodiversity and water provisioning. While fens tend to occur in clusters around regional groundwater mounds, Ives Road Fen in southern Michigan is an example of a geographically-isolated fen. In this paper, we apply a multi-scale groundwater modeling approach to understand the groundwater sources for Ives Road fen. We apply Transition Probability geo-statistics on more than 3000 well logs from a state-wide water well database to characterize the complex geology using conditional simulations. We subsequently implement a 3-dimensional reverse particle tracking to delineate groundwater contribution areas to the fen. The fen receives water from multiple sources: local recharge, regional recharge from an extensive till plain, a regional groundwater mound, and a nearby pond. The regional sources deliver water through a tortuous, 3-dimensional "pipeline" consisting of a confined aquifer lying beneath an extensive clay layer. Water in this pipeline reaches the fen by upwelling through openings in the clay layer. The pipeline connects the geographically-isolated fen to the same regional mound that provides water to other fen clusters in southern Michigan. The major implication of these findings is that fen conservation efforts must be expanded from focusing on individual fens and their immediate surroundings, to studying the much larger and inter-connected hydrologic network that sustains multiple fens.

  9. Fungal Diversity in a Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystem (DOVE on Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Staudigel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fumarolic Ice caves on Antarctica’s Mt. Erebus contain a dark oligotrophic volcanic ecosystem (DOVE and represent a deep biosphere habitat that can provide insight into microbial communities that utilize energy sources other than photosynthesis. The community assembly and role of fungi in these environments remains largely unknown. However, these habitats could be relatively easily contaminated during human visits. Sixty-one species of fungi were identified from soil clone libraries originating from Warren Cave, a DOVE on Mt. Erebus. The species diversity was greater than has been found in the nearby McMurdo Dry Valleys oligotrophic soil. A relatively large proportion of the clones represented Malassezia species (37% of Basidomycota identified. These fungi are associated with skin surfaces of animals and require high lipid content for growth, indicating that contamination may have occurred through the few and episodic human visits in this particular cave. These findings highlight the importance of fungi to DOVE environments as well as their potential use for identifying contamination by humans. The latter offers compelling evidence suggesting more strict management of these valuable research areas.

  10. Phytoplankton biovolume is independent from the slope of the size spectrum in the oligotrophic atlantic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique

    2015-08-06

    Modelling the size-abundance spectrum of phytoplankton has proven to be a very useful tool for the analysis of physical-biological coupling and the vertical flux of carbon in oceanic ecosystems at different scales. A frequent observation relates high phytoplankton biovolume in productive regions with flatter spectrum slope and the opposite in oligotrophic ecosystems. Rather than this, the relationship between high biovolume phytoplankton assemblages and flatter size-abundance spectra does not correspond with measurements of the phytoplankton community in the Atlantic Ocean open waters. As part of the Malaspina Circunnavegation Expedition, sixty seven sampling stations within the Atlantic Ocean covering six oceanographic provinces, at different seasons, produced a complete set of phytoplankton size-spectra whose slope and biovolume did not show any obvious interrelation. In these oligotrophic sites, small (procaryotes) and medium-size (nanoplankton) cells are responsible for the most part of biovolume, and their response to environmental conditions does not apply to changes in the size-abundance spectrum slope as expected in richer, large-cell dominated ecosystems.

  11. NO3 uptake in shallow, oligotrophic, mountain lakes: The influence of elevated NO3 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydick, K.R.; LaFrancois, B.M.; Baron, Jill S.

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment experiments were conducted in 1.2-m deep enclosures in 2 shallow, oligotrophic, mountain lakes. 15N-NO3 isotope tracer was used to compare the importance of phytoplankton and benthic compartments (epilithon, surface sediment [epipelon], and subsurface sediment) for NO3 uptake under high and low NO3 conditions. NO3 uptake approached saturation in the high-N lake, but not in the low-N lake. The capacity of phytoplankton and benthic compartments to take up NO3 differed among treatments and between lakes, and depended on water-column nutrient conditions and the history of NO3 availability. Phytoplankton productivity responded strongly to addition of limiting nutrients, and NO3 uptake was related to phytoplankton biomass and photosynthesis. However, more NO3 usually was taken up by benthic compartments (57–92% combined) than by phytoplankton, even though the response of benthic algal biomass to nutrient additions was less pronounced than that of phytoplankton and benthic NO3 uptake was unrelated to benthic algal biomass. In the low-N lake where NO3 uptake was unsaturated, C content or % was related to NO3 uptake in benthic substrates, suggesting that heterotrophic bacterial processes could be important in benthic NO3 uptake. These results suggest that phytoplankton are most sensitive to nutrient additions, but benthic processes are important for NO3 uptake in shallow, oligotrophic lakes.

  12. Post-fire regeneration of vegetation on sandy oligotrophic soil, in Itabaiana, Sergipe, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Vinicius Paes Dantas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two models of post-disturbance regeneration of vegetation in areas of oligotrophic soils have been proposed for temperate regions. The first model is characterized by rapid recovery of the floristic composition, due to the fire resistance of plants; while in the second model, the fire causes extensive mortality and the recovery occurs by recruitment from the seed bank. Since these models have been rarely tested in tropical oligotrophic environments, we applied them in the analysis of floristic compositions in three areas with different post-fire regeneration times in Sergipe State, Brazil. The regeneration followed the seed bank recruitment model in places of bare ground, with a progressive increase in plant density and changes in the relative abundance and dominance of the populations along the successional process. The parameters that best allowed the succession evaluation were the floral similarity, plant height and density, which increased as regeneration progressed. The stem diameter and tillering were inconclusive as parameters for assessing the regeneration progress.

  13. Oligotrophic wetland sediments susceptible to shifts in microbiomes and mercury cycling with dissolved organic matter addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. Graham

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances have allowed for greater investigation into microbial regulation of mercury toxicity in the environment. In wetlands in particular, dissolved organic matter (DOM may influence methylmercury (MeHg production both through chemical interactions and through substrate effects on microbiomes. We conducted microcosm experiments in two disparate wetland environments (oligotrophic unvegetated and high-C vegetated sediments to examine the impacts of plant leachate and inorganic mercury loadings (20 mg/L HgCl2 on microbiomes and MeHg production in the St. Louis River Estuary. Our research reveals the greater relative capacity for mercury methylation in vegetated over unvegetated sediments. Further, our work shows how mercury cycling in oligotrophic unvegetated sediments may be susceptible to DOM inputs in the St. Louis River Estuary: unvegetated microcosms receiving leachate produced substantially more MeHg than unamended microcosms. We also demonstrate (1 changes in microbiome structure towards Clostridia, (2 metagenomic shifts toward fermentation, and (3 degradation of complex DOM; all of which coincide with elevated net MeHg production in unvegetated microcosms receiving leachate. Together, our work shows the influence of wetland vegetation in controlling MeHg production in the Great Lakes region and provides evidence that this may be due to both enhanced microbial activity as well as differences in microbiome composition.

  14. Seagrass as major source of transparent exopolymer particles in the oligotrophic Mediterranean coast

    KAUST Repository

    Iuculano, Francesca

    2017-01-09

    The role of seagrass, Posidonia oceanica, meadows as a source of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) to Mediterranean coastal waters was tested by comparing the TEP dynamics in two adjacent coastal waters in the oligotrophic NW Mediterranean Sea, one characterized by oligotrophic open-sea waters and the other accumulating seagrass leaf litter, together with an experimental examination of TEP release by seagrass litter. TEP concentrations ranged from 4.6 µg XG Eq L−1 to 90.6 µg XG Eq L−1, with mean (±SE) values of 38.7 (±2.02) µg XG Eq L−1 in the site devoid of seagrass litter, whereas the coastal beach site accumulating leaf litter had > 10-fold mean TEP concentrations of 487.02 (±72.8) µg XG Eq L−1 . Experimental evaluation confirmed high rates of TEP production by P. oceanica litter, allowing calculations of the associated TEP yield. We demonstrated that P. oceanica is an important source of TEP to the Mediterranean Sea, contributing an estimated 0.10 Tg C as TEP annually. TEP release by P. oceanica seagrass explains the elevated TEP concentration relative to the low chlorophyll a concentration in the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Substrate Use of Pseudovibrio sp. Growing in Ultra-Oligotrophic Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Anne; Seidel, Michael; Dittmar, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Bondarev, Vladimir; Romano, Stefano; Lavik, Gaute; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2015-01-01

    Marine planktonic bacteria often live in habitats with extremely low concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM). To study the use of trace amounts of DOM by the facultatively oligotrophic Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1, we investigated the composition of artificial and natural seawater before and after growth. We determined the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), free and hydrolysable amino acids, and the molecular composition of DOM by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS). The DOC concentration of the artificial seawater we used for cultivation was 4.4 μmol C L-1, which was eight times lower compared to the natural oligotrophic seawater we used for parallel experiments (36 μmol C L -1). During the three-week duration of the experiment, cell numbers increased from 40 cells mL-1 to 2x104 cells mL -1 in artificial and to 3x105 cells mL -1 in natural seawater. No nitrogen fixation and minor CO2 fixation (seawater, using unexpected organic compounds to fuel their energy, carbon and nitrogen requirements. PMID:25826215

  16. Characteristics and ontogeny of oligotrophic hardwater lakes in the Forsmark area, central Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunberg, A.K.; Blomqvist, P. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology

    1999-12-01

    This is the first part of a report characterising the lakes of Uppsala county, with special emphasis on the coastal lakes in the Forsmark area.The aim of the study is to characterise different main types of lakes within the Forsmark area and to create a basis for prediction of their ontogeny, that can be used also for new lakes which due to shoreline displacement will be formed during the next 10 000 years. Areas where future research is needed to fully understand the functioning of the lake ecosystems and their ontogeny should also be identified. This first part of the study identifies and describes one of the most common lake types in the area, the oligotrophic hardwater lake. The geology in the catchments of the Forsmark area includes a bedrock dominated by granites and gneisses, covered by calcareous glacial till and postglacial clay. The catchments are dominated by forest, and the oligotrophic hardwater lakes are to a large extent surrounded by mires. Inflow as well as outflow of water is often diffuse, via the surrounding mire. The lakes are small and shallow, with nutrient poor and highly alkaline water. Three key habitats have been identified within the lakes; the pelagic zone, characterised by low production of biota;, the presumably moderately productive emergent macrophyte zone, dominated by Sphagnum and Phragmites;, and the light exposed soft-bottom zone with Chara meadows and an unusually rich and presumably highly productive microbial sediment community. The oligotrophic hardwater lakes have their origin as depressions in the bottom of the Baltic Sea, which are successively transported upwards due to the land-rise process in the area. As the basins are isolated from the sea , a gradual change from a brackish to freshwater conditions occur. When the lakes have become completely isolated, the oligotrophic hardwater stage follows, due to inflow of carbonate-rich and well buffered groundwater. In the next successional stage, Sphagnum mosses start to

  17. Characteristics and ontogeny of oligotrophic hardwater lakes in the Forsmark area, central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunberg, A.K.; Blomqvist, P.

    1999-12-01

    This is the first part of a report characterising the lakes of Uppsala county, with special emphasis on the coastal lakes in the Forsmark area.The aim of the study is to characterise different main types of lakes within the Forsmark area and to create a basis for prediction of their ontogeny, that can be used also for new lakes which due to shoreline displacement will be formed during the next 10 000 years. Areas where future research is needed to fully understand the functioning of the lake ecosystems and their ontogeny should also be identified. This first part of the study identifies and describes one of the most common lake types in the area, the oligotrophic hardwater lake. The geology in the catchments of the Forsmark area includes a bedrock dominated by granites and gneisses, covered by calcareous glacial till and postglacial clay. The catchments are dominated by forest, and the oligotrophic hardwater lakes are to a large extent surrounded by mires. Inflow as well as outflow of water is often diffuse, via the surrounding mire. The lakes are small and shallow, with nutrient poor and highly alkaline water. Three key habitats have been identified within the lakes; the pelagic zone, characterised by low production of biota;, the presumably moderately productive emergent macrophyte zone, dominated by Sphagnum and Phragmites;, and the light exposed soft-bottom zone with Chara meadows and an unusually rich and presumably highly productive microbial sediment community. The oligotrophic hardwater lakes have their origin as depressions in the bottom of the Baltic Sea, which are successively transported upwards due to the land-rise process in the area. As the basins are isolated from the sea , a gradual change from a brackish to freshwater conditions occur. When the lakes have become completely isolated, the oligotrophic hardwater stage follows, due to inflow of carbonate-rich and well buffered groundwater. In the next successional stage, Sphagnum mosses start to

  18. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  19. Mountain pine beetle infestations in relation to lodgepole pine diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter E. Cole; Gene D. Amman

    1969-01-01

    Tree losses resulting from infestation by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) were measured in two stands of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) where the beetle population had previously been epidemic. Measurement data showed that larger diameter trees were infested and killed first. Tree losses...

  20. Understanding toxicity at the watershed scale : design of the Syncrude Sandhill Fen watershed research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wytrykush, C.

    2010-01-01

    Fens are peat-accumulating wetlands with a water table consisting of mineral-rich ground or surface water. This study discussed the construction of a fen-type reclaimed wetland constructed in a post-mining oil sands landscape. Syncrude Canada's Sandhill fen watershed project represents the first attempt at constructing a fen wetland in the oil sands region. The wetland and its watershed will be constructed on a soft tailings deposit. The design basis for the fen and watershed was developed by a team of researchers and scientists. The aim of the fen design was to control the salinity caused by tailings consolidation and seepage over time. Methods of mitigating potentially toxic effects from salinity were discussed.

  1. Climate influences on whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Haiganoush K. Preisler; John T. Abatzoglou; Kenneth F. Raffa; Jesse A. Logan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive mortality of whitebark pine, beginning in the early to mid-2000s, occurred in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) of the western USA, primarily from mountain pine beetle but also from other threats such as white pine blister rust. The climatic drivers of this recent mortality and the potential for future whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle...

  2. Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Fuel reduction treatments around pinyon pine trees began as a simple project but ended in something more complex, enjoyable, and rewarding. The project eventually led to pinyon species (Pinus monophylla and P. quadrifolia) reforestation efforts, something that has been tried in the past with disappointing results. The Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project and current...

  3. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  4. Phosphorus cycling and partitioning in an oligotrophic Everglades wetland ecosystem: A radioisotope tracing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, G.B.; Scinto, L.J.; Taylor, J.; Childers, D.L.; Jones, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    1. Our goal was to quantify short-term phosphorus (P) partitioning and identify the ecosystem components important to P cycling in wetland ecosystems. To do this, we added P radiotracer to oligotrophic, P-limited Everglades marshes. 32PO4 was added to the water column in six 1-m2 enclosed mesocosms located in long-hydroperiod marshes of Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park. Ecosystem components were then repeatedly sampled over 18 days. 2. Water column particulates (>0.45 ??m) incorporated radiotracer within the first minute after dosing and stored 95-99% of total water column 32P activity throughout the study. Soluble (<0.45 ??m) 32P in the water column, in contrast, was always <5% of the 32P in surface water. Periphyton, both floating and attached to emergent macrophytes, had the highest specific activity of 32P (Bq g-131P) among the different ecosystem components. Fish and aquatic macroinvertebrates also had high affinity for P, whereas emergent macrophytes, soil and flocculent detrital organic matter (floc) had the lowest specific activities of radiotracer. 3. Within the calcareous, floating periphyton mats, 81% of the initial 32P uptake was associated with Ca, but most of this 32P entered and remained within the organic pool (Ca-associated = 14% of total) after 1 day. In the floc layer, 32P rapidly entered the microbial pool and the labile fraction was negligible for most of the study. 4. Budgeting of the radiotracer indicated that 32P moved from particulates in the water column to periphyton and floc and then to the floc and soil over the course of the 18 days incubations. Floc (35% of total) and soil (27%) dominated 32P storage after 18 days, with floating periphyton (12%) and surface water (10%) holding smaller proportions of total ecosystem 32P. 5. To summarise, oligotrophic Everglades marshes exhibited rapid uptake and retention of labile 32P. Components dominated by microbes appear to control short-term P cycling in this oligotrophic ecosystem.

  5. High diversity and suggested endemicity of culturable Actinobacteria in an extremely oligotrophic desert oasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Fernando Arocha-Garza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The phylum Actinobacteria constitutes one of the largest and anciently divergent phyla within the Bacteria domain. Actinobacterial diversity has been thoroughly researched in various environments due to its unique biotechnological potential. Such studies have focused mostly on soil communities, but more recently marine and extreme environments have also been explored, finding rare taxa and demonstrating dispersal limitation and biogeographic patterns for Streptomyces. To test the distribution of Actinobacteria populations on a small scale, we chose the extremely oligotrophic and biodiverse Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB, an endangered oasis in the Chihuahuan desert to assess the diversity and uniqueness of Actinobacteria in the Churince System with a culture-dependent approach over a period of three years, using nine selective media. The 16S rDNA of putative Actinobacteria were sequenced using both bacteria universal and phylum-specific primer pairs. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed to analyze OTUs clustering and taxonomic identification of the isolates in an evolutionary context, using validated type species of Streptomyces from previously phylogenies as a reference. Rarefaction analysis for total Actinobacteria and for Streptomyces isolates were performed to estimate species’ richness in the intermediate lagoon (IL in the oligotrophic Churince system. A total of 350 morphologically and nutritionally diverse isolates were successfully cultured and characterized as members of the Phylum Actinobacteria. A total of 105 from the total isolates were successfully subcultured, processed for DNA extraction and 16S-rDNA sequenced. All strains belong to the order Actinomycetales, encompassing 11 genera of Actinobacteria; the genus Streptomyces was found to be the most abundant taxa in all the media tested throughout the 3-year sampling period. Phylogenetic analysis of our isolates and another 667 reference strains of the family Streptomycetaceae

  6. High diversity and suggested endemicity of culturable Actinobacteria in an extremely oligotrophic desert oasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha-Garza, Hector Fernando; Canales-Del Castillo, Ricardo; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Souza, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria constitutes one of the largest and anciently divergent phyla within the Bacteria domain. Actinobacterial diversity has been thoroughly researched in various environments due to its unique biotechnological potential. Such studies have focused mostly on soil communities, but more recently marine and extreme environments have also been explored, finding rare taxa and demonstrating dispersal limitation and biogeographic patterns for Streptomyces. To test the distribution of Actinobacteria populations on a small scale, we chose the extremely oligotrophic and biodiverse Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), an endangered oasis in the Chihuahuan desert to assess the diversity and uniqueness of Actinobacteria in the Churince System with a culture-dependent approach over a period of three years, using nine selective media. The 16S rDNA of putative Actinobacteria were sequenced using both bacteria universal and phylum-specific primer pairs. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed to analyze OTUs clustering and taxonomic identification of the isolates in an evolutionary context, using validated type species of Streptomyces from previously phylogenies as a reference. Rarefaction analysis for total Actinobacteria and for Streptomyces isolates were performed to estimate species’ richness in the intermediate lagoon (IL) in the oligotrophic Churince system. A total of 350 morphologically and nutritionally diverse isolates were successfully cultured and characterized as members of the Phylum Actinobacteria. A total of 105 from the total isolates were successfully subcultured, processed for DNA extraction and 16S-rDNA sequenced. All strains belong to the order Actinomycetales, encompassing 11 genera of Actinobacteria; the genus Streptomyces was found to be the most abundant taxa in all the media tested throughout the 3-year sampling period. Phylogenetic analysis of our isolates and another 667 reference strains of the family Streptomycetaceae shows that our

  7. Plant biomass carbon store after water-level drawdown of pine mires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laiho, R; Laine, J [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology

    1997-12-31

    Tall-sedge pine fen is the site type most commonly drained in Finland. In their natural undrained condition sites of this type are rather wet with sparse, Scots pine dominated forest growing on hummocks and with large lawns dominated by sedges, usually Carex rostrata and/or C. lasiocarpa. Most of the primary production takes place in the field and ground layers. The major pathway for carbon accumulation in the system is via Sphagna and sedge roots, carbon accumulation by the tree stand being very slow. After drainage the situation changes radically as the sedges die out and the tree stand growth increases considerably. The aim of this study is to produce means of estimating the post-drainage dynamics of the plant biomass carbon store. The study is based on the assumption that sites similar before drainage will change in a similar manner following drainage. (5 refs.)

  8. Plant biomass carbon store after water-level drawdown of pine mires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laiho, R.; Laine, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology

    1996-12-31

    Tall-sedge pine fen is the site type most commonly drained in Finland. In their natural undrained condition sites of this type are rather wet with sparse, Scots pine dominated forest growing on hummocks and with large lawns dominated by sedges, usually Carex rostrata and/or C. lasiocarpa. Most of the primary production takes place in the field and ground layers. The major pathway for carbon accumulation in the system is via Sphagna and sedge roots, carbon accumulation by the tree stand being very slow. After drainage the situation changes radically as the sedges die out and the tree stand growth increases considerably. The aim of this study is to produce means of estimating the post-drainage dynamics of the plant biomass carbon store. The study is based on the assumption that sites similar before drainage will change in a similar manner following drainage. (5 refs.)

  9. The Austrian x red pine hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. B. Critchfield

    1963-01-01

    The genetic improvement of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) presents tree breeders with one of their most difficult problems. Not only is this valuable species remarkably uniform, but until 1955 it resisted all attempts to cross it with other pines. In that year red pine and Austrian pine (P. nigra var. austriaca [...

  10. Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli Peacher

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most destructive forest insect in the South. The SPB attacks all species of southern pine, but loblolly and shortleaf are most susceptible. The Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS) is the computerized database used by the national forests in the Southern Region for tracking individual southern pine beetle infestations....

  11. Carbon sequestration and natural longleaf pine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph S. Meldahl; John S. Kush

    2006-01-01

    A fire-maintained longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem may offer the best option for carbon (C) sequestration among the southern pines. Longleaf is the longest living of the southern pines, and products from longleaf pine will sequester C longer than most since they are likely to be solid wood products such as structural lumber and poles....

  12. Phosphorus flux due to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in an oligotrophic upland stream: effects of management and demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith H. Nislow; John D. Armstrong; Simon. McKelvey

    2004-01-01

    Little is known concerning the role of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the transport of nutrients to and from river systems. We used demographic data from the River Bran, an oligotrophic river in Scotland, UK, to construct a budget for the transport of phosphorus (P) and applied it to investigate the effects of management strategies and demographic...

  13. Sea surface temperature control of taxon specific phytoplankton production along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.V.; Boute, P.G.; Rozema, P.D.; Buma, A.; Kulk, G.; Rijkenberg, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess changes in phytoplankton composition and productivity along an oligotrophic gradient in relation to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). Phytoplankton pigments, nutrients, and physical water column properties were studied along a longitudinal transect in the

  14. Minor effects of long-term ozone exposure on boreal peatland species Eriophorum vaginatum and Sphagnum papillosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mörsky, SK; Haapala, JK; Rinnan, Riikka

    2011-01-01

    The effects of long-term ozone fumigation on two common peatland plant species, a sedge Eriophorum vaginatum L. and a moss Sphagnum papillosum Lindb., were studied applying peatland microcosms. The peat cores with intact vegetation were cored from an oligotrophic pine fen and partially embedded...

  15. Soluble and colloidal iron in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Boyle, E; Sunda, W; Wen, L S

    2001-08-03

    In the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific, ultrafiltration studies show that concentrations of soluble iron and soluble iron-binding organic ligands are much lower than previously presumed "dissolved" concentrations, which were operationally defined as that passing through a 0.4-micrometer pore filter. Our studies indicate that substantial portions of the previously presumed "dissolved" iron (and probably also iron-binding ligands) are present in colloidal size range. The soluble iron and iron-binding organic ligands are depleted at the surface and enriched at depth, similar to distributions of major nutrients. By contrast, colloidal iron shows a maximum at the surface and a minimum in the upper nutricline. Our results suggest that "dissolved" iron may be less bioavailable to phytoplankton than previously thought and that iron removal through colloid aggregation and settling should be considered in models of the oceanic iron cycle.

  16. Dynamics of biochemical processes and redox conditions in geochemically linked landscapes of oligotrophic bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Szajdak, L.; Sergeeva, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity in oligotrophic peatlands at the margins of the Vasyugan Mire has been studied. It is shown found that differently directed biochemical processes manifest themselves in the entire peat profile down to the underlying mineral substrate. Their activity is highly variable. It is argued that the notion about active and inert layers in peat soils is only applicable for the description of their water regime. The degree of the biochemical activity is specified by the physical soil properties. As a result of the biochemical processes, a micromosaic aerobic-anaerobic medium is developed under the surface waterlogged layer of peat deposits. This layer contains the gas phase, including oxygen. It is concluded that the organic and mineral parts of peat bogs represent a single functional system of a genetic peat profile with a clear record of the history of its development.

  17. Silvicultural treatments for converting loblolly pine to longleaf pine dominance: Effects on planted longleaf pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huifeng Hu; G.Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    A field study was installed to test silvicultural treatments for establishing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill) in loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) stands. Harvesting was used to create seven canopy treatments, four with uniformly distributed canopies at different residual basal areas [Control (16.2 m2/ha),...

  18. Impact of water-level changes to aquatic vegetation in small oligotrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egert VANDEL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effect of drastic water-level changes to the aquatic vegetation in three small oligotrophic lakes situated in Kurtna Kame Field in north-eastern Estonia. The area holds around 40 lakes in 30 km2 of which 18 lakes are under protection as Natura Habitat lakes (Natura 2000 network. The area is under a strong human impact as it is surrounded by oil shale mines, sand quarry, peat harvesting field etc. The most severe impact comes from the groundwater intake established in 1972 in the vicinity of three studied lakes. The exploitation of groundwater led to drastic water-level drops. In 1980s the water-level drops were measured to be up to 3 to 4 meters compared to the levels of 1946. Lake Martiska and Lake Kuradijärv were severely affected and only 29% and 45% of lake area respectively and 21% of initial volume remained. Both lakes were described as oligotrophic lakes before severe human impact and held characteristic macrophytes such as Isoëtes lacustris L., Sparganium angustifolium Michx and Lobelia dortmanna L. As the water level declined the lakes lost their rare characteristic species and can now be described more as a meso- or even eutrophic lakes. When the volume of groundwater abstraction decreased in the 1990s the water levels started to recover but did not reach the natural levels of pre-industrialized era. Also the vegetation did not show any signs of recovery. In 2012 the pumping rates increased again causing a new rapid decline in water levels which almost exceed the previous minimum levels. The water-level monitoring alongside with the macrophyte monitoring data gives us a good case study on how the long term abrupt water-level changes can affect the aquatic vegetation

  19. Microbial communities in dark oligotrophic volcanic ice cave ecosystems of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley M. Tebo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s crust hosts a subsurface, dark, and oligotrophic biosphere that is poorly understood in terms of the energy supporting its biomass production and impact on food webs at the Earth’s surface. Dark oligotrophic volcanic ecosystems (DOVEs are good environments for investigations of life in the absence of sunlight as they are poor in organics, rich in chemical reactants and well known for chemical exchange with Earth’s surface systems. Ice caves near the summit of Mt. Erebus (Antarctica offer DOVEs in a polar alpine environment that is starved in organics and with oxygenated hydrothermal circulation in highly reducing host rock. We surveyed the microbial communities using PCR, cloning, sequencing and analysis of the small subunit (16S ribosomal and Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (RubisCO genes in sediment samples from three different caves, two that are completely dark and one that receives snow-filtered sunlight seasonally. The microbial communities in all three caves are composed primarily of Bacteria and fungi; Archaea were not detected. The bacterial communities from these ice caves display low phylogenetic diversity, but with a remarkable diversity of RubisCO genes including new deeply branching Form I clades, implicating the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle as a pathway of CO2 fixation. The microbial communities in one of the dark caves, Warren Cave, which has a remarkably low phylogenetic diversity, were analyzed in more detail to gain a possible perspective on the energetic basis of the microbial ecosystem in the cave. Atmospheric carbon (CO2 and CO, including from volcanic emissions, likely supplies carbon and/or some of the energy requirements of chemoautotrophic microbial communities in Warren Cave and probably other Mt. Erebus ice caves. Our work casts a first glimpse at Mt. Erebus ice caves as natural laboratories for exploring carbon, energy and nutrient sources in the subsurface biosphere and the

  20. Remotely sensed hydrological isolation : a key factor predicting plant species distribution in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    In fens the species composition, vegetation structure and succession rate are determined by vegetation management and water chemistry, particularly by the base status and nutrient status. Base-rich and nutrient-rich surface water causes fens to become eutrophied, which leads to an increased

  1. Microbial activity and community structure in two drained fen soils in the Ljubljana Marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraigher, Barbara; Stres, Blaz; Hacin, Janez; Ausec, Luka; Mahne, Ivan; van Elsas, Jan D.; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    Fen peatlands are specific wetland ecosystems containing high soil organic carbon (SOC). There is a general lack of knowledge about the microbial communities that abound in these systems. We examined the microbial activity and community structure in two fen soils differing in SOC content sampled

  2. HYDRO-ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FEN SYSTEM LIEPER POSSE, EASTERN GERMANY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIGGELEN, R; GROOTJANS, AP; KEMMERS, RH; KOOIJMAN, AM; SUCCOW, M; DEVRIES, NPJ; VANWIRDUM, G; Vries, N.P.J. de; Wirdum, G. van

    The Lieper Posse is a calcareous, ground water-fed fen system, situated in the end-moraine area of northeastern Germany. Nowadays the fen is partly drained and the vegetation adversely affected; hence regeneration measures are considered. Here we report a pilot survey of the actual vegetation cover

  3. Identifying ponderosa pines infested with mountain pine beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. McCambridge

    1974-01-01

    Trees successfully and unsuccessfully attacked by mountain pine beetles have several symptoms in common, so that proper diagnosis is not always easy. Guidelines presented here enable the observer to correctly distinguish nearly all attacked trees.

  4. Ponderosa pine mortality resulting from a mountain pine beetle outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. McCambridge; Frank G. Hawksworth; Carleton B. Edminster; John G. Laut

    1982-01-01

    From 1965 to 1978, mountain pine beetles killed 25% of the pines taller than 4.5 feet in a study area in north-central Colorado. Average basal area was reduced from 92 to 58 square feet per acre. Mortality increased with tree diameter up to about 9 inches d.b.h. Larger trees appeared to be killed at random. Mortality was directly related to number of trees per acre and...

  5. Pine weevil feeding in Scots pine and Norway spruce regenerations

    OpenAIRE

    Wallertz, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Damage caused by the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis (L) feeding on conifer seedlings is a major problem in reforested areas in many parts of Europe. The adult weevil feeds on the stem-bark of young seedlings, frequently killing a large proportion of newly planted seedlings. The aims of the studies underlying this thesis were to investigate whether additional food supplies could decrease the damage caused by pine weevil to seedlings, and to determine whether access to extra food might explain w...

  6. Computerbasiert prüfen [Computer-based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Computer-based testing in medical education offers new perspectives. Advantages are sequential or adaptive testing, integration of movies or sound, rapid feedback to candidates and management of web-based question banks. Computer-based testing can also be implemented in an OSCE examination. In e-learning environments formative self-assessment are often implemented and gives helpful feedbacks to learners. Disadvantages in high-stake exams are the high requirements as well for the quality of testing (e.g. standard setting as additionally for the information technology and especially for security. [german] Computerbasierte Prüfungen im Medizinstudium eröffnen neue Möglichkeiten. Vorteile solcher Prüfungen liegen im sequentiellen oder adaptiven Prüfen, in der Integration von Bewegtbildern oder Ton, der raschen Auswertung und zentraler Verwaltung der Prüfungsfragen via Internet. Ein Einsatzgebiet mit vertretbarem Aufwand sind Prüfungen mit mehreren Stationen wie beispielsweise die OSCE-Prüfung. Computerbasierte formative Selbsttests werden im Bereiche e-learning häufig angeboten. Das hilft den Lernenden ihren Wissensstand besser einzuschätzen oder sich mit den Leistungen anderer zu vergleichen. Grenzen zeigen sich bei den summativen Prüfungen beim Prüfungsort, da zuhause Betrug möglich ist. Höhere ärztliche Kompetenzen wie Untersuchungstechnik oder Kommunikation eigenen sich kaum für rechnergestützte Prüfungen.

  7. a fenómenos epidemiológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Castro Castro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan avances del proyecto de investigación modelación y simulación computacional usando sistemas de información geográfica (SIG con dinámicas de sistemas aplicados a fenómenos epidemiológicos con el cual se han abordado los principales modelos matemáticos usados en epidemiología (susceptible- infectado-recuperado: SIR, susceptible-infectado-recuperado-susceptible: SIRS, susceptible-infectado-susceptible: SIS, para su integración, espacialización y simulación usando diferentes técnicas computacionales con el fin de modelar factores críticos en la propagación de epidemias. Para correr el modelo, se tomaron los datos de una epidemia de asma en el distrito de Manhattan de Nueva York, del tutotial de ARCGIS® versión 8.3.

  8. Bartonellosis y fenómeno de Mooser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Groot

    1941-02-01

    Full Text Available Es conocido el fenómeno o reacción de Mooser que este investigador lograra al inocular a un curí por vía intraperitoneal sangre de un tifoso exantemático mejicano, y que consiste en una edema escroto-testicular bastante típico (1-6. En líneas generales se puede decir que un curí inoculado intraperitonealmente con sangre de un tifoso exantemático, presenta después de un período de incubación que varía entre dos días y dos semanas (variación que depende especialmente de las dosis inoculadas uan fiebre de 39,8 a 40,5 que puede durar de 3 a 14 días. Clínicamente la hembra muestra sólo la reacción febril, mientras que en el macho se observan lesiones inflamatorias escroto-testiculares características.

  9. Utilization of the southern pines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, P

    1972-01-01

    After several years out of print, this book is again available. The two-volume reference characterizes the southern pine tree as raw material and describes the process by which it is converted to use. All 10 species are considered. The book is addressed primarily to the incoming generation of researchers and industrial managers in the southern pine industry. Foremen, superintendents, quality control personnel, wood procurement men, forest managers, extension workers, professors, and students of wood technology should find the handbook of value.

  10. Diversity of picoeukaryotes at an oligotrophic site off the Northeastern Red Sea Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco; Ngugi, David Kamanda; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-08-20

    Picoeukaryotes are protists ≤ 3 μm composed of a wide diversity of taxonomic groups. They are an important constituent of the ocean's microbiota and perform essential ecological roles in marine nutrient and carbon cycles. Despite their importance, the true extent of their diversity has only recently been uncovered by molecular surveys that resulted in the discovery of a substantial number of previously unknown groups. No study on picoeukaryote diversity has been conducted so far in the main Red Sea basin-a unique marine environment characterized by oligotrophic conditions, high levels of irradiance, high salinity and increased water temperature. We sampled surface waters off the coast of the northeastern Red Sea and analyzed the picoeukaryotic diversity using Sanger-based clone libraries of the 18S rRNA gene in order to produce high quality, nearly full-length sequences. The community captured by our approach was dominated by three main phyla, the alveolates, stramenopiles and chlorophytes; members of Radiolaria, Cercozoa and Haptophyta were also found, albeit in low abundances. Photosynthetic organisms were especially diverse and abundant in the sample, confirming the importance of picophytoplankton for primary production in the basin as well as indicating the existence of numerous ecological micro-niches for this trophic level in the upper euphotic zone. Heterotrophic organisms were mostly composed of the presumably parasitic Marine Alveolates (MALV) and the presumably bacterivorous Marine Stramenopiles (MAST) groups. A small number of sequences that did not cluster closely with known clades were also found, especially in the MALV-II group, some of which could potentially belong to novel clades. This study provides the first snapshot of the picoeukaryotic diversity present in surface waters of the Red Sea, hence setting the stage for large-scale surveying and characterization of the eukaryotic diversity in the entire basin. Our results indicate that the

  11. Net community production and metabolic balance at the oligotrophic ocean site, station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    le B. Williams, Peter J.; Morris, Paul J.; Karl, David M.

    2004-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that in oligotrophic areas of the ocean respiration exceeds production, a 12-month study was undertaken of in vitro-determined net oxygen production and consumption in the top 150 m of the water column at the extreme oligotrophic site, Station ALOHA, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. Throughout the year the water column was observed to be in metabolic deficit, the calculated cumulative shortfall being 9±1.7 mol O2 m-2 a-1 (approximately 100 g C m-2 a-1), an amount equivalent to 40% of measured production (annual estimated rates of production and consumption were, respectively, 22 and 31 mol O2 m-2 a-1). We consider three possible explanations for the observed deficit: the in vitro oxygen rate measurements, in themselves, are fundamentally flawed and should be discounted, the observations are correct and the observed deficit is a true account of the balance of oxygen (and organic carbon) at Station ALOHA, or the observations are correct as they stand, but need not be interpreted as organic carbon imbalance for that ecosystem. We find no error unique to the oxygen rate measurements themselves. We find also no evidence that the associated organic carbon deficit can be sustained over the long-term by internal organic reserves or by external subsidy. Accordingly we accept the geochemical findings that calculated in situ oxygen flux requires the euphotic zone of the water column at this site to be slightly (circa 2 mol C m-2 a-1) autotrophic, in contrast to the simple analysis of our observations which gives a net heterotrophic water column. We discuss a number of processes that may give rise to the observed discrepancy. In part it may derive from the difficulty of reproducing the variations in the light field experienced by an algal cell due to vertical advection. It may also derive from the intermittency of production. This latter effect would manifest itself in the following manner. Because of its universal distribution in the food web

  12. Predicting aquatic macrophyte occurrence in soft-water oligotrophic lakes (Pyrenees mountain range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pulido

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of aquatic macrophytes in lakes is related to geographical, morphological, catchment and water chemistry variables as well as human impacts, which modify the original environment. Here, we aim at building statistical models to establish the ecological niches of 11 aquatic macrophytes (10 different phanerogams and the genus Nitella from oligotrophic soft-water lakes and infer their ecological requirements and environmental constraints at the southernmost limit of their distribution. Macrophyte occurrence and environmental variables were obtained from 86 non-exploited oligotrophic soft-water lakes from the Pyrenees (Southern Europe; 42º50´N, 1º00´E; macrophytes inhabited 55 of these lakes. Optimum ranges and macrophyte occurrence were predicted in relation to 18 geographical, morphological, catchment and water chemistry variables using univariate and multivariate logistic models. Lakes at low altitude, in vegetated catchments and with low water concentration of NO3- and SO4-2, were the most suitable to host macrophytes. In general, individual species of aquatic macrophytes showed clear patterns of segregation along conductivity and pH gradients, although the specific combination of variables selected in the best models explaining their occurrence differed among species.  Based on the species response to pH and conductivity, we found Isoetes lacustris have its optimum in waters with low conductivity and pH (i.e. negative monotonic response. In contrast, Callitriche palustris, Ranunculus aquatilis, Subularia aquatica, Nitella spp., and Myriophyllum alterniflorum showed an optimum at intermediate values (i.e. unimodal response, whereas Potamogeton berchtoldii, Potamogeton alpinus, and Ranunculus trichophyllus as species had their optimum at relatively high water pH and conductivity (i.e. positive monotonic response. This pattern has been observed in other regions for the same species, although with different optima and tolerance

  13. Field Tests of Pine Oil as a Repellent for Southern Pine Bark Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.C. Nod; F.L. Hastings; A.S. Jones

    1990-01-01

    An experimental mixture of terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood pulping, BBR-2, sprayed on the lower 6 m of widely separated southern pine trees did not protect nearby trees from southern pine beetle attacks. Whether treated trees were protected from southern pine beetle was inconclusive. The pine oil mixture did not repellpsfrom treated trees or nearby untreated...

  14. A ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon: results after 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.W. Seidel

    1989-01-01

    The growth response after 20 years from an initial spacing study established in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) plantation was measured in central Oregon. The study was designed to compare the growth rates of pure ponderosa pine, pure lodgepole pine, and a...

  15. Strategies for managing whitebark pine in the presence of white pine blister rust [Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond J. Hoff; Dennis E. Ferguson; Geral I. McDonald; Robert E. Keane

    2001-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is one of many North American white pine species (Pinus subgenus Strobus) susceptible to the fungal disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Blister rust has caused severe mortality (often reaching nearly 100 percent) in many stands of white bark pine north of 45° latitude in western North America. The rust is slowly...

  16. Assessing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) restoration after southern pine beetle kill using a compact experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.-P. Berrill; C.M. Dagley

    2010-01-01

    A compact experimental design and analysis is presented of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) survival and growth in a restoration project in the Piedmont region of Georgia, USA. Longleaf pine seedlings were planted after salvage logging and broadcast burning in areas of catastrophic southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) attacks on even-aged mixed pine-hardwood...

  17. Limber pine forests on the leading edge of white pine blister rust distribution in Northern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Betsy A. Goodrich; Anna W. Schoettle

    2011-01-01

    The combined threats of the current mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) epidemic with the imminent invasion of white pine blister rust (caused by the non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, WPBR) in limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in northern Colorado threatens the limber pine's regeneration cycle and ecosystem function. Over one million...

