WorldWideScience

Sample records for oligonucleotides antisense

  1. Antisense oligonucleotides in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Stein, Cy A

    2014-11-01

    Over the past several dozen years, regardless of the substantial effort directed toward developing rational oligonucleotide strategies to silence gene expression, antisense oligonucleotide-based cancer therapy has not been successful. This review focuses on the most likely reasons for this lack of success, and on the barriers that still need to be overcome to make a clinical cancer treatment reality out of the promise of antisense therapy. Considerable progress has been made in the design and delivery of nucleic acid fragments. Chemical modifications have considerably improved oligonucleotide absorption, distribution and metabolism while at the same time reducing toxicity. Nevertheless, the delivery and the cellular uptake of these molecules are still not adequate to provide the desired therapeutic outcome. Recent therapeutic interventional phase III trials of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides for a cancer indication will be discussed, in addition to those studies that markedly improve the scientific understanding of the properties of these molecules. We still do not have a marketed antisense oligonucleotide for a cancer indication. This is because critical aspects of the cellular, tumor pharmacology and delivery properties of these agents are still not well understood.

  2. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  4. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnik, Peter; Boyer, David S.; Grillone, Lisa R.; Clement, John G.; Henry, Scott P.; Green, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and other parts of the world. Historically, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy surgery have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetic macular edema. Both procedures have proven to be useful under certain conditions but have their limitations. New pathways and processes that promote diabetic retinopathy have been identified, and several new therapeutic approaches are under investigation. These new therapies may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and include antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, corticosteroids, and therapies that may potentially target a number of additional diabetic retinopathy-related factors and processes, including antisense oligonucleotides. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides, such as iCo-007, may offer a significant advantage in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by downregulating the signal pathways of multiple growth factors that seem to play a critical role in the process of ocular angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Benefits of such molecules are expected to include the specificity of the kinase target and an extended half-life, resulting in less frequent intravitreal drug administration, resistance to molecule degradation, and a good safety profile. PMID:20144342

  8. Guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides as synthetic riboregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by short oligonucleotides (antisense oligonucleotides), which can modulate RNA structures and inhibit subsequent associations with the translation machinery, is a potential approach for gene therapy. This chapter describes an alternative antisense strategy using guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides (G-ASs) to introduce a DNA-RNA heteroquadruplex structure at a designated sequence on RNA targets. The feasibility of using G-ASs to modulate RNA conformation may allow control of RNA function by inducing biologically important quadruplex structures. This approach to manipulate quadruplex structures using G-ASs may expand the strategies for regulating RNA structures and the functions of short oligonucleotide riboregulators.

  9. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  10. Antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maartje E; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S G; Kastelein, John J P

    2012-06-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are short synthetic analogues of natural nucleic acids designed to specifically bind to a target messenger RNA (mRNA) by Watson-Crick hybridization, inducing selective degradation of the mRNA or prohibiting translation of the selected mRNA into protein. Antisense technology has the ability to inhibit unique targets with high specificity and can be used to inhibit synthesis of a wide range of proteins that could influence lipoprotein levels and other targets. A number of different classes of antisense agents are under development. To date, mipomersen, a 2'-O-methoxyethyl phosphorothioate 20-mer ASO, is the most advanced ASO in clinical development. It is a second-generation ASO developed to inhibit the synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-100 in the liver. In Phase 3 clinical trials, mipomersen has been shown to significantly reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) as well as other atherogenic apoB containing lipoproteins such as lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and small-dense LDL particles. Although concerns have been raised because of an increase in intrahepatic triglyceride content, preliminary data from long-term studies suggest that with continued treatment, liver fat levels tend to stabilize or decline. Further studies are needed to evaluate potential clinical relevance of these changes. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) is another promising novel target for lowering LDL-c by ASOs. Both second-generation ASOs and ASOs using locked nucleic acid technology have been developed to inhibit PCSK9 and are under clinical development. Other targets currently being addressed include apoC-III and apo(a) or Lp(a). By directly inhibiting the synthesis of specific proteins, ASO technology offers a promising new approach to influence the metabolism of lipids and to control lipoprotein levels. Its application to a wide variety of potential targets can be expected if these agents prove to be clinically safe and

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Valentina; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Falzarano, Maria Sofia

    2017-04-05

    Neuromuscular disorders such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy are neurodegenerative genetic diseases characterized primarily by muscle weakness and wasting. Until recently there were no effective therapies for these conditions, but antisense oligonucleotides, a new class of synthetic single stranded molecules of nucleic acids, have demonstrated promising experimental results and are at different stages of regulatory approval. The antisense oligonucleotides can modulate the protein expression via targeting hnRNAs or mRNAs and inducing interference with splicing, mRNA degradation, or arrest of translation, finally, resulting in rescue or reduction of the target protein expression. Different classes of antisense oligonucleotides are being tested in several clinical trials, and limitations of their clinical efficacy and toxicity have been reported for some of these compounds, while more encouraging results have supported the development of others. New generation antisense oligonucleotides are also being tested in preclinical models together with specific delivery systems that could allow some of the limitations of current antisense oligonucleotides to be overcome, to improve the cell penetration, to achieve more robust target engagement, and hopefully also be associated with acceptable toxicity. This review article describes the chemical properties and molecular mechanisms of action of the antisense oligonucleotides and the therapeutic implications these compounds have in neuromuscular diseases. Current strategies and carrier systems available for the oligonucleotides delivery will be also described to provide an overview on the past, present and future of these appealing molecules.

  12. Mechanism of antisense oligonucleotide interaction with natural RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, R; Petyuk, V; Vorobijev, Y; Koval, V; Fedorova, O; Vlassov, V; Zenkova, M

    2011-08-01

    Oligonucleotides find several numbers of applications: as diagnostic probes, RT and PCR primers and antisense agents due to their ability of forming specific interactions with complementary nucleotide sequences within nucleic acids. These interactions are strongly affected by accessibility of the target sequence in the RNA structure. In the present work the mechanism of invasion of RNA structure by oligonucleotide was investigated using a model system: yeast tRNA(Phe) and oligonucleotides complementary to the 3'-part of this molecule. Kinetics of interaction of oligonucleotides with in vitro transcript of yeast tRNAPhe was studied using stopped-flow technique with fluorescence quenching detection, 5'-DABCYL labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized with 3'-fluorescein labeled tRNA(Phe). The results evidence for a four-step invasion process of the oligonucleotide-RNA complex formation. The process is initiated by formation of transition complexes with nucleotides in the T-loop and ACCA sequence. This complex formation is followed by RNA unfolding and formation of an extended heteroduplex with the oligonucleotide via strand displacement process. Computer modeling of oligonucleotide-tRNA(Phe) interaction revealed potential factors that could favor transition complexes formation and confirmed the proposed mechanism, showing the oligonucleotide to be a molecular "wedge". Our data evidence that oligonucleotide invasion into structured RNA is initiated by loop-single strand interactions, similar to the initial step of the antisense RNA-RNA interactions. The obtained results can be used for choosing efficient oligonucleotide probes.

  13. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  14. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havens, Mallory A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA-RNA base-pairing or protein-RNA...

  15. Antithrombotic effect of antisense factor XI oligonucleotide treatment in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeffrey R; Marzec, Ulla; Revenko, Alexey S; Zhao, Chenguang; Gao, Dacao; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David; MacLeod, A Robert; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, Andras; Hanson, Stephen R; Monia, Brett P

    2013-07-01

    During coagulation, factor IX (FIX) is activated by 2 distinct mechanisms mediated by the active proteases of either FVIIa or FXIa. Both coagulation factors may contribute to thrombosis; FXI, however, plays only a limited role in the arrest of bleeding. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of FXI may produce an antithrombotic effect with relatively low hemostatic risk. We have reported that reducing FXI levels with FXI antisense oligonucleotides produces antithrombotic activity in mice, and that administration of FXI antisense oligonucleotides to primates decreases circulating FXI levels and activity in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Here, we evaluated the relationship between FXI plasma levels and thrombogenicity in an established baboon model of thrombosis and hemostasis. In previous studies with this model, antibody-induced inhibition of FXI produced potent antithrombotic effects. In the present article, antisense oligonucleotides-mediated reduction of FXI plasma levels by ≥ 50% resulted in a demonstrable and sustained antithrombotic effect without an increased risk of bleeding. These results indicate that reducing FXI levels using antisense oligonucleotides is a promising alternative to direct FXI inhibition, and that targeting FXI may be potentially safer than conventional antithrombotic therapies that can markedly impair primary hemostasis.

  16. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  17. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and cell uptake of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Norris, Daniel; Yu, Rosie; Bennett, C Frank

    2015-06-29

    Pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides are largely driven by chemistry of the backbone and thus are sequence independent within a chemical class. Tissue bioavailability (% of administered dose) is assisted by plasma protein binding that limits glomerular filtration and ultimate urinary excretion of oligonucleotides. The substitution of one non-bridging oxygen with the more hydrophobic sulfur atom (phosphorothioate) increases both plasma stability and plasma protein binding and thus, ultimately, tissue bioavailability. Additional modifications of the sugar at the 2' position, increase RNA binding affinity and significantly increase potency, tissue half-life and prolong RNA inhibitory activity. Oligonucleotides modified in this manner consistently exhibit the highest tissue bioavailability (>90%). Systemic biodistribution is broad, and organs typically with highest concentrations are liver and kidney followed by bone marrow, adipocytes, and lymph nodes. Cell uptake is predominantly mediated by endocytosis. Both size and charge for most oligonucleotides prevents distribution across the blood brain barrier. However, modified single-strand oligonucleotides administered by intrathecal injection into the CSF distribute broadly in the CNS. The majority of intracellular oligonucleotide distribution following systemic or local administration occurs rapidly in just a few hours following administration and is facilitated by rapid endocytotic uptake mechanisms. Further understanding of the intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides may provide further enhancements in design and ultimate potency of antisense oligonucleotides in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin M Evers

    Full Text Available To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUGn triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG(7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well.

  19. Synthesis and antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinghua; Pandey, Sanjay K; Khatri, Hetal; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2014-09-01

    To ascertain whether increasing hydrophobicity can enhance the activity of second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in muscle, we investigated the antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA (2S-MOP)-modified ASOs. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl uridine phosphoramidite was accomplished on a multi-gram scale by Lewis-acid-catalyzed ring opening of 5'-O-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl ether-protected 2,2'-anhydro-5-methyl uridine with 2S-methoxy-1-propanol. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl cytidine nucleoside from the corresponding 5-methyl uridine nucleoside was accomplished by formation and displacement of a 4-triazolide intermediate with aqueous ammonia. 2S-MOP-modified oligonucleotides were prepared on an automated DNA synthesizer and showed similar enhancements in duplex thermal stability as 2'-O-methoxyethyl RNA (MOE)-modified oligonucleotides. 2S-MOP-containing antisense oligonucleotides were evaluated in Balb-c mice and showed good activity for decreasing the expression levels of scavenger receptor B1 (Srb1) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mRNA in liver and muscle tissue. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A Tandem Oligonucleotide Approach for SNP-Selective RNA Degradation Using Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been studied for many years as a tool for gene silencing. One of the most difficult cases of selective RNA silencing involves the alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, in which the allele sequence is differentiated by a single nucleotide. A new approach to improve the performance of allele selectivity for antisense oligonucleotides is proposed. It is based on the simultaneous application of two oligonucleotides. One is complementary to the mutated form of the targeted RNA and is able to activate RNase H to cleave the RNA. The other oligonucleotide, which is complementary to the wild type allele of the targeted RNA, is able to inhibit RNase H cleavage. Five types of SNPs, C/G, G/C, G/A, A/G, and C/U, were analyzed within the sequence context of genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and Machado-Joseph disease. For most analyzed cases, the application of the tandem approach increased allele-selective RNA degradation 1.5-15 fold relative to the use of a single antisense oligonucleotide. The presented study proves that differentiation between single substitution is highly dependent on the nature of the SNP and surrounding nucleotides. These variables are crucial for determining the proper length of the inhibitor antisense oligonucleotide. In the tandem approach, the comparison of thermodynamic stability of the favorable duplexes WT RNA-inhibitor and Mut RNA-gapmer with the other possible duplexes allows for the evaluation of chances for the allele-selective degradation of RNA. A larger difference in thermodynamic stability between favorable duplexes and those that could possibly form, usually results in the better allele selectivity of RNA degradation.

  1. Anti sense and sensibility : renal and skin effects of (antisense) oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the clinical investigation of a novel treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (t2dm) using an antisense oligonucleotide(aon)to inhibit the sglt2 receptor. Furthermore it describes skin effects of oligonucleotides

  2. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides using cholesterol-modified sense dendrimers and cationic lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaltin, Patrick; Margineanu, Anca; Marchand, Damien; Aerschot, Arthur Van; Rozenski, Jef; Schryver, Frans De; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Juliano, Rudolph; Fisher, Michael H.; Kang, Hyunmin; Feyter, Steven De; Herdewijn, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Cholesterol modified mono-, di-, and tetrameric oligonucleotides were synthesized and hybridized with antisense oligonucleotides to study their incorporation in cationic liposomes together with the influence of this dendrimeric delivery system on biological activity. Electrostatic interactions seem

  3. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipu...

  5. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of ANGPTL3 Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Brandt, Teresa A; Tai, Li-Jung; Fu, Wuxia; Peralta, Raechel; Yu, Rosie; Hurh, Eunju; Paz, Erika; McEvoy, Bradley W; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen C; Digenio, Andres; Hughes, Steven G; Geary, Richard S; Witztum, Joseph L; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-07-20

    Epidemiologic and genomewide association studies have linked loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL3, encoding angiopoietin-like 3, with low levels of plasma lipoproteins. We evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting Angptl3 messenger RNA (mRNA) for effects on plasma lipid levels, triglyceride clearance, liver triglyceride content, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis in mice. Subsequently, 44 human participants (with triglyceride levels of either 90 to 150 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 1.7 mmol per liter] or >150 mg per deciliter, depending on the dose group) were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo or an antisense oligonucleotide targeting ANGPTL3 mRNA in a single dose (20, 40, or 80 mg) or multiple doses (10, 20, 40, or 60 mg per week for 6 weeks). The main end points were safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures, and changes in levels of lipids and lipoproteins. The treated mice had dose-dependent reductions in levels of hepatic Angptl3 mRNA, Angptl3 protein, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as reductions in liver triglyceride content and atherosclerosis progression and increases in insulin sensitivity. After 6 weeks of treatment, persons in the multiple-dose groups had reductions in levels of ANGPTL3 protein (reductions of 46.6 to 84.5% from baseline, Pantisense oligonucleotide and three who received placebo reported dizziness or headache. There were no serious adverse events. Oligonucleotides targeting mouse Angptl3 retarded the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in mice. Use of the same strategy to target human ANGPTL3 reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in humans. (Funded by Ionis Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02709850 .).

  6. An overview of sugar-modified oligonucleotides for antisense therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Thazha P

    2011-09-01

    Among the multitude of chemical modifications that have been described over the past two decades, oligonucleotide analogs that are modified at the 2'-position of the furanose sugar have been especially useful for improving the drug-like properties of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). These modifications bias the sugar pucker towards the 3'-endo-conformation and improve ASO affinity for its biological target (i.e., mRNA). In addition, antisense drugs incorporating 2'-modified nucleotides exhibit enhanced metabolic stability, and improved pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. Further conformational restriction of the 2'-substituent to the 4'-position of the furanose ring yielded the 2',4'-bridged nucleic acid (BNA) analogs. ASOs containing BNA modifications showed unprecedented increase in binding affinity for target RNA, while also improved nuclease resistance, in vitro and in vivo potency. Several ASO drug candidates containing 2'-modified nucleotides have entered clinical trials and continue to make progress in the clinic for a variety of therapeutic indications. 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  7. Determination of optimal sites of antisense oligonucleotide cleavage within TNFα mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. H.; Giles, R. V.; Spiller, D. G.; Grzybowski, J.; Tidd, D. M.; Sibson, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides provide a powerful tool in order to determine the consequences of the reduced expression of a selected target gene and may include target validation and therapeutic applications. Methods of predicting optimum antisense sites are not always effective. We have compared the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides, which were selected in vitro using random combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries of differing length and complexity, upon putative target sites within TNFα mRNA. The relationship of specific target site accessibility and oligonucleotide efficacy with respect to these parameters proved to be complex. Modification of the length of the recognition sequence of the oligonucleotide library illustrated that independent target sites demonstrated a preference for antisense oligonucleotides of a defined and independent optimal length. The efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide sequences selected in vitro paralleled that observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated U937 cells. The application of methylphosphonate:phosphodiester chimaeric oligonucleotides to U937 cells reduced mRNA levels to up to 19.8% that of the untreated cell population. This approach provides a predictive means to profile any mRNA of known sequence with respect to the identification and optimisation of sites accessible to antisense oligonucleotide activity. PMID:11522838

  8. Reversing Antisense Oligonucleotide Activity with a Sense Oligonucleotide Antidote: Proof of Concept Targeting Prothrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Zhang, Hong; MacLeod, A Robert; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2015-12-01

    The tissue half-life of second-generation antisense oligonucleotide drugs (ASOs) is generally longer than traditional small molecule therapeutics. Thus, a strategy to reverse the activity of antisense drugs is warranted in certain settings. In this study, we describe a strategy employing the administration of a complementary sense oligonucleotide antidote (SOA). As a model system we have chosen to target the coagulation factor and antithrombotic drug target, prothrombin, to assess the feasibility of this approach. ASO targeting mouse prothrombin specifically suppressed >90% hepatic prothrombin mRNA levels and circulating prothrombin protein in mice. These effects were dose- and time-dependent, and as expected produced predictable increases in anticoagulation activity [prothrombin time/activated partial thromboplastin time (PT/aPTT)]. Treatment with prothrombin SOAs resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of ASO activity, as measured by a return in prothrombin mRNA levels and thrombin activity, and normalization of aPTT and PT. The antithrombotic activity of prothrombin ASOs was demonstrated in a FeCl3-induced thrombosis mouse model, and as predicted for this target, the doses required for antithrombotic activity were also associated with increased bleeding. Treatment with SOA was able to prevent prothrombin ASO-induced bleeding in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of SOAs to selectively and specifically reverse the intracellular effects of an antisense therapy.

  9. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Transcript Knockdown in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pauli

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are synthetic, single-strand RNA-DNA hybrids that induce catalytic degradation of complementary cellular RNAs via RNase H. ASOs are widely used as gene knockdown reagents in tissue culture and in Xenopus and mouse model systems. To test their effectiveness in zebrafish, we targeted 20 developmental genes and compared the morphological changes with mutant and morpholino (MO-induced phenotypes. ASO-mediated transcript knockdown reproduced the published loss-of-function phenotypes for oep, chordin, dnd, ctnnb2, bmp7a, alk8, smad2 and smad5 in a dosage-sensitive manner. ASOs knocked down both maternal and zygotic transcripts, as well as the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA MALAT1. ASOs were only effective within a narrow concentration range and were toxic at higher concentrations. Despite this drawback, quantitation of knockdown efficiency and the ability to degrade lncRNAs make ASOs a useful knockdown reagent in zebrafish.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Xiang Wang; Xing Yao; Yong-Liang Lu; Jin-Liang Ping; Jian-Fang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) andin situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylineosin (HE) staining.RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues.CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  12. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  13. Liposome-coated lipoplex-based carrier for antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrozumska, Paulina; Meissner, Justyna; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Szarawarska, Marta; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Ugorski, Maciej; Walasek, Marta A; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-01-01

    The chemical nature of genetic drugs (e.g. antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA, vectors) requires a suitable carrier system to protect them from enzymatic degradation without changing their properties and enable efficient delivery into target cells. Lipid vectors for nucleic acid delivery that have been widely investigated for years can be very effective. As the majority of attempts made in the field of cancer gene therapy have focused on solid tumors, while blood cancer cells have attracted less attention, the latter became the subject of our investigation. The lipid carrier proposed here is based on liposomes constructed by others but the lipid composition is original. A liposome-coated lipoplex (L-cL) consists of a core arising from complexation of positively charged lipid and negatively charged oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) or plasmid DNA coated by a neutral or anionic lipid bilayer. Moreover, our lipid vector demonstrates size stability and is able to retain a high content of enclosed plasmid DNA or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asODNs). Observed transfection efficacies of the tested preparation using a plasmid coding for fluorescent protein were up to 60-85% of examined leukemia cells (Jurkat T and HL-60 lines) in the absence or the presence of serum. When BCL‑2 asODN was encapsulated in the L-cL, specific silencing of this gene product at both the mRNA and protein level and also a markedly decreased cell survival rate were observed in vitro. Moreover, biodistribution analysis in mice indicates prolonged circulation characteristic for PEG-modified liposomal carriers. Experiments on tumor-engrafted animals indicate substantial inhibition of tumor growth.

  14. Efficient in vivo delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Wenying; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Nishina, Tomoko; Sakata, Mina; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2013-03-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) is present on the ventricular walls of the brain, produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains many blood vessels, and is a major functional component of the blood-CSF barrier. The CP is an important site in the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and meningeal amyloidosis. We performed gene silencing in the CP in vivo by using an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). A short ASO of length 12 nucleotides was intravenously injected into rats. The ASO was not delivered to neurons or glia in the central nervous system, but was successfully delivered into the CP, and resulted in a significant reduction of endogenous target gene expression in epithelial cells within the CP. Although the mechanism of uptake of the ASO by the CP was not elucidated, the ASO bound to albumin in vivo, and the distribution of ASO delivery was similar to that of albumin delivery. These findings suggest that we inhibited target gene expression in the epithelial cells of the CP via albumin-ASO conjugates. This strategy should be useful for investigations of the function of CP, and for the development of new gene-silencing therapies for diseases with pathophysiology related to the CP.

  15. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences.

  16. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  17. Conjugation with receptor-targeted histidine-rich peptides enhances the pharmacological effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Juliano, Rudy

    2014-01-15

    Ineffective delivery to intracellular sites of action is one of the key limitations to the use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Here, we describe molecular scale antisense oligonucleotide conjugates that bind selectively to a cell surface receptor, are internalized, and then partially escape from nonproductive endosomal locations to reach their sites of action in the nucleus. Peptides that include bombesin sequences for receptor targeting and a run of histidine residues for endosomal disruption were covalently linked to a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide. The conjugates were tested for their ability to correct splicing and up-regulate expression of a luciferase reporter in prostate cancer cells that express the bombesin receptor. We found that trivalent conjugates that included both the targeting sequence and several histidine residues were substantially more effective than conjugates containing only the bombesin or histidine moieties. This demonstrates the potential of creating molecular scale oligonucleotide conjugates with both targeting and endosome escape capabilities.

  18. Profiled support vector machines for antisense oligonucleotide efficacy prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Guerrero José D

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs for prediction and analysis of antisense oligonucleotide (AO efficacy. The collected database comprises 315 AO molecules including 68 features each, inducing a problem well-suited to SVMs. The task of feature selection is crucial given the presence of noisy or redundant features, and the well-known problem of the curse of dimensionality. We propose a two-stage strategy to develop an optimal model: (1 feature selection using correlation analysis, mutual information, and SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE, and (2 AO prediction using standard and profiled SVM formulations. A profiled SVM gives different weights to different parts of the training data to focus the training on the most important regions. Results In the first stage, the SVM-RFE technique was most efficient and robust in the presence of low number of samples and high input space dimension. This method yielded an optimal subset of 14 representative features, which were all related to energy and sequence motifs. The second stage evaluated the performance of the predictors (overall correlation coefficient between observed and predicted efficacy, r; mean error, ME; and root-mean-square-error, RMSE using 8-fold and minus-one-RNA cross-validation methods. The profiled SVM produced the best results (r = 0.44, ME = 0.022, and RMSE= 0.278 and predicted high (>75% inhibition of gene expression and low efficacy (http://aosvm.cgb.ki.se/. Conclusions The SVM approach is well suited to the AO prediction problem, and yields a prediction accuracy superior to previous methods. The profiled SVM was found to perform better than the standard SVM, suggesting that it could lead to improvements in other prediction problems as well.

  19. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  20. Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Giovanni; Neurath, Markus F; Ardizzone, Sandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Fantini, Massimo C; Castiglione, Fabiana; Scribano, Maria L; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Caprioli, Flavio; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Rogai, Francesca; Vecchi, Maurizio; Atreya, Raja; Bossa, Fabrizio; Onali, Sara; Fichera, Maria; Corazza, Gino R; Biancone, Livia; Savarino, Vincenzo; Pica, Roberta; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Crohn's disease-related inflammation is characterized by reduced activity of the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) due to high levels of SMAD7, an inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Preclinical studies and a phase 1 study have shown that an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, mongersen, targets ileal and colonic SMAD7. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we evaluated the efficacy of mongersen for the treatment of persons with active Crohn's disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10, 40, or 160 mg of mongersen or placebo per day for 2 weeks. The primary outcomes were clinical remission at day 15, defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of less than 150, with maintenance of remission for at least 2 weeks, and the safety of mongersen treatment. A secondary outcome was clinical response (defined as a reduction of 100 points or more in the CDAI score) at day 28. The proportions of patients who reached the primary end point were 55% and 65% for the 40-mg and 160-mg mongersen groups, respectively, as compared with 10% for the placebo group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants reaching clinical remission between the 10-mg group (12%) and the placebo group. The rate of clinical response was significantly greater among patients receiving 10 mg (37%), 40 mg (58%), or 160 mg (72%) of mongersen than among those receiving placebo (17%) (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). Most adverse events were related to complications and symptoms of Crohn's disease. We found that study participants with Crohn's disease who received mongersen had significantly higher rates of remission and clinical response than those who received placebo. (Funded by Giuliani; EudraCT number, 2011-002640-27.).

  1. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  2. Polymerase-Endonuclease Amplification Reaction (PEAR) for Large-Scale Enzymatic Production of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gou, Deming; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR), for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI) cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. PMID:20062528

  3. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  4. Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büller, Harry R; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-15

    Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).

  5. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to the cornea by iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo, M; Valamanesh, F; Andrieu, C; Klein, C; Benezra, D; Courtois, Y; Behar-Cohen, F

    2003-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the potential of iontophoresis to promote the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) directed at the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 receptor (KDR/Flk) to the cornea of the rat eye. Fluorescence (CY5)-labeled ODNs in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (20 microM) were locally administered to rat eyes, and their fate within the anterior segment was studied. Thirty-four male, 5-week-old Wistar rats were used for all experiments. The rats were divided in four groups. In group I (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered by iontophoresis (300 microA for 5 minutes) using a specially designed corneal applicator. In group II (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered using the same applicator, but no electrical current was applied. In group III (6 rats, 6 eyes), a corneal neovascular reaction was induced prior to the application of ODNs (20 microM), and iontophoresis electrical current was delivered as for group I rats. Group IV (4 rats, 4 eyes) received ODN (60 microM) iontophoresis application (300 microA for 5 minutes) and were used for ODN integrity studies. The animals were killed 5 minutes, 90 minutes, and 24 hours after a single ODN application and studied. Topically applied ODNs using the same iontophoresis applicator but without current do not penetrate the cornea and remain confined to the superficial epithelial layer. ODNs delivered with transcorneoscleral iontophoresis penetrate into all corneal layers and are also detected in the iris. In corneas with neovascularization, ODNs were particularly localized within the vascular endothelial cells of the stroma. ODNs extracted from eye tissues 24 hours after iontophoresis remained unaltered. The iontophoresis current did not cause any detectable ocular damage under these conditions. Iontophoresis promotes the delivery of ODNs to the anterior segment of the eye, including all corneal layers. Iontophoresis of ODNs directed at VEGF-R2 may be used for the

  6. Obstructive Effects of Ultrasonic Microbubble Intensifier on CHG-5 Cell with Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hong-ying; CAO You-de; WANG Zhi-gang; LI Pan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects on human glioma cell line CHG-5 by ultrasonic microbubble intensifier with survivin antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN)transfection. Methods: Antisense oligonucleotides targeting survivin mRNA was designed and synthesized.Four regimen groups were designed,group A:survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with ultrasonic microbubble intensifier combined with ultrasound irradiation,group B: survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with lipofectamine combined with ultrasound irradiation,group C:survivin antisense oligonucelotides with lipofectamine transfection.group D:blank control.The expression changes of surviving protein were measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting,and MTr assay was used to measure the changes of proliferation.Results:Survivin protein expression in group A was decreased significantly in human glioma cell line CHG-5 than other groups(P<0.05),and the proliferating rate of CHG-5 in group A was also significantly inhibited(P<0.05).Conclusion:Ultrasonic microbubble intensifier transfection combined with ultrasound irradiation is a promising method in gene transfection effectively and noninvasively.

  7. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  8. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  9. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50...

  10. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Antisense and siRNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, RL; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress is being made concerning the development of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Studies with antisense, siRNA, and other forms of oligonucleotides have shown promise in cellular and animal models and in some clinical studies. Nonetheless our understanding of how oligonucleotides function in cells and tissues is really quite limited. One major issue concerns the modes of uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides, whether as ‘free’ molecules, or linked to various delivery moieties such as nanoparticles or targeting ligands. In this review we examine the recent literature on oligonucleotide internalization and subcellular trafficking in the context of current insights into the basic machinery for endocytosis and intracellular vesicular traffic. PMID:21992697

  11. Oligonucleotides conjugated with short chemically defined polyethylene glycol chains are efficient antisense agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrzadeh, Nasrin; Winkler, Anna-Maria; Dirin, Mehrdad; Winkler, Johannes

    2014-12-15

    Ligand conjugation is an attractive approach to rationally modify the poor pharmacokinetic behavior and cellular uptake properties of antisense oligonucleotides. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) attachment is a method to increase solubility of oligonucleotides and prevent the rapid elimination, thus increasing tissue distribution. On the other hand, the attachment of long PEG chains negatively influences the pharmacodynamic effect by reducing the hybridization efficiency. We examined the use of short PEG ligands on the in vitro effect of antisense agents. Circular dichroism showed that the tethering of PEG12-chains to phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides had no influence on their secondary structure and did not reduce the affinity to the counter strand. In an in vitro tumor model, a luciferase reporter assay indicated unchanged gene silencing activity compared to unmodified compounds, and even slightly superior target down regulation was found after treatment with a phosphorothioate modified conjugate. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of CD44 Suppression by Antisense Oligonucleotide on Attachment of Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells to HA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中国; 张虹

    2004-01-01

    The effects of suppression of CD44 by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronic acid (HA) were observed and the possible relationship between CD44 and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) investigated. CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was delivered with cationic lipid to cultured human trabecular meshwork cells. The expression of CD44 suppressed by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The effect of CD44 suppression by specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of trabecular meshwork cells to HA was measured by MTT assay. Results showed that expression of CD44 was suppressed by CD4, specific antisense oligonucleotide. Antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the adhesion of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA in a concentration dependent manner. It was concluded that attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA was decreased when CD44 was suppressed by specific antisense oligonucleotide. CD44might play a role in pathogenesis of POAG by affecting the adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to HA.

  13. THE EFFECT OF ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDE ON THE INTERLEUKIN-5 IN THE SUPERNATANTS OF SPLEEN CELL CULTURES OF ASTHMATIC MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美琴; 白春学; 钮善福; 方晓惠; 陈常庆; 陈波

    2001-01-01

    To explore the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on the production of IL-5 by mouse spleen T lymphocytes.Methods Based on the IL-5 cDNA sequence of mouse, a segment of antisense oligonucleotide was designed and synthesized. 5’-labeling of antisense oligonucleotide was signed by T4 PNK in order that the efficiency of stearylamine liposome in transfecting antisense oligonucleotide can be evaluated. Asthma model was duplicated with ovalbumin(OVA) absorbed to aluminum hydroxide. T lymphocytes of mice were separated by nylon fiber method, then T lymphocytes transfected with different concentration of antisense oligonucleotide with cation stearylamine liposme were incubated respectively in order to observe the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on Il-5 production by T lymphocytes. IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were determined by ELISA.Results Stearylamine liposome could markedly increase the efficiency of antisense oligonucleotide transfection. The transfection efficiency of antisense oligouncleotide increased approximately 12 times at a ratio of 1: 15m/m (antisense oligonucleotide to SA liposome). In healthy and asthma Balb/c mice, IL-5 was not detectable in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures without stimulated with OVA; however, IL-5 was increased markedly in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures stimulated with OVA. After transfection with different concentrations of antisense oligonucleotide, IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were significantly lower than those in control cultured without antisense oligonucleotide transfection. IL-5 levels decreased from 44.60±6.23 pg/ml to 30.70±7.362 pg/ml, 17.20±6.181 pg/ml and 8.16±2.34 pg/ml respectively. And IL-5 synthesis was inhibited by 31.17%, 61.43% and 81.7% respectively.Conclusion IL-5 synthesis could be obviously inhibited by antisense oligonucleotide and showed a markedly correlation between dose and effectiveness. It suggests the production

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides as innovative therapeutic strategy in the treatment of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Gerardo; Caffo, Mariella; Raudino, Giuseppe; Alafaci, Concetta; Salpietro, Francesco M; Tomasello, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Despite the intensive recent research in cancer therapy, the prognosis in patients affected by high-grade gliomas is still very unfavorable. The efficacy of classical anti-cancer strategies is seriously limited by lack of specific therapies against malignant cells. The extracellular matrix plays a pivotal role in processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and migration in both the normal and the pathologic nervous system. Glial tumors seem to be able to create a favorable environment for the invasion of glioma cells in cerebral parenchyma when they combine with the extracellular matrix via cell surface receptors. Glioma cells synthesize matrix proteins, such as tenascin, laminin, fibronectin that facilitate the tumor cell's motility. New treatments have shown to hit the acting molecules in the tumor growth and to increase the efficacy and minimize the toxicity. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic stretches of DNA which hybridize with specific mRNA strands. The specificity of hybridization makes antisense method an interesting strategy to selectively modulate the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. In this review we will focus on the mechanisms of action of antisense oligonucleotides and report clinical and experimental studies on the treatment of high-grade gliomas. We will also report the patents of preclinical and/or clinical studies that adopt the antisense oligonucleotide therapy list in cerebral gliomas.

  15. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels; Hansen, Henrik F; Persson, Robert; Møller, Marianne R; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Ørum, Henrik; Straarup, Ellen M; Koch, Troels

    2012-02-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). PCSK9 increases the degradation of the LDL receptor, resulting in high LDL-C in individuals with high PCSK9 activity. Here, we show that two locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50% reduction in circulating LDL-C. Serum total cholesterol (TC) levels were reduced to the same extent as LDL-C with no reduction in high-density lipoprotein levels, demonstrating a specific pharmacological effect on LDL-C. The reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA correlated with liver LNA oligonucleotide content. This verified that anti-PCSK9 LNA oligonucleotides regulated LDL-C through an antisense mechanism. The compounds were well tolerated with no observed effects on toxicological parameters (liver and kidney histology, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine). The pharmacologic evidence and initial safety profile of the compounds used in this study indicate that LNA antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 provide a viable therapeutic strategy and are potential complements to statins in managing high LDL-C.

  16. Effect of antisense oligonucleotides targeting telomerase catalytic subunit on tumor cell proliferationin vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To screen specific antitumor drugs targeting telomerase catalytic subunit (hEST2), 12 different hEST2 antisense oligonucleotides were designed based on hEST2 mRNA second structure and transfected into tumor cell lines by the lipofectin-mediated method. Cell growth activity was evaluated by MTT assay. hEST212 was picked out and its specificity, antitumor tree and continuous effect were analyzed. The results showed that hEST212 had promising antitumor activity in vitro, hEST2 can be used as a pratical target and an antisense drug candidate for cancer.

  17. Acute kidney injury during therapy with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poelgeest, Eveline P; Swart, Reinout M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Moerland, Matthijs; Weening, Jan J; Tessier, Yann; Hodges, Michael R; Levin, Arthur A; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2013-10-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been explored widely in clinical trials and generally are considered to be nontoxic for the kidney, even at high concentrations. We report a case of toxic acute tubular injury in a healthy 56-year-old female volunteer after a pharmacologically active dose of a locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide was administered. The patient received 3 weekly subcutaneous doses of experimental drug SPC5001, an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) that is under investigation as an agent to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Five days after the last dose, the patient's serum creatinine level increased from 0.81 mg/dL at baseline (corresponding to an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] of 78 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to 2.67 mg/dL (eGFR, 20 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and this increase coincided with the presence of white blood cells, granular casts, and minimal hematuria on urine microscopy. The patient's serum creatinine level peaked at 3.81 mg/dL (eGFR, 13 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) 1 week after the last oligonucleotide dose. Kidney biopsy showed multifocal tubular necrosis and signs of oligonucleotide accumulation. Upon conservative treatment, the patient's serum creatinine level gradually decreased and reached her baseline level 44 days after the last oligonucleotide was administered. The patient recovered fully and kidney function was normal at every follow-up visit. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antisense Oligonucleotide Inhibition of Apolipoprotein C-III Reduces Plasma Triglycerides in Rodents, Nonhuman Primates, and Humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Bell, III, Thomas A; Fu, Wuxia; Mullick, Adam E; Alexander, Veronica J; Singleton, Walter; Viney, Nick; Geary, Richard; Su, John; Baker, Brenda F; Burkey, Jennifer; Crooke, Stanley T; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2013-01-01

    .... METHODS AND RESULTS:Rodent- and human-specific second-generation antisense oligonucleotides were identified and evaluated in preclinical models, including rats, mice, human apoC-III transgenic mice, and nonhuman...

  19. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  20. THERAPEUTIC ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES AGAINST CANCER: HURDLING TO THE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miguel Duarte Moreno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  1. The role of antisense oligonucleotide therapy in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: risks, benefits, and management recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Anandita; Jones, Peter; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions. It functions at the cellular level by interfering with RNA function, often leading to degradation of specifically targeted abnormal gene products implicated in the disease process. Mipomersen is a novel antisense oligonucleotide directed at apolipoprotein (apoB)-100, the primary apolipoprotein associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), which has recently been approved for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy in lowering LDL-C and apoB levels in patients with elevated LDL-C despite maximal medical therapy using conventional lipid-lowering agents. This review outlines the risks and benefits of therapy and provides recommendations on the use of mipomersen.

  2. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing the sequence-specificity of antisense oligonucleotides in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Hansen, Bo R; Koch, Troels; Lindow, Morten

    2017-03-17

    All drugs perturb the expression of many genes in the cells that are exposed to them. These gene expression changes can be divided into effects resulting from engaging the intended target and effects resulting from engaging unintended targets. For antisense oligonucleotides, developments in bioinformatics algorithms, and the quality of sequence databases, allow oligonucleotide sequences to be analyzed computationally, in terms of the predictability of their interactions with intended and unintended RNA targets. Applying these tools enables selection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides where no- or only few unintended RNA targets are expected. To evaluate oligonucleotide sequence-specificity experimentally, we recommend a transcriptomics protocol where two or more oligonucleotides targeting the same RNA molecule, but with entirely different sequences, are evaluated together. This helps to clarify which changes in cellular RNA levels result from downstream processes of engaging the intended target, and which are likely to be related to engaging unintended targets. As required for all classes of drugs, the toxic potential of oligonucleotides must be evaluated in cell- and animal models before clinical testing. Since potential adverse effects related to unintended targeting are sequence-dependent and therefore species-specific, in vitro toxicology assays in human cells are especially relevant in oligonucleotide drug discovery. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Purification of noncoding RNA and bound proteins using FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense-oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    To understand the function of certain RNAs, including noncoding RNAs, it is important to identify the proteins that interact with the RNAs. Here we describe the method for purification of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes composed of specific cellular RNAs by pull-down with FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Using this method, we identified a novel protein component of U7 snRNP complex.

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Patients with Advanced Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. Improvements in therapy have increased the survival of patients with CRC from 10 months to two years, but for patients who stop responding to treatments, such as irinotecan, options for additional therapy are limited. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) may offer advantages over traditional therapies if an appropriate target can be identified.

  6. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  7. Cross-protective effect of antisense oligonucleotide developed against the common 3' NCR of influenza A virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Rajput, Roopali; Saxena, Latika; Banerjea, Akhil C; Khanna, Madhu

    2013-11-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) has eight segmented single-stranded RNA genome containing a common and evolutionarily conserved non-coding region (NCRs) at 5' and 3' ends that are important for the virus replication. In this study, we designed an antisense oligonucleotide against the 3' NCR of vital segments of the IAV genome to inhibit its replication. The results demonstrated that the co-transfection of Madine Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells with the antisense oligonucleotide and the plasmids encoding the viral genes led to the down-regulation of the viral gene expression. The designed antisense molecules reduced the cytopathic effect caused by A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), A/Udorn/307/72 (H3N2), and A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) strains of IAV for almost 48 h. Furthermore, the intra-venous delivery of this oligonucleotide significantly reduced the viral titers in the lungs of infected mice and protected the mice from lethal effects of all the strains of influenza virus. The study demonstrated that the antisense oligonucleotide designed against the NCR region inhibits the expression of the viral genome. The decrease of the cytopathic effect in the MDCK cells and increase in survival of mice confirmed the reduction of virus multiplication and pathogenesis in the presence of antisense oligonucleotide. Thus, we demonstrate that a single antisense oligonucleotide is capable of providing protection against more than one strains of the IAV.

  8. Gene silencing by siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides in the laboratory and the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acids are commonly used laboratory tools for modulating gene expression and have the potential to be widely used in the clinic. Progress towards nucleic acid drugs, however, has been slow and many challenges remain to be overcome before their full impact on patient care can be understood. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the two most widely used strategies for silencing gene expression. We first describe these two approaches and contrast their relative strengths and weaknesses for laboratory applications. We then review the choices faced during development of clinical candidates and the current state of clinical trials. Attitudes towards clinical development of nucleic acid silencing strategies have repeatedly swung from optimism to depression during the past twenty years. Our goal is to provide the information needed to design robust studies with oligonucleotides, making use of the strengths of each oligonucleotide technology. PMID:22069063

  9. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    , most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides...... by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA...... and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media....

  10. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  11. The small molecule Retro-1 enhances the pharmacological actions of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Fisher, Michael; Noel, Romain; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Barbier, Julien; Cao, Canhong; Bauman, John; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2013-04-01

    The attainment of strong pharmacological effects with oligonucleotides is hampered by inefficient access of these molecules to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Attempts to address this problem with lipid or polymeric delivery systems have been only partially successful. Here, we describe a novel alternative approach involving the use of a non-toxic small molecule to enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides. The compound Retro-1 was discovered in a screen for small molecules that reduce the actions of bacterial toxins and has been shown to block the retrograde trafficking pathway. We demonstrate that Retro-1 can also substantially enhance the effectiveness of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. This effect occurs at the level of intracellular trafficking or processing and is correlated with increased oligonucleotide accumulation in the nucleus but does not involve the perturbation of lysosomal compartments. We also show that Retro-1 can alter the effectiveness of splice switching oligonucleotides in the in vivo setting. These observations indicate that it is possible to enhance the pharmacological actions of oligonucleotides using non-toxic and non-lysosomotropic small molecule adjuncts.

  12. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  13. Gene expression visualisation with antisense oligonucleotides; Visualisation de l'expression d'un gene: la strategie antisens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brard, P.Y.; Gauchez, A.S.; Vuillez, J.P. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, INSERM E 03-40, Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques, Faculte de Medecine, 38 (France); Defrancq, E. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, UMR CNRS 5616 - LEDSS, Faculte de Medecine, 38 (France)

    2004-08-01

    Using radiolabelled antisense oligonucleotides to target mRNAs is a very promising method to study gene expression in vivo. This molecular imaging technique has the aim to identify cellular modifications in a very early stage of disease. During the last ten years, the number of published studies concerning in vivo tumor specific imaging is small. This fact depends on numerous biological challenges. In fact, gene specific oligonucleotides must be chemically modified to increase nuclease resistance and permit labelling with radionuclide. To be used as imaging radiopharmaceutical agent, a good antisense oligonucleotide need to valid a lot of steps: in vivo stability, cell membrane passage and durable hybridization to mRNA to obtain a kinetic which depends directly on gene expression level. We can get over these difficulties, we will illustrate with our experience on chemo-resistance imaging with antisense oligonucleotides which target h-mdr 1, in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon.

  15. Efficient inhibition of human telomerase activity by antisense oligonucleotides sensitizes cancer cells to radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-mei JI; Cong-hua XIE; Ming-hao FANG; Fu-xiang ZHOU; Wen-jie ZHANG; Ming-sheng ZHANG; Yun-feng ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of the antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) specific for human telomerase RNA (hTR) on radio sensitization and proliferation inhibition in human neurogliocytoma cells (U251). Methods: U251 cells were transfected with hTR ASODN or nonspecific oligonucleotides (NSODN). Before and after irradiation of 60Co-γray, telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP-PCR-ELISA), and DNA damage and repair were examined by the comet assay. The classical colony assay was used to plot the cell-survival curve, to detect the D0 value. Results: hTR antisense oligonucleotides could downregulate the telomerase activity, increase radiation induced DNA damage and reduce the subsequent repair. Furthermore, it could inhibit the proliferation and decrease the D0 value which demonstrates rising radiosensitivity. However, telomere length was unchanged over a short period of time. Conclusion: These findings suggest that an ASODN-based strategy may be used to develop telomerase inhibitors, which can efficiently sensitize radiotherapy.

  16. Antisense oligonucleotide to insulin—like growth factor Ⅱ induces apotosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINDELING; LUPU; 等

    1998-01-01

    The effects of antisense oligonucleotide to insulin0like growth factor -Ⅱ(IGFⅡ)to induce apotosis in human ovarian cancer cells were evaluated.Antiproliferation effects of antisense to IGFⅡin ovarian cancer AO cells were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation.Apoptosis of the IGFⅡ antisense-treated cells was quantitated by both nuclear condensation and flow cytometry after cells were stained with propidium iodide,IGFⅡ antisense(4.5μM) treatment of 48h maximally inhibited proliferation of AO cells,More than 25% of IGFⅡantisense-treated cells(4.5μM for 24h) had undergone apoptosis,whereas less than 3% of the cells were apoptotic in either IGFⅡ sense-treated cells or untreated cells.Antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell.These data suggest that IGFII may be a potential target in treatment of ovarian cancer and antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ may serve as a therapeutic approach.

  17. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-03

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  18. Direct oligonucleotide-photosensitizer conjugates for photochemical delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ahu; Laing, Brian; Hu, Yiqiao; Ming, Xin

    2015-04-18

    Activation of photosensitizers in endosomes enables release of therapeutic macromolecules into the cytosol of the target cells for pharmacological actions. In this study, we demonstrate that direct conjugation of photosensitizers to oligonucleotides (ONs) allows spatial and temporal co-localization of the two modalities in the target cells, and thus leads to superior functional delivery of ONs. Further, light-activated delivery of an anticancer ON caused cancer cell killing via modulation of an oncogene and photodynamic therapy.

  19. Synthesis of antisense oligonucleotides containing acyclic alkynyl nucleoside analogs and their biophysical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Aya; Maeda, Yusuke; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2017-02-17

    The synthesis of oligonucleotide (ON) analogs, which can be used as antisense molecules, has recently gained much attention. Here, we report the synthesis and properties of an ON analog containing acyclic thymidine and cytidine analogs with a 4-pentyl-1,2-diol instead of the d-ribofuranose moiety. The incorporation of these analogs into the ON improved its nuclease resistance to 3'-exonucleases. Furthermore, it was found that the incorporation of the acyclic thymidine analog into a DNA/RNA duplex accelerates the RNA cleavage of a DNA/RNA duplex by Escherichia coli RNase H.

  20. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection i...

  1. Efficient Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5'-GalNAc Conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Michael E; Yu, Jinghua; Kinberger, Garth A; Wan, W Brad; Migawa, Michael T; Vasquez, Guillermo; Schmidt, Karsten; Gaus, Hans J; Murray, Heather M; Low, Audrey; Swayze, Eric E; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P

    2015-08-19

    Conjugation of triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc) to oligonucleotide therapeutics results in marked improvement in potency for reducing gene targets expressed in hepatocytes. In this report we describe a robust and efficient solution-phase conjugation strategy to attach triantennary GalNAc clusters (mol. wt. ∼2000) activated as PFP (pentafluorophenyl) esters onto 5'-hexylamino modified antisense oligonucleotides (5'-HA ASOs, mol. wt. ∼8000 Da). The conjugation reaction is efficient and was used to prepare GalNAc conjugated ASOs from milligram to multigram scale. The solution phase method avoids loading of GalNAc clusters onto solid-support for automated synthesis and will facilitate evaluation of GalNAc clusters for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Furthermore, we show that transfer of the GalNAc cluster from the 3'-end of an ASO to the 5'-end results in improved potency in cells and animals.

  2. Superior Silencing by 2′,4′-BNANC-Based Short Antisense Oligonucleotides Compared to 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-Based Apolipoprotein B Antisense Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The duplex stability with target mRNA and the gene silencing potential of a novel bridged nucleic acid analogue are described. The analogue, 2′,4′-BNANC antisense oligonucleotides (AONs ranging from 10- to 20-nt-long, targeted apolipoprotein B. 2′,4′-BNANC was directly compared to its conventional bridged (or locked nucleic acid (2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterparts. Melting temperatures of duplexes formed between 2′,4′-BNANC-based antisense oligonucleotides and the target mRNA surpassed those of 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterparts at all lengths. An in vitro transfection study revealed that when compared to the identical length 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterpart, the corresponding 2′,4′-BNANC-based antisense oligonucleotide showed significantly stronger inhibitory activity. This inhibitory activity was more pronounced in shorter (13-, 14-, and 16-mer oligonucleotides. On the other hand, the 2′,4′-BNANC-based 20-mer AON exhibited the highest affinity but the worst IC50 value, indicating that very high affinity may undermine antisense potency. These results suggest that the potency of AONs requires a balance between reward term and penalty term. Balance of these two parameters would depend on affinity, length, and the specific chemistry of the AON, and fine-tuning of this balance could lead to improved potency. We demonstrate that 2′,4′-BNANC may be a better alternative to conventional 2′,4′-BNA/LNA, even for “short” antisense oligonucleotides, which are attractive in terms of drug-likeness and cost-effective bulk production.