  18. The most oligotrophic subtropical zones of the global ocean: similarities and differences in terms of chlorophyll and yellow substance

    OpenAIRE

    A. Morel; H. Claustre; B. Gentili

    2010-01-01

    The cores of the subtropical anticyclonic gyres are characterized by their oligotrophic status and minimal chlorophyll concentration, compared to that of the whole ocean. These zones are unambiguously detected by space borne ocean color sensors thanks to their typical spectral reflectance, which is that of extremely clear and deep blue waters. Not only the low chlorophyll (denoted [Chl]) level, but also a reduced amount of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM or "yellow substance") account ...

  19. The most oligotrophic subtropical zones of the global ocean: similarities and differences in terms of chlorophyll and yellow substance

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, A.; Claustre, H.; Gentili, B.

    2010-01-01

    The cores of the subtropical anticyclonic gyres are characterized by their oligotrophic status and minimal chlorophyll concentration, compared to that of the whole ocean. These zones are unambiguously detected by space borne ocean color sensors thanks to their typical spectral reflectance, which is that of extremely clear and deep blue waters. Not only the low chlorophyll (denoted [Chl]) level, but also a reduced amount of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM or "yellow substance") acc...

  20. Escaping the oligotrophic gyre? The year-round movements, foraging behaviour and habitat preferences of Murphy’s petrels

    OpenAIRE

    Clay, Thomas A.; Phillips, Richard A.; Manica, Andrea; Jackson, Hazel A.; Brooke, M. de L.

    2017-01-01

    The South Pacific Gyre is the world’s largest expanse of oligotrophic ocean and supports communities of endemic gadfly petrels Pterodroma spp., yet little is known about their foraging ecology in this nutrient-poor environment. We tracked Murphy’s petrels Pterodroma ultima with geolocators from Henderson Island, Pitcairn Islands, for 2 consecutive years (2011 to 2013). During pre-laying exodus, petrels travelled south and southwest of the colony, with males travelling further than females to ...

  1. Photochemical production of ammonium in the oligotrophic Cyprus Gyre (Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kitidis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the photoproduction of ammonium (NH4+ in surface waters of the Cyprus gyre in the central Eastern Mediterranean in May 2002, in 8 on deck irradiations with freshly collected, filtered samples. NH4+ photoproduction (photoammonification increased with time-integrated irradiance during the course of irradiations. Photoammonification rates around local noon were 0.4–2.9 nmol L−1 h−1. Normalised to time integrated irradiance, these rates were 0.9–3.8 pmol L−1 h−1/(W m−2 and were significantly correlated with Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM absorbance at 300 nm normalised to Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC. These results are consistent with the notion that successive CDOM photobleaching in the surface mixed layer results in decreased DOC-normalised light absorbance concurrent with decreased dissolved organic matter reactivity with regard to photochemical NH4+ release. Combining our experimental data with estimates of annual solar irradiance and water column light attenuation yields an annual photoammonification rate for the Cyprus Gyre of 40±17 mmol m−2 a−1, equivalent to ~12±5% of the previously estimated annual nitrogen requirement of new production and in the same order of magnitude as atmospheric N deposition in this region. Based on this analysis, NH4+ photoproduction makes a small, but significant contribution to the nitrogen budget of the euphotic zone in the oligotrophic Cyprus Gyre.

  2. Determinants of Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin recruitment under oligotrophic conditions: Implications for conservation management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Silvia; Farina, Simone; Pinna, Stefania; Guala, Ivan; Agnetta, Davide; Ariotti, Pierre Antoine; Mura, Francesco; Ceccherelli, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins may deeply shape the structure of macrophyte-dominated communities and require the implementation of sustainable management strategies. In the Mediterranean, the identification of the major recruitment determinants of the keystone sea urchin species Paracentrotus lividus is required, so that source areas of the populations can be identified and exploitation or programmed harvesting can be spatially managed. In this study a collection of eight possible determinants, these encompassing both the biotic (larvae, adult sea urchins, fish, encrusting coralline algae, habitat type and spatial arrangement of habitats) and abiotic (substrate complexity and nutritional status) realms was considered at different spatial scales (site, area, transect and quadrat). Data from a survey including sites subject to different levels of human influence (i.e. from urbanized to protected areas), but all corresponding to an oligotrophic and low-populated region were fitted by means of a generalized linear mixed model. Despite the extensive sampling effort of benthic quadrats, an overall paucity of recruits was found, recruits being aggregated in a very small number of quadrats and in few areas. The analysis of data detected substrate complexity, and adult sea urchin and predatory fish abundances as the momentous determinants of Paracentrotus lividus recruitment. Possible mechanisms of influence are discussed beyond the implications of conservation management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonal variation of limnological features and trophic state index of two oligotrophic reservoirs of southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, S A; Bicudo, C E M

    2017-01-01

    Limnological features of two reservoirs were studied in dry (August 2013) and rainy (January 2014) periods to evaluate the water quality that supply the city of Guarulhos, southeast Brazil. Water samples were collected in three depths and the following characteristics were measured: alkalinity, dissolved O2, free and total CO2, HCO3, soluble reactive silica, dissolved and total nitrogen and phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a. Water transparency was also measured and temperature, pH and electric conductivity profiles were obtained. Great seasonal and low spatial variability of the water characteristics occurred in the reservoirs. High values of water transparency, free CO2 availability, and low of pH, soluble reactive silica and total and dissolved nutrients values were recorded at the dry period, and different conditions were found at the rainy season. The two reservoirs were characterized by low nutrients, chlorophyll-a and turbidity, and high transparency, these features being typical of oligotrophic systems. The two reservoirs still remain under low anthropogenic impact conditions, and are presently considered reference systems for the SPMR, São Paulo Metropolitan Region. The need for actions that will reduce the input of nutrients from the neighboring cities and the main tributaries of the hydrographic basin is emphasized to maintain the ecological quality of the reservoirs and their reference conditions among the SPRM reservoirs.

  4. Can Asian Dust Trigger Phytoplankton Blooms in the Oligotrophic Northern South China Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng Hsiang; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Huang, Shih-Jen; Lau, William K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite data estimate a high dust deposition flux (approximately 18 g m(exp-2 a(exp-1) into the northern South China Sea (SCS). However, observational evidence concerning any biological response to dust fertilization is sparse. In this study, we combined long-term aerosol and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) measurements from satellite sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) with a 16-year record of dust events from surface PM10 observations to investigate dust transport, flux, and the changes in Chl-a concentration over the northern SCS. Our result revealed that readily identifiable strong dust events over this region, although relatively rare (6 cases since 1994) and accounting for only a small proportion of the total dust deposition (approximately 0.28 g m(exp-2 a(exp-1), do occur and could significantly enhance phytoplankton blooms. Following such events, the Chl-a concentration increased up to 4-fold, and generally doubled the springtime background value (0.15 mg m(exp-3). We suggest these heavy dust events contain readily bioavailable iron and enhance the phytoplankton growth in the oligotrophic northern SCS.

  5. Bio-optical characterization in an ultra-oligotrophic region: the North central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kheireddine, Malika

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, satellite-derived ocean color observations have been the only means of evaluating optical variability of the Red Sea. During a cruise in autumn 2014, we investigated the variability of Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) in the North Central Red Sea (NCRS) with a particular focus on the particulate backscattering coefficient, bbp, and colored dissolved organic matter, CDOM, absorption. To our knowledge, these are some of the measurements of these properties in the Red Sea. The IOPs are derived from the concentration and physical properties of suspended particles in the ocean. They provide a simple description of the influence of these particles on the light within the water column. Bio-optical relationships found for ultra-oligotrophic waters of the six stations sampled significantly depart from the mean standard relationships provided for the global ocean, showing the peculiar character of the Red Sea. These optical anomalies relate to the specific biological and environmental conditions occurring in the Red Sea ecosystem. Specifically, the surface specific phytoplankton absorption coefficients are lower than the values predicted from the global relationships due to a high proportion of relatively large sized phytoplankton. Conversely, bbp values are much higher than the mean standard values for a given chlorophyll-a concentration, Chl a. This presumably results from the influence of highly refractive submicrometer particles of Saharan origin in the surface layer of the water column.

  6. Vitality of aquatic plants and microbial activity of sediment in an oligotrophic lake (Lake Bohinj, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana SIMČIČ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The vitality of eight macrophyte species and the microbial activity of sediment in an oligotrophic lake (Lake Bohinj, Slovenia were studied via the terminal electron transport system (ETS activity of mitochondria. The levels of ETS activity of vascular plants were as follows: Ranunculus circinatus, Myriohpyllum spicatum, Potamogeton alpinus, P. perfoliatus, P. lucens. Fontinalis antipyretica exhibited the highest ETS activity of the non-vascular plants, followed by charales Chara delicatula and C. aspera. High values enable R. circinatus, an amphibious species with rapid growth, to survive under conditions in which the water level changes throughout the season. M. spicatum, a species with broad ecological tolerance, also exhibited high ETS activity. The ETS activity of the microbial community in sediment was affected by temperature and/or the amount and origin of the organic matter. A positive correlation between the ETS activity of the sediment and that of M. spicatum and R. circinatus was measured, while negative correlations or no correlation were observed for mosses and macroalgae. The high ETS activity in sediment indicates rapid mineralization of organic matter and, in turn, sufficient nutrients for growth of macrophytes.

  7. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Vander Schaaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes.

  8. Enhancing surface methane fluxes from an oligotrophic lake: exploring the microbubble hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Daniel F; Kirillin, Georgiy; Tang, Kam W; Flury, Sabine; Bodmer, Pascal; Engelhardt, Christof; Casper, Peter; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-20

    Exchange of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) across inland water surfaces is an important component of the terrestrial carbon (C) balance. We investigated the fluxes of these two gases across the surface of oligotrophic Lake Stechlin using a floating chamber approach. The normalized gas transfer rate for CH4 (k600,CH4) was on average 2.5 times higher than that for CO2 (k600,CO2) and consequently higher than Fickian transport. Because of its low solubility relative to CO2, the enhanced CH4 flux is possibly explained by the presence of microbubbles in the lake’s surface layer. These microbubbles may originate from atmospheric bubble entrainment or gas supersaturation (i.e., O2) or both. Irrespective of the source, we determined that an average of 145 L m(–2) d(–1) of gas is required to exit the surface layer via microbubbles to produce the observed elevated k600,CH4. As k600 values are used to estimate CH4 pathways in aquatic systems, the presence of microbubbles could alter the resulting CH4 and perhaps C balances. These microbubbles will also affect the surface fluxes of other sparingly soluble gases in inland waters, including O2 and N2.

  9. Protozooplankton in the Deep Oligotrophic Traunsee (Austria) Influenced by Discharges of Soda and Salt Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, Bettina; Posch, Thomas; Klammer, Susanne; Griebler, Christian; Psenner, Roland

    2002-01-01

    Traunsee is a deep oligotrophic lake in Austria characterised by an artificial enrichment of chloride in the hypolimnion (up to 170 mg L -1 ) caused by waste disposal of soda and salt industries. Protists were collected monthly over one year, observed alive and after Quantitative Protargol Staining (ciliates) or via epifluorescence microscopy (heterotrophic flagellates). Three sites within the lake (0-40 m depths) were compared to deeper water layers from 60-160 m depths where chloride concentrations and conductivity were increased. In addition, we observed the protozooplankton of two neighbouring lakes, i.e. reference systems, during one sampling occasion. In Traunsee the abundance of ciliates was low (200-36 600 cells L -1 ) in contrast to high species diversity (at least 60 different species; H S = 2.6) throughout the year. The main pelagic species in terms of abundance were small oligotrichs and prostomatids like Rimostrombidium brachykinetum/hyalinum, Balanion planctonicum and Urotricha spp. throughout the investigation period. Among free-living heterotrophic flagellates, which occurred at densities of 40-2800 cells mL -1 , small morphotypes dominated in the pelagial. No differences at the community level between the three lakes could be observed and pelagic ciliates and flagellates seemed not to be affected by increased chloride concentrations or by enhanced conductivity

  10. Protozooplankton in the Deep Oligotrophic Traunsee (Austria) Influenced by Discharges of Soda and Salt Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonntag, Bettina, E-mail: bettina.sonntag@uibk.ac.at; Posch, Thomas [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Zoology and Limnology (Austria); Klammer, Susanne [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology (Austria); Griebler, Christian [University of Tuebingen, Centre for Applied Earth Science (Germany); Psenner, Roland [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Zoology and Limnology (Austria)

    2002-07-15

    Traunsee is a deep oligotrophic lake in Austria characterised by an artificial enrichment of chloride in the hypolimnion (up to 170 mg L{sup -1}) caused by waste disposal of soda and salt industries. Protists were collected monthly over one year, observed alive and after Quantitative Protargol Staining (ciliates) or via epifluorescence microscopy (heterotrophic flagellates). Three sites within the lake (0-40 m depths) were compared to deeper water layers from 60-160 m depths where chloride concentrations and conductivity were increased. In addition, we observed the protozooplankton of two neighbouring lakes, i.e. reference systems, during one sampling occasion. In Traunsee the abundance of ciliates was low (200-36 600 cells L{sup -1}) in contrast to high species diversity (at least 60 different species; H{sub S} = 2.6) throughout the year. The main pelagic species in terms of abundance were small oligotrichs and prostomatids like Rimostrombidium brachykinetum/hyalinum, Balanion planctonicum and Urotricha spp. throughout the investigation period. Among free-living heterotrophic flagellates, which occurred at densities of 40-2800 cells mL{sup -1}, small morphotypes dominated in the pelagial. No differences at the community level between the three lakes could be observed and pelagic ciliates and flagellates seemed not to be affected by increased chloride concentrations or by enhanced conductivity.

  11. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential and a link to lichen symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cene eGostinčar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g. on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses.

  12. Seasonal variation of the protozooplanktonic community in a tropical oligotrophic environment (Ilha Solteira reservoir, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansano, A S; Hisatugo, K F; Leite, M A; Luzia, A P; Regali-Seleghim, M H

    2013-05-01

    The seasonal variation of the protozooplanktonic community (ciliates and testate amoebae) was studied in a tropical oligotrophic reservoir in Brazil, which was under the influence of two contrasting climatic seasons (rainy/warm and dry/cold). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these climatic changes on physical, chemical and biological variables in the dynamic of this community. The highest mean density of total protozoans occurred in the rainy/warm season (5683.2 ind L-1), while the lowest was in the dry/cold (2016.0 ind L-1). Considering the seasonal variations, the protozoan groups that are truly planktonic, such as the oligotrichs (Spirotrichea), predominated in the dry season, whereas during the rainy season, due to the material input and resuspension of sediment, sessile protozoans of the Peritrichia group were the most important ones. The dominant protozoans were Urotricha globosa, Cothurnia annulata, Pseudodifflugia sp. and Halteria grandinella. The highest densities of H. grandinella were associated with more oxygenated and transparent water conditions, while the highest densities of C. annulata occurred in sites with high turbidity, pH and trophic state index (TSI). The study demonstrated that density and composition of protozooplanktonic species and groups of the reservoir suffered seasonal variation due to the environmental variables (mainly temperature, turbidity, water transparency, dissolved oxygen and TSI) and the biological variables (e.g. morphological characteristics, eating habits and escape strategies from predation of the species).

  13. Atributos privativos e musicais do fenômeno noturno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Salgado Gontijo Oliveira Clovis Salgado Gontijo Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Desde a sua análise como mero fenômeno, elaborada com pretensões de neutralidade, a noite é por nós concebida a partir de atributos predominantemente privativos. Estes se acentuam culturalmente na tradição ocidental, que tende a desvalorizá-los como signos de um vazio de ordem ontológica, epistemológica, ética e, até mesmo, estética. Associadas a uma esfera de negatividade, tais privações parecem impedir ou, pelo menos, dificultar o tratamento artístico da experiência noturna, sobretudo quando este pretende se realizar num modelo de arte em continuidade com uma proposta visual e iluminista. Tomando como base nossa tese de doutorado, intitulada XXX, pretendemos aqui analisar de que modo os atributos privativos referentes à noite não só dificultam a sua mímese quanto estão presentes, sob nova interpretação, em contextos que revalorizam positivamente a experiência noturna, potencializando-a, assim, como motivo. Dentre estes contextos, concederemos particular atenção à arte musical, que, coincidentemente, manifesta para o teórico e o ouvinte alguns dos mesmos atributos privativos identificados na análise primária do noturno. A fim de efetuar este estudo, recorreremos ao pensamento de Vladimir Jankélévitch, principal fundamentação teórica da tese cujo percurso será sintetizado neste artigo.

  14. Nantucket Pine Tip Moth Control and Loblolly Pine Growth in Intensive Pine Culture: Two-Year Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Kulhavy; Jimmie L. Yeiser; L. Allen Smith

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-two treatments replicated four times were applied to planted loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L. on bedded industrial forest land in east Texas for measurement of growth impact of Nantucket pine tip moth (NPTM), Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), and effects on pine growth over 2 years. Treatments were combinations of Velpar, Oust, and Arsenal...

  15. Prescribed Burn at Pine Bluff Arsenal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peacock, Lance

    2000-01-01

    .... Abandoned fields grew up in pine or in some cases were planted in pine during the 1930's. The burning of farm stubble and woodlands was a common practice in Arkansas throughout this time period...

  16. Southern Pine Based on Biorefinery Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragauskas, Arthur J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Singh, Preet [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-12-20

    This program seeks to develop an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility on the Recipient’s campus, that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale, including: The generation of the bioethanol from pines residues and hemicelluloses extracted from pine woodchips; The conversion of extracted woodchips to linerboard and bleach grade pulps; and the efficient conversion of pine residues, bark and kraft cooking liquor into a useful pyrolysis oil.

  17. Are we over-managing longleaf pine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Kush; Rebecca J. Barlow; John C. Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) is not loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) or slash pine (Pinus elliottii L.). There is the need for a paradigmatic shift in our thinking about longleaf pine. All too often we think of longleaf as an intolerant species, slow-grower, difficult to regenerate, and yet it dominated the pre...

  18. Guidelines for whitebark pine planting prescriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenda L. Scott; Ward W. McCaughey; Kay Izlar

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a keystone species in high-elevation ecosystems of the western United States. Unfortunately many fragile subalpine ecosystems are losing whitebark pine as a functional community component due to the combined effects of an introduced disease, insects and succession. Planting whitebark pine is one part of a multifaceted restoration...

  19. Human FEN1 Expression and Solubility Patterson in DNA Replication and Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrier, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Flap endo-/exonuclease (FEN1) is a highly conserved protein shown to be one of 10 essential human proteins required for the production of form I DNA following DNA replication from the simian virus 40 (SV40...

  20. Landscape history, calcareous fen development and historical events in the Slovak Eastern Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jamrichová, Eva; Hájková, Petra; Horsák, M.; Rybníčková, E.; Lacina, A.; Hájek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 5 (2014), s. 497-513 ISSN 0939-6314 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : forest development * spring fen * multi-proxy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.648, year: 2014

  1. The growth of Scots pine and the availability of nutrients in old Finnish liming experiments on drained peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieminen, M.; Paetilae, A.

    1994-01-01

    Liming (with applications of 1000 to 8000 kg/ha) had no long- term (1929-1985) effect on the growth of Scots pine on drained oligotrophic peatlands. Liming plus NPK fertilization had a variable effect on the growth of stands. The same treatment could result in a very different response in different experimental areas. Both liming alone and liming plus NPK fertilization increased the calcium, magnesium and nitrogen contents of peat and decreased the C/Nratio and acidity. Liming plus fertilization decreased needle boron and manganese and increased calcium and nitrogen concentrations. The results of peat and needle analysis indicated that the changes in nitrogen availability to trees caused by liming have not been sufficient enough to affect tree growth. It was also concluded that boron deficiency was the main reason for the lowered yield. (26 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs.) (author)

  2. Phase transformations in interstitial Fe-N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapina, T.

    2005-04-15

    Nitriding is a prominent thermochemical heat-treatment procedure leading to various types of surface property improvements of the treated iron and steel. Many questions regarding even very basic properties of these compound layers and the relevant nitride phases are still open. Some of these open questions related with the behaviour of iron nitrides and, in particular, of iron nitride compound layers occurring below the usual process temperatures are addressed to in this thesis, as relevant e.g. for the cooling procedure after nitriding. The most important iron nitrides occurring in iron-nitride compound layers are the {gamma}'- and {epsilon}-phases in the Fe-N system. It is shown that for relatively low nitrogen contents of epsilon-iron nitrides (around Fe{sub 3}N) the cooling rate upon going down from an elevated annealing temperature to room temperature has a significant effect on the lattice parameters. X-ray and neutron diffraction analysis revealed that the lattice parameter values observed after fast cooling are affected by the higher degree of nitrogen disorder at elevated temperature, thus changing the c/a ratio. New relations between the lattice parameters of {epsilon}-iron nitrides and the nitrogen content are suggested for different types of cooling. The investigation by TEM of the decomposition upon annealing (633 K, 673 K) of initially homogeneous {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N powders revealed that the {gamma}'-formation occurs in only a few powder particles in a grain-like form. Moreover, diffraction line-profile analysis revealed N transport occurring from particle to particle, leading to inhomogeneities of N content in the epsilon-phase. It was shown that {gamma}'-iron nitride formation can occur by backwards growth of the existing {gamma}'-sublayer at the cost of the {epsilon}-sublayer increasing N concentration in the {epsilon}-layer. Another process, which may additionally occur in the compound layer upon annealing, is diffusion of N

  3. Complex microbiota of a Chinese "Fen" liquor fermentation starter (Fen-Daqu), revealed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, X.; Zheng, Y.; Han, B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Samson, R.A.; Boekhout, T.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Daqu is a traditional fermentation starter that is used for Chinese liquor production. Although partly mechanized, its manufacturing process has remained traditional. We investigated the microbial diversity of Fen-Daqu, a starter for light-flavour liquor, using combined culture-dependent and

  4. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8–2.4 nM⋅h−1 at 6 m, which could explain 33–44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux. PMID:22089233

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321: Insights into Symbiosis Evolution in Soil Oligotrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Tsukui, Takahiro; Maita, Hiroko; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Saito, Akihiro; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Reiko; Shimomura, Yumi; Haruta, Shin; Morimoto, Sho; Wang, Yong; Sakai, Yoriko; Hattori, Masahira; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Nagashima, Kenji V. P.; Masuda, Sachiko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Yamashita, Akifumi; Bao, Zhihua; Hayatsu, Masahito; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Yoshinaga, Ikuo; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Toyota, Koki; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Anda, Mizue; Niwa, Rieko; Jung-Hwan, Park; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Tokuda, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Syuji; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Nakahira-Yanaka, Yuka; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Hirakawa, Hideki; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Itakura, Manabu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Sakakura, Natsuko; Kaminuma, Eli; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321 is an oligotrophic bacterium isolated from paddy field soil. Although S23321 is phylogenetically close to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, a legume symbiont, it is unable to induce root nodules in siratro, a legume often used for testing Nod factor-dependent nodulation. The genome of S23321 is a single circular chromosome, 7,231,841 bp in length, with an average GC content of 64.3%. The genome contains 6,898 potential protein-encoding genes, one set of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Comparison of the genome structure between S23321 and USDA110 showed strong colinearity; however, the symbiosis islands present in USDA110 were absent in S23321, whose genome lacked a chaperonin gene cluster (groELS3) for symbiosis regulation found in USDA110. A comparison of sequences around the tRNA-Val gene strongly suggested that S23321 contains an ancestral-type genome that precedes the acquisition of a symbiosis island by horizontal gene transfer. Although S23321 contains a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster, the organization, homology, and phylogeny of the genes in this cluster were more similar to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia ORS278 and BTAi1 than to those on the symbiosis island of USDA110. In addition, we found genes encoding a complete photosynthetic system, many ABC transporters for amino acids and oligopeptides, two types (polar and lateral) of flagella, multiple respiratory chains, and a system for lignin monomer catabolism in the S23321 genome. These features suggest that S23321 is able to adapt to a wide range of environments, probably including low-nutrient conditions, with multiple survival strategies in soil and rhizosphere. PMID:22452844

  6. Diversity of Picoeukaryotes at an Oligotrophic Site off the Northern Red Sea Coast

    KAUST Repository

    Espinosa, Francisco Jose Acosta

    2012-05-01

    Picoeukaryotes are protist 3 µm belonging to a wide diversity of taxonomic groups, and they are an important constituent of the ocean microbiota, performing essential ecological roles in marine trophic chains and in nutrient and carbon budgets. Despite this, the true extent of their diversity is currently unknown, and in the last decade molecular surveys have uncovered a substantial number of previously unknown groups from all taxonomic levels. No studies on this group have been done so far on the Red Sea, a unique marine environment characterized by oligotrophic conditions and high irradiance, salinity and water temperature. We sampled the surface waters of a site near the northern Red Sea coast, and analyzed the picoeukaryotic diversity through the construction of PCR clone libraries using the 18S ribosomal gene. The community captured by our library is dominated by three main groups, the alveolates (32%), chlorophytes (32%) and Stramenopiles (20.55%). Members of Radiolaria, Cercozoans and Haptophyta were also found, although in low abundances. Photosynthetic organisms are especially diverse and abundant in the sample, with heterotrophic organism mostly composed by the mostly parasitic novel alveolates and bacterivorous stramenopiles. Novel clades were detected among the Novel Alveolates- II and the photosynthetic stramenopiles taxa, which suggests that they may be part of a number of groups unique to the basin and adapted to the high salinity and temperature conditions. This is the first study done on the Red Sea focusing on the diversity of the complete picoeukaryotic fraction, and provides a stepping stone in the characterization of the picoeukaryotic component of the microbial diversity of the basin.

  7. Pine creek geosyncline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, R.S.; Ewers, G.R.; Ferguson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Pine Creek Geosyncline is a 66,000 km 2 inlier of Early Proterozoic metasediments, mafic and felsic intrusives and minor extrusives, surrounding small late Archaean granitic domes. Economic uranium occurrences cluster into three fields, with the Alligator Rivers field being the most significant. The metasediments are alluvial and reduced shallow-water pelites and psammites. Evaporitic carbonate developed on shallow shelves around Archaean islands. Basin development and sedimentation (c. 2000-1870 Ma) were related to gradual subsidence induced by crustal extension. Facies variations and volcanism were in places controlled by the extensional faults. The rocks were metamorphosed to lower the high grade, complexly folded, and intruded by numerous granitoids from c. 1870 to 1730 Ma. Late orogenic felsic volcanics accumulated in local rift systems. Middle Proterozoic sandstone was deposited on a peneplaned and deeply weathered surface from about 1650 Ma. Uranium is enriched in some Archaean and Proterozoic igneous rocks, but there is no local or regional enrichment of the metasedimentary hosts or of the unconformably overlying sandstone. There is no regional gravity, magnetic or radiometric character attributable to the region's significance as a uranium province; contrasts with surrounding sedimentary basins reflect expected differences in rock properties between a heterogeneous igneous/metamorphic region and relatively homogeneous undeformed and unmineralized sediments. Uranium-enriched Archaean and Proterozoic granitoids and felsic volcanics with labile U are likely though not exclusive source rocks. U was probably transported in oxidized low temperature solutions as uranyl complexes and precipitated in reduced, structurally controlled, low-pressure traps. All uranium occurrences are broadly classified as 'Proterozoic unconformity related'. Greatest potential for further discovery is offered in the Alligator Rivers field, where perhaps at least 3 to 5.5 times the

  8. Pine needle abortion biomarker detected in bovine fetal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine needle abortion is a naturally occurring condition in free-range cattle caused by the consumption of pine needles from select species of cypress, juniper, pine, and spruce trees. Confirmatory diagnosis of pine needle abortion has previously relied on a combined case history of pine needle cons...

  9. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic

  10. Prokaryotes in subsoil – evidence for spatial separation of oligotrophs and copiotrophs by co-occurrence networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchloter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities provide a wide range of soil functions including nutrient cycling, soil formation, and plant growth promotion. On the small scale, nutrient rich soil hotspots developed from soil animal or plant activity are important drivers for microbial communities and their activity pattern. Nevertheless, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with diverging lifestyles has been barely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in topsoil and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophs and heterotrophs in subsoil and hotspots was assessed. Four co-occurring bacterial communities were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, which represent many copiotrophic bacteria, are affiliated to the hotspot communities – the rhizosphere and drilosphere – both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia with many oligotrophic bacteria, are the abundant groups of the bulk subsoil community. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated and only covers 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads but includes both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. Instead, the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity and comprises only the ammonium oxidizing Nitrososphaera. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea are a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes.

  11. Longleaf Pine: An Updated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl; William D. Boyer; Charles K. McMahon

    1996-01-01

    The longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forest figured prominently in the cultural and economic development of the South. What was once one of the most extensive forest ecosystems in North America has now become critically endangered (6). At the time of European settlement, this ecosystem dominated as much as 92 million acres throughout the...

  12. Fusiform Rust of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. R. Phelps; F. L. Czabator

    1978-01-01

    Fusiform rust, caused by the fungus Cronartium fusiforme Hedg. & Hunt ex Cumm., is distributed in the Southern United States from Maryland to Florida and west to Texas and southern Arkansas. Infections by the fungus, which develops at or near the point of infection, result in tapered, spindle-shaped swells, called galls, on branches and stems of pines. (see photo...

  13. Nutrient Management in Pine Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan E. Tiarks

    1999-01-01

    Coastal plain soils are naturally low in fertility and many pine stands will give an economic response to fertilization, especially phosphorus. Maintaining the nutrients that are on the site by limiting displacement of logging slash during and after the harvest can be important in maintaining the productivity of the site and reducing the amount of fertilizer required...

  14. The most oligotrophic subtropical zones of the global ocean: similarities and differences in terms of chlorophyll and yellow substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, A.; Claustre, H.; Gentili, B.

    2010-10-01

    The cores of the subtropical anticyclonic gyres are characterized by their oligotrophic status and minimal chlorophyll concentration, compared to that of the whole ocean. These zones are unambiguously detected by space borne ocean color sensors thanks to their typical spectral reflectance, which is that of extremely clear and deep blue waters. Not only the low chlorophyll (denoted [Chl]) level, but also a reduced amount of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM or "yellow substance") account for this clarity. The oligotrophic waters of the North and South Pacific gyres, the North and South Atlantic gyres, and the South Indian gyre have been comparatively studied with respect to both [Chl] and CDOM contents, by using 10-year data (1998-2007) of the Sea-viewing Wide field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, NASA). Albeit similar these oligotrophic zones are not identical regarding their [Chl] and CDOM contents, as well as their seasonal cycles. According to the zone, the averaged [Chl] value varies from 0.026 to 0.059 mg m-3, whereas the ay(443) average (the absorption coefficient due to CDOM at 443 nm) is between 0.0033 and 0.0072 m-1. The CDOM-to-[Chl] relative proportions also differ between the zones. The clearest waters, corresponding to the lowest [Chl] and CDOM concentrations, are found near Easter Island and near Mariana Islands in the western part of the North Pacific Ocean. In spite of its low [Chl], the Sargasso Sea presents the highest CDOM content amongst the six zones studied. Except in the North Pacific gyre (near Mariana and south of Hawaii islands), a conspicuous seasonality appears to be the rule in the other 4 gyres and affects both [Chl] and CDOM; both quantities vary in a ratio of about 2 (maximum-to-minimum). Coinciding [Chl] and CDOM peaks occur just after the local winter solstice, which is also the period of the maximal mixed layer depth in these latitudes. It is hypothesized that the vertical transport of unbleached CDOM from the subthermocline layers

  15. The annual carbon budget for fen and forest in a wetland at Arctic treeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, W. R. [McMaster Univ., School of Geography and Geology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Bello, R. L.; D' Souza, A. [York Univ., Dept. of Geography, Toronto, ON (Canada); Griffis, T. J. [Minnesota Univ., Dept. of Soil, Water and Climate, St. Paul, MN (United States); LaFleur, P. M. [Trent Univ., Dept. of Geography, Peterborough, ON (Canada)

    2002-09-01

    This study of a wetland system at the Arctic treeline compares two carbon budget estimates, one derived from long-term growth rates of organic soil and the other based on shorter-term flux measurements. Result showed that while there was a small loss of carbon from the ecosystem in the case of tundra fen over a period of fifty-three years, the adjacent open subarctic forest showed large gains in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the same period. These longer-term data were supported by shorter-term flux measurements, which also showed carbon loss by the fen and carbon uptake by the forest. The shorter term data indicate that the carbon loss from the fen during this period was attributable to one particularly dry year. The different rates of carbon exchange appear to be controlled by two primary factors. The first is the enhanced development in the fen of a photosynthesis-inhibiting hummock-hollow landscape, while the second is related to warmer and drier average growing season conditions, which inhibit carbon dioxide uptake in the fen and enhances it in the forest. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  16. AMS radiocarbon analyses from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Challenges of dating sediments from a large, oligotrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Jones, Glenn A.; Rubin, M.; King, J.W.; Peck, J.A.; Orem, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    A suite of 146 new accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon ages provides the first reliable chronology for late Quaternary sediments in Lake Baikal. In this large, highly oligotrophic lake, biogenic and authigenic carbonate are absent, and plant macrofossils are extremely rare. Total organic carbon is therefore the primary material available for dating. Several problems are associated with the TOC ages. One is the mixture of carbon sources in TOC, not all of which are syndepositional in age. This problem manifests itself in apparent ages for the sediment surface that are greater than zero. However, because most of the organic carbon in Lake Baikal sediments is algal (autochthonous) in origin, this effect is limited to about 1000+500 years, which can be corrected, at least for young deposits. The other major problem with dating Lake Baikal sediments is the very low carbon contents of glacial-age deposits, which makes them extremely susceptible to contamination with modern carbon. This problem can be minimized by careful sampling and handling procedures. The ages show almost an order of magnitude difference in sediment-accumulation rates among different sedimentary environments in Lake Baikal, from about 0.04 mm/year on isolated banks such as Academician Ridge, to nearly 0.3 mm/year in the turbidite depositional areas beneath the deep basin floors, such as the Central Basin. The new AMS ages clearly indicate that the dramatic increase in diatom productivity in the lake, as evidenced by increases in biogenic silica and organic carbon, began about 13 ka, in contrast to previous estimates of 7 ka for the age of this transition. Holocene net sedimentation rates may be less than, equal to, or greater than those in the late Pleistocene, depending on the site. This variability reflects the balance between variable terrigenous sedimentation and increased biogenic sedimentation during interglaciations. The ages reported here, and the temporal and spatial variation in

  17. Plankton origin of particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate in a Mediterranean oligotrophic coastal and shallow ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Natacha; Bogé, Gérard; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Richard, Simone

    2009-03-01

    We report here dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) levels as a function of plankton communities and abiotic factors over a 12-month cycle in the Mediterranean oligotrophic coastal and shallow ecosystem of Niel Bay (N.W. Mediterranean Sea, France). Total particulate DMSP (DMSP p) and DMS concentrations were highly seasonal, peaking during a spring (April) bloom at 8.9 nM and 73.9 nM, respectively. Significant positive correlations were found between total DMSP p concentration and the abundance or biomass of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum compressum (Spearman's rank correlation test: r = 0.704; p = 0.011). Similarly, DMS concentrations peaked during the development of blooms of P. compressum and Gymnodinium sp. There seemed to be a positive relationship between the chlorophyll a to pheopigment ratio and DMS concentrations, suggesting that DMS was released during phytoplankton growth. High DMS levels recorded in the shallow Niel Bay may also result from the activity of benthic macroalgae, and/or macrophytes such as Posidonia spp., or the resuspension of sulfur species accumulating in sediments. The fractionation of particulate DMSP into three size classes (>90 μm, 5-90 μm and 0.2-5 μm) revealed that 5-90 μm DMSP-containing particles made the greatest contribution to the total DMSP p pool (annual mean contribution = 62%), with a maximal contribution in April (96%). This size class consisted mainly of dinoflagellates (annual mean contribution = 68%), with P. compressum and Gymnodinium sp. the predominant species, together accounting for up to 44% of the phytoplankton present. The positive correlation between DMSP concentration in the 5-90 μm size class and the abundance of P. compressum (Spearman's rank correlation test: r = 0.648; p = 0.023) suggests that this phytoplankton species would be the major DMSP producer in Niel Bay. The DMSP collected in the >90 μm fraction was principally associated with zooplankton organisms, dominated by

  18. Biodiversity patterns of crustacean suprabenthic assemblages along an oligotrophic gradient in the bathyal Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana; Frutos, Inmaculada; Tecchio, Samuele; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Company, Joan B.; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Cunha, Marina R.

    2017-03-01

    Crustacean suprabenthic abundance, community structure, α-diversity (both taxonomic and trophic) and β-diversity were studied along a West-East gradient of oligotrophy in the deep Mediterranean Sea. The assemblages were sampled with a suprabenthic sledge in three regions (western, central and eastern basins) at three water depths (1200, 2000 and 3000 m) in May-June 2009. Environmental data were obtained at each sampling location including sediment properties, oceanographic variables near the seafloor and in the water column, and proxies of epipelagic productivity at the surface. Our results, concerning the crustacean component of the suprabenthos, showed complex trends in community structure and biodiversity across different spatial scales (longitudinal, bathymetric, and near-bottom distribution). A decrease in the number of species and abundance, accompanied by changes in the trophic structure of the assemblages were observed from West to East. In the eastern region the assemblages were impoverished in number of trophic guilds and trophic diversity. The West-East oligotrophic gradient was identified as the main driver in community structure as shown by the significant correlation with trophic environmental variables. Differences in community structure across regions were more marked at greater depths, while at the shallower sites assemblages were more similar. Within each basin, abundance, number of species and number of trophic groups decreased with depth, showing high turnover rates between 1200 and 2000 m depths. The small-scale (0-150 cm) vertical distribution of the suprabenthos was interpreted in relation to the species' functional traits (e.g. swimming activity, migratory behaviour, bottom dependence, feeding habits). Bottom-dependent and more mobile components of the suprabenthos were apparently responding differently to the various environmental challenges imposed by the large-scale longitudinal and bathymetric gradients. We propose that the bathyal

  19. Experimental acidification of a poor fen in northwestern Ontario: Effects on emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, D.M.; Wiens, A.P.; Bilyj, B. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Central and Arctic Region; Armstrong, L. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Central and Arctic Region

    1995-10-01

    The effects of experimental acidification and N fertilization on chironomid emergence from a poor fen in northwestern Ontario were studied from 1984 to 1989. Experimental treatments did not affect the numbers of chironomids emerging weekly, the timing of emergence, or the species composition of emergence during the study period. Weekly emergence counts were higher (P<0.05) from the periphery of the fen than the central part. Total seasonal emergence was higher from an area that was previously burned than from the rest of that swamp, though the difference was not statistically significant. Stability of species composition, despite experimental treatments and physiographic differences in the fen, may be a widespread characteristic of Canadian acidic peatlands. 7 tabs., 4 figs., 23 refs.

  20. Examining the peat-accumulating potential of fen vegetation in the context of fed restoration of harvested peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, M.; Rochefort, L. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Phytologie, Peatland Ecology and Research Group

    2009-07-01

    The return of peat-accumulating function is an important long-term goal in peatland restoration. However, researchers do not yet know which vegetation groups increase the ability of ecosystems to accumulate peat in fens. This study assessed the decomposition rates of 3 vegetation species typical to undisturbed fen regions, and 3 species that spontaneously colonize harvested fens. All species were incubated in a harvest fen restoration site as well as at an undisturbed fen in order to compare decomposition rates according to different environmental conditions. The study showed that the average exponential decay coefficient for all species was higher at the harvested fen site. The decay coefficient varied only slightly between undisturbed and harvested fens, despite wide variations in hydrological conditions. Litter type had the most significant impact on decomposition rates. Annual primary production of the species was also measured in order to estimate the peat accumulating capacity of each species. Results showed that Scirpus cyperinus primary annual production rates were 3 times higher than the other studied species. It was concluded that the harvested fen sites have a higher peat-accumulating potential than undisturbed fens. 60 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. Decomposition rate of peat-forming plants in the oligotrophic peatland at the first stages of destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, L. G.; Golovatskaya, E. A.; Terechshenko, N. N.

    2018-03-01

    The research presents quantitative estimates of the decomposition rate of plant residues at the initial stages of the decay of two plant species (Eriophorum vaginatum and Sphagnum fuscum) in a peat deposit of the oligotrophic bog in the southern taiga subzone of Western Siberia. We also studied a change in the content of total carbon and nitrogen in plant residues and the activity of microflora in the initial stages of decomposition. At the initial stage of the transformation process of peat-forming plants the losses of mass of Sph. fuscum is 2.5 times lower then E. vaginatum. The most active mass losses, as well as a decrease in the total carbon content, is observed after four months of the experiment. The most active carbon removal is characteristic for E. vaginatum. During the decomposition of plant residues, the nitrogen content decreases, and the most intense nitrogen losses were characteristic for Sph. fuscum. The microorganisms assimilating organic and mineral nitrogen are more active in August, the oligotrophic and cellulolytic microorganisms – in July.