  3. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid E C Verhaart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks. Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days. Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days. Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD.

  4. Lipid-Albumin Nanoparticles (LAN) for Therapeutic Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotide against HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Quan, Jishan; Zhang, Mengzi; Yung, Bryant C; Cheng, Xinwei; Liu, Yang; Lee, Young B; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Kim, Deog Joong; Lee, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-albumin nanoparticles (LAN) were synthesized for delivery of RX-0047, an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) against the hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) to solid tumor. These lipid nanoparticles (LNs) incorporated a human serum albumin-pentaethylenehexamine (HSA-PEHA) conjugate, which is cationic and can form electrostatic complexes with negatively charged oligonucleotides. The delivery efficiency of LAN-RX-0047 was investigated in KB cells and a KB murine xenograft model. When KB cells were treated with LAN-RX-0047, significant HIF-1α downregulation and enhanced cellular uptake were observed compared to LN-RX-0047. LN-RX-0047 and LAN-RX-0047 showed similar cytotoxicity against KB cells with IC50 values of 19.3 ± 3.8 and 20.1 ± 4.2 μM, respectively. LAN-RX-0047 was shown to be taken up by the cells via the macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways while LN-RX-0047 was taken up by cells via caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In the KB xenograft tumor model, LAN-RX-0047 exhibited tumor suppressive activity and significantly reduced intratumoral HIF-1α expression compared to LN-RX-0047. Furthermore, LAN-RX-0047 greatly increased survival time of mice bearing KB-1 xenograft tumors at doses of either 3 mg/kg or 16 mg/kg. These results indicated that LAN-RX-0047 is a highly effective vehicle for therapeutic delivery of antisense agents to tumor.

  5. PNA-based artificial nucleases as antisense and anti-miRNA oligonucleotide agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglione, M; Milano, G; Chambery, A; Moggio, L; Romanelli, A; Messere, A

    2011-08-01

    Because of its interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) has attracted major attention in molecular biology, for diagnostics purposes and development of biosensors. PNAs have become candidates for gene therapeutic drugs in ANTISENSE (AO) strategy with favorable in vivo biochemical properties. Recently, antisense PNA oligonucleotides have been described in anti-miRNA approach (AMO). We propose PNA-based nucleases as AO and AMO agents. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of two kinds of artificial nucleases composed of a PEG-PNA-PEG domain conjugated to HGG·Cu (A) and DETA (B) as well known cleavage sites. Qualitative (MALDI-TOF) and quantitative (HTS) assays were planned to study nuclease activity of constructs A and B on RNA-3'-FAM target sequence. The results have highlighted the best performance of nuclease B and the relevance of the PEG spacer, in particular for conjugate A, in terms of efficiency of the cleavage, suggesting that conjugates A and B also act as potential antisense and anti-miRNA agents.

  6. A Novel Family of Small Molecules that Enhance the Intracellular Delivery and Pharmacological Effectiveness of Antisense and Splice Switching Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Ariyarathna, Yamuna; Ming, Xin; Yang, Bing; James, Lindsey I; Kreda, Silvia M; Porter, Melissa; Janzen, William; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2017-08-18

    The pharmacological effectiveness of oligonucleotides has been hampered by their tendency to remain entrapped in endosomes, thus limiting their access to cytosolic or nuclear targets. We have previously reported a group of small molecules that enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by causing their release from endosomes. Here, we describe a second novel family of oligonucleotide enhancing compounds (OECs) that is chemically distinct from the compounds reported previously. We demonstrate that these molecules substantially augment the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in cell culture. We also find enhancement of SSO effects in a murine model. These new compounds act by increasing endosome permeability and causing partial release of entrapped oligonucleotides. While they also affect the permeability of lysosomes, they are clearly different from typical lysosomotropic agents. Current members of this compound family display a relatively narrow window between effective dose and toxic dose. Thus, further improvements are necessary before these agents can become suitable for therapeutic use.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte S; Jensen, Knud J; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-03-15

    Specific target binding and stability in diverse biological media is of crucial importance for applications of synthetic oligonucleotides as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. So far, these issues have been addressed by chemical modification of oligonucleotides and by conjugation with a peptide, most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides that target the BRAF V600E oncogene, with a library of rationally designed peptides employing CuAAC "click" chemistry. The peptide sequence has an influence on the specificity and affinity of target DNA/RNA binding. We also investigated the impact of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) on the latter. Lysine residues improve binding of POCs to target DNA and RNA, whereas the distance to lysine correlates exclusively with a decrease in binding of mismatched RNA targets. Glycine and tyrosine residues affect target binding as well. Importantly, the resistance of POCs to enzymatic degradation is dramatically improved by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media.

  8. Osmolality of antisense oligonucleotide parenteral formulations: Implications on counterion dissociation and recommended osmometry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Marc; Dibble, Andrew

    2016-12-30

    The intrinsic osmolality of aqueous solutions of sodium salt antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) has been studied to inform formulation practices, understand the molecular basis underlying the difference between theoretical and empirical results, and determine suitable measurement methods. It was found that regardless of nucleotide sequence, ASO concentration of ∼140mg/mL has isotonic osmolality of ∼290mOsm/kg water (SI unit: mmol osmotically-active particles/kg water), such that lower concentration formulations require excipients for tonicity adjustment. The range of osmolality values at a given active ingredient concentration can be ascribed to drug substance lot-to-lot purity differences impacting total oligonucleotide content (i.e., including oligonucleotide-related impurities). Empirical osmolality measurements were found to be ∼70% of theoretical values, which corresponds to an osmotic coefficient value of ∼0.7, thus inferring incomplete counterion dissociation. When comparing theoretical (ideal) osmolality of multiple sequences with various nucleotide compositions and chemistries at the same w/v concentration, the "average osmolar mass" (molar mass of the oligonucleotide, including the sodium counterions, divided by the ideal Van't Hoff factor, i(id)) appears to be the strongest factor governing theoretical osmolality values. Other factors examined were the sequence length, backbone chemistry, 2' sugar chemistry, and nucleotide composition. A head-to-head comparison between two osmolality techniques showed that vapor pressure osmometry is generally more suitable than freezing point osmometry for oligonucleotide solutions greater than ∼150mg/mL due to viscosity effects, but the two techniques are comparable otherwise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Otero, Carolina

    2016-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  10. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Otero, Carolina

    2016-12-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  11. In vivo reduction of hepatitis B virus antigenemia and viremia by antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billioud, Gaetan; Kruse, Robert L; Carrillo, Melissa; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Gao, Dacao; Kim, Aneeza; Chen, Leon; McCaleb, Michael L; Crosby, Jeffrey R; Hamatake, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Swayze, Eric; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Wieland, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Current treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) includes interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues, which generally do not reduce HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) production, a constellation that is associated with poor prognosis of CHB. Here we evaluated the efficacy of an antisense approach using antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) technology already in clinical use for liver targeted therapy to specifically inhibit HBsAg production and viremia in a preclinical setting. A lead ASO was identified and characterized in vitro and subsequently tested for efficacy in vivo and in vitro using HBV transgenic and hydrodynamic transfection mouse and a cell culture HBV infection model, respectively. ASO treatment decreased serum HBsAg levels ⩾2 logs in a dose and time-dependent manner; HBsAg decreased 2 logs in a week and returned to baseline 4 weeks after a single ASO injection. ASO treatment effectively reduced HBsAg in combination with entecavir, while the nucleoside analogue alone did not. ASO treatment has pan-genotypic antiviral activity in the hydrodynamic transfection system. Finally, cccDNA-driven HBV gene expression is ASO sensitive in HBV infected cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate in a preclinical setting the efficacy of an antisense approach against HBV by efficiently reducing serum HBsAg (as well as viremia) across different genotypes alone or in combination with standard nucleoside therapy. Since the applied antisense technology is already in clinical use, a lead compound can be rapidly validated in a clinical setting and thus, constitutes a novel therapeutic approach targeting chronic HBV infection. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing antisense efficacy with multimers and multi-targeting oligonucleotides (MTOs) using cleavable linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Romesh R; Wysk, Mark A; Ogilvie, Kathleen M; Bhat, Abhijit; Kuang, Bing; Rockel, Thomas D; Weber, Markus; Uhlmann, Eugen; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-10-30

    The in vivo potency of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) has been significantly increased by reducing their length to 8-15 nucleotides and by the incorporation of high affinity RNA binders such as 2', 4'-bridged nucleic acids (also known as locked nucleic acid or LNA, and 2',4'-constrained ethyl [cET]). We now report the development of a novel ASO design in which such short ASO monomers to one or more targets are co-synthesized as homo- or heterodimers or multimers via phosphodiester linkers that are stable in plasma, but cleaved inside cells, releasing the active ASO monomers. Compared to current ASOs, these multimers and multi-targeting oligonucleotides (MTOs) provide increased plasma protein binding and biodistribution to liver, and increased in vivo efficacy against single or multiple targets with a single construct. In vivo, MTOs synthesized in both RNase H-activating and steric-blocking oligonucleotide designs provide ≈4-5-fold increased potency and ≈2-fold increased efficacy, suggesting broad therapeutic applications. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Target gene knockdown by 2',4'-BNA/LNA antisense oligonucleotides in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Motoyuki; Nakaura, Mizuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    Gene knockdowns using oligonucleotide-based approaches are useful for studying gene function in both in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo animal models. We evaluated the efficacy of 2',4'-bridged nucleic acids (BNA)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) for gene knockdown in zebrafish. We used the tcf7l1a gene as a model for testing the knockdown efficacy of 2',4'-BNA AONs and examined how the target sites/affinity and RNase H induction activity of 2',4'-BNA AONs affect knockdown efficacy. We found that tcf7l1a gene function was knocked down by 2',4'-BNA AONs that target the start codon and induce RNase H activity. Although nonspecific p53-mediated developmental defects were observed at higher doses, the effective dose of the 2',4'-BNA AONs for tcf7l1a is much lower than that of morpholino oligonucleotides. Our data thus show a potential application for 2',4'-BNA AONs in the downregulation of specific genes in zebrafish.

  14. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  15. Inhibitory effects of intrathecal p38β antisense oligonucleotide on bone cancer pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hang; Xiang, Hong-Bing; Ye, Da-Wei; Tian, Xue-Bi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of intrathecal administration p38β antisense oligonucleotide on the development of bone cancer pain rats. Forty female SD rats weighing 180~220 g were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10 each): Group A (control group): intra-tibial injection of 3 μl Hank's solution; group B (model group): intra-tibial injection of 3 μl MADB-106 mammary gland carcinoma cells of rats (4.8 × 10(3)/μl); group C (p38β-SODN 20 μg); group D (p38β-ASODN 20 μg). The model procedures in group C and D were same to those in the group B. From the 14th day after operation, p38β-SODN 20 μg and p38β-ASODN 20 μg were respectively intrathecally administrated in group C and D once daily for 6 days whereas normal saline was for group A and B. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and radiant heat threshold of rat hind paws were measured before operation and every other day until 22 d of post-operation. The lumbar 4-6 spinal cord was removed on the 22(nd) day. The expression of spinal p38β protein was determined by Western blot. No significant differences in mechanical withdrawal threshold and radiant heat threshold were found at all time points in control group. During the first 6 days after operation there were obvious differences in radiant heat stimulus between control group between the other groups (P 0.05). The expression of p38β protein in lumbar spinal cord was significantly higher between p38β-SODN group and Model group than that in control group (P 0.05). Hyperalgesia induced by bone cancer can be inhibited by intrathecal administration of p38β antisense oligonucleotide, which is achieved by reducing expression of p38β protein.

  16. Study on Apoptosis-Inducing Effect of XIAP Antisense Oligonucleotides on Glioblastoma Cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongwei Zhao; Zhengchun Sun; Yunhan Zhang; Ming Zhang; Xudong Ma

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the apoptosis-inducing effect of XIAP antisense oligonucleotides on glioblastoma cells in vitro.METHODS There were 4 groups in our experiment. Group A,as a cell control group, had normal cell culture and no treatment applied. Group B, as a blank control group, had normal cell culture and no liposome control of ASODN. Group C was N-ODN.Group D was the ASODN group. RT-PCR and Western blot assay were conducted to detect the expression of XIAP in all A-172cell groups after treatment with XIAP antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN). MTT assay and flow-cytometry (FCM) detection were used to detect the ability of cell anchoring growth and apoptotic rates of all groups. The processing time was 72 h.RESULTS The expression of XIAP in the A-172 cells was greatly down-regulated, after treated with XIAP-ASODN. Among different concentrations of ASODN, the 300nM was the most optimal one. The down-regulation of XIAP obviously inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of the A-172 cells and the increased apoptotic rate of A-172 cells (87.45%) was significantly higher than that of the A-172 in the control groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups (P < 0.01).CONCLUSION The XIAP-ASODN can effectively regulate the expression of the XIAP down, as a result, inhibit the growth of the glioblastoma cells (A-172) and obviously increase the apoptotic rate of the A-172 cells. The results of the study manifest an overt killing role of XIAP-ASODN to the glioblastoma cells.

  17. Antisense oligonucleotide therapies: the promise and the challenges from a toxicologic pathologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kendall S

    2015-01-01

    Many antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) from several classes of molecules are currently in drug development. Despite over 20 years of pharmaceutical research, few ASOs have been marketed due to problems with clinical efficacy or preclinical toxicologic challenges. However, a number of recent developments have renewed interest in this class including the registration of mipomersen, the advent of successful screening strategies to eliminate more toxic molecules, and new understanding of the risks of off-target nucleotide binding and mitigation of potential off-target effects. Recent advances in backbone chemistries, conjugation to other moieties, and new delivery systems have allowed better tissue penetration, enhanced intracellular targeting, and less frequent dosing, resulting in fewer toxicities. While these new developments provide invigorated interest in these platforms, a few lingering challenges and preclinical/clinical toxicity issues remain to be completely resolved, including: (1) proinflammatory effects (vasculitis/inflammatory infiltrates); (2) nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity unrelated to lysosomal accumulation; and (3) thrombocytopenia. Recent investigative work by several laboratories have helped elucidate mechanisms for these issues, allowing a better understanding of the clinical relevance and implications of particular toxicities. It is important for toxicologists, pathologists, and regulatory reviewers to be familiar with new developments in the ASO field and their implications, as a greater number of new types of antisense molecules undergo preclinical toxicity testing. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  18. Translation efficiency of mRNAs is increased by antisense oligonucleotides targeting upstream open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Migawa, Michael T; Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-08-01

    Increasing the levels of therapeutic proteins in vivo remains challenging. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are often used to downregulate gene expression or to modify RNA splicing, but antisense technology has not previously been used to directly increase the production of selected proteins. Here we used a class of modified ASOs that bind to mRNA sequences in upstream open reading frames (uORFs) to specifically increase the amounts of protein translated from a downstream primary ORF (pORF). Using ASO treatment, we increased the amount of proteins expressed from four genes by 30-150% in a dose-dependent manner in both human and mouse cells. Notably, systemic treatment of mice with ASO resulted in an ∼80% protein increase of LRPPRC. The ASO-mediated increase in protein expression was sequence-specific, occurred at the level of translation and was dependent on helicase activity. We also found that the type of RNA modification and the position of modified nucleotides in ASOs affected translation of a pORF. ASOs are a useful class of therapeutic agents with broad utility.

  19. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-05-24

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented.

  20. Allele-Selective Inhibition of Mutant Huntingtin Expression with Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Expanded CAG Repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Pendergraff, Hannah M.; Deleavey, Glen F.; Swayze, Eric E.; Potier, Pierre; Randolph, John; Roesch, Eric B.; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Damha, Masad J.; Bennett, C. Frank; Montaillier, Christophe; Lemaitre, Marc; Corey, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Therapeutic approaches include selectively inhibiting the expression of the mutated HTT allele while conserving function of the normal allele. We have evaluated a series of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the expanded CAG repeat within HTT mRNA for their ability to selectively inhibit expression of mutant HTT protein. Several ASOs incorporating a variety of modifications, including bridged nucleic acids and phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages, exhibited allele-selective silencing in patient-derived fibroblasts. Allele-selective ASOs did not affect the expression of other CAG repeat-containing genes and selectivity was observed in cell lines containing minimal CAG repeat lengths representative of most HD patients. Allele-selective ASOs left HTT mRNA intact and did not support ribonuclease H activity in vitro. We observed cooperative binding of multiple ASO molecules to CAG repeat-containing HTT mRNA transcripts in vitro. These results are consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition at the level of translation. ASOs targeted to the CAG repeat of HTT provide a starting point for the development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics that can inhibit gene expression with allelic discrimination in patients with HD. PMID:21028906

  1. PRO-051, an antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Suzan M; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-08-01

    PRO-051 (GSK-2402968), being developed by GlaxoSmithKline plc, under license from Leiden University Medical Center and Prosensa Therapeutics BV, is a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The PRO-051 oligonucleotide sequence induces skipping of exon 51 of the dystrophin gene by binding to a sequence within the dystrophin pre-mRNA and masking the exon inclusion signals that are used for splicing. Removal of exon 51 from an exon 45 to 50, 47 to 50, 48 to 50, 49 to 50, 50, 52 or 52 to 63 deleted transcript allows restoration of the open reading frame and synthesis of an internally truncated, semi-functional dystrophin protein. By targeting exon 51, approximately 13% of patients with DMD could be treated, the largest proportion of patients that could benefit from targeting a single dystrophin exon. A proof-of-concept clinical trial of PRO-051 in patients with DMD demonstrated that a single intramuscular administration of PRO-051 induced exon skipping within muscle fibers adjacent to the injection site, while biopsies revealed dystrophin expression in treated but not control muscle fibers. At the time of publication, a phase I/IIa trial to evaluate subcutaneous delivery of PRO-051 had been completed, although full results were yet to be published.

  2. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Erik C; Morcos, Paul A; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2008-03-11

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orthologue of the ATP7A gene. Embryonic-recessive lethal mutants have impaired copper homeostasis that results in absent melanin pigmentation, impaired notochord formation, and hindbrain neurodegeneration. In this current study, we have attempted to rescue these striking phenotypic alterations by using a series of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against the splice-site junctions of two mutant calamity alleles. Our findings reveal a robust and complete correction of the copper-deficient defects of calamity in association with the generation of the WT Menkes protein in all rescued mutants. Interestingly, a quantitative analysis of atp7a-specific transcripts suggests that competitive translational regulation may account for the synthesis of WT protein in these embryos. This in vivo correction of Menkes disease through the rescue of aberrant splicing may provide therapeutic options in this fatal disease and illustrates the potential for zebrafish models of human genetic disease in the development of treatments based on the principles of interactions of synthetic oligonucleotide analogues with mRNA.

  3. Optimizing RNA/ENA chimeric antisense oligonucleotides using in vitro splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Mariko; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A molecular therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that converts dystrophin mRNA from out-of-frame to in-frame transcripts by inducing exon skipping with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) is now approaching clinical application. To exploit the broad therapeutic applicability of exon skipping therapy, it is necessary to identify AOs that are able to induce efficient and specific exon skipping. To optimize AOs, we have established an in vitro splicing system using cultured DMD myocytes. Here, we describe the process of identifying the best AO.Cultured DMD myocytes are established from a biopsy sample and the target exon is chosen. A series of AOs are designed to cover the whole target exon sequence. As AOs, we use 15-20-mer chimeric oligonucleotides consisting of 2'-O-methyl RNA and modified nucleic acid (2'-O, 4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid). Each AO is transfected individually into cultured DMD myocytes, and the resulting mRNA is analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. The ability of each AO to induce exon skipping is examined by comparing the amount of cDNA with and without exon skipping. If necessary, having roughly localized the target region, another set of AOs are designed and the exon skipping abilities of the new AOs are examined. Finally, one AO is determined as the best for the molecular therapy.Our simple and reliable methods using an in vitro splicing system have enabled us to identify optimized AOs against many exons of the DMD gene.

  4. Down-regulation of nerve growth factor expression in the bladder by antisense oligonucleotides as new treatment for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Mahendra; Kawamorita, Naoki; Tyagi, Vikas; Sugino, Yoshio; Chancellor, Michael; Yoshimura, Naoki; Tyagi, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Nerve growth factor over expression in the bladder has a role in overactive bladder symptoms via the mediation of functional changes in bladder afferent pathways. We studied whether blocking nerve growth factor over expression in bladder urothelium by a sequence specific gene silencing mechanism would suppress bladder overactivity and chemokine expression induced by acetic acid. Female Sprague-Dawley® rats anesthetized with isoflurane were instilled with 0.5 ml saline, scrambled or TYE™ 563 labeled antisense oligonucleotide targeting nerve growth factor (12 μM) alone or complexed with cationic liposomes for 30 minutes. The efficacy of nerve growth factor antisense treatments for acetic acid induced bladder overactivity was assessed by cystometry. Bladder nerve growth factor expression levels and cellular distribution were quantified by immunofluorescence staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Effects on bladder chemokine expression were measured by Luminex® xMAP® analysis. Liposomes were needed for bladder uptake of oligonucleotide, as seen by the absence of bright red TYE 563 fluorescence in rats instilled with oligonucleotide alone. At 24 hours after liposome-oligonucleotide treatment baseline bladder activity during saline infusion was indistinct in the sham and antisense treated groups with a mean ± SEM intercontraction interval of 348 ± 55 and 390 ± 120 seconds, respectively. Acetic acid induced bladder overactivity was shown by a decrease in the intercontraction interval to a mean of 33.2% ± 4.0% of baseline in sham treated rats. However, the reduction was blunted to a mean of 75.8% ± 3.4% of baseline in rats treated with liposomal antisense oligonucleotide (p antisense treatment, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reduced nerve growth factor immunoreactivity in the urothelium. Increased nerve growth factor in bladder tissue was associated with sICAM-1, sE-selectin, CXCL-10 and 1, leptin, MCP-1 and vascular endothelial

  5. Chemosensitization of Human Renal Cell Cancer Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Antiapoptotic Gene Clusterin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zellweger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal cell cancer (RCC is a chemoresistant disease with no active chemotherapeutic agent achieving objective response rates higher than 15%. Clusterin is a cell survival gene that increases in human renal tubular epithelial cells after various states of injury and disease. Downregulation of clusterin, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, has recently been shown to increase chemosensitivity in several prostate cancer models. The objectives in this study were to evaluate clusterin expression levels in human RCC and normal kidney tissue, and to test whether clusterin ASO could also enhance chemosensitivity in human RCC Caki-2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used to characterize clusterin expression in 67 RCC and normal kidney tissues obtained from radical nephrectomy specimens. Northern blot analysis was used to assess changes in clusterin mRNA expression after ASO and paclitaxel treatment. The effects of combined clusterin ASO and paclitaxel treatment on Caki-2 cell growth was examined using an MTT assay. Athymic mice bearing Caki-2 tumors were treated with clusterin ASO alone, clusterin ASO plus paclitaxel, and mismatch control oligonucleotides plus paclitaxel, over a period of 28 days with measurement of tumor volumes once weekly over 8 weeks. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry of normal and malignant kidney tissue sections of 67 patients demonstrated positive clusterin staining for almost all RCC (98% and an overexpression, compared to normal tissue, in a majority of RCC (69%. Clusterin ASO, but not mismatch control oligonucleotides, decreased clusterin mRNA expression in Caki-2 cells in a dosedependent and sequence-specific manner. Pretreatment of Caki-2 cells with clusterin ASO significantly enhanced chemosensitivity to paclitaxel in vitro. Characteristic apoptotic DNA laddering was observed after combined treatment with ASO plus paclitaxel, but not with either agent alone. In vivo

  6. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide into cells using synthetic peptide; Gosei pepuchido wo mochiita anchisensu origonukureochido no saibounai donyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niidome, Takuro [Nagasaki University, Nagasaki (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-12-16

    Much attention has been attracted to the antisense oligonucleotide as a novel nucleic acid medicine. However, many problems to be solved such as delivery system in vivo and permeation through cell membrane are pointed out. In this study, we found out that some cationic peptides were useful as an oligonucleotide-carrier molecule into cells. Furthermore, to develop a cell specific gene delivery system using the cationic peptide, we modified the peptides with several galactose residues. As a result, the modified peptides showed high transfer efficiencies into hepatoma cells, and then, it was clear that the internalization into cells was mediated by asialoglycoprotein receptor on hepatoma cell. (author)

  7. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudome, Yuya; Takahama, Mamiko; Hirose, Jun; Yoshida, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by providing sliding friction onto the surface of agar gel; we then investigated whether penetron formation was applicable to gene silencing techniques. Antisense DNA was artificially synthesized as 15 or 90mer DNA oligonucleotides based on the sequences around the translation start codon of target mRNAs. Mixtures of bacterial cells with antisense DNA adsorbed on α-sepiolite were stimulated by sliding friction on the surface of agar gel for 60 s. Upon formation of Escherichia coli penetrons, β-lactamase and β-galactosidase expression was evaluated by counting the numbers of colonies formed on LB agar containing ampicillin and by measuring β-galactosidase activity respectively. The numbers of ampicillin resistant colonies and the β-galactosidase activity derived from penetrons bearing antisense DNA (90mer) was repressed to 15% and 25%, respectively, of that of control penetrons which lacked antisense DNA. Biphenyl metabolite, ring cleavage yellow compound produced by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes penetron treated with antisense oligonucleotide DNA targeted to bphD increased higher than that lacking antisense DNA. This result indicated that expression of bphD in P. pseudoalcaligenes penetrons was repressed by antisense DNA that targeted bphD mRNA. Sporulation rates of Bacillus subtilis penetrons treated with antisense DNA (15mer) targeted to spo0A decreased to 24.4% relative to penetrons lacking antisense DNA. This novel method of gene silencing has substantial promise for

  8. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by providing sliding friction onto the surface of agar gel; we then investigated whether penetron formation was applicable to gene silencing techniques. Antisense DNA was artificially synthesized as 15 or 90mer DNA oligonucleotides based on the sequences around the translation start codon of target mRNAs. Mixtures of bacterial cells with antisense DNA adsorbed on α-sepiolite were stimulated by sliding friction on the surface of agar gel for 60 s. Upon formation of Escherichia coli penetrons, β-lactamase and β-galactosidase expression was evaluated by counting the numbers of colonies formed on LB agar containing ampicillin and by measuring β-galactosidase activity respectively. The numbers of ampicillin resistant colonies and the β-galactosidase activity derived from penetrons bearing antisense DNA (90mer) was repressed to 15% and 25%, respectively, of that of control penetrons which lacked antisense DNA. Biphenyl metabolite, ring cleavage yellow compound produced by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes penetron treated with antisense oligonucleotide DNA targeted to bphD increased higher than that lacking antisense DNA. This result indicated that expression of bphD in P. pseudoalcaligenes penetrons was repressed by antisense DNA that targeted bphD mRNA. Sporulation rates of Bacillus subtilis penetrons treated with antisense DNA (15mer) targeted to spo0A decreased to 24.4% relative to penetrons lacking antisense DNA. This novel method of gene silencing has substantial promise for

  9. Intramural coronary delivery of advanced antisense oligonucleotides reduces neointimal formation in the porcine stent restenosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipshidze, Nicholas N; Kim, Han Soo; Iversen, Patrick; Yazdi, Hamid A; Bhargava, Balram; New, Gishel; Mehran, Roxana; Tio, Fermin; Haudenschild, Christian; Dangas, George; Stone, Gregg W; Iyer, Sriram; Roubin, Gary S; Leon, Martin B; Moses, Jeffrey W

    2002-05-15

    We evaluated the long-term influence of intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense oligonucleotides (Resten-NG) on neointimal hyperplasia after stenting in a pig model. Neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary interventions is one of the key components of the restenotic process. The c-myc is a critical cell division cycle protein involved in the formation of neointima. In short-term experiments, different doses (from 500 microg to 5 mg) of Resten-NG or saline were delivered to the stent implantation site with an infiltrator delivery system (Interventional Technologies, San Diego, California). Animals were euthanized at 2, 6 and 18 h after interventions, and excised vessels were analyzed for c-myc expression by Western blot. In long-term experiments, either saline or a dose of 1, 5 or 10 mg of Resten-NG was delivered in the same fashion, and animals were euthanized at 28 days after the intervention. Western blot analysis demonstrated inhibition of c-myc expression and was dose dependent. Morphometry showed that the intimal area was 3.88 +/- 1.04 mm(2) in the control. There was statistically significant reduction of intimal areas in the 5 and 10 mg groups (2.01 +/- 0.66 and 1.95 +/- 0.91, respectively, p 0.5) in comparison with control. This study demonstrated that intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense morpholino compound completely inhibits c-myc expression and dramatically reduces neointimal formation in a dose dependent fashion in a porcine coronary stent restenosis model, while allowing for complete vascular healing.

  10. Short locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides potently reduce apolipoprotein B mRNA and serum cholesterol in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Fisker, Niels; Hedtjärn, Maj; Lindholm, Marie W; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Aarup, Vibeke; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund; Ørum, Henrik; Hansen, Jens B Rode; Koch, Troels

    2010-11-01

    The potency and specificity of locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides was investigated as a function of length and affinity. The oligonucleotides were designed to target apolipoprotein B (apoB) and were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. The high affinity of LNA enabled the design of short antisense oligonucleotides (12- to 13-mers) that possessed high affinity and increased potency both in vitro and in vivo compared to longer oligonucleotides. The short LNA oligonucleotides were more target specific, and they exhibited the same biodistribution and tissue half-life as longer oligonucleotides. Pharmacology studies in both mice and non-human primates were conducted with a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide against apoB, and the data showed that repeated dosing of the 13-mer at 1-2 mg/kg/week was sufficient to provide a significant and long lasting lowering of non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol without increasing serum liver toxicity markers. The data presented here show that oligonucleotide length as a parameter needs to be considered in the design of antisense oligonucleotide and that potent short oligonucleotides with sufficient target affinity can be generated using the LNA chemistry. Conclusively, we present a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide with therapeutic potential that produce beneficial cholesterol lowering effect in non-human primates.

  11. Targeted Knockdown of Hepatic SOAT2 With Antisense Oligonucleotides Stabilizes Atherosclerotic Plaque in ApoB100-only LDLr-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, John T; Olson, John D; Kelley, Kathryn L; Wilson, Martha D; Sawyer, Janet K; Link, Kerry M; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that the attenuation of cholesterol oleate packaging into apoB-containing lipoproteins will arrest progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions. Atherosclerosis was induced in apoB-100 only, LDLr(-/-) mice by feeding a diet enriched in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids for 24 weeks. A subset of mice was then euthanized to quantify the extent of atherosclerosis. The remaining mice were continued on the same diet (controls) or assigned to the following treatments for 16 weeks: (1) a diet enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, (2) the cis-monounsaturated fatty acid diet plus biweekly injections of an antisense oligonucleotide specific to hepatic sterol-O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2); or (3) the cis-monounsaturated fatty acid diet and biweekly injections of a nontargeting hepatic antisense oligonucleotide. Extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta was monitored morphometrically in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo histologically and immunochemically. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 via antisense oligonucleotide treatment arrested lesion growth and stabilized lesions. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 in apoB100-only, LDLr(-/-) mice resulted in remodeling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions into a stable phenotype, suggesting SOAT2 is a viable target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Integrated Safety Assessment of 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotides in NonHuman Primates and Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Baker, Brenda F; Kwoh, T Jesse; Cheng, Wei; Schulz, Dan J; Xia, Shuting; Salgado, Nelson; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Hart, Christopher E; Burel, Sebastien A; Younis, Husam S; Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    The common chemical and biological properties of antisense oligonucleotides provide the opportunity to identify and characterize chemical class effects across species. The chemical class that has proven to be the most versatile and best characterized is the 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. In this report we present an integrated safety assessment of data obtained from controlled dose-ranging studies in nonhuman primates (macaques) and healthy human volunteers for 12 unique 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. Safety was assessed by the incidence of safety signals in standardized laboratory tests for kidney and liver function, hematology, and complement activation; as well as by the mean test results as a function of dose level over time. At high doses a number of toxicities were observed in nonhuman primates. However, no class safety effects were identified in healthy human volunteers from this integrated data analysis. Effects on complement in nonhuman primates were not observed in humans. Nonhuman primates predicted safe doses in humans, but over predicted risk of complement activation and effects on platelets. Although limited to a single chemical class, comparisons from this analysis are considered valid and accurate based on the carefully controlled setting for the specified study populations and within the total exposures studied.

  13. Serial incorporation of a monovalent GalNAc phosphoramidite unit into hepatocyte-targeting antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Sawamura, Motoki; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The targeting of abundant hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) with trivalent N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) is a reliable strategy for efficiently delivering antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to the liver. We here experimentally demonstrate the high systemic potential of the synthetically-accessible, phosphodiester-linked monovalent GalNAc unit when tethered to the 5'-terminus of well-characterised 2',4'-bridged nucleic acid (also known as locked nucleic acid)-modified apolipoprotein B-targeting ASO via a bio-labile linker. Quantitative analysis of the hepatic disposition of the ASOs revealed that phosphodiester is preferable to phosphorothioate as an interunit linkage in terms of ASGPR binding of the GalNAc moiety, as well as the subcellular behavior of the ASO. The flexibility of this monomeric unit was demonstrated by attaching up to 5 GalNAc units in a serial manner and showing that knockdown activity improves as the number of GalNAc units increases. Our study suggests the structural requirements for efficient hepatocellular targeting using monovalent GalNAc and could contribute to a new molecular design for suitably modifying ASO.

  14. A Short Antisense Oligonucleotide Ameliorates Symptoms of Severe Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Keil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports underscore the unparalleled potential of antisense-oligonucleotide (ASO-based approaches to ameliorate various pathological conditions. However, in vivo studies validating the effectiveness of a short ASO (<10-mer in the context of a human disease have not been performed. One disease with proven amenability to ASO-based therapy is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. SMA is a neuromuscular disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene. Correction of aberrant splicing of the remaining paralog, SMN2, can rescue mouse models of SMA. Here, we report the therapeutic efficacy of an 8-mer ASO (3UP8i in two severe models of SMA. While 3UP8i modestly improved survival and function in the more severe Taiwanese SMA model, it dramatically increased survival, improved neuromuscular junction pathology, and tempered cardiac deficits in a new, less severe model of SMA. Our results expand the repertoire of ASO-based compounds for SMA therapy, and for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of a short ASO in the context of a human disease.

  15. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  16. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid--modified antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Hollingshead, Brett D; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S; Reed, Lori A; Davis, John W; Whiteley, Laurence O

    2014-04-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure-toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure-toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing.

  17. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid—modified antisense oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D.; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R.; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A.; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S.; Reed, Lori A.; Davis, John W.; Whiteley, Laurence O.

    2014-01-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure–toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure–toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing. PMID:24550163

  18. Emerging LDL therapies: Mipomersen-antisense oligonucleotide therapy in the management of hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter P

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by severe elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and poses considerable treatment challenges. Substantive LDL-C reductions are difficult to achieve with standard therapies, and many patients with FH do not tolerate currently available lipid-lowering medications. Mipomersen is an antisense oligonucleotide injectable drug that was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of homozygous FH. It is complementary in sequence to a segment of the human apolipoprotein (Apo) B-100 messenger RNA and specifically binds to it, blocking translation of the gene product. Reducing the production of Apo B-100 reduces hepatic production of very low-density lipoprotein, consequently decreasing circulating levels of atherogenic very low-density lipoprotein remnants, intermediate-density lipoproteins, LDL, and lipoprotein(a) particles. Results from a pivotal trial conducted in patients with homozygous FH, and supporting trials in patients with heterozygous FH with coronary artery disease (CAD) (LDL-C ≥ 100 mg/dL, triglycerides 100 mg/dL in homozygous FH and severe hypercholesterolemia populations. The main on-treatment adverse events were mild-to-moderate injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. Available data regarding the efficacy, safety and tolerability of mipomersen, including results at up to 104 weeks of therapy, support the use of mipomersen for the treatment of FH. Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of antisense oligonucleotides to correct the splicing error in ISCU myopathy patient cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Crooks, Daniel R; Haller, Ronald G; Guo, Shuling; Freier, Susan M; Monia, Brett P; Rouault, Tracey A

    2016-12-01

    ISCU myopathy is an inherited disease that primarily affects individuals of northern Swedish descent who share a single point mutation in the fourth intron of the ISCU gene. The current study shows correction of specific phenotypes associated with disease following treatment with an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the site of the mutation. We have shown that ASO treatment diminished aberrant splicing and increased ISCU protein levels in both patient fibroblasts and patient myotubes in a concentration dependent fashion. Upon ASO treatment, levels of SDHB in patient myotubular cell lines increased to levels observed in control myotubular cell lines. Additionally, we have shown that both patient fibroblast and myotubular cell lines displayed an increase in complex II activity with a concomitant decrease in succinate levels in patient myotubular cell lines after ASO treatment. Mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase activities increased significantly following ASO treatment in patient myotubes. The current study suggests that ASO treatment may serve as a viable approach to correcting ISCU myopathy in patients. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotide Mediated Splice Correction of a Deep Intronic Mutation in OPA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bonifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited optic neuropathies (ION present an important cause of blindness in the European working-age population. Recently we reported the discovery of four independent families with deep intronic mutations in the main inherited optic neuropathies gene OPA1. These deep intronic mutations cause mis-splicing of the OPA1 pre-messenger-RNA transcripts by creating cryptic acceptor splice sites. As a rescue strategy we sought to prevent mis-splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA by applying 2′O-methyl-antisense oligonucleotides (AONs with a full-length phosphorothioate backbone that target the cryptic acceptor splice sites and the predicted novel branch point created by the deep intronic mutations, respectively. Transfection of patient-derived primary fibroblasts with these AONs induced correct splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA in a time and concentration dependent mode of action, as detected by pyrosequencing of informative heterozygous variants. The treatment showed strong rescue effects (≃55% using the cryptic acceptor splice sites targeting AON and moderate rescue (≃16% using the branch point targeting AON. The highest efficacy of Splice correction could be observed 4 days after treatment however, significant effects were still seen 14 days post-transfection. Western blot analysis revealed increased amounts of OPA1 protein with maximum amounts at ≃3 days post-treatment. In summary, we provide the first mutation-specific in vitro rescue strategy for OPA1 deficiency using synthetic AONs.

  1. Efficient SMN Rescue following Subcutaneous Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Robin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene, which encodes the protein survival motor neuron (SMN, whose absence dramatically affects the survival of motor neurons. In humans, the severity of the disease is lessened by the presence of a gene copy, SMN2. SMN2 differs from SMN1 by a C-to-T transition in exon 7, which modifies pre-mRNA splicing and prevents successful SMN synthesis. Splice-switching approaches using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs have already been shown to correct this SMN2 gene transition, providing a therapeutic avenue for SMA. However, AON administration to the CNS presents additional hurdles. In this study, we show that systemic delivery of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA AONs in a type III SMA mouse augments retention of exon 7 in SMN2 mRNA both in peripheral organs and the CNS. Mild type III SMA mice were selected as opposed to the severe type I model in order to test tcDNA efficacy and their ability to enter the CNS after maturation of the blood brain barrier (BBB. Furthermore, subcutaneous treatment significantly improved the necrosis phenotype and respiratory function. In summary, our data support that tcDNA oligomers effectively cross the blood-brain barrier and offer a promising systemic alternative for treating SMA.

  2. Synthesis, biophysical properties and biological activity of second generation antisense oligonucleotides containing chiral phosphorothioate linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W Brad; Migawa, Michael T; Vasquez, Guillermo; Murray, Heather M; Nichols, Josh G; Gaus, Hans; Berdeja, Andres; Lee, Sam; Hart, Christopher E; Lima, Walt F; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2014-12-16

    Bicyclic oxazaphospholidine monomers were used to prepare a series of phosphorothioate (PS)-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with control of the chirality of each of the PS linkages within the 10-base gap. The stereoselectivity was determined to be 98% for each coupling. The objective of this work was to study how PS chirality influences biophysical and biological properties of the ASO including binding affinity (Tm), nuclease stability, activity in vitro and in vivo, RNase H activation and cleavage patterns (both human and E. coli) in a gapmer context. Compounds that had nine or more Sp-linkages in the gap were found to be poorly active in vitro, while compounds with uniform Rp-gaps exhibited activity very similar to that of the stereo-random parent ASOs. Conversely, when tested in vivo, the full Rp-gap compound was found to be quickly metabolized resulting in low activity. A total of 31 ASOs were prepared with control of the PS chirally of each linkage within the gap in an attempt to identify favorable Rp/Sp positions. We conclude that a mix of Rp and Sp is required to achieve a balance between good activity and nuclease stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Huntingtin-lowering strategies in Huntington's disease: antisense oligonucleotides, small RNAs, and gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-09-15

    The idea to lower mutant huntingtin is especially appealing in Huntington's disease (HD). It is autosomal dominant, so that expression of the mutant allele causes the disease. Advances in RNA and gene regulation provide foundations for the huntingtin gene (both normal and mutant alleles) and possibly the mutant allele only. There is much preclinical animal work to support the concept of gene and RNA silencing, but, to date, no clinical studies have been attempted in HD. Preventing expression of mutant huntingtin protein is at the cusp for a human trial. Antisense oligonucleotides delivered to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been well tolerated; small RNAs administered to rodent and nonhuman primate brain knocked down huntingtin messenger RNA (mRNA); short-hairpin complementary DNA of microRNAs can be expressed in adeno-associated virus to provide long-term silencing of huntingtin mRNA and protein. We expect that these approaches will be ready for clinical studies in the near future, once safety has been validated. Our understanding of gene editing-changing the huntingtin gene itself-is rapidly progressing. Harnessing our knowledge of transcription and translation should push scientific creativity to new and exciting advances that overcome the lethality of the mutant gene in HD. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Efficacy and Safety Profile of Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotides in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Relizani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases. However, despite advances in AON chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is limited due to poor tissue uptake and sufficient therapeutic efficacy is still difficult to achieve. A novel class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA is considered very promising for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a neuromuscular disease typically caused by frameshifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene-encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure in addition to cognitive impairment. Herein, we report the efficacy and toxicology profile of a 13-mer tcDNA in mdx mice. We show that systemic delivery of 13-mer tcDNA allows restoration of dystrophin in skeletal muscles and to a lower extent in the brain, leading to muscle function improvement and correction of behavioral features linked to the emotional/cognitive deficiency. More importantly, tcDNA treatment was generally limited to minimal glomerular changes and few cell necroses in proximal tubules, with only slight variation in serum and urinary kidney toxicity biomarker levels. These results demonstrate an encouraging safety profile for tcDNA, albeit typical of phosphorothiate AONs, and confirm its therapeutic potential for the systemic treatment of DMD patients.

  5. Thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant for permeation enhancement in nasal delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, A; Martien, R; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant to enhance the permeation and improve the stability of a phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (PTO-ODN) on the nasal mucosa. Polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) was synthesized by the covalent attachment of L-cysteine to the polymeric backbone. Cytotoxicity tests were examined on human nasal epithelial cells from surgery of nasal polyps confirmed by histological studies. Deoxyribonuclease I activity in respiratory region of the porcine nasal cavity was analyzed by an enzymatic assay. The enzymatic degradation of PTO-ODNs on freshly excised porcine nasal mucosa was analyzed and protection of PCP-cysteine toward DNase I degradation was evaluated. Permeation studies were performed in Ussing-type diffusion chambers. PCP-Cys/GSH did not arise a remarkable mortal effect. Porcine respiratory mucosa was shown to possess nuclease activity corresponding to 0.69 Kunitz units/mL. PTO-ODNs were degraded by incubation with nasal mucosa. In the presence of 0.45% thiolated polycarbophil and 0.5% glutathione (GSH), this degradation process could be lowered. In the presence of thiolated polycarbophil and GSH the uptake of PTO-ODNs from the nasal mucosa was 1.7-fold improved. According to these results thiolated polycarbophil/GSH might be a promising excipient for nasal administration of PTO-ODNs.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of a fluorine-18 labeled antisense oligonucleotide as a potential PET tracer for NOS mRNA expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Dijkstra, G; Moshage, H; Elsinga, PH; Jansen, PLM; Vaalburg, W

    2004-01-01

    Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel diseases. An antisense oligonucleotide with good hybridization properties for iNOS mRNA was selected using RT-PCR. The oligonucleotide was reliably labeled with fluorine-18 using N-(4-[F-18]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide. Cellular u

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of a fluorine-18 labeled antisense oligonucleotide as a potential PET tracer for NOS mRNA expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Dijkstra, G; Moshage, H; Elsinga, PH; Jansen, PLM; Vaalburg, W

    2004-01-01

    Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel diseases. An antisense oligonucleotide with good hybridization properties for iNOS mRNA was selected using RT-PCR. The oligonucleotide was reliably labeled with fluorine-18 using N-(4-[F-18]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide. Cellular u

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a fluorine-18 labeled antisense oligonucleotide as a potential PET tracer for iNOS mRNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Erik F.J. de E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@pet.azg.nl; Vroegh, Joke; Dijkstra, Gerard; Moshage, Han; Elsinga, Philip H.; Jansen, Peter L.M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    2004-07-01

    Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel diseases. An antisense oligonucleotide with good hybridization properties for iNOS mRNA was selected using RT-PCR. The oligonucleotide was reliably labeled with fluorine-18 using N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide. Cellular uptake and efflux of oligonucleotide complexed with FuGENE-6 were rapid, unlike naked oligonucleotide, which hardly accumulated. However, neither uptake nor efflux showed any selectivity for iNOS expressing cells. The oligonucleotide showed a high level of non-specific binding, which may have obscured its specific hybridization to iNOS mRNA.

  9. 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides: Symbiosis of Charge Interaction Factors and Stereoelectronic Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prhavc, M.; Prakash, T.P.; Minasov, G.; Egli, M.; Manoharan, M. (Vanderbilt)

    2010-03-08

    Oligonucleotides with a novel, 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] (2'-O-DMAEOE) modification have been synthesized. This modification, a cationic analogue of the 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) (2'-O-MOE) modification, exhibits high binding affinity to target RNA (but not to DNA) and exceptional resistance to nuclease degradation. Analysis of the crystal structure of a self-complementary oligonucleotide containing a single 2'-O-DMAEOE modification explains the importance of charge factors and gauche effects on the observed antisense properties. 2'-O-DMAEOE modified oligonucleotides are ideal candidates for antisense drugs.

  10. Inhibitory effect of 2 '-o-methoxyethyl-modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A on SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yi-bing; WEN Ze-qing; ZHAO Xing-bo; YAN Lei; ZHANG Chun-hua; WANG Fei

    2011-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancers are often at an advanced stage at diagnosis because early detection is difficult. The poor prognosis of ovarian cancers highlights the crucial need to develop better therapeutic agents and strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of a new modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.Methods Antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A was designed, synthesized and transfected into SKOV3ovarian cancer cells. Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR were used to analyze the inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotides on VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression. Transwell matrix assay was used to detect cell migration inhibition.Results The antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A significantly decreased VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression and inhibited cell migration in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.Conclusions This new modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A can decrease VEGF-A expression and inhibit cell migration in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. This new oligonucleotides may be a promising therapeutic agent for ovarian cancers.

  11. Cationic vesicles based on non-ionic surfactant and synthetic aminolipids mediate delivery of antisense oligonucleotides into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalvo, Santiago; Alagia, Adele; Puras, Gustavo; Zárate, Jon; Pedraz, Jose Luis; Eritja, Ramon

    2014-07-01

    A formulation based on a synthetic aminolipid containing a double-tailed with two saturated alkyl chains along with a non-ionic surfactant polysorbate-80 has been used to form lipoplexes with an antisense oligonucleotide capable of inhibiting the expression of Renilla luciferase mRNA. The resultant lipoplexes were characterized in terms of morphology, Zeta potential, average size, stability and electrophoretic shift assay. The lipoplexes did not show any cytotoxicity in cell culture up to 150 mM concentration. The gene inhibition studies demonstrated that synthetic cationic vesicles based on non-ionic surfactant and the appropriate aminolipid play an important role in enhancing cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides obtaining promising results and efficiencies comparable to commercially available cationic lipids in cultured mammalian cells. Based on these results, this amino lipid moiety could be considered as starting point for the synthesis of novel cationic lipids to obtain potential non-viral carriers for antisense and RNA interference therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide induced exon skipping and the dystrophin gene transcript: cocktails and chemistries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs can interfere with exon recognition and intron removal during pre-mRNA processing, and induce excision of a targeted exon from the mature gene transcript. AOs have been used in vitro and in vivo to redirect dystrophin pre-mRNA processing in human and animal cells. Targeted exon skipping of selected exons in the dystrophin gene transcript can remove nonsense or frame-shifting mutations that would otherwise have lead to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the most common childhood form of muscle wasting. Results Although many dystrophin exons can be excised using a single AO, several exons require two motifs to be masked for efficient or specific exon skipping. Some AOs were inactive when applied individually, yet pronounced exon excision was induced in transfected cells when the AOs were used in select combinations, clearly indicating synergistic rather than cumulative effects on splicing. The necessity for AO cocktails to induce efficient exon removal was observed with 2 different chemistries, 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Similarly, other trends in exon skipping, as a consequence of 2'-O-methyl AO action, such as removal of additional flanking exons or variations in exon skipping efficiency with overlapping AOs, were also seen when the corresponding sequences were prepared as phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Conclusion The combination of 2 AOs, directed at appropriate motifs in target exons was found to induce very efficient targeted exon skipping during processing of the dystrophin pre-mRNA. This combinatorial effect is clearly synergistic and is not influenced by the chemistry of the AOs used to induce exon excision. A hierarchy in exon skipping efficiency, observed with overlapping AOs composed of 2'-O-methyl modified bases, was also observed when these same sequences were evaluated as phosphorodiamidate morpholino

  14. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-08

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  15. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby S Shemesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3 is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of 3H-radiolabeled (3H placed in THA or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5′-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs.

  17. Improved antisense oligonucleotide design to suppress aberrant SMN2 gene transcript processing: towards a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalermchai Mitrpant

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, resulting in reduced SMN protein. Humans possess the additional SMN2 gene (or genes that does produce low level of full length SMN, but cannot adequately compensate for loss of SMN1 due to aberrant splicing. The majority of SMN2 gene transcripts lack exon 7 and the resultant SMNΔ7 mRNA is translated into an unstable and non-functional protein. Splice intervention therapies to promote exon 7 retention and increase amounts of full-length SMN2 transcript offer great potential as a treatment for SMA patients. Several splice silencing motifs in SMN2 have been identified as potential targets for antisense oligonucleotide mediated splice modification. A strong splice silencer is located downstream of exon 7 in SMN2 intron 7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting this motif promoted SMN2 exon 7 retention in the mature SMN2 transcripts, with increased SMN expression detected in SMA fibroblasts. We report here systematic optimisation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO that promote exon 7 retention to levels that rescued the phenotype in a severe mouse model of SMA after intracerebroventricular delivery. Furthermore, the PMO gives the longest survival reported to date after a single dosing by ICV.

  18. Hybridization of different antisense oligonucleotides on the surface of gold nanoparticles to silence zinc metalloproteinase gene after uptake by Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, Ali; Anvari-Tafti, Mohammad Hosssein

    2015-05-01

    The use of antisense oligonucleotides is a novel strategy to treat infectious diseases. In this approach, vital mRNAs are targeted by antisense oligonucleotides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gold nanoparticles hybridized with different antisense oligonucleotides on Leishmania (L) major. In this project, gold nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then conjugated with primary oligonucleotides, 3'-AAA-5'. Next, conjugated gold nanoparticles (NP1) were separately hybridized with three types of antisense oligonucleotide from coding reign of GP63 gene (NP2), non-coding reign of GP63 gene (NP3), and both coding and non-coding reigns of GP63 (NP4). Then, 1mL of L. major suspension was separately added to 1mL of different hybridized gold nanoparticles at serial concentrations (1-200μg/mL), and incubated for 24, 48, and 72h at 37°C. Next, the uptake of each nanoparticle was separately measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. After incubation, the cell viability was separately evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Also, the expression of GP63 gene was read out by quantitative-real-time PCR. This study showed that NP2 and NP3 had higher (5-fold) uptake than NP1 and NP4. Moreover, NP2 and NP3 led to less cell viability and gene expression, compared with NP1 and NP4. It could be concluded that both sequence and size of antisense oligonucleotide were important for transfection of L. major. Importantly, these antisense oligonucleotides can be obtained from both coding and non-coding reign of GP63 gene. Moreover, hybridized gold nanoparticles not only could silence GP63 gene, but also could kill L. major. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat shock protein 70 antisense oligonucleotide inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Zhao; Wen-Lu Shen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Heat shock protein (HSP)70 is over-expressed in human gastric cancer and plays an important role in the progression of this cancer. We investigated the effects of antisense HSP70 oligomer on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, and its potential role in gene therapy for this cancer.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was treated in vitro with various concentrations of antisense HSP70 oligonucleotides at different intervals. Growth inhibition was determined as percentage by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Extracted DNA was electrophoresed on agarose gel, and distribution of cell cycle and kinetics of apoptosis induction were analyzed by propidium iodide DNA incorporation using flow cytometry, which was also used to detect the effects of antisense oligomer pretreatment on the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock in SGC-7901 cells. Proteins were extracted for simultaneous measurement of HSP70 expression level by SDS-PAGE Western blotting.RESULTS: The number of viable cells decreased in a doseand time-dependent manner, and ladder-like patterns of DNA fragments were observed in SGC-7901 cells treated with antisense HSP70 oligomers at a concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h, which were consistent with inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Flow cytometric analysis showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptotic rate by HSP70 antisense oligomers. This response was accompanied with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, suggesting inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, flow cytometry also showed that pretreatment of SGC-7901 cells with HSP70 antisense oligomers enhanced the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that HSP70 antisense oligomers inhibited HSP70 expression, which preceded apoptosis, and HSP70 was undetectable at the concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h.CONCLUSION: Antisense HSP70 oligomers

  20. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting at the initiator of hTERT arrests growth of hepatoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Xia; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Cao, Ying-Lin; Ma, Chun-Hong; Han, Li-Hui; Zhang, Li-Ning; Wang, Zhen-Guang; Zhu, Fa-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effect of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide (asON) complementary to the initiator of human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) on the growth of hepatoma cells. METHODS: The as-hTERT was synthesized by using a DNA synthesizer. HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with as-hTERT at the concentration of 10 μmol/L. After 72 h, these cells were obtained for detecting growth inhibition, telomerase activity using the methods of MTT, TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. BALB/c(nu/nu) mice were injected HepG2.2.15 cells and a human-nude mice model was obtained. There were three groups for anti-tumor activity study. Once tumors were established, these animals in the first group were administered as-hTERT and saline. Apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by FCM. In the 2nd group, the animals were injected HepG2.2.15 cells together with as-hTERT. In the third group, the animals were given as-hTERT 24 hours postinjection of HepG2.2.15 cells. The anti-HBV effects were assayed with ELISA in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Growth inhibition was observed in cells treated with as-hTERT in vitro. A significant different in the value of A570 - A630 was found between cells treated with as-hTERT and control (P < 0.01) by MTT method. The telomerase activity of tumor cells treated with as-hTERT was reduced, the value of A450 nm was 0.42 compared to control (1.49) with TRAP-PCR-ELISA. The peak of apoptosis in tumor cells given as-hTERT was 21.12%, but not seen in saline-treated control. A prolonged period of carcinogenesis was observed in the second and third group animals. There was inhibitory effect on the expression of HBsAg and HBeAg in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSION: As-hTERT has an anti-tumor activity, which may be useful for gene therapy of tumors. PMID:14760759

  1. Antisense oligonucleotides on neurobehavior, respiratory, and cardiovascular function, and hERG channel current studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Won; Kim, Ki-Suk; Seo, Joung-Wook; Park, Shin-Young; Henry, Scott P

    2014-01-01

    Safety Pharmacology studies were conducted in mouse, rat, and non-human primate to determine in vivo effects of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) on the central nervous system, respiratory system, and cardiovascular system. Effects on the hERG potassium channel current was evaluated in vitro. ASOs contained terminal 2'-O-methoxyethyl nucleotides, central deoxy nucleotides, and a phosphorothioate backbone. Neurobehavior was evaluated by Functional Observatory Battery in rodents. Respiratory function was directly measured in rodents by plethysmograph; respiratory rate and blood gases were measured in monkey. Basic cardiovascular endpoints were measured in rat; cardiovascular evaluation in monkey involved implanted telemetry units. In single and repeat dose studies ASOs were administered by subcutaneous injection at up to 300 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 40 mg/kg in mouse, rat, or monkey, respectively. Assays were performed in HEK293 or CHO-K1 cells, stably transfected with hERG cDNA, at ASO concentrations of up to 300 μM. No apparent effects were noted for respiratory or CNS function. Continuous monitoring of the cardiovascular system in monkey demonstrated no ASO-related changes in blood pressures, heart rate, or ECG and associated parameters (i.e., QRS duration). Specific assessment of the hERG potassium channel indicated no potential for actions on ventricular repolarization or modest effects only at excessive concentrations. The absence of direct actions on neurobehavior and respiratory function associated with the administration of ASOs in safety pharmacology core battery studies is consistent with published toxicology studies. The combination of in vitro hERG studies and in vivo studies in rat and monkey are consistent with no direct actions by ASOs on cardiac cell function or electrical conduction at relevant concentrations and dose levels. Taken as a whole, dedicated studies focused on the safety pharmacology of specific organ systems do not appear to add

  2. [Experimental study of TGF-β2 antisense oligonucleotide on inhibiting corneal scar hyperplasia in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guang-ying; Hao, Li-li; Wang, Rui-na; Lian, Yuan-jun; Tan, Nan

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the influence of TGF-β2 antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) on preventing corneal scar hyperplasia in rabbits and to provide experimental evidence for its clinical application. It was an experimental study. One hundred and ninety two New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups (groups A, B, C and D). Corneal injury models were established in all groups. There were 48 experimental animals in each group. TGF-β2 ASON was dropped into right eyes in group A, dexamethasone was dropped into right eyes in group B, deionized water was dropped into right eyes in group C and nothing was dropped into right eyes in group D after the operation. The corneas were surgically removed and assessed by hematoxylin eosin (HE) staining, immunohistochemical study and real time PCR at four different time points (4 d, 7 d, 14 d and 28 d) after surgery. HE staining: at the same time point, fibroblasts in the groups A and B were significantly fewer than that in the groups C and D, the difference was statistically significant (P fibroblasts could be observed by the 4th day (9.44 ± 0.47/HP), reached a climax by the 7th day (12.50 ± 0.81/HP), and returned to the baseline levels by the 14th day (0.85 ± 0.43/HP) in the group A, which was similar to that in the group B (9.49 ± 0.95, 12.42 ± 0.70, 0.86 ± 0.79/HP) at the same time point (P > 0.05), but it was significantly fewer than that in the group C(20.14 ± 0.78, 18.19 ± 1.28, 4.87 ± 0.58/HP) and group D(20.21 ± 0.92, 18.25 ± 1.39, 5.00 ± 2.217/HP), which was statistical significant (P corneal tissue by inhibiting the activity of TGF-β2 after injury. The early stage of corneal repair is 7 days after injury, so it is important to use TGF-β2 ASON at this stage to inhibit the scar hyperplasia. In addition, it is safe to apply TGF-β2 ASON topically to protect the cornea from obvious side effects.

  3. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  4. Antisense Oligonucleotide Targeting TGF-β1 Abrogates Tumorigenicity of Rhabdomyosarcoma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shouli Wang; Huihua Yao; Lingling Guo; Liang Dong; Shigang Li; Haizhen Deng; Maomin Sun

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Over-expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) has been observed in many advanced cancers.The present study was aimed at developing potential antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs) to repress TGF-β1 expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) RD cells, and to examine their effect on tumorigenicity of RD cells in vivo.METHODS ASONs targeting the region surrounding the start codon of TGF-β1 were synthesized and transferred into cells in the form of complexes with Lipofectamine 2000. The TGF-β1 protein was determined by immunofluorescence and ELISA.The cell viability and cell cycle were examined by MTT and flow cytometry. The RD cells, with or without TGF-β1ASON, in 50 μl of serum-free EMDM medium were injected subcutaneously into the right flank of nude mice. The tumors were then measured and weighed.RESULTS The ASON sequence targeting the first start site at bases 841-855 of the human TGF-β1 gene had the greatest effect on attenuating the expression of TGF-β1 (P<0.05). The ASONs induced a decrease in OD values after 6 d (P<0.05). Analysis of the cell cycle revealed that the ASON induced a significant decrease in cells in the S phase and an increase in cells in the G1 phase (P<0.05). In the nude mice model, the mean tumor volume, after 2 weeks of treatment with Lipofectamine or ASON,decreased to 88.5% or 55% respectively, compared to the control tumor size, resulting in a significant difference (P<0.01).CONCLUSION The sequence of the ASON, which targeted the start condon at the bases 841-855 of the human TGF-β1 gene, was demonstrated to be a useful agent for studying the regulation of TGF-β1 over-expression in RD cells, and has important therapeutic potential for suppressing the tumorigenicity of human RMS in vivo.

  5. RNA Interference-Guided Targeting of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Antisense Locked Nucleic Acid-Based Oligonucleotides Containing 8-oxo-dG Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutso, Margit; Nikonov, Andrei; Pihlak, Arno; Žusinaite, Eva; Viru, Liane; Selyutina, Anastasia; Reintamm, Tõnu; Kelve, Merike; Saarma, Mart; Karelson, Mati; Merits, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory potency of an antisense oligonucleotide depends critically on its design and the accessibility of its target site. Here, we used an RNA interference-guided approach to select antisense oligonucleotide target sites in the coding region of the highly structured hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. We modified the conventional design of an antisense oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues at its termini (LNA/DNA gapmer) by inserting 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) residues into the central DNA region. Obtained compounds, designed with the aim to analyze the effects of 8-oxo-dG modifications on the antisense oligonucleotides, displayed a unique set of properties. Compared to conventional LNA/DNA gapmers, the melting temperatures of the duplexes formed by modified LNA/DNA gapmers and DNA or RNA targets were reduced by approximately 1.6-3.3°C per modification. Comparative transfection studies showed that small interfering RNA was the most potent HCV RNA replication inhibitor (effective concentration 50 (EC50): 0.13 nM), whereas isosequential standard and modified LNA/DNA gapmers were approximately 50-fold less efficient (EC50: 5.5 and 7.1 nM, respectively). However, the presence of 8-oxo-dG residues led to a more complete suppression of HCV replication in transfected cells. These modifications did not affect the efficiency of RNase H cleavage of antisense oligonucleotide:RNA duplexes but did alter specificity, triggering the appearance of multiple cleavage products. Moreover, the incorporation of 8-oxo-dG residues increased the stability of antisense oligonucleotides of different configurations in human serum.

  6. RNA Interference-Guided Targeting of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Antisense Locked Nucleic Acid-Based Oligonucleotides Containing 8-oxo-dG Modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Mutso

    Full Text Available The inhibitory potency of an antisense oligonucleotide depends critically on its design and the accessibility of its target site. Here, we used an RNA interference-guided approach to select antisense oligonucleotide target sites in the coding region of the highly structured hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA genome. We modified the conventional design of an antisense oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acid (LNA residues at its termini (LNA/DNA gapmer by inserting 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG residues into the central DNA region. Obtained compounds, designed with the aim to analyze the effects of 8-oxo-dG modifications on the antisense oligonucleotides, displayed a unique set of properties. Compared to conventional LNA/DNA gapmers, the melting temperatures of the duplexes formed by modified LNA/DNA gapmers and DNA or RNA targets were reduced by approximately 1.6-3.3°C per modification. Comparative transfection studies showed that small interfering RNA was the most potent HCV RNA replication inhibitor (effective concentration 50 (EC50: 0.13 nM, whereas isosequential standard and modified LNA/DNA gapmers were approximately 50-fold less efficient (EC50: 5.5 and 7.1 nM, respectively. However, the presence of 8-oxo-dG residues led to a more complete suppression of HCV replication in transfected cells. These modifications did not affect the efficiency of RNase H cleavage of antisense oligonucleotide:RNA duplexes but did alter specificity, triggering the appearance of multiple cleavage products. Moreover, the incorporation of 8-oxo-dG residues increased the stability of antisense oligonucleotides of different configurations in human serum.

  7. Combination of vascular endothelial growth factor antisense oligonucleotide therapy and radiotherapy increases the curative effects against maxillofacial VX2 tumors in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Linfeng, E-mail: zhenglinfeng04@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Li Yujie, E-mail: yujieli01@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Wang Han, E-mail: bingowh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Zhao Jinglong, E-mail: jinglongz@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Wang Xifu, E-mail: wangxiechen001@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Hu Yunsheng, E-mail: springmorninghu@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China); Zhang Guixiang, E-mail: guixiangzhang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Medical College, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Hanning Road, 100, 200080 Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To study the effects of combination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antisense oligonucleotide therapy and radiotherapy on maxillofacial VX2 tumors in rabbits. Methods: We used 24 New Zealand white rabbits as a model to induce maxillofacial VX2 tumor. The rabbits were randomly divided into the following 4 groups: radiotherapy group (group A), treated with 16 Gy of radiotherapy; VEGF antisense oligonucleotide treatment group (group B), treated with an injection of 150 {mu}g of VEGF antisense oligonucleotide into the local tumor; VEGF antisense oligonucleotide combined with radiotherapy group (group C), treated with an injection of 150 {mu}g of VEGF antisense oligonucleotide into the local tumor immediately after 16 Gy of radiotherapy; and control group (group D), treated with an injection of 300 {mu}l 5% aqueous glucose solution into the local tumor. On days 3 and 14 after treatment, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was performed to calculate maximal enhancement ratio (MER), slope of enhancement (SLE), and tumor volume change. Rabbits were killed on day 14 to obtain samples for pathological examination and immunohistochemical staining for VEGF. Results: In group C, tumor volume was significantly reduced on day 14 after treatment, and the difference was statistically different as compared to that before treatment, on day 3 after treatment and other groups (P < 0.01). Values of both MER and SLE after treatment were significantly lower than the values before treatment (P < 0.05). Pathological specimen revealed tumor cell edema, bleeding, necrosis, vascular wall thickening and occlusion, and decreased VEGF expression. The immunohistochemical score (IHS) of group C was significantly different from groups A and D respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Injecting the tumor with VEGF antisense oligonucleotide immediately after radiotherapy can enhance the curative effect on rabbit maxillofacial VX2 tumor, and DCE-MRI can serve

  8. Evaluation of multiple-turnover capability of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides in cell-free RNase H-mediated antisense reaction and in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Naoko; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Shigesada, Naoya; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The multiple-turnover ability of a series of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in the RNase H-mediated scission reaction was estimated using a newly developed cell-free reaction system. We determined the initial reaction rates of AONs under multiple-turnover conditions and found that among 24 AONs tested, AONs with melting temperatures (Tm) of 40°C-60°C efficiently elicit multiple rounds of RNA scission. On the other hand, by measuring Tm with two 10-mer RNAs partially complementary to AONs as models of cleaved 5' and 3' fragments of mRNA, we found that AONs require adequate binding affinity for efficient turnover activities. We further demonstrated that the efficacy of a set of 13-mer AONs in mice correlated with their turnover efficiency, indicating that the intracellular situation where AONs function is similar to multiple-turnover conditions. Our methodology and findings may provide an opportunity to shed light on a previously unknown antisense mechanism, leading to further improvement of the activity and safety profiles of AONs.

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting Livin induces apoptosis of human bladder cancer cell via a mechanism involving caspase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aim in recent years, Livin, a new member of IAPs family, is found to be a key molecule in cancers. Researchers consider Livin may become a new target for tumor therapy; however, the role of it in bladder cancer is still unclear. The purpose of this article is to investigate Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASODN of Livin on treating bladder cancer cell and underlying mechanisms. Methods Phosphorathioate modifying was used to synthesize antisense oligonucleotides targeting Livin, followed by transfection into human bladder cancer cell 5637. After transfection, Livin mRNA and protein level, cell proliferation and apoptosis changes, caspase3 level and its effect on human bladder cancer transplantable tumor in nude mice were measured. Result results showed Livin ASODN effectively inhibited Livin expression and tumor cell proliferation, and these effects probably through enhanced caspase3 activity and apoptosis of tumor cells. In nude mice transplantable tumor model, Livin expressions were inhibited meanwhile caspase3 expression was increased. Tumor growth slowed down and apoptosis was enhanced. Conclusion Our data suggest that Livin plays an important role in inhibiting apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. Livin ASODN may promote cell apoptosis, inhibit bladder cancer growth, and become one of the methods of gene therapy for bladder cancer.

  10. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides using poly(alkylene oxide)-poly(propylacrylic acid) graft copolymers in conjunction with cationic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddada, Lavanya Y; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Devore, David I; Minko, Tamara; Roth, Charles M

    2014-11-28

    The clinical application of gene silencing is hindered by poor stability and low delivery efficiency of naked oligonucleotides. Here, we present the in vitro and in vivo behaviors of a rationally designed, ternary, self-assembled nanoparticle complex, consisting of an anionic copolymer, cationic DOTAP liposome, and antisense oligonucleotide (AON). The multifunctional copolymers are based on backbone poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA), a pH-sensitive hydrophobic polymer, with grafted poly(alkylene oxides) (PAOs) varying in extent of grafting and PAO chemistry. The nanoparticle complexes with PPAA-g-PAO copolymers enhance antisense gene silencing effects in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. A greater amount of AON is delivered to ovarian tumor xenografts using the ternary copolymer-stabilized delivery system, compared to a binary DOTAP/AON complex, following intraperitoneal injection in mice. Further, intratumoral injection of the nanoparticle complexes containing 1 mol% grafted PAO reduced tumoral bcl-2 expression by up to 60%. The data for complexes across the set of PAO polymers support a strong role for the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of the graft copolymer in achieving serum stability and cellular uptake. Based upon these results, we anticipate that this novel nanoparticle delivery system can be extended to the delivery of plasmid DNA, siRNA, or aptamers for preclinical and clinical development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides

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    Atze J Bergsma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of apolipoprotein C-III reduces plasma triglycerides in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Bell, Thomas A; Fu, Wuxia; Mullick, Adam E; Alexander, Veronica J; Singleton, Walter; Viney, Nick; Geary, Richard; Su, John; Baker, Brenda F; Burkey, Jennifer; Crooke, Stanley T; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2013-05-24

    Elevated plasma triglyceride levels have been recognized as a risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) represents both an independent risk factor and a key regulatory factor of plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, elevated apoC-III levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, no selective apoC-III therapeutic agent has been evaluated in the clinic. To test the hypothesis that selective inhibition of apoC-III with antisense drugs in preclinical models and in healthy volunteers would reduce plasma apoC-III and triglyceride levels. Rodent- and human-specific second-generation antisense oligonucleotides were identified and evaluated in preclinical models, including rats, mice, human apoC-III transgenic mice, and nonhuman primates. We demonstrated the selective reduction of both apoC-III and triglyceride in all preclinical pharmacological evaluations. We also showed that inhibition of apoC-III was well tolerated and not associated with increased liver triglyceride deposition or hepatotoxicity. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I clinical study was performed in healthy subjects. Administration of the human apoC-III antisense drug resulted in dose-dependent reductions in plasma apoC-III, concomitant lowering of triglyceride levels, and produced no clinically meaningful signals in the safety evaluations. Antisense inhibition of apoC-III in preclinical models and in a phase I clinical trial with healthy subjects produced potent, selective reductions in plasma apoC-III and triglyceride, 2 known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This compelling pharmacological profile supports further clinical investigations in hypertriglyceridemic subjects.

  13. Characterizing the effect of GalNAc and phosphorothioate backbone on binding of antisense oligonucleotides to the asialoglycoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Prakash, Thazha P; Donner, Aaron J; Kinberger, Garth A; Gaus, Hans J; Low, Audrey; Østergaard, Michael E; Bell, Melanie; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2017-03-17

    Targeted delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) to hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR) has improved the potency of ASO drugs ∼30-fold in the clinic (1). In order to fully characterize the effect of GalNAc valency, oligonucleotide length, flexibility and chemical composition on ASGR binding, we tested and validated a fluorescence polarization competition binding assay. The ASGR binding, and in vitro and in vivo activities of 1, 2 and 3 GalNAc conjugated single stranded and duplexed ASOs were studied. Two and three GalNAc conjugated single stranded ASOs bind the ASGR with the strongest affinity and display optimal in vitro and in vivo activities. 1 GalNAc conjugated ASOs showed 10-fold reduced ASGR binding affinity relative to three GalNAc ASOs but only 2-fold reduced activity in mice. An unexpected observation was that the ASGR also appears to play a role in the uptake of unconjugated phosphorothioate modified ASOs in the liver as evidenced by the loss of activity of GalNAc conjugated and unconjugated ASOs in ASGR knockout mice. Our results provide insights into how backbone charge and chemical composition assist in the binding and internalization of highly polar anionic single stranded oligonucleotides into cells and tissues. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Monitoring of labeled antisense oligonucleotides within living cells by using a multifrequency phase/modulation approach for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocisova, E.; Sureau, F.; Praus, P.; Rosenberg, I.; Stepanek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.

    2003-06-01

    A multifrequency phase/modulation method has been developed for our UV confocal laser microspectrofluorimeter (modulation frequency 1-200 MHz) for fluorescence lifetime measurements. This technique enables excited state lifetimes of mixed fluorescent components to be resolved and the fluorescence spectral contribution of each species to be determined without using any model spectra. This approach is very efficient for analyzing intracellular multicomponent fluorescence signals. Our effort is focused on the elucidation of the intracellular behavior of synthetic modified oligonucleotides - potential drugs for antisense and/or antigene strategies of curing viral and malignant diseases. A novel type single stranded dT 15 oligomer analogue containing isopolar, non-isosteric, phosphonate-based internucleotide linkages (3'-O-P-CH 2-O-5'), labeled with tetramethylrhodamine dye at the 3'-end, has been utilized. This method, along with fluorescence micro-imaging, was used to monitor uptake, distribution and stability of our modified oligonucleotide inside living cells. Binding to Escort™ vector leads to an homogeneous intracellular distribution of fluorescent labeled oligonucleotide, including nucleus staining, while point distribution only is achieved for its free form.

  15. Co-Administration of an Excipient Oligonucleotide Helps Delineate Pathways of Productive and Nonproductive Uptake of Phosphorothioate Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Aaron J; Wancewicz, Edward V; Murray, Heather M; Greenlee, Sarah; Post, Noah; Bell, Melanie; Lima, Walt F; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2017-08-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS) modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have progressed rapidly in the clinic for treating a variety of disease indications. We previously demonstrated that the activity of PS ASOs in the liver can be enhanced by co-infusion of an excipient oligonucleotide (EON). It was posited that the EON saturates a nonproductive uptake pathway(s) thereby permitting accumulation of the PS ASO in a productive tissue compartment. In this report, we measured PS ASO activity following administration by bolus, infusion or co-fusion with EON within hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs), of the liver. This revealed that while ASOs accumulate preferentially in NPCs, they are intrinsically more active in hepatocytes. Furthermore, we show that the EON enhances ASO potency when infused up to 72 h before or after administration of the active ASO suggesting that the EON can saturate and displace the ASO from nonproductive to productive compartments. Physical presence of the EON in tissues was required for optimal potentiation suggesting that there is a dynamic distribution of the ASO and EON between the compartments. Lastly, using a candidate approach, we confirmed Stabilin-2 as a molecular pathway for ASO uptake in sinusoidal endothelial cells and the ASGR as a pathway for ASO uptake into hepatocytes in the liver.

  16. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Matos

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in “Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II” Matos et al. (2015 [1].

  17. Suppression of BCL2 by Antisense Oligonucleotides and Compensation by Non-Targeted Genes May Enhance Tumor Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Marvin; Hollowell, Courtney M P; Guinan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been used to target regulatory proteins in both in vivo and in vitro models of prostate cancer. Our previous studies showed that oligonucleotide-treated LNCaP prostate cancer cells compensate for diminished expression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), an apoptosis inhibitor, by suppressing the expression of caspase-3 (an apoptosis promoter) while enhancing that of serine/threonine protein kinase (AKT1) (another apoptosis inhibitor). In addition, we found an enhanced expression of the androgen receptor (AR), its p300 and interleukin-6 (IL6) co-activators, polymerase transcription mediator (MED12), and growth-regulating signal transducer (STAT3). The net result was an altered pattern of gene expression often associated with more aggressive and proliferative tumors. To further evaluate adaptive compensatory mechanisms related to tumor resistance, aggression and proliferation, herein we evaluated the level of expression of a proliferation antigen (KI-67) and mitosis-regulating cyclins (B1 and D1). Compared to the relative levels of compensation detailed above, we found the expression of KI-67 to be statistically the most enhanced non-targeted protein yet identified in compensation for suppression of BCL2. Expression of cyclin D1 was also significantly enhanced, although to a much lesser extent. As a result, we propose that oligonucleotide-mediated treatment could be more effective when directed towards KI-67 and BCL2. This could be accomplished by dual monospecific targeting KI-67 and BCL2, or with a bispecific (or proposed multispecific) oligonucleotide simultaneously targeting both. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/antisense oligonucleotide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxel, Fernanda; Vilela, José Mario Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Malachias, Ângelo; Perez, Carlos A; Magalhães-Paniago, Rogério; Oliveira, Mônica Cristina; Teixeira, Helder F

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments were used to investigate the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes. Oligonucleotides targeting topoisomerase II gene were adsorbed on cationic nanoemulsions obtained by means of spontaneous emulsification procedure. Topographical analysis by atomic force microscopy allowed the observation of the nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes through three-dimensional high-resolution images. Flattening of the oil droplets was observed, which was reduced in the complexes obtained at high amount of adsorbed oligonucleotides. In such conditions, complexes exhibit droplet size in the 600nm range. The oligonucleotides molecules were detected on the surface of the droplets, preventing their fusion during aggregation. A lamellar structure organization was identified by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments. The presence of the nucleic acid molecules led to a disorganization of the lipid arrangement and an expansion in the lattice spacing, which was proportional to the amount of oligonucleotides added. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Cationic Carotenoid Lipids as Delivery Vectors of Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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    Vassilia Partali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a common, inherited, incurable, fatal muscle wasting disease caused by deletions that disrupt the reading frame of the DMD gene such that no functional dystrophin protein is produced. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO-directed exon skipping restores the reading frame of the DMD gene, and truncated, yet functional dystrophin protein is expressed. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of two novel rigid, cationic carotenoid lipids, C30-20 and C20-20, in the delivery of a phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO AO, specifically designed for the targeted skipping of exon 45 of DMD mRNA in normal human skeletal muscle primary cells (hSkMCs. The cationic carotenoid lipid/PMO-AO lipoplexes yielded significant exon 45 skipping relative to a known commercial lipid, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC.

  20. Down-regulation of Survivin by Antisense Oligonucleotides Increases Apoptosis, Inhibits Cytokinesis and Anchorage-Independent Growth

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    Jun Chen

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family, is detected in most common human cancers but not in adjacent normal cells. Previous studies suggest that survivin associates with the mitotic spindle and directly inhibits caspase activity. To further investigate the function of survivin, we used a survivin antisense (AS oligonucleotide to downregulate survivin expression in normal and cancer cells. We found that inhibition of survivin expression increased apoptosis and polyploidy while decreasing colony formation in soft agar. Immunohistochemistry showed that cells without survivin can initiate the cleavage furrow and contractile ring, but cannot complete cytokinesis, thus resulting in multinucleated cells. These findings indicate that survivin plays important roles in a late stage of cytokinesis, as well as in apoptosis.

  1. Protein Kinase C-α is a Critical Protein for Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Silencing in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Lin, Min; Kowolik, Claudia; Koch, Troels; Hansen, Bo Rode; Oerum, Henrik; Stein, Cy A

    2016-06-01

    We have identified the existence of a productive, PKC-α-dependent endocytotic silencing pathway that leads gymnotically-delivered locked nucleic acid (LNA)-gapmer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into late endosomes. By blocking the maturation of early endosomes to late endosomes, silencing the expression of PKC-α results in the potent reduction of ASO silencing ability in the cell. We have also demonstrated that silencing of gene expression in the cytoplasm is vitiated when PKC-α expression is reduced. Restoring PKC-α expression via a reconstitution experiment reinstates the ability of ASOs to silence. These results advance our understanding of intracellular ASO trafficking and activity following gymnotic delivery, and further demonstrate the existence of two distinct silencing pathways in mammalian cells, one in the cytoplasmic and the other in the nuclear compartment.

  2. Formulation and drug-content assay of microencapsulated antisense oligonucleotide to NF-κB using ATR-FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwale, Rodney; Meadows, Fred; Mody, Vicky V.; Shah, Samit

    2013-09-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide to NF-κB sequence: 5‧-GGA AAC ACA TCC TCC ATG-3‧, was microencapsulated in an albumin matrix by the method of spray dryingTM. Spectral analysis was performed on varying drug loading formulations of both drugs by mid-IR attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). An out of plane O-H bending vibration at 948 cm-1, unique to both the native and microencapsulated drugs was identified. The calculated peak areas corresponded to the drug loadings in the microsphere formulations. A standard curve could then be used to determine the drug content of an unknown microsphere formulation. Accuracy and precision were determined to be comparable to other analytical techniques such as HPLC.

  3. In vitro and in vivo suppression of hepatocellular carcinoma growth by midkine-antisense oligonucleotide-loaded nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Xing Yao; Xiang Wang; Shu-Qiong Niu; Lin-Fu Zhou; Fang-Fang Fu; Shui-Xin Yang; Jin-Liang Ping

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To synthesize antisense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) of midkine (MK), package the ASODNs with nanoparticles, and to inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth using these nanoparticles.METHODS: HepG2 cell proliferation was analyzed in vitro using the 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)- 2Htetrazolium, inner salt assay. The in vivo activity of nanoparticles delivering the MK-ASODNs was analyzed by histopathological and immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).RESULTS: The in vitro proliferation of HepG2 cells was significantly inhibited by the nanoparticles packaged with MK-ASODNs (NANO-ASODNs). Furthermore, the NANOASODNs significantly inhibited the growth of HCC in the mouse model.

  4. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  5. Long-term Exon Skipping Studies With 2′-O-Methyl Phosphorothioate Antisense Oligonucleotides in Dystrophic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa L Tanganyika-de Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is currently tested in phase 3 clinical trials. The aim of this approach is to modulate splicing by skipping a specific exon to reframe disrupted dystrophin transcripts, allowing the synthesis of a partly functional dystrophin protein. Studies in animal models allow detailed analysis of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs. Here, we tested the safety and efficacy of subcutaneously administered 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate AON at 200 mg/kg/week for up to 6 months in mouse models with varying levels of disease severity: mdx mice (mild phenotype and mdx mice with one utrophin allele (mdx/utrn+/−; more severe phenotype. Long-term treatment was well tolerated and exon skipping and dystrophin restoration confirmed for all animals. Notably, in the more severely affected mdx/utrn+/− mice the therapeutic effect was larger: creatine kinase (CK levels were more decreased and rotarod running time was more increased. This suggests that the mdx/utrn+/− model may be a more suitable model to test potential therapies than the regular mdx mouse. Our results also indicate that long-term subcutaneous treatment in dystrophic mouse models with these AONs is safe and beneficial.

  6. Cationic polyelectrolyte-mediated delivery of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a series of cationic polyelectrolytes (PEs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) polymer series, especially PE-3 and PE-4, improves the delivery efficiency of PMO, comparable with Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. The enhanced PMO delivery and targeting to dystrophin exon 23 was further observed in mdx mice, up to fourfold with the PE-4, compared with PMO alone. The cytotoxicity of the PEs was lower than that of Endoporter and polyethylenimine 25,000 Da in vitro, and was not clearly detected in muscle in vivo under the tested concentrations. Together, these results demonstrate that optimization of PE molecular size, composition, and distribution of cationic charge are key factors to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The increased efficiency and lower toxicity show this PDDAC series to be capable gene/antisense oligonucleotide delivery-enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Survivin Protein Expression and Its Therapeutic Depletion by an Antisense Oligonucleotide in Human Lung Tumors

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    Anna L Olsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed antisense and interference therapeutics are a promising treatment option for cancer. The demonstration of depletion of target proteins within human tumors in vivo using validated methodology will be a key to the application of this technology. Here, we present a flow cytometric-based approach to quantitatively determine protein levels in solid tumor material derived by fiber optic brushing (FOB of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Focusing upon the survivin protein, and its depletion by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO (LY2181308, we show that we can robustly identify a subpopulation of survivin positive tumor cells in FOB samples, and, moreover, detect survivin depletion in tumor samples from a patient treated with LY2181308. Survivin depletion appears to be a result of treatment with this ASO, because a tumor treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy did not exhibit a decreased percentage of survivin positive cells. Our approach is likely to be broadly applicable to, and useful for, the quantification of protein levels in tumor samples obtained as part of clinical trials and studies, facilitating the proof-of-principle testing of novel targeted therapies.

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  9. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

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    Xing Xian Yu

    Full Text Available Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4 in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  10. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  11. Efficient gene silencing by delivery of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides, unassisted by transfection reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C A; Hansen, J Bo; Lai, Johnathan; Wu, SiJian; Voskresenskiy, Anatoliy; Høg, Anja; Worm, Jesper; Hedtjärn, Maj; Souleimanian, Naira; Miller, Paul; Soifer, Harris S; Castanotto, Daniella; Benimetskaya, Luba; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2010-01-01

    For the past 15-20 years, the intracellular delivery and silencing activity of oligodeoxynucleotides have been essentially completely dependent on the use of a delivery technology (e.g. lipofection). We have developed a method (called 'gymnosis') that does not require the use of any transfection reagent or any additives to serum whatsoever, but rather takes advantage of the normal growth properties of cells in tissue culture in order to promote productive oligonucleotide uptake. This robust method permits the sequence-specific silencing of multiple targets in a large number of cell types in tissue culture, both at the protein and mRNA level, at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Optimum results were obtained with locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate gap-mers. By appropriate manipulation of oligonucleotide dosing, this silencing can be continuously maintained with little or no toxicity for >240 days. High levels of oligonucleotide in the cell nucleus are not a requirement for gene silencing, contrary to long accepted dogma. In addition, gymnotic delivery can efficiently deliver oligonucleotides to suspension cells that are known to be very difficult to transfect. Finally, the pattern of gene silencing of in vitro gymnotically delivered oligonucleotides correlates particularly well with in vivo silencing. The establishment of this link is of particular significance to those in the academic research and drug discovery and development communities.

  12. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  13. Effective exon skipping and dystrophin restoration by 2'-o-methoxyethyl antisense oligonucleotide in dystrophin-deficient mice.

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    Lu Yang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotide (AO-mediated exon-skipping therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and several AO chemistries have been rigorously investigated. In this report, we focused on the effect of 2'-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides (MOE on exon skipping in cultured mdx myoblasts and mice. Efficient dose-dependent skipping of targeted exon 23 was achieved in myoblasts with MOE AOs of different lengths and backbone chemistries. Furthermore, we established that 25-mer MOE phosphorothioate (PS AOs provided the greatest exon-skipping efficacy. When compared with 2'O methyl phosphorothioate (2'OmePS AOs, 25-mer MOE (PS AOs also showed higher exon-skipping activity in vitro and in mdx mice after intramuscular injections. Characterization of uptake in vitro corroborated with exon-skipping results, suggesting that increased uptake of 25-mer MOE PS AOs might partly contribute to the difference in exon-skipping activity observed in vitro and in mdx mice. Our findings demonstrate the substantial potential for MOE PS AOs as an alternative option for the treatment of DMD.

  14. Expression of heparanase mRNA in anti-sense oligonucleotide-transfected human esophageal cancer EC9706 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui-Sheng Chen; Lan Zhang; Lin Tang; Yun-Han Zhang; Dong-Ling Gao; Liang Yan; Lei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of anti-sense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) on mRNA expression of heparanase in human esophageal cancer EC9706 cells.METHODS: One non-sense oligonucleotide (N-ODN) and five ASODNs against different heparanase mRNA sites were transfected into EC9706 cells, then the expression of heparanase mRNA in EC9706 cells was studied byin situ hybridization.RESULTS: The expression of heparanase mRNA could be inhibited by ASODNs.There was no significant difference among five ASODNs (P>0.05), but there was a significant difference between ASODNs and N-ODN or non-transfected group (ASODN1: 2.25±0.25, ASODN2: 2.21±0.23, ASODN3:2.23±0.23, ASODN4:2.25±0.24 vs N-ODN: 3.47±2.80 or non- transfected group: 3.51±2.93 respectively, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The expression of heparanase mRNA in EC9706 cells can be inhibited by ASODNs in vivo, and heparanase ASODNs can inhibit metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma or other tumors by inhibiting the expression of heparanase.

  15. Influence of connective tissue growth factor antisense oligonucleotide on angiotensin Ⅱ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in HK2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long CHEN; Bi-cheng LIU; Xiao-liang ZHANG; Jian-dong ZHANG; Hong LIU; Min-xia LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to further investigate the effect of connective tissue growth factor antisense oligonucleotide (CTGF-AS) on angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ)-induced tubular cell epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro. Methods: The human proximal tubular cell line (HK2) was grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% heat inactivated fetal calf serum. After being rested in serum-free medium for 24 h, the influence of CTGF-AS (20 μg/mL) on Ang Ⅱ-induced (1×10-7 mol/L) CTGF mRNA and the protein expression were examined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and indirectimmunofluorescence. The effect of CTGF-AS on Ang Ⅱ-induced cellular ultrastructure was observed using a transmissive electronic microscope. The expression of α-smooth action (α-SMA) was assayed by immunocytochemistry. In all experiments, the control group was treated with scrambled oligonucleotide. Results: It was shown that Ang Ⅱ significantly induced the increasing expression of CTGF mRNA and protein (P<0.01, respectively), which were significantly abolished by treatment with CTGF-AS. After stimulating cells with Ang Ⅱ, the cellular ultrastructure showed mesenchymal features. These effects were partially inhibited by CTGF-AS. Ang Ⅱ significantly resulted in the expression of α-SMA in time dependent manner, which was markedly attenuated by the treatment with CTGF-AS (P<0.01, respectively). In contrast, no similar effects were observed in the control group treated with scrambled oligonucleotide. Conclusion: Ang Ⅱ-induced EMT in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTC) can be attenuated by treatment with CTGF-AS. Our data provides further evidence that CTGF might be involved in Ang Ⅱ-induced EMT in PTC.

  16. Evaluation of Amphiphilic Peptide Modified Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mingxing Wang; Bo Wu; Peijuan Lu; Shah, Sapana N.; Jason D. Tucker; Lauren E. Bollinger; Qilong Lu

    2017-01-01

    A series of amphiphilic peptides modified PMO (Pt-PMO) were prepared, and their antisense effect and toxicity were evaluated both in vitro and in mdx mice. The results showed that the exon-skipping performance of Pt-PMO are relative to the structure of the conjugated peptide: the Pt3/Pt4 composed of six/seven arginines and one myristoylation modified PMO showed more efficacy and with less toxicity as compared to others, confirming that appropriate hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) and cati...

  17. Effects of Intrathecally Administerd NaV1.8 Antisense Oligonucleotide on the Expression of Sodium Channel mRNA in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongmin; YAO Shanglong; SONG Wenge; WANG Yuelan; LIU Dong; ZEN Lian

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain has been hypothesized to be the result of aberrant expression and function of sodium channels at the site of injury. To investigate the effects of NaV1.8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in chronic neuropathic pain. 24 Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-260 g were anesthetized with the in of sciatic nerve trunk by 4-0 chromic gut. The mechanical and thermal pain threshold were measured before operation and 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days after operation. A PE-10 catheter was implanted in subarachnoid space at lumbar region. On the 7th postoperative day the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups. The drugs were injected intrathecally twice a day for 5 consecutive days in group 2-4. The animals were decapitated 14 days after the surgery. The L4-L6 DRG of the operated side was removed and crushed, and total RNA was extracted with Trizol reagent. The contralateral side was used as control. The change of NaV1.8 sodium channel transcripts was determined by RT-PCR. Pain threshold was significantly lowered after CCI as compared with that in control group and was elevated 3 days after antisense oligonucleotide injection. Sensory neuron specific TTX-R sodium channel NaV1.8 transcript was down-regulated after antisense oligonucleotide injection at the dosage of 45 μg as compared with that in CCI group (P<0.01), and it was even greater at the dosage of 90 μg. The intrathecally injected NaV1.8 antisense oligonucleotide can reduce the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia partially by downregulating the SNS transcript expression.

  18. Antitumor activity of antisense oligonucleotide p45Skp2 in soft palate carcinoma cell squamous in vitro

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    Supriatno Supriatno

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human soft palate cancers are characterized by a high degree of local invasion and metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. Treatment options for this cancer are limited. However, a new strategy for refractory cancer, gene therapy is watched with keen interest. p45Skp2 gene as a tumor promoter gene is one of target of the oral cancer therapy. To inhibit the activity of p45Skp2 gene is carried-out the genetic engineering via antisense technique. Purpose: To examine the antitumor activity of p45Skp2 antisense (p45Skp2 AS gene therapy in human soft palate [Hamakawa-Inoue (HI] cancer cells. Methods: Pure laboratory experimental study with post test only control group design was conducted as a research design. To investigate the apoptosis induction of p45Skp2 AStransfected cell was evaluated by colorimetric caspase-3 assay and Flow cytometry. Furthermore, to detect the suppression of in vitro HI cell invasion and cell growth of p45Skp2 AS-treatment cell was examined by Boyden chamber kit and MTT assay, respectively. Results: The cell number of p45Skp2 AS-treated HI cell was significant decreased when compared with that of p45Skp2 sense (p45Skp2 S cells (p<0.05. p45Skp2 AS-treated cell induced apoptosis characterized by an increase in the early and late apoptosis, and activation of caspase-3 (p<0.05. Therefore, suppression of HI cell invasion and cell growth were markedly increased by p45Skp2 AS treatment (p<0.05. Conclusion: Antisense oligonucleotide p45Skp2 has a high antitumor activity in human soft palate cancer cell, targeting this molecule could represent a promising new therapeutics approach for this type of cancer.Latar belakang: Kanker palatum lunak mempunyai karakteristik invasi dan metastasis ke limfonodi regional yang tinggi. Pilihan perawatan kanker tersebut masih sangat terbatas. Walaupun demikian, strategi baru untuk penanganan kanker yaitu terapi gen menjadi pilihan utama. Gen p45Skp2 sebagai gen pemacu tumor merupakan salah

  19. [Transfection of hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro with (99)Tc(m)-labeled antisense miR208b oligonucleotide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Feng, Huijuan; Ou, Yangwei; Sun, Yungang; Wu, Juqing; Chen, Pan

    2015-08-01

    To test the efficiency of transfecting (99)Tc(m)-labeled anti-miR208b oligonucleotide into early hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro. The anti-oligonucleotide targeting miR208b (AMO) was synthesized and modified with LNA followed by conjugation with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl S-acetyl-meraptoacetyl triglycine (NHS-MAG3) and radiolabeling with (99)Tc(m). NHS-MAG3-LNA-AMO and labeled AMO were purified with Sep-Pak C18 column chromatography, and the former was examined for UV absorption at the 260 nm using Gene Quant DNA/RNA calculator. The labeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability and molecular hybridization activity were analyzed. An angiotensin II-induced cell model of hypertrophic cardiac myocytes was transfected with (99)Tc(m)-NHS-MAG3-LNA-AMO via liposome, and the relative expression of miRNA208b and retention ratio of the labeled AMO in early hypertrophic cells were determined. The labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of the labeled AMO after purification exceeded 84% and 86%, respectively. The radio- chemical purities of the labeled AMO incubated in serum and normal saline for 12 h were both higher than 80%, and the labeled AMO showed a capacity to hybridize with the target gene. In the hypertrophic model of cardiac myocytes, the retention ratio of labeled AMO at 6 h was higher than 20%. The (99)Tc(m)-labeled antisense probe can be efficiently transfected into hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro, which provides an experimental basis for subsequent radionuclide imaging studies.

  20. Inhibition of PCNA Antisense Oligonucleotides Mediated by Liposome on mRNA Expression and Proliferation of h-RPE Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jianbin; XIANG Nan; XU Lili; ZENG Shuiqing

    2006-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene expression was blocked and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation was inhibited by using antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN)mediated by liposome, to find a new genetic therapy of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). RPE cells cultured in vitro were transfected with synthetic fluorescence labled AS-ODN mediated by liposome-Lipofectamine, and the intracellular distribution and persistence time of AS-ODN were dynamically observed. AS-ODN (0.07, 0.28 and 1.12 μ mol/L and sense oligonucleotides (S-ODN with the same concentrations as AS-ODN) mediated by liposome were delivered to the RPE cells cultured in vitro, and CPM values were measured by 3H-TdR incorporation assay and analyzed statistically by variance by comparison with blank control group.Expression of PCNA mRNA in RPE cells was detected by in situ hybridization after the treatment of different concentrations of PCNA AS-ODN and S-ODN, and the average optic density (AOD) was measured by image analysis system and was subjected to q-test and correlation analysis with CPM.Our results showed that AS-ODN mediated by liposome could quickly aggregate in cellular plasma and nuclei in 30 min and 6 h, and stayed for as long as 6 days. AS-ODN (0.28 and 1.12 μ mol/L) markedly suppressed proliferation of RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.05 and P<0.01,repectively) as compared with blank control group. AOD was well correlated with CPM (r=0.975). It is concluded that liposome could increase transfection efficiency of AS-ODN in RPE cells, and AS-ODN could sequence-specifically suppress PCNA mRNA expression and proliferation of human RPE cells.

  1. Association of long-term administration of the survivin mRNA-targeted antisense oligonucleotide LY2181308 with reversible kidney injury in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, William G; Talbot, Denis C; Lahn, Michael M; Brandt, John T; Callies, Sophie; Nagle, Ray; Winearls, Christopher G; Roberts, Ian S D

    2011-02-01

    A 57-year-old man with metastatic melanoma was treated with the survivin inhibitor and antisense oligonucleotide LY2181308 as part of a First-in-Human Dose trial. After 18 months of treatment, he developed kidney injury and the treatment was discontinued. At 9 months and before the development of kidney injury, LY2181308 concentrations were 8- to 10-fold higher relative to median predicted values, but within the targeted exposure considered to be safe. However, at 17 months, 28 days after stopping LY2181308 therapy, LY2181308 concentration exceeded the predicted range by 38-fold. His decreased kidney function was slow to improve after stopping treatment. A kidney biopsy showed signs of acute tubular injury with regeneration. Complete recovery of kidney function occurred 6 months after treatment was stopped. The relationship between high exposures and slow LY2181308 clearance with the gradual improvement in kidney function after stopping the antisense treatment suggests that the oligonucleotide was related to the kidney injury. Based on this case report, kidney function should be monitored frequently in patients receiving long-term treatment with antisense oligonucleotides that specifically target survivin, particularly when they receive concomitant angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reliable Assessment and Quantification of the Fluorescence-Labeled Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Munisso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of fluorescent dyes and the advances in the optical systems for in vivo imaging have stimulated an increasing interest in developing new methodologies to study and quantify the biodistribution of labeled agents. However, despite these great achievements, we are facing significant challenges in determining if the observed fluorescence does correspond to the quantity of the dye in the tissues. In fact, although the far-red and near-infrared lights can propagate through several centimetres of tissue, they diffuse within a few millimetres as consequence of the elastic scattering of photons. In addition, when dye-labeled oligonucleotides form stable complex with cationic carriers, a large change in the fluorescence intensity of the dye is observed. Therefore, the measured fluorescence intensity is altered by the tissue heterogeneity and by the fluctuation of dye intensity. Hence, in this study a quantification strategy for fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides was developed to solve these disadvantageous effects. Our results proved that upon efficient homogenization and dilution with chaotropic agents, such as guanidinium thiocyanate, it is possible to achieve a complete fluorescence intensity recovery. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this method has the advantage of good sensitivity and reproducibility, as well as easy handling of the tissue samples.