  2. Potential for hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic and diazotrophic populations to initiate biofilm formation in oligotrophic, deep terrestrial subsurface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Pedersen, Karsten; Edlund, Johanna; Eriksson, Lena; Åström, Mats; Andersson, Anders F; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2017-03-23

    Deep terrestrial biosphere waters are separated from the light-driven surface by the time required to percolate to the subsurface. Despite biofilms being the dominant form of microbial life in many natural environments, they have received little attention in the oligotrophic and anaerobic waters found in deep bedrock fractures. This study is the first to use community DNA sequencing to describe biofilm formation under in situ conditions in the deep terrestrial biosphere. In this study, flow cells were attached to boreholes containing either "modern marine" or "old saline" waters of different origin and degree of isolation from the light-driven surface of the earth. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we showed that planktonic and attached populations were dissimilar while gene frequencies in the metagenomes suggested that hydrogen-fed, carbon dioxide- and nitrogen-fixing populations were responsible for biofilm formation across the two aquifers. Metagenome analyses further suggested that only a subset of the populations were able to attach and produce an extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Initial biofilm formation is thus likely to be mediated by a few bacterial populations which were similar to Epsilonproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and unclassified bacteria. Populations potentially capable of attaching to a surface and to produce extracellular polysaccharide matrix for attachment were identified in the terrestrial deep biosphere. Our results suggest that the biofilm populations were taxonomically distinct from the planktonic community and were enriched in populations with a chemolithoautotrophic and diazotrophic metabolism coupling hydrogen oxidation to energy conservation under oligotrophic conditions.

  3. Naturally Occurring Compound Can Protect Pines from the Southern Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Strom; R.A. Goyer; J.L. Hayes

    1995-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB), Dendroctonus frontalis, is the most destructive insect pest of southern pine forests. This tiny insect, smaller than a grain of rice, is responsible for killing pine timber worth millions of dollars on a periodic basis in Louisiana.

  4. Monitoring white pine blister rust infection and mortality in whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathie Jean; Erin Shanahan; Rob Daley; Gregg DeNitto; Dan Reinhart; Chuck Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for information on the status and trend of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Concerns over the combined effects of white pine blister rust (WPBR, Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae), and climate change prompted an interagency working group to design and implement...

  5. Establishing Longleaf Pine Seedlings Under a Loblolly Pine Canopy (User’s Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    longleaf pine forests (Figure 1) for the diverse values they provide. These forests afford abundant recreational opportunities like hiking , bird...combined herbicide-fertilizer treatments that might benefit planted longleaf pine seedlings after planting. In addition to measuring longleaf pine

  6. Tip moth control and loblolly pine growth in intensive pine culture: four year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Kulhavy; Jimmie L. Yeiser; L. Allen Smith

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-two treatments replicated four times were applied to planted loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., on bedded industrial forest land in east Texas for measurement of growth impact of Nantucket pine tip moth (NPTM), Rhyacionia frustrana Comstock, and effects on pine growth over 2 years. Treatments were combinations of Velpar®,...

  7. Selection for resistance to white pine blister rust affects the abiotic stress tolerances of limber pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J. Vogan; Anna W. Schoettle

    2015-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) mortality is increasing across the West as a result of the combined stresses of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola; WPBR), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium cyanocarpum) in a changing climate. With the continued spread of WPBR, extensive mortality will continue with strong selection...

  8. Foliar fungi of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    OpenAIRE

    Millberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is an ecologically and economically important tree species in Fennoscandia. Scots pine needles host a variety of fungi, some with the potential to profoundly influence their host. These fungi can have beneficial or detrimental effects with important implications for both forest health and primary production. In this thesis, the foliar fungi of Scots pine needles were investigated with the aim of exploring spatial and temporal patterns, and development with needle...

  9. Bio-composites made from pine straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Jamie Tang

    2004-01-01

    Pine straw is renewable natural resource that is under-utilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and mechanical performances of pine straw composites. Three panel density levels (0.8, 0.9, 1.0 g/cm2) and two resin content levels (1% pMDI + 4% UF, 2% pMDI + 4% UF) were selected as treatments. For the pine-straw-bamboo-...

  10. Compostos fenólicos totais e taninos condensados em frutas nativas do cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Silveira Rocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As frutas nativas do cerrado têm despertado ultimamente interesse crescente, devido às suas propriedades nutricionais e funcionais aliadas ao potencial para agregar valor e conservar a biodiversidade deste bioma. Muitos compostos fenólicos apresentam capacidade antioxidante de neutralizar a atividade de radicais livres gerados no organismo, que estão associados a diversas doenças crônico-degenerativas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de três soluções extratoras (acetona a 70 %, etanol a 95 % e metanol a 99,8 % e determinar os teores de compostos fenólicos em 10 espécies de frutas nativas do cerrado, utilizando o método de Folin-Ciocalteou para compostos fenólicos totais e o método da vanilina para taninos condensados. A acetona a 70 % mostrou-se como o melhor solvente extrator de compostos fenólicos totais e taninos condensados em frutos de Pouteria gardneriana, Eugenia dysenterica, E. klostzchiana, E. punicifolia, Plinia edulis, Campomanesia sp., fenólicos totais de Brosimium gaudichaudii e taninos condensados de Jaracatia spinosa. O etanol a 95 % foi mais eficiente na extração de fenólicos totais de Jaracatia spinosa e taninos condensados de Brosimium gaudichaudii; o metanol a 99,8 % foi mais eficiente na extração de taninos condensados de Eugenia dysenterica. Os teores de compostos fenólicos totais variaram entre 90 e 327 mg de ácido gálico equivalente por 100g de polpa para as espécies E. dysenterica e E. punicifolia, respectivamente. Os teores de taninos condensados variaram entre 4 e 291 mg de catequina equivalente por 100 g de polpa para as espécies E. dysenterica e E. calcyna, respectivamente. As espécies de frutas do cerrado, avaliadas neste estudo, podem ser consideradas boas fontes de compostos fenólicos totais, sendo que a natureza específica dos diferentes tipos deve ser avaliada em estudos futuros.

  11. Literatura expandida: el fenómeno fanfiction en español

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Martínez, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    En este trabajo se pretende abordar el estudio del llamado “fenómeno fanfiction”, un fenómeno que ha sacudido internet en las últimas décadas y que supone una nueva forma de creación de literatura. La creación de fanfiction supone la realización de una obra, normalmente narrativa, cuyo contenido contiene aspectos de una obra de ficción publicada, siempre sin ánimo de lucro. Departamento de Literatura Española y Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada Grado en Español: Lengua y...

  12. E-sports: um fenómeno da cultura digital contemporânea

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva, Pedro André Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Mestrado em Comunicação, Cultura e Tecnologias de Informação A competição entre dois jogadores está na génese dos jogos digitais e é esse o fator que está no centro deste trabalho, que explora o fenómeno do desporto eletrónico, os e-sports. Este conceito representa a prática competitiva e profissionalmente organizada nos videojogos. Situado conceptualmente entre o gaming e o desporto, os e-sports apresentam-se como um fenómeno da cultura digital contemporânea, partic...

  13. Modelado lingüístico de fenómenos complejos

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Álvarez, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Actualmente, es posible adquirir y almacenar grandes volúmenes de datos sobre diferentes fenómenos complejos en muchas áreas importantes. Con el fin de ser útil, esta información debe ser explicada de la manera más comprensible posible, incluyendo los conocimientos previos disponibles sobre el fenómeno que se estudia. Estos objetivos sólo pueden lograrse mediante el uso de lenguaje natural, especialmente si la información final va a ser utilizada por personas no expertas. Por lo tanto, e...

  14. El Fenómeno de Consumo y el Consumo en Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagoberto Páramo Morales

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan las principales características que tipifican el fenómeno de consumo en las sociedades contemporáneas. Para lograrlo, primero se revisan algunas aproximaciones conceptuales del consumo, visto como fenómeno social, asociándolo con el simbolismo de consumo, los rituales, las posesiones y el materialismo como motores propulsores de la concepción y práctica del marketing de hoy.

  15. Rehabilitation of acidified and eutrophied fens in The Netherlands : Effects of hydrologic manipulation and liming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, B.; Broek, T. van den; Barendregt, A.; Bootsma, M.C.; Grootjans, A.P.

    Mosaic fen communities with many rare plant species were outcompeted by fast-growing bryophyte stands (Sphagnum flexuosum/Sphagnum fallax and Polytrichum commune). Eutrophication and acidification were the main causes. Management experiments were carried out to set back this succession by restoring

  16. Prospects of fen restoration in relation to changing land use—An example from central Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, A.; Dzierza, P.; Grootjans, A.P.; Kotowski, W.; Diggelen, R.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out an eco-hydrological analysis to evaluate the most important effects of land use changes on the hydrological functioning of a fen system in Poland. We measured water levels (hydraulic heads) and water flow along a transect through the study area and also analysed land use changes using

  17. Prospects of fen restoration in relation to changing land use-An example from central Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Dzierża, Paulina; Grootjans, Ab P.; Kotowski, Wiktor; Diggelen, Rudy Van

    2010-01-01

    We carried out an eco-hydrological analysis to evaluate the most important effects of land use changes on the hydrological functioning of a fen system in Poland. We measured water levels (hydraulic heads) and water flow along a transect through the study area and also analysed land use changes using

  18. Phase Transformations and Phase Equilibria in the Fe-N System at Temperatures below 573 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinov, S.; Böttger, A.J.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    The phase transformations of homogeneous Fe-N alloys of nitrogen contents from 10 to 26 at. pct were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction analysis upon aging in the temperature range from 373 to 473 K. It was found that precipitation of alpha double prime-Fe16N2 below 443 K does not only oc...

  19. Diferentes Abordagens dos Fenômenos Subjetivos na Obra de B. F. Skinner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Mesquita Pompermaier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Como a análise do comportamento aborda os fenômenos subjetivos? Seria a teoria de eventos privados a única maneira? Guiado por essas questões, o presente trabalho busca apresentar a abordagem dos fenômenos subjetivos na obra de B. F. Skinner, indicando não apenas a teoria de eventos privados, mas também a possibilidade de abordagens alternativas a essa temática, sem referência à privacidade, por exemplo, por meio da magnitude das ações envolvidas nos fenômenos, níveis (aberto e encoberto do comportamento e conceitos disposicionais. Indica-se ainda uma significativa diferença de ênfase na teoria de eventos privados ao longo da obra skinneriana. Por fim, conduz-se uma discussão sobre o papel da teoria de eventos privados na análise do comportamento para a abordagem dos fenômenos subjetivos.

  20. Effects of Reduced and Oxidised Nitrogen on Rich-Fen Mosses: a 4-Year Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, Maurice P.C.P.; Bobbink, Roland; Robat, Sandra A.; Verhoeven, Jos T.A.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch fens, subjected to high nitrogen (N) deposition levels with reduced N (NHy) highly dominating over oxidised N (NOx), have since the second half of the past century seen a significant decline of Scorpidium and other characteristic brown moss species, while several Sphagnum species have

  1. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order

  2. Una revisión del fenómeno de aislamiento magnético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zósimo Arévalo Velosa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Los dispositivos de alta energía son diseñados para que funcionen con campos eléctricos y magnéticos extrema-damente altos. Debido a esto, dichos dispositivos presentan fenómenos y comportamientos no lineales, como el aislamiento magnético que altera el transporte de los electrones. La no linealidad ha obligado a analizar y revisar desde el punto de vista matemático las condiciones de frontera y las soluciones del problema. El objetivo de este trabajo es exponer el tema a un nivel que facilite su difusión entre la comunidad académica no familiarizada con el mismo. Para ello, el trabajo presenta una descripción de los fenómenos que se generan cuando hay campos eléctricos y magnéticos muy altos, tomando el caso de un diodo plano al vacío, así como las ecuaciones que modelan el fenómeno de aislamiento magnético; también demuestra la existencia de las soluciones y encuentra las positivas en base a los métodos de solución superior e inferior para problemas de valor de frontera, y pro-porciona algunos ejemplos de aplicación del fenómeno de aislamiento magnético.

  3. Short-Term Summer Inundation as a Measure to Counteract Acidification in Rich Fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettrop, I.S.; Cusell, C.; Kooijman, A.M.; Lamers, L.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    In regions with intensive agriculture, water level fluctuation in wetlands has generally become constricted within narrow limits. Water authorities are, however, considering the re-establishment of fluctuating water levels as a management tool in biodiverse, base-rich fens (‘rich fens’). This

  4. Partitioning of habitat effects casts light on the decline of the fen orchid, Liparis loeselii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Minter, Martine Olesen

    2015-01-01

    Liparis loeselii is a rare and declining orchid species restricted to rich fens in the northern hemisphere. Suggested reasons for the decline are habitat destruction, eutrophication, altered hydrology and scrub encroachment after termination of traditional management such as grazing and hay making...

  5. The effect of habitat fragmentation and abiotic factors on fen plant occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soomers, H.; Karssenberg, D.J.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.; Verweij, P.A.; Wassen, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Human landscape modification has led to habitat fragmentation for many species. Habitat fragmentation, leading to isolation, decrease in patch size and increased edge effect, is observed in fen ecosystems that comprise many endangered plant species. However, until now it has remained unclear

  6. Human FEN1 Expression and Solubility Patterson in DNA Replication and Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrier, Richard

    1999-01-01

    .... I show that human FEN1 mRNA and protein levels increase in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with peak mRNA and protein levels attained coincident with S phase DNA replication in both primary and transformed cells...

  7. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.S. Kane; M.R. Chivers; M.S. Turetsky; C.C. Treat; D.G. Petersen; M. Waldrop; J.W. Harden; A.D. McGuire

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2...

  8. BOREAS TGB-1/TGB-3 CH4 Chamber Flux Data over the NSA Fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jill L.; Moore, Tim R.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-3 team collected methane (CH4) chamber flux measurements at the NSA fen site during May-September 1994 and June-October 1996. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  9. Lago Maggiore oligotrophication as seen from the long-term evolution of its phytoplankton taxonomic size structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe MORABITO

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid and common deterioration of aquatic ecosystems, scientists and environmental protection organizations acutely need means capable of producing quantitative estimates for structural deformations of natural communities. Recently, very common biomass size spectra ignore community taxonomic composition, i.e., one of the most important kinds of biological information. Therefore, another very old, but rare in planktonology, method – the traditional taxonomic size spectrum (TTSS – can be helpful. TTSS, a specific form of size-frequency distribution of taxonomic units, reveals repeating patterns of deep subalpine Lago Maggiore (Italy phytoplankton taxonomic structure. The general TTSS pattern was safeguarded during 22 annual cycles (1984-2005, when many principal environmental characteristics were changed considerably during the lake oligotrophication. At the same time, the fine structure deformations of this pattern helped us divide the total oligotrophication process into several stages characterized by notable changes of TTSS peaks' proportions. These peak-height alterations were caused by pronounced changes in the species list and overall taxonomic diversity of the lake phytoplankton. The average cell volume decline was found. It was significantly correlated with the total phosphorus descending trend. This cell volume decline was produced by the addition of numerous species into the medium-and-small size fractions. Typical patterns of the stable and transitory stages were differentiated, which could be valuable for environmental protection and diagnostic applications. The central peak height difference between the stable and the transitory periods was statistically significant. Oligotrophication process decomposition into several more homogenous groups of years was supported by quantitative estimators produced by hierarchical cluster analysis. The highest level of the similarity measure (Pearson r in pairs of annual TTSS was

  10. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jeanthon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 % was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies

  11. Diverse gene cassettes in class 1 integrons of facultative oligotrophic bacteria of River Mahananda,West Bengal, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Chakraborty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study a large random collection (n=2188 of facultative oligotrophic bacteria, from 90 water samples gathered in three consecutive years (2007-2009 from three different sampling sites of River Mahananda in Siliguri, West Bengal, India, were investigated for the presence of class 1 integrons and sequences of the amplification products. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replica plating method was employed for determining the antibiotic resistance profile of the randomly assorted facultative oligotrophic isolates. Genomic DNA from each isolate was analyzed by PCR for the presence of class 1 integron. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced. Numerical taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were done to ascertain putative genera of the class 1 integron bearing isolates. Out of 2188 isolates, 1667 (76.19% were antibiotic-resistant comprising of both single-antibiotic resistance (SAR and multiple-antibiotic resistant (MAR, and 521 (23.81% were sensitive to all twelve different antibiotics used in this study. Ninety out of 2188 isolates produced amplicon(s of varying sizes from 0.15 to 3.45 KB. Chi-square (χ(2 test revealed that the possession of class 1 integron in sensitive, SAR and MAR is not equally probable at the 1% level of significance. Diverse antibiotic-resistance gene cassettes, aadA1, aadA2, aadA4, aadA5, dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, dfrA16, dfrA17, dfrA28, dfrA30, dfr-IIe, blaIMP-9, aacA4, Ac-6'-Ib, oxa1, oxa10 and arr2 were detected in 64 isolates. The novel cassettes encoding proteins unrelated to any known antibiotic resistance gene function were identified in 26 isolates. Antibiotic-sensitive isolates have a greater propensity to carry gene cassettes unrelated to known antibiotic-resistance genes. The integron-positive isolates under the class Betaproteobacteria comprised of only two genera, Comamonas and Acidovorax of family Comamonadaceae, while isolates under class Gammaproteobacteria fell under the families

  12. Tracking climate change in oligotrophic mountain lakes: Recent hydrology and productivity synergies in Lago de Sanabria (NW Iberian Peninsula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina-Enríquez, Margarita; Recio, Clemente; Vega, José Carlos; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2017-07-15

    Mountain lakes are particularly sensitive to global change as their oligotrophic conditions may be rapidly altered after reaching an ecological threshold, due to increasing human impact and climate change. Sanabria Lake, the largest mountain lake in the Iberian Peninsula and with a recent history of increased human impact in its watershed, provides an opportunity to investigate recent trends in an oligotrophic, hydrologically-open mountain lake, and their relationship with climate, hydrological variability and human pressure. We conducted the first systematic and detailed survey of stable isotope compositions of Sanabria Lake and Tera River together with limnological analyses during 2009-2011. δ 18 O lakewater and δD lakewater seasonal fluctuations are strongly linked to river discharges, and follow the monthly mean isotopic composition of precipitation, which is controlled by NAO dynamics. δ 13 C POM and δ 13 C DIC revealed higher contribution of allochthonous organic matter in winter and spring due to higher river inflow and lower primary productivity. Increased phytoplankton biomass in late summer correlated significantly with higher pH and Chl-a, and higher nutrient input and lower river inflow. However, the small δ 13 C POM seasonal amplitude underlines the stability of the oligotrophic conditions and the isotopic variation in POM and DIC reflect small seasonal fluctuations mostly as a consequence of strong throughflow. The stability of hydrology and productivity patterns is consistent with Holocene and last millennium reconstructions of past limnological changes in Sanabria Lake. The results of this study indicate that trophic state in this hydrologically-open mountain lake is strongly controlled by climate variability, but recent changes in human-land uses have increased sediment delivery and nutrients supply to the lake and have to be considered for management policies. Monitoring surveys including isotope techniques provide snapshots of modern isotope

  13. Filtering fens: Mechanisms explaining phosphorus-limited hotspots of biodiversity in wetlands adjacent to heavily fertilized areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cusell, C.; Kooijman, A.; Fernandez, F.; van Wirdum, G.; Geurts, J.J.M.; van Loon, E.E.; Kalbitz, K.; Lamers, L.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The conservation of biodiverse wetland vegetation, including that of rich fens, has a high priority at a global scale. Although P-eutrophication may strongly decrease biodiversity in rich fens, some well-developed habitats do still survive in highly fertilized regions due to nutrient filtering

  14. Changing Land Use: The Fens of England. A Case Study in Land Reclamation [And] Student Work Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Kevin

    A social studies unit and student workbook explore changes in land use that have occurred in the Fenlands of England since the time it was first inhabited. Fens are lowlying land which is partially or completely covered with water. The English Fens are located on the eastern side of the British Isles and cover a total area of about 2,000 square…

  15. Comparisons of soil nitrogen mass balances for an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian H. Hill; Terri M. Jicha; LaRae L.P. Lehto; Colleen M. Elonen; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Randy Kolka

    2016-01-01

    Wecompared nitrogen (N) storage and flux in soils froman ombrotrophic bogwith that of a minerotrophic fen to quantify the differences in N cycling between these two peatlands types in northernMinnesota (USA). Precipitation, atmospheric deposition, and bog and fen outflowswere analyzed for nitrogen species. Upland and peatland soil sampleswere analyzed for N content,...

  16. Fenóis totais, flavonoides totais e atividade antioxidante de Selaginella convoluta (Arn. Spring (Selaginellaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Guilherme Sousa de Sá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selaginella convoluta é uma espécie conhecida no Nordeste do Brasil como “jericó”, e bastante utilizada na medicina popular para tratamento de doenças. Este estudo teve como objetivo determinar o teor de compostos fenólicos e avaliar a atividade antioxidante in vitro do extrato etanólico e das frações obtidas por partição de S. convoluta. O conteúdo de fenóis totais foi determinado pelo método de Folin-Ciocalteu. O teor de flavonoides totais também foi avaliado. A atividade antioxidante dos extratos foi avaliada usando o método do sequestro do radical DPPH e inibição da auto-oxidação do sistema β-caroteno-ácido linoleico e comparada com os compostos de referência ácido ascórbico, BHA, BHT, quercetina e pirogalol. O conteúdo fenólico total foi de 209,90 ± 19,84 e 61,13 ± 2,50 mg equivalente de ácido gálico/g para os extratos AcOEt e EEB, respectivamente. O conteúdo de flavonoides totais foi de 155,70 ± 6,21 e 62,13 ± 4,10 para os dois extratos, respectivamente. Os extratos AcOEt e EEB apresentaram boas atividades antioxidantes. BHA foi o antioxidante mais efetivo, com um valor de IC50 de 1,62 ± 0,69 µg/mL. Os resultados obtidos mostram que S. convoluta pode ser uma boa fonte de compostos fenólicos antioxidantes. Estudos posteriores serão realizados para se chegar ao isolamento e identificação dos principais constituintes fenólicos dos extratos.

  17. Insects in IBL-4 pine weevil traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Skrzecz

    2003-01-01

    Pipe traps (IBL-4) are used in Polish coniferous plantations to monitor and control the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.). This study was conducted in a one-year old pine plantation established on a reforested clear-cut area in order to evaluate the impact of these traps on non-target insects. Evaluation of the catches indicated that species of

  18. Dynamics of whlte pine in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Leak; J.B. Cullen; Thomas S. Frieswyk

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of growth, regeneration, and quality changes for white pine between the 1970's and 1980's in the six-state New England region. Growth rates seemed comparable among ail states except Rhode Island, where the percentage of growth (1.71%) seemed low. Over all states, the proportion of acreage in seedling/sapling white pine stands averaged too low (8%) to...

  19. Diprionidae sawflies on lodgepole and ponderosa pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eight species of Diprionidae feed on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa) in western United States: Neodiprion burkei Middleton, N. annulus contortae Ross, N. autumnalis Smith, N. fulviceps (Cresson), N. gillettei (Rohwer), N. mundus Rohwer, N. ventralis Ross, and Zadi...

  20. High elevation white pines educational website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna W. Schoettle; Michele Laskowski

    2011-01-01

    The high elevation five-needle white pines are facing numerous challenges ranging from climate change to invasion by a non-native pathogen to escalation of pest outbreaks. This website (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/highelevationwhitepines/) serves as a primer for managers and the public on the high elevation North American five-needle pines. It presents information on each...

  1. Survey of microsatellite DNA in pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt

    1997-01-01

    A large insert genomic library from eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) was probed for the microsatellite motifs (AC)n and (AG)n, all 10 trinucleotide motifs, and 22 of the 33 possible tetranucleotide motifs. For comparison with a species from a different subgenus, a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) genomic...

  2. Risk Assessment for the Southern Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Birt

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) causes significant damage (tree mortality) to pine forests. Although this tree mortality has characteristic temporal and spatial patterns, the precise location and timing of damage is to some extent unpredictable. Consequently, although forest managers are able to identify stands that are predisposed to SPB damage, they are unable to...

  3. Grading sugar pine saw logs in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Henley

    1972-01-01

    Small limbs and small overgrown limbs cause problems when grading saw logs in sugar pine trees. Surface characteristics and lumber recovery information for 426 logs from 64 sugar pine trees were examined. Resulting modifications in the grading specification that allow a grader to ignore small limbs and small limb indicators do not appear to decrease the performance of...

  4. Specific growth rate plays a critical role in hydrogen peroxide resistance of the marine oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium Sphingomonas alaskensis strain RB2256

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostrowski, M; Cavicchioli, R; Gottschal, JC; Blaauw, Maarten

    The marine oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium Sphingomonas alaskensis RB2256 has a physiology that is distinctly different from that of typical copiotrophic marine bacteria, such as Vibrio angustum S14. This includes a high level of inherent stress resistance and the absence of starvation-induced

  5. Geographic variation in shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) - cortical monoterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Schmidtling; J.H. Myszewski; C.E. McDaniel

    2005-01-01

    Cortical monoterpenes were assayed in bud tissue from 16 Southwide Southern Pine Seed Source Study (SSPSS) sources and from 6 seed orchard sources fiom across the natural range of the species, to examine geogaphic variation in shortleaf pine. Spruce pine and pond pine were also sampled. The results show geographic differences in all of the major terpenes. There was no...

  6. State of pine decline in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori Eckhardt; Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Don Imm

    2010-01-01

    Pine decline is an emerging forest health issue in the southeastern United States. Observations suggest pine decline is caused by environmental stress arising from competition, weather, insects and fungi, anthropogenic disturbances, and previous management. The problem is most severe for loblolly pine on sites that historically supported longleaf pine, are highly...

  7. The health of loblolly pine stands at Fort Benning, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung-Ryoul Ryu; G. Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker

    2013-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) (RCW) groups at Fort Benning, GA, depend on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands for nesting or foraging. However, loblolly pine stands are suspected to decline. Forest managers want to replace loblolly pine with longleaf pine (P. palustris...

  8. Forest development and carbon dynamics after mountain pine beetle outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Matthew. Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Mountain pine beetles periodically infest pine forests in western North America, killing many or most overstory pine stems. The surviving secondary stand structure, along with recruited seedlings, will form the future canopy. Thus, even-aged pine stands become multiaged and multistoried. The species composition of affected stands will depend on the presence of nonpines...

  9. Biogeography and diversity of pines in the Madrean Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    George M. Ferguson; Aaron D. Flesch; Thomas R. Van Devender

    2013-01-01

    Pines are important dominants in pine-oak, pine and mixed-conifer forests across the Colorado Plateau, southern Rocky Mountains, Sierra Madre Occidental, and in the intervening Sky Islands of the United States-Mexico borderlands. All 17 native species of pines in the Sky Islands region or their adjacent mountain mainlands reach the northern or southern margins of their...

  10. Length Research Paper The effects of the pine processionary moth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pine processionary moth (PPM), causing significant damage on pine stands in Turkey, affects mainly crimean pine stands within the Ulus vicinity. To determine the damage, 20 sample plots of second site class crimean pine stands were measured; 10 of which were taken as the control sample and 10 of which were ...

  11. Evolutionary relationships of Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii ) with its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    llozymes in bud tissue and monoterpene contents in xylem oleoresin of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) were analyzed from populations across the natural distribution, as well as those from other species in the AUSTRALES pines. Allozyme diversity measures of slash pine were similar to those found in other southern pines.

  12. White pine blister rust resistance research in Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew David; Paul Berrang; Carrie Pike

    2012-01-01

    The exotic fungus Cronartium ribicola causes the disease white pine blister rust on five-needled pines throughout North America. Although the effects of this disease are perhaps better known on pines in the western portion of the continent, the disease has also impacted regeneration and growth of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L. ...

  13. White pine blister rust in the interior Mountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Burns; Jim Blodgett; Dave Conklin; Brian Geils; Jim Hoffman; Marcus Jackson; William Jacobi; Holly Kearns; Anna Schoettle

    2010-01-01

    White pine blister rust is an exotic, invasive disease of white, stone, and foxtail pines (also referred to as white pines or five-needle pines) in the genus Pinus and subgenus Strobus (Price and others 1998). Cronartium ribicola, the fungus that causes WPBR, requires an alternate host - currants and gooseberries in the genus Ribes and species of Pedicularis...

  14. Small molecule inhibitors uncover synthetic genetic interactions of human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 with DNA damage response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ward

    Full Text Available Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 is a structure selective endonuclease required for proficient DNA replication and the repair of DNA damage. Cellularly active inhibitors of this enzyme have previously been shown to induce a DNA damage response and, ultimately, cell death. High-throughput screens of human cancer cell-lines identify colorectal and gastric cell-lines with microsatellite instability (MSI as enriched for cellular sensitivity to N-hydroxyurea series inhibitors of FEN1, but not the PARP inhibitor olaparib or other inhibitors of the DNA damage response. This sensitivity is due to a synthetic lethal interaction between FEN1 and MRE11A, which is often mutated in MSI cancers through instabilities at a poly(T microsatellite repeat. Disruption of ATM is similarly synthetic lethal with FEN1 inhibition, suggesting that disruption of FEN1 function leads to the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. These are likely a result of the accumulation of aberrant replication forks, that accumulate as a consequence of a failure in Okazaki fragment maturation, as inhibition of FEN1 is toxic in cells disrupted for the Fanconi anemia pathway and post-replication repair. Furthermore, RAD51 foci accumulate as a consequence of FEN1 inhibition and the toxicity of FEN1 inhibitors increases in cells disrupted for the homologous recombination pathway, suggesting a role for homologous recombination in the resolution of damage induced by FEN1 inhibition. Finally, FEN1 appears to be required for the repair of damage induced by olaparib and cisplatin within the Fanconi anemia pathway, and may play a role in the repair of damage associated with its own disruption.

  15. Influence of ocean acidification and deep water upwelling on oligotrophic plankton communities in the subtropical North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taucher, Jan; Bach, Lennart T.; Boxhammer, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) causes pronounced shifts in marine carbonate chemistry and a decrease in seawater pH. Increasing evidence indicates that these changes-summarized by the term ocean acidification (OA)-can significantly affect marine food webs and biogeochemical...... cycles. However, current scientific knowledge is largely based on laboratory experiments with single species and artificial boundary conditions, whereas studies of natural plankton communities are still relatively rare. Moreover, the few existing community-level studies were mostly conducted in rather...... and successfully simulated a deep water upwelling event that induced a pronounced plankton bloom. Our study revealed significant effects of OA on the entire food web, leading to a restructuring of plankton communities that emerged during the oligotrophic phase, and was further amplified during the bloom...

  16. The most oligotrophic subtropical zones of the global ocean: similarities and differences in terms of chlorophyll and yellow substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Morel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cores of the subtropical anticyclonic gyres are characterized by their oligotrophic status and minimal chlorophyll concentration, compared to that of the whole ocean. These zones are unambiguously detected by space borne ocean color sensors thanks to their typical spectral reflectance, which is that of extremely clear and deep blue waters. Not only the low chlorophyll (denoted [Chl] level, but also a reduced amount of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM or "yellow substance" account for this clarity. The oligotrophic waters of the North and South Pacific gyres, the North and South Atlantic gyres, and the South Indian gyre have been comparatively studied with respect to both [Chl] and CDOM contents, by using 10-year data (1998–2007 of the Sea-viewing Wide field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, NASA. Albeit similar these oligotrophic zones are not identical regarding their [Chl] and CDOM contents, as well as their seasonal cycles. According to the zone, the averaged [Chl] value varies from 0.026 to 0.059 mg m−3, whereas the ay(443 average (the absorption coefficient due to CDOM at 443 nm is between 0.0033 and 0.0072 m−1. The CDOM-to-[Chl] relative proportions also differ between the zones. The clearest waters, corresponding to the lowest [Chl] and CDOM concentrations, are found near Easter Island and near Mariana Islands in the western part of the North Pacific Ocean. In spite of its low [Chl], the Sargasso Sea presents the highest CDOM content amongst the six zones studied. Except in the North Pacific gyre (near Mariana and south of Hawaii islands, a conspicuous seasonality appears to be the rule in the other 4 gyres and affects both [Chl] and CDOM; both quantities vary in a ratio of about 2 (maximum-to-minimum. Coinciding [Chl] and CDOM peaks occur just after the local winter solstice, which is also the period of the maximal mixed layer depth in these latitudes. It is hypothesized that the vertical

  17. Variable nutrient stoichiometry (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) across trophic levels determines community and ecosystem properties in an oligotrophic mangrove system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, U M; Ulanowicz, R E; Fogel, M L; Wooller, M J; Jacobson-Meyers, M E; Lovelock, C E; Feller, I C; Frischer, M; Lee, R; McKee, K; Romero, I C; Schmit, J P; Shearer, C

    2015-11-01

    Our study investigated the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of mangrove island of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Twin Cays, Belize). The C:N:P of abiotic and biotic components of this oligotrophic ecosystem was measured and served to build networks of nutrient flows for three distinct mangrove forest zones (tall seaward fringing forest, inland dwarf forests and a transitional zone). Between forest zones, the stoichiometry of primary producers, heterotrophs and abiotic components did not change significantly, but there was a significant difference in C:N:P, and C, N, and P biomass, between the functional groups mangrove trees, other primary producers, heterotrophs, and abiotic components. C:N:P decreased with increasing trophic level. Nutrient recycling in the food webs was highest for P, and high transfer efficiencies between trophic levels of P and N also indicated an overall shortage of these nutrients when compared to C. Heterotrophs were sometimes, but not always, limited by the same nutrient as the primary producers. Mangrove trees and the primary tree consumers were P limited, whereas the invertebrates consuming leaf litter and detritus were N limited. Most compartments were limited by P or N (not by C), and the relative depletion rate of food sources was fastest for P. P transfers thus constituted a bottleneck of nutrient transfer on Twin Cays. This is the first comprehensive ecosystem study of nutrient transfers in a mangrove ecosystem, illustrating some mechanisms (e.g. recycling rates, transfer efficiencies) which oligotrophic systems use in order to build up biomass and food webs spanning various trophic levels.

  18. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-Vega, Alex; Chong, Guillermo; Serrano, Antonio E; Guajardo, Mariela; Encalada, Olga; Parro, Victor; Blanco, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis; Rose, Kevin C; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Luque, José A; Cabrol, Nathalie A; Demergasso, Cecilia S

    2018-01-01

    Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others) affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity). We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively) and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP) represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes.

  19. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Echeverría-Vega

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity. We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes.

  20. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-Vega, Alex; Chong, Guillermo; Serrano, Antonio E.; Guajardo, Mariela; Encalada, Olga; Parro, Victor; Blanco, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis; Rose, Kevin C.; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Luque, José A.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Demergasso, Cecilia S.

    2018-01-01

    Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others) affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity). We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively) and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP) represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes. PMID:29556224

  1. Annual changes of bacterial mortality due to viruses and protists in an oligotrophic coastal environment (NW Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boras, Julia A; Sala, M Montserrat; Vázquez-Domínguez, Evaristo; Weinbauer, Markus G; Vaqué, Dolors

    2009-05-01

    The impact of viruses and protists on bacterioplankton mortality was examined monthly during 2 years (May 2005-April 2007) in an oligotrophic coastal environment (NW Mediterranean Sea). We expected that in such type of system, (i) bacterial losses would be caused mainly by protists, and (ii) lysogeny would be an important type of virus-host interaction. During the study period, viruses and grazers together were responsible for 50.6 +/- 40.1% day(-1) of bacterial standing stock losses (BSS) and 59.7 +/- 44.0% day(-1) of bacterial production losses (BP). Over the first year (May 2005-April 2006), protists were the principal cause of bacterial mortality, removing 29.9 +/- 20.4% day(-1) of BSS and 33.9 +/- 24.3% day(-1) of BP, whereas viral lysis removed 13.5 +/- 17.0% day(-1) of BSS and 12.3 +/- 12.3% day(-1) of BP. During the second year (May 2006-April 2007), viruses caused comparable bacterial losses (29.2 +/- 14.8% day(-1) of BSS and 40.9 +/- 20.7% day(-1) of BP) to protists (28.6 +/- 25.5% day(-1) of BSS and 32.4 +/- 20.0% day(-1) of BP). In 37% of cases higher losses of BP due to viruses than due to protists were found. Lysogenic infection was detected in 11 of 24 samplings. Contrary to our expectations, lytic infections dominated over the two years, and viruses resulted to be a significant source of bacterial mortality in this oligotrophic site.

  2. Variable nutrient stoichiometry (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) across trophic levels determines community and ecosystem properties in an oligotrophic mangrove system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, U.M.; Ulanowicz, Robert E.; Fogel, M.L.; Wooller, M.J.; Jacobson-Meyers, M.E.; Lovelock, C.E.; Feller, I.C.; Frischer, M.; Lee, R.; Mckee, Karen L.; Romero, I.C.; Schmit, J.P.; Shearer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Our study investigated the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of mangrove island of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Twin Cays, Belize). The C:N:P of abiotic and biotic components of this oligotrophic ecosystem was measured and served to build networks of nutrient flows for three distinct mangrove forest zones (tall seaward fringing forest, inland dwarf forests and a transitional zone). Between forest zones, the stoichiometry of primary producers, heterotrophs and abiotic components did not change significantly, but there was a significant difference in C:N:P, and C, N, and P biomass, between the functional groups mangrove trees, other primary producers, heterotrophs, and abiotic components. C:N:P decreased with increasing trophic level. Nutrient recycling in the food webs was highest for P, and high transfer efficiencies between trophic levels of P and N also indicated an overall shortage of these nutrients when compared to C. Heterotrophs were sometimes, but not always, limited by the same nutrient as the primary producers. Mangrove trees and the primary tree consumers were P limited, whereas the invertebrates consuming leaf litter and detritus were N limited. Most compartments were limited by P or N (not by C), and the relative depletion rate of food sources was fastest for P. P transfers thus constituted a bottleneck of nutrient transfer on Twin Cays. This is the first comprehensive ecosystem study of nutrient transfers in a mangrove ecosystem, illustrating some mechanisms (e.g. recycling rates, transfer efficiencies) which oligotrophic systems use in order to build up biomass and food webs spanning various trophic levels.

  3. Scientific designs of pine seeds and pine cones for species conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Reproduction and propagation of species are the most important missions of every living organism. For effective species propagation, pine cones fold their scales under wet condition to prevent seeds from short-distance dispersal. They open and release their embedded seeds on dry and windy days. In this study, the micro-/macro-scale structural characteristics of pine cones and pine seeds are studied using various imaging modalities. Since the scales of pine cones consist of dead cells, the folding motion is deeply related to structural changes. The scales of pine cones consist of three layers. Among them, bract scales are only involved in collecting water. This makes pine cones reduce the amount of water and minimize the time spent on structural changes. These systems also involve in drying and recovery of pine cones. In addition, pine cones and pine seeds have advantageous structures for long-distance dispersal and response to natural disaster. Owing to these structural features, pine seeds can be released safely and efficiently, and these types of structural advantages could be mimicked for practical applications. This research was financially supported by the Creative Research Initiative of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) and the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea (Contract grant number: 2008-0061991).

  4. Non-Ribes alternate hosts of white pine blister rust: What this discovery means to whitebark pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul J. Zambino; Bryce A. Richardson; Geral I. McDonald; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook. Kim

    2006-01-01

    From early to present-day outbreaks, white pine blister rust caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola, in combination with mountain pine beetle outbreaks and fire exclusion has caused ecosystem-wide effects for all five-needled pines (McDonald and Hoff 2001). To be successful, efforts to restore whitebark pine will require sound management decisions that incorporate an...

  5. Hybridization in naturally regenerated shortleaf pine as affected by the distance to nearby artificially regenerated stands of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Stewart; Charles G. Tauer; James M. Guldin; C. Dana Nelson

    2013-01-01

    The natural range of shortleaf pine encompasses 22 states from New York to Texas, second only to eastern white pine in the eastern United States. It is a species of minor and varying occurrence in most of these states usually found in association with other pines, but it is the only naturally occurring pine in the northwestern part of its range in Oklahoma, Arkansas,...

  6. Hybridization Leads to Loss of Genetic Integrity in Shortleaf Pine: Unexpected Consequences of Pine Management and Fire Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Tauer; John F. Stewart; Rodney E. Will; Curtis J. Lilly; James M. Guldin; C. Dana Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization between shortleaf pine and loblolly pine is causing loss of genetic integrity (the tendency of a population to maintain its genotypes over generations) in shortleaf pine, a species already exhibiting dramatic declines due to land-use changes. Recent findings indicate hybridization has increased in shortleaf pine stands from 3% during the 1950s to 45% for...

  7. Regeneration of Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) three decades after stand-replacing fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan D. Coop; Anna W. Schoettle

    2009-01-01

    Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) are important highelevation pines of the southern Rockies that are forecast to decline due to the recent spread of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) into this region. Proactive management strategies to promote the evolution of rust resistance and maintain ecosystem function...

  8. Microbial ecology in a future climate: effects of temperature and moisture on microbial communities of two boreal fens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, Krista; Laiho, Raija; Juottonen, Heli; Kiikkilä, Oili; Mäkiranta, Päivi; Minkkinen, Kari; Pennanen, Taina; Penttilä, Timo; Sarjala, Tytti; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Tuomivirta, Tero; Fritze, Hannu

    2015-07-01

    Impacts of warming with open-top chambers on microbial communities in wet conditions and in conditions resulting from moderate water-level drawdown (WLD) were studied across 0-50 cm depth in northern and southern boreal sedge fens. Warming alone decreased microbial biomass especially in the northern fen. Impact of warming on microbial PLFA and fungal ITS composition was more obvious in the northern fen and linked to moisture regime and sample depth. Fungal-specific PLFA increased in the surface peat in the drier regime and decreased in layers below 10 cm in the wet regime after warming. OTUs representing Tomentella and Lactarius were observed in drier regime and Mortierella in wet regime after warming in the northern fen. The ectomycorrhizal fungi responded only to WLD. Interestingly, warming together with WLD decreased archaeal 16S rRNA copy numbers in general, and fungal ITS copy numbers in the northern fen. Expectedly, many results indicated that microbial response on warming may be linked to the moisture regime. Results indicated that microbial community in the northern fen representing Arctic soils would be more sensitive to environmental changes. The response to future climate change clearly may vary even within a habitat type, exemplified here by boreal sedge fen. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Missed cleavage opportunities by FEN1 lead to Okazaki fragment maturation via the long-flap pathway

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2018-01-27

    RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by low fidelity DNA polymerase α to initiate eukaryotic lagging strand synthesis must be removed efficiently during Okazaki fragment (OF) maturation to complete DNA replication. In this process, each OF primer is displaced and the resulting 5\\'-single-stranded flap is cleaved by structure-specific 5\\'-nucleases, mainly Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1), to generate a ligatable nick. At least two models have been proposed to describe primer removal, namely short- and long-flap pathways that involve FEN1 or FEN1 along with Replication Protein A (RPA) and Dna2 helicase/nuclease, respectively. We addressed the question of pathway choice by studying the kinetic mechanism of FEN1 action on short- and long-flap DNA substrates. Using single molecule FRET and rapid quench-flow bulk cleavage assays, we showed that unlike short-flap substrates, which are bound, bent and cleaved within the first encounter between FEN1 and DNA, long-flap substrates can escape cleavage even after DNA binding and bending. Notably, FEN1 can access both substrates in the presence of RPA, but bending and cleavage of long-flap DNA is specifically inhibited. We propose that FEN1 attempts to process both short and long flaps, but occasional missed cleavage of the latter allows RPA binding and triggers the long-flap OF maturation pathway.

  10. Missed cleavage opportunities by FEN1 lead to Okazaki fragment maturation via the long-flap pathway

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.; Rashid, Fahad; Song, Bo; Joudeh, Luay I; Sobhy, Mohamed Abdelmaboud; Tehseen, Muhammad; Hingorani, Manju M; Hamdan, Samir

    2018-01-01

    RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by low fidelity DNA polymerase α to initiate eukaryotic lagging strand synthesis must be removed efficiently during Okazaki fragment (OF) maturation to complete DNA replication. In this process, each OF primer is displaced and the resulting 5'-single-stranded flap is cleaved by structure-specific 5'-nucleases, mainly Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1), to generate a ligatable nick. At least two models have been proposed to describe primer removal, namely short- and long-flap pathways that involve FEN1 or FEN1 along with Replication Protein A (RPA) and Dna2 helicase/nuclease, respectively. We addressed the question of pathway choice by studying the kinetic mechanism of FEN1 action on short- and long-flap DNA substrates. Using single molecule FRET and rapid quench-flow bulk cleavage assays, we showed that unlike short-flap substrates, which are bound, bent and cleaved within the first encounter between FEN1 and DNA, long-flap substrates can escape cleavage even after DNA binding and bending. Notably, FEN1 can access both substrates in the presence of RPA, but bending and cleavage of long-flap DNA is specifically inhibited. We propose that FEN1 attempts to process both short and long flaps, but occasional missed cleavage of the latter allows RPA binding and triggers the long-flap OF maturation pathway.

  11. Damage by pathogens and insects to Scots pine and lodgepole pine 25 years after reciprocal plantings in Canada and Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Anders

    2017-01-01

    A combined species - provenance - family experiment with Scots pine and lodgepole pine was planted in Canada and Sweden. One aim of the experiment was to evaluate the two species' sensitivities to pathogens and insects 25 years after establishment in their non-native continents. In Canada, Scots pine had better average survival than lodgepole pine, but survival rates among trees from the best seed-lots were equal. In Canada only western gall rust infected Scots pine to some extent, and mounta...

  12. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. Results We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. Conclusion In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine. PMID:23679205

  13. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E; Yuen, Macaire M S; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet K; Li, Maria; Henderson, Hannah; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Liao, Nancy Y; Docking, Roderick T; Chan, Simon K; Cooke, Janice Ek; Breuil, Colette; Jones, Steven Jm; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-05-16

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine.

  14. Compostos fenólicos totais e antocianinas em suco de uva

    OpenAIRE

    Malacrida,Cassia R.; Motta,Silvana da

    2005-01-01

    As concentrações de compostos fenólicos totais e antocianinas em sucos de uva reconstituídos e simples, de diferentes marcas, disponíveis no comércio varejista da região metropolitana de Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais) foram quantificadas. Também se determinou a contribuição das antocianinas poliméricas à cor e o índice de degradação das antocianinas. Os teores de compostos fenólicos totais variaram entre 0,27 e 2,41 g/L e as concentrações de antocianinas de 1,17 a 66,80 mg/L. Foram observadas ...

  15. Net ecosystem exchange in a sedge-sphagnum fen at the South of West Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyukarev, Egor

    2017-04-01

    The model of net ecosystem exchange was used to study the influence of different environmental factors and to calculate daily and growing season carbon budget for minerotrophic fen at South of West Siberia, Russia. Minerotrophic sedge-sphagnum fen occupies the central part of the Bakcharskoe bog. The model uses air and soil temperature, incoming photosynthetically active radiation, and leaf area index as the explanatory factors for gross primary production, heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration. The model coefficients were calibrated using data collected by automated soil CO2 flux system with clear long-term chamber. The studied ecosystem is a sink of carbon according to modelling and observation results. This study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Researches (grant numbers 16-07-01205 and 16-45-700562.

  16. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order ferromagnetically in agreement with experiment. We establish the dynamics and time scale of the film formation as a function of the film thickness. The process is split in two phases: formation of almost flat FeN layers and optimization of the distance to the substrate. Our calculated magnetic moments are 1.67 μ B, 2.14 μ B, and 2.21 μ B for one, two, and three monolayers of iron nitride. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Southern pine beetle in loblolly pine: simulating within stand interactions using the process model SPBLOBTHIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Strom; J. R. Meeker; J. Bishir; James Roberds; X. Wan

    2016-01-01

    Pine stand density is a key determinant of damage resulting from attacks by the southern pine beetle (SPB, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). High-density stands of maturing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) are at high risk for losses to SPB, and reducing stand density is the primary tool available to forest managers for preventing and mitigating damage. Field studies are...

  18. Impact of a Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak on Young Lodgepole Pine Stands in Central British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Amalesh; Balliet, Nicole; Runzer, Kyle; Hawkins, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The current mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonous ponderosae Hopkins) epidemic has severely affected pine forests of Western Canada and killed millions of hectares of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) forest. Generally, MPB attack larger and older (diameter > 20 cm or >60 years of age) trees, but the current epidemic extends this limit with attacks on even younger and smaller trees. The study’s aim was to investigate the extent of MPB attack in y...

  19. Hybrid pine for tough sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    A test planting of 30 first- and second-generation pitch x loblolly pine (pinus rigida x P. taeda) hybrids was established on a West Virginia minesoil in 1985. The site was considered orphaned because earlier attempts at revegetation were unsuccessful. The soil was acid (pH 4.6), lacking in nutrients, and compacted. Vegetation present at the time of planting consisted of a sparse cover of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and poverty grass (Danthonia spicata) and a few sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum) and mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) seedlings. In the planting trial, 30 different hybrids were set out in 4 tree linear plots replicated 5 times. The seedlings had been grown in containers for 1 yr before outplanting. Evaluations made after 6 growing seasons showed overall plantation survival was 93%; six hybrids and one open-pollinated cross survived 100%. Individual tree heights ranged from 50 to 425 cm with a plantation average of 235 cm (7.7 ft). Eleven of the hybrids had average heights that exceeded the plantation average. Another test planting of tree and shrub species on this site has very poor survival. Therefore, pitch x loblolly hybrid pine can be recommended for reclaiming this and similar sites

  20. Leaf-litter microfungal community on poor fen plant debris in Torfy Lake area (Central Poland)

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Wilk; Agnieszka Banach; Julia Pawłowska; Marta Wrzosek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to initially evaluate the species diversity of microfungi growing on litter of 15 plant species occurring on the poor fen and neighbouring area of the Torfy Lake, Masovian voivodeship, Poland. The lake is located near the planned road investment (construction of the Warsaw southern express ring road S2). The place is biologically valuable as there are rare plant communities from Rhynchosporion albae alliance protected under the Habitats Directive adopted by the E...

  1. Fen ecohydrologic trajectories in response to groundwater drawdown with edaphic, floristic, and hydrologic feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, E.; Steven, L. I.; Bart, D.

    2017-12-01

    Calcareous fens are unique and often isolated ecosystems of high conservation value worldwide because they provide habitat for many rare plant and animal species. Their identity is inextricably linked to an absolute dependence on a consistent discharge of groundwater that saturates the near surface for most of the growing season leading to the accumulation of carbon as peat or tufa and sequestration of nutrients. The stresses resulting from consistent saturation and low-nutrient availability result in high native plant diversity including very high rare species richness compared to other ecosystems. Decreases in the saturation stress by reduced groundwater inputs (e.g., from nearby pumping) can result in losses of native diversity, decreases in rare-species abundance, and increased invasion by non-native species. As such, fen ecosystems are particularly susceptible to changes in groundwater conditions including reduction in water levels due to nearby groundwater pumping. Trajectories of degradation are complex due to feedbacks between loss of soil organic carbon, changes in soil properties, and plant water use. We present a model of an archetype fen that couples a hydrological niche model with a variably-saturated groundwater flow model to predict changes in vegetation composition in response to different groundwater drawdown scenarios (step change, declining trend, and periodic drawdown during dry periods). The model also includes feedbacks among vegetation composition, plant water use, and soil properties. The hydrological niche models (using surface soil moisture as predictor) and relationships between vegetation composition, plant water use (via stomatal conductance and leaf-area index), and soil hydraulic properties (van Genuchten parameters) were determined based on data collected from six fens in Wisconsin under various states of degradation. Results reveal a complex response to drawdown and provide insight into other ecosystems with linkages between the

  2. Mountain pine beetle infestation of lodgepole pine in areas of water diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Sharon L; Anthamatten, Peter J; Bruederle, Leo P; Barbour, Jon M; Chambers, Frederick B

    2014-06-15

    The Rocky Mountains have experienced extensive infestations from the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins), affecting numerous pine tree species including lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia). Water diversions throughout the Rocky Mountains transport large volumes of water out of the basins of origin, resulting in hydrologic modifications to downstream areas. This study examines the hypothesis that lodgepole pine located below water diversions exhibit an increased incidence of mountain pine beetle infestation and mortality. A ground survey verified diversion structures in a portion of Grand County, Colorado, and sampling plots were established around two types of diversion structures, canals and dams. Field studies assessed mountain pine beetle infestation. Lodgepole pines below diversions show 45.1% higher attack and 38.5% higher mortality than lodgepole pines above diversions. These findings suggest that water diversions are associated with increased infestation and mortality of lodgepole pines in the basins of extraction, with implications for forest and water allocation management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lodgepole Pine Wood Chips Affected by the Mountain Pine Beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwig Peemoeller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wood-water interactions of mountain pine beetle affected lodgepole pine were found to vary with time since death. Based on an analysis of magnetization components and spin-spin relaxation times from 1H NMR, it was determined that the mountain pine beetle attack does not affect the crystalline structure of the wood. Both the amorphous structure and the water components vary with time since death, which could be due to the fungi present after a mountain pine beetle attack, as well as the fact that wood from the grey-stage of attack cycles seasonally through adsorption and desorption in the stand.

  4. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lodgepole Pine Wood Chips Affected by the Mountain Pine Beetle

    OpenAIRE

    Todoruk, Tara M.; Hartley, Ian D.; Teymoori, Roshanak; Liang, Jianzhen; Peemoeller, Hartwig

    2010-01-01

    In this study, wood-water interactions of mountain pine beetle affected lodgepole pine were found to vary with time since death. Based on an analysis of magnetization components and spin-spin relaxation times from 1H NMR, it was determined that the mountain pine beetle attack does not affect the crystalline structure of the wood. Both the amorphous structure and the water components vary with time since death, which could be due to the fungi present after a mountain pine beetle attack, as wel...

  5. Annual cycle of methane emission from a boreal fen measured by the eddy covariance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, Janne.; Pihlatie, Mari; Haapanala, Sami; Vesala, Timo; Riutta, Terhi; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aurela, Mika; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    The northern wetlands are one of the major sources of methane into the atmosphere. We measured annual methane emission from a boreal minerotrophic fen, Siikaneva, by the eddy covariance method. The average wintertime emissions were below 1 mg/m 2 /h, and the summertime emissions about 3.5 mg/m 2 /h. The water table depth did have any clear effect on methane emissions. During most of the year the emission depended on the temperature of peat below the water table. However, during the high and late summer the emission was independent on peat temperature as well. No diurnal cycle of methane flux was found. The total annual emission from the Siikaneva site was 12.6 g/m 2 . The emissions of the snow free period contributed 91% to the annual emission. The emission pulse during the snow melting period was clearly detectable but of minor importance adding only less than 3% to the annual emission. Over 20% of the carbon assimilated during the year as carbon dioxide was emitted as methane. Thus methane emission is an important component of the carbon balance of the Siikaneva fen. This indicates need of taking methane into account when studying carbon balances of northern fen ecosystems

  6. Restoring sedges and mosses into frost heaving iron fens, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Chimner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rare iron fens in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado are frequently in poor condition due to mining, roads and ditches, which have left much of the fen completely bare of vegetation. Natural revegetation is slow to occur in the bare areas because of severe frost heave in the cold mountain climate. Therefore, experimental revegetation plots were conducted in a factorial design with mulching and no mulching, crossed with moss diaspores, sedge transplants, and moss and sedge combined. Mulching influenced surface soil temperatures by reducing the midday highs and increasing the night-time lows, which decreased the frequency and amount of frost heave. Peat moisture also modified frost heave, with the greatest frost heaving occurring near 75 % peat moisture content (water table 10–20 cm below the surface and the least when soils were either wetter or drier. Moss survival was dependent on mulch, with no moss surviving in plots without mulch. Mulching also increased sedge transplant survival. In summary, mulching significantly increased the success of vegetation restoration efforts for frost heave areas in mountain fens.

  7. El concepto de fenómeno en el joven Heidegger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco De Lara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo es una discusión del concepto de fenómeno tal y como éste se encuentra determinado en la filosofía del joven Heidegger. Con ella se pretende ir a la base que permite dilucidar en qué sentido hace éste fenomenología o, en otras palabras, qué idea de filosofía se encuentra expresada bajo el título de hermenéutica fenomenológica. Al hilo de la lectura del concepto de fenómeno como concepto filosófico, esto es, como indicación formal, nos preguntaremos: 1 cómo se toma en consideración lo investigado fenomenológicamente; 2 cómo debe comparecer lo así investigado y 3 si, en efecto, el concepto de fenómeno funciona siempre en Heidegger como una indicación formal o si no puede constatarse en él una cierta ambigüedad.

  8. Low offspring survival in mountain pine beetle infesting the resistant Great Basin bristlecone pine supports the preference-performance hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Eidson

    Full Text Available The preference-performance hypothesis states that ovipositing phytophagous insects will select host plants that are well-suited for their offspring and avoid host plants that do not support offspring performance (survival, development and fitness. The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, a native insect herbivore in western North America, can successfully attack and reproduce in most species of Pinus throughout its native range. However, mountain pine beetles avoid attacking Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva, despite recent climate-driven increases in mountain pine beetle populations at the high elevations where Great Basin bristlecone pine grows. Low preference for a potential host plant species may not persist if the plant supports favorable insect offspring performance, and Great Basin bristlecone pine suitability for mountain pine beetle offspring performance is unclear. We infested cut bolts of Great Basin bristlecone pine and two susceptible host tree species, limber (P. flexilis and lodgepole (P. contorta pines with adult mountain pine beetles and compared offspring performance. To investigate the potential for variation in offspring performance among mountain pine beetles from different areas, we tested beetles from geographically-separated populations within and outside the current range of Great Basin bristlecone pine. Although mountain pine beetles constructed galleries and laid viable eggs in all three tree species, extremely few offspring emerged from Great Basin bristlecone pine, regardless of the beetle population. Our observed low offspring performance in Great Basin bristlecone pine corresponds with previously documented low mountain pine beetle attack preference. A low preference-low performance relationship suggests that Great Basin bristlecone pine resistance to mountain pine beetle is likely to be retained through climate-driven high-elevation mountain pine beetle outbreaks.

  9. Fenólicos totais e capacidade antioxidante in vitro de polpas de frutos tropicais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanne Morais Vieira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O consumo de frutos e suas polpas tem sido muito recomendado por seu valor nutricional, alto teor de fibras, vitamina C e carotenoides. Trabalhos recentes têm apontado esses alimentos como fontes de compostos fenólicos com ação antioxidante, portanto sequestradores de radicais livres, com ação protetora contra o surgimento e/ou desenvolvimento de processos degenerativos que conduzem a doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. Devido à crescente comercialização e consumo de polpas de frutas no Brasil, especialmente na cidade de Teresina-Piauí, este trabalho selecionou um grupo de polpas de frutos de elevado consumo local para avaliação do teor de fenólicos totais e da atividade antioxidante in vitro pelo método de captura de radicais livres: DPPH (radical 1,1-diphenil-2-picrilhydrazil e ABTS (radical 2,2'azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid. Os frutos selecionados foram: Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC., Bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart., Cajá (Spondias mombin L., Caju (Anacardium occidentale, Goiaba(Psidium guajava e Tamarindo (Tamarindus indica L.. Os teores de fenólicos totais encontrados nas polpascongeladas destes frutos exibiram quantidades relevantes de polifenóis, destacando-se a polpa de acerola com 835,25 ± 32,44 e 449,63 ± 10,24 mg /100g nos extratos aquosos e hidroalcoólicos, respectivamente, seguido pela polpa de caju com 201,61 ± 19,15 e 165,07 ± 4,10 mg /100g. As polpas de bacuri e tamarindo foram as que apresentaram os menores teores de fenólicos totais. Com relação à atividade antioxidante in vitro, os melhores resultados foram encontrados para os extratos aquosos e hidroalcoólicos das polpas de acerola, caju e goiaba. A capacidade antioxidante destas polpas (EC50 em µg/mL variou de 24,42 a 413,36 e de 1,74 a 259,18 para os extratos aquosos e hidroalcoólicos, respectivamente. Utilizando o radical ABTS, a atividade antioxidante para essas mesmas polpas de frutas apresentou valores TEAC que

  10. TBT recommends : Courtney Pine. Hansa disco night

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Inglise jazzsaksofonisti Courtney Pine heliplaadi "Resistance" esitluskontserdist 15. dets. Rock Cafés Tallinnas. Inglise laulja Chris Norman läti ansamblitega üritusel "Hansa disco night Nr.4" 9. dets. Kipsala Hallis Riias

  11. Predictions of fire behavior and resistance to control: for use with photo series for the ponderosa pine type, ponderosa pine and associated species type, and lodgepole pine type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin R. Ward; David V. Sandberg

    1981-01-01

    This publication presents tables on the behavior of fire and the resistance of fuels to control. The information is to be used with the publication, "Photo Series for Quantifying Forest Residues in the Ponderosa Pine Type, Ponderosa Pine and Associated Species Type, Lodgepole Pine Type" (Maxwell, Wayne G.; Ward, Franklin R. 1976. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-052....

  12. Fenómenos mixtos en la división neurosis y psicosis: un estudio de las elaboraciones freudianas

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Javier

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo aborda algunos desarrollos freudianos referidos a la división neurosis y psicosis. El análisis se centra en la hipótesis referida a la existencia de fenómenos mixtos, neuróticos y psicóticos, o sea, fenómenos que se presentarían de una misma manera en su articulación en ambas categorías. Se concluye que la expresión “fenómenos mixtos” no es adecuada, en la medida que Freud aborda el fenómeno siempre de una manera articulada y no de una manera aislada, es decir, la caracter...

  13. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Pujari, Bhalchandra S.; Bhandary, Sumanta; Cossu, Fabrizio; Eriksson, Olle; Kanhere, Dilip G.; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations

  14. Determination of natural organic matter and iron binding capacity in fen samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Stefan; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Frieder Mohr, Jan; Wichard, Thomas; Küsel, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in ecosystem processes such as soil carbon stabilization, nutrient availability and metal complexation. Iron-NOM-complexes, for example, are known to increase the solubility and, as a result, the bioavailability of iron in natural environments leading to several effects on the microbial community. Due to the various functions of NOM in natural environments, there is a high level of interest in the characterization of the molecular composition. The complexity of NOM presents a significant challenge in the elucidation of its composition. However, the development and utilization of high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) as a tool to detect single compounds in complex samples has spearheaded the effort to elucidate the composition of NOM. Over the past years, the accuracy of ion cyclotron- or Orbitrap mass spectrometers has increased dramatically resulting in the possibility to obtain a mass differentiation of the large number of compounds in NOM. Together these tools provide significant and powerful insight into the molecular composition of NOM. In the current study, we aim to understand abiotic and biotic interactions between NOM and metals, such as iron, found in the Schlöppnerbrunnen fen (Fichtelgebirge, Germany) and how these interactions impact the microbial consortia. We characterized the dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as basic chemical parameters in the iron-rich (up to 20 mg (g wt peat)-1), slightly acidic (pH 4.8) fen to gain more information about DOM-metal interactions. This minerotrophic peatland connected to the groundwater has received Fe(II) released from the surrounding soils in the Lehstenbach catchment. Absorption spectroscopy (AAS), differential pulse polarography (DPP) and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-Orbitrap-MS) was applied to characterize the molecular composition of DOM in the peat water extract (PWE). We identified typical patterns for DOM

  15. Comparative Transcriptomics Among Four White Pine Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan A. G. Baker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Conifers are the dominant plant species throughout the high latitude boreal forests as well as some lower latitude temperate forests of North America, Europe, and Asia. As such, they play an integral economic and ecological role across much of the world. This study focused on the characterization of needle transcriptomes from four ecologically important and understudied North American white pines within the Pinus subgenus Strobus. The populations of many Strobus species are challenged by native and introduced pathogens, native insects, and abiotic factors. RNA from the needles of western white pine (Pinus monticola, limber pine (Pinus flexilis, whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis, and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana was sampled, Illumina short read sequenced, and de novo assembled. The assembled transcripts and their subsequent structural and functional annotations were processed through custom pipelines to contend with the challenges of non-model organism transcriptome validation. Orthologous gene family analysis of over 58,000 translated transcripts, implemented through Tribe-MCL, estimated the shared and unique gene space among the four species. This revealed 2025 conserved gene families, of which 408 were aligned to estimate levels of divergence and reveal patterns of selection. Specific candidate genes previously associated with drought tolerance and white pine blister rust resistance in conifers were investigated.

  16. Primary marine aerosol emissions from the Mediterranean Sea during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions: correlations to seawater chlorophyll a from a mesocosm study

    OpenAIRE

    Schwier , A. N.; Rose , C.; Asmi , E.; Ebling , A. M.; Landing , W. M.; Marro , S.; Pedrotti , M.-L.; Sallon , A.; Iuculano , F.; Agusti , S.; Tsiola , A.; Pitta , P.; Louis , J.; Guieu , C.; Gazeau , F.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ocean acidification and changing water conditions on primary (and secondary) marine aerosol emissions is not well understood on a regional or a global scale. To investigate this effect as well as the indirect effect on aerosol that changing biogeochemical parameters can have, ~ 52 m3 pelagic mesocosms were deployed for several weeks in the Mediterranean Sea during both winter pre-bloom and summer oligotrophic conditions and were subjected to various levels of C...

  17. A multiple antibiotic and serum resistant oligotrophic strain, Klebsiella pneumoniae MB45 having novel dfrA30, is sensitive to ZnO QDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Pinak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe a novel trimethoprim resistance gene cassette, designated dfrA30, within a class 1 integron in a facultatively oligotrophic, multiple antibiotic and human serum resistant test strain, MB45, in a population of oligotrophic bacteria isolated from the river Mahananda; and to test the efficiency of surface bound acetate on zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO QDs as bactericidal agent on MB45. Methods Diluted Luria broth/Agar (10-3 media was used to cultivate the oligotrophic bacteria from water sample. Multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria were selected by employing replica plate method. A rapid assay was performed to determine the sensitivity/resistance of the test strain to human serum. Variable region of class 1 integron was cloned, sequenced and the expression of gene coding for antibiotic resistance was done in Escherichia coli JM 109. Identity of culture was determined by biochemical phenotyping and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on representative trimethoprim resistance-mediating DfrA proteins retrieved from GenBank. Growth kinetic studies for the strain MB45 were performed in presence of varied concentrations of ZnO QDs. Results and conclusions The facultatively oligotrophic strain, MB45, resistant to human serum and ten antibiotics trimethoprim, cotrimoxazole, ampicillin, gentamycin, netilmicin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, cefotaxime, kanamycin and streptomycin, has been identified as a new strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A novel dfr gene, designated as dfrA30, found integrated in class 1 integron was responsible for resistance to trimethoprim in Klebsiella pneumoniae strain MB45. The growth of wild strain MB45 was 100% arrested at 500 mg/L concentration of ZnO QDs. To our knowledge this is the first report on application of ZnO quantum dots to kill multiple antibiotics and serum resistant K. pneumoniae strain.

  18. Response of benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods index to different perturbations in coastal oligotrophic areas (Canary archipelago, North East Atlantic Ocean)

    OpenAIRE

    Riera, Rodrigo; de-la-Ossa-Carretero, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Oligotrophic areas harbour low macrofaunal abundance and patchy distribution. In these areas it is necessary to test the reliability of biological indicators, especially those based on taxonomic sufficiency where the level of identification is balanced against the need for ecological information and could affect the efficiency of bioindicators. The BOPA (benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods) index was applied in five coastal areas subjected to different perturbations (aquaculture, ...

  19. Identification of human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) inhibitors using a machine learning based consensus virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Amit Laxmikant; Chandra, Sharat; Singh, Deependra Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Banerjee, Dibyendu

    2017-07-25

    Human Flap endonuclease1 (FEN1) is an enzyme that is indispensable for DNA replication and repair processes and inhibition of its Flap cleavage activity results in increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents (cisplatin, temozolomide, MMS, etc.), with the potential to improve cancer prognosis. Reports of the high expression levels of FEN1 in several cancer cells support the idea that FEN1 inhibitors may target cancer cells with minimum side effects to normal cells. In this study, we used large publicly available, high-throughput screening data of small molecule compounds targeted against FEN1. Two machine learning algorithms, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Random Forest (RF), were utilized to generate four classification models from huge PubChem bioassay data containing probable FEN1 inhibitors and non-inhibitors. We also investigated the influence of randomly selected Zinc-database compounds as negative data on the outcome of classification modelling. The results show that the SVM model with inactive compounds was superior to RF with Matthews's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.67 for the test set. A Maybridge database containing approximately 53 000 compounds was screened and top ranking 5 compounds were selected for enzyme and cell-based in vitro screening. The compound JFD00950 was identified as a novel FEN1 inhibitor with in vitro inhibition of flap cleavage activity as well as cytotoxic activity against a colon cancer cell line, DLD-1.

  20. Design, construction and performance of an experimental watershed to support a fen peatland for mine landscape reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. S.; Petrone, R. M.; Strack, M.; Cooper, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    In the Alberta oil sands region, fen peatlands comprised 50% of the boreal landscape. Oil sands mining has stripped over 800 km2 of land surface to access bitumen, necessitating landscape reclamation to re-establish functional wetlands. Fens are peat-dominated wetlands that commonly rely on groundwater to supplement their water budget and deliver dissolved solutes that impart a distinct geochemistry, hence vegetation community. A numerical model was used to test the concept and guide selection of earth materials and system geometry. The goal was to maintain the placed peat in a sufficiently wet condition to support wetland plants and become a net carbon sink, in this sub-humid climate. The 32.1 ha Nikanotee Fen Watershed comprises a 7.7 ha upland, that was designed to recharge sufficient water, and deliver it to the 2.9 ha fen via groundwater flow. These features are surrounded by other reclaimed slopes designed to store water, rather than deliver it downslope. Four years of monitoring since construction show the fen maintains a high water table, and the peatland has become a strong carbon sink, even though the hydrological performance of construction materials varied substantially from what was anticipated (lower hydraulic conductivity). However, solutes associated with the tailings sand used in construction are moving towards the fen, and are expected to influence the future vegetation community and system biogeochemistry. One of the biggest uncertainties is the changing performance of soils and vegetation as they develop.

  1. Large-scale thinning, ponderosa pine, and mountain pine beetle in the Black Hills, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Kurt K. Allen; Angie Ambourn; Blaine Cook; Kenneth Marchand

    2017-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) (MPB), can cause extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) mortality in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA. Lower tree densities have been associated with reduced MPB-caused tree mortality, but few studies have reported on large-scale thinning and most data come from small plots that...

  2. Mountain pine beetle attack alters the chemistry and flammability of lodgepole pine foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley G. Page; Michael J. Jenkins; Justin B. Runyon

    2012-01-01

    During periods with epidemic mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) populations in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) forests, large amounts of tree foliage are thought to undergo changes in moisture content and chemistry brought about by tree decline and death. However, many of the presumed changes have yet to be...

  3. Is lodgepole pine mortality due to mountain pine beetle linked to the North American Monsoon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara A. Goeking; Greg C. Liknes

    2012-01-01

    Regional precipitation patterns may have influenced the spatial variability of tree mortality during the recent mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa) (MPB) outbreak in the western United States. Data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program show that the outbreak was especially severe in the state of Colorado where over 10 million lodgepole pines (...

  4. Strong partial resistance to white pine blister rust in sugar pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch, Jr.; Deems Burton; Dean A. Davis; Robert D. Westfall; Joan Dunlap; Detlev Vogler

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative resistance to white pine blister rust in 128 controlled- and open-pollinated sugar pine families was evaluated in a “disease garden”, where alternate host Ribes bushes were interplanted among test progenies. Overall infection was severe (88%), but with great variation among and within families: a 30-fold range in numbers of infections...

  5. Silvicultural Considerations in Managing Southern Pine Stands in the Context of Southern Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin

    2011-01-01

    Roughly 30 percent of the 200 million acres of forest land in the South supports stands dominated by southern pines. These are among the most productive forests in the nation. Adapted to disturbance, southern pines are relatively easy to manage with even-aged methods such as clearcutting and planting, or the seed tree and shelterwood methods with natural regeneration....

  6. Dose-dependent pheromone responses of mountain pine beetle in stands of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; B. Staffan Lindgren; John H. Borden

    2005-01-01

    We conducted seven behavioral choice tests with Lindgren multiple-funnel traps in stands of mature lodgepole pine in British Columbia, from 1988 to 1994, to determine the dosedependent responses of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, to its pheromones. Amultifunctional dose-dependent response was exhibited by D. ...

  7. Insect biodiversity reduction of pine woods in southern Greece caused by the pine scale (Marchalina hellenica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrakis, P. V.; Spanos, K.; Feest, A.

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the impact of the pine scale (Marchalina hellenica Gennadius, Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Margarodidae) on the insect biodiversity of pinewoods in Attica, Greece. The comparison of biodiversities was done by estimating the biodiversity by the Ewens-Caswells V statistic in a set of nine sites each containing two linetransects. Transects pairs went through free and infested pine woods from the pine scale and each one had several tenth hectare plots on both sides. The ecosystem temperature (= disorder) of the sites was computed and found high, together with the idiosyncratic temperatures (= susceptibility to extinction) of the 158 species in order to detect local extinctions. The indicator values of insect species were computed on the basis of the relative cover of each plant species. The main findings of this study are (1) the reduction of insect species biodiversity because of the introduction of the pine scale, (2) the moderate increase of disorder in pine scale infested sites,(3) many insect species can characterize site groups but none of them can distinguish infested from pine scale free sites. The introduction of pine scale in pine woods disturbs their insect fauna before its influence to the floristic composition and the associated vegetation structure appears. The causes behind this reduction of biodiversity and the anthropogenic influences are discussed. (Author) 64 refs.

  8. Influence of hardwood midstory and pine species on pine bole arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher S. Collins; Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz

    2002-01-01

    Arthropod density on the boles of loblolly pines (Pinus taeda) was compared between a stand with and stand without hardwood midstory and between a stand of loblolly and shortleaf pines (P. echinata) in the Stephen E Austin Experimental Forest, Nacogdoches Co., Texas, USA from September 1993 through July 1994. Arthropod density was...

  9. Preparation of Fe-cored carbon nanomaterials from mountain pine beetle-killed pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) wood treated with iron (III) nitrate solution was used for the preparation of Fe-cored carbon nanomaterials (Fe-CNs) under various carbonization temperatures. The carbonization yield of Fe-treated sample (5% as Fe) was always 1–3% higher (after ash compensation) than that of the non-...

  10. Mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine for the production of submicron lignocellulose fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid Hoeger; Rolland Gleisner; Jose Negron; Orlando J. Rojas; J. Y. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    The elevated levels of tree mortality attributed to mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western North American forests create forest management challenges. This investigation introduces the production of submicron or nanometer lignocellulose fibrils for value-added materials from the widely available resource represented by dead pines after...

  11. Mountain pine beetle-killed trees as snags in Black Hills ponderosa pine stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Schmid; S. A. Mata; W. C. Schaupp

    2009-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle-killed ponderosa pine trees in three stands of different stocking levels near Bear Mountain in the Black Hills National Forest were surveyed over a 5-year period to determine how long they persisted as unbroken snags. Rate of breakage varied during the first 5 years after MPB infestation: only one tree broke during the first 2 years in the three...

  12. White pine blister rust resistance in limber pine: Evidence for a major gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. W. Schoettle; R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; K. S. Burns

    2014-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is being threatened by the lethal disease white pine blister rust caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola. The types and frequencies of genetic resistance to the rust will likely determine the potential success of restoration or proactive measures. These first extensive inoculation trials using individual tree seed collections...

  13. Histology of white pine blister rust in needles of resistant and susceptible eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel A. Jurgens; Robert A. Blanchette; Paul J. Zambino; Andrew David

    2003-01-01

    White pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola, has plagued the forests of North America for almost a century. Over past decades, eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) that appear to tolerate the disease have been selected and incorporated into breeding programs. Seeds from P. strobus with putative resistance were...

  14. Threats, status & management options for bristlecone pines and limber pines in Southern Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. W. Schoettle; K. S. Burns; F. Freeman; R. A. Sniezko

    2006-01-01

    High-elevation white pines define the most remote alpine-forest ecotones in western North America yet they are not beyond the reach of a lethal non-native pathogen. The pathogen (Cronartium ribicola), a native to Asia, causes the disease white pine blister rust (WPBR) and was introduced into western Canada in 1910. Whitebark (Pinus albicaulis) and...

  15. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  16. Impacts of light shading and nutrient enrichment geo-engineering approaches on the productivity of a stratified, oligotrophic ocean ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman-Mountford, Nick J; Polimene, Luca; Hirata, Takafumi; Brewin, Robert J W; Aiken, Jim

    2013-12-06

    Geo-engineering proposals to mitigate global warming have focused either on methods of carbon dioxide removal, particularly nutrient fertilization of plant growth, or on cooling the Earth's surface by reducing incoming solar radiation (shading). Marine phytoplankton contribute half the Earth's biological carbon fixation and carbon export in the ocean is modulated by the actions of microbes and grazing communities in recycling nutrients. Both nutrients and light are essential for photosynthesis, so understanding the relative influence of both these geo-engineering approaches on ocean ecosystem production and processes is critical to the evaluation of their effectiveness. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between light and nutrient availability on productivity in a stratified, oligotrophic subtropical ocean ecosystem using a one-dimensional water column model coupled to a multi-plankton ecosystem model, with the goal of elucidating potential impacts of these geo-engineering approaches on ecosystem production. We find that solar shading approaches can redistribute productivity in the water column but do not change total production. Macronutrient enrichment is able to enhance the export of carbon, although heterotrophic recycling reduces the efficiency of carbon export substantially over time. Our results highlight the requirement for a fuller consideration of marine ecosystem interactions and feedbacks, beyond simply the stimulation of surface blooms, in the evaluation of putative geo-engineering approaches.

  17. Species- and habitat-specific bioaccumulation of total mercury and methylmercury in the food web of a deep oligotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcagni, Marina; Juncos, Romina; Rizzo, Andrea; Pavlin, Majda; Fajon, Vesna; Arribére, María A; Horvat, Milena; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio

    2018-01-15

    Niche segregation between introduced and native fish in Lake Nahuel Huapi, a deep oligotrophic lake in Northwest Patagonia (Argentina), occurs through the consumption of different prey. Therefore, in this work we analyzed total mercury [THg] and methylmercury [MeHg] concentrations in top predator fish and in their main prey to test whether their feeding habits influence [Hg]. Results indicate that [THg] and [MeHg] varied by foraging habitat and they increased with greater percentage of benthic diet and decreased with pelagic diet in Lake Nahuel Huapi. This is consistent with the fact that the native creole perch, a mostly benthivorous feeder, which shares the highest trophic level of the food web with introduced salmonids, had higher [THg] and [MeHg] than the more pelagic feeder rainbow trout and bentho-pelagic feeder brown trout. This differential THg and MeHg bioaccumulation observed in native and introduced fish provides evidence to the hypothesis that there are two main Hg transfer pathways from the base of the food web to top predators: a pelagic pathway where Hg is transferred from water, through plankton (with Hg in inorganic species mostly), forage fish to salmonids, and a benthic pathway, as Hg is transferred from the sediments (where Hg methylation occurs mostly), through crayfish (with higher [MeHg] than plankton), to native fish, leading to one fold higher [Hg]. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Climate Warming as a Possible Trigger of Keystone Mussel Population Decline in Oligotrophic Rivers at the Continental Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotov, Ivan N; Makhrov, Alexander A; Gofarov, Mikhail Yu; Aksenova, Olga V; Aspholm, Paul E; Bespalaya, Yulia V; Kabakov, Mikhail B; Kolosova, Yulia S; Kondakov, Alexander V; Ofenböck, Thomas; Ostrovsky, Andrew N; Popov, Igor Yu; von Proschwitz, Ted; Rudzīte, Mudīte; Rudzītis, Māris; Sokolova, Svetlana E; Valovirta, Ilmari; Vikhrev, Ilya V; Vinarski, Maxim V; Zotin, Alexey A

    2018-01-08

    The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearl mussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.

  19. Assessing Phytoplankton Nutritional Status and Potential Impact of Wet Deposition in Seasonally Oligotrophic Waters of the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwick, P. N.; Bernhardt, P. W.; Mulholland, M. R.; Najjar, R. G.; Blumen, L. M.; Sohst, B. M.; Sookhdeo, C.; Widner, B.

    2018-04-01

    To assess phytoplankton nutritional status in seasonally oligotrophic waters of the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight, and the potential for rain to stimulate primary production in this region during summer, shipboard bioassay experiments were performed using natural seawater and phytoplankton collected north and south of the Gulf Stream. Bioassay treatments comprised iron, nitrate, iron + nitrate, iron + nitrate + phosphate, and rainwater. Phytoplankton growth was inferred from changes in chlorophyll a, inorganic nitrogen, and carbon-13 uptake, relative to unamended control treatments. Results indicated the greatest growth stimulation by iron + nitrate + phosphate, intermediate growth stimulation by rainwater, modest growth stimulation by nitrate and iron + nitrate, and no growth stimulation by iron. Based on these data and analysis of seawater and atmospheric samples, nitrogen was the proximate limiting nutrient, with a secondary limitation imposed by phosphorus. Our results imply that summer rain events increase new production in these waters by contributing nitrogen and phosphorus, with the availability of the latter setting the upper limit on rain-stimulated new production.

  20. Dendrochronologically dated pine stumps document phase-wise bog expansion at a northwest German site between ca. 6700 and ca. 3400 BC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maike Achterberg, Inke Elisabeth; Eckstein, Jan; Birkholz, Bernhard; Bauerochse, Andreas; Leuschner, Hanns Hubert

    2018-01-01

    The investigated northwest German mire site at Totes Moor is densely covered with subfossil pine stumps (Pinus sylvestris L.) from the fen-bog transition. This facilitates the spatio-temporal reconstruction of mire development, which is based on 212 in situ tree stumps in the case study presented here. Six dendrochronologically dated site chronologies together cover 2345 years between 6703 and 3403 BC. The gaps in between are 6 to 550 years long. Additionally, a floating chronology of 309 years, containing 30 trees, was radiocarbon-dated to the beginning of the 7th millennium cal BC. Peat-stratigraphical survey was carried out additionally, and elevations a.s.l. were determined at several locations. Tree dying-off phases, which indicate water level rise at the site, mostly in context of the local fen-bog transition, are evident for ca. 6600-6450, ca. 6350-5750, ca. 5300-4900, ca. 4700-4550, ca. 3900-3850, ca. 3700-3600, ca. 3500-3450 and ca. 3400 BC. The spatial distribution of the dated in situ trees illustrates the phase-wise expansion of raised bog over fen peat at the site. The documented bog expansion pulses likely correspond to climatic wet sifts.