  3. Antisense Oligonucleotide (AON-based Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Caused by a Frequent Mutation in CEP290

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    Rob WJ Collin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA is the most severe form of inherited retinal degeneration, with an onset in the first year of life. The most frequent mutation that causes LCA, present in at least 10% of individuals with LCA from North-American and Northern-European descent, is an intronic mutation in CEP290 that results in the inclusion of an aberrant exon in the CEP290 mRNA. Here, we describe a genetic therapy approach that is based on antisense oligonucleotides (AONs, small RNA molecules that are able to redirect normal splicing of aberrantly processed pre-mRNA. Immortalized lymphoblastoid cells of individuals with LCA homozygously carrying the intronic CEP290 mutation were transfected with several AONs that target the aberrant exon that is incorporated in the mutant CEP290 mRNA. Subsequent RNA isolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that a number of AONs were capable of almost fully redirecting normal CEP290 splicing, in a dose-dependent manner. Other AONs however, displayed no effect on CEP290 splicing at all, indicating that the rescue of aberrant CEP290 splicing shows a high degree of sequence specificity. Together, our data show that AON-based therapy is a promising therapeutic approach for CEP290-associated LCA that warrants future research in animal models to develop a cure for this blinding disease.

  4. In vitro and in vivo rescue of aberrant splicing in CEP290-associated LCA by antisense oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanto, Alejandro; Chung, Daniel C; Duijkers, Lonneke; Corral-Serrano, Julio C; Messchaert, Muriël; Xiao, Ru; Bennett, Jean; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-06-15

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe disorder resulting in visual impairment usually starting in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA is an intronic mutation in CEP290 (c.2991 + 1655A > G) that creates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of a pseudoexon (exon X) into CEP290 mRNA. Previously, we showed that naked antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) effectively restored normal CEP290 splicing in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. We here explore the therapeutic potential of naked and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-packaged AONs in vitro and in vivo In both cases, AON delivery fully restored CEP290 pre-mRNA splicing, significantly increased CEP290 protein levels and rescued a ciliary phenotype present in patient-derived fibroblast cells. Moreover, administration of naked and AAV-packaged AONs to the retina of a humanized mutant Cep290 mouse model, carrying the intronic mutation, showed a statistically significant reduction of exon X-containing Cep290 transcripts, without compromising the retinal structure. Together, our data highlight the tremendous therapeutic prospective of AONs for the treatment of not only CEP290-associated LCA but potentially many other subtypes of retinal dystrophy caused by splicing mutations.

  5. A Polyethylenimine-Containing and Transferrin-Conjugated Lipid Nanoparticle System for Antisense Oligonucleotide Delivery to AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited success of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO in clinical anticancer therapy calls for more effective delivery carriers. The goal of this study was to develop a nanoparticle system for delivery of ASO G3139, which targets mRNA of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, to acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. The synthesized nanoparticle Tf-LPN-G3139 contained a small molecular weight polyethylenimine and two cationic lipids as condensing agents, with transferrin on its surface for selective binding and enhanced cellular uptake. The optimized nitrogen to phosphate (N/P ratio was 4 to achieve small particle size and high G3139 entrapment efficiency. The Tf-LPN-G3139 exhibited excellent colloidal stability during storage for at least 12 weeks and remained intact for 4 hours in nuclease-containing serum. The cellular uptake results showed extensive internalization of fluorescence-labelled G3139 in MV4-11 cells through Tf-LPN. Following transfection, Tf-LPN-G3139 at 1 µM ASO level induced 54% Bcl-2 downregulation and >20-fold apoptosis compared to no treatment. When evaluated in mice bearing human xenograft AML tumors, Tf-LPN-G3139 suppressed tumor growth by ~60% at the end of treatment period, accompanied by remarkable pharmacological effect of Bcl-2 inhibition in tumor. In conclusion, Tf-LPN-G3139 is a promising nanoparticle system for ASO G3139 delivery to AML and warrants further investigations.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide against hTERT (Cantide inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic primary hepatic lymphoma mouse model.

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    Bo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human xenograft models, resulting from orthotopic transplantation (implantation into the anatomically correct site of histologically intact tissue into animals, are important for investigating local tumor growth, vascular and lymphatic invasion at the primary tumor site and metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used surgical orthotopic transplantation to establish a nude mouse model of primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL, HLBL-0102. We performed orthotopic transfer of the HLBL-0102 tumor for 42 generations and characterized the tumor cells. The maintenance of PHL characteristics were supported by immunohistochemical and cytogenetic analysis. We also report the antitumor effect of Cantide, an antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide against hTERT, on the growth of HLBL-0102 tumors. We showed a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of tumor weight and serum LDH activity in the orthotopically transplanted animals by Cantide. Importantly, survival was prolonged in Cantide-treated HLBL-0102 tumor-bearing mice when compared to mock-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provided the basis for the development of a clinical trial protocol to treat PHL.

  7. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

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    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  8. Lack of clinical pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between warfarin and the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Hard, Marjie L; Grundy, John S; Singh, Tejdip; von Moltke, Lisa L; Boltje, Ingrid

    2014-08-01

    Mipomersen is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide indicated as an adjunct therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). Warfarin is commonly prescribed for a variety of cardiac disorders in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia population, and concurrent use of warfarin and mipomersen is likely. This open-label, single-sequence 2-period phase 1 study in healthy subjects evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between mipomersen and warfarin. The subjects received a single oral 25 mg dose of warfarin alone on day 1, and after a 7-day washout period, received 200 mg mipomersen alone subcutaneously every other day on days 8-12, and received both concurrently on day 14. Coadministration of mipomersen did not change the pharmacodynamics (international normalized ratio, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of warfarin. There were no clinically significant changes in the PK of mipomersen with concurrent administration of warfarin. There were no events indicative of an increase in bleeding tendency when warfarin was coadministered with mipomersen, and the adverse event profile of mipomersen did not appear to be altered in combination with warfarin, as compared with that of the respective reference treatment. The combination of these 2 medications appeared to be safe and well tolerated. These results suggest that the dosage adjustment of warfarin or mipomersen is not expected to be necessary with coadministration.

  9. Phase I study of LY2181308, an antisense oligonucleotide against survivin, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, M; Nokihara, H; Yamamoto, N; Yamada, Y; Yamada, K; Goto, Y; Fujimoto, T; Sekiguchi, R; Uenaka, K; Callies, S; Tamura, T

    2011-08-01

    LY2181308 is an antisense oligonucleotide that complementarily binds to survivin mRNA and inhibits its expression in tumor tissue. This phase I dose escalation study evaluated the tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer activity of LY2181308 in Japanese. Patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapy received LY2181308 (400, 600, or 750 mg) as a 3-h intravenous infusion for 3 consecutive days and thereafter once a week. LY2181308 was administered to 14 patients, aged 44-73 (median 60) years. Flu-like syndrome, prolonged prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (PT-INR), thrombocytopenia, and fatigue were common reversible grade 1/2 toxicities. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible grade 3 elevation of ALT/AST/γ-GTP in 1 patient treated at the 750-mg dose. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a long terminal half-life of 21 days and an extensive tissue distribution of LY2181308. In 12 evaluable patients, one patient had stable disease, while the remaining 11 patients had progressive disease. LY2181308 monotherapy is well tolerated up to 750 mg with a manageable toxicity, the pharmacokinetic profile warrants further evaluation of LY2181308 in combination with cytotoxic agents or radiotherapy.

  10. Peptide conjugation of 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides enhances cardiac uptake and exon skipping in mdx mice.

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    Jirka, Silvana M G; Heemskerk, Hans; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Muilwijk, Daan; Pang, Kar Him; de Visser, Peter C; Janson, Anneke; Karnaoukh, Tatyana G; Vermue, Rick; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Aguilera, Begoña; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2014-02-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy that is currently being tested in various clinical trials. This approach is based on restoring the open reading frame of dystrophin transcripts resulting in shorter but partially functional dystrophin proteins as found in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy. After systemic administration, a large proportion of AONs ends up in the liver and kidneys. Therefore, enhancing AON uptake by skeletal and cardiac muscle would improve the AONs' therapeutic effect. For phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer, AONs use nonspecific positively charged cell penetrating peptides to enhance efficacy. However, this is challenging for negatively charged 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligomer. Therefore, we screened a 7-mer phage display peptide library to identify muscle and heart homing peptides in vivo in the mdx mouse model and found a promising candidate peptide capable of binding muscle cells in vitro and in vivo. Upon systemic administration in dystrophic mdx mice, conjugation of a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate AON to this peptide indeed improved uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and resulted in higher exon skipping levels with a significant difference in heart and diaphragm. Based on these results, peptide conjugation represents an interesting strategy to enhance the therapeutic effect of exon skipping with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  11. Development of a Method for Profiling Protein Interactions with LNA-Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides Using Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2016-04-01

    Development of locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by nontarget-mediated hepatotoxicity. Increased binding of hepatocellular proteins to toxic LNA gapmers may be one of the mechanisms contributing to LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the protein binding propensity of nontoxic sequence-1 (NTS-1), toxic sequence-2 (TS-2), and severely highly toxic sequence-3 (HTS-3) LNA gapmers using human protein microarrays. We previously demonstrated by the transcription profiling analysis of liver RNA isolated from mice that TS-2 and HTS-3 gapmers modulate different transcriptional pathways in mice leading to hepatotoxicity. Our protein array profiling demonstrated that a greater number of proteins, including ones associated with hepatotoxicity, hepatic system disorder, and cell functions, were bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 compared with NTS-1. However, the profiles of proteins bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 were similar and did not distinguish proteins contributing to severe in vivo toxicity. These results, together with the previous transcription profiling analysis, indicate that the combination of sequence-dependent transcription modulation and increased protein binding of toxic LNA gapmers contributes to hepatotoxicity.

  12. Targeting TGF-β Signaling by Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Knockdown of TGF-β Type I Receptor

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    Dwi U Kemaladewi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by lack of functional dystrophin and results in progressive myofiber damage and degeneration. In addition, impaired muscle regeneration and fibrosis contribute to the progressive pathology of DMD. Importantly, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is implicated in DMD pathology and is known to stimulate fibrosis and inhibit muscle regeneration. In this study, we present a new strategy to target TGF-β signaling cascades by specifically inhibiting the expression of TGF-β type I receptor TGFBR1 (ALK5. Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs were designed to specifically induce exon skipping of mouse ALK5 transcripts. AON-induced exon skipping of ALK5 resulted in specific downregulation of full-length receptor transcripts in vitro in different cell types, repression of TGF-β activity, and enhanced C2C12 myoblast differentiation. To determine the effect of these AONs in dystrophic muscles, we performed intramuscular injections of ALK5 AONs in mdx mice, which resulted in a decrease in expression of fibrosis-related genes and upregulation of Myog expression compared to control AON-injected muscles. In summary, our study presents a novel method to target TGF-β signaling cascades with potential beneficial effects for DMD.

  13. 2′-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping

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    Tomoko Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51, which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2′-O,4′-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA, which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2′-O-methyl RNA(2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85 had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD.

  14. Presymptomatic Treatment with Acetylcholinesterase Antisense Oligonucleotides Prolongs Survival in ALS (G93A-SOD1 Mice

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    Gotkine Marc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Previous research suggests that acetylcholinesterase (AChE may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. AChE enzyme inhibitors can upregulate AChE transcription which in certain contexts can have deleterious (noncatalytic effects, making them theoretically harmful in ALS, whilst AChE antisense-oligonucleotides (mEN101, which downregulate AChE may be beneficial. Our aim was to investigate whether downregulation of AChE using mEN101 is beneficial in an ALS mouse model. Methods. ALS (G93A-SOD1 mice received saline, mEN101, inverse-EN101, or neostigmine. Treatments were administered from 5 weeks. Disease-onset and survival were recorded. Additional mice were sacrificed for pathological analysis at 15 weeks of age. In a follow-up experiment treatment was started at the symptomatic stage at a higher dose. Results. mEN101 given at the presymptomatic (but not symptomatic stage prolonged survival and attenuated motor-neuron loss in ALS mice. In contrast, neostigmine exacerbated the clinical parameters. Conclusions. These results suggest that AChE may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. The accelerated disease course with neostigmine suggests that any beneficial effects of mEN101 occur through a non-catalytic rather than cholinergic mechanism.

  15. Wild-type mouse models to screen antisense oligonucleotides for exon-skipping efficacy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Limin Cao

    Full Text Available A readily available animal model is essential for rapidly identifying effective treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a devastating neuromuscular disorder caused by the lack of dystrophin protein, which results from frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene. Currently, the mdx mouse is the most commonly used model for antisense oligonucleotide (AO-mediated exon skipping pre-clinical studies, with a mild phenotype. However, the accessibility of mdx mouse colonies particularly in developing countries can constrain research. Therefore in this study we explore the feasibility of using wild-type mice as models to establish exon-skipping efficiency of various DMD AO chemistries and their conjugates. Four different strains of wild-type mice and six different AO chemistries were investigated intramuscularly and the results indicated that the same exon-skipping efficiency was achieved for all tested AOs as that from mdx mice. Notably, levels of exon-skipping obtained in C57BL6 and C3H and mdx mice were most closely matched, followed by ICR and BALB/C mice. Systemic validation revealed that wild-type mice are less responsive to AO-mediated exon skipping than mdx mice. Our study provides evidence for the first time that wild-type mice can be appropriate models for assessing DMD AO exon-skipping efficiency with similar sensitivity to that of mdx mice and this finding can further accelerate the development of effective DMD AOs.

  16. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

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    Niels H Skotte

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs. We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  17. Apoptosis of drug-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line COC1/DDP induced by survivin antisense oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Fei; RUAN Fei; XIE Xian-kuan; LIU Shao-yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Currently, surgery-oriented treatment plays a major role in the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. But 5-year survival rate of patients is still around 30%. One of the main reasons for the Iow survival rate is the drug resistance of tumor cells against chemotherapy.1,2 The function of antiapoptosis in the course of initiation and progress of cancer has a close relationship with drug resistance of tumor cells. Survivin is a new discovered anti-apoptosis gene, its expression levels correlating with more aggressive disease and poor clinical outcome in many of these tumors. It has been reported that survivin is expressed during fetal development and in cancer tissues.3 Furthermore,survivin overexpression, by disrupting the balance between cell proliferation/differentiation and apoptosis, may relate with the resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy.4,5 We designed antisense oligonucleotides of survivin to treat the drug-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line COC1/DDP, and studied its effects on inducing COC1/DDP apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to find a novel approach to improve the sensitivity of ovarian carcinoma chemotherapy.

  18. Modulation of p53 expression using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA in vitro and in the living cells.

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    Agnieszka Gorska

    Full Text Available The p53 protein is a key player in cell response to stress events and cancer prevention. However, up-regulation of p53 that occurs during radiotherapy of some tumours results in radio-resistance of targeted cells. Recently, antisense oligonucleotides have been used to reduce the p53 level in tumour cells which facilitates their radiation-induced apoptosis. Here we describe the rational design of antisense oligomers directed against the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA aimed to inhibit the synthesis of p53 protein and its ΔNp53 isoform. A comprehensive analysis of the sites accessible to oligomer hybridization in this mRNA region was performed. Subsequently, translation efficiency from the initiation codons for both proteins in the presence of selected oligomers was determined in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in MCF-7 cells. The antisense oligomers with 2'-OMe and LNA modifications were used to study the mechanism of their impact on translation. It turned out that the remaining RNase H activity of the lysate contributed to modulation of protein synthesis efficiency which was observed in the presence of antisense oligomers. A possibility of changing the ratio of the newly synthetized p53 and ΔNp53 in a controlled manner was revealed which is potentially very attractive considering the relationship between the functioning of these two proteins. Selected antisense oligonucleotides which were designed based on accessibility mapping of the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were able to significantly reduce the level of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells. One of these oligomers might be used in the future as a support treatment in anticancer therapy.

  19. STAT1 Antisense Oligonucleotides Attenuate the Proinflammatory Cytokine Release of Alveolar Macrophages in Bleomycin-Induced Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianming Fan; Zengli Wang

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) antisense oligonucleotides (ASON) on concentrations of TNF-α, IL-8, NO secreted by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis, five adult female Wistar rats were intratracheally instilled with bleomycin. After 7 days, the rats were killed by right ventricle of heart exsanguinations under ketamine anaesthesia and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed to obtain AMs. AMs were divided into four groups, treated with STAT1 ASON, STAT1 sense oligonucleotides (SON), dexamethasone (DEX) and medium alone (control), respectively. AMs and media were collected after culture for 36 h. The mRNA and protein expressions of STAT1 and ICAM-1 in AMs were detected by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-8, NO in cultured medium were detected.The STAT1 mRNA expression by AMs in the STAT1 ASON group was lower than those of AMs in the STAT1 SON group, the DEX group and the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the STAT1 mRNA expression by AMs in the DEX group was also lower than those of AMs in the STAT1 SON group and the control group (p < 0.05), but the STAT1 mRNA expression by AMs in the STAT1 SON group was not different from that of the control group (p >0.05). The protein expressions of STAT1 and ICAM-1 and the mRNA expression of ICAM-1 showed similar changes to the STAT1 mRNA expression by AMs. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-8, NO in cultured medium from STAT1 ASON group were lower than those from STAT1 SON, DEX and the control groups (p < 0.05). Moreover,the concentrations of TNF-α, IL-8, NO in cultured medium from DEX group were also lower than those from the control and STAT1 SON group (p < 0.05), but no difference between STAT1 SON group and the control (p > 0.05).The results suggest that STAT1 ASON could inhibit the secretion of TNF-α, IL-8, NO in AMs, and STAT1 could become a target of treating pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Dynamics of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding influences the induction of dystrophin exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides.

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    Keng Boon Wee

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs mediated exon skipping offers potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the identification of effective AON target sites remains unsatisfactory for lack of a precise method to predict their binding accessibility. This study demonstrates the importance of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding in determining the accessibility of AON target sites for AON induction of selective exon skipping in DMD. Because transcription and splicing occur in tandem, AONs must bind to their target sites before splicing factors. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding forms transient secondary structures, which redistributes accessible binding sites. In our analysis, to approximate transcription elongation, a "window of analysis" that included the entire targeted exon was shifted one nucleotide at a time along the pre-mRNA. Possible co-transcriptional secondary structures were predicted using the sequence in each step of transcriptional analysis. A nucleotide was considered "engaged" if it formed a complementary base pairing in all predicted secondary structures of a particular step. Correlation of frequency and localisation of engaged nucleotides in AON target sites accounted for the performance (efficacy and efficiency of 94% of 176 previously reported AONs. Four novel insights are inferred: (1 the lowest frequencies of engaged nucleotides are associated with the most efficient AONs; (2 engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site attenuate AON performance more than at other sites; (3 the performance of longer AONs is less attenuated by engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site compared to shorter AONs; (4 engaged nucleotides at 3' end of a short target site attenuates AON efficiency more than at 5' end.

  1. Targeting eukaryotic translation in mesothelioma cells with an eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide.

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    Blake A Jacobson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrant cap-dependent translation is implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple tumor types including mesothelioma. In this study, disabling the eIF4F complex by targeting eIF4E with eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide (4EASO is assessed as a therapy for mesothelioma. METHODS: Mesothelioma cells were transfected with 4EASO, designed to target eIF4E mRNA, or mismatch-ASO control. Cell survival was measured in mesothelioma treated with 4EASO alone or combined with either gemcitabine or pemetrexed. Levels of eIF4E, ODC, Bcl-2 and β-actin were assessed following treatment. Binding to a synthetic cap-analogue was used to study the strength of eIF4F complex activation following treatment. RESULTS: eIF4E level and the formation of eIF4F cap-complex decreased in response to 4EASO, but not mismatch control ASO, resulting in cleavage of PARP indicating apoptosis. 4EASO treatment resulted in dose dependent decrease in eIF4E levels, which corresponded to cytotoxicity of mesothelioma cells. 4EASO resulted in decreased levels of eIF4E in non-malignant LP9 cells, but this did not correspond to increased cytotoxicity. Proteins thought to be regulated by cap-dependent translation, Bcl-2 and ODC, were decreased upon treatment with 4EASO. Combination therapy of 4EASO with pemetrexed or gemcitabine further reduced cell number. CONCLUSION: 4EASO is a novel drug that causes apoptosis and selectively reduces eIF4E levels, eIF4F complex formation, and proliferation of mesothelioma cells. eIF4E knockdown results in decreased expression of anti-apoptotic and pro-growth proteins and enhances chemosensitivity.

  2. Impact of dosing regimen of custirsen, an antisense oligonucleotide, on safety, tolerability and cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich-Guilatt, Laura; Elgart, Anna; Erisson, Lavi; Willsie, Sandra K; Tessler, Shoshi; Barnett-Griness, Ofra; Pande, Amitkumar; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-09-01

    Custirsen (OGX-011/TV-1011), a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that reduces clusterin production, is under investigation with chemotherapy in patients with solid tumours. Custirsen is associated with constitutional symptoms (CS) that may interfere with clinical pharmacology investigations, such as QT interval studies. Experience with other ASOs suggests NSAID premedication may ameliorate CS, but we observed suboptimal outcomes in healthy subjects given custirsen and NSAIDs. We sought to establish a custirsen regimen for future clinical pharmacology studies in healthy subjects. Subjects received custirsen (640 mg intravenously over 120 min) with dexamethasone premedication or increasing doses (320, 480, 640 mg over 6 days) of custirsen with dexamethasone premedication, then one full custirsen dose without premedication on day 8. Incidence/severity of adverse events (AEs) and extensive electrocardiogram readings were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. AEs included CS, elevated transaminases and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that were predominantly grade 1/2. Administration of increasing custirsen doses and dexamethasone premedication reduced the incidence of CS associated with full dose custirsen. Transaminase elevation showed a dose-dependent effect (0% at days 2, 4, 27% at day 6) with the highest custirsen doses. Increasing doses of custirsen may have mitigated the severity but not incidence of aPTT prolongation. Neither regimen was associated with cardiac repolarization changes in QT values or concentration-effect analyses. The custirsen pharmacokinetic profile was consistent with previous experience. Escalation of custirsen dose combined with dexamethasone premedication reduced CS associated with full dose custirsen and should be considered in future clinical pharmacology studies of custirsen. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Antisense oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of the APOB mRNA generates a novel isoform of APOB

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    Chew Shern L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B (APOB is an integral part of the LDL, VLDL, IDL, Lp(a and chylomicron lipoprotein particles. The APOB pre-mRNA consists of 29 constitutively-spliced exons. APOB exists as two natural isoforms: the full-length APOB100 isoform, assembled into LDL, VLDL, IDL and Lp(a and secreted by the liver in humans; and the C-terminally truncated APOB48, assembled into chylomicrons and secreted by the intestine in humans. Down-regulation of APOB100 is a potential therapy to lower circulating LDL and cholesterol levels. Results We investigated the ability of 2'O-methyl RNA antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs to induce the skipping of exon 27 in endogenous APOB mRNA in HepG2 cells. These ASOs are directed towards the 5' and 3' splice-sites of exon 27, the branch-point sequence (BPS of intron 26–27 and several predicted exonic splicing enhancers within exon 27. ASOs targeting either the 5' or 3' splice-site, in combination with the BPS, are the most effective. The splicing of other alternatively spliced genes are not influenced by these ASOs, suggesting that the effects seen are not due to non-specific changes in alternative splicing. The skip 27 mRNA is translated into a truncated isoform, APOB87SKIP27. Conclusion The induction of APOB87SKIP27 expression in vivo should lead to decreased LDL and cholesterol levels, by analogy to patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia. As intestinal APOB mRNA editing and APOB48 expression rely on sequences within exon 26, exon 27 skipping should not affect APOB48 expression unlike other methods of down-regulating APOB100 expression which also down-regulate APOB48.

  4. XRN2 is required for the degradation of target RNAs by RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides

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    Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Obika, Satoshi, E-mail: obika@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-21

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) can suppress the expression of a target gene by cleaving pre-mRNA and/or mature mRNA via RNase H1. Following the initial endonucleolytic cleavage by RNase H1, the target RNAs are degraded by a mechanism that is poorly understood. To better understand this degradation pathway, we depleted the expression of two major 5′ to 3′ exoribonucleases (XRNs), named XRN1 and XRN2, and analyzed the levels of 3′ fragments of the target RNAs in vitro. We found that the 3′ fragments of target pre-mRNA generated by ASO were almost completely degraded from their 5′ ends by nuclear XRN2 after RNase H1-mediated cleavage, whereas the 3′ fragments of mature mRNA were partially degraded by XRN2. In contrast to ASO, small interference RNA (siRNA) could reduce the expression level of only mature mRNA, and the 3′ fragment was degraded by cytoplasmic XRN1. Our findings indicate that the RNAs targeted by RNase H1-dependent ASO are rapidly degraded in the nucleus, contrary to the cytoplasmic degradation pathway mediated by siRNA. - Highlights: • We compared the degradation mechanism of the transcript targeted by ASO and siRNA. • We focused on two 5′ to 3′ exoribonucleases, cytoplasmic XRN1, and nuclear XRN2. • The 3′ fragment of target pre-mRNA generated by ASO was degraded by XRN2. • The 3′ fragment of target mRNA generated by ASO was partially degraded by XRN2. • XRN1 depletion promoted accumulation of the 3′ fragment of mRNA generated by siRNA.

  5. Knock-down of postsynaptic density protein 95 expression by antisense oligonucleotides protects against apoptosis-like cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Zhi Yan; Yong Liu; Yan-Yan Zong; Guang-Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) plays important roles in the regulation of glutamate signaling,such as that of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs).In this study,the functional roles of PSD-95 in tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit 2A (NR2A) and in apoptosis-like cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured rat cortical neurons were investigated.Methods We used immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting to detect PSD-95 protein level,tyrosine phosphorylation level of NR2A,and the interaction between PSD-95 and NR2A or Src.Apoptosis-like cells were observed by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining.Results Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A and apoptosis-like cell death were increased after recovery following 60-min OGD.The increases were attenuated by pretreatment with antisense oligonucleotides against PSD-95 before OGD,but not by missense oligonucleotides or vehicle.PSD-95 antisense oligonucleotides also inhibited the increased interaction between PSD-95 and NR2A or Src,while NR2A expression did not change under this condition.Conclusion PSD-95 may be involved in regulating NR2A tyrosine phosphorylation by Src kinase.Inhibition of PSD-95 expression can be neuroprotective against apoptosislike cell death after recovery from OGD.

  6. LNA/DNA mixmer-based antisense oligonucleotides correct alternative splicing of the SMN2 gene and restore SMN protein expression in type 1 SMA fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touznik, Aleksander; Maruyama, Rika; Hosoki, Kana; Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2017-06-16

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting motor neurons, and is currently the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN2 is an SMN1 paralogue, but cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 since exon 7 in SMN2 mRNA is excluded (spliced out) due to a single C-to-T nucleotide transition in the exon 7. One of the most promising strategies to treat SMA is antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated therapy. AONs are utilized to block intronic splicing silencer number 1 (ISS-N1) on intron 7 of SMN2, which causes exon 7 inclusion of the mRNA and the recovery of the expression of functional SMN protein from the endogenous SMN2 gene. We developed novel locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense oligonucleotides (LNA/DNA mixmers), which efficiently induce exon 7 inclusion in SMN2 and restore the SMN protein production in SMA patient fibroblasts. The mixmers are highly specific to the targeted sequence, and showed significantly higher efficacy than an all-LNA oligonucleotide with the equivalent sequence. These data suggest that use of LNA/DNA mixmer-based AONs may be an attractive therapeutic strategy to treat SMA.

  7. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation.

  8. Effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting bFGF on apoptosis of hepatoma cells%多层螺旋CT同层动态扫描结合MPR技术诊断肝外胆管癌的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jielin Qi; Ning Wu; Li Li; Bing Bu; Dengfeng Zhou; Xiqin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the cell cycle changes of hepatoma cells and the rote of antisense oligonucleotide targeting bFGF.Methods:Inhibition of bFGF protein expression was investigated by conical microscopy analysis and Western blot in the best condition of transfecting antisense oligonucleotide targeting bFGF.Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected with flow cytometry analysis.Results:Treatmenl with antisense oligonucleotide of bFGF not only reduced the expression of bFGF by conical microscopy and Western blot analysises,but also increased the apoptosis of HepG2 cells(P<0.01).Conclusion:bFGF may take part in apoptosis regulation of hepatoma cells and be used as a target of hepatocel-lular carcinoma therapy.

  9. A locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide (LNA silences PCSK9 and enhances LDLR expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 is an important factor in the etiology of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and is also an attractive therapeutic target to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. PCSK9 accelerates the degradation of hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR and low levels of hepatic PCSK9 activity are associated with reduced levels of circulating LDL-cholesterol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study presents the first evidence for the efficacy of a locked nucleic acid (LNA antisense oligonucleotide (LNA ASO that targets both human and mouse PCSK9. We employed human hepatocytes derived cell lines HepG2 and HuH7 and a pancreatic mouse beta-TC3 cell line known to express high endogenous levels of PCSK9. LNA ASO efficiently reduced the mRNA and protein levels of PCSK9 with a concomitant increase in LDLR protein levels after transfection in these cells. In vivo efficacy of LNA ASO was further investigated in mice by tail vein intravenous administration of LNA ASO in saline solution. The level of PCSK9 mRNA was reduced by approximately 60%, an effect lasting more than 16 days. Hepatic LDLR protein levels were significantly up-regulated by 2.5-3 folds for at least 8 days and approximately 2 fold for 16 days. Finally, measurement of liver alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels revealed that long term LNA ASO treatment (7 weeks does not cause hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: LNA-mediated PCSK9 mRNA inhibition displayed potent reduction of PCSK9 in cell lines and mouse liver. Our data clearly revealed the efficacy and safety of LNA ASO in reducing PCSK9 levels, an approach that is now ready for testing in primates. The major significance and take home message of this work is the development of a novel and promising approach for human therapeutic intervention of the PCSK9 pathway and hence for reducing some of the cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic

  10. Synthesis of a Morpholino Nucleic Acid (MNA-Uridine Phosphoramidite, and Exon Skipping Using MNA/2′-O-Methyl Mixmer Antisense Oligonucleotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxiang Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesised a morpholino nucleoside-uridine (MNA-U phosphoramidite and evaluated the potential of a MNA-modified antisense oligonucleotide (AO sequences to induce exon 23 skipping in mdx mouse myotubes in vitro towards extending the applicability of morpholino chemistry with other nucleotide monomers. We designed, synthesised, and compared exon skipping efficiencies of 20 mer MNA-modified 2′-O-methyl RNA mixmer AO on a phosphorothioate backbone (MNA/2′-OMePS to the corresponding fully modified 2′-O-methyl RNA AO (2′-OMePS as a control. Our results showed that the MNA/2′-OMePS efficiently induced exon 23 skipping. As expected, the 2′-OMePS AO control yielded efficient exon 23 skipping. Under the applied conditions, both the AOs showed minor products corresponding to exon 22/23 dual exon skipping in low yield. As these are very preliminary data, more detailed studies are necessary; however, based on the preliminary results, MNA nucleotides might be useful in constructing antisense oligonucleotides.

  11. In vitro correction of a pseudoexon-generating deep intronic mutation in LGMD2A by antisense oligonucleotides and modified small nuclear RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Lorea; Aiastui, Ana; Goicoechea, Maria; Martins de Araujo, Mafalda; Avril, Aurélie; Beley, Cyriaque; García, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan; Fortes, Puri; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2013-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. The majority of the mutations described to date are located in the coding sequence of the gene. However, it is estimated that 25% of the mutations are present at exon-intron boundaries and modify the pre-mRNA splicing of the CAPN3 transcript. We have previously described the first deep intronic mutation in the CAPN3 gene: c.1782+1072G>C mutation. This mutation causes the pseudoexonization of an intronic sequence of the CAPN3 gene in the mature mRNA. In the present work, we show that the point mutation generates the inclusion of the pseudoexon in the mRNA using a minigene assay. In search of a treatment that restores normal splicing, splicing modulation was induced by RNA-based strategies, which included antisense oligonucleotides and modified small-nuclear RNAs. The best effect was observed with antisense sequences, which induced pseudoexon skipping in both HeLa cells cotransfected with mutant minigene and in fibroblasts from patients. Finally, transfection of antisense sequences and siRNA downregulation of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) indicate that binding of this factor to splicing enhancer sequences is involved in pseudoexon activation. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    Abdominal adhesions are the aberrant result of peritoneal wound healing commonly associated with surgery and inflammation. A subject of a large number of studies since the first half of the last century, peritoneal adhesion prevention has, for the most part, evaded the scientific community and continues to cost Americans an estimated $2-4 billion annually. It is known that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays a key role in the wound healing cascade; however, suppression of this multifunctional growth factor's activity may have more harmful consequences than can be tolerated. As a result, much attention has fallen on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-beta's fibrotic action. It has been demonstrated in several in vitro models, that the suppression of CTGF hinders fibroblast proliferation, a necessary condition for fibrosis. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides (antisense oligos, AO) to CTGF have been shown to knock down CTGF mRNA levels by specifically hindering the translation of CTGF protein. Antisense technologies have met with a great deal of excitement as a viable means of preventing diseases such as adhesions by hindering protein translation at the mRNA level. However, the great challenge associated with the use of these drugs lies in the short circulation time when administered "naked". Viral delivery systems, although excellent platforms in metabolic studies, are not ideal for diagnostic use because of the inherent danger associated with viral vectors. Microparticles made of biodegradable polymers have therefore presented themselves as a viable means of delivering these drugs to target cells over extended periods. Herein, we present two in vivo studies confirming the up-regulation of TGF-beta protein and CTGF mRNA following injury to the uterine tissues of female rats. We were able to selectively knockdown post-operative CTGF protein levels following surgery, however, our observations led us to conclude that

  13. Translational inhibition of CTX M extended spectrum β-lactamase in clinical strains of Escherichia coli by synthetic antisense oligonucleotides partially restores sensitivity to cefotaxime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benedict Readman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25 mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO and a 13 mer polyamide (peptide nucleic acid (PNA were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and –17 to –5 respectively close to the translational initiation site of the extended spectrum β lactamase resistance genes of CTX M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell free translation transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a blaCTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0 - 40 nM. The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (KFF3K and both significantly (P<0.05 increased sensitivity to cefotaxime in a dose dependent manner (0 - 40 nM in field isolates harbouring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine Dalgarno region of blaCTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates.

  14. An intranasal selective antisense oligonucleotide impairs lung cyclooxygenase-2 production and improves inflammation, but worsens airway function, in house dust mite sensitive mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujols Laura

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its reported pro-inflammatory activity, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 has been proposed to play a protective role in asthma. Accordingly, COX-2 might be down-regulated in the airway cells of asthmatics. This, together with results of experiments to assess the impact of COX-2 blockade in ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized mice in vivo, led us to propose a novel experimental approach using house dust mite (HDM-sensitized mice in which we mimicked altered regulation of COX-2. Methods Allergic inflammation was induced in BALBc mice by intranasal exposure to HDM for 10 consecutive days. This model reproduces spontaneous exposure to aeroallergens by asthmatic patients. In order to impair, but not fully block, COX-2 production in the airways, some of the animals received an intranasal antisense oligonucleotide. Lung COX-2 expression and activity were measured along with bronchovascular inflammation, airway reactivity, and prostaglandin production. Results We observed impaired COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in the lung tissue of selective oligonucleotide-treated sensitized mice. This was accompanied by diminished production of mPGE synthase and PGE2 in the airways. In sensitized mice, the oligonucleotide induced increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine, but a substantially reduced bronchovascular inflammation. Finally, mRNA levels of hPGD synthase remained unchanged. Conclusion Intranasal antisense therapy against COX-2 in vivo mimicked the reported impairment of COX-2 regulation in the airway cells of asthmatic patients. This strategy revealed an unexpected novel dual effect: inflammation was improved but AHR worsened. This approach will provide insights into the differential regulation of inflammation and lung function in asthma, and will help identify pharmacological targets within the COX-2/PG system.

  15. Effects of connective tissue growth factor antisense oligonucleotides on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of the cultured human keloid fibroblasts in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘剑毅; 李世荣; 纪淑兴

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) on the pathogenesis of human keloid. Methods: CTGF antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) conjugated with isothiocyananate fluorescence was encapsulated by liposome, and then added into the human keloid fibroblasts (HKFs) culture media. The intracellular distribution of CTGF ASODN was observed by fluorescence microscopy in the fixed HKFs. The proliferation of HKFs was measured by MTT test. The collagen synthesis of HKFs was measured by 3H-proline incorporation method. Results: Compared with control group, the CTGF ASODN can inhibit the proliferation and collagen synthesis of the HKFs (P < 0.01 ). Conclusion: CTGF ASODN has anti-fibrotic effects on keloid in vitro, and CTGF play an important role in promoting the fibrosis of keloid.

  16. Conjugation of mono and di-GalNAc sugars enhances the potency of antisense oligonucleotides via ASGR mediated delivery to hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Yu, Jinghua; Vasquez, Guillermo; Low, Audrey; Chappell, Alfred; Schmidt, Karsten; Murray, Heather M; Gaus, Hans; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2016-08-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) conjugated to trivalent GalNAc ligands show 10-fold enhanced potency for suppressing gene targets expressed in hepatocytes. Trivalent GalNAc is a high affinity ligand for the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR)-a C-type lectin expressed almost exclusively on hepatocytes in the liver. In this communication, we show that conjugation of two and even one GalNAc sugar to single stranded chemically modified ASOs can enhance potency 5-10 fold in mice. Evaluation of the mono- and di-GalNAc ASO conjugates in an ASGR binding assay suggested that chemical features of the ASO enhance binding to the receptor and provide a rationale for the enhanced potency.

  17. Potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Huntington disease gene / allele-specific silencing of mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Southwell, Amber L;

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG-expansion in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in a toxic gain of function in the mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). Reducing the expression of mHTT is therefore an attractive therapy for HD. However, wild......-type HTT protein is essential for development and has critical roles in maintaining neuronal health. Therapies for HD that reduce wild-type HTT may therefore generate unintended negative consequences. We have identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets in the human HD population for the disease......-specific targeting of the HTT gene. Using primary cells from patients with HD and the transgenic YAC18 and BACHD mouse lines, we developed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) molecules that potently and selectively silence mHTT at both exonic and intronic SNP sites. Modification of these ASOs with S-constrained-ethyl (c...

  18. Anti-Urokinase Receptor Antisense Oligonucleotide (uPAR-aODN) to Prevent and Cure Long-Term Space Exploration-Related Retinal Pathological Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarano, Stefano; Lulli, Matteo; Fibbi, Gabriella; Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Serrati, Simona; Witort, Ewa; Chilla, Anastasia; Lapucci, Andrea; Donnini, Martino; Quaglierini, Paolo; Romiti, Alice; Specogna, Rebecca; Del Rosso, Mario; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2008-06-01

    Angiogenesis underlies a variety of physiological processes and its possible deregulation during long term space exploration needs to be investigated. Angiogenesis is a multistep process of new blood capillary formation, where degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteolytic enzymes, including uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) and opening the way to migration of endothelial cells (EC), is critical. Plasminogen activation system regulates angiogenesis by both uPA-driven ECM degradation and uPA receptor (uPAR). Microgravity and low dose irradiations promote tissue neoangiogeenesis and neovascularization is often common occurence in ophthalmologic pathologies. We have designed and patented the uPAR antisense oligonucleotide (aODN) and evaluated its antiangiogenetic activity by EC cellular migration and capillary morphogenesis assays. The uPAR aODN treatment caused a 75% inhibition of human microvascular EC migration and a complete inhibition of capillary morphogenesis, suggesting its therapeutic application to prevent neoangiogenesis-related ophthalmologic pathologies during space exploration.

  19. Involvement of Bcl-2 and Bax in photodynamic therapy-mediated apoptosis. Antisense Bcl-2 oligonucleotide sensitizes RIF 1 cells to photodynamic therapy apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, M; Ahmad, N; Gupta, S; Mukhtar, H

    2001-05-04

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising treatment modality, is an oxidative stress that induces apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and tumors in vivo. Understanding the mechanism(s) involved in PDT-mediated apoptosis may improve its therapeutic efficacy. Although studies suggest the involvement of multiple pathways, the triggering event(s) responsible for PDT-mediated apoptotic response is(are) not clear. To investigate the role of Bcl-2 in PDT-mediated apoptosis, we employed Bcl-2-antisense and -overexpression approaches in two cell types differing in their responses toward PDT apoptosis. In the first approach, we treated radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF 1) cells, which are resistant to silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4)-PDT apoptosis, with Bcl-2-antisense oligonucleotide. This treatment resulted in sensitization of RIF 1 cells to PDT-mediated apoptosis as demonstrated by i) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, ii) DNA ladder formation, iii) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, and iv) DEVDase activity. This treatment also resulted in oligonucleotide concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein with a concomitant increase in apoptosis. However, the level of Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family, remained unaltered. In the second approach, an overexpression of Bcl-2 in PDT apoptosis-sensitive human epidermoid carcinoma (A431) cells resulted in enhanced apoptosis and up-regulation of Bax following PDT. In both the approaches, the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was associated with an increased apoptotic response of PDT. Our data also demonstrated that PDT results in modulation of other Bcl-2 family members in a way that the overall ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic member proteins favors apoptosis.

  20. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-07-05

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA.

  1. Stabilin-1 and Stabilin-2 are specific receptors for the cellular internalization of phosphorothioate-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Colton M; Donner, Aaron J; Blank, Emma E; Egger, Andrew W; Kellar, Brianna M; Østergaard, Michael E; Seth, Punit P; Harris, Edward N

    2016-04-07

    Phosphorothioate (PS)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been extensively investigated over the past three decades as pharmacological and therapeutic agents. One second generation ASO, Kynamro™, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and over 35 second generation PS ASOs are at various stages of clinical development. In this report, we show that the Stabilin class of scavenger receptors, which were not previously thought to bind DNA, do bind and internalize PS ASOs. With the use of primary cells from mouse and rat livers and recombinant cell lines each expressing Stabilin-1 and each isoform of Stabilin-2 (315-HARE and 190-HARE), we have determined that PS ASOs bind with high affinity and these receptors are responsible for bulk, clathrin-mediated endocytosis within the cell. Binding is primarily dependent on salt-bridge formation and correct folding of the intact protein receptor. Increased internalization rates also enhanced ASO potency for reducing expression of the non-coding RNA Malat-1, in Stabilin-expressing cell lines. A more thorough understanding of mechanisms by which ASOs are internalized in cells and their intracellular trafficking pathways will aid in the design of next generation antisense agents with improved therapeutic properties. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. AZD9150, a next-generation antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of STAT3 with early evidence of clinical activity in lymphoma and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, David; Kurzrock, Razelle; Kim, Youngsoo; Woessner, Richard; Younes, Anas; Nemunaitis, John; Fowler, Nathan; Zhou, Tianyuan; Schmidt, Joanna; Jo, Minji; Lee, Samantha J; Yamashita, Mason; Hughes, Steven G; Fayad, Luis; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Nadella, Murali V P; Mohseni, Morvarid; Lawson, Deborah; Reimer, Corinne; Blakey, David C; Xiao, Xiaokun; Hsu, Jeff; Revenko, Alexey; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2015-11-18

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded our understanding of cancer genetics. Antisense technology is an attractive platform with the potential to translate these advances into improved cancer therapeutics, because antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibitors can be designed on the basis of gene sequence information alone. Recent human clinical data have demonstrated the potent activity of systemically administered ASOs targeted to genes expressed in the liver. We describe the preclinical activity and initial clinical evaluation of a class of ASOs containing constrained ethyl modifications for targeting the gene encoding the transcription factor STAT3, a notoriously difficult protein to inhibit therapeutically. Systemic delivery of the unformulated ASO, AZD9150, decreased STAT3 expression in a broad range of preclinical cancer models and showed antitumor activity in lymphoma and lung cancer models. AZD9150 preclinical activity translated into single-agent antitumor activity in patients with highly treatment-refractory lymphoma and non-small cell lung cancer in a phase 1 dose-escalation study. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of chitosan nanoparticles carrying NF-κB/p65 antisense oligonucleotide in RAW264.7 macropghage stimulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Shen, Chuan-an; Gao, Lei; Li, Da-wei; Shang, Yu-ru; Yin, Kai; Zhao, Dong-xu; Cheng, Wen-feng; Quan, Dong-qin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this present study is to prepare NF-κB/p65 antisense oligonucleotide loaded chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluate their physicochemical characterization and antisense effects in RAW264.7 macrophages. Condensed nanoparticles with mean particle size of 128±16nm, average Zeta potential of 19.6±6.3mV and high entrapment efficiency (EE) of 98.6±0.11% were formed between NF-κB/p65 antisense gene (NAG) and chitosan by complex coacervation method. Trypan blue staining and MTT tests showed that NAG chitosan NPs had no toxic effect on RAW264.7 macrophages when the dose was no more than 20μg/mL. Confocal microscopy images showed that NAG chitosan NPs were capable to deliver NAG into cytoplasm of RAW264.7 macrophages and finally into nucleus. Real-time PCR tests verified that NAG chitosan NPs could significantly decrease the mRNA expression level of NF-κB/p65 and inflammatory cytokines including TNF-ɑ, IL-1 and IL-6. Accordingly, western blot study showed that NAG NPs uptaken in the cells could efficiently reversed the expression of NF-κB/p65 protein induced by LPS. At last, downstream release level of inflammatory factors including TNF-ɑ, IL-1 and IL-6 in LPS stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages was significantly decreased after treated by NAG chitosan NPs. It could be concluded that chitosan NPs were excellent delivery vectors to ferry the NAG into the cytoplasm and nucleus of macrophages. The NAG chitosan NPs might be a novel therapeutic apparatus for the treatment of LPS induced sepsis by inhibiting NF-κB-related pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion.

  4. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by prov...

  5. Evaluation of the effects of chemically different linkers on hepatic accumulations, cell tropism and gene silencing ability of cholesterol-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shunsuke; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Fumito; Sawamura, Motoki; Waki, Reiko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2016-03-28

    Cholesterol conjugation of oligonucleotides is an attractive way to deliver the oligonucleotides specifically to the liver. However cholesterol-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) mainly accumulate in non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) such as Kupffer cells. In this study, to increase the hepatic accumulation of cholesterol-conjugated ASOs, we prepared a variety of linkers for cholesterol conjugation to anti-Pcsk9 ASOs and examined their effects on pharmacological parameters. Hepatic accumulation of ASO was dramatically increased with cholesterol conjugation. The increase in hepatic accumulation depended largely on the linker chemistry of each cholesterol-conjugated ASO. In addition to hepatic accumulation, the cell tropism of each cholesterol-conjugated ASO tended to depend on their linker. Although a linker bearing a disulfide bond accumulated mainly in NPCs, hexamethylene succinimide linker accumulated mainly in hepatocytes. To estimate the benefits of releasing ASO from the conjugated cholesterol in hepatocyte, we designed another linker based on hexamethylene succinimide, which has a phosphodiester bond between the linker and the ASO. The cholesterol-conjugated ASO bearing such a phosphodiester bond showed a significantly improved Pcsk9 mRNA inhibitory effect compared to its counterpart, cholesterol-conjugated ASO with a phosphorothioate bond, while the hepatic accumulation of both cholesterol-conjugated ASOs was comparable, indicating the effectiveness of removing the conjugated cholesterol for ASO activity. In toxicity analysis, some of the linkers induced lethal toxicities when they were injected at high concentrations (>600μM). These toxicities were attributed to decreased platelet levels in the blood, suggesting an interaction between cholesterol-conjugated ASO and platelets. Our findings may provide a guideline for the design of molecule-conjugated ASOs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of 2'-O-methyl/thiophosphonoacetate-modified antisense oligonucleotides on huntingtin expression in patient-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Masayuki; Threlfall, Richard N; Caruthers, Marvin H; Corey, David R

    2014-12-15

    Optimizing oligonucleotides as therapeutics will require exploring how chemistry can be used to enhance their effects inside cells. To achieve this goal it will be necessary to fully explore chemical space around the native DNA/RNA framework to define the potential of diverse chemical modifications. In this report we examine the potential of thiophosphonoacetate (thioPACE)-modified 2'-O-methyl oligoribonucleotides as inhibitors of human huntingtin (HTT) expression. Inhibition occurred, but was less than with analogous locked nucleic acid (LNA)-substituted oligomers lacking the thioPACE modification. These data suggest that thioPACE oligonucleotides have the potential to control gene expression inside cells. However, advantages relative to other modifications were not demonstrated. Additional modifications are likely to be necessary to fully explore any potential advantages of thioPACE substitutions.