  1. Seasonal Trace Gas Dynamics on Minerotrophic Fen Peatlands in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual trace gas balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest balances in both years. For implementing a

  2. Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Selected Fen Peatland Sites in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest CO2 balances in both years. For implementing a

  3. The GAN Exonuclease or the Flap Endonuclease Fen1 and RNase HII Are Necessary for Viability of Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Brett W; Cubonova, Lubomira; Heider, Margaret R; Kelman, Zvi; Reeve, John N; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    Many aspects of and factors required for DNA replication are conserved across all three domains of life, but there are some significant differences surrounding lagging-strand synthesis. In Archaea , a 5'-to-3' exonuclease, related to both bacterial RecJ and eukaryotic Cdc45, that associates with the replisome specifically through interactions with GINS was identified and designated GAN (for G INS- a ssociated n uclease). Despite the presence of a well-characterized flap endonuclease (Fen1), it was hypothesized that GAN might participate in primer removal during Okazaki fragment maturation, and as a Cdc45 homologue, GAN might also be a structural component of an archaeal CMG (Cdc45, MCM, and GINS) replication complex. We demonstrate here that, individually, either Fen1 or GAN can be deleted, with no discernible effects on viability and growth. However, deletion of both Fen1 and GAN was not possible, consistent with both enzymes catalyzing the same step in primer removal from Okazaki fragments in vivo RNase HII has also been proposed to participate in primer processing during Okazaki fragment maturation. Strains with both Fen1 and RNase HII deleted grew well. GAN activity is therefore sufficient for viability in the absence of both RNase HII and Fen1, but it was not possible to construct a strain with both RNase HII and GAN deleted. Fen1 alone is therefore insufficient for viability in the absence of both RNase HII and GAN. The ability to delete GAN demonstrates that GAN is not required for the activation or stability of the archaeal MCM replicative helicase. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms used to remove primer sequences from Okazaki fragments during lagging-strand DNA replication differ in the biological domains. Bacteria use the exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase I, whereas eukaryotes and archaea encode a flap endonuclease (Fen1) that cleaves displaced primer sequences. RNase HII and the GINS-associated exonuclease GAN have also been hypothesized to assist in primer

  4. Wollemi Pine: Living Fossil from Jurassic Landscape -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    city of Sydney, Australia. This giant ... It is also being exploited to grow commer- cially to ... Australia. There are huge kauri pines (Agathis sps) along with. Wollemi pine seedling ... Natural History Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies.

  5. Research of Ancient Architectures in Jin-Fen Area Based on GIS&BIM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jing; Zheng, Qiuhong; Gao, Huiying; Sun, Hai

    2017-05-01

    The number of well-preserved ancient buildings located in Shanxi Province, enjoying the absolute maximum proportion of ancient architectures in China, is about 18418, among which, 9053 buildings have the structural style of wood frame. The value of the application of BIM (Building Information Modeling) and GIS (Geographic Information System) is gradually probed and testified in the corresponding fields of ancient architecture’s spatial distribution information management, routine maintenance and special conservation & restoration, the evaluation and simulation of related disasters, such as earthquake. The research objects are ancient architectures in JIN-FEN area, which were first investigated by Sicheng LIANG and recorded in his work of “Chinese ancient architectures survey report”. The research objects, i.e. the ancient architectures in Jin-Fen area include those in Sicheng LIANG’s investigation, and further adjustments were made through authors’ on-site investigation and literature searching & collection. During this research process, the spatial distributing Geodatabase of research objects is established utilizing GIS. The BIM components library for ancient buildings is formed combining on-site investigation data and precedent classic works, such as “Yingzao Fashi”, a treatise on architectural methods in Song Dynasty, “Yongle Encyclopedia” and “Gongcheng Zuofa Zeli”, case collections of engineering practice, by the Ministry of Construction of Qing Dynasty. A building of Guangsheng temple in Hongtong county is selected as an example to elaborate the BIM model construction process based on the BIM components library for ancient buildings. Based on the foregoing work results of spatial distribution data, attribute data of features, 3D graphic information and parametric building information model, the information management system for ancient architectures in Jin-Fen Area, utilizing GIS&BIM technology, could be constructed to support the

  6. Violencia en la pareja, las caras del fenómeno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elena Ocampo Otálvaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo pretende mostrar las diversas caras o facetas del fenómeno de la violencia en la pareja, el mismo que en la literatura es conocido como violencia conyugal, violencia doméstica, violencia por parte del compañero íntimo, etc. Se identifica como un problema de salud pública, debido a los altos costos que genera y la manera como lesiona la vida cotidiana de quienes lo padecen. Se manifiesta en el seno de las relaciones de pareja, e irradia hacia los diversos ámbitos de interacción de los actores: mujer, varón, niño, niña. Involucra a todo el grupo o los grupos familiares de quienes lo viven, y puede lesionar de forma severa a los mismos. Se revisan aspectos del fenómeno, como el hecho que no sólo se presenta en las relaciones en las que la pareja tenga una unión de hecho, sino también en parejas de novios. No solo afecta a las mujeres o a las niñas; también afecta a los hombres. Tampoco es exclusivo de las parejas heterosexuales; los estudios muestran que entre parejas del mismo sexo también está presente. Se trata entonces de un fenómeno universal, multicausal, multidimensional, de salud y de tipo legal, que genera consecuencias que incluyen desde un problema de autoestima, de ansiedad, de depresión, de estrés hasta la muerte misma.

  7. Evaluation on the Efficiency of Subsurface Drainage in Chiu-Fen Landslide at Northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, L. Y.; Lin, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    For administrative district, the Chiu-Fen landslide is situated at northern Taiwan and comes within the jurisdiction of Ruei-Fang district, New Taipei City Government. Chiu-Fen village is a famous spot for sightseeing and tourism in Southeast Asia. In the last decade, for economic purpose, a vast area of slope land in Chiu-Fen area was reclaimed into business and commercial districts. However, due to the complicated geological and hydrological conditions, improper reclamation, and lack of appropriate soil and water conservation facilities, large scale landslides are frequently triggered by typhoon rainfall and causes damages to the transportation and residential building in the community. As a consequence, the government initiated a comprehensive field investigations and remediation plans to stabilize the landslide from 1997 and the remediation works were concentrated on subsurface drainages, namely the application of drainage well (a vertical shaft with multi-level horizontal drainage boreholes). To investigate the efficiency of drainage wells on the landslide, the A1-profile in the landslide which covers the drainage wells W2 and W4 was selected for a series of rainfall seepage and slope stability analyses. In addition, a 48-hrs design rainfall with return period of 25, 50 and 100 years based on the local meteorological data bank was adopted for the analyses. The numerical results indicate the factor safety FS of the three potential sliding surfaces within A1-profile are constantly keeping greater than one (FS > 1.0) and without decreasing with the elapsed time during rainfall. This implies that the subsurface drainage works can drain off the infiltrated rainwater from a high intensity and long duration rainfall and preserve the slope stability of landslides from deterioration. Finally, the efficiency of the drainage wells can be evaluated quantitatively in terms of the time-dependent factor of safety and the pore water pressure distribution on several potential

  8. Research of Ancient Architectures in Jin-Fen Area Based on GIS and BIM Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jing; Zheng, Qiuhong; Gao, Huiying; Sun, Hai

    2017-01-01

    The number of well-preserved ancient buildings located in Shanxi Province, enjoying the absolute maximum proportion of ancient architectures in China, is about 18418, among which, 9053 buildings have the structural style of wood frame. The value of the application of BIM (Building Information Modeling) and GIS (Geographic Information System) is gradually probed and testified in the corresponding fields of ancient architecture’s spatial distribution information management, routine maintenance and special conservation and restoration, the evaluation and simulation of related disasters, such as earthquake. The research objects are ancient architectures in JIN-FEN area, which were first investigated by Sicheng LIANG and recorded in his work of “Chinese ancient architectures survey report”. The research objects, i.e. the ancient architectures in Jin-Fen area include those in Sicheng LIANG’s investigation, and further adjustments were made through authors’ on-site investigation and literature searching and collection. During this research process, the spatial distributing Geodatabase of research objects is established utilizing GIS. The BIM components library for ancient buildings is formed combining on-site investigation data and precedent classic works, such as “Yingzao Fashi”, a treatise on architectural methods in Song Dynasty, “Yongle Encyclopedia” and “Gongcheng Zuofa Zeli”, case collections of engineering practice, by the Ministry of Construction of Qing Dynasty. A building of Guangsheng temple in Hongtong county is selected as an example to elaborate the BIM model construction process based on the BIM components library for ancient buildings. Based on the foregoing work results of spatial distribution data, attribute data of features, 3D graphic information and parametric building information model, the information management system for ancient architectures in Jin-Fen Area, utilizing GIS and BIM technology, could be constructed to support

  9. Primary marine aerosol emissions from the Mediterranean Sea during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions: correlations to seawater chlorophyll a from a mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, A. N.; Rose, C.; Asmi, E.; Ebling, A. M.; Landing, W. M.; Marro, S.; Pedrotti, M.-L.; Sallon, A.; Iuculano, F.; Agusti, S.; Tsiola, A.; Pitta, P.; Louis, J.; Guieu, C.; Gazeau, F.; Sellegri, K.

    2015-07-01

    The effect of ocean acidification and changing water conditions on primary (and secondary) marine aerosol emissions is not well understood on a regional or a global scale. To investigate this effect as well as the indirect effect on aerosol that changing biogeochemical parameters can have, ~ 52 m3 pelagic mesocosms were deployed for several weeks in the Mediterranean Sea during both winter pre-bloom and summer oligotrophic conditions and were subjected to various levels of CO2 to simulate the conditions foreseen in this region for the coming decades. After seawater sampling, primary bubble-bursting aerosol experiments were performed using a plunging water jet system to test both chemical and physical aerosol parameters (10-400 nm). Comparing results obtained during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions, we find the same four log-normal modal diameters (18.5 ± 0.6, 37.5 ± 1.4, 91.5 ± 2.0, 260 ± 3.2 nm) describing the aerosol size distribution during both campaigns, yet pre-bloom conditions significantly increased the number fraction of the second (Aitken) mode, with an amplitude correlated to virus-like particles, heterotrophic prokaryotes, TEPs (transparent exopolymeric particles), chlorophyll a and other pigments. Organic fractions determined from kappa closure calculations for the diameter, Dp ~ 50 nm, were much larger during the pre-bloom period (64 %) than during the oligotrophic period (38 %), and the organic fraction decreased as the particle size increased. Combining data from both campaigns together, strong positive correlations were found between the organic fraction of the aerosol and chlorophyll a concentrations, heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria abundance, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. As a consequence of the changes in the organic fraction and the size distributions between pre-bloom and oligotrophic periods, we find that the ratio of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to condensation nuclei (CN) slightly decreased during the

  10. Eletricidade Atmosférica e Fenômenos Correlatos

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, M.; Santiago, M.A.M

    2002-01-01

    A qualquer momento, existem cerca de 2000 tempestades com relâmpagos nos cêus em torno do mundo. Estima-se que as tempestades combinadas produzem aproximadamente 100 descargas de raios por segundo, cada uma com temperatura em torno de 30.0000ºC - mais quente que a superfície do Sol. Esse trabalho apresenta aos leitores alguns fenômenos elêtricos na atmosfera e estratosfera. Tais eventos fazem parte de um sugerido circuito elêtrico atmosfêrico global e estão conectados à pesquisa de plasmas. A...

  11. Potencial de actividad antioxidante de extractos fenólicos de Theobroma cacao L. (cacao)

    OpenAIRE

    Quiñones Gálvez, Janet; Trujillo Sánchez, Reinaldo; Capdesuñer Ruiz, Yanelis; Quirós Molina, Yemeys; Hernández de la Torre, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: Theobroma cacao L. (cacao), familia Sterculiaceae, es una planta rica en fenoles, los cuales en las plantas son de especial interés por su potente actividad antioxidante, dada esencialmente por sus propiedades redox, que pueden desempeñar un papel importante en la absorción y neutralización de los radicales libres. Objetivos: seleccionar un clon promisorio en la producción de compuestos fenólicos, determinar los órganos con mayor contenido de fenoles, establecer el cultivo in vi...

  12. Estudio nacional exploratorio descriptivo sobre el fenómeno de trata de personas en Colombia.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Para el Ministerio del Interior y de Justicia como Secretaría Técnica del Comité Interinstitucional para la lucha contra la Trata de Personas y para la Oficina de Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito en Colombia UNODC, es un honor presentar a ustedes en esta oportunidad el primer Estudio Nacional Exploratorio Descriptivo sobre el Fenómeno de la Trata de Personas en Colombia, desarrollado por unequipo de Investigadoras e Investigadores de la Escuela de Estudios de Género de la Universid...

  13. BOREAS TGB-3 Plant Species Composition Data over the NSA Fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jill L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-3) team collected several data sets that contributed to understanding the measured trace gas fluxes over sites in the Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains information about the composition of plant species that were within the collars used to measure Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 (NEE). The species composition was identified to understand the differences in NEE among the various plant communities in the NSA fen. The data were collected in July of 1994 and 1996. The data are contained in comma-delimited, ASCII files.

  14. BOREAS TGB-1/TGB-3 NEE Data over the NSA Fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisario, Lianne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Moore, Tim R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-1) and TGB-3 teams collected several data sets that contributed to understanding the measured trace gas fluxes over sites in the Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 (NEE) measurements collected with chambers at the NSA fen in 1994 and 1996. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  15. Ecosystem-based management in the lodgepole pine zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin C. Hardy; Robert E. Keane; Catherine A. Stewart

    2000-01-01

    The significant geographic extent of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) in the interior West and the large proportion within the mixed-severity fire regime has led to efforts for more ecologically based management of lodgepole pine. New research and demonstration activities are presented that may provide knowledge and techniques to manage lodgepole pine...

  16. Restoring fire in lodgepole pine forests of the Intermountain west

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin C. Hardy; Ward W. McCaughey

    1997-01-01

    We are developing new management treatments for regenerating and sustaining lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests through emulation of natural disturbance processes. Lodgepole pine is the principal forest cover on over 26 million hectares in western North America. While infrequent, stand replacing fires following mountain pine beetle outbreaks are common to the...

  17. Direct and indirect chemical defence of pine against folivorous insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mumm, R.; Hilker, M.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical defence of pine against herbivorous insects has been intensively studied with respect to its effects on the performance and behaviour of the herbivores as well as on the natural enemies of pine herbivores. The huge variety of terpenoid pine components play a major role in mediating

  18. Early longleaf pine seedling survivorship on hydric soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Cohen; Joan Walker

    2006-01-01

    We established a study to evaluate site preparation in restoring longleaf pine on poorly drained sites. Most existing longleaf pine stands occur on drier sites, and traditional approaches to restoring longleaf pine on wetter sites may rely on intensive practices that compromise the integrity of the ground layer vegetation. We applied silvicultural treatments to improve...

  19. Blister rust control in the management of western white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth P. Davis; Virgil D. Moss

    1940-01-01

    The forest industry of the western white pine region depends on the production of white pine as a major species on about 2,670,000 acres of commercial forest land. Continued production of this species and maintenance of the forest industry at anything approaching its present level is impossible unless the white pine blister rust is controlled. Existing merchantable...

  20. Avian response to pine restoration at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Clawson; Carrie Steen; Kim Houf; Terry Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Midco Pine Flats is a 2,223-acre region of Peck Ranch Conservation Area (CA) that is classified as a pine-oak plains land type association. Extensive logging in the early 1900s removed most overstory shortleaf pine allowing oak to become the primary overstory component. In 2000, Missouri Department of Conservation staff initiated a pineoak woodland restoration project...

  1. Historic forests and endemic mountain pine beetle and dwarf mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Negron

    2012-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle has always been a significant disturbance agent in ponderosa and lodgepole pine forests in Colorado. Most studies have examined the impacts to forest structure associated with epidemic populations of a single disturbance agent. In this paper we address the role of endemic populations of mountain pine and their interactions with dwarf mistletoe...

  2. Direct seeding of pitch pine in southern New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Little; C. B. Cranmer; H. A. Somes

    1958-01-01

    There is not enough pine reproduction in the woodlands of southern New Jersey. This increasingly important problem, which plagues the state's Pine Region, is especially severe where seed sources for natural regeneration are poor. In some of these areas, pulpwood cuttings have removed all pines large enough to bear many cones. In other areas, wildfires have killed...

  3. White pines, blister rust, and management in the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. A. Conklin; M Fairweather; D Ryerson; B Geils; D Vogler

    2009-01-01

    White pines in New Mexico and Arizona are threatened by the invasive disease white pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola. Blister rust is already causing severe damage to a large population of southwestern white pine in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico. Recent detection in northern and western New Mexico suggests that a major expansion of the...

  4. White pines, Ribes, and blister rust: integration and action

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Hunt; B. W. Geils; K. E. Hummer

    2010-01-01

    The preceding articles in this series review the history, biology and management of white pine blister rust in North America, Europe and eastern Asia. In this integration, we connect and discuss seven recurring themes important for understanding and managing epidemics of Cronartium ribicola in the white pines (five-needle pines in subgenus Strobus). Information and...

  5. Natural regeneration of whitebark pine: Factors affecting seedling density

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Goeking; D. Izlar

    2014-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is an ecologically important species in high-altitude areas of the western United States and Canada due to the habitat and food source it provides for Clark’s nutcrackers, red squirrels, grizzly bears, and other animals. Whitebark pine stands have recently experienced high mortality due to wildfire, white pine blister rust, and a...

  6. Taxonomy, phylogeny, and coevolution of pines and their stem rusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. I. Millar; B. B. Kinloch

    1991-01-01

    We review and reinterpret major events in the evolution of pines and their stem rusts using information from their taxonomy, genetics, biogeography, and fossil history. Understanding of pine evolution has been significantly revised in the last 20 years. Pines appear to have evolved early in the Mesozoic and to have diversified and migrated throughout middle latitudes...

  7. Mechanized row-thinning systems in slash pine plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter C. Anderson; James E. Granskog

    1974-01-01

    Over the next decade or two, most of the 15 to 20 million acres of pine plantations in the South will become ready for a first commercial thinning. The magnitude and nature of the job is illustrated by the situation in slash pine-the most extensively planted of the southern pines.

  8. Separating Trends in Whitebark Pine Radial Growth Related to Climate and Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks in the Northern Rocky Mountains, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia L. van de Gevel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought and mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins outbreaks have affected millions of hectares of high-elevation conifer forests in the Northern Rocky Mountains during the past century. Little research has examined the distinction between mountain pine beetle outbreaks and climatic influence on radial growth in endangered whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm. ecosystems. We used a new method to explore divergent periods in whitebark pine radial growth after mountain pine beetle outbreaks across six sites in western Montana. We examined a 100-year history of mountain pine beetle outbreaks and climate relationships in whitebark pine radial growth to distinguish whether monthly climate variables or mountain pine outbreaks were the dominant influence on whitebark pine growth during the 20th century. High mortality of whitebark pines was caused by the overlapping effects of previous and current mountain pine beetle outbreaks and white pine blister rust infection. Wet conditions from precipitation and snowpack melt in the previous summer, current spring, and current summer benefit whitebark pine radial growth during the following growing season. Whitebark pine radial growth and climate relationships were strongest in sites less affected by the mountain pine beetle outbreaks or anthropogenic disturbances. Whitebark pine population resiliency should continue to be monitored as more common periods of drought will make whitebark pines more susceptible to mountain pine beetle attack and to white pine blister rust infection.

  9. Resilience of ponderosa and lodgepole pine forests to mountain pine beetle disturbance and limited regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Jenny S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Vandendriesche, Don

    2015-01-01

    After causing widespread mortality in lodgepole pine forests in North America, the mountain pine beetle (MPB) has recently also affected ponderosa pine, an alternate host species that may have different levels of resilience to this disturbance. We collected field data in ponderosa pine- and lodgepole pine-dominated forests attacked by MPB in Colorado and then simulated stand growth over 200 years using the Forest Vegetation Simulator. We compared scenarios of no disturbance with scenarios of MPB-caused mortality, both with and without regeneration. Results indicated that basal area and tree density recovered to predisturbance levels relatively rapidly (within 1‐8 decades) in both forest types. However, convergence of the disturbed conditions with simulated undisturbed conditions took longer (12‐20+ decades) and was delayed by the absence of regeneration. In MPB-affected ponderosa pine forests without regeneration, basal area did not converge with undisturbed conditions within 200 years, implying lower resilience in this ecosystem. Surface fuels accumulated rapidly in both forest types after MPB-induced mortality, remaining high for 3‐6 decades in simulations. Our results suggest that future patterns of succession, regeneration, fuel loading, climate, and disturbance interactions over long time periods should be considered in management strategies addressing MPB effects in either forest type, but particularly in ponderosa pine.

  10. Fenómenos que Organizan el Límite (Phenomena that Organize Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Sánchez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se pone de manifiesto la presencia de los fenómenos de aproximación organizados por una definición de límite en el caso de las sucesiones de números reales y de las funciones reales de una variable real. La exposición incluye la caracterización de tales fenómenos, una descripción del análisis comparativo desarrollado en base a ellos entre dos definiciones formales de límite de sucesión y función, y una síntesis del estudio llevado a cabo sobre una muestra intencional de libros de texto de matemáticas.In this paper we show the presence of the phenomena of approximation organized by a definition of limit in the cases of the successions of real numbers and the real functions of one real variable. The exposition includes the characterization of such phenomena, a description of the comparative analysis, developed using them, between two formal definitions of limit of succession and function, and a synthesis of the study carried out on an intentional sample of mathematics textbooks.

  11. Experiencias para observar el fenómeno de fluorescencia con luz ultravioleta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heredia Avalos, S.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La fluorescencia tiene lugar cuando una sustancia emite luz visible al absorber radiación de una longitud de onda menor, como por ejemplo luz ultravioleta. La diferencia entre la energía absorbida (del fotón ultravioleta y la emitida (del fotón visible se disipa en forma de calor. Se dice que la sustancia posee fluorescenciacuando este proceso es muy rápido; si es más lento se dice que la sustancia posee fosforescencia. A continuación se describen varias experiencias sencillas para poner de manifiesto el fenómeno de fluorescencia. Todas ellas requieren de reactivos y materiales fácilmente accesibles y asequibles y se pueden realizar con alumnos de secundaria o de bachillerato para poner de manifiesto este fenómeno. Además, también se propone una experiencia en la que se observa la reversibilidad de las reacciones químicas ácido-base a través de la fluorescencia.

  12. Gravidez na adolescência: um olhar sobre um fenômeno complexo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Garcia Dias

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta uma revisão seletiva e não sistemática da literatura a respeito do fenômeno da gestação na adolescência. Três eixos temáticos orientam a organização do trabalho: (a Riscos e problemas associados à gestação na adolescência; (b Fatores precursores relacionados à gravidez na adolescência; e (c Fatores sócio-culturais associados ao desejo de ser mãe na adolescência. Entre as conclusões, destaca-se que a gravidez na adolescência é uma experiência que pode ter consequências tanto negativas quanto positivas para os adolescentes. Além disso, o fenômeno evidencia a necessidade de intervenções voltadas à saúde sexual e reprodutiva dos adolescentes.

  13. Fenótipos clínicos de asma grave Clinical phenotypes of severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseliane de Souza Araújo Alves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer os fenótipos clínicos em portadores de asma grave. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados, retrospectivamente, 111 pacientes em um ambulatório especializado. Os pacientes foram avaliados e acompanhados de maneira sistemática, estabelecendo-se ao final do acompanhamento a adesão e o controle ou não da doença por dados clínicos e funcionais. A resistência ao tratamento foi definida como o não preenchimento, ao final do acompanhamento, por pelo menos seis meses, dos critérios de controle de asma, apesar do uso correto e adesão à medicação. Os fenótipos foram determinados por análise fatorial e comparados por testes diversos. RESULTADOS: Ao final, 88 pacientes foram considerados aderentes e 23 não aderentes. Por análise fatorial do grupo aderente, quatro fenótipos foram determinados: o fenótipo 1 (28 pacientes, formado pelos pacientes resistentes ao tratamento, com maior freqüência de sintomas noturnos, maior número de exacerbações e uso mais freqüente de broncodilatador de resgate; o fenótipo 2 (48 pacientes, formado pelos pacientes com obstrução persistente, com menores valores de relação volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo/capacidade vital forçada na avaliação inicial, idade mais avançada e maior tempo de doença; o fenótipo 3 (42 pacientes, representa os pacientes com rinossinusite alérgica, sendo constituído de não fumantes com obstrução predominantemente reversível; e o fenótipo 4 (15 pacientes, formado por casos com história de intolerância à aspirina associado à asma quase fatal. CONCLUSÕES: Um número significativo de portadores de ama grave não adere ao tratamento. Muitos pacientes com asma grave têm obstrução irreversível, mas o fenótipo clínico mais relevante é constituído pelos pacientes resistentes ao tratamento habitual.OBJECTIVE: To characterize clinical phenotypes of severe asthma. METHODS: A total of 111 patients were retrospectively evaluated at a

  14. Measurement of 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe cross section near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the cross section of the 54 Fe(n,2n) 53 Fe reaction near threshold. Measurements were made at 6 different neutron energies and cover the 1 MeV energy range from threshold (13.64 MeV) to 14.64 MeV. The 54 Fe(n,2n) cross section was measured relative to the 27 Al(n,p) 27 Mg cross section to an accuracy of a few percent. These accurate cross-section measurements will be useful in calculating damage caused by 14 MeV D-T plasma neutrons in Fe and calculating the production of the long-lived 53 Mn nuclei that account for much of the buildup of long-lived radioactivity in steel structures and other ferrous materials used in the construction of fusion reactors. They will also play an important part in a new method for measuring the plasma ion temperature of a D-T plasma

  15. Constraining the sources and cycling of dissolved organic carbon in a large oligotrophic lake using radiocarbon analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigah, Prosper K.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; McNichol, Ann P.; Xu, Li; Werne, Josef P.

    2017-07-01

    We measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of solid phase extracted (SPE) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and high molecular weight (HMW) DOC and their constituent organic components in order to better constrain the sources and cycling of DOC in a large oligotrophic lacustrine system (Lake Superior, North America). SPE DOC constituted a significant proportion (41-71%) of the lake DOC relative to HMW DOC (10-13%). Substantial contribution of 14C-depleted components to both SPE DOC (Δ14C = 25-43‰) and HMW DOC (Δ14C = 22-32‰) was evident during spring mixing, and depressed their radiocarbon values relative to the lake dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; Δ14C ∼ 59‰). There was preferential removal of 14C-depleted (older) and thermally recalcitrant components from HMW DOC and SPE DOC in the summer. Contemporary photoautotrophic addition to HMW DOC was observed during summer stratification in contrast to SPE DOC, which decreased in concentration during stratification. Serial thermal oxidation radiocarbon analysis revealed a diversity of sources (both contemporary and older) within the SPE DOC, and also showed distinct components within the HMW DOC. The thermally labile components of HMW DOC were 14C-enriched and are attributed to heteropolysaccharides (HPS), peptides/amide and amino sugars (AMS) relative to the thermally recalcitrant components reflecting the presence of older material, perhaps carboxylic-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM). The solvent extractable lipid-like fraction of HMW DOC was very 14C-depleted (as old as 1270-2320 14C years) relative to the carbohydrate-like and protein-like substances isolated by acid hydrolysis of HMW DOC. Our data constrain relative influences of contemporary DOC and old DOC, and DOC cycling in a modern freshwater ecosystem.

  16. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  17. Sources and sinks of nitrogen and phosphorus to a deep, oligotrophic lake, Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.W.; Cox, S.E.; Embrey, S.S.; Huffman, R.L.; Olsen, T.D.; Fradkin, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Crescent, in Olympic National Park in the northwest corner of Washington State is a deep-water lake renowned for its pristine water quality and oligotrophic nature. To examine the major sources and sinks of nutrients (as total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and dissolved nitrate), a study was conducted in the Lake Crescent watershed. The study involved measuring five major inflow streams, the Lyre River as the major outflow, recording weather and climatic data, coring lake bed sediment, and analyzing nutrient chemistry in several relevant media over 14 months. Water samples for total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and dissolved nitrate from the five inflow streams, the outlet Lyre River, and two stations in the lake were collected monthly from May 2006 through May 2007. Periodic samples of shallow water from temporary sampling wells were collected at numerous locations around the lake. Concentrations of nutrients detected in Lake Crescent and tributaries were then applied to the water budget estimates to arrive at monthly and annual loads from various environmental components within the watershed. Other sources, such as leaf litter, pollen, or automobile exhaust were estimated from annual values obtained from various literature sources. This information then was used to construct a nutrient budget for total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The nitrogen budget generally highlights vehicle traffic-diesel trucks in particular-along U.S. Highway 101 as a potential major anthropogenic source of nitrogen compounds in the lake. In contrast, contribution of nitrogen compounds from onsite septic systems appears to be relatively minor related to the other sources identified.

  18. Mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine: mortality and fire implications (Project INT-F-07-03)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Daniel R. West; Mike A Battaglia; Sheryl L. Costello; José F. Negrón; Charles C. Rhoades; John Popp; Rick Caissie

    2013-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) has infested over 2 million acres of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) forest since an outbreak began approximately in 2000 in north central Colorado. The tree mortality from mountain pine beetle outbreaks has the potential to alter stand composition and stand...

  19. Probability of infestation and extent of mortality models for mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Jennifer G. Klutsch

    2017-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a significant agent of tree mortality in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) forests throughout western North America. A large outbreak of mountain pine beetle caused extensive tree mortality in north-central Colorado beginning in the late 1990s. We use data from a network of plots established in...

  20. Revivification of a method for identifying longleaf pine timber and its application to southern pine relicts in southeastern Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Philip M. Sheridan; Arvind A.R. Bhuta

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) cannot be distinguished from the other southern pines based on wood anatomy alone. A method that involves measuring pith and second annual ring diameters, reported by Arthur Koehler in 1932 (The Southern Lumberman, 145: 36–37), was revisited as an option for identifying longleaf pine timbers and stumps. Cross-section...

  1. Fertilizer responses of longleaf pine trees within a loblolly pine plantation: separating direct effects from competition effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter H Anderson; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is mixed on how well longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) responds to increased soil nitrogen via fertilization. We examined growth and physiological responses of volunteer longleaf pine trees within an intensive loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) fertilization experiment. Fertilizer was applied annually following thinning at age 8 years (late 1992) at rates...

  2. The push–pull tactic for mitigation of mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) damage in lodgepole and whitebark pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy E. Gillette; Constance J. Mehmel; Sylvia R. Mori; Jeffrey N. Webster; David L. Wood; Nadir Erbilgin; Donald R. Owen

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to improve semiochemical-based treatments for protecting forest stands from bark beetle attack, we compared push-pull versus push-only tactics for protecting lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon) and whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) stands from attack by mountain pine beetle (...

  3. Development and assessment of 30-meter pine density maps for landscape-level modeling of mountain pine beetle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin A. Crabb; James A. Powell; Barbara J. Bentz

    2012-01-01

    Forecasting spatial patterns of mountain pine beetle (MPB) population success requires spatially explicit information on host pine distribution. We developed a means of producing spatially explicit datasets of pine density at 30-m resolution using existing geospatial datasets of vegetation composition and structure. Because our ultimate goal is to model MPB population...

  4. Status of white pine blister rust and seed collections in california's high-elevation white pine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Dunlap

    2011-01-01

    White pine blister rust (caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola) reached northern California about 80 years ago. Over the years its spread southward had been primarily recorded on sugar pine. However, observations on its occurrence had also been reported in several of the higher elevation five-needled white pine species in California. Since the late...

  5. White pine blister rust resistance of 12 western white pine families at three field sites in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Sniezko; Robert Danchok; Jim Hamlin; Angelia Kegley; Sally Long; James Mayo

    2012-01-01

    Western white pine (Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don) is highly susceptible to the non-native, invasive pathogen Cronartium ribicola, the causative agent of white pine blister rust. The susceptibility of western white pine to blister rust has limited its use in restoration and reforestation throughout much of western North...

  6. Genomic selection in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Fikret; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Farjat, Alfredo; Chancerel, Emilie; Raffin, Annie; Sanchez, Leopoldo; Plomion, Christophe; Bouffier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    A two-generation maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) breeding population (n=661) was genotyped using 2500 SNP markers. The extent of linkage disequilibrium and utility of genomic selection for growth and stem straightness improvement were investigated. The overall intra-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium was r(2)=0.01. Linkage disequilibrium corrected for genomic relationships derived from markers was smaller (rV(2)=0.006). Genomic BLUP, Bayesian ridge regression and Bayesian LASSO regression statistical models were used to obtain genomic estimated breeding values. Two validation methods (random sampling 50% of the population and 10% of the progeny generation as validation sets) were used with 100 replications. The average predictive ability across statistical models and validation methods was about 0.49 for stem sweep, and 0.47 and 0.43 for total height and tree diameter, respectively. The sensitivity analysis suggested that prior densities (variance explained by markers) had little or no discernible effect on posterior means (residual variance) in Bayesian prediction models. Sampling from the progeny generation for model validation increased the predictive ability of markers for tree diameter and stem sweep but not for total height. The results are promising despite low linkage disequilibrium and low marker coverage of the genome (∼1.39 markers/cM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pinon Pine IGCC project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, E.B.; Lamarre, L.J.; Glazer, M.

    1993-01-01

    Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo) intends to build the Pinon Pine Power Project, an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada. The plant will burn approximately 800 tons of coal per day to generate electricity in a base load application. The Pinon Project was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for funding under Round IV of the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project will demonstrate the use of the KRW agglomerating fluidized bed gasifer operating in the air blown mode. Hot gas cleanup consisting of particulate and sulfur removal will also be demonstrated. The Cooperative Agreement between SPPCo and the DOE was executed in August 1992. Foster Wheeler USA Corporation (FWUSA) will provide engineering and construction management services. The M.W. Kellogg Company (MWK) will provide engineering of the gasifer and hot gas cleanup systems. A discussion of project progress since the 1992 Clean Coal Technology Conference, design and economic considerations, and current project status is presented

  8. Solar Decathlon 2015 - Indigo Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blouin, Vincent [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2016-05-30

    The Solar Decathlon competition challenges students across the country to design and build a net-zero, market ready solar powered home. The bi-annual competition consists of ten contests that seek to balance the home on a scale of innovation. The ten contests were selected by to organizers to address all aspects of housing, including architecture, market appeal, engineering, communication, affordability, comfort, appliances, home life, commuting, and energy balance. Along with the criteria associated with the contests, the competition includes several design constraints that mirror those found in practical housing applications: including (but certainly not limited to) lot lines, building height, and ADA accessibility. The Solar Decathlon 2015 was held at the Orange Country Great Park in Irvine, CA. The 2015 competition was Clemson University’s first entry into the Solar Decathlon and was a notable milestone in the continued development of a home, called Indigo Pine. From the beginning, the team reconsidered the notion of sustainability as related to both the design of a home and the competition itself. The designing and building process for the home reflects a process which seamlessly moves between thinking and making to develop a comprehensive design with a method and innovations that challenge the conventions of residential construction. This report is a summary of the activities of the Clemson University team during the two-year duration of the project leading to the participation in the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition in Irvine California.

  9. Compostos fenólicos e capacidade antioxidante em frutos de tomateiros mutantes fotomorfogenéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Dias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Compostos fenólicos e capacidade antioxidante são mecanismos de defesa das plantas aos danos do estresse oxidativo. Os compostos fenólicos são sintetizados pela via dos fenilpropanoides, cuja enzima chave, fenilalanina amônia liase, é influenciada pela luz e ação de fotorreceptores, como o fitocromo. O objetivo do presente trabalho é avaliar a concentração de compostos fenólicos e a capacidade antioxidante de frutos de microtomateiro selvagem, cultivar "Micro-Tom" (MT, e seus mutantes fotomorfogenéticos high pigment 1 (hp1, super-responsivo a eventos mediados por luz e aurea (au, deficiente quantitativo em fitocromos. Vinte frutos maduros de cada genótipo (MT, hp1 e au foram utilizados para as análises, realizadas em triplicata. Para quantificação dos compostos fenólicos totais, foi utilizado o método de Folin-Ciocalteu e a capacidade antioxidante foi realizada pelos métodos Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP e 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH. Os frutos do mutante hp1 apresentaram maiores conteúdos de compostos fenólicos totais e também maior capacidade antioxidante em relação à cultivar selvagem ("MT" e ao mutante au, o qual não diferiu significativamente da cultivar "MT".

  10. Determination of the 54Fe(n, 2n)53gFe and 54Fe(n, 2n)53mFe cross sections averaged over a 235U fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro Guevara, S.; Arribere, M.; Kestelman, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The reaction cross sections averaged over a 235 U fission neutron spectrum have been measured for the 54 Fe(n, 2n) 53g Fe and 54 Fe(n, 2n) 53m Fe threshold reactions. The values found are, respectively: (1.14 ± 0.13) μb, and (0.52 ± 0.16) μb. The measured cross sections are referred to the (111± 3) mb standard cross section of the 58 Ni(n, p) 58m+g Co reaction. The (81.7 ± 2.2) mb standard cross section value for the 54 Fe(n, p) 54 Mn reaction, was also used as a monitor to check the results obtained with the Ni standard, leading to an excellent agreement. (author)

  11. Mountain pine beetle attack associated with low levels of 4-allylanisole in ponderosa pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerick, Jay J; Snyder, Aaron I; Bower, Nathan W; Snyder, Marc A

    2008-08-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is the most important insect pest in southern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. Tree mortality is hastened by the various fungal pathogens that are symbiotic with the beetles. The phenylpropanoid 4-allylanisole is an antifungal and semiochemical for some pine beetle species. We analyzed 4-allylanisole and monoterpene profiles in the xylem oleoresin from a total of 107 trees at six sites from two chemotypes of ponderosa pine found in Colorado and New Mexico using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Although monoterpene profiles were essentially the same in attacked and nonattacked trees, significantly lower levels of 4-allylanisole were found in attacked trees compared with trees that showed no evidence of attack for both chemotypes.

  12. Conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake - implications for net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Glatzel, Stephan; Hofmann, Joachim; Forbrich, Inke; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    Extensive rewetting projects to re-establish the natural carbon (C) sequestration function of degraded peatlands are currently taking place in Europe and North-America. Year-round flooding provides a robust measure to prevent periods of drought that are associated with ongoing peat mineralization and to initiate the accumulation of new organic matter. Here, we present measurements of net carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange during the gradual conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake. When we started our measurements in 2009, mean growing season water level (MWGL) was 0 cm. In 2010 the site was flooded throughout the year with MWGL of 36 cm. Extraordinary strong rainfalls in July 2011 resulted in a further increase of MWGL to 56 cm. Measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were conducted during growing seasons (May-October) using the Eddy Covariance method. Information about vegetation vitality was deduced from the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) based on MODIS data. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were high during vegetation period 2009 (1273.4 and -1572.1 g CO2-C m-2), but decreased by 61 and 46% respectively when the fen was flooded throughout 2010. Under water-logged conditions, heterotrophic respiration declines and gas exchange is limited. Moreover, flooding is a severe stress factor for plants and decreases autotrophic respiration and photosynthesis. However, in comparison to 2010, rates of Reco and GEP doubled during the beginning of growing season 2011, indicating plastic response strategies of wetland plants to flooding. Presumably, plants were not able to cope with the further increase of water levels to up to 120 cm in June/July 2011, resulting in another drop of GEP and Reco. The effects of plant vitality on GEP were confirmed by the remote sensed vegetation index. Throughout all three growing seasons, the fen was a distinct net CO2 sink (2009: -333.3±12.3, 2010: -294.1±8.4, -352.4±5.1 g CO2-C m-2

  13. Impacts of oil sands process water on fen plants: Implications for plant selection in required reclamation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouliot, Rémy; Rochefort, Line; Graf, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    Fen plant growth in peat contaminated with groundwater discharges of oil sands process water (OSPW) was assessed in a greenhouse over two growing seasons. Three treatments (non-diluted OSPW, diluted OSPW and rainwater) were tested on five vascular plants and four mosses. All vascular plants tested can grow in salinity and naphthenic acids levels currently produced by oil sands activity in northwestern Canada. No stress sign was observed after both seasons. Because of plant characteristics, Carex species (C. atherodes and C. utriculata) and Triglochin maritima would be more useful for rapidly restoring vegetation and creating a new peat-accumulating system. Groundwater discharge of OSPW proved detrimental to mosses under dry conditions and ensuring adequate water levels would be crucial in fen creation following oil sands exploitation. Campylium stellatum would be the best choice to grow in contaminated areas and Bryum pseudotriquetrum might be interesting as it has spontaneously regenerated in all treatments. - Highlights: ► Fen plant growth was assessed under groundwater discharges of oil sands process water. ► Sedge and grass species were not stressed after two growing seasons in greenhouse. ► Carex species and Triglochin maritima would be helpful in created contaminated fens. ► In dry conditions, contaminated groundwater discharge was detrimental for mosses. ► Campylium stellatum would be the best choice in created fens with contaminated water. - Sedges and grasses tolerated the contact with oil sands process water and could probably grow well in contaminated created fens, but mosses were particularly affected under dry conditions.

  14. The response of soil organic carbon of a rich fen peatland in interior Alaska to projected climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; David McGuire, Anthony; Turetsky, Merritt R; Harden, Jennifer W; Michael Waddington, James; Kane, Evan S

    2013-02-01

    It is important to understand the fate of carbon in boreal peatland soils in response to climate change because a substantial change in release of this carbon as CO2 and CH4 could influence the climate system. The goal of this research was to synthesize the results of a field water table manipulation experiment conducted in a boreal rich fen into a process-based model to understand how soil organic carbon (SOC) of the rich fen might respond to projected climate change. This model, the peatland version of the dynamic organic soil Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (peatland DOS-TEM), was calibrated with data collected during 2005-2011 from the control treatment of a boreal rich fen in the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX). The performance of the model was validated with the experimental data measured from the raised and lowered water-table treatments of APEX during the same period. The model was then applied to simulate future SOC dynamics of the rich fen control site under various CO2 emission scenarios. The results across these emissions scenarios suggest that the rate of SOC sequestration in the rich fen will increase between year 2012 and 2061 because the effects of warming increase heterotrophic respiration less than they increase carbon inputs via production. However, after 2061, the rate of SOC sequestration will be weakened and, as a result, the rich fen will likely become a carbon source to the atmosphere between 2062 and 2099. During this period, the effects of projected warming increase respiration so that it is greater than carbon inputs via production. Although changes in precipitation alone had relatively little effect on the dynamics of SOC, changes in precipitation did interact with warming to influence SOC dynamics for some climate scenarios. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The response of soil organic carbon of a rich fen peatland in interior Alaska to projected climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; McGuire, Anthony David; Turetsky, Merritt R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Waddington, James Michael; Kane, Evan S.

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand the fate of carbon in boreal peatland soils in response to climate change because a substantial change in release of this carbon as CO2 and CH4 could influence the climate system. The goal of this research was to synthesize the results of a field water table manipulation experiment conducted in a boreal rich fen into a process-based model to understand how soil organic carbon (SOC) of the rich fen might respond to projected climate change. This model, the peatland version of the dynamic organic soil Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (peatland DOS-TEM), was calibrated with data collected during 2005–2011 from the control treatment of a boreal rich fen in the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX). The performance of the model was validated with the experimental data measured from the raised and lowered water-table treatments of APEX during the same period. The model was then applied to simulate future SOC dynamics of the rich fen control site under various CO2 emission scenarios. The results across these emissions scenarios suggest that the rate of SOC sequestration in the rich fen will increase between year 2012 and 2061 because the effects of warming increase heterotrophic respiration less than they increase carbon inputs via production. However, after 2061, the rate of SOC sequestration will be weakened and, as a result, the rich fen will likely become a carbon source to the atmosphere between 2062 and 2099. During this period, the effects of projected warming increase respiration so that it is greater than carbon inputs via production. Although changes in precipitation alone had relatively little effect on the dynamics of SOC, changes in precipitation did interact with warming to influence SOC dynamics for some climate scenarios.

  16. Water Source Utilization of Hammock and Pine Rockland Plant Communities in the Everglades, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A. K.; Sternberg, L.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.

    2007-12-01

    South Florida has a mosaic of plant communities resulting from topographical differences, spatially varying hydroperiods and fire. The only plant communities not flooded in the wet season are hardwood hammocks and often pine rocklands. Natural fires burn off litter accumulated in pine rocklands, with the exception of organic matter in sinkholes in the limestone bedrock. This relative lack of soil is thought to constrain pineland plants in the Everglades to depend upon groundwater that is typically low in nutrients. In contrast, adjoining hardwood hammocks have accumulated an organic soil layer that traps rainwater and nutrients. Plants in hammocks may be able to utilize this water and thereby access nutrients present in the litter. Hammocks are thus viewed as localized areas of high nutrients and instances of vegetation feedback upon the oligotrophic everglades landscape enabling establishment and survival of flood-intolerant tropical hardwood species. This study examines water source use and couples it to foliar nutrient concentrations of plants found in hammocks and pinelands. We examined the δ2H and δ18O of stem waters in plants in Everglades National Park and compared those with the δ2H and δ18O of potential water sources. In the wet season hammock plants accessed both groundwater and water in the surface organic soil layer while in the dry season they relied more on groundwater. A similar seasonal shift was observed in pineland plants; however groundwater constituted a much higher proportion of total water uptake throughout the year under observation. Concomitant with differential water utilization by hammock and pineland plant communities, we observed hammock plants having a significantly higher annual mean foliar N and P concentration than pineland plants. Most hammock species are intolerant of flooded soils and are thus constrained by the high water table in the wet season, yet access the lowered groundwater table in the dry season due to drying up of

  17. Compostos fenólicos totais, atividade antioxidante e antifúngica demultimisturas enriquecidas com a microalga Spirulina platensis

    OpenAIRE

    Bierhals, Vânia da Silva; Machado, Vanessa Goulart; Echevenguá, Walesca Oliveira; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Furlong, Eliana Badiale

    2009-01-01

    Com o objetivo de avaliar o conteúdo fenólico e as atividades antioxidantes e antifúngicas de multimisturas enriquecidas com Spirulina platensis, foram formuladas quatro multimisturas com farelo de arroz ou trigo, duas contendo Spirulina platensis e duas com sementes de girassol. Os compostos fenólicos foram estimados pela técnica de Folin-Ciocalteau. A atividade antioxidante foi avaliada por meio de inibição do radical livre DPPH e a atividade antifúngica foi analisada por meio de ensaio de ...

  18. Los fenómenos psicológicos no investigados en la comunicación educativa

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Torres, Emilio Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Propósito: el artículo tiene por objetivo valorar la importancia del estudio científico de los fenómenos psicológicos la sugestión, la percepción interpersonal y el rumor, los cuales inciden en la comunicación educativa. Tema: el tema que se trabaja es la existencia e influencia de dichos fenómenos subjetivos en los diferentes contextos formativos donde se desarrolla la comunicación interpersonal. Desarrollo: se realiza un análisis teórico sobre la comunicación educativa como concepto interdi...

  19. Regeneration of different plant functional types in a Masson pine forest following pine wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guang; Xu, Xuehong; Wang, Yuling; Lu, Gao; Feeley, Kenneth J; Yu, Mingjian

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt disease is a severe threat to the native pine forests in East Asia. Understanding the natural regeneration of the forests disturbed by pine wilt disease is thus critical for the conservation of biodiversity in this realm. We studied the dynamics of composition and structure within different plant functional types (PFTs) in Masson pine forests affected by pine wilt disease (PWD). Based on plant traits, all species were assigned to four PFTs: evergreen woody species (PFT1), deciduous woody species (PFT2), herbs (PFT3), and ferns (PFT4). We analyzed the changes in these PFTs during the initial disturbance period and during post-disturbance regeneration. The species richness, abundance and basal area, as well as life-stage structure of the PFTs changed differently after pine wilt disease. The direction of plant community regeneration depended on the differential response of the PFTs. PFT1, which has a higher tolerance to disturbances, became dominant during the post-disturbance regeneration, and a young evergreen-broad-leaved forest developed quickly after PWD. Results also indicated that the impacts of PWD were dampened by the feedbacks between PFTs and the microclimate, in which PFT4 played an important ecological role. In conclusion, we propose management at the functional type level instead of at the population level as a promising approach in ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation.

  20. Impact of pine needle leachates from a mountain pine beetle infested watershed on groundwater geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryhoda, M.; Sitchler, A.; Dickenson, E.

    2013-12-01

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic in the northwestern United States is a recent indicator of climate change; having an impact on the lodgepole pine forest ecosystem productivity. Pine needle color can be used to predict the stage of a MPB infestation, as they change color from a healthy green, to red, to gray as the tree dies. Physical processes including precipitation and snowfall can cause leaching of pine needles in all infestation stages. Understanding the evolution of leachate chemistry through the stages of MPB infestation will allow for better prediction of the impact of MPBs on groundwater geochemistry, including a potential increase in soil metal mobilization and potential increases in disinfection byproduct precursor compounds. This study uses batch experiments to determine the leachate chemistry of pine needles from trees in four stages of MPB infestation from Summit County, CO, a watershed currently experiencing the MPB epidemic. Each stage of pine needles undergoes four subsequent leach periods in temperature-controlled DI water. The subsequent leaching method adds to the experiment by determining how leachate chemistry of each stage changes in relation to contact time with water. The leachate is analyzed for total organic carbon. Individual organic compounds present in the leachate are analyzed by UV absorption spectra, fluorescence spectrometry, high-pressure liquid chromatography for organic acid analysis, and size exclusion chromatography. Leachate chemistry results will be used to create a numerical model simulating reactions of the leachate with soil as it flows through to groundwater during precipitation and snowfall events.

  1. Seedling regeneration on decayed pine logs after the deforestation events caused by pine wilt disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukasawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coarse woody debris (CWD forms an important habitat suitable for tree seedling establishment, and the CWD decay process influences tree seedling community. In Japan, a severe dieback of Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc. caused by pine wilt disease (PWD damaged huge areas of pine stands but creates huge mass of pine CWD. It is important to know the factors influencing seedling colonization on pine CWD and their variations among geographical gradient in Japan to expect forest regeneration in post-PWD stands. I conducted field surveys on the effects of latitude, climates, light condition, decay type of pine logs, and log diameter on tree seedling colonization at ten geographically distinct sites in Japan. In total, 59 tree taxa were recorded as seedlings on pine logs. Among them, 13 species were recorded from more than five sites as adult trees or seedlings and were used for the analyses. A generalized linear model showed that seedling colonization of Pinus densiflora was negatively associated with brown rot in sapwood, while that of Rhus trichocarpa was positively associated with brown rot in heartwood. Regeneration of Ilex macropoda had no relationships with wood decay type but negatively associated with latitude and MAT, while positively with log diameter. These results suggested that wood decay type is a strong determinant of seedling establishment for certain tree species, even at a wide geographical scale; however, the effect is tree species specific.

  2. Fe-N and (Fe, Ni)-N Fine Powders for Magnetic Recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Fashen

    1998-01-01

    Combining Moessbauer spectroscopy with magnetic property measurement, we have studied Fe-N and (Fe, Ni)-N powders for magnetic recording. The typical particles of the core (α-Fe)/shell (γ'-Fe 4 N) structure have been successfully prepared. All the products are stabilized in a multi-organic solution. It has been found that the coercivity can be changed from 300 to 800 Oe by adjusting the shape of the particles. The special saturation magnetization of the particles can be adjusted from 120 to 180emu/g and their chemical stability is improved by substituting nickel for iron in γ'-Fe 4 N. Following experiments for corrosion resistance, it is expected that (Fe, Ni)-N and the core/shell particles will be applied as recording media in the near future

  3. Fe-N and (Fe, Ni)-N Fine Powders for Magnetic Recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Fashen [Lanzhou University, Department of Physics (China)

    1998-12-15

    Combining Moessbauer spectroscopy with magnetic property measurement, we have studied Fe-N and (Fe, Ni)-N powders for magnetic recording. The typical particles of the core ({alpha}-Fe)/shell ({gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N) structure have been successfully prepared. All the products are stabilized in a multi-organic solution. It has been found that the coercivity can be changed from 300 to 800 Oe by adjusting the shape of the particles. The special saturation magnetization of the particles can be adjusted from 120 to 180emu/g and their chemical stability is improved by substituting nickel for iron in {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N. Following experiments for corrosion resistance, it is expected that (Fe, Ni)-N and the core/shell particles will be applied as recording media in the near future.

  4. Effects of peat-winning on the water environment at a sedge fen ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, L.

    1997-06-01

    Peatlands are used in agriculture and forestry for vegetational growth and in peat-winning for soil improvement, horticulture production and as fuel. A prerequisite in peatland use is drainage, with influences on water conditions in the peatland and in its surroundings. Environmental effects from such peatland use have been investigated at a sedge fen in central Sweden. Groundwater, runoff, water chemistry and streamwater biology were studied during almost 14 years. This period started with a virgin undrained peatland, later being drained for forest production and after a period of seven years intensively drained for peat-winning and with peat harvesting going on for another seven year period with hydrological investigations. Results show a lowered groundwater level, increased runoff and both higher concentrations of most elements and higher leaching from the drained peatland. Biomass and number of individuals of the benthic fauna in streamwater also increased. 7 refs

  5. Effects of peat-winning on the water environment at a sedge fen ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, L.

    1996-03-01

    Peatlands are used in agriculture and forestry for vegetational growth and in peat-winning for soil improvement, horticulture production and as fuel. A prerequisite in peatland use is drainage, with influences on water conditions in the peatland and its surroundings. Environmental effects from such peatland use have been investigated at a sedge fen in central Sweden. Groundwater, runoff, water chemistry and stream water biology were studied during almost 14 years. This period started with a virgin undrained peatland, later being drained for forest production and after a period of seven years intensively drained for peat-winning and with peat harvesting going on for another seven years period with hydrological investigations. Results show a lowered groundwater level, increased runoff and both higher concentrations of most elements and higher leaching from the drained peatland. Biomass and number of individuals of the benthic fauna in stream water also increased. 7 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Innovative wetland reclamation design case studies : the Suncor fen and pond 1 marsh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, C.A. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Price, J.; Rezanezhad, F. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada); Rochefort, L.; Graf, M. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Russell, B. [BGC Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Suncor Energy Inc. is an energy company strategically focused in Canada's Athabasca oil sands region. The company has more than 40 years of experience in pioneering commercial development. This presentation discussed reclamation requirements for Suncor Energy. Reclamation objectives that were addressed in this presentation included operating approvals, biodiversity and meeting stakeholder expectations. Several photographs of reclaimed forest areas were shown along with 5 freshwater wetland types and wetland values. Two innovative wetland reclamation design case studies were also presented, described and illustrated, with particular reference to the Suncor fen and pond 1 marsh. It was concluded that future work will involve finalizing site investigation and designs, as well as construction, vegetation, and monitoring. figs.

  7. Factors Influencing Mesostigmata Mites (Acari, Parasitiformes In The Alkaline Fen Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmane Ineta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesostigmata mite fauna was investigated in soil of one alkaline fen at Apšuciems in the Maritime Lowland in Latvia in 2009. Thirty sample plots were selected in the following way: half of them were located in Brown Bog Rush, Schoenus ferrugineus and half — in Saw-Sedge, Cladium mariscus prevailing habitat. Soil samples were collected using a soil borer. Vegetation cover was described in accordance with Braun-Blanquet classes. Mites were extracted using modified Berlese funnels. In total, more than 28 species were recorded, of them Prozercon kochi and Pergamasus vagabundus were dominant species. Mean density of Mesostigmata mites ranged from 520 to 2140 ind./m2. Mite abundance and distribution between habitats depended on vegetation cover of the vascular plants, while moss cover and soil pH had no significant influence.

  8. Stream characteristics and their implications for the protection of riparian fens and meadows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baattrup-Pedersen, A.; Larsen, S.E.; Andersen, Peter Mejlhede

    2011-01-01

    the influence of stream size, morphology and chemical water characteristics for the distribution of water-dependent terrestrial habitat types, i.e. alkaline fens, periodically inundated meadows and meadows in riparian areas in Denmark using an extensive data set covering a total of 254 stream reaches. A species......1. Running waters, including associated riparian areas, are embraced by international legal frameworks outlining targets for the preservation, protection and improvement of the quality of the environment. Interactions between stream and river processes and riparian habitats have not received much...... attention in the management of stream ecosystems, and integrated measures that consider both the ecological status of streams and rivers (sensu EU Water Framework Directive, WFD) and the conservation status of riparian habitats and species (sensu EU Habitats Directive, HD) are rare. 2. Here, we analysed...

  9. Cyberbullying : a faceta de um fenómeno em jovens universitários portugueses

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, Sofia Mateus

    2012-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Psicologia (Secção de Psicologia da Educação e da Orientação), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Psicologia, 2012 Com a crescente utilização das novas tecnologias de informação e comunicação (TIC) nascem grandes vantagens para os jovens, mas também a esta utilização acrescem alguns riscos. Um desses riscos diz respeito ao cyberbullying. Assim, o presente estudo pretende dar a conhecer o fenómeno em estudantes do ensino superior, através da aplicação do Questionário de ...

  10. Mountain Pine Beetle Dynamics and Reproductive Success in Post-Fire Lodgepole and Ponderosa Pine Forests in Northeastern Utah.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Lerch

    Full Text Available Fire injury can increase tree susceptibility to some bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae, but whether wildfires can trigger outbreaks of species such as mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins is not well understood. We monitored 1173 lodgepole (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Doug. and 599 ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Doug. ex Law pines for three years post-wildfire in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah in an area with locally endemic mountain pine beetle. We examined how the degree and type of fire injury influenced beetle attacks, brood production, and subsequent tree mortality, and related these to beetle population changes over time. Mountain pine beetle population levels were high the first two post-fire years in lodgepole pine, and then declined. In ponderosa pine, populations declined each year after initial post-fire sampling. Compared to trees with strip or failed attacks, mass attacks occurred on trees with greater fire injury, in both species. Overall, a higher degree of damage to crowns and boles was associated with higher attack rates in ponderosa pines, but additional injury was more likely to decrease attack rates in lodgepole pines. In lodgepole pine, attacks were initially concentrated on fire-injured trees, but during subsequent years beetles attacked substantial numbers of uninjured trees. In ponderosa pine, attacks were primarily on injured trees each year, although these stands were more heavily burned and had few uninjured trees. In total, 46% of all lodgepole and 56% of ponderosa pines underwent some degree of attack. Adult brood emergence within caged bole sections decreased with increasing bole char in lodgepole pine but increased in ponderosa pine, however these relationships did not scale to whole trees. Mountain pine beetle populations in both tree species four years post-fire were substantially lower than the year after fire, and wildfire did not result in population outbreaks.

  11. Mountain Pine Beetle Dynamics and Reproductive Success in Post-Fire Lodgepole and Ponderosa Pine Forests in Northeastern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Andrew P; Pfammatter, Jesse A; Bentz, Barbara J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-01-01

    Fire injury can increase tree susceptibility to some bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae), but whether wildfires can trigger outbreaks of species such as mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is not well understood. We monitored 1173 lodgepole (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Doug.) and 599 ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Doug. ex Law) pines for three years post-wildfire in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah in an area with locally endemic mountain pine beetle. We examined how the degree and type of fire injury influenced beetle attacks, brood production, and subsequent tree mortality, and related these to beetle population changes over time. Mountain pine beetle population levels were high the first two post-fire years in lodgepole pine, and then declined. In ponderosa pine, populations declined each year after initial post-fire sampling. Compared to trees with strip or failed attacks, mass attacks occurred on trees with greater fire injury, in both species. Overall, a higher degree of damage to crowns and boles was associated with higher attack rates in ponderosa pines, but additional injury was more likely to decrease attack rates in lodgepole pines. In lodgepole pine, attacks were initially concentrated on fire-injured trees, but during subsequent years beetles attacked substantial numbers of uninjured trees. In ponderosa pine, attacks were primarily on injured trees each year, although these stands were more heavily burned and had few uninjured trees. In total, 46% of all lodgepole and 56% of ponderosa pines underwent some degree of attack. Adult brood emergence within caged bole sections decreased with increasing bole char in lodgepole pine but increased in ponderosa pine, however these relationships did not scale to whole trees. Mountain pine beetle populations in both tree species four years post-fire were substantially lower than the year after fire, and wildfire did not result in population outbreaks.

  12. Preliminary investigations on picoplankton-related precipitation of alkaline-earth metal carbonates in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Jaquet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a routine water-quality survey in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland, suspended matter was collected by filtration on 0.2 μm membranes in July and August 2012 at the depth of maximal chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration (2 mg m–3. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous dark and gelatinous patches occluding the pores of the membranes, containing high numbers of picoplanktonic cells and, in places, clusters of high-reflectance smooth microspheres (1-2 μm in diameter. Their chemical composition, determined by semi-quantitative, energy-dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDS showed magnesium (Mg, calcium (Ca, strontium (Sr and barium (Ba (alkaline earth metals to be the dominant cations. Among the anions, phosphorus (P and carbon (C were present, but only the latter is considered here (as carbonate. The microspheres were subdivided into four types represented in a Ca-Sr-Ba ternary space. All types are confined within a domain bound by Ca>45, Sr<10 and Ba<50 (in mole %. Type I, the most frequent, displays a broad variability in Ba/Ca, even within a given cluster. Types II and III are devoid of Ba, but may incorporate P. Type IV contains only Ca. The Type I composition resembles that of benstonite, a Group IIA carbonate that was recently found as intracellular granules in a cyanobacterium from alkaline lake Alchichica (Mexico.Lake Geneva microspheres are solid, featureless and embedded in a mucilage-looking substance in the vicinity of, but seemingly not inside, picoplanktonic cells morphologically similar to Chlorella and Synechococcus. In summer 2012, the macroscopic physico-chemical conditions in lake Geneva epilimnion were such as to allow precipitation of Ca but not of Sr and Ba carbonates. Favourable conditions did exist, though, in the micro-environment provided by the combination of active picoplankton and a mucilaginous envelope. Further studies are ongoing to investigate the

  13. The first decade of oligotrophication in Lake Constance : I. The response of phytoplankton biomass and cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedke, Ursula; Schweizer, Anette

    1993-03-01

    Phytoplankton biomass and species composition were measured with a relatively high temporal resolution (once or twice a week during the growing season) from 1979 to 1989 in Lake Constance/Überlingersee. Over this period soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations during winter mixing were reduced by ca. 50% from 104 to 47 μg 1 -1 , which caused a prolongation and amplification of the epilimnetic P depletion during the growth period. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton reacted to the decrease of SRP in the following ways: (1) Algal biomass decreased at least proportionally to the winter SRP concentrations in summer, but not in spring and autumn when biomass fluctuated irregularly. (2) The peak of biomass concentration changed from summer to spring. (3) The earlier onset of epilimnetic P depletion during the season in recent years promoted a stronger growth of some pennate diatoms in spring. It caused an amplification of the silicon depletion in summer, which may cause still greater reduction of diatoms and total algal biomass in summer. (4) Reduction of algal biomass during the clear-water phase proper became shorter and less pronounced. (5) The temporal variability of algal biomass decreased in summer and autumn but not in spring. (6) Average cell sizes remained unchanged in summer and autumn but increased in spring during the beginning of oligotrophication. These results are largely in agreement with other studies on lake restoration and expectations derived from the PEG (Plankton Ecology Group) model (Sommer et al. 1986). They show that a 50% reduction of SRP concentrations during homothermy may have pronounced effects on seasonal dynamics of algal biomass in a large and deep lake. The algal response to the external change of SRP concentrations can be described by the Le Chatelier principle, implying that the internal structure of the system (e.g. species composition) changes in order to minimize the effect of the external pressure (e.g. reduction of total

  14. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of pelagic zooplankton elucidate ecohydrographic features in the oligotrophic Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kürten, Benjamin

    2015-11-10

    Although zooplankton occupy key roles in aquatic biogeochemical cycles, little is known about the pelagic food web and trophodynamics of zooplankton in the Red Sea. Natural abundance stable isotope analysis (SIA) of carbon (δ13C) and N (δ15N) is one approach to elucidating pelagic food web structures and diet assimilation Integrating the combined effects of ecological processes and hydrography, ecohydrographic features often translate into geographic patterns in δ13C and δ15N values at the base of food webs. This is due, for example, to divergent 15N abundances in source end-members (deep water sources: high δ15N, diazotrophs: low δ15N). Such patterns in the spatial distributions of stable isotope values were coined isoscapes. Empirical data of atmospheric, oceanographic, and biological processes, which drive the ecohydrographic gradients of the oligotrophic Red Sea, are under-explored and some rather anticipated than proven. Specifically, five processes underpin Red Sea gradients: a) monsoon-related intrusions of nutrient-rich Indian Ocean water; b) basin scale thermohaline circulation; c) mesoscale eddy activity that causes up-welling of deep water nutrients into the upper layer; d) the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N2) by diazotrophs; and e) the deposition of aerosol-derived N. This study assessed relationships between environmental samples (nutrients, chlorophyll a), oceanographic data (temperature, salinity, current velocity [ADCP]), particulate organic matter (POM), and net-phytoplankton, with the δ13C and δ15N values of zooplankton collected in spring 2012 from 16°28’ to 26°57’N along the central axis of the Red Sea. The δ15N of bulk POM and most zooplankton taxa increased from North (Duba) to South (Farasan). The potential contribution of deep water nutrient-fueled phytoplankton, POM, and diazotrophs varied among sites. Estimates suggested higher diazotroph contributions in the North, a greater contribution of POM in the South

  15. Fen Eğitiminde Öğrenme Döngüsü Modelleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Keleş

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Öğrenme döngüleri yapılandırıcı yaklaşımla fen eğitimi için geliştirilmiş modellerdir. Öğrenme döngüsü modelleri birbirini izleyen 3, 5 veya 7 evreden oluşmaktadır, bu evreler birbirinden ayrı ya da doğrusal değildir. Öğrenme döngüsü uygulamalarının yaratıcı ve eleştirel düşünme için öğrencileri teşvik etmesi ve bilime karşı olumlu tutum geliştirilmesi beklenmektedir. Kavramların daha iyi anlaşılmasına ve öğrencilerde ileri düşünme yeteneklerinin gelişmesine yardımcı olacağı düşünülmektedir. Bu makalede 5E ve 7E modellerinin her bir evresindeki öğrenci ve öğretmen rolleri üzerinde durulmaktadır. Model üzerinde gerçekleştirilen çalışmaların sonuçlarına dayanılarak modelin sağlayacağı olası faydalar tartışılmaktadır. Fen eğitiminde öğrenme döngüsü uygulamalarının yaygınlaştırılması amacıyla, öğretmen yetiştirme süreçlerinde öğrenme döngüsü modellerine yer verilmesi önerilmektedir.

  16. Análisis del fenómeno de la violencia contra los ancianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celín Pérez Nájera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta una revisión bibliográfica sobre el impacto social de la violencia contra los ancianos, desde la óptica criminológica. En el trabajo se utilizó como método investigativo el enfoque dialéctico-materialista de la realidad, que facilitó el engranaje de toda la investigación en diferentes etapas. Las valoraciones generalizadoras y sistematizadoras se elaboraron desde los enfoques modelativo y sistémico-estructural. Luego de analizar la diversidad de conceptos de violencia, se estableció una definición desde una formación social e histórica; existen dos principios que distinguen sus características: uno que la concibe como un fenómeno de carácter social y el teórico-ecológico, que consiste en el empleo de la fuerza física, económica o política, e implica el abuso de poder cómo único método para resolver el conflicto. Así mismo, se examinó el comportamiento de la violencia contra los ancianos en diversos países: España, Estados Unidos, Perú, Brasil, Panamá, Argentina, Colombia, Chile y Cuba. En general, son alarmantes las cifras de incidencia del fenómeno. De igual forma, en Cuba crece la victimización sobre los ancianos. Se aprecia como manifestación fundamental la violencia psicológica o emocional. Aunque existen mecanismos de denuncia, falta de divulgación y sistematicidad de acciones, que permitan enfrentar la incidencia de este mal social, que afecta a dicho grupo de riesgo de la violencia.

  17. Turismo religioso: fenómeno social y económico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maribel Tobón Perilla

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El turismo religioso, como fenómeno social y económico, ha cobrado interés entre académicos y empresarios por las dinámicas que ha generado en las comunidades receptoras de visitantes. Para los primeros, el interés radica en el estudio de las motivaciones, intereses y necesidades espirituales o culturales que parecen haber despertado los centros religiosos; para los segundos, el impacto económico y las oportunidades de rentas adicionales que generan los visitantes, creando nuevas oportunidades de negocios y fuentes de ingresos y empleo para las comunidades aledañas. Este documento hace una revisión a la bibliografía sobre el tema de turismo religioso en el mundo, para lo cual se consultaron las bases de datos ScienceDirect, Jstor, Ebsco, ProQuest y Google Académico, a fin de rastrear las publicaciones más relevantes y estudios empíricos sobre el tema, haciendo un recorrido desde 1963 hasta 2013. Se concluye que el turismo religioso es un fenómeno que tiene su antecedente en el peregrinaje a centros religiosos, pero donde además de las motivaciones, netamente religiosas –ofrecer un sacrificio, obtener un beneficio divino o expiar pecados–, existe un interés cultural, en términos de conocer centros históricos o profundizar sobre las raíces de un credo religioso. Adicionalmente, se observa cómo el turismo religioso se ha convertido en un motor de desarrollo económico de las ciudades receptoras de viajeros a sitios religioso.

  18. El Quijote y el fenómeno del quijotismo (Don Quixote and Quixotism Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Ruiz Fernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Estudia el presente artículo el fenómeno del quijotismo, ingrediente de la razón, y, por tanto, del comportamiento humano. Pero distingue entre el error del quijotismo estático y el sano proceder del dinámico. Para ello se vale del concepto de razón vital de Ortega y Gasset, así como del Quijote. Con respecto al primero, amplía la utilización que de la magna obra podía haber hecho y no hizo el ilustre filósofo. Y sobre el segundo, destaca sus insuficiencias de contenido, por no haber alcanzado el quijotismo dinámico, es decir, porque, queriendo criticar el idealismo desmedido del caballero manchego, termina por proponer otro quijote. De cualquier forma, el artículo señala cómo el irónico fenómeno del quijotismo no es un juego, para lo cual discute ciertas interpretaciones recientes del Quijote.Abstract: This article studies Quixotism phenomenon, ingredient of vital reason, and, consequently, of human behaviour. However, it distinguishes between the mistake of static quixotism and the right conduct of the dynamic one. In order to do so, it makes use of Ortega y Gasset's concept of Vital Reason, and Don Quixote’s as well. Concerning the first one, it highlights the insufficiency of its content since it has not fulfilled the dynamic quixotism, that is to say, because, with the intention to criticize La Mancha’s Knight’s excessive idealism, it ends up proposing other quixotic person. Anyway, this article points out how the ironic quixotism phenomenon is not a game, for which reason it discusses certain Don Quixote’s recent interpretations.

  19. Caledonian scots pine: origins and genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B Kinloch; R. D. Westfall; G. I. Forrest

    1986-01-01

    Monoterpene and isozyme loci, used as markers to study the genetic structure of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) native to Scotland, showed that the endemic populations are not genetically impoverished, in spite of severe contraction in range and numbers as a result of both natural and anthropogenic causes. On the contrary, variability in the relict...

  20. Producing high-quality slash pine seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Barnett; Sue Varela

    2003-01-01

    Slash pine is a desirable species. It serves many purposes and is well adapted to poorly drained flatwoods and seasonally flooded areas along the lower Coastal Plain of the Southeastern US. The use of high-quality seeds has been shown to produce uniform seedlings for outplanting, which is key to silvicultural success along the Coastal Plain and elsewhere. We present...

  1. Insects associated with ponderosa pine in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Stevens; J. Wayne Brewer; David A. Leatherman

    1980-01-01

    Ponderosa pine serves as a host for a wide variety of insects. Many of these, including all the particularly destructive ones in Colorado, are discussed in this report. Included are a key to the major insect groups, an annotated list of the major groups, a glossary, and a list of references.

  2. Esthetic considerations in management of shortleaf pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Stignani

    1986-01-01

    Application of esthetic concerns in the management of shortleaf pine or any species should be predicated on a systematic approach. Many mitigation techniques are available, but those selected will need to be carefully tailored to the specific situation and to the unique characteristics of plant communities and landforms involved. Some additional costs should be...

  3. Limber pine health in the Canadian Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyndi M. Smith; David Langor; Colin Myrholm; Jim Weber; Cameron Gillies; Jon Stuart-Smith

    2011-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) reaches the northern limit of its range at about 52 degrees latitude in Alberta (AB) and 51 degrees latitude in British Columbia (BC). Most populations are found on the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, with a few disjunct populations west of the Continental Divide in southeastern BC.

  4. Comparing Planting Tools for Container Longleaf Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Leduc; James D. Haywood; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2011-01-01

    We examined if compressing the soil to make a planting hole with a custom-built, solid round dibble versus coring the soil with a commercially available tube dibble influenced container-grown longleaf pine seedling development differently. Seven teen months after planting, the planting tool did not significantly affect root collar diameter, shoot or root mass, root-to-...

  5. Direct-seedling pines in the south

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold J. Derr; William F. Mann

    1971-01-01

    Direct seeding of the southern pines is a versatile reforestation technique that is being widely accepted by land managers. On many sites it is more economical than planting nursery-grown seedlings or waiting for natural reproduction. It is applicable on some sites where access, terrain, or drainage conditions make planting difficult. Commercial trials have proved it...

  6. Economic Impacts of the Southern Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Pye; Thomas P. Holmes; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David N. Wear

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the timber economic impacts of the southern pine beetle (SPB). Although we anticipate that SPB outbreaks cause substantial economic losses to households that consume the nonmarket economic services provided by healthy forests, we have narrowly focused our attention here on changes in values to timber growers and wood-products...

  7. Sugar pine management—an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Averell; John C. Crowell; Clarence R. Quick; Gilbert H. Schubert

    1955-01-01

    The purposes of this bibliography are to enumerate and describe publications that have a bearing on the growing of sugar pine for timber production. It is intended primarily for the information of forest managers, and it includes mainly those articles which appeared to pertain rather directly to management. Although a careful search was made for titles, no claim is...

  8. Regional vegetation management standards for commercial pine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the understanding gained from these trials allowed for the development of vegetation management standards, their operational and economic viability need to be tested on a commercial basis. Four pine trials were thus initiated to test the applicability of these standards when utilised on a commercial scale. Two of ...

  9. What's known about managing eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Lockard

    1959-01-01

    At the 1957 meeting of the Northeastern Forest Research Advisory Council the comment was made that although Eastern white pine has been the most studied forest tree species in the Northeast, the only literature on the management of the species was in reports on isolated and uncoordinated studies. There was no comprehensive compendium of knowledge.

  10. Electromagnetic treatment of loblolly pine seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. P. [Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA (United States); Krugman, S. L.

    1989-11-15

    Loblolly pine (Pinus faeda L.) seeds were exposed to an electromagnetic radiation treatment (Energy Transfer Process@, marketed by the Energy Transfer Corporation), and the effects of the treatments on seed germination, seedling development, disease resistance, and field performance of seedlings were evaluated. None of the evaluated variables showed any improvement over untreated controls.

  11. Anatomical characteristics of southern pine stemwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaine T. Howard; Floyd G. Manwiller

    1968-01-01

    To obtain a definitive description of the wood and anatomy of all 10 species of southern pine, juvenile, intermediate, and mature wood was sampled at three heights in one tree of each species and examined under a light microscope. Photographs and three-dimensional drawings were made to illustrate the morphology. No significant anatomical differences were found...

  12. Cone and Seed Maturation of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett

    1976-01-01

    If slightly reduced yields and viability are acceptable, loblolly and slash cone collections can begin 2 to 3 weeks before maturity if the cones are stored before processing. Longleaf(P. palestris Mill.) pine cones should be collected only when mature, as storage decreased germination of seeds from immature cones. Biochemical analyses to determine reducing sugar...

  13. Hydraulic adjustment of Scots pine across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Vilalta, J.; Cochard, H.; Mencuccini, M.; Sterck, F.J.; Herrero, A.; Korhonen, J.F.J.; Llorens, P.; Nikinmaa, E.; Nolè, A.; Poyatos, R.; Ripullone, F.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Zweifel, R.

    2009-01-01

    The variability of branch-level hydraulic properties was assessed across 12 Scots pine populations covering a wide range of environmental conditions, including some of the southernmost populations of the species. The aims were to relate this variability to differences in climate, and to study the

  14. Carbon sequestration and natural longleaf pine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Thapa; Dean Gjerstad; John Kush; Bruce Zutter

    2010-01-01

    The Southeastern United States was once dominated by a longleaf pine ecosystem which ranged from Virginia to Texas and covered approximately 22 to 36 million ha. The unique fire tolerant species provided the necessary habitat for numerous plant and animal species. Different seasons of prescribed fire have various results on the ecosystem and the carbon which is stored...

  15. Silvical characteristics of pitch pine (Pinus rigida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Little

    1959-01-01

    Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) grows over a wide geographical range - from central Maine to New York and extreme southeastern Ontario, south to Virginia and southern Ohio, and in the mountains to eastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, and western South Carolina. Because it grows mostly on the poorer soils, its distribution is spotty.

  16. Pine Gene Discovery Project - Final Report - 08/31/1997 - 02/28/2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, R. W.; Sederoff, R. R.; Kinlaw, C.; Retzel, E.

    2001-01-01

    Integration of pines into the large scope of plant biology research depends on study of pines in parallel with study of annual plants, and on availability of research materials from pine to plant biologists interested in comparing pine with annual plant systems. The objectives of the Pine Gene Discovery Project were to obtain 10,000 partial DNA sequences of genes expressed in loblolly pine, to determine which of those pine genes were similar to known genes from other organisms, and to make the DNA sequences and isolated pine genes available to plant researchers to stimulate integration of pines into the wider scope of plant biology research. Those objectives have been completed, and the results are available to the public. Requests for pine genes have been received from a number of laboratories that would otherwise not have included pine in their research, indicating that progress is being made toward the goal of integrating pine research into the larger molecular biology research community

  17. Modern distribution patterns of snails and plants in the Western Carpathian spring fens: is it a result of historical development?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horsák, M.; Hájek, Michal; Dítě, D.; Tichý, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2007), s. 53-60 ISSN 0260-1230 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB601630501; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6163302 Program:KJ Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Snails * plants * rich fens Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2007

  18. Contrasting species-environment relationships in communities of testate amoebae, bryophytes and vascular plants along the fen-bog gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Lamentowicz, Lukasz; van der Knaap, Willem O; Gabka, Maciej; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2010-04-01

    We studied the vegetation, testate amoebae and abiotic variables (depth of the water table, pH, electrical conductivity, Ca and Mg concentrations of water extracted from mosses) along the bog to extremely rich fen gradient in sub-alpine peatlands of the Upper Engadine (Swiss Alps). Testate amoeba diversity was correlated to that of mosses but not of vascular plants. Diversity peaked in rich fen for testate amoebae and in extremely rich fen for mosses, while for testate amoebae and mosses it was lowest in bog but for vascular plants in extremely rich fen. Multiple factor and redundancy analyses (RDA) revealed a stronger correlation of testate amoebae than of vegetation to water table and hydrochemical variables and relatively strong correlation between testate amoeba and moss community data. In RDA, hydrochemical variables explained a higher proportion of the testate amoeba and moss data than water table depth. Abiotic variables explained a higher percentage of the species data for testate amoebae (30.3% or 19.5% for binary data) than for mosses (13.4%) and vascular plants (10%). These results show that (1) vascular plant, moss and testate amoeba communities respond differently to ecological gradients in peatlands and (2) testate amoebae are more strongly related than vascular plants to the abiotic factors at the mire surface. These differences are related to vertical trophic gradients and associated niche differentiation.

  19. Effectiveness of turf stripping as a measure for restoring species-rich fen meadows in suboptimal hydrological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der D.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.

    2007-01-01

    Most species-rich fen meadows in nature reserves in The Netherlands are acidified due to weaker upwelling of base-rich groundwater. The present study investigated whether and why turf stripping combined with superficial drainage might promote the long-term recovery of such meadows and restore the

  20. A first principles calculations of structural, electronic, magnetic and dynamical properties of mononitrides FeN and CoN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, Himadri R.; Mankad, Venu; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present spin dependent bandstructure, structural and magnetic moment of FeN/CoN. ► The PDC, PHDOS, spin effect on phonons suggests ZB is preferred at ambient pressure. ► Spin calculation offers an opportunity to understand the role of spin on phonons. - Abstract: Using first principles density functional theoretical calculations, the present paper reports a systematic nonspin and spin polarized total energy calculations of the lattice dynamical and a number of other properties such as band structure, structural and magnetic moment of two mononitrides FeN and CoN. The phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states in the case of FeN and CoN have been determined for the first time and discussed. The structural and dynamical calculations suggest that the zinc blende structure is preferred at ambient pressure for both compounds. The rocksalt FeN has a nonzero magnetic moment while for FeN in zinc blende phase, it is either zero or very small. The zinc blende phase for both compounds is nonmagnetic. The spin calculation offers an intensive opportunity to understand the role of spin on the phonon properties of two mononitrides. Majority of the modes are sensitive to the effect of spin due to the modification of lattice constant. In this work we reveal that spin modifies the interionic interactions and local structure and leads to a flexible lattice which can be used for the functional materials design.

  1. Migração internacional de trabalho qualificado e o fenômeno do brain drain no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    FARIA, Bruna Maia de

    2008-01-01

    Maia de Faria, Bruna; Barrantes Hidalgo, Álvaro. Migração internacional de trabalho qualificado e o fenômeno do brain drain no Brasil. 2008. Dissertação (Mestrado). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Economia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, 2008.