  7. Non-hybridization saturable mechanisms play a role in the uptake of (68)Ga-Labeled LNA-DNA mixmer antisense oligonucleotides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvai, Gabor; Monazzam, Azita; Velikyan, Irina; Eriksson, Barbro; Josephsson, Raymond; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats; Estrada, Sergio

    2009-09-01

    Oligonucleotides (ODN) are key molecules for the aim of preventing translation of a gene product or monitoring gene expression in tissues. However, multiple methodological and biological hurdles need to be solved before in vivo application in humans will be possible. For positron emission tomography (PET) investigations, a 20-mer DNA-locked nucleic acid (LNA) mixmer ODN specific for rat chromogranin-A mRNA was labeled with (68)Ga and its uptake was examined in vivo in rats with and without blocking of scavenger receptors by polyribonucleotides. In addition, uptake studies of (68)Ga-LNA were performed with respect to time and concentration in human and rat cell lines. The human cell lines did not express the target mRNA. Both polyinosinic acid (poly-I) and polyadenylic acid (poly-A) reduced the uptake in rat tissues and in human cell lines. Poly-I was found to be more effective in the liver whereas poly-A was more effective in the kidney. In addition, the blockade by poly-I was statistically significant in the pancreas, adrenal gland, bone marrow, intestine, testis, urinary bladder, muscle, parotid gland, and heart, whereas poly-A also caused significant reduction in pancreas, adrenal gland, and bone marrow but not as much as in kidney. Cell culture study showed a 2-phase dose-dependent uptake characteristic with a saturable and a passive diffusion-like phase; however, these 2 phases were not so well expressed in the rat cell line. The results suggest that scavenger receptors or other saturable processes unrelated to hybridization may be involved in the tissue uptake of (68)Ga-LNA and in the clearance of antisense ODN through the liver, kidney, spleen, and bone marrow. The fact that these processes may be sequence-dependent suggests that proof of in vivo hybridization through imaging may not be obtained by only comparing sense and antisense sequences and proving dose-dependency.

  8. Effect of 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] modification on activity of gapmer antisense oligonucleotides containing 2',4'-constrained 2'-O-ethyl nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay K; Nowak, Anna; Perkins, Jake; Ferng, Annie; Prakash, Thazha P

    2015-04-15

    We evaluated the effect of combining 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] (2'-O-DMAEOE), a 2'-cationic modification, with a 2',4'-constrained 2'-O-ethyl nucleic acid (cEt BNA) on the activity of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) using PTEN as a model target. Our results suggest that replacing one cEt BNA nucleotide with 2'-O-DMAEOE nucleotide at the 5'-end of a 2-10-2 gapmer ASO maintained the potency relative to parent ASO in liver. The cationic 2'-O-DMAEOE modification did not improve the activity of ASO in extra-hepatic tissues. Results from this study provide guidance to design improved antisense oligonucleotide drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotide-based Splice Correction for USH2A-associated Retinal Degeneration Caused by a Frequent Deep-intronic Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulfus WN Slijkerman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is the most common cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. The hearing loss can be partly compensated by providing patients with hearing aids or cochlear implants, but the loss of vision is currently untreatable. In general, mutations in the USH2A gene are the most frequent cause of USH explaining up to 50% of all patients worldwide. The first deep-intronic mutation in the USH2A gene (c.7595-2144A>G was reported in 2012, leading to the insertion of a pseudoexon (PE40 into the mature USH2A transcript. When translated, this PE40-containing transcript is predicted to result in a truncated non-functional USH2A protein. In this study, we explored the potential of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs to prevent aberrant splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA as a consequence of the c.7595-2144A>G mutation. Engineered 2'-O-methylphosphorothioate AONs targeting the PE40 splice acceptor site and/or exonic splice enhancer regions displayed significant splice correction potential in both patient derived fibroblasts and a minigene splice assay for USH2A c.7595-2144A>G, whereas a non-binding sense oligonucleotide had no effect on splicing. Altogether, AON-based splice correction could be a promising approach for the development of a future treatment for USH2A-associated retinitis pigmentosa caused by the deep-intronic c.7595-2144A>G mutation.

  11. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis with antisense oligonucleotides(Cantide) targeting hTERT in an in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-xian LIN; Chao-wei TUO; Qiu-jun L(u); Wei ZHANG; Sheng-qi WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the in vivo antitumor effects of Cantide and the combined effect with 5-fluorouracil. Methods: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma model was established in mice livers orthotopically. Drugs were administered intravenously and tumor sizes were monitored with calipers. Plasma alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were detected by radiation immunoassay. Morphology of tumors was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining of histological sections. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein levels were detected by Western blotting. Results: Cantide significantly inhibit in situ human hepatocellular compared to the saline group in a dose-dependent manner, which included injectthe tumor in liver. Cantide was also found to prevent tumor recurrence in the liver and metastasis in the lung, showing a dose-dependent response. When Cantide was administered by iv combined with 5-fluorouracil, it resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth compared to either agent alone treatment group. After the treatment with Cantide alone or combined with 5-fluorouracil, plasma AFP concentration decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that Cantide was an effective antitumor antisense oligonucleotide in vivo and has the potential to be developed into a clinical anti-cancer drug.

  12. Thermo-Responsive Complexes of c-Myc Antisense Oligonucleotide with Block Copolymer of Poly(OEGMA) and Quaternized Poly(4-Vinylpyridine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuzogullari, Murat; Elalmis, Yeliz Basaran; Isoglu, Sevil Dincer

    2017-04-01

    Solution behavior of thermo-responsive polymers and their complexes with biological macromolecules may be affected by environmental conditions, such as the concentration of macromolecular components, pH, ion concentration, etc. Therefore, a thermo-responsive polymer and its complexes should be characterized in detail to observe their responses against possible environments under physiological conditions before biological applications. To briefly indicate this important issue, thermo-responsive block copolymer of quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) and poly(oligoethyleneglycol methyl ether methacrylate) as a potential nonviral vector has been synthesized. Polyelectrolyte complexes of this copolymer with the antisense oligonucleotide of c-Myc oncogene are also thermo-responsive but, have lower LCST (lower critical solution temperature) values compared to individual copolymer. LCST values of complexes decrease with molar ratio of macromolecular components and presence of salt. Dilution of solutions also affects solution behavior of complexes and causes a significant decrease in size and an increase in LCST, which indicates possible effects of severe dilutions in the blood stream.

  13. Antisense 2'-Deoxy, 2'-Fluoroarabino Nucleic Acid (2'F-ANA) Oligonucleotides: In Vitro Gymnotic Silencers of Gene Expression Whose Potency Is Enhanced by Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souleimanian, Naira; Deleavey, Glen F; Soifer, Harris; Wang, Sijian; Tiemann, Katrin; Damha, Masad J; Stein, Cy A

    2012-01-01

    Gymnosis is the process of the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to cells, in the absence of any carriers or conjugation, that produces sequence-specific gene silencing. While gymnosis was originally demonstrated using locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, 2'-deoxy-2'fluoroarabino nucleic acid (2'F-ANA) phosphorothioate gapmer oligonucleotides (oligos) when targeted to the Bcl-2 and androgen receptor (AR) mRNAs in multiple cell lines in tissue culture, are approximately as effective at silencing of Bcl-2 expression as the iso-sequential LNA congeners. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, gymnotic silencing of the AR by a 2'F-ANA phosphorothioate gapmer oligo led to downstream silencing of cellular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression even in the presence of the androgenic steroid R1881 (metribolone), which stabilizes cytoplasmic levels of the AR. Furthermore, gymnotic silencing occurs in the absence of serum, and silencing by both LNA and 2'F-ANA oligos is augmented in serum-free (SF) media in some cell lines when they are treated with oleic acid and a variety of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-6 PUFAs), but not by an aliphatic (palmitic) fatty acid. These results significantly expand our understanding of and ability to successfully manipulate the cellular delivery of single-stranded oligos in vitro.

  14. Impact of patient characteristics on the clinical efficacy of mongersen (GED-0301), an oral Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide, in active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, G; Di Sabatino, A; Ardizzone, S; Pallone, F; Usiskin, K; Zhan, X; Rossiter, G; Neurath, M F

    2016-03-01

    In a phase 2 study, mongersen, an oral antisense oligonucleotide targeting Smad7, was effective in inducing clinical remission in approximately 60% of patients with active Crohn's disease (CD). In a post hoc analysis to evaluate those patient disease characteristics that may have influenced the efficacy and safety of mongersen therapy. Patients with steroid-dependent/resistant, active CD were randomised to mongersen 10, 40 or 160 mg/day or placebo for 2 weeks; patients were followed for 10 weeks. Clinical remission [Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score 260. Additional patient baseline and disease characteristics were explored. Clinical remission and response rates were significantly higher in patients receiving mongersen 40 and 160 mg/day but not 10 mg/day vs. placebo and independent of disease duration and hsCRP. Patients with baseline CDAI ≤260 had significantly higher remission rates with 40 and 160 mg/day. In patients with baseline CDAI >260, remission rates were statistically greater with 160 mg/day and numerically better with 40 mg/day vs. placebo. Adverse event rates were similar across treatment groups. Mongersen was safe and well tolerated. Patients with higher CDAI scores achieved clinical remission most frequently with the highest mongersen dose. Disease duration and baseline human serum C-reactive protein did not appear to significantly impact efficacy of mongersen in this study (EudraCT Number: 2011-002640-27.). © 2016 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of sodium lactate Ringer's injection on transfection of human protein kinase C-α antisense oligonucleotide in A549 lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z H; Sun, W W; Han, Y L; Ma, Z

    2016-08-26

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of four solutions [Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), sodium lactate Ringer's injection (SLRI), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and NaCl] on the transfection of the human protein kinase C-a antisense oligonucleotide (PKC-a ASO) aprinocarsen in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Specifically, SLRI, DMEM, PBS, or NaCl were used as the growth solutions for A549 cells, and OPTI-MEM was used as the PKC-a ASO diluent for transfection. Additionally, SLRI, DMEM, PBS, or NaCl were used as both the growth solutions and diluents for transfection. The cell viability and transfection efficiency were determined. The results demonstrated that when SLRI was used as either the growth solution or both the growth solution and diluent for aprinocarsen transfection in A549 cells, the effects were close to the best effects observed with DMEM as the growth solution and OPTI-MEM as the diluent, which supported the transfection of aprinocarsen into the cells. Moreover, SLRI resulted in higher transfection efficiency than those of PBS and NaCl. In in vitro experiments, aprinocarsen effectively induced apoptosis in A549 cells. In conclusion, SLRI may replace PBS or NaCl in clinical trials as a transfection solution readily accepted by the human body. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the use of SLRI as a transfection solution in lung-cancer cell lines.

  16. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Sebastien A; Hart, Christopher E; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Crooke, Stanley T; Henry, Scott P

    2016-03-18

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Clinical and preclinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mipomersen (kynamro(®)): a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of apolipoprotein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Baker, Brenda F; Crooke, Stanley T

    2015-02-01

    Mipomersen (Kynamro(®)), a second-generation 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), inhibits the synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB) and is indicated in the US as an adjunct therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) at a dose of 200 mg subcutaneously (SC) once weekly. The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of mipomersen are generally consistent across all species studied, including mouse, rat, monkey, and humans. After SC administration, mipomersen is rapidly and extensively absorbed. It has an apparent plasma and tissue terminal elimination half-life of approximately 30 days. Mipomersen achieves steady-state tissue concentrations within approximately 4-6 months of once-weekly dosing. It does not exhibit PK-based drug-drug interactions with other concomitant medications, either involving competition for plasma protein binding or alterations in disposition of any evaluated drugs. Furthermore, mipomersen does not prolong the corrected QT (QTc) interval. There have been no ethnic- or gender-related differences in PK observed. In clinical trials, both as a single agent and in the presence of maximal lipid-lowering therapy, mipomersen has demonstrated significant dose-dependent reductions in all measured apoB-containing atherogenic lipoproteins. Overall, mipomersen has well-characterized PK and pharmacodynamic properties in both animals and humans, and is an efficacious adjunct treatment for patients with HoFH.

  18. Local and systemic tolerability of a 2'O-methoxyethyl antisense oligonucleotide targeting interleukin-4 receptor-α delivery by inhalation in mouse and monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Robert A; Templin, Michael V; McDonald, Jacob D; Yu, Rosie Z; Hutt, Julie A; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Henry, Scott P; Reed, Matthew D

    2014-07-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) bind and facilitate degradation of RNA and inhibit protein expression in pathways not easily targeted with small molecules or antibodies. Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 potentiate signaling through the shared IL-4 receptor-α (IL-4Rα) subunit of their receptors. ASO targeting of IL-4Rα mRNA in a mouse model of asthma led to attenuation of airway hyperactivity, demonstrating potential benefit in asthma patients. This study focused on tolerability of inhaled IL-4Rα-targeting ASOs. Toxicity studies were performed with mouse- (ISIS 23189) and human-specific (ISIS 369645) sequences administered by inhalation. Four week (monkey) or 13 week (mouse) repeat doses at levels of up to 15 mg/kg/exposure (exp) and 50 mg/kg/exp, respectively, demonstrated dose-dependent effects limited to increases in macrophage size and number in lung and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The changes were largely non-specific, reflecting adaptive responses that occur during active exposure and deposition of ASO and other material in the lung. Reversibility was observed at a rate consistent with the kinetics of tissue clearance of ASO. Systemic bioavailability was minimal, and no systemic toxicity was observed at exposure levels appreciably above pharmacological doses and doses proposed for clinical trials.

  19. Restoration of correct splicing in IVSI-110 mutation of β-globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides: implications and applications in functional assay development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Mansoori Derakhshan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs to restore normal splicing by blocking the recognition of aberrant splice sites by the spliceosome represents an innovative means of potentially controlling certain inherited disorders affected by aberrant splicing. Selection of the appropriate target site is essential in the success of an AO therapy. In this study, in search for a splice model system to facilitate the evaluation of AOs to redirect defective splicing of IVSI-110 β-globin intron, an EGFP-based IVSI-110 specific cellular reporter assay system has been developed and a number of AOs were tested in this cellular splicing assay. Materials and Methods: A recombinant plasmid (pEGFP/I-110 carrying the EGFP gene interrupted by a mutated human β-globin intron 1 (IVSI-110 was developed and transfected into K562 cells. A number of AOs with a 2’-O-methyl oligoribonucleotide (2’-O-Me backbone system were systematically tested in this cellular splicing assay. Results: The mutation in the intron causes aberrant splicing of EGFP pre-mRNA, preventing translation of EGFP; however, treatment of the cells with specific concentration of a sequence specific 2’-O-Me AO targeted to the aberrant splice site induced correct splicing and resulted in restoring of EGFP activity. Conclusion: This cellular splicing assay provides a novel functional assay system in assessing the cellular delivery efficiency of AOs and therapeutic effect of AOs in restoration of aberrant splicing.

  20. Gain of Toxicity from ALS/FTD-Linked Repeat Expansions in C9ORF72 Is Alleviated by Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting GGGGCC-Containing RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Gendron, Tania F; Saberi, Shahram; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Seelman, Amanda; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Drenner, Kevin; Schulte, Derek; Chun, Seung; Sun, Shuying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Myers, Brian; Engelhardt, Jeffery; Katz, Melanie; Baughn, Michael; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Marsala, Martin; Watt, Andy; Heyser, Charles J; Ard, M Colin; De Muynck, Louis; Daughrity, Lillian M; Swing, Deborah A; Tessarollo, Lino; Jung, Chris J; Delpoux, Arnaud; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Hedrick, Stephen M; de Jong, Pieter J; Edbauer, Dieter; Van Damme, Philip; Petrucelli, Leonard; Shaw, Christopher E; Bennett, C Frank; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Cleveland, Don W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2016-05-04

    Hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are the most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Disease mechanisms were evaluated in mice expressing C9ORF72 RNAs with up to 450 GGGGCC repeats or with one or both C9orf72 alleles inactivated. Chronic 50% reduction of C9ORF72 did not provoke disease, while its absence produced splenomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and mild social interaction deficits, but not motor dysfunction. Hexanucleotide expansions caused age-, repeat-length-, and expression-level-dependent accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins synthesized by AUG-independent translation, accompanied by loss of hippocampal neurons, increased anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. Single-dose injection of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target repeat-containing RNAs but preserve levels of mRNAs encoding C9ORF72 produced sustained reductions in RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins, and ameliorated behavioral deficits. These efforts identify gain of toxicity as a central disease mechanism caused by repeat-expanded C9ORF72 and establish the feasibility of ASO-mediated therapy.

  1. Antisense Oligonucleotides Promote Exon Inclusion and Correct the Common c.-32-13T>G GAA Splicing Variant in Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van der Wal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common variant causing Pompe disease is c.-32-13T>G (IVS1 in the acid α-glucosidase (GAA gene, which weakens the splice acceptor of GAA exon 2 and induces partial and complete exon 2 skipping. It also allows a low level of leaky wild-type splicing, leading to a childhood/adult phenotype. We hypothesized that cis-acting splicing motifs may exist that could be blocked using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs to promote exon inclusion. To test this, a screen was performed in patient-derived primary fibroblasts using a tiling array of U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA-based AONs. This resulted in the identification of a splicing regulatory element in GAA intron 1. We designed phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer-based AONs to this element, and these promoted exon 2 inclusion and enhanced GAA enzyme activity to levels above the disease threshold. These results indicate that the common IVS1 GAA splicing variant in Pompe disease is subject to negative regulation, and inhibition of a splicing regulatory element using AONs is able to restore canonical GAA splicing and endogenous GAA enzyme activity.

  2. Effect of transfection with PLP2 antisense oligonucleotides on gene expression of cadmium-treated MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Alessandra; Librizzi, Mariangela; Luparello, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cadmium (Cd) is able to regulate gene expression, drastically affecting the pattern of transcriptional activity in human normal and pathological cells. We have already shown that exposure of MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells to 5 μM CdCl(2) for 96 h, apart from significantly affecting mitochondrial metabolism, induces modifications of the expression level of genes coding for members of stress response-, mitochondrial respiration-, MAP kinase-, NF-κB-, and apoptosis-related pathways. In the present study, we have expanded the knowledge on the biological effects of Cd-breast cancer cell interactions, indicating PLP2 (proteolipid protein-2) as a novel member of the list of Cd-upregulated genes by MDA-MB231 cancer cells and, through the application of transfection techniques with specific antisense oligonucleotides, we have demonstrated that such over-expression may be an upstream event to some of the changes of gene expression levels already observed in Cd-treated cells, thus unveiling new possible molecular relationship between PLP2 and genes linked to the stress and apoptotic responses.

  3. Depressive Effect of the Antisense Oligonucleotides of C-myc and PCNA on the Proliferation of VSMC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingxian Li; Yanfu Wang; Yuhua Liao; Huiling Zhang; Yanying Jiang

    2007-01-01

    To study the depressive effect of the antisense oligonuceotides (ASODN) of c-myc and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on the proliferation of VSMC.Methods Taking the VSMC obtained from rat aorta thoracalis cultured 4 ~ 8 generation as research object.The objects were divided into three groups to carry out control study:control group,PCNA ASODN group and c-myc ASODN group.The ASODNs' working concentration all were 1:50.The depressive effect of ASODN on VSMC proliferation was investigated by cell counting,MTT and 3H-TdR incorporation assay;PCNA and c-myc expression were detected by immunohistochemical method after transferring PCNA successfully;the corresponding gene was inhibited obviously;compared with control group ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions PCNA and c-myc might play a considerable role in the VSMC proliferation process.The corresponding gene could be depressed successfully after transferring PCNA and c-myc ASODN into VSMC,and then the proliferation of VSMC was slowed down.This study presented a beneficial proposal and theoretical fundament for atherosclerotic treatment.

  4. Modulation of p53 Expression Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Complementary to the 5′-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA In Vitro and in the Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorska, Agnieszka; Swiatkowska, Agata; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiolka, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is a key player in cell response to stress events and cancer prevention. However, up-regulation of p53 that occurs during radiotherapy of some tumours results in radio-resistance of targeted cells. Recently, antisense oligonucleotides have been used to reduce the p53 level in tumour cells which facilitates their radiation-induced apoptosis. Here we describe the rational design of antisense oligomers directed against the 5′-terminal region of p53 mRNA aimed to inhibit the synthesis of p53 protein and its ΔNp53 isoform. A comprehensive analysis of the sites accessible to oligomer hybridization in this mRNA region was performed. Subsequently, translation efficiency from the initiation codons for both proteins in the presence of selected oligomers was determined in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in MCF-7 cells. The antisense oligomers with 2′-OMe and LNA modifications were used to study the mechanism of their impact on translation. It turned out that the remaining RNase H activity of the lysate contributed to modulation of protein synthesis efficiency which was observed in the presence of antisense oligomers. A possibility of changing the ratio of the newly synthetized p53 and ΔNp53 in a controlled manner was revealed which is potentially very attractive considering the relationship between the functioning of these two proteins. Selected antisense oligonucleotides which were designed based on accessibility mapping of the 5′-terminal region of p53 mRNA were able to significantly reduce the level of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells. One of these oligomers might be used in the future as a support treatment in anticancer therapy. PMID:24244378

  5. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  6. Determination of cellular uptake and intracellular levels of Cenersen (Aezea(®), EL625), a p53 antisense oligonucleotide in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alachkar, Houda; Xie, Zhiliang; Marcucci, Guido; Chan, Kenneth K

    2012-12-01

    TP53 encodes for tumor protein p53. The suppression of p53 protein results in interruption of DNA repair mechanisms in dividing malignant cells thereby increasing the DNA damage and activating p53-independent mechanisms of apoptosis. This ultimately may translate into enhanced cytotoxic effects of standard chemotherapy. Based on this rationale, Cenersen, a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide antisense to p53-mRNA was synthesized and tested in clinical trials for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). An important component of Cenersen clinical development is to develop a sensitive and specific method to quantify plasma and intracellular levels of Cenersen in different biologic matrices in order to determine tissue and intracellular distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. Ultimately, this will allow us to determine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship for dose-effect correlation and design effective regimen to be rapidly translate into the clinic. An ELISA-based assay was adapted for assay development and validation of Cenersen in mouse plasma and cell lysate. Cellular uptake of Cenersen was studied in MV4-11 and KASUMI-1 AML cell lines. Real-time RT-PCR was used to measure P53-mRNA expression changes in treated cells. The assay had a limit of quantification of 35pmol/L in mouse plasma. Within-day and between-day precision of oligonucleotides was 0.06% and 0.4%, respectively. Cenersen was stable in mouse plasma up to 8h at 37°C. When exposed to 0.1-1μmol/L Cenersen, MV4-11 and KASUMI-1 cells showed intracellular concentration in the range of 9.97-45.34nmol/mg protein and 0.1-2.1nmol/mg protein, respectively. Successful downregulation of p53-mRNA expression was observed in Cenersen treated cells. This ELISA-based assay was applicable to plasma and intracellular concentration measurement of Cenersen. Assessment of achievable concentration of Cenersen in different biologic matrices will be useful to elucidate the biological and clinical

  7. Comparison of hepatic transcription profiles of locked ribonucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides: evidence of distinct pathways contributing to non-target mediated toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Koza-Taylor, Petra H; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Nelms, Linda F; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Hollingshead, Brett D; Burdick, Andrew D; Reed, Lori A; Warneke, James A; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2014-03-01

    Development of LNA gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by non-target mediated hepatotoxicity issues. In the present study, we investigated hepatic transcription profiles of mice administered non-toxic and toxic LNA gapmers. After repeated administration, a toxic LNA gapmer (TS-2), but not a non-toxic LNA gapmer (NTS-1), caused hepatocyte necrosis and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels. Microarray data revealed that, in addition to gene expression patterns consistent with hepatotoxicity, 17 genes in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway were altered in the TS-2 group. TS-2 significantly down-regulated myosin 1E (Myo1E), which is involved in release of clathrin-coated pits from plasma membranes. To map the earliest transcription changes associated with LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity, a second microarray analysis was performed using NTS-1, TS-2, and a severely toxic LNA gapmer (HTS-3) at 8, 16, and 72 h following a single administration in mice. The only histopathological change observed was minor hepatic hypertrophy in all LNA groups across time points. NTS-1, but not 2 toxic LNA gapmers, increased immune response genes at 8 and 16 h but not at 72 h. TS-2 significantly perturbed the CME pathway only at 72 h, while Myo1E levels were decreased at all time points. In contrast, HTS-3 modulated DNA damage pathway genes at 8 and 16 h and also modulated the CME pathway genes (but not Myo1E) at 16 h. Our results may suggest that different LNAs modulate distinct transcriptional genes and pathways contributing to non-target mediated hepatotoxicity in mice.

  8. Identification and characterization of modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting DMPK in mice and nonhuman primates for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay K; Wheeler, Thurman M; Justice, Samantha L; Kim, Aneeza; Younis, Husam S; Gattis, Danielle; Jauvin, Dominic; Puymirat, Jack; Swayze, Eric E; Freier, Susan M; Bennett, C Frank; Thornton, Charles A; MacLeod, A Robert

    2015-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. DM1 is caused by an expanded CTG repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of DMPK, the gene encoding dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK). Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing 2',4'-constrained ethyl-modified (cEt) residues exhibit a significantly increased RNA binding affinity and in vivo potency relative to those modified with other 2'-chemistries, which we speculated could translate to enhanced activity in extrahepatic tissues, such as muscle. Here, we describe the design and characterization of a cEt gapmer DMPK ASO (ISIS 486178), with potent activity in vitro and in vivo against mouse, monkey, and human DMPK. Systemic delivery of unformulated ISIS 486718 to wild-type mice decreased DMPK mRNA levels by up to 90% in liver and skeletal muscle. Similarly, treatment of either human DMPK transgenic mice or cynomolgus monkeys with ISIS 486178 led to up to 70% inhibition of DMPK in multiple skeletal muscles and ∼50% in cardiac muscle in both species. Importantly, inhibition of DMPK was well tolerated and was not associated with any skeletal muscle or cardiac toxicity. Also interesting was the demonstration that the inhibition of DMPK mRNA levels in muscle was maintained for up to 16 and 13 weeks post-treatment in mice and monkeys, respectively. These results demonstrate that cEt-modified ASOs show potent activity in skeletal muscle, and that this attractive therapeutic approach warrants further clinical investigation to inhibit the gain-of-function toxic RNA underlying the pathogenesis of DM1. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Digital Droplet PCR for the Absolute Quantification of Exon Skipping Induced by Antisense Oligonucleotides in (Pre-)Clinical Development for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, Ruurd C.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Datson, Nicole A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) aim to induce skipping of a specific exon of the dystrophin transcript during pre-mRNA splicing. This results in restoration of the open reading frame and consequently synthesis of a dystrophin protein with a shorter yet functional central rod domain. To monitor the molecular therapeutic effect of exon skip-inducing AONs in clinical studies, accurate quantification of pre- and post-treatment exon skip levels is required. With the recent introduction of 3rd generation digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), a state-of-the-art technology became available which allows absolute quantification of transcript copy numbers with and without specific exon skip with high precision, sensitivity and reproducibility. Using Taqman assays with probes targeting specific exon-exon junctions, we here demonstrate that ddPCR reproducibly quantified cDNA fragments with and without exon 51 of the DMD gene over a 4-log dynamic range. In a comparison of conventional nested PCR, qPCR and ddPCR using cDNA constructs with and without exon 51 mixed in different molar ratios using, ddPCR quantification came closest to the expected outcome over the full range of ratios (0–100%), while qPCR and in particular nested PCR overestimated the relative percentage of the construct lacking exon 51. Highest accuracy was similarly obtained with ddPCR in DMD patient-derived muscle cells treated with an AON inducing exon 51 skipping. We therefore recommend implementation of ddPCR for quantification of exon skip efficiencies of AONs in (pre)clinical development for DMD. PMID:27612288

  10. Inefficient cationic lipid-mediated siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide transfer to airway epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cationic lipid Genzyme lipid (GL 67 is the current "gold-standard" for in vivo lung gene transfer. Here, we assessed, if GL67 mediated uptake of siRNAs and asODNs into airway epithelium in vivo. Methods Anti-lacZ and ENaC (epithelial sodium channel siRNA and asODN were complexed to GL67 and administered to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo Transfection efficiency and efficacy were assessed using real-time RT-PCR as well as through protein expression and functional studies. In parallel in vitro experiments were carried out to select the most efficient oligonucleotides. Results In vitro, GL67 efficiently complexed asODNs and siRNAs, and both were stable in exhaled breath condensate. Importantly, during in vitro selection of functional siRNA and asODN we noted that asODNs accumulated rapidly in the nuclei of transfected cells, whereas siRNAs remained in the cytoplasm, a pattern consistent with their presumed site of action. Following in vivo lung transfection siRNAs were only visible in alveolar macrophages, whereas asODN also transfected alveolar epithelial cells, but no significant uptake into conducting airway epithelial cells was seen. SiRNAs and asODNs targeted to β-galactosidase reduced βgal mRNA levels in the airway epithelium of K18-lacZ mice by 30% and 60%, respectively. However, this was insufficient to reduce protein expression. In an attempt to increase transfection efficiency of the airway epithelium, we increased contact time of siRNA and asODN using the in vivo mouse nose model. Although highly variable and inefficient, transfection of airway epithelium with asODN, but not siRNA, was now seen. As asODNs more effectively transfected nasal airway epithelial cells, we assessed the effect of asODN against ENaC, a potential therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis; no decrease in ENaC mRNA levels or function was detected. Conclusion This study suggests that although siRNAs and asODNs can be developed to inhibit

  11. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting apolipoprotein(a) in people with raised lipoprotein(a): two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Nicholas J; van Capelleveen, Julian C; Geary, Richard S; Xia, Shuting; Tami, Joseph A; Yu, Rosie Z; Marcovina, Santica M; Hughes, Steven G; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-11-05

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a highly prevalent (around 20% of people) genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis, but no approved specific therapy exists to substantially lower Lp(a) concentrations. We aimed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of two unique antisense oligonucleotides designed to lower Lp(a) concentrations. We did two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In a phase 2 trial (done in 13 study centres in Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and the UK), we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)Rx, an oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein(a). Participants with elevated Lp(a) concentrations (125-437 nmol/L in cohort A; ≥438 nmol/L in cohort B) were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio in cohort A and in a 4:1 ratio in cohort B) with an interactive response system to escalating-dose subcutaneous IONIS-APO(a)Rx (100 mg, 200 mg, and then 300 mg, once a week for 4 weeks each) or injections of saline placebo, once a week, for 12 weeks. Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in fasting plasma Lp(a) concentration at day 85 or 99 in the per-protocol population (participants who received more than six doses of study drug) and safety and tolerability in the safety population. In a phase 1/2a first-in-man trial, we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)-LRx, a ligand-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide designed to be highly and selectively taken up by hepatocytes, at the BioPharma Services phase 1 unit (Toronto, ON, Canada). Healthy volunteers (Lp[a] ≥75 nmol/L) were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of 10-120 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in a 3:1 ratio; single-ascending-dose phase), or multiple doses of 10 mg, 20 mg, or 40 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in an 8:2 ratio) at day 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, and 22 (multiple-ascending-dose phase). Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in

  12. Beneficial metabolic effects of CB1R anti-sense oligonucleotide treatment in diet-induced obese AKR/J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Tang

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence supports pleiotropic metabolic roles of the cannibinoid-1 receptor (CB1R in peripheral tissues such as adipose, liver, skeletal muscle and pancreas. To further understand the metabolic consequences of specific blockade of CB1R function in peripheral tissues, we performed a 10-week-study with an anti-sense oligonucleotide directed against the CB1R in diet-induced obese (DIO AKR/J mice. DIO AKR/J mice were treated with CB1R ASO Isis-414930 (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg/week or control ASO Isis-141923 (25 mg/kg/week via intraperitoneal injection for 10 weeks. At the end of the treatment, CB1R mRNA from the 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO group in the epididymal fat and kidney was decreased by 81% and 63%, respectively. Body weight gain was decreased in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly different in the 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO group (46.1±1.0 g vs veh, 51.2±0.9 g, p<0.05. Body fat mass was reduced in parallel with attenuated body weight gain. CB1R ASO treatment led to decreased fed glucose level (at week 8, 25 mg/kg/week group, 145±4 mg/dL vs veh, 195±10 mg/dL, p<0.05. Moreover, CB1R ASO treatment dose-dependently improved glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test, whereas control ASO exerted no effect. Liver steatosis was also decreased upon CB1R ASO treatment. At the end of the study, plasma insulin and leptin levels were significantly reduced by 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO treatment. SREBP1 mRNA expression was decreased in both epididymal fat and liver. G6PC and fatty acid translocase/CD36 mRNA levels were also reduced in the liver. In summary, CB1R ASO treatment in DIO AKR/J mice led to improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. The beneficial effects of CB1R ASO treatment strongly support the notion that selective inhibition of the peripheral CB1R, without blockade of central CB1R, may serve as an effective approach for treating type II diabetes, obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Reversing multidrug resistance in Caco-2 by silencing MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, and BCL-2/BCL-xL using liposomal antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Lo

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major impediment to chemotherapy. In the present study, we designed antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs against MDR1, MDR-associated protein (MRP1, MRP2, and/or BCL-2/BCL-xL to reverse MDR transporters and induce apoptosis, respectively. The cationic liposomes (100 nm composed of N-[1-(2,3-dioleyloxypropyl]-n,n,n-trimethylammonium chloride and dioleoyl phosphotidylethanolamine core surrounded by a polyethylene glycol (PEG shell were prepared to carry ASOs and/or epirubicin, an antineoplastic agent. We aimed to simultaneously suppress efflux pumps, provoke apoptosis, and enhance the chemosensitivity of human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells to epirubicin. We evaluated encapsulation efficiency, particle size, cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation, mRNA levels, cell cycle distribution, and caspase activity of these formulations. We found that PEGylated liposomal ASOs significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability and thus intensified epirubicin-mediated apoptosis. These formulations also decreased the MDR1 promoter activity levels and enhanced the intracellular retention of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells. Epirubicin and ASOs in PEGylated liposomes remarkably decreased mRNA expression levels of human MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, and BCL-2. The combined treatments all significantly increased the mRNA expressions of p53 and BAX, and activity levels of caspase-3, -8, and -9. The formulation of epirubicin and ASOs targeting both pump resistance of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2 and nonpump resistance of BCL-2/BCL-xL demonstrated more superior effect to all the other formulations used in this study. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanisms by which PEGylated liposomal ASOs against both resistance types act as activators to epirubicin-induced apoptosis through suppressing MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2, as well as triggering intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. The complicated regulation of MDR highlights the necessity

  14. Intrathecal administration of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 antisense oligonucleotide reverses tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats following chronic compression of dorsal root of ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-jie WEN; Zhang-jun LI; Zhi-xin CHEN; Zhi-yuan FANG; Chen-xiang YANG; Heng LI; Yin-ming ZENG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to elucidate the role of T-subtype calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3) in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain at spinal level. Methods: The chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) rat model was adopted. The antisense oligonucleotide of Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3 or normal saline (NS) were intrathecally administered twice per day from the first day to the fourth day after operation. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw thermal withdrawal latency were measured to evaluate the tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Results: CCD rats developed reliable tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after operation. Intrathecal administration of antisense oligonucleotide of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 significantly relieved tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCD rats, but not Cav3.1. Conclusion: Cav2 and Cav3.3 subtype calcium channels in the spinal cord may play an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, which may contribute to the management of the neuropathic pain.

  15. Short locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides potently reduce apolipoprotein B mRNA and serum cholesterol in mice and non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Fisker, Niels; Hedtjärn, Maj

    2010-01-01

    -life as longer oligonucleotides. Pharmacology studies in both mice and non-human primates were conducted with a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide against apoB, and the data showed that repeated dosing of the 13-mer at 1-2 mg/kg/week was sufficient to provide a significant and long lasting lowering of non...... using the LNA chemistry. Conclusively, we present a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide with therapeutic potential that produce beneficial cholesterol lowering effect in non-human primates....

  16. A novel dual lock method for down-regulation of genes, in which a target mRNA is captured at 2 independent positions by linked locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Ryohei; Makado, Gouki; Kitamura, Ayaka; Watanabe, Hajime; Wada, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NFκB), which is composed of the RelA and p50 subunits, binds to NFκB response elements (NREs) and stimulates the transcription of inflammation-related genes. Here, locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) complementary to the termini of the 3'- and 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the RelA mRNA were generated; these molecules were named 3'-LNA and 5'-LNA, respectively. To evaluate their effects on NFκB activity, HeLa cells were co-transfected with the LNA ASOs and a luciferase reporter gene carrying an NRE. Transfection of the cells with 3'-LNA reduced NFκB activity by 30-40%, without affecting RelA mRNA accumulation. Concomitant transfection of HeLa cells with 5'-LNA and 3'-LNA resulted in a 70% reduction in NFκB activity. Furthermore, partial poly(A) tail shortening occurred in LNA ASO-transfected cells. We also employed triethylene glycol as a spacer to link 5'-LNA and 3'-LNA. Reporter gene assays showed that the spacer-linked LNA ASO reduced NFκB activity similarly to a combination of 5'-LNA and 3'-LNA. In addition, an in vitro translation assay revealed that spacer-linked LNA ASOs inhibited the translation of a target mRNA in a specific manner. In summary, this study describes a novel antisense method capturing the target mRNA at independent positions.

  17. Making Sense of Antisense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Yacyshyn

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the DNA double-stranded helix, the gene as a target of therapy and, moreover, the use of DNA as a drug have been possibilities. ‘Antisense’ is used by some living organisms, specifically viruses, to control gene replication. Only recently, the use of antisense DNA as a mechanism to control human gene translation has been appreciated. A recent report on the use of systemically administered oligonucleotides in human Crohn’s disease is reviewed. DNA antisense oligonucleotides offer a technology capable of unique use at the laboratory bench as well as for highly specific therapeutic drugs. The conceptualization and possible future directions of these exciting compounds are reviewed.

  18. Antisense oligonucleotide against GSK-3β in brain of SAMP8 mice improves learning and memory and decreases oxidative stress: Involvement of transcription factor Nrf2 and implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Susan A; Ripley, Jessica L; Sultana, Rukhsana; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Niehoff, Michael L; Platt, Thomas L; Murphy, M Paul; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in the pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including the heightened levels of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid-beta (Aβ), and neurodegeneration. In this study we used 12-month-old SAMP8 mice, an AD model, to examine the effects GSK-3β may cause regarding the cognitive impairment and oxidative stress associated with AD. To suppress the level of GSK-3β, SAMP8 mice were treated with an antisense oligonucleotide (GAO) directed at this kinase. We measured a decreased level of GSK-3β in the cortex of the mice, indicating the success of the antisense treatment. Learning and memory assessments of the SAMP8 mice were tested post-antisense treatment using an aversive T-maze and object recognition test, both of which observably improved. In cortex samples of the SAMP8 mice, decreased levels of protein carbonyl and protein-bound HNE were measured, indicating decreased oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to increase the level of many antioxidants, including glutathione-S transferase (GST), and is negatively regulated by the activity of GSK-3β. Our results indicated the increased nuclear localization of Nrf2 and level of GST, suggesting the increased activity of the transcription factor as a result of GSK-3β suppression, consistent with the decreased oxidative stress observed. Consistent with the improved learning and memory, and consistent with GSK-3b being a tau kinase, we observed decreased tau phosphorylation in brain of GAO-treated SAMP8 mice compared to that of RAO-treated SAMP8 mice. Lastly, we examined the ability of GAO to cross the blood-brain barrier and determined it to be possible. The results presented in this study demonstrate that reducing GSK-3 with a phosphorothionated antisense against GSK-3 improves learning and memory, reduces oxidative stress, possibly coincident with increased

  19. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Rudolph L

    2016-08-19

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Poly(ester amine) Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Bollinger, Lauren E; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    A series of poly(esteramine)s (PEAs) constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI) and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs), 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2′-OMePS) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2′-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was f...

  1. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach.

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    Agata Swiatkowska

    Full Text Available The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein. 2'-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers' binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors.

  2. Poly(ester amine Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of poly(esteramines (PEAs constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs, 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2′-OMePS and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2′-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was found in the order of PEA 01, PEA 04 > PEA 05 > others. The in vivo study in mdx mice demonstrated enhanced exon-skipping of 2′-OMePS with the order of PEA 06 > PEA 04, PEA 07 > PEA 03 > PEA 01 > others, and much higher than PEI 25k formulated 2′-OMePS. Exon-skipping efficiency of PMO in formulation with the PEAs were significantly enhanced in the order of PEA 02 > PEA 10 > PEA 01, PEA 03 > PEA 05, PEA 07, PEA 08 > others, with PEA 02 reaching fourfold of Endo-porter formulated PMO. PEAs improve PMO delivery more effectively than 2′-OMePS delivery in vivo, and the systemic delivery evaluation further highlight the efficiency of PEA for PMO delivery in all skeletal muscle. The results suggest that the flexibility of PEA polymers could be explored for delivery of different AO chemistries, especially for antisense therapy.

  3. Species-specific inflammatory responses as a primary component for the development of glomerular lesions in mice and monkeys following chronic administration of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kendall S; Sobry, Cécile; Derr, Victoria; Adams, Mike J; Besten, Cathaline Den; De Kimpe, Sjef; Francis, Ian; Gales, Tracy L; Haworth, Richard; Maguire, Shaun R; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Mullins, David; Palate, Bernard; Doorten, Yolanda Ponstein-Simarro; Ridings, James E; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Silvano, Jérémy; Woodfine, Jennie

    2014-07-01

    Chronic administration of drisapersen, a 2'-OMe phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (AON) to mice and monkeys resulted in renal tubular accumulation, with secondary tubular degeneration. Glomerulopathy occurred in both species with species-specific characteristics. Glomerular lesions in mice were characterized by progressive hyaline matrix accumulation, accompanied by the presence of renal amyloid and with subsequent papillary necrosis. Early changes involved glomerular endothelial hypertrophy and degeneration, but the chronic glomerular amyloid and hyaline alterations in mice appeared to be species specific. An immune-mediated mechanism for the glomerular lesions in mice was supported by early inflammatory changes including increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and other immunomodulatory genes within the renal cortex, increased stimulation of CD68 protein, and systemic elevation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1. In contrast, kidneys from monkeys given drisapersen chronically showed less severe glomerular changes characterized by increased mesangial and inflammatory cells, endothelial cell hypertrophy, and subepithelial and membranous electron-dense deposits, with ultrastructural and immunohistochemical characteristics of complement and complement-related fragments. Lesions in monkeys resembled typical features of C3 glomerulopathy, a condition described in man and experimental animals to be linked to dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Thus, inflammatory/immune mechanisms appear critical to glomerular injury with species-specific sensitivities for mouse and monkey. The lower observed proinflammatory activity in humans as compared to mice and monkeys may reflect a lower risk of glomerular injury in patients receiving AON therapy.

  4. Pilot trial of EZN-2968, an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), in patients with refractory solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woondong; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Park, Sook Ryun; Kinders, Robert J; Chen, Alice; Melillo, Giovanni; Turkbey, Baris; Steinberg, Seth M; Choyke, Peter; Doroshow, James H; Kummar, Shivaani

    2014-02-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) facilitates the adaptation of normal and tumor tissues to oxygen deprivation. HIF-1 is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, where it is involved in the upregulation of many genes necessary for survival. EZN-2968 is an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide that specifically targets HIF-1α, one of the subunits of HIF-1. We conducted a trial of EZN-2968 in patients with refractory solid tumors to evaluate antitumor response and to measure modulation of HIF-1α mRNA and protein levels as well as HIF-1 target genes. Adult patients with refractory advanced solid tumors were administered EZN-2968 as a 2-h IV infusion at a dose of 18 mg/kg once a week for three consecutive weeks followed by 3-week off; in a 6-week cycle. Tumor biopsies and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) were performed at baseline and after the third dose. Ten patients were enrolled, of whom all were evaluable for response; one patient with a duodenal neuroendocrine tumor had prolonged stabilization of disease (24 weeks). Reduction in HIF-1α mRNA levels compared to baseline was demonstrated in 4 of 6 patients with paired tumor biopsies. Reductions in levels of HIF-1α protein and mRNA levels of some target genes were observed in two patients. Quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI from two patients revealed changes in K (trans) and k ep. The trial was closed prematurely when the sponsor suspended development of this agent. This trial provides preliminary proof of concept for modulation of HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression and target genes in tumor biopsies following the administration of EZN-2968.

  5. Effects of an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of C-reactive protein synthesis on the endotoxin challenge response in healthy human male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noveck, Robert; Stroes, Erik S G; Flaim, JoAnn D; Baker, Brenda F; Hughes, Steve; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Ridker, Paul M

    2014-07-10

    C-reactive protein (CRP) binds to damaged cells, activates the classical complement pathway, is elevated in multiple inflammatory conditions, and provides prognostic information on risk of future atherosclerotic events. It is controversial, however, as to whether inhibiting CRP synthesis would have any direct anti-inflammatory effects in humans. A placebo-controlled study was used to evaluate the effects of ISIS 329993 (ISIS-CRPR x) on the acute-phase response after endotoxin challenge in 30 evaluable subjects. Healthy adult males were randomly allocated to receive 6 injections over a 22-day period of placebo or active therapy with ISIS 329993 at 400- or 600-mg doses. Eligible subjects were subsequently challenged with a bolus of endotoxin (2 ng/kg). Inflammatory and hematological biomarkers were measured before and serially after the challenge. ISIS-CRPR x was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. Median CRP levels increased more than 50-fold from baseline 24 hours after endotoxin challenge in the placebo group. In contrast, the median increase in CRP levels was attenuated by 37% (400 mg) and 69% (600 mg) in subjects pretreated with ISIS-CRPR x (Pantisense oligonucleotides and provide an investigative tool to further define the role of CRP in human pathological conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Different effects of antisense RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 oligonucleotides on the nuclear factor-κB mediated expression of ICAM-1 in human coronary endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Both Anton

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is one of the key events in early atherosclerosis and restenosis. We hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α induced and NF-κB mediated expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 can be inhibited by antisense RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 oligonucleotides (RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. Results Smooth muscle cells (SMC from human coronary plaque material (HCPSMC, plaque material of 52 patients, SMC from the human coronary media (HCMSMC, human endothelial cells (EC from umbilical veins (HUVEC, and human coronary EC (HCAEC were successfully isolated (HCPSMC, HUVEC, identified and cultured (HCPSMC, HCMSMC, HUVEC, HCAEC. 12 hrs prior to TNF-α stimulus (20 ng/mL, 6 hrs RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 (1, 2, 4, 10, 20, and 30 μM and controls were added for a period of 18 hrs. In HUVEC and HCAEC there was a dose dependent inhibition of ICAM-1 expression after adding of both RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. No inhibitory effect was seen after incubation of HCMSMC with RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. A moderate inhibition of ICAM-1 expression was found after simultaneous addition of RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 to HCPSMC, no inhibitory effect was detected after individual addition of RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. Conclusions The data point out that differences exist in the NF-κB mediated expression of ICAM-1 between EC and SMC. Experimental antisense strategies directed against RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 in early atherosclerosis and restenosis are promising in HCAEC but will be confronted with redundant pathways in HCMSMC and HCPSMC.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Suppression of Muscle Glycogen Synthase 1 Synthesis as an Approach for Substrate Reduction Therapy of Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Clayton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA; EC 3.2.1.20 and the resultant progressive lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human GAA (rhGAA has proven beneficial in addressing several aspects of the disease such as cardiomyopathy and aberrant motor function. However, residual muscle weakness, hearing loss, and the risks of arrhythmias and osteopenia persist despite enzyme therapy. Here, we evaluated the relative merits of substrate reduction therapy (by inhibiting glycogen synthesis as a potential adjuvant strategy. A phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO designed to invoke exon skipping and premature stop codon usage in the transcript for muscle specific glycogen synthase (Gys1 was identified and conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide (GS-PPMO to facilitate PMO delivery to muscle. GS-PPMO systemic administration to Pompe mice led to a dose-dependent decrease in glycogen synthase transcripts in the quadriceps, and the diaphragm but not the liver. An mRNA response in the heart was seen only at the higher dose tested. Associated with these decreases in transcript levels were correspondingly lower tissue levels of muscle specific glycogen synthase and activity. Importantly, these reductions resulted in significant decreases in the aberrant accumulation of lysosomal glycogen in the quadriceps, diaphragm, and heart of Pompe mice. Treatment was without any overt toxicity, supporting the notion that substrate reduction by GS-PPMO-mediated inhibition of muscle specific glycogen synthase represents a viable therapeutic strategy for Pompe disease after further development.

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) LY2181308 as a single-agent or in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erba, Harry P; Sayar, Hamid; Juckett, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Andre, Valerie; Callies, Sophie; Schmidt, Shelly; Kadam, Sunil; Brandt, John T; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Andreeff, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Survivin is expressed in tumor cells, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), regulates mitosis, and prevents tumor cell death. The antisense oligonucleotide sodium LY2181308 (LY2181308) inhibits survivin expression and may cause cell cycle arrest and restore apoptosis in AML. In this study, the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics/efficacy of LY2181308 was examined in AML patients, first in a cohort with monotherapy (n = 8) and then post-amendment in a cohort with the combination of cytarabine and idarubicin treatment (n = 16). LY2181308 was administered with a loading dosage of three consecutive daily infusions of 750 mg followed by weekly intravenous (IV) maintenance doses of 750 mg. Cytarabine 1.5 g/m(2) was administered as a 4-hour IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1, and idarubicin 12 mg/m(2) was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1. Cytarabine and idarubicin were administered on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each subsequent 28-day cycle. Reduction of survivin was evaluated in peripheral blasts and bone marrow. Single-agent LY2181308 was well tolerated and survivin was reduced only in patients with a high survivin expression. In combination with chemotherapy, 4/16 patients had complete responses, 1/16 patients had incomplete responses, and 4/16 patients had cytoreduction. Nine patients died on study: 6 (monotherapy), 3 (combination). LY2181308 alone is well tolerated in patients with AML. In combination with cytarabine and idarubicin, LY2181308 does not appear to cause additional toxicity, and has shown some clinical benefit needing confirmation in future clinical trials.