  2. A conceptual model for the blooming behavior and persistence of the benthic mat-forming diatom Didymosphenia geminata in oligotrophic streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, James D. S.; Gillis, Carole-Anne; Bothwell, Max L.; Kilroy, Cathy; Packman, Aaron; Hassan, Marwan

    2012-06-01

    The benthic, mat-forming diatomDidymosphenia geminata has the unique ability to produce large amounts of algal biomass under oligotrophic conditions in cold, fast flowing streams and rivers. This presents an ecological paradox that challenges our current understanding of stream ecosystem dynamics. Our understanding of the drivers of D. geminata ecology is still limited. Here we present a conceptual model for the blooming behavior and persistence of this species to advance scientific understanding of strategies for life in fast flowing oligotrophic waters and support the design of future research and mitigation measures for nuisance algal blooms. The conceptual model is based on a synthesis of data and ideas from a range of disciplines including hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemistry, and ecology. The conceptual model highlights the role of water chemistry, river morphology, and flow thresholds in defining the habitat window for D. geminata. We propose that bed disturbance is a primary control on accumulation and persistence of D. geminataand that the removal threshold can be determined by synthesizing site-specific information on hydrology and geomorphology. Further, we propose that a key to understanding the didymo paradox is the separation of cellular reproduction and mat morphology with specific controls acting in respect of the different processes.

  3. Assessing the Roles of Iron, Macronutrients and Wet deposition in Controlling Phytoplankton Growth in Seasonally Oligotrophic Waters of the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwick, P.; Mulholland, M. R.; Najjar, R.; Bernhardt, P. W.; Price, L. M.; Sohst, B. M.; Sookhdeo, C.; Widner, B.

    2016-02-01

    The role of iron supply in regulating phytoplankton production in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ocean regions has been well established. Less clear, however, is the importance of iron for phytoplankton processes in other oceanic settings, such as coastal and oligotrophic waters, where differential changes in the supply and removal of dissolved iron (dFe) can result in limitation or co-limitation of growth due to iron deficiency. One such region of interest is the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), where previous field experiments have provided some evidence of co-limitation of algal growth by nitrogen and iron. In summer 2014 we conducted field sampling and shipboard experiments to assess the role of iron and macronutrient availability in controlling primary production in seasonally oligotrophic waters over the MAB continental slope, with a focus on the the impacts of wet deposition. Our results indicate that nitrogen was the proximate limiting nutrient, with a secondary limitation imposed by availability of phosphorus; we found no evidence for a deficiency in dFe, which was present at concentrations in the range 0.3-0.9 nM. Phytoplankton growth was clearly stimulated by the addition of natural rainwater, suggesting that summer rain events stimulate primary production in the MAB by contributing new nitrogen (primarily as ammonium) and phosphorus, whilst maintaining iron-replete conditions.

  4. Sapwood Stored Resources Decline in Whitebark and Lodgepole Pines Attacked by Mountain Pine Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Eleanor C; Sala, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Recent outbreaks of forest insects have been directly linked to climate change-induced warming and drought, but effects of tree stored resources on insects have received less attention. We asked whether tree stored resources changed following mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) attack and whether they affected beetle development. We compared initial concentrations of stored resources in the sapwood of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelmann) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex. Louden) with resource concentrations one year later, in trees that were naturally attacked by beetles and trees that remained unattacked. Beetles did not select host trees based on sapwood resources-there were no consistent a priori differences between attacked versus unattacked trees-but concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC), lipids, and phosphorus declined in attacked trees, relative to initial concentrations and unattacked trees. Whitebark pine experienced greater resource declines than lodgepole pine; however, sapwood resources were not correlated with beetle success in either species. Experimental manipulation confirmed that the negative effect of beetles on sapwood and phloem NSC was not due to girdling. Instead, changes in sapwood resources were related to the percentage of sapwood with fungal blue-stain. Overall, mountain pine beetle attack affected sapwood resources, but sapwood resources did not contribute directly to beetle success; instead, sapwood resources may support colonization by beetle-vectored fungi that potentially accelerate tree mortality. Closer attention to stored resource dynamics will improve our understanding of the interaction between mountain pine beetles, fungi, and host trees, an issue that is relevant to our understanding of insect range expansion under climate change. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  5. The effect of water limitation on volatile emission, tree defense response, and brood success of Dendroctonus ponderosae in two pine hosts, lodgepole and jack pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka eLusebrink

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae has recently expanded its range from lodgepole pine forest into the lodgepole × jack pine hybrid zone in central Alberta, within which it has attacked pure jack pine. This study tested the effects of water limitation on tree defense response of mature lodgepole and jack pine (Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana trees in the field. Tree defense response was initiated by inoculation of trees with the MPB-associated fungus Grosmannia clavigera and measured through monoterpene emission from tree boles and concentration of defensive compounds in phloem, needles, and necrotic tissues. Lodgepole pine generally emitted higher amounts of monoterpenes than jack pine; particularly from fungal-inoculated trees. Compared to non-inoculated trees, fungal inoculation increased monoterpene emission in both species, whereas water treatment had no effect on monoterpene emission. The phloem of both pine species contains (--α-pinene, the precursor of the beetle’s aggregation pheromone, however lodgepole pine contains two times as much as jack pine. The concentration of defensive compounds was 70-fold greater in the lesion tissue in jack pine, but only 10-fold in lodgepole pine compared to healthy phloem tissue in each species, respectively. Water-deficit treatment inhibited an increase of L-limonene as response to fungal inoculation in lodgepole pine phloem. The amount of myrcene in jack pine phloem was higher in water-deficit trees compared to ambient trees. Beetles reared in jack pine were not affected by either water or biological treatment, whereas beetles reared in lodgepole pine benefited from fungal inoculation by producing larger and heavier female offspring. Female beetles that emerged from jack pine bolts contained more fat than those that emerged from lodgepole pine, even though lodgepole pine phloem had a higher nitrogen content than jack pine phloem. These results suggest that jack pine chemistry

  6. Mechanisms controlling Cu, Fe, Mn, and Co profiles in peat of the Filson Creek Fen, northeastern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Day, K.; Filipek, L.H.; Papp, C.S.E.

    1990-01-01

    Filson Creek Fen, located in northeastern Minnesota, overlies a Cu-Ni sulfide deposit. A site in the fen was studied to evaluate the hydrogeochemical mechanisms governing the development of Fe, Mn, Co, and Cu profiles in the peat. At the study site, surface peat approximately 1 m thick is separated from the underlying mineralized bedrock by a 6-12 m thickness of lake and glaciofluvial sediments and till. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Co, and Cu in peat and major elements in pore water delineate a shallow, relatively oxidized, Cu-rich zone overlying a deeper, reduced, Fe-, Mn-, and Co-rich zone within the peat. Sequential metal extractions from peat samples reveal that 40-55% of the Cu in the shallow zone is associated with organic material, whereas the remaining Cu is distributed between iron-oxide, sulfide, and residual fractions. Sixty to seventy percent of the Fe, Mn, and Co concentrated in the deeper zone occur in the residual phase. The metal profiles and associations probably result from non-steady-state input of metals and detritus into the fen during formation of the peat column. The enrichment of organic-associated Cu in the upper, oxidized zone represents a combination of Cu transported into the fen with detrital plant fragments and soluble Cu, derived from weathering of outcrop and subcrop of the mineral deposit, transported into the fen, and fixed onto organic matter in the peat. The variable stratigraphy of the peat indicates that weathering processes and surface vegetation have changed through time in the fen. The Fe, Mn, and Co maxima at the base of the peat are associated with a maximum in detrital matter content of the peat resulting from a transition between the underlying inorganic sedimentary environment to an organic sedimentary environment. The chemistry of sediments and ground water collected beneath the peat indicate that mobilization of metals from sulfide minerals in the buried mineral deposit or glacial deposits is minimal. Therefore, the

  7. Rate-determining Step of Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) Reflects a Kinetic Bias against Long Flaps and Trinucleotide Repeat Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Mary E; Bilotti, Katharina; Huang, Ji; Delaney, Sarah

    2015-08-21

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a structure-specific nuclease responsible for removing 5'-flaps formed during Okazaki fragment maturation and long patch base excision repair. In this work, we use rapid quench flow techniques to examine the rates of 5'-flap removal on DNA substrates of varying length and sequence. Of particular interest are flaps containing trinucleotide repeats (TNR), which have been proposed to affect FEN1 activity and cause genetic instability. We report that FEN1 processes substrates containing flaps of 30 nucleotides or fewer at comparable single-turnover rates. However, for flaps longer than 30 nucleotides, FEN1 kinetically discriminates substrates based on flap length and flap sequence. In particular, FEN1 removes flaps containing TNR sequences at a rate slower than mixed sequence flaps of the same length. Furthermore, multiple-turnover kinetic analysis reveals that the rate-determining step of FEN1 switches as a function of flap length from product release to chemistry (or a step prior to chemistry). These results provide a kinetic perspective on the role of FEN1 in DNA replication and repair and contribute to our understanding of FEN1 in mediating genetic instability of TNR sequences. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. First report of the white pine blister rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola, infecting Pinus flexilis on Pine Mountain, Humboldt National Forest, Elko County, northeastern Nevada, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlev R. Vogler; Patricia E. Maloney; Tom Burt; Jacob W. Snelling

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, while surveying for five-needle white pine cone crops in northeastern Nevada, we observed white pine blister rust, caused by the rust pathogen Cronartium ribicola Fisch., infecting branches and stems of limber pines (Pinus flexilis James) on Pine Mountain (41.76975°N, 115.61622°W), Humboldt National Forest,...

  9. The hydrological and geochemical isolation of a freshwater bog within a saline fen in north-eastern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Scarlett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the oil sands development region near Fort McMurray, Alberta, wetlands cover ~62 % of the landscape, and ~95 % of these wetlands are peatlands. A saline fen was studied as a reference site for peatland reclamation. Despite highly saline conditions, a freshwater bog was observed in the path of local saline groundwater flow. The purpose of this study was to identify the hydrological controls that have allowed the development and persistence of a bog in this setting. The presence of bog vegetation and its dilute water chemistry suggest that saline groundwater from the fen rarely enters the bog, which functions predominantly as a groundwater recharge system. Chloride (Cl– and sodium (Na+ were the dominant ions in fen water, with concentrations averaging 5394 and 2307 mg L-1, respectively, while the concentrations in bog water were 5 and 4 mg L-1, respectively. These concentrations were reflected by salinity and electrical conductivity measurements, which in the fen averaged 9.3 ppt, and 15.8 mS cm-1, respectively, and in the bog averaged 0.1 ppt and 0.3 mS cm-1, respectively. A small ridge in the mineral substratum was found at the fen–bog margin, which created a persistent groundwater mound. Under the dry conditions experienced in early summer, groundwater flow was directed away from the bog at a rate of 14.6 mm day-1. The convex water table at the fen-bog margin impeded flow of saline water into the bog and instead directed it around the bog margin. However, the groundwater mound was eliminated during flooding in autumn, when the horizontal hydraulic gradient across the margin became negligible, suggesting the possibility of saline water ingress into the bog under these conditions.

  10. A decade of boreal rich fen greenhouse gas fluxes in response to natural and experimental water table variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefeldt, David; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Kane, Evan S.; McGuire, A. David; Waldrop, Mark P.; Turetsky, Merritt R.

    2017-01-01

    Rich fens are common boreal ecosystems with distinct hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology that influence their carbon (C) balance. We present growing season soil chamber methane emission (FCH4), ecosystem respiration (ER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary production (GPP) fluxes from a 9-years water table manipulation experiment in an Alaskan rich fen. The study included major flood and drought years, where wetting and drying treatments further modified the severity of droughts. Results support previous findings from peatlands that drought causes reduced magnitude of growing season FCH4, GPP and NEE, thus reducing or reversing their C sink function. Experimentally exacerbated droughts further reduced the capacity for the fen to act as a C sink by causing shifts in vegetation and thus reducing magnitude of maximum growing season GPP in subsequent flood years by ~15% compared to control plots. Conversely, water table position had only a weak influence on ER, but dominant contribution to ER switched from autotrophic respiration in wet years to heterotrophic in dry years. Droughts did not cause inter-annual lag effects on ER in this rich fen, as has been observed in several nutrient-poor peatlands. While ER was dependent on soil temperatures at 2 cm depth, FCH4 was linked to soil temperatures at 25 cm. Inter-annual variability of deep soil temperatures was in turn dependent on wetness rather than air temperature, and higher FCH4 in flooded years was thus equally due to increased methane production at depth and decreased methane oxidation near the surface. Short-term fluctuations in wetness caused significant lag effects on FCH4, but droughts caused no inter-annual lag effects on FCH4. Our results show that frequency and severity of droughts and floods can have characteristic effects on the exchange of greenhouse gases, and emphasize the need to project future hydrological regimes in rich fens.

  11. Silvicultural treatments for converting loblolly pine to longleaf pine dominance: Effects on resource availability and their relationships with planted longleaf pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huifeng Hu; G.Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the southeastern United States, land managers are currently interested in converting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations to species rich longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystems. In a 3-year study on moderately well- to well-drained soils of the Lower Coastal Plain in North Carolina, we examined the...

  12. Fen Bilgisi Öğretmen Adaylarının Kimya Bilgilerini Günlük Hayatla İlişkilendirebilme Düzeyleri

    OpenAIRE

    Yadigaroğlu, Yrd. Doç. Dr. Mustafa; DEMİRCİOĞLU, Doç. Dr. Gökhan; DEMİRCİOĞLU, Doç. Dr. Hülya

    2017-01-01

    Fen eğitiminin temel amaçlarındanbiri, öğrencilerin fen okur-yazarı olmalarını sağlayarak onları günlükyaşantılarında karşılaştıkları fen olaylarına anlam vermelerine yardımcıolmaktır. Günlük hayatla ya da bağlamı ile ilişkilendirilmeyen bilgi öğrencininzihninde her zaman eksik olacaktır. Bunun gerçekleştirilmesinde fen dersleriiçerisinde yer alan kimya önemli bir yere sahiptir. Bu düşünceden hareketleçalışmada, fen bilgisi öğretmen adaylarının kimya bilgilerini günlük hayatlailişkilendirebil...

  13. Xylem monoterpenes of pines: distribution, variation, genetics, function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Smith

    2000-01-01

    The monoterpenes of about 16,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) speciesand hybrids—largely from the western United States—were analyzed in this long-term study of the resistance of pines to attack by bark beetles (Coleoptera:Scolytidae), with special emphasis on resistance to the western pine beetle(Dendroctonus brevicomis). The samples were analyzed by gas liquid...

  14. Whitebark pine vulnerability to climate-driven mountain pine beetle disturbance in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jesse A; MacFarlane, William W; Willcox, Louisa

    2010-06-01

    Widespread outbreaks of mountain pine beetles (MPB) are occurring throughout the range of this native insect. Episodic outbreaks are a common occurrence in the beetles' primary host, lodgepole pine. Current outbreaks, however, are occurring in habitats where outbreaks either did not previously occur or were limited in scale. Herein, we address widespread, ongoing outbreaks in high-elevation, whitebark pine forests of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where, due to an inhospitable climate, past outbreaks were infrequent and short lived. We address the basic question: are these outbreaks truly unprecedented and a threat to ecosystem continuity? In order to evaluate this question we (1) present evidence that the current outbreak is outside the historic range of variability; (2) examine system resiliency to MPB disturbance based on adaptation to disturbance and host defenses to MPB attack; and (3) investigate the potential domain of attraction to large-scale MPB disturbance based on thermal developmental thresholds, spatial structure of forest types, and the confounding influence of an introduced pathogen. We conclude that the loss of dominant whitebark pine forests, and the ecological services they provide, is likely under continuing climate warming and that new research and strategies are needed to respond to the crisis facing whitebark pine.

  15. Diversity and decay ability of basidiomycetes isolated from lodgepole pines killed by the mountain pine beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, E; Kim, J-J; Lim, Y W; Au-Yeung, T T; Yang, C Y H; Breuil, C

    2011-01-01

    When lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Louden var. latifolia Engelm. ex S. Watson) that are killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its fungal associates are not harvested, fungal decay can affect wood and fibre properties. Ophiostomatoids stain sapwood but do not affect the structural properties of wood. In contrast, white or brown decay basidiomycetes degrade wood. We isolated both staining and decay fungi from 300 lodgepole pine trees killed by mountain pine beetle at green, red, and grey stages at 10 sites across British Columbia. We retained 224 basidiomycete isolates that we classified into 34 species using morphological and physiological characteristics and rDNA large subunit sequences. The number of basidiomycete species varied from 4 to 14 species per site. We assessed the ability of these fungi to degrade both pine sapwood and heartwood using the soil jar decay test. The highest wood mass losses for both sapwood and heartwood were measured for the brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola and the white rot Metulodontia and Ganoderma species. The sap rot species Trichaptum abietinum was more damaging for sapwood than for heartwood. A number of species caused more than 50% wood mass losses after 12 weeks at room temperature, suggesting that beetle-killed trees can rapidly lose market value due to degradation of wood structural components.

  16. Bathypelagic particle flux signatures from a suboxic eddy in the oligotrophic tropical North Atlantic: production, sedimentation and preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Karstensen, J.; Romero, O.; Baumann, K.-H.; Donner, B.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.; Iversen, M.; Fiedler, B.; Monteiro, I.; Körtzinger, A.

    2015-11-01

    Particle fluxes at the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO) in the eastern tropical North Atlantic for the period December 2009 until May 2011 are discussed based on bathypelagic sediment trap time series data collected at 1290 and 3439 m water depth. The typically oligotrophic particle flux pattern with weak seasonality is modified by the appearance of a highly productive and low oxygen anticyclonic modewater eddy (ACME) in winter 2010. The eddy passage was accompanied by unusually high mass fluxes, lasting from December 2009 to May 2010. Distinct biogenic silica (BSi) and organic carbon flux peaks were observed in February-March 2010 when the eddy approached CVOO. The flux of the lithogenic component, mostly mineral dust, was well correlated to that of organic carbon in particular in the deep trap samples, suggesting a close coupling. The lithogenic ballasting obviously resulted in high particle settling rates and, thus, a fast transfer of epi-/mesopelagic signatures to the bathypelagic traps. Molar C : N ratios of organic matter during the ACME passage were around 18 and 25 for the upper and lower trap samples, respectively. This suggests that some production under nutrient (nitrate) limitation in the upper few tens of meters above the zone of suboxia might have occurred in the beginning of 2010. The δ15N record showed a decrease from January to March 2010 while the organic carbon and N fluxes increased. The causes of enhanced sedimentation from the eddy in February/March 2010 remain elusive but nutrient depletion and/or a high availability of dust as ballast mineral for organic-rich aggregates might have contributed to the elevated fluxes during the eddy passage. Remineralization of sinking organic-rich particles could have contributed to the formation of a suboxic zone at shallow depth. Although the eddy has been formed in the African coastal area in summer 2009, no indication of coastal flux signatures were found in the sediment traps, suggesting an

  17. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, E.S.; Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Treat, C.C.; Petersen, D.G.; Waldrop, M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2 production potential at 10 cm depth (14.1 ± 0.9 μmol C g−1 d−1) was as high as aerobic CO2 production potential (10.6 ± 1.5 μmol C g−1 d−1), while CH4 production was low (mean of 7.8 ± 1.5 nmol C g−1 d−1). Denitrification enzyme activity indicated a very high denitrification potential (197 ± 23 μg N g−1 d−1), but net NO-3 reduction suggested this was a relatively minor pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. Abundances of denitrifier genes (nirK and nosZ) did not change across water table treatments. SO2-4 reduction also did not appear to be an important pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. The net accumulation of acetate and formate as decomposition end products in the raised water table treatment suggested that fermentation was a significant pathway for carbon mineralization, even in the presence of NO-3. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were the strongest predictors of potential anaerobic and aerobic CO2 production. Across all water table treatments, the CO2:CH4 ratio increased with initial DOC leachate concentrations. While the field water table treatment did not have a significant effect on mean CO2 or CH4 production potential, the CO2:CH4 ratio was highest in shallow peat incubations from the drained treatment. These data suggest that with continued drying or with a more variable water table, anaerobic CO2 production may be favored over CH4 production in this rich fen. Future research examining the potential for dissolved organic substances to facilitate anaerobic respiration, or alternative redox processes that limit the effectiveness of organic acids as substrates in anaerobic metabolism, would help explain additional

  18. Impacts of road construction and removal on the hydrologic and geochemical function of a fen peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C. M.; Petrone, R. M.; Sutherland, G.; Price, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Linear disturbances such as roads cover vast swaths of northeastern Alberta, the majority of which are wetlands with shallow and local hydrologic connections. Thus, the effects of road construction on wetland hydrological pathways can have significant implications on water movement within the region, and by extension the productivity of vegetation communities and carbon sequestration. However, little is known about the effect that roads have on wetland hydrology. In 2013, a gravel road built within a fen peatland was reclaimed to evaluate hydrologic impacts post removal. Prior to removal, ground and surface water flow was obstructed leading to surface ponding, and vegetation mortality was observed on the up-gradient (wet) side of the road. Rebounding of the peat column was observed throughout the fen immediately following road removal in 2013 (maximum of 12 cm, mean of 2 cm), with modest but slightly smaller expansion in 2014. For both years, peat rebound was greatest in areas where the road was removed. Peat physical properties contrasted sharply between the reclaimed road (RR) peat and the adjacent, unimpacted peatland (UP). Surface bulk densities (pb, 0-10 cm) ranged from 0.1-0.25 g cm-3 along the RR compared to 0.02-0.07 g cm-3 for the UP and on average, pb for all depths were lower at the RR compared to the UP. Similar spatial patterns were observed for peat porosity. Correspondingly low horizontal saturated hydraulic conductivities (Kh) were observed along the RR compared to the UP, averaging 5.7x10-4 m s-1 and 1.7x10-3 m s-1, respectively. The local flow system across the RR and thus subsurface flow was impeded by almost half (0.4 m d-1) compared to flow observed within the UP (0.8 m d-1), leading to ponding on the upgradient side. A marked change in hydrophysical properties and ground and surface water flow patterns post road removal has implications for plant reestablishment and restoration and will form the basis of further study.

  19. Compuestos fenólicos del olivo (Olea europea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maestro-Durán, R.

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Certain plant properties, such as the colour, the nutritional value, the resistance to microorganisms, the pharmacologic effects and the organoleptic character, are due to the phenolic compounds. It is interesting the study of phenolic compounds from olive because they:

    -Inhibit Gram+ microorganisms, such as Lactobacillus, which are involved in the fermentation of the olive fruit. -Inhibit the activity of cellulases and other enzymes. -Contribute to the stability and organoleptic character of virgin olive oil. -Inhibit the effect of microorganisms involved in the anaerobic depuration of vegetation water. Thus, the phenolic compounds are the major bothersome contaminants of these wastewater. -Have pharmacologic properties (to reduce blood pressure levels. -Are natural antioxidants.

    In the present review we describe the composition of the phenolic compounds from the olive fruit (pulp and seed, the olive oil and its by-products (vegetation water and rape and the olive leaves.

    Ciertas propiedades de las plantas, como el color, valor nutricional, autoprotección contra microorganismos, propiedades farmacológicas o caracteres organolépticos, son debidas a los compuestos fenólicos. Su estudio, en el caso del olivo, es de gran interés por diversas razones:

    -Por su carácter antibiótico, los fenoles de la aceituna inhiben los microorganismos Gram+, como Lactobacillus, necesarios para la fermentación de aceitunas de mesa. -Inhiben la acción de las celulasas y otras enzimas. -Son los responsables de la alta estabilidad de los aceites vírgenes de oliva, así como de alguno de sus caracteres organolépticos. -Inhiben la acción de los microorganismos responsables de la depuración anaerobia de los alpechines y son las sustancias contaminantes de estas aguas residuales cuya degradación para eliminar la DQO presenta más dificultades. -Tienen propiedades

  20. Saturated and unsaturated salt transport in peat from a constructed fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhayov, Reuven B.; Weber, Tobias K. D.; Price, Jonathan S.

    2018-02-01

    The underlying processes governing solute transport in peat from an experimentally constructed fen peatland were analyzed by performing saturated and unsaturated solute breakthrough experiments using Na+ and Cl- as reactive and non-reactive solutes, respectively. We tested the performance of three solute transport models, including the classical equilibrium convection-dispersion equation (CDE), a chemical non-equilibrium one-site adsorption model (OSA) and a model to account for physical non-equilibrium, the mobile-immobile (MIM) phases. The selection was motivated by the fact that the applicability of the MIM in peat soils finds a wide consensus. However, results from inverse modeling and a robust statistical evaluation of this peat provide evidence that the measured breakthrough of the conservative tracer, Cl-, could be simulated well using the CDE. Furthermore, the very high Damköhler number (which approaches infinity) suggests instantaneous equilibration between the mobile and immobile phases underscoring the redundancy of the MIM approach for this particular peat. Scanning electron microscope images of the peat show the typical multi-pore size distribution structures have been homogenized sufficiently by decomposition, such that physical non-equilibrium solute transport no longer governs the transport process. This result is corroborated by the fact the soil hydraulic properties were adequately described using a unimodal van Genuchten-Mualem model between saturation and a pressure head of ˜ -1000 cm of water. Hence, MIM was not the most suitable choice, and the long tailing of the Na+ breakthrough curve was caused by chemical non-equilibrium. Successful description was possible using the OSA model. To test our results for the unsaturated case, we conducted an unsaturated steady-state evaporation experiment to drive Na+ and Cl- transport. Using the parameterized transport models from the saturated experiments, we could numerically simulate the unsaturated

  1. Methane Exchange in a Coastal Fen in the First Year after Flooding - A Systems Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Juliane; Köhler, Stefan; Glatzel, Stephan; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background Peatland restoration can have several objectives, for example re-establishing the natural habitat, supporting unique biodiversity attributes or re-initiating key biogeochemical processes, which can ultimately lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Every restoration measure, however, is itself a disturbance to the ecosystem. Methods Here, we examine an ecosystem shift in a coastal fen at the southern Baltic Sea which was rewetted by flooding. The analyses are based on one year of bi-weekly closed chamber measurements of methane fluxes gathered at spots located in different vegetation stands. During measurement campaigns, we recorded data on water levels, peat temperatures, and chemical properties of peat water. In addition we analyzed the first 20 cm of peat before and after flooding for dry bulk density (DBD), content of organic matter and total amounts of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and other nutrients. Results Rewetting turned the site from a summer dry fen into a shallow lake with water levels up to 0.60 m. We observed a substantial die-back of vegetation, especially in stands of sedges (Carex acutiformis Ehrh). Concentrations of total organic carbon and nitrogen in the peat water, as well as dry bulk density and concentrations of C, N and S in the peat increased. In the first year after rewetting, the average annual exchange of methane amounted to 0.26 ± 0.06 kg m-2. This is equivalent to a 190-times increase in methane compared to pre-flooding conditions. Highest methane fluxes occurred in sedge stands which suffered from the heaviest die-back. None of the recorded environmental variables showed consistent relationships with the amounts of methane exchanged. Conclusions Our results suggest that rewetting projects should be monitored not only with regard to vegetation development but also with respect to biogeochemical conditions. Further, high methane emissions that likely occur directly after rewetting by flooding should

  2. Feminización del fenómeno migratorio ecuatoriano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Moreno Egas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La crítica situación económica y política del Ecuador en la última década del XX fue la coyuntura que agudizó el fenómeno migratorio presente desde mediados de ese siglo. América Latina, Norte América y en los últimos tiempos Europa, particularmente España e Italia son los lugares de destino de los ecuatorianos. Este hecho se caracteriza por ser amplio y diverso. Los migrantes provienen de todas las clases sociales, es multigeneracional y particularmente femenino. Los efectos de la crisis y situaciones particulares de violencia y marginación han obligado a las mujeres a buscar alternativas de trabajo fuera del país. La feminización del fenómeno migratorio, dentro o fuera de la legalidad, más allá de su lado bueno, - remesas para la familia que queda a tras, éxitos personales en los lugares de acogida y la perspectiva de reunificación de la familia -, coloca a las migrantes en situaciones de vulnerabilidad, origina rupturas familiares y pone en riesgo la seguridad de los niños por privárseles del papel protagónico que las madres cumplen en su crianza.___________________ABSTRACT:Ecuador’s critical economic and political situation during the last decade of the Twentieth Century was the trend that worsened the emigration phenomenon present from the middle of the century. Latin America, North America and, lately, Europe, particularly Spain and Italy, are the destinations for Ecuadorians. This fact is characterized by being broad and diverse. Emigrants come from all social classes, are multi-generational and particularly female. The effects of the crisis and the specific situations of violence and marginalization have forced women to seek options for work outside the country. The feminization of the emigration phenomenon inside or outside the law other than its good side – remittances to the family that stayed behind, personal success in the places where they are received and the perspective of reuniting with family

  3. The Effect of Water Limitation on Volatile Emission, Tree Defense Response, and Brood Success of Dendroctonus ponderosae in Two Pine Hosts, Lodgepole, and Jack Pine

    OpenAIRE

    Lusebrink, Inka; Erbilgin, Nadir; Evenden, Maya L.

    2016-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) has recently expanded its range from lodgepole pine forest into the lodgepole × jack pine hybrid zone in central Alberta, within which it has attacked pure jack pine. This study tested the effects of water limitation on tree defense response of mature lodgepole and jack pine (Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana) trees in the field. Tree defense response was initiated by inoculation of trees with the MPB-associated fungus Grosmannia clavig...

  4. Alkaline pretreatment of Mexican pine residues for bioethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline pretreatment of Mexican pine residues for bioethanol production. ... Keywords: Lignocellulosic biomass, alkaline pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentable sugars, fermentation. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(31), pp.

  5. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Mark E.

    2001-11-01

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring.

  6. Antioxidant potential of six pine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Anilda; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Roussis, Vassilios

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant efficacy of extracts obtained from six Pinus species (P. pinea, P. brutia, P. radiata, P. halepensis, P. attenuata, P. nigra) growing in natural forests in Southern Greece. Specimens of fresh, dry needles and pine bark were extracted and fractionated with a variety of organic solvents and the efficient concentration and their radical scavenging activity was evaluated by the Co(II)/EDTA induced luminol plateau chemiluminescence assay. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Tolerance of Loblolly Pines to Fusiform Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Walkinshaw; James P. Barnett

    1995-01-01

    Loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) that were 8 to 17 yr old tolerated one to three fusiform rust (Cronartium quercuum [Berk.] Miyabe ex Shirai f. sp. fusiforme) galls in their stems.Families with four or more galls in their stems lost 2.5% or more of the trees by age 17.In living trees with less than four stem galls, diameter growth was comparable to...

  8. ¹H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lodgepole Pine Wood Chips Affected by the Mountain Pine Beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoruk, Tara M; Hartley, Ian D; Teymoori, Roshanak; Liang, Jianzhen; Peemoeller, Hartwig

    2010-12-31

    In this study, wood-water interactions of mountain pine beetle affected lodgepole pine were found to vary with time since death. Based on an analysis of magnetization components and spin-spin relaxation times from 1H NMR, it was determined that the mountain pine beetle attack does not affect the crystalline structure of the wood. Both the amorphous structure and the water components vary with time since death, which could be due to the fungi present after a mountain pine beetle attack, as well as the fact that wood from the grey-stage of attack cycles seasonally through adsorption and desorption in the stand.

  9. Leaf-litter microfungal community on poor fen plant debris in Torfy Lake area (Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wilk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to initially evaluate the species diversity of microfungi growing on litter of 15 plant species occurring on the poor fen and neighbouring area of the Torfy Lake, Masovian voivodeship, Poland. The lake is located near the planned road investment (construction of the Warsaw southern express ring road S2. The place is biologically valuable as there are rare plant communities from Rhynchosporion albae alliance protected under the Habitats Directive adopted by the European Union. On the examined plant debris 73 taxa of fungi were recorded (3 basidiomycetes, 13 ascomycetes, 2 zygomycetes, 43 anamorphic ascomycetes, 12 unidentified. Two of them, Dicranidion sp. and Wentiomyces sp. are presented here as new to Poland. Among the plant species examined, the litter of Rhododendron tomentosum harbored the highest number of fungal taxa (16. The highest percents of substrate-specific microfungi (i.e. recorded only on one plant species was noted on R. tomentosum (81.3 %, and Pteridium aquilinum (75%. It is emphasized that the lake area should be protected not only because of rare plant community but also because of the uniqueness and diversity of mycobiota.

  10. Characterizing Early Succession Following Wildfires at Different Severities in Boreal Bog and Fen Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E. J.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Kane, E. S.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Endres, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic-boreal region is experiencing changes in climate, trending toward warmer summers, resulting in a greater occurrence of wildfires with longer burning periods and higher intensities. Drought-like conditions have dried surface fuels, leading to a higher probability of ignition, even in lowland peatlands. Previous work has been done to characterize post-fire succession rates in Arctic-boreal upland sites, but much less is known of fire effects and early successional dynamics in lowlands. Wildland fires are the number one disturbance in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT), which characteristically burn at high intensities with large flame fronts, and result in some of the biggest wildfires in the world. Areas surrounding the Great Slave Lake, NWT—including parts of the Taiga Plains, Taiga Shield, and Boreal Plains ecozones—experienced exceptional wildfire activity in 2014 and 2015. We characterized burn severity of the bog and fen peat surface and canopy layers at several burned sites. To determine if the severe ground or crown wildfires were stand-replacing events, we characterized post-fire vegetation in peatlands in 2015 and 2016 based on seedling regeneration. We stratified sites according to estimated water residence times across the three ecozones and made comparisons between data collected at the same sites across years. This work adds much needed context for post-fire succession in boreal peatland ecosystems, as the susceptibility of these systems to burning will continue to increase with a warming climate.

  11. El fenómeno del Greenwashing y su impacto sobre los consumidores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Hallama

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hoy en día y mediante una publicidad sofisticada, las empresas tratan de proyectar una imagen respetuosa con el medio ambiente en la percepción de los consumidores. Esta imagen no refleja necesariamente la realidad. Se habla de “Greenwashing” cuando una empresa utiliza la ampliación selectiva de información medioambiental positiva con la finalidad de causar una imagen distorsionada donde los aspectos positivos predominan mas del debido. Este artículo pretende de abordar este fenómeno y avaluar su existencia, importancia y el efecto causado sobre los consumidores mediante el diseño de una metodología piloto para la investigación, aplicando ésta a una muestra de estudiantes. Los resultados indican que la imagen transmitida por la publicidad de cinco grandes empresas seleccionadas contrasta con ejemplos de mala gestión y que esta manipulación influye en la percepción que tiene la muestra encuestada. Los estudiantes de Ciencias Ambientales encuestados presentan ser ligeramente más resistentes contra el Greenwashing debido a su formación, pero también incorporan mayoritariamente el discurso oficial procedente de las relaciones públicas empresariales.

  12. Efectos ecológicos del fenómeno ENOS en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesid Carvajal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El fenómeno ENOS, tiene un sustancial efecto sobre las variaciones del clima a nivel mundial; por lo tanto, no sorprende que sus efectos tengan un impacto ecológico y socioeconómico fuerte, alterando la seguridad alimentaria de los países a nivel mundial. Ante este panorama, es comprensible que haya despertado el mayor interés mundial, no sólo en los especialistas en meteorología y oceanografía sino también entre biólogos, ecólogos, físicos, matemáticos, agrónomos, hidrólogos, economistas, sociólogos y planificadores, entre otros. En el presente documento, se muestra algunos de los principales efectos ecológicos en Colombia durante las fases extremas cálida (El Niño y fría (La Niña, indicando que es una necesidad urgente, orientar la investigación en sus causas, consecuencias e impactos.

  13. Modeling thermodynamics of Fe-N phases; characterisation of e-Fe2N1-z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekelharing, M.I.; Böttger, A.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to arrive at modeling the thermodynamics of Fe-N phases, including long-range (LRO) and short-range ordering (SRO) of the N atoms, it is important to understand the role of N interstitially dissolved in an Fe-host lattice. The crystal structure of -Fe2N1-z consists of an h.c.p. iron...... sublattice and a hexagonal nitrogen sublattice formed by octahedral interstices of the Fe sublattice [1]. Two ground-state structures have been proposed for the ordered arrangement of the N atoms on their own sublattice [1], which were shown to be thermodynamically favourable [2]: configuration A for Fe2N1...... investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A thermodynamic model accounting for the two configurations of LRO of the N atoms [2,3] was fitted to the N-absorption isotherm at 723 K and resulted in the occupancies of the sites of the nitrogen sublattice. A miscibility gap between...

  14. Una mirada al fenómeno de la violencia escolar en Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Arias-Sandoval

    2009-06-01

    En el actual contexto educativo, padres de familia, estudiantes, docentes, medios de comunicación y demás sectores de la sociedad costarricense, manifiestan su preocupación ante el problema de la violencia escolar, fenómeno social que ha venido en aumento en los últimos años. Sus manifestaciones se perciben por medio de conductas de maltrato, intimidación, agresión verbal o física entre jóvenes, y que se construye por medio de prácticas culturales. De ahí que, para comprender este problema, se debe reflexionar acerca de las posibles causas, teniendo en cuenta el contexto en el cual se desarrolla la convivencia social en cada centro educativo. Algunas de las manifestaciones de violencia tienen su origen en la familia, en la comunidad, en la imitación de patrones de conducta y en la influencia de los medios de información de masa. Además, estos comportamientos son potenciados por el modelo curricular vigente, lo que genera resistencia a las normas institucionales.

  15. Three-dimensional information extraction from GaoFen-1 satellite images for landslide monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixin; Yang, Baolin; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Futao; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Qing

    2018-05-01

    To more efficiently use GaoFen-1 (GF-1) satellite images for landslide emergency monitoring, a Digital Surface Model (DSM) can be generated from GF-1 across-track stereo image pairs to build a terrain dataset. This study proposes a landslide 3D information extraction method based on the terrain changes of slope objects. The slope objects are mergences of segmented image objects which have similar aspects; and the terrain changes are calculated from the post-disaster Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from GF-1 and the pre-disaster DEM from GDEM V2. A high mountain landslide that occurred in Wenchuan County, Sichuan Province is used to conduct a 3D information extraction test. The extracted total area of the landslide is 22.58 ha; the displaced earth volume is 652,100 m3; and the average sliding direction is 263.83°. The accuracies of them are 0.89, 0.87 and 0.95, respectively. Thus, the proposed method expands the application of GF-1 satellite images to the field of landslide emergency monitoring.

  16. Fenômeno, estrutura, sintoma e clínica: a droga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Alberti

    Full Text Available Partindo de uma leitura que se baseia em quatro autores brasileiros, este trabalho problematiza e verifica posições teóricas acerca do fenômeno toxicomaníaco e levanta a hipótese de que é possível, com o discurso do analista, em certo contexto e a partir de certas condições, apontar a toxicomania como equivalente ao sintoma no discurso da histérica, o que abre vias para a construção de uma clínica em que prevaleça a aposta no desejo do analista. Ao retomar as referências freudianas quanto à equivalência da droga com o discurso religioso e suas funções de entorpecimento, verificase uma possível sustentação metafórica, necessária para qualquer formação de sintoma. Por outro lado, ao retomar as referências de Lacan quanto ao discurso do capitalista como o discurso do mestre contemporâneo, a questão é de sustentar a possibilidade de a droga fazer obstáculo ao livre funcionamento do gozo do mestre nesse discurso.