  9. First-in-human Phase I study of EZN-4176, a locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide to exon 4 of the androgen receptor mRNA in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, D; Omlin, A; Pezaro, C; Lorente, D; Ferraldeschi, R; Mukherji, D; Crespo, M; Figueiredo, I; Miranda, S; Riisnaes, R; Zivi, A; Buchbinder, A; Rathkopf, D E; Attard, G; Scher, H I; de Bono, J; Danila, D C

    2013-11-12

    Prostate cancer remains dependent of androgen receptor (AR) signalling, even after emergence of castration resistance. EZN-4176 is a third-generation antisense oligonucleotide that binds to the hinge region (exon 4) of AR mRNA resulting in full-length AR mRNA degradation and decreased AR protein expression. This Phase I study aimed to evaluate EZN-4176 in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patients with progressing CRPC were eligible; prior abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment were allowed. EZN-4176 was administered as a weekly (QW) 1-h intravenous infusion. The starting dose was 0.5 mg kg(-1) with a 4-week dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) period and a 3+3 modified Fibonacci dose escalation design. After determination of the DLT for weekly administration, an every 2 weeks schedule was initiated. A total of 22 patients were treated with EZN-4176. At 10 mg kg(-1) QW, two DLTs were observed due to grade 3-4 ALT or AST elevation. No confirmed biochemical or soft tissue responses were observed. Of eight patients with <5 circulating tumour cells at baseline, a conversion to <5 was observed in three (38%) patients. The most common EZN-4176-related toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (59%), reversible abnormalities in liver function tests ALT (41%) and AST (41%) and infusion-related reactions including chills (36%) and pyrexia (14%). Activity of EZN-4176 at the doses and schedules explored was minimal. The highest dose of 10 mg kg(-1) QW was associated with significant but reversible transaminase elevation.

  10. Dose-effect relationship of antisense oligonucleotide of type Ⅰ procollagen on hypertrophic scar%Ⅰ型前胶原基因反义核酸对增生性瘢痕作用的量效关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁少海; 利天增; 谢举临; 贲晓松; 唐冰; 罗超权; 何洁华

    2001-01-01

    目的了解Ⅰ型前胶原基因反义寡聚核苷酸对人增生性瘢痕的作用,探讨增生性瘢痕的基因治疗。方法选择120只裸鼠建立增生性瘢痕动物模型,将模型随机分为空白对照组(C组,6只)、RPMI1640组(R组,6只)、反义寡聚核苷酸1(ASONs1)治疗组(54只)及反义寡聚核苷酸2(ASONs1)治疗组(54只),后两组又分为25,50,100 μg/100 μl三个剂量组,每个剂量组又分为治疗7,10,14 d 3组;分别合成位于Ⅰ型前胶原基因5'端翻译区域21 bp的ASONs1和位于第1个外显子与第1个内含子之间22 bp ASONs2,用微注射法分别将两基因片段作用于动物模型,通过测定增生性瘢痕Ⅰ型胶原含量变化、瘢痕体积变化以及运用光、电镜研究不同剂量反义寡聚核苷酸的抑制作用。结果 ASONs1和ASONs2能使瘢痕体积缩小,在治疗10,14 d后,瘢痕组织中Ⅰ型胶原含量降低,与C组和R组比较,差异有显著性意义(P<0.05);光、电镜下见瘢痕结构疏松,胶原纤维变小,成纤维细胞的粗面内质网和线粒体减少,而C组和R组无明显变化。结论 ASONs1和ASONs2能够有效抑制Ⅰ型胶原蛋白的合成,从而抑制瘢痕增生。Z%Objective To investigate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide of type Ⅰ procollagen on hypertrophic scar and to explore a new gene therapy to hypertrophic scar.  Methods The scar models were established in 120 nude mice by a microinjection of ASONs1 and ASONs2. All the mice were divided into blank control group (6 mice), RPMI1640 group (6 mice), ASONs1 treatment group (54 mice) and ASONs2 treatment group (54 mice). The latter 2 groups were subdivided into 25, 50 and 100 μg/μl groups which were further assigned into 3 groups, i.e., 7, 10 and 14 days after treatment. The phosphorothioate ASONs1 and ASONs2 for type Ⅰ collagen used in this study were complementary to type Ⅰ collagen mRNA at the translationregion (21 bp) and at the

  11. Survivin反义寡核苷酸协同Taxol诱导肺癌细胞株凋亡%Effect of Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotide Combined with Taxol on Induced Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈余清; 夏雪梅; 蔡映云; 黄礼年; 李殿明; 胡俊锋

    2005-01-01

    [目的]研究Survivin反义寡核苷酸(antisense oligonucleotide,ASODN)单独或联合Taxol对肺癌细胞株Survivin mRNA和蛋白表达,细胞凋亡,生长抑制率的影响.[方法]Survivin ASODN经脂质体介导转染人小细胞肺癌细胞株NCI-H446,用RT-PCR法、Western blot法检测Survivin表达;Survivin ASODN单独、联合Taxol作用NCI-H446细胞后,用MTT法检测细胞生长抑制率,台盼兰拒染实验检测细胞死亡率,流式细胞仪检测细胞凋亡并计算两药相互作用指数(CDI).[结果]Survivin ASODN转染NCI-H446细胞后,Survivin mRNA表达和蛋白表达明显下调,其中SurvivinASODN 500nM作用72h时Survivin mRNA抑制率达62.72%,效果最佳;Survivin ASODN单独或联合Taxol作用NCI-H446细胞后发现Survivin ASODN联合Taxol作用的效果明显优于两药单独应用(P<0.01).其联用时细胞凋亡率达73.3%,而单用时分别为43.6%和23.8%.其联用时细胞生长抑制率达80.1%,而单用时抑制率分别为50.4%和30.5%(P均<0.01).两药联用组细胞死亡率达69.9%,高于两药单用时的41.4%和24.8%(P均<0.01);CDI值为0.43,表明两药具有显著协同作用.[结论]Survivin ASODN能够抑制肺癌细胞株Survivin mRNA和蛋白表达并诱导肺癌细胞凋亡;Survivin ASODN能够增加Taxol的敏感性.

  12. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most pr...... oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)....

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  14. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  15. Antisense gene therapy using anti-k-ras and antitelomerase oligonucleotides in colorectal cancer Eficacia de la terapia génica antisentido utilizando oligonucleótidos anti K-ras y antitelomerasa en cáncer colorrectal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lledó

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to test the efficacy of anti-k-ras and antitelomerase oligonucleotides for disabling colorectal cancer cell growth. Material and methods: an established human colorectal cancer cell line (SW 480, ATTC® was used. Oligodeoxiribonucleotides (ODNs have a phosphorotioate modification to ensure intracellular intake. We used an antitelomerase ODN (Telp5 and two anti-k-ras ODNs (AS-KRAS and ISIS. AS-KRAS is designed to join the k-ras oncogene's exon 1. ISIS links to the terminal transcription unit 5' of k-ras. Telp5 joins the template region of the hTR telomerase subunit. ODNs have been tested in different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20 micromolar. Cell viability has been tested at 48 and 72 hours. Statistical analysis and graphic design were made with the statistical package "Analyzing Data with GraphPad Prism-1999", GraphPad Sofware Inc., San Diego CA©. We used the Student's t test for statistical analysis. Results: the lowest dose (1 µM was not effective. Using the highest dose (20 mM for 48 hours of combined AS-KRAS and Telp5 cell viability decreased to 99.67%. The rest of results varied depending on ODN type, dose, and exposure time. Conclusions: tested antisense ODNs stop colorectal cancer cell growth, and a combination of anti-telomerase and anti-k-ras is the most useful treatment. Efficacy is best with a higher dose and longer treatment period.Objetivo: evaluar la eficacia de oligonucleótidos anti k-ras y antitelomerasa para detener el crecimiento tumoral en el cáncer colorrectal. Material y métodos: se ha empleado una línea celular establecida de cáncer colorrectal humano (SW 480, ATTC®. Los oligodesoxirribonucleótidos (ODN utilizados en el presente trabajo presentan modificación fosforotioato con el fin de mejorar su estabilidad en presencia de fluidos biológicos. Hemos utilizado un ODN antitelomerasa (Telp5, y dos ODN anti k-ras (AS-KRAS e ISIS. AS-KRAS actúa en el exón 1 e ISIS actúa a nivel de la unidad terminal de

  16. Diversification of antisense research and development: review of the Ringberg meeting, April 1994. Mechanisms of antisense-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J W; Nellen, W

    1994-01-01

    Antisense technology has established itself as a new and vibrant entrant into the discipline of molecular biology. As such, it has contributed to basic research by providing tools for the molecular dissection of diverse experimental systems. In applied research, antisense approaches have contributed to development of agricultural products (D. Grierson) now coming to market and to the design of a number of oligonucleotide drugs, now in clinical trials. However, few activities to date have focused on the study of antisense per se. Further, few conceptual perspectives have regarded antisense as an integral part of cellular function and genetic regulation. The Ringberg conference showcased a number of systems that would seem unrelated if we regard antisense as a superficial tool to be imposed on nature. On the other hand, if we want to begin to regard antisense as a field of its own with deeper biological and genetic rationales, the Ringberg meeting provided much tantalizing evidence to do so.

  17. Effects of antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF on radio sensitivity of uterine cervix cancer Hela cells%血管内皮生长因子反义核酸对宫颈癌Hela细胞的放射增敏作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Xing; Li Qi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on radiosensitivity of uterine cervix cancer Hela cells. Methods: VEGF antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) was transfected into Hela cells by liposome-mediated method. Cells transfected with the oligodeoxynuclecotide and saline were used as control groups. Cells were irradiated by 6 MV X ray at the dose of 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy respectively. The expression of VEGF mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Apoptosis were evaluated using FCM. Cloning efficiency was deter-mined by colony formation assay. Results: The expression of VEGF mRNA was inhibited by ASODN (P < 0.01) in Hela cells. The inhibited activation which was influenced by radiation resulted in increasing apoptosis (P < 0.01) and inhibiting plating efficiency (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The expression of VEGF induced by Ⅹ irradiation in Hela cells can be blocked by VEGF ASODN. Treatment with VEGF might increase apoptosis in HeLa cells and enhance radiosensitivity.

  18. The Chemistry and Biology of Oligonucleotide Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, R.L.; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Short DNA or RNA oligonucleotides have tremendous potential as therapeutic agents. Because of their ability to engage in Watson-Crick base pairing they can interact with messenger mRNA or pre-mRNA targets with high selectivity and thus offer the possibility of precise manipulation of gene expression. This possibility has engendered extensive efforts to develop oligonucleotides as drugs, with many candidates already in clinical trials. However, a major impediment to the maturation of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics is the fact that these relatively large and usually highly charged molecules have great difficulty crossing cellular membranes and thus in penetrating to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. In this Account we first summarize some basic aspects of the biology of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides and then discuss chemical conjugation as an approach to improving the intracellular delivery and therapeutic potential of these agents. Our emphasis will be on the pharmacological ramifications of oligonucleotide conjugates rather than the details of conjugation chemistry. One important approach has been conjugation with ligands designed to bind to particular receptors and thus provide specificity to the interaction of cells with oligonucleotides. Another approach has been to couple antisense or siRNA with agents such as cell penetrating peptides that are designed to provoke escape of the conjugate from intracellular vesicular compartments. Both of these approaches have enjoyed some success. However, there remains much to be learned before oligonucleotide conjugates can find an important place in human therapeutics. PMID:22353142

  19. Identification of sequence motifs significantly associated with antisense activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peek Andrew S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the suppression activity of antisense oligonucleotide sequences is the main goal of the rational design of nucleic acids. To create an effective predictive model, it is important to know what properties of an oligonucleotide sequence associate significantly with antisense activity. Also, for the model to be efficient we must know what properties do not associate significantly and can be omitted from the model. This paper will discuss the results of a randomization procedure to find motifs that associate significantly with either high or low antisense suppression activity, analysis of their properties, as well as the results of support vector machine modelling using these significant motifs as features. Results We discovered 155 motifs that associate significantly with high antisense suppression activity and 202 motifs that associate significantly with low suppression activity. The motifs range in length from 2 to 5 bases, contain several motifs that have been previously discovered as associating highly with antisense activity, and have thermodynamic properties consistent with previous work associating thermodynamic properties of sequences with their antisense activity. Statistical analysis revealed no correlation between a motif's position within an antisense sequence and that sequences antisense activity. Also, many significant motifs existed as subwords of other significant motifs. Support vector regression experiments indicated that the feature set of significant motifs increased correlation compared to all possible motifs as well as several subsets of the significant motifs. Conclusion The thermodynamic properties of the significantly associated motifs support existing data correlating the thermodynamic properties of the antisense oligonucleotide with antisense efficiency, reinforcing our hypothesis that antisense suppression is strongly associated with probe/target thermodynamics, as there are no enzymatic

  20. Effect of a antisense oligonucleotide to noggin on the expression of nestin and GFAP in the hippocampus of adult rats%反义Noggin基因对成年大鼠海马内Nestin及GFAP表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海伟; 范晓棠

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨Noggin基因对成年大鼠海马内Nestin及GFAP表达的影响.方法反义寡核苷酸技术封闭内源性Noggin基因的表达,免疫组化法检测成年大鼠海马内Nestin与GFAP的表达.结果侧脑室连续4 d注射Noggin基因的反义寡核苷酸后,可见海马齿状回(dentate gyrus,DG)内Nestin阳性细胞数与GFAP阳性细胞数较对照组显著增加;室下区GFAP阳性细胞数亦明显增加.结论Noggin对成年海马干细胞的分化有重要作用,内源性Noggin基因的表达可使神经干细胞向神经元方向分化.%Objective To examine the role of noggin on the expression of nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the hippocampus of adult rats. Methods Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) technique was employed to inhibit endogenous noggin expression and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expressions of Nestin and GFAP in the hippocampus of adult rats. Results It was observed that the number of nestin and GFAP immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus was increased in adult rats treated with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to noggin. Moreover, the number of GFAP immunoreactive cells was increased in the subventricular zone of the rats treated with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to noggin. Conclusion The results in the present study indicates that noggin may play a role in the differentiation of neural stem cells in the adult hippocampus, and it promotes the differentiation of neural stem cells in the DG to neuronal fate.

  1. Correction: Liang, J., et al. Antisense Oligonucleotide Against Clusterin Regulates Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invasion Through Transcriptional Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and E-Cadherin. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 10594-10607

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomin Yan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The original version of the paper reports that “OGX-011 is a second generation 21-mer oligonucleotide with a 20-O-(2-methoxy-ethyl modification, generously provided by OncoGenex Technologies (OncoGenex, Vancouver, Canada” [1] (p. 10602. OGX-011 was not provided by OncoGenex Technologies directly. Therefore, we would like to correct the wording to: “OGX-011 was obtained without the benefit of an agreement with OncoGenex, or The University British Columbia, or any other party”. The authors would like to apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused to the readers of this journal.

  2. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.

    2003-01-01

    or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...... of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...

  3. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.;

    2003-01-01

    of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...... or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...

  4. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Ming, X.; Cao, C.; Laing, B.; Yuan, A.; Porter, M. A.; Hull-Ryde, E. A.; Maddry, J.; Suto, M.; Janzen, W. P.; Juliano, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides has been constrained by the limited ability of these membrane-impermeable molecules to reach their intracellular sites of action. We sought to address this problem using small organic molecules to enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by modulating their intracellular trafficking and release from endosomes. A high-throughput screen of multiple small molecule libraries yielded several hits that markedly potentiated the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. These compounds also enhanced the effects of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides. The hit compounds preferentially caused release of fluorescent oligonucleotides from late endosomes rather than other intracellular compartments. Studies in a transgenic mouse model indicated that these compounds could enhance the in vivo effects of a splice-switching oligonucleotide without causing significant toxicity. These observations suggest that selected small molecule enhancers may eventually be of value in oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:25662226

  5. Stimulation of ribosomal frameshifting by antisense LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H. M.; Olsthoorn, René C. L.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism commonly used by RNA viruses to express two or more proteins from a single mRNA at a fixed ratio. An essential element in this process is the presence of an RNA secondary structure, such as a pseudoknot or a hairpin, located downstream of the slippery sequence. Here, we have tested the efficiency of RNA oligonucleotides annealing downstream of the slippery sequence to induce frameshifting in vitro. Maximal frameshifting was observed with oligonucleotides of 12–18 nt. Antisense oligonucleotides bearing locked nucleid acid (LNA) modifications also proved to be efficient frameshift-stimulators in contrast to DNA oligonucleotides. The number, sequence and location of LNA bases in an otherwise DNA oligonucleotide have to be carefully manipulated to obtain optimal levels of frameshifting. Our data favor a model in which RNA stability at the entrance of the ribosomal tunnel is the major determinant of stimulating slippage rather than a specific three-dimensional structure of the stimulating RNA element. PMID:20693527

  6. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi AA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ammad Ahmad Farooqi,1 Zia ur Rehman,2 Jordi Muntane3,4 1Laboratory for Translational Oncology and Personalized Medicine, Rashid Latif Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan; 2Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Kohat University of Science and Technology (KUST, Kohat, Pakistan; 3Department of General Surgery, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS, Hospital Universitary "Virgen del Rocío"/CSIC/University of Seville, Sevilla, Spain; 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD o Ciberehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Abstract: There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA, and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent

  7. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  8. 鞘内注射NR2B反义寡核苷酸对纳洛酮诱发吗啡依赖大鼠戒断反应的影响%Effect of NR2B antisense oligonucleotide on naloxone-induced withdrawal responses in morphine-dependent rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫毅; 石翊飒; 张双银; 马永丰

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of NR2B antisense oligonucleotide on naloxone-induced withdrawal responses in morphine-dependent rats. Methods Famale SD rats weighing 230-270 g were anesthetized with intraperitoneal pentobarhital 60 mg/kg. Intrathecal (IT)catheter was placed at L3,4 interspace.Thirty-two rats in which FT catheter was successfully placed were randomly divided into 4 groups ( n = 8 each) : group C control; group MD morphine dependence; group AO NR2B antisense oligonucleotide (aNR2B) and group SO NR2B sense oligonucleotide (sNR2B) . In group MD, AO, SO chronic morphine dependence was induced by increasing doses of subcutaneous morphine for 6 days. The initial dose of morphine was 10 mg/kg twice a day and was increased by 10 mg/kg twice every other day and reached 50 mg/kg on the 6th day. In group AO and SO IT aNR2B or sNR2B 15 nmol was administered simultaneously with subcutaneous morphine. Morphine withdrawal responses was induced by IT naloxone 4 mg/kg and scored based on the responses (0 = normal; higher scores signify severer responses) . The weight loss was calculated.The expression of NR1, NR2A and NR2B mRNA in hippocampus was determined by RT-PCR. Results The morphine withdrawal syndrome and weight loss were significantly incresed in group MD, AO and SO, while NR2B mRNA expression in hippocampus was up-regulated in group MD and SO compared with group C. The morphine withdrawal syndrome and weight loss were significantly decreased, NR2A mRNA expression in hippocampus was up-regulated and NR2B mRNA expression was down-regulated in group AO compared with group MD. There was no significant difference in NR1 mRNA expression between the 4 groups . Conclusion NR2B antisense oligonucleotide can suppress morphine withdrawal responses through the regulation of NMDA receptor level and construction in hippocampus.%目的 评价鞘内注射N-甲基-D-天门冬氨酸(NMDA)受体2B亚基(NR2B)反义寡核苷酸对纳洛酮诱发吗啡依赖大

  9. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  10. Studies of Liposomal bcl-2 Antisense Oligode-oxynucleofide Induction of Apoptosis in Raji Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongmeiHe; HuanZhong

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of liposomal G3139 and transfected antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides directed against the coding region of the bcl-2 messenger RNA and the translation site on apoptosis in Raji cells.METHODS Cytotoxic effects were measured by use of the MTT method; The expression levels of Bcl-2 protein were assayed by immunofiuorescence using a fluoresce isothiocyanate label. Apoptosis was determined by morphological observation and flow cytometric analysis.RESULTS The 2 antisense oligonucleotides and G3139 can reduce Bcl-2 protein levels and Raji cell viability (IC50=4.54, 4.72 and 4.26 μmol/L, respectively), and induce apoptosis. A scrambled sequence control oligonucleotide and empty liposomes did not alter cell viability, Bcl-2 protein expression or apoptosis rates. There was no difference in reducing Bcl-2 protein levels and apoptosis rates found among the 3 antisense oligonucleotides.CONCLUSION The 2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides of bcl-2 messenger RNA can effectively induce apoptosis of Raji cells. The 2 antisense sequences and G3139 have a similarity in their antisense effect.

  11. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (PSK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  12. 细胞周期蛋白E2反义脱氧寡核苷酸对K562细胞增殖及凋亡的调控作用%Effect of cyclin E2 antisense oligonucleotide on human leukemic cell line K562

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丽粉; 郭晓楠; 刘英芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cyclin E2 antisense oligonucleotide ( ASON) on human leukemic cell line K562. Methods Cyclin E2 ASON was used in vitro culture K562 cell study. MTT assay was used to measure the growth inhibitory effect of transfection of ASON and lipofectamine TM2000. The Mrna expression levels of cyclin E2 were examined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Apopsis was detected by flow cytometry and morphology method. Results Cyclin E2 ASON specifically inhibited K562 cell Mrna expression level as well as the K562 cell proliferation. After transfection with cyclin E2 ASON.K562 cells developed apoptosis. Conclusion Cyclin E2 ASON can specifically inhibit K562 cell Mrna expression levels as well as the K562 cell proliferation. After being transfected with cyclin E2 ASON,K562 cells developed apoptosis. Cyclin E2 gene is likely to be a new target for antisense nucleotides techonology therapy of leukemia.%目的 研究细胞周期蛋白E2 (cyclin E2)反义脱氧寡核苷酸(ASON)对人红白血病细胞K562增殖的调控作用.方法 采用反义技术合成ASON并与K562细胞共培养.用四甲基偶氮唑蓝(MTT)法检测转染ASON和脂质体lipofectamineTM 2000后的细胞活力,逆转录-聚合酶链式反应(RT-PCR)方法检测转染细胞cyclin E2 mRNA表达水平及流式细胞术和形态学观察检测细胞凋亡.结果 Cyclin E2特异的ASON能显著地抑制cyclin E2mRNA水平的表达(F=26.442,P<0.01);白血病细胞的生长明显受抑制(P<0.01),细胞凋亡明显增加.结果 表明反义脱氧寡核苷酸能有效地抑制K562细胞的增殖,抑制K562细胞cyclin E2 mRNA表达上调,并显著地诱导细胞凋亡.结论 脂质体转染cyclin E2的反义寡核苷酸能够有效地抑制K562细胞cyclin E2 mRNA的表达,同时对白血病细胞K562的生长有明显的抑制作用,并可诱导K562细胞凋亡.提示cyclin E2在细胞周期调控中起作用,cyclinE2基因有望

  13. MPC30-DEA70-loaded transforming growth factor beta1 antisense oligonucleotide for transfection of cardiomyocytes%磷酸胆碱聚合物MPC30-DEA70负载转化生长因子β1AS-ODN转染心肌细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨煜; 张敏; 徐建荣; 林雪烽; 赵侠; 王志荣; 曹希传; 张卓琦

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Currently, antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN) have a good prospect in gene therapy, but AS-ODN with smal molecular weight cannot easily enter into the cels, which is susceptible to nuclease degradation. Therefore, there is stil a lack of fundamental understanding about how to improve their transfection efficiency, and target-based transferring. OBJECTIVE:To investigate whether a weak cationic and phosphorylcholine-containing diblock copolymer (MPC30-DEA70) can act as a carrier system to deliver a chemicaly synthesized transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) AS-ODN into myocardial cels. METHODS: MPC30-DEA70 was compounded with TGF-β1 AS-ODN at various N/P ratios and the MPC30-DEA70/TGF-β1 AS-ODN complexes were characterized by DNA electrophoresis. MTT assay was used to observe the biocompatibility. Confocal laser scanning microscope was used to observe the distribution and location of MPC30- DEA70/TGF-β1 AS-ODN in cells. Flow cytometry was used to detect the transfection efficiency and fluorescence intensity of MPC30-DEA70/TGF-β1 AS-ODN in cells. Western blot and RT-PCR methods were employed to measure the expression of TGF-β1 in cells. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Cell growth inhibition showed that the MPC30-DEA70 had low cytotoxicity to myocardial cells within the effective transfection dosage range (20 mg/L)下才表现出一定的细胞毒性并呈剂量依赖;MPC30-DEA70/TGF-β1AS-ODN 复合物对心肌细胞具有较高的转染效率,并且能够携带转化生长因子β1 AS-ODN进入细胞后下调转化生长因子β1 mRNA和蛋白的表达。新型阳离子磷酸胆碱基聚合物MPC30-DEA70可以有效负载和运输转化生长因子。

  14. 侧脑室注射 ERK5的反义寡核苷酸对小鼠神经病理性痛的作用%Intracerelar ventricular injection of the antisense oligonucleotides of ERK5 inhibits neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秋萍; 杨建平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 signaling pathway in chronic constriction injury ( CCI)-induced neuropathic pain above spinal cord level. Methods The CCI model of neuropathic pain was established.Intracerebroventricular injection of antisense oligonucleotides and immunohistochemical labeling technique were employed.And the heat and mechanical hyperalgesia responses were used to examine the affect of ERK5 in CCI-induced neuropathic pain and the expression of p-CREB ( cAMP response-element binding protein) in spinal cord.Results The mechanical paw withdrawal reflex threshold and thermal reflex latency became significantly lower in CCI-induced mice. Compared with saline group, mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia significantly decreased and the expression of p-CREB protein decreased at spinal cord in oligonucleotide group.Conclusion The ERK5 spinal cord neurons are involved in the regulation of CCI-induced neuropathic pain in mice.And this effect is achieved by adjusting the CREB-dependent gene expression.%目的:探讨脊髓上水平的细胞外信号调节蛋白激酶5( ERK5)信号通路在慢性坐骨神经结扎( CCI )致神经病理性疼痛中的作用。方法制作CCI神经病理性疼痛模型,应用侧脑室注射反义寡核苷酸技术和免疫组织化学标记技术,应用von Frey机械痛敏检测仪和热辐射痛敏检测仪,检测鞘内注射ERK5反义寡核苷酸对神经病理性疼痛小鼠机械缩足反射阈值( MWT )和热缩足反射潜伏期( TWL )、脊髓磷酸化cAMP反应元件结合蛋白( CREB )表达的影响。结果 CCI致神经病理性疼痛刺激后,小鼠患侧后足机械缩足反射阈值和热缩足反射潜伏期均明显降低;侧脑室注射ERK5反义寡核苷酸,与错义寡核苷酸或生理盐水组相比,CCI所致的机械和热痛觉过敏明显减轻;同时,侧脑室注射ERK5反义寡核苷酸抑制了CCI小鼠脊髓p-CREB蛋

  15. 术前输注供者CD80low/CD86low树突状细胞延长小鼠同种异体移植心脏存活%Donor dendritic cells treated with B7- 1, B7- 2 antisense oligonucleotide prolonged mouse cardiac allograft survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晓燕; 陈宗佑; 钱诗光; 李树浓

    2000-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of donor bone marrow derived dentritic cell (DC) treated with B7 - 1, B7 - 2 antisense oligonucleotide on mouse heart allografe survival time and its mechanism. METHODS: There were 7 groups of C57BL/10J (B10) mouse bone marrow DCs which were treated by 400 nM antisense oligonucleotide target to B7 -1, B7 -2 mRNA (AS B7- 1/2), B7- 1 mismatch oligo control ,B7- 2 mismatch control(mASB7- 1/2), lipofeetamine only and non-treatment, respectively. Each group of DC were named as ASB7- 1 DC, ASB7- 2 DC, mASB7 - 1 DC, mAS B7 - 2DC, and Lipo DC, respectively. RESULTS: Flow cytometer results shown that AS B7- 1/2 can inhibit B7- 1 (CD80)and B7- 2 (CD86) molecule express on DC surface, while control groups have no effects. To observe their tolerogenicity in mouse cardiac allograft model, B10→C3H heterotopic heart transplantation were performed. Recepients were received 2 x 106 of DC injection 7 days before transplantation. Results showed that both AS B7 - 1 DC and AS B7 - 2 DC can prolong mouse cardiac allograft survival time to (18.6 + 0.89) days and (23.67 + 10.73) days, respectively, compared with IL - 4 DC [ (6.22 + 0.97) days ( P < 0.01 ) ]. Two mismatch control groups can slightly prolong while oligo DC has no effect. For understanding its mechanism, each group of DC was used as stimulator to stimulated C3H spleen T cell. Results suggested that AS B7 - 1DC and AS B7 - 2 DC had less allo - stimulate function, including MLR and generation CTL and IL - 2 production than IL - 4 DC but control groups have no effect. CONCLUSION: Donor bone marrow derived DC treated with AS B7 - 1 oligo and AS B7 - 2 oligo expressed lower level of CD80 and CD86, respectively. These cells can induce allogeneic T cells anergy in vitro and markedly prolong mouse heart allograft survival time in vivo.%目的:应用B7-1和B7-2反义寡核苷酸(AS B7-1/AS B7-2 oligo)抑制CD80(B7-1)、CD86(B7-2)在供体小鼠骨髓树突状细胞(DC)上的表达,观察这类DC

  16. Effect of intrathecal NR2B antisense oligonucleotide on congnitive function in morphine-dependent rats%鞘内注射NR2B反义寡核苷酸对吗啡依赖大鼠认知功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张双银; 石翊飒; 卫毅

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of intrathecal (IT) NR2B antisense oligonucleotide (aNR2B) on cognitive function in morphine-dependent rats.Methods Male SD rats weighing 230-270 g were used in this study. The animals were anesthetized with intraperitoneal pentobarbital 60 mg/kg.IT catheter was placed at L3-4 interspace according to the technique described by Yang. Thirty rats in which IT catheter was successfully placed without any complication were randomly divided into 3 groups(n=10 each):control group (group C), morphine dependence group (group MD) and group aNR2B.Morphine dependence was induced in group MD and aNR2B by increasing doses of morphine for 6 days. The initial dose of morphine was 10mg/kg injected subcutaneously (SC) twice a day and was increased by 10 mg/kg.every other day.The final dose was 50mg/kg. Then morphine 30 mg/kg was administered SC once a day for 4 weeks. aNR2B 15 nmol was administered IT at 30 min before SC morphine every day in group aNR2B.In control group normal saline was administered instead of morphine. Morris water maze was used to assess the cognitive function at 0 (T0, baseline),1 and 3 weeks of morphine administration (T1,T2).The escape latency and the number of times the animals crossing the plateform were recorded. The animals were killed after the test and the hippocampus was isolated for determination of choline acetytransferase(ChAT)expression.Results There was no significant difference in the baseline escape latency and the baseline number of times the animals crossing the plateform at T0 among the 3 groups. The escape latency was significantly prolonged and the number of times the animals crossing the plateform decreased at T1 and T2 as compared with the baseline at T0 in group MD.The ChAT expression was significantly down-regulated in group MD as compared with control group. IT aNR2B significantly ameliorated cognitive dysfunction at T1 and T2 and increased ChAT expression in group aNR2B compared with group MD

  17. Inhibition of VASP Gene Expression on HUVEC by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Ling ZHANG; Jing-Ping Ou YANG; Yong-Ming LIU; Nian WANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein ( VASP ), a proline-rich founding member of the Ena-VASP proteinfamily, was discovered both as a substrate of cyclic AMPand cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases and a component of the actin-based cytoskeleton. VASP is associated with focal adhesions, actin filaments, and highly dynamic membrance regions and is a crucial factor in regulating actin remodelling and associated processes such as cellcell adhesion, platelet aggregation and actin-based motility. Phosphorylation may significantly alter the actin binding properties of VASP and phosphorylation of Ser157causes the phosphorylation-induced mobility shift in SDSPAGE from 46 KDa to 50 KDa. Some articles indicate changes of the VASP phosphorylation expression participate in the regulation of actin remodelling in HUVEC under different level of laminar flow[1] . However, a number of seemingly conflicting studies have confused the VASP field, pointing to roles for these proteins in both promotion and inhibition of actin-dependent processes.

  18. Inhibition of VASP Gene Expression on HUVEC by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionVasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein(VASP),a proline-rich founding member of the Ena-VASP protein family,was discovered both as a substrate of cyclic AMP-and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases and a component of the actin-based cytoskeleton.VASP is associated with focal adhesions,actin filaments,and highly dynamic membrance regions and is a crucial factor in regulating actin remodelling and associated processes such as cell-cell adhesion,platelet aggregation and actin-based motility. Phosph...

  19. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.M.; Pepers, B.A.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Mulders, S.A.M.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Ommen, G.J.B. van; Roon-Mom, W.M. van

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion i

  20. Induction of Radiosensitization by Antisense Oligonucleotide Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    selected for on the basis of neomycin resistance. MCF-7 cells transformed with PKC 8 or PKC C dominant negative mutants demonstrated approximately 60...pcDNA3-neo-PKC6 dn (normalized for neomycin resitstance gene copy number). Post- transfection (96 h) culture medium was exchanged with DMEM/10% FBS...milk, 0.1% albumin DNA binding assay ( chicken egg), 1% (vL/v) FBS, 100%(v/v) of 10 x ., V ~- PBS, 773- 0.2%-(v/v) Tween-2-). After washing Chloroquine

  1. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.M.; Pepers, B.A.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Mulders, S.A.M.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Ommen, G.J.B. van; Roon-Mom, W.M. van

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion i

  2. EFFECT OF BcL-2 ANTISENSE DRUG WITH DIFFERENT STRUCTURE ON THE BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF K562 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷小勇; 张洹; 何冬梅

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the differences and similarities of the antisense drugs with different structures on the biological functions of K562 cells. Methods: Cytotoxic effects were measured by use of a cell viability assay. Flow cytometric analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA fragmentation were also performed. The expression level of protein was assayed by immunofluorescence using fluoresce isothiocyanate label. Results: PNA targeting the coding region of the Bcl-2 messenger RNA could effectively inhibit K562 cell viability, down-regulate the synthesis of the Bcl-2 protein and increase cell apoptosis. By 72 h after the Bcl-2 antisense PNA treatment, K562 cells showed more reduction in the level of Bcl-2 protein compared with cells treated with the antisense ODN. After treatment with 10μmol/L of Bcl-2 antisense PNA or antisense ODN for 72 h, apoptotic rates of K562 cells were 13.15±1.13 and 11.72±1.12, respectively. Furthermore, there was significant difference in the percentage of apoptotic cells between antisense PNA group and antisense ODN group. Conclusion: The results suggest that antisense PNA targeting the coding region of Bcl-2 mRNA has better antisense effects than the antisense oligonucleotides on inducing apoptosis of K562 cells.

  3. Identification of sense and antisense transcripts regulated by drought in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke, Carolina Gimiliani; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Sato, Paloma Mieko; de Andrade, Rodrigo Fandiño; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important sugar and energy crop that can be used efficiently for biofuels production. The development of sugarcane cultivars tolerant to drought could allow for the expansion of plantations to sub-prime regions. Knowledge on the mechanisms underlying drought responses and its relationship with carbon partition would greatly help to define routes to increase yield. In this work we studied sugarcane responses to drought using a custom designed oligonucleotide array with 21,901 different probes. The oligoarrays were designed to contain probes that detect transcription in both sense and antisense orientation. We validated the results obtained using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A total of 987 genes were differentially expressed in at least one sample of sugarcane plants submitted to drought for 24, 72 and 120 h. Among them, 928 were sense transcripts and 59 were antisense transcripts. Genes related to Carbohydrate Metabolism, RNA Metabolism and Signal Transduction were selected for gene expression validation by qPCR that indicated a validation percentage of 90%. From the probes presented on the array, 75% of the sense probes and 11.9% of the antisense probes have signal above background and can be classified as expressed sequences. Our custom sugarcane oligonucleotide array provides sensitivity and good coverage of sugarcane transcripts for the identification of a representative proportion of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and sense-antisense transcript pairs (SATs). The antisense transcriptome showed, in most cases, co-expression with respective sense transcripts.

  4. Chemically robust fluoroalkyl phthalocyanine-oligonucleotide bioconjugates and their GRP78 oncogene photocleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pradeepkumar; Patel, Hemantbhai H; Borland, Emily; Gorun, Sergiu M; Sabatino, David

    2014-06-18

    The first representative of functionalized fluoroalkyl phthalocyanines, F48H7(COOH)PcZn, is reported. The complex generates (1)O2 affording long-lasting photooxidation of an external substrate without self-decomposition. The carboxylic group couples with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting GRP78 oncogenes, resulting in the F48H7PcZn-cancer targeting oligonucleotide (CTO). The bioconjugated fluorophthalocyanine effectively hybridizes complementary GRP78 DNA and mRNA sequences. Piperidine cleavage assays reveal desired photochemical oligonucleotide oxidative degradation for both F48H7PcZn-CTO:DNA and F48H7PcZn-CTO:mRNA hybrids. This new materials strategy could be extended to other functional fluorinated phthalocyanines-antisense oligonucleotide combinations for long-lasting oncogene-targeting photodynamic therapy.

  5. Antisense inhibition of microRNA-21 or -221 arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and sensitizes the effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Kook; Lee, Eun Joo; Esau, Christine; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2009-10-01

    The contribution of overexpressed microRNA-21 and -221 (miR-21 and miR-221) to the malignant phenotype was determined by inhibiting these miRNAs using antisense oligonucleotides. The effects of antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, combinatorial effects with gemcitabine, and effects on target protein levels were studied. Low nanomolar concentrations of both antisense oligonucleotides reduced proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Reduced proliferation was less pronounced in the normal ductal epithelial cell line human pancreatic Nestin-expressing cell or in pancreatic cancer cell lines exposed to an irrelevant control oligonucleotide. Inhibition of miR-21 and miR-221 increased the amount of apoptosis in HS766T cells by 3- to 6-fold compared with the control oligonucleotide. HS766T cells exposed to miR-21 antisense resulted in cell cycle arrest (G1 phase). Protein levels of tumor suppressor targets of the miRNAs were increased by antisense to miR-21 (PTEN and RECK) and miR-221 (p27). Antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 sensitized the effects of gemcitabine, and the antisense-gemcitabine combinations were synergistic at high fraction affected. We demonstrate that antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 results in significant cell killing under various conditions and that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to miRNA represents a potential new therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  6. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, John A; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. T...

  7. Hepatotoxic Potential of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Can Be Predicted from Their Sequence and Modification Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H.; Yakimov, Victor; Ottosen, Søren; Kammler, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels F.; Høg, Anja M.; Hedtjärn, Maj; Meldgaard, Michael; Møller, Marianne R.; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides that recruit RNase H and thereby cleave complementary messenger RNAs are being developed as therapeutics. Dose-dependent hepatic changes associated with hepatocyte necrosis and increases in serum alanine-aminotransferase levels have been observed after treatment with certain oligonucleotides. Although general mechanisms for drug-induced hepatic injury are known, the characteristics of oligonucleotides that determine their hepatotoxic potential are not well understood. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the hepatotoxic potential of locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides in mice. We developed a random forests classifier, in which oligonucleotides are regarded as being composed of dinucleotide units, which distinguished between 206 oligonucleotides with high and low hepatotoxic potential with 80% accuracy as estimated by out-of-bag validation. In a validation set, 17 out of 23 oligonucleotides were correctly predicted (74% accuracy). In isolation, some dinucleotide units increase, and others decrease, the hepatotoxic potential of the oligonucleotides within which they are found. However, a complex interplay between all parts of an oligonucleotide can influence the hepatotoxic potential. Using the classifier, we demonstrate how an oligonucleotide with otherwise high hepatotoxic potential can be efficiently redesigned to abate hepatotoxic potential. These insights establish analysis of sequence and modification patterns as a powerful tool in the preclinical discovery process for oligonucleotide-based medicines. PMID:23952551

  8. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    2003-01-01

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons, alpha-bromo-alpha'-[F-18]fluoro-m-xy

  9. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  10. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  11. In situ entry of oligonucleotides into brain cells can occur through a nucleic acid channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Fuxin; Gounko, Natasha V.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Ronken, Eric; Hoekstra, Dick

    2007-01-01

    Brain tissue has become a challenging therapeutic target, in part because of failure of conventional treatments of brain tumors and a gradually increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases. Because antisense oligonucleotides are readily internalized by neuronal cells in culture, these compounds c

  12. LNA-antisense rivals siRNA for gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Wengel, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing unprecedented binding affinity toward complementary DNA and RNA while obeying the Watson-Crick base-pairing rules. For efficient gene silencing in vitro and in vivo, fully modified or chimeric LNA oligonucleotides have been a...... or phosphorothioate-DNA segment flanked by LNA gaps, rivals siRNA as the technology of choice for target validation and therapeutic applications....... applied. LNA oligonucleotides are commercially available, can be transfected using standard techniques, are non-toxic, lead to increased target accessibility, can be designed to activate RNase H, and function in steric block approaches. LNA-Antisense, including gapmer LNA containing a central DNA...

  13. Evaluation of a new biocompatible poly(N-(morpholino ethyl methacrylate)-based copolymer for the delivery of ruthenium oligonucleotides, targeting HPV16 E6 oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschner, Anca; Shim, Yong Ho; Dubois, Philippe; Delvenne, Philippe; Evrard, Brigitte; Marcélis, Lionel; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Defrancq, Eric; Raes, Martine; Piette, Jacques; Collard, Laurence; Piel, Géraldine

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the use of a new biocompatible block copolymer poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-N-(morpholino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA) for the delivery of a particular antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene from human papilloma virus. This antisense oligonucleotide was derivatized with a polyazaaromatic Ru(II) complex which, under visible illumination, is able to produce an irreversible crosslink with the complementary targeted sequence. The purpose of this study is to determine whether by the use of a suitable transfection agent, it is possible to increase the efficiency of the antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene, named Ru-P-4. In a recent study, we showed that Oligofectamine transfected Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide failed to inhibit efficiently the growth of cervical cancer cell line SiHa, contrarily to the Ru-P-6 antisense oligonucleotide, another sequence also targeting the E6 gene. The ability of PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA to form polyplexes with optimal physicochemical characteristics was investigated first. Then the ability of the PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA/Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide polyplexes to transfect two keratinocyte cell lines (SiHa and HaCat) and the capacity of polyplexes to inhibit HPV16+ cervical cancer cell growth was evaluated. PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA base polyplexes at the optimal molar ratio of polymer nitrogen atoms to DNA phosphates (N/P), were able to deliver Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide and to induce a higher growth inhibition in human cervical cancer SiHa cells, compared to other formulations based on Oligofectamine.

  14. Stereospecificity of oligonucleotide interactions revisited: no evidence for heterochiral hybridization and ribozyme/DNAzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hoehlig

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications.

  15. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  16. Method of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Mediated Antisense Inhibition of Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligonucleotide mimic that recognizes and binds to nucleic acids. The strong binding affinity of PNA to mRNA coupled with its high sequence specificity enable antisense PNA to selectively inhibit (i.e., knockdown) the protein synthesis of a target gene. This novel technology provides a powerful tool for Campylobacter studies because molecular techniques have been relatively less well-developed for this bacterium as compared to other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. This chapter describes a protocol for PNA-mediated antisense inhibition of gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

  17. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Unaided cellular uptake of RNA interference agents such as antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA is extremely poor, and in vivo bioavailability is also limited. Thus, effective delivery strategies for such potential drugs are in high demand. Recently, a novel approach using a class of short cationic...

  18. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  19. Dopamine-induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells: inhibition by nucleic acides antisense to the dopamine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porat, S.; Gabbay, M.; Tauber, M.; Ratovitski, T.; Blinder, E.; Simantov, R. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    1996-09-01

    Human neuroblastoma NMB cells take up [{sup 3}H]dopamine in a selective manner indicating that dopamine transporters are responsible for this uptake. These cells were therefore used as a model to study dopamine neurotoxicity, and to elucidate the role of dopamine transporters in controlling cell death. Treatment with 0.05-0.4 mM dopamine changed cells' morphology within 4 h, accompanied by retraction of processes, shrinkage, apoptosis-like atrophy, accumulation of apoptotic particles, DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cycloheximide inhibited dopamine's effect, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by dopamine was dependent upon protein synthesis. Dopamine cytotoxicity, monitored morphologically by flow cytometric analysis, and by lactate dehydrogenase released, was blocked by cocaine but not by the noradrenaline and serotonin uptake blockers desimipramine and imipramine, respectively. Attempting to inhibit dopamine transport and toxicity in a drug-free and highly selective way, three 18-mer dopamine transporter antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (numbers 1, 2 and 3) and a new plasmid vector expressing the entire rat dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation were prepared and tested. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 inhibited [{sup 3}H]dopamine uptake in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Likewise, transient transfection of NMB cells with the plasmid expressing dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation partially blocked [{sup 3}H]dopamine uptake. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 also decreased, dose-dependently, the toxic effect of dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine. Western blot analysis with newly prepared anti-human dopamine transporter antibodies showed that antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 decreased the transporter protein level. These studies contribute to better understand the mechanism of dopamine-induced apoptosis and neurotoxicity. (Copyright (c) 1996

  20. 博来霉素致肺纤维化大鼠不同时间点吸人STAT1反义寡核苷酸的疗效比较%Therapeutic effects of aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 antisense oligonucleotide administered at different time points on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis: experiment with rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 曾鸣; 朱晨; 王文军; 湛晓勤; 范贤明

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨雾化吸入信号转导和转录活化因子1(STAT1)反义寡核苷酸(ASON)干预肺纤维化的最佳给药时机.方法 Wistar雌性大鼠25只随机均分为博来霉素(BLM)组、ASON 0 d组、ASON 7 d组、ASON 14 d组和生理盐水(NS)组,前4组气管内灌注BLM建立肺纤维化模型,NS组气管内灌注NS.ASON 0、7、14 d组分别于气管内灌注BLM后立即、第7和14天开始雾化吸入STATI ASON;NS组和BLM组雾化吸入NS.气管内灌注BLM后第28天处死各组大鼠,取肺组织分别行HE和Masson染色,观察肺泡炎和纤维化情况并评分;酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)测定支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中转化生长因子β(TGF-β)和肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)浓度.结果 肺组织病理学观察显示ASON 0 d组大鼠肺泡炎和肺纤维化程度明显轻于BLM组和ASON 14 d组,肺泡炎评分(1.80±0.84)和肺纤维化评分(2.60±0.55)均明显低于BLM组(2.40±0.55、4.40±0.55)、ASON 7 d组(2.20±0.45、3.00 ±0.71)和ASON 14 d组(2.20±0.84、4.00±1.00)(均P<0.05);ASON 7 d组肺纤维化评分也明显低于BLM组和ASON 14 d组(均P<0.05).ASON 0 d组BALF中TGF-β与TNF-α浓度[(48.11±3.46)pg/ml、(1.93±0.14)ng/ml]均明显低于BLM组[(57.67±2.46)pg/ml、(2.45±0.25)ng/ml,均P<0.05],TGF-β浓度明显低于ASON 7 d组[(51.42±3.57)pg/ml]和ASON 14 d组[(55.83±1.79)pg/ml](均P<0.05);ASON 7 d组BALF中TGF-β浓度也明显低于BLM组和ASON 14d组(均P<0.05).结论 早期雾化吸入STAT1 ASON对BLM致肺纤维化大鼠的肺纤维化形成有明显阻抑作用,用药越早效果越好,提示雾化吸入STAT1 ASON有可能成为肺纤维化的早期干预手段.%Objective To investigate the curative effects of inhaling signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) on alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis and the best administration time. Methods Twenty-five adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups: BLM group, undergoing intra

  1. Fragment-based solid-phase assembly of oligonucleotide conjugates with peptide and polyethylene glycol ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirin, Mehrdad; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R; Winkler, Johannes

    2016-10-04

    Ligand conjugation to oligonucleotides is an attractive strategy for enhancing the therapeutic potential of antisense and siRNA agents by inferring properties such as improved cellular uptake or better pharmacokinetic properties. Disulfide linkages enable dissociation of ligands and oligonucleotides in reducing environments found in endosomal compartments after cellular uptake. Solution-phase fragment coupling procedures for producing oligonucleotide conjugates are often tedious, produce moderate yields and reaction byproducts are frequently difficult to remove. We have developed an improved method for solid-phase coupling of ligands to oligonucleotides via disulfides directly after solid-phase synthesis. A 2'-thiol introduced using a modified nucleotide building block was orthogonally deprotected on the controlled pore glass solid support with N-butylphosphine. Oligolysine peptides and a short monodisperse ethylene glycol chain were successfully coupled to the deprotected thiol. Cleavage from the resin and full removal of oligonucleotide protection groups were achieved using methanolic ammonia. After standard desalting, and without further purification, homogenous conjugates were obtained as demonstrated by HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The attachment of both amphiphilic and cationic ligands proves the versatility of the conjugation procedure. An antisense oligonucleotide conjugate with hexalysine showed pronounced gene silencing in a cell culture tumor model in the absence of a transfection reagent and the corresponding ethylene glycol conjugate resulted in down regulation of the target gene to nearly 50% after naked application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Propionic and Methylmalonic Acidemia: Antisense Therapeutics for Intronic Variations Causing Aberrantly Spliced Messenger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón, A. ; Aguado, C. ; Desviat, L. R. ; Sánchez-Alcudia, R. ; Ugarte, M. ; Pérez, B. 

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs) to restore normal splicing caused by intronic molecular defects identified in methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and propionic acidemia (PA). The three new point mutations described in deep intronic regions increase the splicing scores of pseudoexons or generate consensus binding motifs for splicing factors, such as SRp40, which favor the intronic inclusions in MUT (r.1957ins76), PCCA (r.1284ins84), or PCCB (r.654ins72) messenger R...