  17. Dendrochronology of bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1953 the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has conducted dendrochronological studies of bristlecone pine Pinus longaeva D.K. Bailey, sp. nov.) in the White Mountains of California. This research resulted in the establishment of a continuous tree-ring sequence of 8253 yr. The millennia-old pines have emerged as a unique source of chronological data and the precisely dated wood is essential to certain paleoenvironmental and geophysical investigations. Over 1000 dendrochronologically dated decade samples of bristlecone pine supplied to three C-14 laboratories have been used to calibrate the radiocarbon time scale for the past seven millennia, a development of far reaching consequences in the fields of archaeology and geology. In addition, recent advances in other methods of analyzing past climatic variability - techniques involving stable isotope ratios, amino acid racemization, remanent magnetism and trace element abundances - have greatly increased the demand for wood of known age and, hence, for chronology development. Spanning the past 7500 yr, 1138 prepared decade samples, with a total weight of nearly 16 kg are available for study. (author)

  18. Calculating wind profiles above a pine forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E.; Dexter, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    A major part of the environmental transport work at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) involves the dispersion of airborne pollutants (aerosols and gases). A major part of the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site is covered with pine forests. Because forests are ''rough'' surfaces which increase turbulence and surface shear stress and, hence, alter the dispersion patterns, the nature of the wind profiles above the forests is being investigated. Two methods for determining the surface shear caused by the atmospheric wind field over a pine plantation were compared. Friction velocity [the square root of the ratio of shearing stress over the density of air; U/sub */ = (stress/density)1/2] calculated by eddy correlation was compared with friction velocity calculated from wind profiles. Data from the first five meters above the pine forest were compared. The data indicated that there was no significant difference in the mean friction velocity measured by each method. However, there were large differences in individual values calculated by the two methods for many of the measurement periods. An attempt was made to reconcile the differences in the measured values, but no satisfactory method was found

  19. Water level, vegetation composition, and plant productivity explain greenhouse gas fluxes in temperate cutover fens after inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Merten; Augustin, Jürgen; Burlo, Andrei; Yarmashuk, Tatsiana; Chuvashova, Hanna; Thiele, Annett; Freibauer, Annette; Tikhonov, Vitalij; Hoffmann, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    Peat extraction leaves a land surface with a strong relief of deep cutover areas and higher ridges. Rewetting inundates the deep parts, while less deeply extracted zones remain at or above the water level. In temperate fens the flooded areas are colonized by helophytes such as Eriophorum angustifolium, Carex spp., Typha latifolia or Phragmites australis dependent on water depth. Reeds of Typha and Phragmites are reported as large sources of methane, but data on net CO2 uptake are contradictory for Typha and rare for Phragmites. Here, we analyze the effect of vegetation, water level and nutrient conditions on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for representative vegetation types along water level gradients at two rewetted cutover fens (mesotrophic and eutrophic) in Belarus. Greenhouse gas emissions were measured campaign-wise with manual chambers every 2 to 4 weeks for 2 years and interpolated by modelling. All sites had negligible nitrous oxide exchange rates. Most sites were carbon sinks and small GHG sources. Methane emissions generally increased with net ecosystem CO2 uptake. Mesotrophic small sedge reeds with water table around the land surface were small GHG sources in the range of 2.3 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. Eutrophic tall sedge - Typha latifolia reeds on newly formed floating mats were substantial net GHG emitters in the range of 25.1 to 39.1 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr. They represent transient vegetation stages. Phragmites reeds ranged between -1.7 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1 with an overall mean GHG emission of 1.3 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. The annual CO2 balance was best explained by vegetation biomass, which includes the role of vegetation composition and species. Methane emissions were obviously driven by biological activity of vegetation and soil organisms. Shallow flooding of cutover temperate fens is a suitable measure to arrive at low GHG emissions. Phragmites australis establishment should be promoted in deeper flooded areas and will lead to moderate, but

  20. Variability of rRNA Operon Copy Number and Growth Rate Dynamics of Bacillus Isolated from an Extremely Oligotrophic Aquatic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Anistro, Jorge A.; Eguiarte-Fruns, Luis E.; Delgado-Sapién, Gabriela; Márquez-Zacarías, Pedro; Gasca-Pineda, Jaime; Learned, Jennifer; Elser, James J.; Olmedo-Alvarez, Gabriela; Souza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rrn) operon is a key suite of genes related to the production of protein synthesis machinery and thus to bacterial growth physiology. Experimental evidence has suggested an intrinsic relationship between the number of copies of this operon and environmental resource availability, especially the availability of phosphorus (P), because bacteria that live in oligotrophic ecosystems usually have few rrn operons and a slow growth rate. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a complex aquatic ecosystem that contains an unusually high microbial diversity that is able to persist under highly oligotrophic conditions. These environmental conditions impose a variety of strong selective pressures that shape the genome dynamics of their inhabitants. The genus Bacillus is one of the most abundant cultivable bacterial groups in the CCB and usually possesses a relatively large number of rrn operon copies (6–15 copies). The main goal of this study was to analyze the variation in the number of rrn operon copies of Bacillus in the CCB and to assess their growth-related properties as well as their stoichiometric balance (N and P content). We defined 18 phylogenetic groups within the Bacilli clade and documented a range of from six to 14 copies of the rrn operon. The growth dynamic of these Bacilli was heterogeneous and did not show a direct relation to the number of operon copies. Physiologically, our results were not consistent with the Growth Rate Hypothesis, since the copies of the rrn operon were decoupled from growth rate. However, we speculate that the diversity of the growth properties of these Bacilli as well as the low P content of their cells in an ample range of rrn copy number is an adaptive response to oligotrophy of the CCB and could represent an ecological mechanism that allows these taxa to coexist. These findings increase the knowledge of the variability in the number of copies of the rrn operon in the genus Bacillus and give insights about the

  1. Metódica: Articulación sistema teórico, fenómeno y procesos en el objeto de estudio. Una perspectiva desde el fenómeno pobreza

    OpenAIRE

    Yajaira Jiménez Zabala

    2011-01-01

    En este artículo discutimos la visión metódica que toma como apoyo el pivote entre lo cualitativo, lo cuantitativo y el orden de complejidad, en un enfoque plurimetódico, a través del cual se construyó la visión de la pobreza como objeto de estudio. Tal selección, está justificada en tanto se entiende la pobreza como un fenómeno social complejo, por las diversas aristas que le identifican. La combinación de los enfoques metodológicos permitió la aprehensión de los diferentes aspectos del fenó...

  2. The distribution and migration of sodium from a reclaimed upland to a constructed fen peatland in a post-mined oil sands landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Eric D; Ketcheson, Scott J; Price, Jonathan S

    2018-07-15

    Post-mine landscape reclamation of the Athabasca Oil Sands Region requires the use of tailings sand, an abundant mine-waste material that often contains large amounts of sodium (Na + ). Due to the mobility of Na + in groundwater and its effects on vegetation, water quality is a concern when incorporating mine waste materials, especially when attempting to construct groundwater-fed peatlands. This research is the first published account of Na + redistribution in groundwater from a constructed tailings sand upland to an adjacent constructed fen peat deposit (Nikanotee Fen). A permeable petroleum coke layer underlying the fen, extending partway into the upland, was important in directing flow and Na + beneath the peat, as designed. Initially, Na + concentration was highest in the tailings sand (average of 232mgL -1 ) and lowest in fen peat (96mgL -1 ). Precipitation-driven recharge to the upland controlled the mass flux of Na from upland to fen, which ranged from 2 to 13tons Na + per year. The mass flux was highest in the driest summer, in part from dry-period flowpaths that direct groundwater with higher concentrations of Na + into the coke layer, and in part because of the high evapotranspiration loss from the fen in dry periods, which induces upward water flow. With the estimated flux rates of 336mmyr -1 , the Na + arrival time to the fen surface was estimated to be between 4 and 11years. Over the four-year study, average Na + concentrations within the fen rooting zone increased from 87 to 200mgL -1 , and in the tailings sand decreased to 196mgL -1 . The planting of more salt-tolerant vegetation in the fen is recommended, given the potential for Na + accumulation. This study shows reclamation designs can use layered flow system to control the rate, pattern, and timing of solute interactions with surface soil systems. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Decade-long time delays in nutrient and plant species dynamics during eutrophication and re-oligotrophication of Lake Fure 1900–2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Båstrup-Spohr, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Fure, Denmark, spanning the transformation from pristine environmental conditions in the early 1900s through a period (1920–1970) of eutrophication – from accelerating sewage input of phosphorus (P) – and subsequent re-oligotrophication after sewage cleaning (1970–2015). We examine time delays between...... sediment release. Fifty years of eutrophication led to a reduction in aquatic macrophyte richness from 36 species to 12. Species’ responses were closely related to their growth strategy and depth distribution. Deep-growing mosses, charophytes and short angiosperms disappeared, while tall angiosperms...... in species dominance takes longer than colonization by new species. Synthesis. Time delays of P concentrations, water clarity and macrophyte richness and composition were long and complex. Neglecting growth strategies of species makes application of extinction debt and colonization credit concepts dubious...

  4. Fenóis totais, atividade antioxidante e constituintes químicos de extratos de Anacardium occidentale L., Anacardiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana H. Chaves

    Full Text Available O presente artigo relata o isolamento e identificação do palmitato, oleato e linoleato de sitosterila, sitosterol, estigmasterol, 3-O-β-D-galactopiranosídeo do sitosterol, 3-O-β-Dgalactopiranosídeo do estigmasterol, 3-O-β-D-glicopiranosídeo do sitosterol e uma mistura de ácidos anacárdicos (monoeno e dieno do extrato etanólico de cascas do caule de Anacardium occidentale L., Anacardiaceae, bem como do sitosterol, estigmasterol, lupeol, β-amirina, catequina e epicatequina do extrato etanólico do tegumento da castanha de caju in natura. Os extratos EtOH da casca e do tegumento foram avaliados quanto ao conteúdo de fenóis totais e atividade antioxidante. O extrato etanólico das cascas do caule apresentou maior conteúdo de compostos fenólicos e percentual de atividade antioxidante.

  5. Biodegradación de compuestos fenólicos del alpechín con Aspergillus terreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Paeja, María P.

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater degradation by Aspergillus terreus and under aerobic conditions at 28°C, was measured by the parameter of phenol content. We have explored the effect of different concentrations of olive mill wastewater upon the activity of Aspergillus terreus. Through HPLC, 10 phenol compounds (90% of the total phenolic content of the olive mill wastewater were identified.Se estudia la degradación de alpechines con Aspergillus terreus en condiciones de aerobiosis y temperatura de 28°C, utilizando como parámetro el contenido fenólico. Se analiza el efecto de la concentración de alpechín con Aspergillus terreus utilizando el mismo parámetro. Se han identificado por cromatografía líquida de alta eficacia (CLAE 10 compuestos fenólicos que suponen el 90% del total del alpechín.

  6. The influence of nanoflagellates on the spatial variety of picoplankton and the carbon flow of the microbial food web in the oligotrophic subtropical pelagic continental shelf ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Tsai, An-Yi; Tsai, Pei-Jung; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Huang, Bang-Qin; Tsai, Sheng-Fang

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the mechanism of the spatial dynamics of picoplankton community (bacteria and Synechococcus spp.) and to estimate the carbon flux of the microbial food web in the oligotrophic Taiwan Warm Current Water of the subtropical marine pelagic ecosystem, we conducted size-fractionation experiments during five cruises by the R/V Ocean Research II during the summers of 2010 and 2011 in the southern East China Sea. We carried out culture experiments using surface water, which according to a temperature-salinity (T-S) diagram, is characterized as oligotrophic Taiwan Current Warm Water. We found a negative correlation between bacteria growth rate and temperature, and another negative correlation between nitrate and temperature indicating that the active growth of heterotrophic bacteria might be induced by nutrients lifted from a deep layer by cold upwelling water. This finding suggests that the area we studied was a bottom-up control pelagic ecosystem. Upwelling brings nutrient-rich water to the euphotic zone and promotes bacterial growth, resulting in increased picoplankton biomass, which increases the consumption rate of nanoflagellates. The net growth rate (growth rate-grazing rate) becomes negative when the densities of bacteria and Synechococcus spp. are lower than the threshold values. The interaction between growth and grazing will limit the abundance of bacteria (105-106 cells ml-1) and Synechococcus spp. (104-105 cells ml-1) within a narrow range. Meanwhile, 61% of bacteria production and 54% of Synechococcus spp. production are transported to a higher trophic level (nanoflagellate), though the cascade effect might cause an underestimation of both percentages of transported carbon. Based on the successive size-fractionation experiments, we estimated that the predation values were underestimated and that the diet of nanoflagellates is composed of 64% bacteria and 36% Synechococcus spp.

  7. Long-Term Trends and Temporal Synchrony in Plankton Richness, Diversity and Biomass Driven by Re-Oligotrophication and Climate across 17 Danish Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan Özkan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-decade (1989–2008 time series of lake phyto- and zooplankton, water characteristics and climate in 17 Danish lakes was analysed to examine the long term changes and the effects of lake restoration efforts. The analyses of the pair-wise correlations across time series revealed a strong synchrony in climatic variables among the lakes. A significant, but weak increase in air temperature was observed and resulted in a corresponding increase in surface water temperature only in summer. Lake physico-chemical variables had weaker synchrony than climatic variables. Synchrony in water temperature and stratification was stronger than lake chemistry as the former is mostly affected by atmospheric energy flux. Synchrony in the taxonomic richness of the plankton groups and phytoplankton biomass was apparent, to a similar degree as observed for lake chemistry. The synchrony and the temporal trends in lake chemistry and plankton were more pronounced for the lakes with strong re-oligotrophication. Phytoplankton biomass decreased and plankton richness increased in these lakes, with a shift from Chlorophyta dominance towards more heterogeneous phytoplankton communities. Notably, a widespread significant positive trend in plankton richness was observed not only in lakes with strong re-oligotrophication but across all lakes. The widespread increase in plankton richness coincided with widespread decrease in phosphate and total nitrogen concentrations, as well as with the trends in climate indicating a likely joint effect of nutrient reduction and climate in driving lake plankton. However, temporal changes and synchrony as well as the recovery of richness and composition of lake plankton more coherently corresponded with the nutrient loading reduction across the Danish landscape, while the role of climate control of the lake plankton was less pronounced.

  8. Influence of Thinning and Pruning on Southern Pine Veneer Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Gibson; Terry R. Clason; Gary L. Hill; George A. Grozdits

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of intensive pine plantation management on veneer yields, veneer grade distribution and veneer MOE as measured by ultrasonic stress wave transmission (Metriguard). Veneer production trials were done at a commercial southern pine plywood plant to elucidate the effects of silvicultural treatments on veneer quality, yield, and modulus of...

  9. Weevil - red rot associations in eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myron D. Ostrander; Clifford H. Foster

    1957-01-01

    The presence of red rot (Fomes pini) in pruned white pine stands has often been attributed to the act of pruning. This assumption may well be true for heavily stocked stands where thinning has been neglected and pruning scars are slow to heal. The question then arises: How do we account for the red rot often found in vigorous unpruned white pine stands? Evidence...

  10. Longleaf pine forests and woodlands: old growth under fire!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan L. Walker

    1999-01-01

    The author discusses a once widespread forest type of the Southeast – longleaf pine dominated forests and woodlands. This system depends on fire – more or less frequent, and often of low intensity. Because human-mediated landscape fragmentation has drastically changed the behavior of fire on longleaf pine dominated landscapes, these forests and woodlands will never be...

  11. Grazing on Regeneration Sites Encourages Pine Seedling Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond D. Ratliff; Renee G. Denton

    1995-01-01

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the...

  12. Pine snake (Pituophis ruthveni and Pituophis mellanoleucus lodingi) hibernacula

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.C. Rudolph; R.R. Schaefer; S.J. Burgdorf; M. Duran; R.N. Conner

    2007-01-01

    Snakes are often highly selective in the choice of sites for hibernation, and suitable sites can potentially be a limiting resource. Hibernating Louisiana Pine Snakes (Pituopllis ruthveni; N = 7) in eastern Texas and Black Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus lodingi; N = 5) in Mississippi were excavated to characterize their...

  13. Possibilities of breeding weevil-resistant white pine strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Wright; William J. Gabriel

    1959-01-01

    Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) is a highly versatile species. It is easily planted, adaptable to a wide variety of soils and climates, and reproduces itself well. Also it grows rapidly and is capable of producing high-quality lumber. These characteristics once entitled white pine to a top position in the forest economy throughout much of the...

  14. Straight studs are produced from southern pine cordwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Koch

    1967-01-01

    A Process for converting southern pine veneer cores into 8-foot 2 by 4's of SPIB Stud grade and better has been developed at the Alexandria, Louisiana, Utilization Laboratory of the Southern Forest Experiment Station. The research leading to this development suggests that a similiar process would be practical for converting 8-foot southern pine cordwood into studs...

  15. Overhead shading and growth of young longleaf pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Gilbert; John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl; William D. Boyer; Dean H. Gjerstad

    2014-01-01

    A study to determine the effects of environmental conditions on the growth of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) was initiated in 1969 on the Escambia Experimental Forest near Brewton, Alabama, USA. This study sample consisted of forty young naturally regenerated, even aged longleaf pine seedlings evenly divided between two soil types. At the beginning of the study...

  16. Exploring whitebark pine resilience in the crown of the continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey A. Burke; Michael S. Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are declining across western North America due to synergies of disturbances, both natural and anthropogenic. Losses at treeline may result in significant changes to the upper subalpine zone, which may result in a regime shift, thus affecting the ecological goods and services whitebark pine systems provide for other species...

  17. Forest stand dynamics of shortleaf pine in the Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Larsen

    2007-01-01

    Much has been written on the management of shortleaf pine in the Ozarks (Brinkman et al. 1965, Brinkman 1967, Brinkman and Smith 1968, Seidel and Rogers 1965, Seidel and Rogers 1966). In large portions of the Ozarks, shortleaf pine does not grow in pure stands but rather in mixes with various oak species. These mixes present unique challenges in finding the set of...

  18. Financial performance of loblolly and longleaf pine plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven D. Mills; Charles T. Stiff

    2013-01-01

    The financial performance of selected management regimes for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) plantations were compared for four cases, each with low- and high-site productivity levels and each evaluated using 5 and 7 percent real discount rates. In all cases, longleaf pine was considered both with...

  19. Effect of dietary mugwort ( Artemisia vulgaris L.) and pine needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of dietary mugwort and pine needle powder supplementation on growth performance, serum cholesterol, and meat quality of broilers were evaluated in a 35 days feed trial. 200 one day old broilers were randomly allocated to five dietary treatments (0, 1 and 2% mugwort or 1 and 2% pine needle powder) with ...

  20. Resistance of three interspecific white pine hybrids to blister rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Z. Callaham

    1962-01-01

    Three white pine hybrids exposed to infection by white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer) since 1946 have inherited the relative resistance of their parental species. The hybrids were produced from controlled pollinations in 1940 and 1941 at the Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, Calif. Twelve seedlings of each hybrid were...

  1. Characteristics of Blister Rust Cankers on Eastern White Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Phelps; Ray Weber

    1969-01-01

    The growth, development, and sporulation of white pine blister rust cankers were studied on eastern white pine in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Three district canker types were identified on the basis of physical appearance, growth rate, and sporulation. Canker growth rate and sporulation decreased as tree size or age increased, and many cankers apparently became inactive...

  2. Comparison of Monterey pine stress in urban and natural forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Joe R. McBride

    1991-01-01

    Monterey pine street trees within Carmel, California and its immediate vicinity, as well as forest-grown Monterey pine within adjacent natural stands, were sampled with regard to visual stress characteristics, and various environmental and biological variables. Two stress indices were computed, one hypothesized before data collection was based on relative foliage...

  3. Rooting Rose Cuttings in Whole Pine Tree Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased demand for alternatives to pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) has led to extensive research on wood-based substrates, such as processed whole pine trees (WPT), for nursery and greenhouse crop production. Limited information is available on how WPT may perform as a rooting substrate for cutti...

  4. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Sensory analysis was performed using the 9-point hedonic scale, with selected assessors. The whey cheese sample with 4% pine nuts was the most appreciated (7.6 points, followed by the classic whey cheese, whey cheese with 6 and 8% pine nuts (7.4 points, and whey cheese with 2% pine nuts (7.3 points. Nevertheless, the sensory characteristics of whey cheese were not significantly influenced by the addition of pine nuts. Whey cheese sensory profiling was successful in differential characterization of whey cheese samples.

  5. Spatial and population genetic structure of microsatellites in white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula E. Marquardt; Bryan K. Epperson

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the population genetic structure of seven microsatellite loci for old growth and second growth populations of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). From each population, located within Hartwick Pines State Park, Grayling, Michigan, USA, 120-122 contiguous trees were sampled for genetic analysis. Within each population, genetic diversity...

  6. Interacting genes in the pine-fusiform rust forest pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.V. Amerson; T.L. Kubisiak; S.A. Garcia; G.C. Kuhlman; C.D. Nelson; S.E. McKeand; T.J. Mullin; B. Li

    2005-01-01

    Fusiform rust (FR) disease of pines, caused by Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme (Cqf), is the most destructive disease in pine plantations of the southern U. S. The NCSU fusiform rust program, in conjunction with the USDA-Forest Service in Saucier, MS and Athens, GA, has research underway to elucidate some of the genetic interactions in this...

  7. Herbaceous weed control in loblolly pine plantations using flazasulfuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew W. Ezell; Jimmie L. Yeiser

    2015-01-01

    A total of 13 treatments were applied at four sites (two in Mississippi and two in Texas) to evaluate the efficacy of flazasulfuron applied alone or in mixtures for providing control of herbaceous weeds. All sites were newly established loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations. Plots were evaluated monthly until 180 days after treatment. No phytotoxicity on pine...

  8. White pines, Ribes, and blister rust: a review and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian W. Geils; Kim E. Hummer; Richard S. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    For over a century, white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) has linked white pines (Strobus) with currants and gooseberries (Ribes) in a complex and serious disease epidemic in Asia, Europe, and North America. Because of ongoing changes in climate, societal demands for forests and their amenities, and scientific advances in genetics and proteomics, our current...

  9. Measurement of tritium in tissue free water of pine needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaomin; Wu Zongmei

    1993-01-01

    Tissue Free Water (TFW) of pine needles is separated out through azeotropic distillation of pine needles and toluene. Recovery ratio of TFW is 90%. Tritium activity in the needles is 1.8 Bq/L(H 2 O), which is of the same level with tritiated water vapour (HTO) in atmosphere during the corresponding period

  10. Silvicultural recommendations for the management of ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Alfonso Mendoza Briseno; Mary Ann Fajvan; Juan Manuel Chacon Sotelo; Alejandro Velazquez Martinez; Antonio Quinonez. Silva

    2014-01-01

    Ponderosa pines are the most important timber producing species in Mexico, and they also represent a major portion of the Usa and Canada timber production. These pines form near pure stands with simple and stable stand structure. They suffer only occasional disturbances, and they sustain a limited capacity to hold biodiversity and other senvironmental services. The...

  11. HOW TO Identify White Pine Blister Rust and Remove Cankers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Nicholls; Robert L. Anderson

    1977-01-01

    White pine blister rust (caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch. ex Rabenh.) was introduced into the United States about 1900 and has since spread throughout the range of white pine. The disease intensity varies throughout the range but is normally most severe where late summers (July-September) are cool (below 67? F) and damp, conditions necessary for...

  12. Severe burning treatment tested on lowland pine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Little; E. B. Moore

    1953-01-01

    Since the prescribed use of fire is a fairly new silvicultural technique for preparing seedbeds for pine in the New Jersey pine region, it has been used rather cautiously. Burning treatments have been made in the winter, when periodic light fires can be easily controlled. The treatments have been used almost exclusively on upland sites.

  13. Concepts of fen and bog re-examined in relation to bryophyte cover and the acidity of surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Eville Gorham; Jan A. Janssens

    2014-01-01

    Studies of surface-water pH and bryophyte assemblages in 440 plots from five peatland regions across northern North America reveal a very distinct, two-fold division into fens with a pH mode at 6.76-7.00, in which Amblystegiaceae are prominent, and bogs with a pH mode at 4.01-4.25, in which Sphagnaceae are dominant. The relevance of the data to past and current views on peatland classification is explored.

  14. A cryptic targeting signal creates a mitochondrial FEN1 isoform with tailed R-Loop binding properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Kazak

    Full Text Available A growing number of DNA transacting proteins is found in the nucleus and in mitochondria, including the DNA repair and replication protein Flap endonuclease 1, FEN1. Here we show a truncated FEN1 isoform is generated by alternative translation initiation, exposing a mitochondrial targeting signal. The shortened form of FEN1, which we term FENMIT, localizes to mitochondria, based on import into isolated organelles, immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation. In vitro FENMIT binds to flap structures containing a 5' RNA flap, and prefers such substrates to single-stranded RNA. FENMIT can also bind to R-loops, and to a lesser extent to D-loops. Exposing human cells to ethidium bromide results in the generation of RNA/DNA hybrids near the origin of mitochondrial DNA replication. FENMIT is recruited to the DNA under these conditions, and is released by RNase treatment. Moreover, high levels of recombinant FENMIT expression inhibit mtDNA replication, following ethidium bromide treatment. These findings suggest FENMIT interacts with RNA/DNA hybrids in mitochondrial DNA, such as those found at the origin of replication.

  15. Interacting effects of sulphate pollution, sulphide toxicity and eutrophication on vegetation development in fens: A mesocosm experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geurts, Jeroen J.M.; Sarneel, Judith M.; Willers, Bart J.C.; Roelofs, Jan G.M.; Verhoeven, Jos T.A.; Lamers, Leon P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Both eutrophication and SO 4 pollution can lead to higher availability of nutrients and potentially toxic compounds in wetlands. To unravel the interaction between the level of eutrophication and toxicity at species and community level, effects of SO 4 were tested in nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich fen mesocosms. Biomass production of aquatic and semi-aquatic macrophytes and colonization of the water layer increased after fertilization, leading to dominance of highly competitive species. SO 4 addition increased alkalinity and sulphide concentrations, leading to decomposition and additional eutrophication. SO 4 pollution and concomitant sulphide production considerably reduced biomass production and colonization, but macrophytes were less vulnerable in fertilized conditions. The experiment shows that competition between species, vegetation succession and terrestrialization are not only influenced by nutrient availability, but also by toxicity, which strongly interacts with the level of eutrophication. This implies that previously neutralized toxicity effects in eutrophied fens may appear after nutrient reduction measures have been taken. - Interspecific competition, vegetation succession and terrestrialization in fens depend on the interacting effects of SO 4 pollution, sulphide toxicity and nutrient availability.

  16. Interacting effects of sulphate pollution, sulphide toxicity and eutrophication on vegetation development in fens: A mesocosm experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geurts, Jeroen J.M., E-mail: j.geurts@b-ware.e [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sarneel, Judith M. [Landscape Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Willers, Bart J.C.; Roelofs, Jan G.M. [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verhoeven, Jos T.A. [Landscape Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Lamers, Leon P.M. [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Both eutrophication and SO{sub 4} pollution can lead to higher availability of nutrients and potentially toxic compounds in wetlands. To unravel the interaction between the level of eutrophication and toxicity at species and community level, effects of SO{sub 4} were tested in nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich fen mesocosms. Biomass production of aquatic and semi-aquatic macrophytes and colonization of the water layer increased after fertilization, leading to dominance of highly competitive species. SO{sub 4} addition increased alkalinity and sulphide concentrations, leading to decomposition and additional eutrophication. SO{sub 4} pollution and concomitant sulphide production considerably reduced biomass production and colonization, but macrophytes were less vulnerable in fertilized conditions. The experiment shows that competition between species, vegetation succession and terrestrialization are not only influenced by nutrient availability, but also by toxicity, which strongly interacts with the level of eutrophication. This implies that previously neutralized toxicity effects in eutrophied fens may appear after nutrient reduction measures have been taken. - Interspecific competition, vegetation succession and terrestrialization in fens depend on the interacting effects of SO{sub 4} pollution, sulphide toxicity and nutrient availability.

  17. Some recent developments in white-pine weevil research in the Northeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. A. Jaynes

    1958-01-01

    Eastern white pine is one of the most important sawtimber species in the Northeast. This species would have still greater potential value were it not for the white-pine weevil, Pissodes strobi (Peck), its most serious insect pest. This is a native insect that occurs throughout the range of eastern white pine. A large percentage of the white pines in...

  18. Re-measurement of whitebark pine infection and mortality in the Canadian Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyndi M. Smith; Brenda Shepherd; Cameron Gillies; Jon Stuart-Smith

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are under threat across the species' range from white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), fire exclusion and climate change (Tomback and Achuff 2010). Loss of whitebark pine is predicted to have cascading effects on the following ecological services: provision of...

  19. Limber pine seed and seedling planting experiment in Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyndi M. Smith; Graeme Poll; Cameron Gillies; Celina Praymak; Eileen Miranda; Justin Hill

    2011-01-01

    Limber pine plays an important role in the harsh environments in which it lives, providing numerous ecological services, especially because its large, wingless seeds serve as a high energy food source for many animals. Limber pine populations are declining due to a combination of white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, drought, and fire suppression. Outplanting...

  20. Using fire to restore pine/hardwood ecosystems in the Southern Appalachians of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Vose; Wayne T. Swank; Barton D. Clinton; Ronald L. Hendrick; Amy E. Major

    1997-01-01

    In the Southern Appalachians, mixed pine/hardwood ecosystems occupy the most xeric sites (i.e., south/west aspect ridge sites). They are typically comprised of varying proportions of pitch pine (Pinus rigida), Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana), and/or shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) and a mixture of hardwoods, including scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea), chestnut oak (...

  1. Native ectomycorrhizal fungi of limber and whitebark pine: Necessary for forest sustainability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathy L. Cripps; Robert K. Antibus

    2011-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are an important component of northern coniferous forests, including those of Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. albicaulis (whitebark pine) which are being decimated by white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetles. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to promote seedling establishment, tree health, and may play a role in forest sustainability....

  2. 75 FR 29686 - Proposed Establishment of the Pine Mountain-Mayacmas Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... states that local growers report that Pine Mountain vineyards are naturally free of mildew, a vineyard... often stall over Pine Mountain and the Mayacmas range, dropping more rain than in other areas. Pine..., these mountain soils include large amounts of sand and gravel. Pine Mountain soils are generally less...

  3. Key to utilization of hardwoods on pine sites: the shaping-lathe headrig

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Koch

    1976-01-01

    In past years, only 30% of southern pine biomass (above- and below-ground parts) ended as primary product. Moreover, hardwoods on pine sites were, and in many cases still are, destroyed with no thought of utilization. Now, however, processes have been invented that can raise utilization of each tree- pine and hardwood on pine sites a like to 67% of total biomass,...

  4. Surfing the Koehler Curve: revisiting a method for the identification of longleaf pine stumps and logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Philip M. Sheridan; Karen G. Reed

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of pith and second growth ring diameters were used by Koehler in 1932 to separate longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) timbers from those of several southern pines (e.g., loblolly, shortleaf). In the current study, measurements were taken from plantation-grown longleaf, loblolly and shortleaf pine trees, as well as old growth longleaf pine, lightwood, and...

  5. Status of fusiform rust incidence in slash and loblolly pine plantations in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    KaDonna C. Randolph

    2016-01-01

    Southern pine tree improvement programs have been in operation in the southeastern United States since the 1950s. Their goal has been to improve volume growth, tree form, disease resistance, and wood quality in southern pines, particularly slash pine (Pinus elliottii) and loblolly pine (P. taeda). The disease of focus has been...

  6. Evaluating governance for sustainable development - Insights from experiences in the Dutch fen landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Uyl, Roos M; Driessen, Peter P J

    2015-11-01

    Prominent strands of discussion in the literature on governance for sustainable development debate how change can be induced to enhance sustainability, and how to evaluate the interventions aimed at prompting such change. Strikingly, there are few contributions about how prominent ideas of inducing change deal with multiple governance criteria for pursuing sustainable development. Moreover, the way ideas about inducing change relate to criteria of governance for sustainable development is not yet studied in an empirical context. This paper therefore comparatively analyses how three prominent modes of sustainable development governance - adaptive management, transition management and payments for environmental services - relate to a set of five prominent criteria reported in the literature, namely: equity, democracy, legitimacy, the handling of scale issues and the handling of uncertainty issues. It finds that the academic debates on these three modes address these criteria with varying attention and rather fragmented, while in the empirical setting of the Dutch fen landscape several aspects relating to the studied criteria were present and substantially influenced the functioning of the three modes of sustainable development. Together, the analysis of the literature debate and the empirical data are able to show that a narrow evaluation perspective may fail to diagnose and capture relevant struggles and complexities coming along with governance for sustainable development relevant issues. The study shows that in order to advance our understanding of governance for sustainable development, it is indeed important to include multiple criteria in studying these modes. Moreover, the study shows the importance of including empirical experiences which manifest when different modes for sustainable development are applied in real-world settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory Effects of the Plant Protection Product Stifenia (FEN560 on Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lamotte

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant defense stimulators (PDSs rely on the activation of plant innate immunity in order to protect crops against various pests. These molecules are thought to be a safer alternative to classical plant protection products. Given that innate immune systems share common features in plants and vertebrates, PDS can potentially cross-react with innate immunity of non-target organisms. To test this hypothesis, we studied effects of the commercial PDS Stifenia (FEN560, which is composed of crushed fenugreek seeds. We tested various concentrations of Stifenia (0.03–1 mg mL−1 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and checked, 20 h later, cell metabolic activity (MA using XTT assay, cell death by flow cytometry analysis, and IL-1β inflammatory cytokine released in the culture medium using ELISA. Stifenia induced a general decrease of the cell MA, which was concomitant with a dose-dependent release of IL-1β. Our results highlight the activation of human immune cells. The inflammatory effect of Stifenia was partially inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor. Accordingly, Stifenia induced the release of p20 caspase-1 fragment into the culture medium suggesting the involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Furthermore, we observed that Stifenia can induce cell death. We also tested the effect of Stifenia on Zebrafish larvae. After 24 h of exposure, Stifenia induced a dose-dependent IL-1β and TNFα gene expression. The human-cell-based approach developed in this work revealed a high sensitivity concerning inflammatory properties of a plant protection product. These tests could be routinely used to screen the potential adverse effects of this type of compounds. Finally, our results suggest a potential danger of using extensively certain PDS for crop protection.

  8. Large CO2 and CH4 release from a flooded formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Franz, D.; Koebsch, F.; Larmanou, E.; Augustin, J.

    2016-12-01

    Drained peatlands are usually strong carbon dioxide (CO2) sources. In Germany, up to 4.5 % of the national CO2 emissions are estimated to be released from agriculturally used peatlands and for some peatland-rich northern states, such as Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, this share increases to about 20%. Reducing this CO2 source and restoring the peatlands' natural carbon sink is one objective of large-scale nature protection and restoration measures, in which 37.000 ha of drained and degraded peatlands in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania are slated for rewetting. It is well known, however, that in the initial phase of rewetting, a reduction of the CO2 source strength is usually accompanied by an increase in CH4 emissions. Thus, whether and when the intended effects of rewetting with regard to greenhouse gases are achieved, depends on the balance of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and on the duration of the initial CH4 emission phase. In 2013, a new Fluxnet site went online at a flooded formerly drained river valley fen site near Zarnekow, NE Germany (DE-Zrk), to investigate the combined CO2 and CH4 dynamics at such a heavily degraded and rewetted peatland. The site is dominated by open water with submerged and floating vegetation and surrounding Typha latifolia.Nine year after rewetting, we found large CH4 emissions of 53 g CH4 m-2 a-1 from the open water area, which are 4-fold higher than from the surrounding vegetation zone (13 g CH4 m-2 a-1). Surprisingly, both the open water and the vegetated area were net CO2 sources of 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1, respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions with a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates, particularly from temporally non-inundated organic mud in the vegetation zone.

  9. Re-establishment of hummock topography promotes tree regeneration on highly disturbed moderate-rich fens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieffers, Victor J; Caners, Richard T; Ge, Hangfei

    2017-07-15

    Winter exploration of oil sands deposits underlying wooded fens mostly eliminates the hummock-hollow topography on drilling pads and the ice roads leading to them, after their abandonment in spring. Recovery of black spruce (Picea mariana (P. Mill.) B.S.P.) and tamarack (Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch) on these disturbed peatlands is thought to depend on the recovery of hummock topography. In late winter, numerous large blocks of frozen peat (1.5 × 1.5 m) were lifted out of the flattened drilling pads and positioned beside their excavated hollows; this was done on six temporary pads. Four years later, the condition of the mounds and the regeneration of conifers from natural seed dispersal were assessed on these elevated mounds compared to adjacent flattened areas of the pads. Then, conifer seedling density was more than five times higher on elevated spots than the mostly flat, flood-prone areas between them, and seedling density was positively related to mound height and strength of seed source. Higher mounds tended to have larger seedlings. Mounds on some of the pads were heavily eroded down; these pads had peat with higher humification, and operationally these pads were also treated in late winter when peat was thawing and fractured into pieces during mound construction. Developing a large volume of elevated substrate that persists until natural hummock-forming mosses can establish is thought necessary for tree recruitment and the recovery of the habitat for the threatened woodland caribou of this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Body temperature variations of the Louisiana pine snake (Pituophis ruthveni) in a longleaf pine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Himes; Laurence M. Hardy; D. Craig Rudolph; Shirley J. Burgdorf

    2006-01-01

    The thermal ecology of the Louisiana pine snake, Pituophis ruthveni, was studied from 1993-97 in Louisiana and Texas. All snakes were implanted with temperature-sensitive radiotransmitters. Temperatures were recorded from snakes located above ground and underground and were compared between size and sex classes (juveniles, adult males, adult females). Associated air...

  11. Effects of Nantucket pine tip moth insecticide spray schedules on loblolly pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Kenneth W. McCravy; C. Wayne Berisford

    2000-01-01

    Frequent and prolonged insecticide applications to control the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock) (Lepidoptera:Torticidae) (NPTM), although effective, may be impractical and uneconomica1, for commercial timber production. Timed insecticide sprays of permethrin (Polmce 3.2® EC) were applied to all possible combinations of spray...

  12. The mountain pine beetle and whitebark pine waltz: Has the music changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Bentz; Greta Schen-Langenheim

    2007-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) (MPB), is a bark beetle native to western North American forests, spanning wide latitudinal and elevational gradients. MPB infest and reproduce within the phloem of most Pinus species from northern Baja California in Mexico to central British Columbia in...

  13. Nitrogen cycling following mountain pine beetle disturbance in lodgepole pine forests of Greater Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob M. Griffin; Monica G. Turner; Martin Simard

    2011-01-01

    Widespread bark beetle outbreaks are currently affecting multiple conifer forest types throughout western North America, yet many ecosystem-level consequences of this disturbance are poorly understood. We quantified the effect of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak on nitrogen (N) cycling through litter, soil, and vegetation in...

  14. Remedial treatment of lodgepole pine infested with mountain pine beetle: efficacy of three insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Tilden

    1985-01-01

    Lindane is registered for remedial control of bark beetles; however, forestry uses are controversial and alternative chemicals are needed. Chlorpyrifos (Dursban 4E), carbaryl (Sevimol 4), and fenitrothion (Sumithion 8E) at 1, 2, and 4 pct active ingredient, and lindane at the registered dosage of 0.6 pct were sprayed on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta...

  15. Arthropod density and biomass in longleaf pines: effects of pine age and hardwood midstory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Christopher S. Collins; Daniel Saenz; Toni Trees; Richard R. Schaefer; D. Craig Rudolph

    2004-01-01

    During a 2-year study we examined arthropod communities (density and biomass) on longleaf pines (Pinus palustris) in eastern Texas during spring, summer, and winter on trees in 3 age classes: 40-50, 60-70, and 130-1 50 years, as a potential food source for the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis). We also examined arthropod...

  16. Impact of a Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak on Young Lodgepole Pine Stands in Central British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalesh Dhar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current mountain pine beetle (MPB (Dendroctonous ponderosae Hopkins epidemic has severely affected pine forests of Western Canada and killed millions of hectares of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm. forest. Generally, MPB attack larger and older (diameter > 20 cm or >60 years of age trees, but the current epidemic extends this limit with attacks on even younger and smaller trees. The study’s aim was to investigate the extent of MPB attack in young pine stands and its possible impact on stand dynamics. Although MPB attacks were observed in trees as small as 7.5 cm diameter at breast height (DBH and as young as 13 years old, the degree of MPB attack (percent stems ha−1 increased with increasing tree diameter and age class (13–20, 21–40, 41–60, and 61–80 years old (6.4%, 49.4%, 62.6%, and 69.5% attack, respectively, by age class which is greater than that reported from previous epidemics for stands of this age. The mean density of surviving residual structure varied widely among age classes and ecological subzones. Depending on age class, 65% to 77% of the attacked stands could contribute to mid-term timber supply. The surviving residual structure of young stands offers an opportunity to mitigate the effects of MPB-attack on future timber supply, increase age class diversity, and enhance ecological resilience in younger stands.

  17. Season of prescribed burn in ponderosa pine forests in eastern Oregon: impact on pine mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter G. Thies; Douglas J. Westlind; Mark. Loewen

    2005-01-01

    A study of the effects of season of prescribed burn on tree mortality was established in mixed-age ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) at the south end of the Blue Mountains near Burns, Oregon. Each of six previously thinned stands was subdivided into three experimental units and one of three treatments was randomly assigned to each:...

  18. Biochemical Assay Detects Feeding Damage to Loblolly Pine Seeds Caused by the Leaffooted Pine Seed Bug (Hemiptera: Coreidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron G. Lait; Daniel R. Miller; Sarah L. Bates; John H. Borden; Allison R. Kermode

    2003-01-01

    A large number of proteins in salivary gland extracts of the leaffooted pine seed bug, Leptoglossus corculus Say, were strongly recognized by a polyclonal antibody-based assay developed for detecting saliva of the western conifer seed bug, Lepfoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, in lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta var...

  19. Tree response and mountain pine beetle attack preference, reproduction, and emergence timing in mixed whitebark and lodgepole pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Bentz; Celia Boone; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2015-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is an important disturbance agent in Pinus ecosystems of western North America, historically causing significant tree mortality. Most recorded outbreaks have occurred in mid elevation lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). In warm years, tree mortality also occurs at higher elevations in mixed species stands.

  20. Evolution of a research prototype expert system for endemic populations of mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale L. Bartos; Kent B. Downing

    1989-01-01

    A knowledge acquisition program was written to aid in obtaining knowledge from the experts concerning endemic populations of mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forest. An application expert system is then automatically generated by the knowledge acquisition program that contains the codified base of expert knowledge. Data can then be entered into the expert system...