  3. Multicellular Tumor Spheroids as a Model for Assessing Delivery of Oligonucleotides in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle; Ming, Xin; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2014-01-01

    Oligonucleotides have shown promise in selectively manipulating gene expression in vitro, but that success has not translated to the clinic for cancer therapy. A potential reason for this is that cells behave differently in monolayer than in the three-dimensional tumor, resulting in limited penetration and distribution of oligonucleotides in the tumor. This may be especially true when oligonucleotides are associated with nanocarriers such as lipoplexes and polyplexes, commonly used delivery vehicles for oligonucleotides. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a three-dimensional model that closely resembles small avascular tumors and micrometastases, has been utilized as an intermediate between monolayer culture and in vivo studies for the screening of small-molecule drugs. However, spheroids have been little used for the study of various oligonucleotide delivery formulations. Here, we have evaluated the uptake and efficacy of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides using various delivery modalities in two- and three-dimensional culture models. We find that the size of the delivery agent dramatically influences penetration into the spheroid and thus the biological effect of the oligonucleotides. We hypothesize that the MCTS model will prove to be a useful tool in the future development of oligonucleotide delivery formulations. PMID:24618852

  4. Massive and selective delivery of lipid-coated cationic lipoplexes of oligonucleotides targeted in vivo to hepatic endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, M; Weeke-Klimp, AH; Meijer, DKF; Scherphof, GL; Kamps, JAAM

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. Previously we reported on massive uptake of liposomes surface-modified with negatively charged aconitylated albumin (Aco-HSA) by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (EC) in vivo. In the present work we applied this principle for the in vivo delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) to the

  5. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  6. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wupeng Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO, small interfering RNA (siRNA, and microRNA (miRNA are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  7. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wupeng; Dong, Jinrui; Peh, Hong Yong; Tan, Lay Hong; Lim, Kah Suan; Li, Li; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred

    2017-01-17

    Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA (miRNA) are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir) has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  8. Lipid-modified oligonucleotide conjugates: Insights into gene silencing, interaction with model membranes and cellular uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Uribe, Begoña; Grijalvo, Santiago; Pertíñez, Samuel Núñez; Busto, Jon V; Martín, César; Alagia, Adele; Goñi, Félix M; Eritja, Ramón; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    The ability of oligonucleotides to silence specific genes or inhibit the biological activity of specific proteins has generated great interest in their use as research tools and therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, their biological applications meet the limitation of their poor cellular accessibility. Developing an appropriate delivery system for oligonucleotides is essential to achieve their efficient cellular uptake. In the present work a series of phosphorothioate lipid-oligonucleotide hybrids were synthesized introducing covalently single or double lipid tails at both 3'- and 5'-termini of an antisense oligonucleotide. Gene transfections in cultured cells showed antisense luciferase inhibition without the use of a transfecting agent for conjugates modified with the double-lipid tail at 5'-termini. The effect of the double lipid-tailed modification was further studied in detail in several model membrane systems as well as in cellular uptake experiments. During these studies the spontaneous formation of self-assembled microstructures is clearly observed. Lipidation allowed the efficient incorporation of the oligonucleotide in HeLa cells by a macropinocytosis mechanism without causing cytotoxicity in cells or altering the binding properties of the oligonucleotide conjugates. In addition, both single- and double-tailed compounds showed a similar behavior in lipid model membranes, making them useful in nucleotide-based technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibitory effects of antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides on pancreatic cancer cell Bxpc-3 telomerase activity and cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Feng Wang; Ke-Jian Guo; Bei-Ting Huang; Yong Liu; Xiao-Yun Tang; Jian-Jun Zhang; Qiang Xia

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of telomerase hTERT gene antisense oligonucleotide (hTERT-ASO) on proliferation and telomerase activity of pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc-3.METHODS: MTT assay was used to detect the effect of different doses of hTERT-ASO on proliferation of Bxpc-3 cell for different times. To study the anti-tumor activity,the cells were divided into there groups: Control group (pancreatic cancer cell Bxpc-3); antisense oligonucleotide (hTERT-ASO) group; and nosense oligonucleotide group decorated with phosphorothioate. Telomerase activity was detected using TRAP-PCR-ELISA. Cell DNA distribution was examined using flow cytometry assay.Cell apoptosis was observed by transmission electron microscope in each group.RESULTS: After treatment with 6 mmol/L hTERTASO, cell proliferation was inhibited in dose- and timedependent manner. The telomerase activity decreased after treatment with hTERT-ASO for 72 h. Flow cytometry showed the cell number of G0/G1 phase increased from 2.7% to 14.7%, the cell number of S phase decreased from 72.7% to 51.0%, and a sub-G1 stage cell apoptosis peak appeared in front of G1 stage.CONCLUSION: Telomerase antisense oligodeoxynucleotide can inhibit the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc-3 and decrease the telomerase activity and increase cell apoptosis rate in vitro.

  10. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P.; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C. Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  11. Antisense bcl-2 retrovirus vector increases the sensitivity of a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W G; Ma, L P; Wang, S W; Zhang, Z Y; Cao, G D

    1999-05-01

    The bcl-2 oncoprotein directly prolongs cellular survival by blocking apoptosis and its overexpression is associated with cellular resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic drugs and gamma-irradiation. Meanwhile, it has been shown that bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide can induce apoptosis or increase toxicity of the treatment in tumors in vivo and in vitro. However, it is difficult to obtain stable transfection by this approach and there are no reports about the effect of an antisense bcl-2 on the sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here we investigated the effect of an antisense bcl-2 RNA retrovirus vector transfer on the sensitivity of 2-butylamino-2-demethoxy-hypocrellin A (2-BA-2-DMHA) photosensitization in a human gastric adenocarcinoma MGC803 cell line. The results indicate that antisense bcl-2-infected MGC803 cells expressed exogenous antisense bcl-2 mRNA measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and significantly reduced bcl-2 protein determined by western blotting analysis. The decreased expression of bcl-2 protein was accompanied by increased phototoxicity and susceptibility to apoptosis induced by 2-BA-2-DMHA PDT. Our finding suggests that reduction of bcl-2 protein in gastric cancers, and possibly also in a variety of other tumors, may be a novel and rational approach to improve photosensitivity and the treatment outcome.

  12. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Saito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  13. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  14. Water-absorbent polymer as a carrier for a discrete deposit of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, M; Ichikawa, M; Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Takahashi, M

    1998-09-01

    One of the problems of introducing antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into the central nervous system (CNS) is their rapid disappearance from the target site due to their dispersion and diffusion, which results in poor uptake and/or retention in cells (M. Morris, A.B. Lucion, Antisense oligonucleotides in the study of neuroendocrine systems, J. Neuroendocrinol. 7 (1995) 493-500; S. Ogawa, H.E. Brown, H.J. Okano, D.W. Pfaff, Cellular uptake of intracerebrally administrated oligodeoxynucleotides in mouse brain, Regul. Pept. 59 (1995) 143-149) [2,5]. Recently, we adapted a new method using water-absorbent polymer (WAP; internally cross-linked starch-grafted-polyacrylates) as a carrier for antisense ODN. The polymer forms a hydro-gel after absorbing water which is chemically and biologically inert. In these studies, the polymer (powder-form) is fully swollen by physiological saline containing antisense ODN (0.2 micromol/ml) to make 80-fold volume gel. Hydro-gel (1 microliter) is injected into the target site, and water solutes are assumed to be diffused stoichiometrically into CNS from the surface of the gel. Histological studies indicate that 24 h after the injection, antisense ODN (5'biotinylated-S-oligos of 15 mer) are distributed to within 800 micrometer from the edge of the area where the gel is located and then gradually disappear from this area within days, but still remain within 300-micrometer distance 7 days later. Antisense ODN are effectively incorporated by all the cell types examined, i.e., neurons, astrocytes and microglias, and suppress the synthesis of the target protein. This method can be adapted to slow delivery of antisense ODN and other water soluble substances into the CNS.

  15. 包载缺氧诱导因子-1α反义寡核苷酸纳米粒子的制备和特性评价%Preparation and characterization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α antisense oligonucleotide loaded nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑延波; 刘胜; 李丽君; 刘万卉

    2011-01-01

    目的 制备一种包载缺氧诱导因子-1α(HIF-1α)反义寡核苷酸的聚乳酸-聚乙醇酸共聚物(PLGA)纳米粒子,并评价其理化特性.方法 应用复乳化-溶剂挥发法制备包载HIF-1α反义寡核苷酸PLGA纳米粒子,并固定其他因素,选择不同的聚乙烯醇(PVA)浓度(0.5%、1.0%、1.5%、2.0%)和乳化速度(17 500、21 500、24 000 r/min),观察其对制备的纳米粒子粒度和载药量的影响;应用电子显微镜和粒度测定仪对制得的纳米粒子进行形态观察和粒径测定;应用高效液相色谱法测定纳米粒子的载药量和包封率并进行体外释药实验.结果 制得的载HIF-1α反义寡核苷酸PLGA纳米粒子外观呈圆形或介于圆形与椭圆形之间,表面光滑圆整,粒径分布范围较窄,平均粒度为320 nm(标准差50 nm),纳米粒子载药量为(0.930±0.015)%,包封率为(79.14±1.78)%;纳米粒子中HIF-1α反义寡核苷酸在24h突释期内累积释放率为31.2%,10d内呈缓慢线性稳定性释放,释放量达81.5%.结论 应用复乳化-溶剂挥发法制备包载HIF-1α反义寡核苷酸PLGA纳米粒子,方法实用有效,工艺稳定,重复性好.%Objective To prepare and characterize the hypoxia-inducible factor-la antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(HIF-lα-ASODN) loaded nanoparticles. Methods Biodegradable polylactide -co -glycolide(PLGA) was used as the carrier material to prepare HIF-lα-ASODN loaded nanoparticles using the emulsification/solvent evaporation technique. The effects of polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) concentration and emulsion speed on drug loading and diameter of nanoparticles were observed. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles were measured by scanning electron microscope and granularity calcimeter, respectively. The drug loading and embedding rates, as well as the in vitro drug release characteristic were investigated with high performance liquid chromatography. The physical stability of the nanoparticles and amplified

  16. Antisense antibiotics: a brief review of novel target discovery and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hui; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-06-01

    The nightmare of multi-drug resistant bacteria will still haunt if no panacea is ever found. Efforts on seeking desirable natural products with bactericidal property and screening chemically modified derivatives of traditional antibiotics have lagged behind the emergence of new multi-drug resistant bacteria. The concept of using antisense antibiotics, now as revolutionary as is on threshold has experienced ups and downs in the past decade. In the past five years, however, significant technology advances in the fields of microbial genomics, structural modification of oligonucleotides and efficient delivery system have led to fundamental progress in the research and in vivo application of this paradigm. The wealthy information provided in the microbial genomics era has allowed the identification and/or validation of a number of essential genes that may serve as possible targets for antisense inhibition; antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the 3rd generation of modified structures, e.g., peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) have shown great potency in gene expression inhibition in a sequence-specific and dosedependent manner at low micromolar concentrations; and cell penetrating peptide mediated delivery system has enabled the effective display of intracellular antisense inhibition of targeted genes both in vitro and in vivo. The new methods show promise in the discovery of novel gene-specific antisense antibiotics that will be useful in the future battle against drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review describes this promising paradigm, the targets that have been identified and the recent technologies on which it is delivered.

  17. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  18. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  19. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  20. Antisense technologies targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinshun; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthesis is a coordinated process involving multiple enzymes. Overexpression of some of these enzymes plays important roles in tumor growth and development. Therefore, these enzymes are attractive targets for cancer therapies. Antisense agents provide highly specific inhibition of the expression of target genes and thus have served as powerful tools for gene functional studies and potential therapeutic agents for cancers. This article reviews different types of antisense agents and their applications in the modulation of fatty acid synthesis. Patents of antisense agents targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes are introduced. In addition, miR-122 has been shown to regulate the expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes, and thus antisense agent patents that inhibit miR-122 expression are also discussed.

  1. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  2. Inhibition of microRNA function by antimiR oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Petri, Andreas; Lindow, Morten

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in many developmental and cellular processes. Moreover, there is now ample evidence that perturbations in the levels of individual or entire families of miRNAs are strongly associated...... with the pathogenesis of a wide range of human diseases. Indeed, disease-associated miRNAs represent a new class of targets for the development of miRNA-based therapeutic modalities, which may yield patient benefits unobtainable by other therapeutic approaches. The recent explosion in miRNA research has accelerated...... the development of several computational and experimental approaches for probing miRNA functions in cell culture and in vivo. In this review, we focus on the use of antisense oligonucleotides (antimiRs) in miRNA inhibition for loss-of-function studies. We provide an overview of the currently employed antisense...

  3. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  4. TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Stanley T

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-β subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-β can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-β subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Clinical potential of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics in the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Sterghios A; Usher, Louise; Lindsay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of an ever-expanding plethora of coding and non-coding RNAs with nodal and causal roles in the regulation of lung physiology and disease is reinvigorating interest in the clinical utility of the oligonucleotide therapeutic class. This is strongly supported through recent advances in nucleic acids chemistry, synthetic oligonucleotide delivery and viral gene therapy that have succeeded in bringing to market at least three nucleic acid-based drugs. As a consequence, multiple new candidates such as RNA interference modulators, antisense, and splice switching compounds are now progressing through clinical evaluation. Here, manipulation of RNA for the treatment of lung disease is explored, with emphasis on robust pharmacological evidence aligned to the five pillars of drug development: exposure to the appropriate tissue, binding to the desired molecular target, evidence of the expected mode of action, activity in the relevant patient population and commercially viable value proposition.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide delivery to cancer cell lines for the treatment of different cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicay, Ebru; Erdal, Ebru; Hazer, Baki; Türk, Mustafa; Denkbas, Emir Baki

    2016-12-01

    Amphiphilic poly(3-hydroxylalkanoate) (PHA) copolymers find interesting applications in drug delivery. The aim of this study was to prepare nucleic acid adsorbed on (PHB-b-PEG-NH2) nanoparticle platform for gene delivery. For this purpose, PHB-b-PEG-NH2 block copolymers were synthesized via transesterification reactions. The copolymers obtained were characterized by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) techniques. The cytotoxic, apoptotic and necrotic effects of these nanoparticles in the MDA 231 human breast cancer cell, the A549 human lung cancer cell and the L929 fibroblast cell lines were also investigated.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although...

  8. Stereoselective Uptake of Cell-Penetrating Peptides is Conserved in Antisense Oligonucleotide Polyplexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favretto, M.E.; Brock, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Stereochemistry matters. A significant conceptual advancement is presented toward the understanding of how functional characteristics of delivery peptides can translate into functional characteristics of peptide-based oligoplexes.

  9. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Erik C.; Morcos, Paul A.; Mendelsohn, Bryce A.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orth...

  10. Oligonucleotide Antiviral Therapeutics: Antisense and RNA Interference for Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts), and poses the contin- ing threat of a global pandemic that could kill millions (Johnson nd Mueller, 2002). Dengue virus is...A single dose of E-specific shRNA- xpressing neurotropic lentivirus was able to provide complete rotection (100% of mice survive) against lethal JEV...449 (7163), 745–747.ohnson, N.P., Mueller, J., 2002. Updating the accounts: global mortality of the 1918-1920 “Spanish” influenza pandemic. Bull. Hist

  11. Study of HIV-2 primer-template initiation complex using antisense oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulmé, F; Freund, F; Gryaznov, S;

    2000-01-01

    HIV-2 reverse transcription is initiated by the retroviral DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) from a cellular tRNALys3 partially annealed to the primer binding site in the 5'-region of viral RNA. The HIV-2 genome has two A-rich regions upstream of the primer binding site. In contrast to HIV-1...

  12. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  13. Antisense expression increases gene expression variability and locus interdependency

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wu; Gagneur, Julien; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Smolik, Miłosz; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription profiling has revealed extensive expression of non-coding RNAs antisense to genes, yet their functions, if any, remain to be understood. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of sense–antisense expression in response to genetic and environmental changes in yeast. We find that antisense expression is associated with genes of larger expression variability. This is characterized by more ‘switching off' at low levels of expression for genes with antisense compa...

  14. Internalization of oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor mRNA in endothelial cells: a three-dimensional reconstruction by confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Pawlowska, Z; Kobylanska, A; Pluskota, E; Maszewska, M; Stec, W J; Cierniewski, C S

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction analysis of localization of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) mRNA within endothelial cells is described. When EA.hy 926 cells were incubated with fluorescently labelled phosphodiester (PO-16) or phosphorothioate (PS-16) oligonucleotides at low, not cytotoxical concentrations, the relative brightness composition of the images of the particular samples was much higher for PS-16 than PO-16 and dependent upon the extracellular concentration and the incubation time. The 3-D reconstructions based on the series of optical sections of the samples, spaced every 1.5 microns, showed the punctuate accumulation of the oligonucleotides and a striking difference in a spatial distribution between PO-16 and PS-16 within the cytoplasm. Even after 24 h incubation of endothelial cells with 2.5 microM of PO-16 and PS-16 oligonucleotides, there was a predominant oligonucleotide localization within the cytoplasm and only traces of oligonucleotides could be seen in the cell nucleus and/or perinuclear organelles.

  15. Pretreatment of Mice with Oligonucleotide prop5 Protects Them from Influenza Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a successful parasite and requires host factors to complete its life cycle. Prop5 is an antisense oligonucleotide, targeting programmed cell death protein 5 (PDCD5. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of prop5 against mouse-adapted A/FM/1/47 strain of influenza A virus in a mouse model. Prop5 intranasally administered the mice at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d at 24 h and 30 min before infection, provided 80% and 100% survival rates and prolonged mean survival days in comparison with influenza virus-infected mice (both p < 0.01. Moreover, viral titres in mice pretreated with prop5, at dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d, had declined significantly on day two, four, and six post-infection compared with the yields in infected mice (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01; lung index in mice pretreated with prop5 (20 mg/kg/d had been inhibited on day six post-infection (p < 0.05. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that prop5 could down-regulate the PDCD5 protein expression levels in lung tissues of infected mice. These data indicate that antisense oligonucleotide prop5 is a promising drug for prophylaxis and control influenza virus infections and provides an insight into the host-pathogen interaction.

  16. Improved Performance of Anti-miRNA Oligonucleotides Using a Novel Non-Nucleotide Modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A Lennox

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-microRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs are steric blocking antisense reagents that inhibit microRNA (miRNA function by hybridizing and repressing the activity of a mature miRNA. First generation AMOs employed 2′-O-Methyl RNA nucleotides (2′OMe with phosphorothioate (PS internucleotide linkages positioned at both ends to block exonuclease attack. Second generation AMOs improved potency through the use of chemical modifications that increase binding affinity to the target, such as locked nucleic acid (LNA residues. However, this strategy can reduce specificity as high binding affinity compounds can bind to and suppress function of related sequences even if one or more mismatches are present. Further, unnatural modified nucleic acid residues can have toxic side effects. In the present study, a variety of non-nucleotide modifiers were screened for utility in steric blocking antisense applications. A novel compound, N,N-diethyl-4-(4-nitronaphthalen-1-ylazo-phenylamine (“ZEN”, was discovered that increased binding affinity and blocked exonuclease degradation when placed at or near each end of a single-stranded oligonucleotide. This new modification was combined with the 2′OMe RNA backbone to make ZEN-AMOs. The new ZEN-AMOs have high potency and can effectively inhibit miRNA function in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations, show high specificity, and have low toxicity in cell culture.

  17. In vitro inhibition of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/RARalpha) expression and leukemogenic activity by DNA/LNA chimeric antisense oligos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprodossi, Sara; Galluzzi, Luca; Biagetti, Simona; Della Chiara, Giulia; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Magnani, Mauro; Fanelli, Mirco

    2005-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(15:17) that leads to the expression of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/ RARalpha) oncofusion protein. The block of differentiation at the promyelocytic stage of the blasts and their increased survival induced by PML/RARalpha are the principal biological features of the disease. Therapies based on pharmacological doses of retinoic acid (RA, 10(-6) M) are able to restore APL cell differentiation in most cases, but not to achieve complete hematological remission because retinoic acid resistance occurs in many patients. In order to elaborate alternative therapeutic approaches, we focused our attention on the use of antisense oligonucleotides as gene-specific drug directed to PML/RARalpha mRNA target. We used antisense molecules containing multiple locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications. The LNAs are nucleotide analogues that are able to form duplexes with complementary DNA or RNA sequences with highly increased thermal stability and are resistant to 3'-exonuclease degradation in vitro. The DNA/LNA chimeric molecules were designed on the fusion sequence of PML and RARalpha genes to specifically target the oncofusion protein. Cell-free and in vitro experiments using U937-PR9-inducible cell line showed that DNA/LNA oligonucleotides were able to interfere with PML/RARalpha expression more efficiently than the corresponding unmodified DNA oligo. Moreover, the treatment of U937-PR9 cells with these chimeric antisense molecules was able to abrogate the block of differentiation induced by PML/RARalpha oncoprotein. These data suggest a possible application of oligonucleotides containing LNA in an antisense therapeutic strategy for APL.

  18. Physicochemical and biological properties of self-assembled antisense/poly(amidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles: the effect of dendrimer generation and charge ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nomani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Alireza Nomani1,6, Ismaeil Haririan1,5, Ramin Rahimnia2,4, Shamileh Fouladdel2, Tarane Gazori1, Rassoul Dinarvand1, Yadollah Omidi3, Ebrahim Azizi2,41Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 4Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Biomaterials Research Center (BRC Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, IranAbstract: To gain a deeper understanding of the physicochemical phenomenon of self-assembled nanoparticles of different generations and ratios of poly (amidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM dendrimer and a short-stranded DNA (antisense oligonucleotide, multiple methods were used to characterize these nanoparticles including photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS; zeta potential measurement; and atomic force microscopy (AFM. PCS and AFM results revealed that, in contrast to larger molecules of DNA, smaller molecules produce more heterodisperse and large nanoparticles when they are condensed with a cationic dendrimer. AFM images also showed that such nanoparticles were spherical. The stability of the antisense content of the nanoparticles was investigated over different charge ratios using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was clear from such analyses that much more than charge neutrality point was required to obtain stable nanoparticles. For cell uptake, self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared with PAMAM G5 and 5’-FITC labeled antisense and the uptake experiment was carried out in T47D cell culture. This investigation also shows that the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles was

  19. Modulation of 5' splice site selection using tailed oligonucleotides carrying splicing signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elela Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the use of tailed oligonucleotides as a means of reprogramming alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and in vivo. The tailed oligonucleotides that were used interfere with splicing because they contain a portion complementary to sequences immediately upstream of the target 5' splice site combined with a non-hybridizing 5' tail carrying binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. In the present study, we have tested the inhibitory activity of RNA oligonucleotides carrying different tail structures. Results We show that an oligonucleotide with a 5' tail containing the human β-globin branch site sequence inhibits the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-xL, albeit less efficiently than a tail containing binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. A branch site-containing tail positioned at the 3' end of the oligonucleotide also elicited splicing inhibition but not as efficiently as a 5' tail. The interfering activity of a 3' tail was improved by adding a 5' splice site sequence next to the branch site sequence. A 3' tail carrying a Y-shaped branch structure promoted similar splicing interference. The inclusion of branch site or 5' splice site sequences in the Y-shaped 3' tail further improved splicing inhibition. Conclusion Our in vitro results indicate that a variety of tail architectures can be used to elicit splicing interference at low nanomolar concentrations, thereby broadening the scope and the potential impact of this antisense technology.

  20. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  1. Effects of surface chemistry and size on iron oxide nanoparticle delivery of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Christopher

    The discovery of RNA interference and the increasing understanding of disease genetics have created a new class of potential therapeutics based on oligonucleotides. This therapeutic class includes antisense molecules, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA modulators such as antagomirs (antisense directed against microRNA) and microRNA mimics, all of which function by altering gene expression at the translational level. While these molecules have the promise of treating a host of diseases from neurological disorders to cancer, a major hurdle is their inability to enter cells on their own, where they may render therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology is the engineering of materials at the nanometer scale and has gained significant interest for nucleic acid delivery due to its biologically relevant length-scale and amenability to multifunctionality. While a number of nanoparticle vehicles have shown promise for oligonucleotide delivery, there remains a lack of understanding of how nanoparticle coating and size affect these delivery processes. This dissertation seeks to elucidate some of these factors by evaluating oligonucleotide delivery efficiencies of a panel of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying cationic coatings and sizes. A panel of uniformly-sized nanoparticles was prepared with surface coatings comprised of various amine groups representing high and low pKas. A separate panel of nanoparticles with sizes of 40, 80, 150, and 200 nm but with the same cationic coating was also prepared. Results indicated that both nanoparticle surface coating and nanoparticle hydrodynamic size affect transfection efficiency. Specific particle coatings and sizes were identified that gave superior performance. The intracellular fate of iron oxide nanoparticles was also tracked by electron microscopy and suggests that they function via the proton sponge effect. The research presented in this dissertation may aid in the rational design of improved nanoparticle delivery vectors for

  2. Uptake, Efficacy, and Systemic Distribution of Naked, Inhaled Short Interfering RNA (siRNA) and Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Antisense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Sterghios A; Frick, Manfred; Taylor, Bruce; Turnpenny, Paul; Graves, Helen; Spink, Karen G; Brady, Kevin; Lamb, David; Collins, David; Rockel, Thomas D; Weber, Markus; Lazari, Ovadia; Perez-Tosar, Luis; Fancy, Sally A; Lapthorn, Chris; Green, Martin X; Evans, Steve; Selby, Matthew; Jones, Gareth; Jones, Lyn; Kearney, Sarah; Mechiche, Houria; Gikunju, Diana; Subramanian, Romesh; Uhlmann, Eugen; Jurk, Marion; Vollmer, Jörg; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Yeadon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) promise specific correction of disease-causing gene expression. Therapeutic implementation, however, has been forestalled by poor delivery to the appropriate tissue, cell type, and subcellular compartment. Topical administration is considered to circumvent these issues. The availability of inhalation devices and unmet medical need in lung disease has focused efforts in this tissue. We report the development of a novel cell sorting method for quantitative, cell type-specific analysis of siRNA, and locked nucleic acid (LNA) ASO uptake and efficacy after intratracheal (i.t.) administration in mice. Through fluorescent dye labeling, we compare the utility of this approach to whole animal and whole tissue analysis, and examine the extent of tissue distribution. We detail rapid systemic access and renal clearance for both therapeutic classes and lack of efficacy at the protein level in lung macrophages, epithelia, or other cell types. We nevertheless observe efficient redirection of i.t. administered phosphorothioate (PS) LNA ASO to the liver and kidney leading to targeted gene knockdown. These data suggest delivery remains a key obstacle to topically administered, naked oligonucleotide efficacy in the lung and introduce inhalation as a potentially viable alternative to injection for antisense administration to the liver and kidneys. PMID:21971426

  3. ENHANCEMENT OF RADIATION-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN RAJI CELL LINE BY BC1-2 ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Dong-mei; ZHANG Huan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the Bc1-2 antisense oligonucleotide(ASODN) may enhance radiation-induced apoptosis in Raji cell line. Methods: Cell surviving fraction was determined using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The expression level of bc1-2 protein was assayed by immunofluorescence using fluoresce isothiocyanate label. Apoptosis was detected by Giemsa staining and flow cytomertric cell cycle analysis. Results: It was found that Bc1-2 ASODN combined with radiation had significantly reduced the number of viable cells (P<0.05). There was no difference on cell survival between mismatch Bc1-2 oligodeoxynucleotide/radiation combination and radiation-treated cells alone. Bc1-2 ASODN combined with radiation could significantly inhibit expression of Bc1-2 protein in Raji cells (P<0.05). Cells treated with Bc1-2 ASODN combined with radiation at 72 h displayed classic apoptotic changes. Apoptosis rates of Raji cells treated with Bc1-2 oligodeoxynucleotide/radiation combination and radiation-treated cells alone, respectively. Conclusion: Bc1-2 antisense oligonucleotide can enhance radiation-induced apoptosis in Raji cell line.

  4. Antisense-mediated RNA targeting: versatile and expedient genetic manipulation in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eZalachoras

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion, but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g. in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover 1. The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry and efficacy.2. The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity and delivery issues.3. The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the CNS can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized.

  5. Antisense mRNA for NPY-Y1 receptor in the medial preoptic area increases prolactin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Silveira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the participation of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptors within the medial preoptic area in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin release. Four bilateral microinjections of sense (control or antisense 18-base oligonucleotides of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA (250 ng corresponding to the NH2-terminus of the neuropeptide Y1 receptor were performed at 12-h intervals for two days into the medial preoptic area of ovariectomized Wistar rats (N = 16, weighing 180 to 200 g, treated with estrogen (50 µg and progesterone (25 mg two days before the experiments between 8.00 and 10:00 a.m. Blockade of Y1 receptor synthesis in the medial preoptic area by the antisense mRNA did not change plasma luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone but did increase prolactin from 19.6 ± 5.9 ng/ml in the sense group to 52.9 ± 9.6 ng/ml in the antisense group. The plasma hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay and the values are reported as mean ± SEM. These data suggest that endogenous neuropeptide Y in the medial preoptic area has an inhibitory action on prolactin secretion through Y1 receptors.

  6. Evaluation of cystine transport in cultured human kidney cells and establishment of cystinuria type I phenotype by antisense technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar; Sagi, Sreedhar; Bolenz, Christian; Alken, Peter; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Knoll, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Cystinuria is a rare hereditary disease resulting in recurrent stone formation and the need for repeated invasive interventions. So far, two responsible genes have been identified which encode the two transporters, rBAT and b(0,+)AT forming a heterodimer to transport cystine in proximal tubular cells (PTC) and whose defect results in increased excretion of cystine. A human cell line mimicing the phenotype of cystinuria in vitro is yet to be developed. Human kidney (HK)-2 is a PTC line derived from normal HK. After determining the presence of rBAT gene by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, radioactively labeled cystine (S(35)) was used to evaluate the functional presence of the amino acid transport in HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. To achieve a cystinuria type I phenotype in HK-2 cells, the rBAT gene was silenced using antisense oligonucleotides complimentary to human rBAT mRNA. The reduced transport activity of cystine was then determined by radiolabeled cystine uptake measurements. RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed the expression of the rBAT gene in HK-2 cells. Considerable transport of the radio labeled cystine was observed in HK-2 cells and was linearly dependent on the incubation time with the amino acid. The cystine transport in rBAT knockdown cells after incubation with antisense oligonucleotides was significantly lower compared to control (0.76 vs. 0.98%; P=0.0008), proving a transient knock-down of the rBAT gene. This study demonstrates the presence of the b(0,+) amino acid transport system in human proximal tubular HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. Inhibition of this transport system is possible by using antisense technology. A permanent inhibition of the cystine transport, based on our model, would be useful for the development and evaluation gene therapeutic approaches.

  7. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  8. Cellular uptake of modified oligonucleotides enhanced by porphyrins studied by time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praus, P.; Kočišová, E.; Mojzeš, P.; Štěpánek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.; Sureau, F.

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence microimaging and homodyne phase-resolved confocal microspectrofluorimetry were used to monitor the transport of antisense oligonucleotide into 3T3 living cells and its subsequent intracellular distribution. Phosphorothioate analog of 15-mer oligothymidylate labeled by ATTO 425 was complexed with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (H 2TMPyP4) as an uptake-mediating agent. High frequency (up to 180 MHz) analog modulation of both exciting diode laser and the detector image intensifier gain was used to record time-resolved fluorescence spectra. Fluorescence lifetime data within a broad spectral range have revealed preservation of oligonucleotide/porphyrin complex integrity and binding properties of both components inside the cell.

  9. Chemically Modified Oligonucleotides Modulate an Epigenetically Varied and Transient Form of Transcription Silencing of HIV-1 in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Knowling

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have been shown to guide epigenetic silencing complexes to target loci in human cells. When targeted to gene promoters, these small RNAs can lead to long-term stable epigenetic silencing of gene transcription. To date, small RNAs have been shown to modulate transcriptional gene silencing (TGS of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 as well as several other disease-related genes, but it has remained unknown as to what extent particular chemistries can be used to generate single-stranded backbone-modified oligonucleotides that are amenable to this form of gene targeting and regulation. Here, we present data indicating that specific combinations of backbone modifications can be used to generate single-stranded antisense oligonucleotides that can functionally direct TGS of HIV-1 in a manner that is however, independent of epigenetic changes at the target loci. Furthermore, this functionality appears contingent on the absence of a 5′ phosphate in the oligonucleotide. These data suggest that chemically modified oligonucleotide based approaches could be implemented as a means to regulate gene transcription in an epigenetically independent manner.

  10. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  11. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  12. Gender-Specific Amelioration of SMA Phenotype upon Disruption of a Deep Intronic Structure by an Oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Matthew D; Ottesen, Eric W; Singh, Natalia N; Anderson, Rachel L; Singh, Ravindra N

    2017-06-07

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic disease of children, is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Here, we employ A15/283, an antisense oligonucleotide targeting a deep intronic sequence/structure, to examine the impact of restoration of SMN in a mild SMA mouse model. We show gender-specific amelioration of tail necrosis upon subcutaneous administrations of A15/283 into SMA mice at postnatal days 1 and 3. We also demonstrate that a modest increase in SMN due to early administrations of A15/283 dramatically improves testicular development and spermatogenesis. Our results reveal near total correction of expression of several genes in adult testis upon temporary increase in SMN during early postnatal development. This is the first demonstration of in vivo efficacy of an antisense oligonucleotide targeting a deep intronic sequence/structure. This is also the first report of gender-specific amelioration of SMA pathology upon a modest peripheral increase of SMN. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Injection site reactions after subcutaneous oligonucleotide therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, L. (Leonie); M. Moerland (Matthijs); Gallagher, J. (Jolie); M.B.A. van Doorn (Martijn); E.P. Prens (Errol); A.F. Cohen; Rissmann, R. (Robert); J. Burggraaf (Jacobus)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractOligonucleotides (ONs) are short fragments of nucleic acids, currently being investigated as therapeutic agents. When administered subcutaneously (sc), ONs cause a specific local reaction originating around the injection site, such as erythema, itching, discomfort and pain, including

  14. Influence of different chelators (HYNIC, MAG{sub 3} and DTPA) on tumor cell accumulation and mouse biodistribution of technetium-99m labeled to antisense DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.M.; Liu, N.; Zhu, Z.-H.; Rusckowski, M.; Hnatowich, D.J. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2000-11-01

    We have shown recently that cell accumulation in culture of antisense DNA is strongly influenced by the presence of a {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} group for radiolabeling. We have now compared the in vitro and mouse in vivo behavior of {sup 99m}Tc when radiolabeled to one antisense phosphorothioate DNA by three different methods. The 18-mer antisense DNA against the RI{alpha} subunit of PKA was conjugated via a primary amine on the 5'-end with the NHS esters of HYNIC and MAG{sub 3} and by the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that the association rate constant for hybridization was unchanged for all three chelators as compared with that of the native DNA. Size exclusion HPLC showed rapid and quantitative protein binding for all three chelators upon incubation of labeled DNAs in 37 C serum and cell culture medium. However, in each case, radiolabeled and intact oligonucleotide was still detectable after 24 h. Cellular uptake was tested in an RI{alpha} mRNA-positive cancer cell line. The order of cellular accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc was DTPA>HYNIC(tricine)>MAG{sub 3}, with the differences increasing with time between 4 and 24 h. The rate of {sup 99m}Tc egress from cells was found to be MAG{sub 3}>HYNIC>DTPA, which may explain the order of cellular accumulation. The biodistribution in normal mice was heavily influenced by the labeling method and followed a pattern similar to that seen previously by us for peptides labeled with the same chelators. In conclusion, although these studies concerned only one antisense DNA in one cell line, the results suggest that the success of antisense imaging may depend, in part, on the method of radiolabeling. (orig.)

  15. Selection of optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin and its application in treatment of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang-Song Tong; Li-Duan Zheng; Fang-Min Chen; Fu-Qing Zeng; Liang Wang; Ji-Hua Dong; Gong-Cheng Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To select the optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin, a highly expressed gene in tumor tissues, in order to explore a novel approach to improve biological therapy of gastric cancer.METHODS: The 20 mer random oligonucleotide library was synthesized, hybridized with in vitro transcribed total survivin cRNA, then digested by RNase H. After primer extension and autoradiography, the antisense accessible sites (AAS) of survivin were selected. Then RNADraw software was used to analyze and choose the AAS with obvious stem-loop structures, according to which the complementary antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) were synthesized and transferred into survivin highly- expressing gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. Survivin expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Cellular growth activities were assayed by tetrazolium bromide (MTT)colorimetry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by electronic microscopy, while apoptosis was detected by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining flow cytometry.RESULTS: Thirteen AAS of survivin were selected in vitro.Four AAS with stem-loop structures were chosen, locating at 207-226 bp, 187-206 bp, 126-145 bp and 44-63 bp of survivin cDNA respectively. When compared with nontranfection controls, their corresponding AS-ODNs (AS-ODN1,AS-ODN2, AS-ODN3 and AS-ODN4) could reduce Survivin mRNA levels in MKN-45 cells by 54.3±1.1% (t= 6.12, P<0.01),86.1±1.0% (t= 5.27, P<0.01), 32.2±1.3% (t= 7.34, P<0.01)and 56.2±0.9% (t= 6.45, P<0.01) respectively, while survivin protein levels were decreased by 42.2±2.5% (t = 6.26,P<0.01), 75.4±3.1% (t= 7.11, P<0.01), 28.3±2.0% (t= 6.04,P<0.01) and 45.8±1.2% (t = 6.38, P<0.01) respectively.After transfection with 600 nmol/L AS-ODN1~AS-ODN4 for24 h, cell growth was inhibited by 28.12±1.54% (t= 7.62,P<0.01), 38.42±3.12% (t = 7.75, P<0.01), 21.46±2.63%(t= 5.94, P<0.01) and 32.12±1.77% (t= 6.17, P<0.01)respectively. Partial cancer cells presented the

  16. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Harhouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670, are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90 at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90 in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A, was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  17. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  18. Inhibition of allergic airway inflammation by antisense-induced blockade of STAT6 expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xin-rui; TIAN Xin-li; BO Jian-ping; LI Shao-gang; LIU Zhuo-la; NIU Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) expression in lung epithelial cells plays a pivotal role in asthma pathogenesis. Activation of STAT6 expression results in T helper cell type 2 (Th2) cell differentiation leading to Th2-mediated IgE production, development of allergic airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Therefore,antagonizing the expression and/or the function of STAT6 could be used as a mode of therapy for allergic airway inflammation.Methods In this study, we synthesized a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASODN) overlapping the translation starting site of STAT6 and constructed STAT6 antisense RNA (pANTI-STAT6), then transfected them into murine spleen lymphocytes and analyzed the effects of antagonizing STAT6 function in vitro and in a murine model of asthma.Results In vitro, we showed suppression of STAT6 expression and interleukin (IL)-4 production of lymphocytes by STAT6 ASODN. This effect was more prominent when cells were cultured with pANTI-STAT6. In a murine model of asthma associated with allergic pulmonary inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice, local intranasal administration of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled STAT6 ASODN to DNA uptake in lung cells was accompanied by a reduction of intracellular STAT6 expression. Such intrapulmonary blockade of STAT6 expression abrogated signs of lung inflammation, infiltration of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine production.Conclusion These data suggest a critical role of STAT6 in the pathogenesis of asthma and the use of local delivery of STAT6 ASODN as a novel approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation such as in asthma.

  19. Comparison of iNOS inhibition by antisense and pharmacological inhibitors after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, D D; Chatzipanteli, K; Marcillo, A E; Bunge, M B; Dietrich, W D

    2003-11-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key mediator of inflammation during pathological conditions. We examined, through the use of selective iNOS inhibitors, the role of iNOS in specific pathophysiological processes after spinal cord injury (SCI), including astrogliosis, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability, polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Administration of iNOS antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) (intraspinally at 3 h) or the pharmacological inhibitors, N-[3(Aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine (1400 W) (i.v./i.p. 3 and 9 h) or aminoguanidine (i.p. at 3 and 9 h) after moderate contusive injury decreased the number of iNOS immunoreactive cells at the injury site by 65.6% (iNOS ASOs), 62.1% (1400 W), or 59% (aminoguanidine) 24 h postinjury. iNOS activity was reduced 81.8% (iNOS ASOs), 56.7% (1400 W), or 67.9% (aminoguanidine) at this time. All iNOS inhibitors reduced the degree of BSCB disruption (plasma leakage of rat immunoglobulins), with iNOS ASO inhibition being more effective (reduced by 58%). Neutrophil accumulation within the injury site was significantly reduced by iNOS ASOs and 1400 W by 78.8% and 20.9%, respectively. Increased astrogliosis was diminished with iNOS ASOs but enhanced following aminoguanidine. Detection of necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death by propidium iodide and an FITC-conjugated Annexin V antibody showed that iNOS inhibition could significantly retard neuronal cell death rostral and caudal to the injury site. These novel findings indicate that acute inhibition of iNOS is beneficial in reducing several pathophysiological processes after SCI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the antisense inhibition of iNOS is more efficacious than currently available pharmacological agents.

  20. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  1. On primordial sense-antisense coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Andrei S; Rodin, Sergei N; Carter, Charles W

    2009-11-01

    The genetic code is implemented by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). These 20 enzymes are divided into two classes that, despite performing same functions, have nothing common in structure. The mystery of this striking partition of aaRSs might have been concealed in their sterically complementary modes of tRNA recognition that, as we have found recently, protect the tRNAs with complementary anticodons from confusion in translation. This finding implies that, in the beginning, life increased its coding repertoire by the pairs of complementary codons (rather than one-by-one) and used both complementary strands of genes as templates for translation. The class I and class II aaRSs may represent one of the most important examples of such primordial sense-antisense (SAS) coding (Rodin and Ohno, Orig Life Evol Biosph 25:565-589, 1995). In this report, we address the issue of SAS coding in a wider scope. We suggest a variety of advantages that such coding would have had in exploring a wider sequence space before translation became highly specific. In particular, we confirm that in Achlya klebsiana a single gene might have originally coded for an HSP70 chaperonin (class II aaRS homolog) and an NAD-specific GDH-like enzyme (class I aaRS homolog) via its sense and antisense strands. Thus, in contrast to the conclusions in Williams et al. (Mol Biol Evol 26:445-450, 2009), this could indeed be a "Rosetta stone" gene (Carter and Duax, Mol Cell 10:705-708, 2002) (eroded somewhat, though) for the SAS origin of the two aaRS classes.

  2. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141-150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Preparation of liposome-coated oligonucleotide labeled with 99mTc and its uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To explore the preparation method of liposome-coated 99mTc-labeled antisense oligonucleotide (ASON),targeteing the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and to explore the biological characteristics and the uptake kinetics of a radiolabeled probe in vascular smooth muscle cells, an 18-base single-stranded antisense oligonucleotide targeting PCNA mRNA and the complementary strand (sense oligonucleotide, SON) were synthesized. The ASON (SON) was labeled with 99mTc, by conjugating the bifunctional chelator (hydrazino nicotinamide, HYNIC), and purified through a gel filtration column of Sephadex G-25. The product was then encapsulated in cationic liposome (oligofectamineTM). The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON in a phosphate buffered solution (PBS), and fresh human serum and its uptake rate were studied. There was no significant difference between the 99mTc radiolabeling efficiencies of HYNIC-ASON and HYNIC-SON, which were 60.04% ± 1.92% and 59.60% ± 2.53%, respectively (P > 0.05, n = 5). The radiochemical purity of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON was 94.70% ± 1.90% (n = 5). And after incubation with PBS and fresh human seAt 90 min after transfection, the uptake rate of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON reached its peak of 83.8% ±5.92% in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and was much higher than that of the nonliposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON, which was 11.16% ± 0.54% (P < 0.01, n = 4). The labeling method of PCNA ASON (SON) conjugated by HYNIC has been proved successful. The liposome was able to enhance the ASON (SON) uptake in VSMCs,and could be widely used as a safe, convenient, effective gene transfer carrier.

  4. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles as a delivery system for antisense therapy: evaluation against EGFR in T47D breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaei F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatemeh Talaei1, Ebrahim Azizi2, Rassoul Dinarvand3, Fatemeh Atyabi31Novel Drug Delivery Systems Lab, 2Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 3Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Thiolated chitosan has high transfection and mucoadhesive properties. We investigated the potential of two recently synthesized polymers: NAC-C (N-acetyl cysteine-chitosan and NAP-C (N-acetyl penicillamine-chitosan in anticancer drug delivery targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Doxorubicin (DOX and antisense oligonucleotide (ASOND-loaded polymer nanoparticles were prepared in water by a gelation process. Particle characterization, drug loading, and drug release were evaluated. To verify drug delivery efficiency in vitro experiments on a breast cancer cell line (T47D were performed. EGFR gene and protein expression was analyzed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. A loading percentage of 63% ± 5% for ASOND and 70% ± 5% for DOX was achieved. Drug release data after 15 hours showed that ASOND and DOX were completely released from chitosan-based particles while a lower and more sustained release of only 22% ± 8% was measured for thiolated particles. In a cytosol simulated release medium/reducing environment, such as found intracellularly, polymer-based nanoparticles dissociated, liberating approximately 50% of both active substances within 7 hours. ASOND-loaded polymer nanoparticles had higher stability and high mucoadhesive properties. The ASOND-loaded thiolated particles significantly suppressed EGFR gene expression in T47D cells compared with ASOND-loaded chitosan particles and downregulated EGFR protein expression in cells. This study could facilitate future investigations into the functionality of NAP-C and NAC-C polymers as an efficient ASOND delivery system in vitro and in vivo

  5. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  6. Regulation of Peripheral Myelination through Transcriptional Buffering of Egr2 by an Antisense Long Non-coding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Martinez-Moreno

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise regulation of Egr2 transcription is fundamentally important to the control of peripheral myelination. Here, we describe a long non-coding RNA antisense to the promoter of Egr2 (Egr2-AS-RNA. During peripheral nerve injury, the expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is increased and correlates with decreased Egr2 transcript and protein levels. Ectopic expression of Egr2-AS-RNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG cultures inhibits the expression of Egr2 mRNA and induces demyelination. In vivo inhibition of Egr2-AS-RNA using oligonucleotide GapMers released from a biodegradable hydrogel following sciatic nerve injury reverts the EGR2-mediated gene expression profile and significantly delays demyelination. Egr2-AS-RNA gradually recruits H3K27ME3, AGO1, AGO2, and EZH2 on the Egr2 promoter following sciatic nerve injury. Furthermore, expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is regulated through ERK1/2 signaling to YY1, while loss of Ser184 of YY1 regulates binding to Egr2-AS-RNA. In conclusion, we describe functional exploration of an antisense long non-coding RNA in peripheral nervous system (PNS biology.

  7. Inhibition of EGF Uptake by Nephrotoxic Antisense Drugs In Vitro and Implications for Preclinical Safety Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Moisan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotide (AON therapeutics offer new avenues to pursue clinically relevant targets inaccessible with other technologies. Advances in improving AON affinity and stability by incorporation of high affinity nucleotides, such as locked nucleic acids (LNA, have sometimes been stifled by safety liabilities related to their accumulation in the kidney tubule. In an attempt to predict and understand the mechanisms of LNA-AON-induced renal tubular toxicity, we established human cell models that recapitulate in vivo behavior of pre-clinically and clinically unfavorable LNA-AON drug candidates. We identified elevation of extracellular epidermal growth factor (EGF as a robust and sensitive in vitro biomarker of LNA-AON-induced cytotoxicity in human kidney tubule epithelial cells. We report the time-dependent negative regulation of EGF uptake and EGF receptor (EGFR signaling by toxic but not innocuous LNA-AONs and revealed the importance of EGFR signaling in LNA-AON-mediated decrease in cellular activity. The robust EGF-based in vitro safety profiling of LNA-AON drug candidates presented here, together with a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, constitutes a significant step toward developing safer antisense therapeutics.

  8. Antisense RNA controls LRP1 Sense transcript expression through interaction with a chromatin-associated protein, HMGB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Lotz, Martin; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-05-12

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including natural antisense transcripts (NATs), are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2) and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer's disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion.

  9. RNA toxicity from the ALS/FTD C9ORF72 expansion is mitigated by antisense intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Christopher J; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pham, Jacqueline T; Haeusler, Aaron R; Heusler, Aaron R; Mistry, Nipun A; Vidensky, Svetlana; Daley, Elizabeth L; Poth, Erin M; Hoover, Benjamin; Fines, Daniel M; Maragakis, Nicholas; Tienari, Pentti J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Traynor, Bryan J; Wang, Jiou; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Blackshaw, Seth; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-10-16

    A hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat expansion in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic abnormality in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The function of the C9ORF72 protein is unknown, as is the mechanism by which the repeat expansion could cause disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-differentiated neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patients revealed disease-specific (1) intranuclear GGGGCCexp RNA foci, (2) dysregulated gene expression, (3) sequestration of GGGGCCexp RNA binding protein ADARB2, and (4) susceptibility to excitotoxicity. These pathological and pathogenic characteristics were confirmed in ALS brain and were mitigated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics to the C9ORF72 transcript or repeat expansion despite the presence of repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN) products. These data indicate a toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism as a cause of C9ORF72 ALS and provide candidate antisense therapeutics and candidate human pharmacodynamic markers for therapy.

  10. Antisense RNA Controls LRP1 Sense Transcript Expression through Interaction with a Chromatin-Associated Protein, HMGB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Yamanaka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, including natural antisense transcripts (NATs, are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1, referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2 and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion.

  11. In vitro detection of mdr1 mRNA in murine leukemia cells with {sup 111}In-labeled oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Jingming; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Biotracer Medicine (Nuclear Medicine), Kanazawa (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro [Kanazawa University, Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa (Japan); Matsushita, Ryo [Kanazawa University, Laboratory for Development of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan); Nomura, Masaaki [Kanazawa University Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    The feasibility of intracellular mdr1 mRNA expression detection with radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) was investigated in the murine leukemia cell line, P388/S, and its subclonal, adriamycin-resistant cell line, P388/R. The expression level of mdr1 mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Existence of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon was assessed via cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (MIBI), a known substrate for P-glycoprotein. A 15-mer phosphorothioate antisense ODN complementary to the sequences located at -1 to 14 of mdr1 mRNA and its corresponding sense ODN were conjugated with the cyclic anhydride of diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (cDTPA) via an amino group linked to the terminal phosphate at the 5' end at pH 8-9. The DTPA-ODN complexes at concentrations of 0.1-17.4 {mu}Mwere reacted with {sup 111}InCl{sub 3} at pH 5 for 1 h. The hybridization affinity of labeled ODN was evaluated with size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography following incubation with the complementary sequence. Cellular uptake of labeled ODN was examined in vitro. Furthermore, enhancing effects of synthetic lipid carriers (Transfast) on transmembrane delivery of ODN were assessed. P388/R cells displayed intense mdr1 mRNA expression in comparison with P388/S cells. {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake in P388/S cells was higher than that in P388/R cells. Specific radioactivity up to 1,634 MBq/nmol was achieved via elevation of added radioactivity relative to ODN molar amount. The hybridization affinity of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN was preserved at approximately 85% irrespective of specific activity. Cellular uptake of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN did not differ from that of sense {sup 111}In-ODN in either P388/S cells or P388/R cells. However, lipid carrier incorporation significantly increased transmembrane delivery of {sup 111}In-ODN; moreover, specific uptake of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN was demonstrated in P388/R

  12. Detection, characterization and regulation of antisense transcripts in HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesnard Jean-Michel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have recently demonstrated that the human retrovirus HTLV-I was producing a spliced antisense transcript, which led to the synthesis of the HBZ protein. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1 and to provide a better characterization of the transcript and its regulation. Results Initial experiments conducted by standard RT-PCR analysis in latently infected J1.1 cell line and pNL4.3-transfected 293T cells confirmed the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1. A more adapted RT-PCR protocol with limited RT-PCR artefacts also led to a successful detection of antisense transcripts in several infected cell lines. RACE analyses demonstrated the existence of several transcription initiation sites mapping near the 5' border of the 3'LTR (in the antisense strand. Interestingly, a new polyA signal was identified on the antisense strand and harboured the polyA signal consensus sequence. Transfection experiments in 293T and Jurkat cells with an antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 proviral DNA showed luciferase reporter gene expression, which was further induced by various T-cell activators. In addition, the viral Tat protein was found to be a positive modulator of antisense transcription by transient and stable transfections of this proviral DNA construct. RT-PCR analyses in 293T cells stably transfected with a pNL4.3-derived construct further confirmed these results. Infection of 293T, Jurkat, SupT1, U937 and CEMT4 cells with pseudotyped virions produced from the antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 DNA clone led to the production of an AZT-sensitive luciferase signal, which was however less pronounced than the signal from NL4.3Luc-infected cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that antisense transcription exists in HIV-1 in the context of infection. Possible translation of the predicted antisense ORF in this transcript should

  13. Chimeric snRNA molecules carrying antisense sequences against the splice junctions of exon 51 of the dystrophin pre-mRNA induce exon skipping and restoration of a dystrophin synthesis in Δ48-50 DMD cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Sthandier, Olga; Berarducci, Barbara; Toso, Silvia; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Ricci, Enzo; Cossu, Giulio; Bozzoni, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Deletions and point mutations in the dystrophin gene cause either the severe progressive myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker muscular dystrophy, depending on whether the translational reading frame is lost or maintained. Because internal in-frame deletions in the protein produce only mild myopathic symptoms, it should be possible, by preventing the inclusion of specific mutated exon(s) in the mature dystrophin mRNA, to restore a partially corrected phenotype. Such control has been previously accomplished by the use of synthetic oligonucleotides; nevertheless, a significant drawback to this approach is caused by the fact that oligonucleotides would require periodic administrations. To circumvent this problem, we have produced several constructs able to express in vivo, in a stable fashion, large amounts of chimeric RNAs containing antisense sequences. In this paper we show that antisense molecules against exon 51 splice junctions are able to direct skipping of this exon in the human DMD deletion 48–50 and to rescue dystrophin synthesis. We also show that the highest skipping activity was found when antisense constructs against the 5′ and 3′ splice sites are coexpressed in the same cell. PMID:12077324

  14. Pharmacology of a Central Nervous System Delivered 2′-O-Methoxyethyl–Modified Survival of Motor Neuron Splicing Oligonucleotide in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Rigo, Frank; Chun, Seung J.; Norris, Daniel A.; Hung, Gene; Lee, Sam; Matson, John; Fey, Robert A.; Gaus, Hans; Hua, Yimin; Grundy, John S.; Krainer, Adrian R; Henry, Scott P.; Bennett, C. Frank

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a debilitating neuromuscular disease caused by the loss of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. Previously, we demonstrated that ISIS 396443, an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the SMN2 pre-mRNA, is a potent inducer of SMN2 exon 7 inclusion and SMN protein expression, and improves function and survival of mild and severe SMA mouse models. Here, we demonstrate that ISIS 396443 is the most potent ASO in central nervous system (CNS) tissues of adul...

  15. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  16. Assessing specific oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for the ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin T King

    Full Text Available Studies on Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP and its orthologs have confirmed their functional role in mRNA stability and localization. CRD-BP is present in extremely low levels in normal adult tissues, but it is over-expressed in many types of aggressive human cancers and in neonatal tissues. Although the exact role of CRD-BP in tumour progression is unclear, cumulative evidence suggests that its ability to physically associate with target mRNAs is an important criterion for its oncogenic role. CRD-BP has high affinity for the 3'UTR of the oncogenic CD44 mRNA and depletion of CRD-BP in cells led to destabilization of CD44 mRNA, decreased CD44 expression, reduced adhesion and disruption of invadopodia formation. Here, we further characterize the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction and assess specific antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for their ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction. CRD-BP has a high affinity for binding to CD44 RNA nts 2862-3055 with a Kd of 645 nM. Out of ten antisense oligonucleotides spanning nts 2862-3055, only three antisense oligonucleotides (DD4, DD7 and DD10 were effective in competing with CRD-BP for binding to 32P-labeled CD44 RNA. The potency of DD4, DD7 and DD10 in inhibiting the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro correlated with their ability to specifically reduce the steady-state level of CD44 mRNA in cells. The aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin and streptomycin effectively inhibited the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro. Assessing the potential inhibitory effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics including neomycin on the CRD-BP-CD44 mRNA interaction in cells proved difficult, likely due to their propensity to non-specifically bind nucleic acids. Our results have important implications for future studies in finding small molecules and nucleic acid-based inhibitors that interfere with protein-RNA interactions.

  17. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-03-31

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3'-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUG(exp)) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUG(exp)/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUG(exp) foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUG(exp)-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1.

  18. Methidium intercalator inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, E. N.; Smirnov, I. P.; Haff, L. A.; Tishchenko, E. I.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Florentiev, V. L.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; PerSeptive BioSystems Inc.

    1996-01-01

    A new methidium intercalator phosphoramidite has been synthesized. Methidium incorporation into an oligonucleotide during the synthesis was confirmed by UV and MALDI TOF MS data. UV melting experiments showed enhanced stability of a duplex, containing internal methidium. Methidium phosphoramidite has been synthesized and used for insertion of intercalator into the deoxyoligonucleotides.

  19. In vitro and in vivo rescue of aberrant splicing in CEP290-associated LCA by antisense oligonucleotide delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garanto, A.; Chung, D.C.; Duijkers, L.; Corral-Serrano, J.C.; Messchaert, M.; Xiao, R.; Bennett, J.; Vandenberghe, L.H.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe disorder resulting in visual impairment usually starting in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA is an intronic mutation in CEP290 (c.2991 + 1655A > G) that creates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of a p

  20. Altered antisense-to-sense transcript ratios in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Reo; Shipitsin, Michail; Choudhury, Sibgat; Wu, Zhenhua; Protopopov, Alexei; Yao, Jun; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Bessarabova, Marina; Ishkin, Alex; Nikolsky, Yuri; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2012-02-21

    Transcriptome profiling studies suggest that a large fraction of the genome is transcribed and many transcripts function independent of their protein coding potential. The relevance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in normal physiological processes and in tumorigenesis is increasingly recognized. Here, we describe consistent and significant differences in the distribution of sense and antisense transcripts between normal and neoplastic breast tissues. Many of the differentially expressed antisense transcripts likely represent long ncRNAs. A subset of genes that mainly generate antisense transcripts in normal but not cancer cells is involved in essential metabolic processes. These findings suggest fundamental differences in global RNA regulation between normal and cancer cells that might play a role in tumorigenesis.

  1. Mucin-mediated nanocarrier disassembly for triggered uptake of oligonucleotides as a delivery strategy for the potential treatment of mucosal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, A.; Olesen, M. J.; Fenton, R. A.; Kjems, J.; Howard, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates gastric mucin-triggered nanocarrier disassembly for release of antisense oligonucleotides and consequent unassisted cellular entry as a novel oral delivery strategy. A fluorescence activation-based reporter system was used to investigate the interaction and mucin-mediated disassembly of chitosan-based nanocarriers containing a 13-mer DNA oligonucleotide with a flanked locked RNA nucleic acid gapmer design. Gastric mucins were shown to trigger gapmer release from nanocarriers that was dependent on the interaction time, mucin concentration and N : P ratio with a maximal release at N : P 10. In contrast to siRNA, naked gapmers exhibited uptake into mucus producing HT-MTX mono-cultures and HT-MTX co-cultured with the carcinoma epithelial cell line Caco-2. Importantly, in vivo gapmer uptake was observed in epithelial tissue 30 min post-injection in murine intestinal loops. The findings present a mucosal design-based system tailored for local delivery of oligonucleotides that may maximize the effectiveness of gene silencing therapeutics within tumours at mucosal sites.This work demonstrates gastric mucin-triggered nanocarrier disassembly for release of antisense oligonucleotides and consequent unassisted cellular entry as a novel oral delivery strategy. A fluorescence activation-based reporter system was used to investigate the interaction and mucin-mediated disassembly of chitosan-based nanocarriers containing a 13-mer DNA oligonucleotide with a flanked locked RNA nucleic acid gapmer design. Gastric mucins were shown to trigger gapmer release from nanocarriers that was dependent on the interaction time, mucin concentration and N : P ratio with a maximal release at N : P 10. In contrast to siRNA, naked gapmers exhibited uptake into mucus producing HT-MTX mono-cultures and HT-MTX co-cultured with the carcinoma epithelial cell line Caco-2. Importantly, in vivo gapmer uptake was observed in epithelial tissue 30 min post-injection in murine intestinal

  2. Electrochemical study of hepta–oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Balcarova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the description and characterization of twohepta–oligonucleotides (DNA and RNA forming special structures.We studied their electrochemical behaviour by means of cyclicvoltammetry (CV and elimination voltammetry with linear scan(EVLS in combination with adsorptive stripping (AdS technique.Differences in electrochemical behaviour of hepta–deoxyribonucleotide and its RNA analog were discussed with regardto their different structures in solutions and their melting points.

  3. Abundant oligonucleotides common to most bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin F Davenport

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria show a bias in their genomic oligonucleotide composition far beyond that dictated by G+C content. Patterns of over- and underrepresented oligonucleotides carry a phylogenetic signal and are thus diagnostic for individual species. Patterns of short oligomers have been investigated by multiple groups in large numbers of bacteria genomes. However, global distributions of the most highly overrepresented mid-sized oligomers have not been assessed across all prokaryotes to date. We surveyed overrepresented mid-length oligomers across all prokaryotes and normalised for base composition and embedded oligomers using zero and second order Markov models. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a presumably ancient set of oligomers conserved and overrepresented in nearly all branches of prokaryotic life, including Archaea. These oligomers are either adenine rich homopurines with one to three guanine nucleosides, or homopyridimines with one to four cytosine nucleosides. They do not show a consistent preference for coding or non-coding regions or aggregate in any coding frame, implying a role in DNA structure and as polypeptide binding sites. Structural parameters indicate these oligonucleotides to be an extreme and rigid form of B-DNA prone to forming triple stranded helices under common physiological conditions. Moreover, the narrow minor grooves of these structures are recognised by DNA binding and nucleoid associated proteins such as HU. CONCLUSION: Homopurine and homopyrimidine oligomers exhibit distinct and unusual structural features and are present at high copy number in nearly all prokaryotic lineages. This fact suggests a non-neutral role of these oligonucleotides for bacterial genome organization that has been maintained throughout evolution.

  4. Synthesis and hybridization properties of inverse oligonucleotides.

    OpenAIRE

    Marangoni, M.; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Augustijns, Patrick; Rozenski, Jef; Herdewijn , Piet

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of adenine and thymine cyclopentylethyl nucleosides is presented. This novel constrained monomeric building block is very difficult to incorporate into oligonucleotides. It was introduced in 13mer oligodeoxynucleotide sequences at a single position using H-phosphonate chemistry. Phosphoramidite chemistry completely failed in this particular case. The H-phosphonate building blocks were obtained starting from the corresponding phosphoramidites. Stability of duplexes with RNA and D...

  5. An evaluation of oligonucleotide-based therapeutic strategies for polyQ diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiszer Agnieszka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi and antisense strategies provide experimental therapeutic agents for numerous diseases, including polyglutamine (polyQ disorders caused by CAG repeat expansion. We compared the potential of different oligonucleotide-based strategies for silencing the genes responsible for several polyQ diseases, including Huntington's disease and two spinocerebellar ataxias, type 1 and type 3. The strategies included nonallele-selective gene silencing, gene replacement, allele-selective SNP targeting and CAG repeat targeting. Results Using the patient-derived cell culture models of polyQ diseases, we tested various siRNAs, and antisense reagents and assessed their silencing efficiency and allele selectivity. We showed considerable allele discrimination by several SNP targeting siRNAs based on a weak G-G or G-U pairing with normal allele and strong G-C pairing with mutant allele at the site of RISC-induced cleavage. Among the CAG repeat targeting reagents the strongest allele discrimination is achieved by miRNA-like functioning reagents that bind to their targets and inhibit their translation without substantial target cleavage. Also, morpholino analog performs well in mutant and normal allele discrimination but its efficient delivery to cells at low effective concentration still remains a challenge. Conclusions Using three cellular models of polyQ diseases and the same experimental setup we directly compared the performance of different oligonucleotide-based treatment strategies that are currently under development. Based on the results obtained by us and others we discussed the advantages and drawbacks of these strategies considering them from several different perspectives. The strategy aimed at nonallele-selective inhibiting of causative gene expression by targeting specific sequence of the implicated gene is the easiest to implement but relevant benefits are still uncertain. The gene replacement strategy that

  6. Polyquaternium-mediated delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2017-11-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown great potential in preclinical and clinical trials, but its therapeutic applications are still limited due to inefficient delivery. In this study, we investigated a few polyquaterniums (PQs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery performance of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Luviquat(TM) series, especially PQ-1 and PQ-3, promoted the exon-skipping efficiency comparable to Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. Significant enhancement in skipping dystrophin exon 23 has also been achieved with PQ-3 up to seven-fold when compared to PMO alone in mdx mice. Cytotoxicity of the PQs was lower than Endoporter and PEI 25 K in vitro and muscle damage not clearly detected in vivo under the tested concentrations. These results together demonstrate that the optimization of PQ in molecular size, composition and distribution of positive charges is the key factor to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The higher efficiency and lower toxicity endow polyquaternium series as AO delivery enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  7. Highly expressed genes are associated with inverse antisense transcription in mouse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andras Györffy; Pawel Surowiak; Zsolt Tulassay; Balazs Györffy

    2007-08-01

    There is a growing evidence, that antisense transcription might have a key role in a range of human diseases. Although predefined sense–antisense pairs were extensively studied, the antisense expression of the known sense genes is rarely investigated. We retrieved and correlated the expression of sense and antisense sequences of 1182 mouse transcripts to assess the prevalence and to find the characteristic pattern of antisense transcription. We contrasted three Affymetrix MGU74A version 1 mouse genome chips to six MGU74A version 2 chips. For these 1182 transcripts, the version 1 chips contain the antisense sequences of the transcripts presented on the version 2 chips. The original data was taken from the GEO database (GDS431 and GDS432). As the Affymetrix data are semiquantitative, the relative expression levels of antisense partners were analysed. We detected antisense transcription, although the average antisense expression is shifted towards smaller expression values (MGU74A version 1, 516; version 2, 1688). An inverse direct correlation between sense and antisense expression values could be observed at high expression values. At a very high relative expression—above 40,000—the Pearson correlation coefficient is getting closer to −1. Transcripts with high inverse expression ratio may be correlated to the investigated gene (major histocompatibility complex class II trans activator). The ratio of sense to antisense transcripts varied among different chromosomes; on chromosomes 14 and 1 the level of antisense expression was higher than that of sense. We conclude that antisense transcription is a common phenomenon in the mouse genome. The hypothesis of regulatory role of antisense transcripts is supported by the inverse antisense gene expression of highly expressed genes.

  8. The role of helper lipids in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) designed for oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Lee, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have shown promise as delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including antisense oligos (ONs), siRNA, and microRNA mimics and inhibitors. In addition to a cationic lipid, LNPs are typically composed of helper lipids that contribute to their stability and delivery efficiency. Helper lipids with cone-shape geometry favoring the formation hexagonal II phase, such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), can promote endosomal release of ONs. Meanwhile, cylindrical-shaped lipid phosphatidylcholine can provide greater bilayer stability, which is important for in vivo application of LNPs. Cholesterol is often included as a helper that improves intracellular delivery as well as LNP stability in vivo. Inclusion of a PEGylating lipid can enhance LNP colloidal stability in vitro and circulation time in vivo but may reduce uptake and inhibit endosomal release at the cellular level. This problem can be addressed by choosing reversible PEGylation in which the PEG moiety is gradually released in blood circulation. pH-sensitive anionic helper lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS), can trigger low-pH-induced changes in LNP surface charge and destabilization that can facilitate endosomal release of ONs. Generally speaking, there is no correlation between LNP activity in vitro and in vivo because of differences in factors limiting the efficiency of delivery. Designing LNPs requires the striking of a proper balance between the need for particle stability, long systemic circulation time, and the need for LNP destabilization inside the target cell to release the oligonucleotide cargo, which requires the proper selection of both the cationic and helper lipids. Customized design and empirical optimization is needed for specific applications.

  9. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...

  10. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  11. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  12. Pip6-PMO, A New Generation of Peptide-oligonucleotide Conjugates With Improved Cardiac Exon Skipping Activity for DMD Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; Coursindel, Thibault; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2012-08-14

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are currently the most promising therapeutic intervention for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). AOs modulate dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing, thereby specifically restoring the dystrophin reading frame and generating a truncated but semifunctional dystrophin protein. Challenges in the development of this approach are the relatively poor systemic AO delivery and inefficient dystrophin correction in affected non-skeletal muscle tissues, including the heart. We have previously reported impressive heart activity including high-splicing efficiency and dystrophin restoration following a single administration of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (CPPs) conjugated to a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO): Pip5e-PMO. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are poorly understood. Here, we report studies involving single dose administration (12.5 mg/kg) of derivatives of Pip5e-PMO, consecutively assigned as Pip6-PMOs. These peptide-PMOs comprise alterations to the central hydrophobic core of the Pip5e peptide and illustrate that certain changes to the peptide sequence improves its activity; however, partial deletions within the hydrophobic core abolish its efficiency. Our data indicate that the hydrophobic core of the Pip sequences is critical for PMO delivery to the heart and that specific modifications to this region can enhance activity further. The results have implications for therapeutic PMO development for DMD.

  13. Pip6-PMO, A New Generation of Peptide-oligonucleotide Conjugates With Improved Cardiac Exon Skipping Activity for DMD Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Betts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs are currently the most promising therapeutic intervention for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. AOs modulate dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing, thereby specifically restoring the dystrophin reading frame and generating a truncated but semifunctional dystrophin protein. Challenges in the development of this approach are the relatively poor systemic AO delivery and inefficient dystrophin correction in affected non-skeletal muscle tissues, including the heart. We have previously reported impressive heart activity including high-splicing efficiency and dystrophin restoration following a single administration of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (CPPs conjugated to a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO: Pip5e-PMO. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are poorly understood. Here, we report studies involving single dose administration (12.5 mg/kg of derivatives of Pip5e-PMO, consecutively assigned as Pip6-PMOs. These peptide-PMOs comprise alterations to the central hydrophobic core of the Pip5e peptide and illustrate that certain changes to the peptide sequence improves its activity; however, partial deletions within the hydrophobic core abolish its efficiency. Our data indicate that the hydrophobic core of the Pip sequences is critical for PMO delivery to the heart and that specific modifications to this region can enhance activity further. The results have implications for therapeutic PMO development for DMD.

  14. Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for FTD/ALS Caused by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion: A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive and lethal disease of motor neuron degeneration, leading to paralysis of voluntary muscles and death by respiratory failure within five years of onset. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is characterised by degeneration of frontal and temporal lobes, leading to changes in personality, behaviour, and language, culminating in death within 5–10 years. Both of these diseases form a clinical, pathological, and genetic continuum of diseases, and this link has become clearer recently with the discovery of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene that causes the FTD/ALS spectrum, that is, c9FTD/ALS. Two basic mechanisms have been proposed as being potentially responsible for c9FTD/ALS: loss-of-function of the protein encoded by this gene (associated with aberrant DNA methylation and gain of function through the formation of RNA foci or protein aggregates. These diseases currently lack any cure or effective treatment. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are modified nucleic acids that are able to silence targeted mRNAs or perform splice modulation, and the fact that they have proved efficient in repeat expansion diseases including myotonic dystrophy type 1 makes them ideal candidates for c9FTD/ALS therapy. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms and challenges for developing oligonucleotide-based therapy for c9FTD/ALS.

  15. Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for FTD/ALS Caused by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion: A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Stephanie A; Douglas, Andrew G L; Varela, Miguel A; Wood, Matthew J A; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and lethal disease of motor neuron degeneration, leading to paralysis of voluntary muscles and death by respiratory failure within five years of onset. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterised by degeneration of frontal and temporal lobes, leading to changes in personality, behaviour, and language, culminating in death within 5-10 years. Both of these diseases form a clinical, pathological, and genetic continuum of diseases, and this link has become clearer recently with the discovery of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene that causes the FTD/ALS spectrum, that is, c9FTD/ALS. Two basic mechanisms have been proposed as being potentially responsible for c9FTD/ALS: loss-of-function of the protein encoded by this gene (associated with aberrant DNA methylation) and gain of function through the formation of RNA foci or protein aggregates. These diseases currently lack any cure or effective treatment. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are modified nucleic acids that are able to silence targeted mRNAs or perform splice modulation, and the fact that they have proved efficient in repeat expansion diseases including myotonic dystrophy type 1 makes them ideal candidates for c9FTD/ALS therapy. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms and challenges for developing oligonucleotide-based therapy for c9FTD/ALS.

  16. Hyphenation of a Deoxyribonuclease I immobilized enzyme reactor with liquid chromatography for the online stability evaluation of oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Porebski, Piotr Wiktor; Gyssels, Ellen; Madder, Annemieke; Lynen, Frederic

    2015-11-27

    The stability of antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) toward nucleases is a key aspect for their possible implementation as therapeutic agents. Typically, ON stability studies are performed off-line, where the ONs are incubated with nucleases in solution, followed by their analysis. The problematics of off-line processing render the detailed comparison of relative ON stability quite challenging. Therefore, the development of an online platform based on an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) coupled to liquid chromatography (LC) was developed as an alternative for improved ON stability testing. More in detail, Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was immobilized on epoxy-silica particles of different pore sizes and packed into a column for the construction of an IMER. Subsequently, the hyphenation of the IMER with ion-pair chromatography (IPC) and ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) was evaluated, leading to the successful development of two online methodologies: IMER-IPC and IMER-IEC. More specifically, natural and modified DNA and RNA oligonucleotides were used for testing the performance of the methodologies. Both methodologies proved to be simple, automatable, fast and highly reproducible for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of ON degradation. In addition, the extended IMER life time in combination with a more straightforward control of the reaction kinetics substantiate the applicability of the IMER-LC platform for ON stability tests and its implementation in routine and research laboratories.

  17. Inhibitory effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to p44/p42 MAPK on angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic response in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-qinZHANG; BoDING; Zhao-guiGUO; Yun-xiaLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibitory effect of antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) to mitogen activated protein kinase(MAPK) on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ). METHODS: A 17-mer phosphorothioate-protected antisense ODN directed against the initiation of translation sites of the p42 and p44 MAPK isoforms byliposomal transfection was applied to inhibit the translation of p44/p42 MAPK mRNA. The sense and random ODNs to p44/p42MAPK were used as sequence controls. Neonatal cardiac myocytes were exposed to Ang Ⅱ (10nmol/L) for 5 min and then harvested in lysis buffer for the measurement of the activity and the phosphorylated protein content of p44/p42MAPK that were tested by P-81 phosphocellulose filter paper method and Western blotting, respectively. The rate of protein synthesis by [3H]leucine incorporation and the diameter of cell were measured after exposure to Ang Ⅱ for 24 h and 72 h, respectively. RESULTS: In cardiac myocyte Ang Ⅱ increased p44/p42MAPK activity and phosphorylated protein content by 140 % and 699 %, and also increased [3H]leucine incorporation and cell diameter by 40 % and 27 %. c-fos and c-myc mRNAs were induced significantly after exposure to Ang Ⅱ. Antisense ODN to p44/p42MAPK (0.2 μmol/L) reduced Ang Ⅱ-induced MAPK activity by 30 %,and phophorylated MAPK protein expression by 59 % in cardiac myocyte, and inhibited c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression induced by Ang Ⅱ by 44 % and 43 %, respectively. The diameter and the rate of protein synthesis of cardiac myocyte induced by Ang Ⅱ were decreased by 16 % and 22 % after pretreatment with antisense ODN to p44/p42MAPK. CONCLUSION: Antisense ODN to p44/p42 MAPK inhibited the increase of rate of protein synthesis,and the augmentation of cell diameter and expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNA induced by Ang Ⅱ in culturedcardiac myocytes, p44/p42 MAPK played a critical role in the hypertrophic response induced by Ang Ⅱ in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.

  18. Lipid Oligonucleotide Conjugates as Responsive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Amphiphiles, oligonucleotides, lipids...peer-reviewed journals: (c) Presentations 1. Philippe Barthélémy, « Hybrid Lipids for Biomedical Applications », Targeting and Triggering Basic Research ...Steadel C. ; Pierre, N. ; Barthélémy, P. : Oligonucléotides amphiphile : Journée Scientifique de l’IFR 66, Talence, le 2 décembre 2008, France 29. Taib

  19. Inhibition of vascular permeability by antisense-mediated inhibition of plasma kallikrein and coagulation factor 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Revenko, Alexey S; Crosby, Jeffrey R; May, Chris; Gao, Dacao; Zhao, Chenguang; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent, acute, and painful episodes of swelling involving multiple tissues. Deficiency or malfunction of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) results in HAE types 1 and 2, respectively, whereas mutations in coagulation factor 12 (f12) have been associated with HAE type 3. C1-INH is the primary inhibitor of multiple plasma cascade pathways known to be altered in HAE patients, including the complement, fibrinolytic, coagulation, and kinin-kallikrein pathways. We have selectively inhibited several components of both the kinin-kallikrein system and the coagulation cascades with potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to investigate their relative contributions to vascular permeability. We have also developed ASO inhibitors of C1-INH and characterized their effects on vascular permeability in mice as an inducible model of HAE. Our studies demonstrate that ASO-mediated reduction in C1-INH plasma levels results in increased vascular permeability and that inhibition of proteases of the kinin-kallikrein system, either f12 or prekallikrein (PKK) reverse the effects of C1-INH depletion with similar effects on both basal and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced permeability. In contrast, inhibition of coagulation factors 11 (f11) or 7 (f7) had no effect. These results suggest that the vascular defects observed in C1-INH deficiency are dependent on the kinin-kallikrein system proteases f12 and PKK, and not mediated through the coagulation pathways. In addition, our results highlight a novel therapeutic modality that can potentially be employed prophylactically to prevent attacks in HAE patients.

  20. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M.D.; Blomberg, K. Emelie M.; Mohammad, Dara K.; Saleh, Amer F.; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z.; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O.; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C.; Behlke, Mark A.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Gait, Michael J.; Lundin, Karin E.; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C.I. Edvard

    2014-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2′-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro–B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA. PMID:25105368

  1. Synthesis of Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligonucleotides and Their Chimeras Using Phosphoramidite Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sibasish; Caruthers, Marvin H

    2016-12-07

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholinos (PMOs) and PMO-DNA chimeras have been prepared on DNA synthesizers using phosphoramidite chemistry. This was possible by first generating boranephosphoroamidate morpholino internucleotide linkages followed by oxidative substitution with four different amines: N,N-dimethylamine, N-methylamine, ammonia, and morpholine. When compared to a natural DNA duplex, the amino modified PMO was found to have a higher melting temperature with either complementary DNA or RNA, whereas the remaining PMO analogues having morpholino, dimethylamino, or N-methylamino phosphorodiamidate linkages had melting temperatures that were either comparable or reduced. Additionally the N,N-dimethylamino PMO-DNA chimeras were found to stimulate RNaseH1 activity. Treatment of HeLa cells with fluorescently labeled PMO chimeras demonstrated that these analogues were efficiently taken up by cells in the presence of a lipid transfection reagent. Because of the simplistic synthesis procedures, various PMO analogues are now readily available and should therefore open new pathways for research into the antisense, diagnostic, and nanotechnology oligonucleotide fields.

  2. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Mohammad, Dara K; Saleh, Amer F; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J; Lundin, Karin E; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2014-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro-B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA.

  3. Nano and Microtechnologies for the Delivery of Oligonucleotides with Gene Silencing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe De Rosa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotides (ONs are synthetic fragments of nucleic acid designed to modulate the expression of target proteins. DNA-based ONs (antisense, antigene, aptamer or decoy and more recently a new class of RNA-based ONs, the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, have gained great attention for the treatment of different disease states, such as viral infections, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer. However, the development of therapeutic strategies based on ONs is hampered by their low bioavailability, poor intracellular uptake and rapid degradation in biological fluids. The use of a non-viral carrier can be a powerful tool to overcome these drawbacks. Lipid or polymer-based nanotechnologies can improve biological stability and cellular uptake of ONs, with possibility of tissue and/or cellular targeting. The use of polymeric devices can also produce a prolonged release of the ON, thus reducing the need of frequent administrations. This review summarizes advantages and issues related to the main non-viral vectors used for ON delivery.

  4. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  5. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  6. Design of oligonucleotides for microarrays and perspectives for design of multi-transcriptome arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Wernersson, Rasmus; Knudsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer with an ......Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer...

  7. Oligonucleotides Containing Aminated 2′-Amino-LNA Nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Samuelsen, Simone V.; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2017-01-01

    Mono- and diaminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. Each modification imparts significant stabilization of nucleic acid duplexes and triplexes, excellent sequence selectivity, and significant nuclease resistance. Molecular modeling suggested...... that structural stabilization occurs via intrastrand electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of the aminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers and the host oligonucleotide backbone....

  8. Enhanced fluorescence of silver nanoclusters stabilized with branched oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Lorca, Romina; Zamora, Félix; Somoza, Álvaro

    2013-05-28

    DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are promising optical materials, whose fluorescence properties can be tuned by the selection of the DNA sequence employed. In this work we have used modified oligonucleotides in the preparation of AgNCs. The fluorescent intensity obtained was 60 times higher than that achieved with standard oligonucleotides.

  9. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A

    2015-01-01

    ) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one......The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition......, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise...

  10. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  11. The Use of Antisense-Mediated Inhibition to Delineate The Role of Inflammatory Agents in The Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien D. Pearse

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the central nervous system (CNS usually lead to a potent and acute inflammatory response[1]. During this period, glia and immune cells respond to chemical cues associated with the debris of lysed neurons, disrupted axons, and a broken blood-brain-barrier by releasing a battery of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and, interleukin-β (IL-1β as well as reactive oxygen species such as nitric oxide (NO-[2]. The secretion of these factors may be primarily responsible for secondary damage to surrounding uninjured tissue that potentiates the initial injury[3]. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are designed to hybridize to specific regions of specific mRNAs. Hybridization of the oligonucleotide to the mRNA then interferes with the normal processing of that mRNA at the ribosome or targets the RNA duplex for cleavage by the RNA digestive enzyme, ribonuclease H, resulting in greatly reduced expression of the coded protein. This effectively reduces the amount of corresponding translated protein product and experiments can be designed to examine the requirement of particular inflammatory agents in eliciting specific deleterious responses after injury, e.g., cell death.

  12. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  13. Preparation and application of triple helix forming oligonucleotides and single strand oligonucleotide donors for gene correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rowshon; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for site-specific modulation of genomic sequences in mammalian cells require two components. One must be capable of recognizing and activating a specific target sequence in vivo, driving that site into an exploitable repair pathway. Information is transferred to the site via participation in the pathway by the second component, a donor nucleic acid, resulting in a permanent change in the target sequence. We have developed biologically active triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as site-specific gene targeting reagents. These TFOs, linked to DNA reactive compounds (such as a cross-linking agent), activate pathways that can engage informational donors. We have used the combination of a psoralen-TFO and single strand oligonucleotide donors to generate novel cell lines with directed sequence changes at the target site. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of bioactive psoralen-linked TFOs, their co-introduction into mammalian cells with donor nucleic acids, and the identification of cells with sequence conversion of the target site. We have emphasized details in the synthesis and purification of the oligonucleotides that are essential for preparation of reagents with optimal activity.

  14. Bioresponsive antisense DNA gold nanobeacons as a hybrid in vivo theranostics platform for the inhibition of cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chenchen; Conde, João; Curtin, James; Artzi, Natalie; Tian, Furong; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-07-01

    Gold nanobeacons can be used as a powerful tool for cancer theranostics. Here, we proposed a nanomaterial platform based on gold nanobeacons to detect, target and inhibit the expression of a mutant Kras gene in an in vivo murine gastric cancer model. The conjugation of fluorescently-labeled antisense DNA hairpin oligonucleotides to the surface of gold nanoparticles enables using their localized surface plasmon resonance properties to directly track the delivery to the primary gastric tumor and to lung metastatic sites. The fluorescently labeled nanobeacons reports on the interaction with the target as the fluorescent Cy3 signal is quenched by the gold nanoparticle and only emit light following conjugation to the Kras target owing to reorganization and opening of the nanobeacons, thus increasing the distance between the dye and the quencher. The systemic administration of the anti-Kras nanobeacons resulted in approximately 60% tumor size reduction and a 90% reduction in tumor vascularization. More important, the inhibition of the Kras gene expression in gastric tumors prevents the occurrence of metastasis to lung (80% reduction), increasing mice survival in more than 85%. Our developed platform can be easily adjusted to hybridize with any specific target and provide facile diagnosis and treatment for neoplastic diseases.

  15. Sense and antisense transcription are associated with distinct chromatin architectures across genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Howe, Françoise S; Fischl, Harry; Chocian, Karolina; Nair, Anitha; Mellor, Jane

    2015-09-18

    Genes from yeast to mammals are frequently subject to non-coding transcription of their antisense strand; however the genome-wide role for antisense transcription remains elusive. As transcription influences chromatin structure, we took a genome-wide approach to assess which chromatin features are associated with nascent antisense transcription, and contrast these with features associated with nascent sense transcription. We describe a distinct chromatin architecture at the promoter and gene body specifically associated with antisense transcription, marked by reduced H2B ubiquitination, H3K36 and H3K79 trimethylation and increased levels of H3 acetylation, chromatin remodelling enzymes, histone chaperones and histone turnover. The difference in sense transcription between genes with high or low levels of antisense transcription is slight; thus the antisense transcription-associated chromatin state is not simply analogous to a repressed state. Using mutants in which the level of antisense transcription is reduced at GAL1, or altered genome-wide, we show that non-coding transcription is associated with high H3 acetylation and H3 levels across the gene, while reducing H3K36me3. Set1 is required for these antisense transcription-associated chromatin changes in the gene body. We propose that nascent antisense and sense transcription have fundamentally distinct relationships with chromatin, and that both should be considered canonical features of eukaryotic genes.

  16. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  17. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  18. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  19. Optical Characterization of Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  20. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  1. ANTISENSE TECHNIQUE TO TREAT BREAST CANCER – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many genes which are responsible for developing breast cancer especially, BRCA2 (Breast Cancer 2 and HER2 are extensively involved in developing breast cancer and hence it is the centre of attractions for all the researchers. Nano-particles conjugated with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies are called as “Trastazumab” which directly target the HER2 gene. The major advantage of this technology is that the cells can be prevented before they evolve in to mature stages i.e. metastases production. The BRCA2 gene belongs to the family of tumor suppressor genes and its protein product is responsible for the error free repair mechanisms of DNA. This BRCA2 gene interacts with RAD51 gene to fix the DNA breaks. Mutation in BRCA2 gene such as insertion and deletion leads to breast cancer. More than 800 mutations are found in this gene that lead to increased risk of the breast cancer. Furthermore, BRCA2 gene is also associated with various cancers like prostate, ovarian, fallopian, male breast cancer. Researchers believe that altered products produced due to defects in this gene are unable to interact with the gene RAD51 and cannot repair the DNA. Antisense RNA is the tool which can used to block any RNA or DNA to synthesize its product. In this review we focus in using Antisense RNA against the sense RNA of an altered BRCA2 gene to block the altered affectivity of that gene on the DNA repair mechanism. However, Antisense RNA technique may not help in treating breast cancer, it can better manage the breast cancer to occur.

  2. A riboswitch-regulated antisense RNA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, J R; Tiensuu, Teresa; Bécavin, Christophe; Gouin, Edith; Johansson, Jörgen; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-08-06

    Riboswitches are ligand-binding elements located in 5' untranslated regions of messenger RNAs, which regulate expression of downstream genes. In Listeria monocytogenes, a vitamin B12-binding (B12) riboswitch was identified, not upstream of a gene but downstream, and antisense to the adjacent gene, pocR, suggesting it might regulate pocR in a nonclassical manner. In Salmonella enterica, PocR is a transcription factor that is activated by 1,2-propanediol, and subsequently activates expression of the pdu genes. The pdu genes mediate propanediol catabolism and are implicated in pathogenesis. As enzymes involved in propanediol catabolism require B12 as a cofactor, we hypothesized that the Listeria B12 riboswitch might be involved in pocR regulation. Here we demonstrate that the B12 riboswitch is transcribed as part of a noncoding antisense RNA, herein named AspocR. In the presence of B12, the riboswitch induces transcriptional termination, causing aspocR to be transcribed as a short transcript. In contrast, in the absence of B12, aspocR is transcribed as a long antisense RNA, which inhibits pocR expression. Regulation by AspocR ensures that pocR, and consequently the pdu genes, are maximally expressed only when both propanediol and B12 are present. Strikingly, AspocR can inhibit pocR expression in trans, suggesting it acts through a direct interaction with pocR mRNA. Together, this study demonstrates how pocR and the pdu genes can be regulated by B12 in bacteria and extends the classical definition of riboswitches from elements governing solely the expression of mRNAs to a wider role in controlling transcription of noncoding RNAs.

  3. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehy, Raymond E.; Kramer, Matthew; Hiatt, William R

    1988-01-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-α-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by A...

  4. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates forming Self-Assembled Nano-aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Julian; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier;

    2015-01-01

    A series of peptide nucleic acid-oligo(bicycloguanidinium) (PNA-BGn) conjugates have been synthesized and characterized in terms of cellular antisense activity using the pLuc750HeLa cell splice correction assay. PNA-BG4 conjugates exhibit low micromolar antisense activity and the cellular activit...

  5. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari;

    2016-01-01

    , increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate...

  6. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  7. Hole hopping rates in single strand oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Raffaele [Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali e Alimentari, Università di Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, I-10095 Grugliasco, TO (Italy); Capobianco, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Peluso, Andrea, E-mail: apeluso@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • DNA hole transfer rates have been computed. • Delocalized adenine domains significantly affect hole transfer rates in DNA. • Franck–Condon weighted density of state from DFT normal modes. • DNA application in molecular electronics. - Abstract: The rates of hole transfer between guanine and adenine in single strand DNA have been evaluated by using Fermi’s golden rule and Kubo’s generating function approach for the Franck–Condon weighted density of states. The whole sets of the normal modes and vibrational frequencies of the two nucleobases, obtained at DFT/B3LYP level of calculation, have been considered in computations. The results show that in single strand the pyramidalization/planarization mode of the amino groups of both nucleobases plays the major role. At room temperature, the Franck–Condon density of states extends over a wide range of hole site energy difference, 0–1 eV, giving some hints about the design of oligonucleotides of potential technological interest.

  8. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  9. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Tang

    Full Text Available To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA, (dC, (dG and (dT to silver staining could be ranged as (dA > (dG > (dC > (dT from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt. The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  10. Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides through metal-induced cyclization of short complementary strands : Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Freville, Fabrice; Richard, Tristan; Bathany, Katell; Moreau, Serge

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A new strategy to cyclize a short synthetic oligonucleotide on a DNA or a RNA target strand is described. This one relies on a metal-mediated cyclization of short synthetic oligonucleotides conjugated with two chelating 2,2':6',2”-terpyridine moieties at their 3' and 5' ends. Cyclization following metal addition (Zn2+, Fe2+) was demonstrated using UV monitored thermal denaturation experiments, mass spectrometry analysis and gel shift assays. NMR experiments were used t...

  11. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  12. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  13. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

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    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  14. COOLAIR Antisense RNAs Form Evolutionarily Conserved Elaborate Secondary Structures

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    Emily J. Hawkes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable debate about the functionality of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs. Lack of sequence conservation has been used to argue against functional relevance. We investigated antisense lncRNAs, called COOLAIR, at the A. thaliana FLC locus and experimentally determined their secondary structure. The major COOLAIR variants are highly structured, organized by exon. The distally polyadenylated transcript has a complex multi-domain structure, altered by a single non-coding SNP defining a functionally distinct A. thaliana FLC haplotype. The A. thaliana COOLAIR secondary structure was used to predict COOLAIR exons in evolutionarily divergent Brassicaceae species. These predictions were validated through chemical probing and cloning. Despite the relatively low nucleotide sequence identity, the structures, including multi-helix junctions, show remarkable evolutionary conservation. In a number of places, the structure is conserved through covariation of a non-contiguous DNA sequence. This structural conservation supports a functional role for COOLAIR transcripts rather than, or in addition to, antisense transcription.

  15. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  16. Functional Analysis of Polyphenol Oxidases by Antisense/Sense Technology

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    Jutharat Attajarusit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO. These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F., cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner, whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants

  17. An antisense transcript in the human cytomegalovirus UL87 gene region

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    Ma Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid advances in research on antisense transcripts are gradually changing our comprehension of genomic and gene expression aspects of the Herpesviridae. One such herpesvirus is the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. Although transcription of the HCMV UL87 gene has not been specifically investigated, cDNA clones of UL87 antisense transcripts were found in HCMV cDNA libraries previously. In this study, the transcription of the UL87 antisense strand was investigated in three clinically isolated HCMV strains. Results First, an 800 nucleotides transcript having an antisense orientation to the UL87 gene was found in a late HCMV cDNA library. Then, the UL87 antisense transcript was confirmed by Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and Northern blot in three HCMV clinical strains. Two ORFs were predicted in the antisense transcript. The putative protein of ORF 1 showed a high degree of conservation among HCMV and other CMV strains. Conclusion An 800nt antisense transcript in the UL87 gene region exists in HCMV clinical strains.

  18. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  19. Molecular identity of the late sodium current in adult dog cardiomyocytes identified by Nav1.5 antisense inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Kyle, John W; Mishra, Sudhish; Undrovinas, Abertas

    2008-08-01

    Late Na(+) current (I(NaL)) is a major component of the action potential plateau in human and canine myocardium. Since I(NaL) is increased in heart failure and ischemia, it represents a novel potential target for cardioprotection. However, the molecular identity of I(NaL) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiac Na(+) channel isoform (Na(v)1.5) is a major contributor to I(NaL) in adult dog ventricular cardiomyocytes (VCs). Cultured VCs were exposed to an antisense morpholino-based oligonucleotide (Na(v)1.5 asOligo) targeting the region around the start codon of Na(v)1.5 mRNA or a control nonsense oligonucleotide (nsOligo). Densities of both transient Na(+) current (I(NaT)) and I(NaL) (both in pA/pF) were monitored by whole cell patch clamp. In HEK293 cells expressing Na(v)1.5 or Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.5 asOligo specifically silenced functional expression of Na(v)1.5 (up to 60% of the initial I(NaT)) but not Na(v)1.2. In both nsOligo-treated controls and untreated VCs, I(NaT) and I(NaL) remained unchanged for up to 5 days. However, both I(NaT) and I(NaL) decreased exponentially with similar time courses (tau = 46 and 56 h, respectively) after VCs were treated with Na(v)1.5 asOligo without changes in 1) decay kinetics, 2) steady-state activation and inactivation, and 3) the ratio of I(NaL) to I(NaT). Four days after exposure to Na(v)1.5 asOligo, I(NaT) and I(NaL) amounted to 68 +/- 6% (mean +/- SE; n = 20, P < 0.01) and 60 +/- 7% (n = 11, P < 0.018) of those in VCs treated by nsOligo, respectively. We conclude that in adult dog heart Na(v)1.5 sodium channels have a "functional half-life" of approximately 35 h (0.69tau) and make a major contribution to I(NaL).

  20. Inhibition of Leukemic Cell Telomerase Activity by Antisense Phosphorothioate Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEDongmei; ZHANGYuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) gene antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) on telomerase activity in K562 cells.Methods Telomerase activity was detemined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA) in K562 cells treated with ASODN and hTERTmRNA expression was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The hTERTmRNA level was decreased,and telomerase activity was significantly inhibited when the K562 cells were treated with ASODN for 48 h. Conclusion It is suggested that hTETR ASODN might specifically inhibit telomrase activity of K562 cells at translation level,and it is further proved that hTERT gene has significant correlation with telopmerase activity.

  1. Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) machinery using oligonucleotides containing 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusaku; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Tarashima, Noriko; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Itoh, Kohji; Minakawa, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) is considered to be one of the most attractive approaches, and takes the place of general antisense, RNA interference (RNAi), and anti-micro RNA machineries. Since the U1i can be induced by short oligonucleotides (ONs), namely U1 adaptors consisting of a 'target domain' and a 'U1 domain', we prepared adaptor ONs using 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides developed by our group, and evaluated their U1i activity. As a result, the desired gene suppression via U1i was observed in ONs prepared as a combination of 2'-fluoro-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units as well as only 2'-fluoronucleoside units, while those prepared as combination of 2'-OMe nucleoside/2'-OMe-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units did not show significant activity. Measurement of Tm values indicated that a higher hybridization ability of adaptor ONs with complementary RNA is one of the important factors to show potent U1i activity.

  2. Investigations of oligonucleotide usage variance within and between prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, J.; Skjerve, E.; Ussery, David

    2008-01-01

    Oligonucleotide usage in archaeal and bacterial genomes can be linked to a number of properties, including codon usage (trinucleotides), DNA base-stacking energy (dinucleotides), and DNA structural conformation (di-to tetranucleotides). We wanted to assess the statistical information potential...... was that prokaryotic chromosomes can be described by hexanucleotide frequencies, suggesting that prokaryotic DNA is predominantly short range correlated, i. e., information in prokaryotic genomes is encoded in short oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide usage varied more within AT-rich and host-associated genomes than...... in GC-rich and free-living genomes, and this variation was mainly located in non-coding regions. Bias (selectional pressure) in tetranucleotide usage correlated with GC content, and coding regions were more biased than non-coding regions. Non-coding regions were also found to be approximately 5.5% more...

  3. Delivery of RNAi-Based Oligonucleotides by Electropermeabilization

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    Muriel Golzio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than a decade, understanding of RNA interference (RNAi has been a growing field of interest. The potent gene silencing ability that small oligonucleotides have offers new perspectives for cancer therapeutics. One of the present limits is that many biological barriers exist for their efficient delivery into target cells or tissues. Electropermeabilization (EP is one of the physical methods successfully used to transfer small oligonucleotides into cells or tissues. EP consists in the direct application of calibrated electric pulses to cells or tissues that transiently permeabilize the plasma membranes, allowing efficient in vitro and in vivo. cytoplasmic delivery of exogenous molecules. The present review reports on the type of therapeutic RNAi-based oligonucleotides that can be electrotransferred, the mechanism(s of their electrotransfer and the technical settings for pre-clinical purposes.

  4. Retro-1 Analogues Differentially Affect Oligonucleotide Delivery and Toxin Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Ming, Xin; Abdelkafi, Hajer; Pons, Valerie; Michau, Aurelien; Gillet, Daniel; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Barbier, Julien; Juliano, Rudy

    2016-11-21

    Retro-1 is a small molecule that displays two important biological activities: First, it blocks the actions of certain toxins by altering their intracellular trafficking. Second, it enhances the activity of oligonucleotides by releasing them from entrapment in endosomes. This raises the question of whether the two actions involve the same cellular target. Herein we report the effects of several Retro-1 analogues on both toxins and oligonucleotides. We found analogues that affect toxins but not oligonucleotides and vice-versa, while Retro-1 is the only compound that affects both. This indicates that the molecular target(s) involved in the two processes are distinct. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes