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Sample records for oligonucleotide probes

  1. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  2. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  3. ProbeMaker: an extensible framework for design of sets of oligonucleotide probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Nilsson, Mats; Landegren, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    Background Procedures for genetic analyses based on oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools that can allow highly parallel investigations of genetic material. Such procedures require the design of large sets of probes using application-specific design constraints. Results ProbeMaker is a software framework for computer-assisted design and analysis of sets of oligonucleotide probe sequences. The tool assists in the design of probes for sets of target sequences, incorporating sequence motifs for purposes such as amplification, visualization, or identification. An extension system allows the framework to be equipped with application-specific components for evaluation of probe sequences, and provides the possibility to include support for importing sequence data from a variety of file formats. Conclusion ProbeMaker is a suitable tool for many different oligonucleotide design and analysis tasks, including the design of probe sets for various types of parallel genetic analyses, experimental validation of design parameters, and in silico testing of probe sequence evaluation algorithms. PMID:16171527

  4. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer G Mulle

    Full Text Available DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  5. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulle, Jennifer G; Patel, Viren C; Warren, Stephen T; Hegde, Madhuri R; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-03-29

    DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  6. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    followed by click assembly and analysis of the read sequence by various techniques. As we demonstrate in this paper, using our new approach, a viral RNA sequence can be detected in less than 2 h without the need for cDNA synthesis or any other enzymatic reactions and with a sensitivity of ... opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  7. The use of oligonucleotide probes for meningococcal serotype characterization

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    SACCHI Claudio Tavares

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examine the potential use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize Neisseria meningitidis serotypes without the use of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Antigenic diversity on PorB protein forms the bases of serotyping method. However, the current panel of MAbs underestimated, by at least 50% the PorB variability, presumably because reagents for several PorB variable regions (VRs are lacking, or because a number of VR variants are not recognized by serotype-defining MAbs12. We analyzed the use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize serotype 10 and serotype 19 of N. meningitidis. The porB gene sequence for the prototype strain of serotype 10 was determined, aligned with 7 other porB sequences from different serotypes, and analysis of individual VRs were performed. The results of DNA probes 21U (VR1-A and 615U (VR3-B used against 72 N. meningitidis strains confirm that VR1 type A and VR3 type B encode epitopes for serotype-defined MAbs 19 and 10, respectively. The use of probes for characterizing serotypes possible can type 100% of the PorB VR diversity. It is a simple and rapid method specially useful for analysis of large number of samples.

  8. ProbeMaker: an extensible framework for design of sets of oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Mats

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procedures for genetic analyses based on oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools that can allow highly parallel investigations of genetic material. Such procedures require the design of large sets of probes using application-specific design constraints. Results ProbeMaker is a software framework for computer-assisted design and analysis of sets of oligonucleotide probe sequences. The tool assists in the design of probes for sets of target sequences, incorporating sequence motifs for purposes such as amplification, visualization, or identification. An extension system allows the framework to be equipped with application-specific components for evaluation of probe sequences, and provides the possibility to include support for importing sequence data from a variety of file formats. Conclusion ProbeMaker is a suitable tool for many different oligonucleotide design and analysis tasks, including the design of probe sets for various types of parallel genetic analyses, experimental validation of design parameters, and in silico testing of probe sequence evaluation algorithms.

  9. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

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    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  10. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

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    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  11. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-09-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed preliminary grouping of three new hyperthermophilic isolates. Together with other group-specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, these probes will facilitate rapid in situ monitoring of the populations present in hydrothermal systems and support cultivation attempts.

  12. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

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    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  13. Kinetic effects on signal normalization in oligonucleotide microchips with labeled immobilized probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan'kov, S V; Chechetkin, V R; Somova, O G; Antonova, O V; Moiseeva, O V; Prokopenko, D V; Yurasov, R A; Gryadunov, D A; Chudinov, A V

    2009-10-01

    Among various factors affecting operation of oligonucleotide microchips, the variations in concentration and in homogeneous distribution of immobilized probes over the cells are one of the most important. The labeling of immobilized probes ensures the complete current monitoring on the probe distribution and is reliable and convenient. Using hydrogel-based oligonucleotide microchips, the applicability of Cy3-labeled immobilized probes for quality control and signal normalization after hybridization with Cy5-labeled target DNA was investigated. This study showed that proper signal normalization should be different in thermodynamic conditions and in transient regime with hybridization far from saturation. This kinetic effect holds for both hydrogel-based and surface oligonucleotide microchips. Besides proving basic features, the technique was assessed on a sampling batch of 50 microchips developed for identifying mutations responsible for rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  14. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

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    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  15. MagiProbe: a novel fluorescence quenching-based oligonucleotide probe carrying a fluorophore and an intercalator

    OpenAIRE

    Yamane, Akio

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence is the favored signaling technology for molecular diagnoses. Fluorescence energy transfer-based methods are powerful homogeneous assay tools. A novel oligonucleotide probe, named MagiProbe, which is simple to use, is described, and information given about the duplex formed with a target. The probe internally has a fluorophore and an intercalator. Its fluorescence is quenched by the intercalator in the absence of a target sequence. On hybridization with a target sequence, the prob...

  16. probeBase--an online resource for rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers: new features 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Daniel; Loy, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-04

    probeBase http://www.probebase.net is a manually maintained and curated database of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers. Contextual information and multiple options for evaluating in silico hybridization performance against the most recent rRNA sequence databases are provided for each oligonucleotide entry, which makes probeBase an important and frequently used resource for microbiology research and diagnostics. Here we present a major update of probeBase, which was last featured in the NAR Database Issue 2007. This update describes a complete remodeling of the database architecture and environment to accommodate computationally efficient access. Improved search functions, sequence match tools and data output now extend the opportunities for finding suitable hierarchical probe sets that target an organism or taxon at different taxonomic levels. To facilitate the identification of complementary probe sets for organisms represented by short rRNA sequence reads generated by amplicon sequencing or metagenomic analysis with next generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina and IonTorrent, we introduce a novel tool that recovers surrogate near full-length rRNA sequences for short query sequences and finds matching oligonucleotides in probeBase.

  17. Rapid identification of bacteria in blood cultures by using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Mooibroek, M; Idema, J; Harmsen, HJM; Welling, GW; Degener, JE

    2000-01-01

    The applicability of whole-cell hybridization for the identification of pathogenic bacteria in blood from septic patients was examined. Oligonucleotide probes, fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, directed against the variable regions of the 16S rRNAs of the following bacterial spe

  18. A comparison of alternative 60-mer probe designs in an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide microarray

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    Fairbanks Benjamin D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays have proven powerful for functional genomics studies. Several technologies exist for the generation of whole-genome arrays. It is well documented that 25mer probes directed against different regions of the same gene produce variable signal intensity values. However, the extent to which this is true for probes of greater length (60mers is not well characterized. Moreover, this information has not previously been reported for whole-genome arrays designed against bacteria, whose genomes may differ substantially in characteristics directly affecting microarray performance. Results We report here an analysis of alternative 60mer probe designs for an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide array for the GC rich, β-proteobacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. Probes were designed using the ArrayOligoSel3.5 software package and whole-genome microarrays synthesized by Agilent, Inc. using their in-situ, ink-jet technology platform. We first validated the quality of the microarrays as demonstrated by an average signal to noise ratio of >1000. Next, we determined that the variance of replicate probes (1178 total probes examined of identical sequence was 3.8% whereas the variance of alternative probes (558 total alternative probes examined designs was 9.5%. We determined that depending upon the definition, about 2.4% of replicate and 7.8% of alternative probes produced outlier conclusions. Finally, we determined none of the probe design subscores (GC content, internal repeat, binding energy and self annealment produced by ArrayOligoSel3.5 were predictive or probes that produced outlier signals. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrated that the use of multiple probes per target sequence is not essential for in-situ synthesized 60mer oligonucleotide arrays designed against bacteria. Although probes producing outlier signals were identified, the use of ratios results in less than 10% of such outlier conclusions. We also determined that

  19. chipD: a web tool to design oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays

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    Dufour, Yann S.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Tritt, Andrew J.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.; Mitchell, Julie C.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    chipD is a web server that facilitates design of DNA oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays, which can be used in a number of genomic applications such as ChIP-chip or gene-expression profiling. The server implements a probe selection algorithm that takes as an input, in addition to the target sequences, a set of parameters that allow probe design to be tailored to specific applications, protocols or the array manufacturer’s requirements. The algorithm optimizes probes to meet three objectives: (i) probes should be specific; (ii) probes should have similar thermodynamic properties; and (iii) the target sequence coverage should be homogeneous and avoid significant gaps. The output provides in a text format, the list of probe sequences with their genomic locations, targeted strands and hybridization characteristics. chipD has been used successfully to design tiling arrays for bacteria and yeast. chipD is available at http://chipd.uwbacter.org/. PMID:20529880

  20. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    results by electronic structure calculations. Functionalized oligonucleotides were prepared in good yields by protein-mediated CuAAC click reactions for the first time with a human copper-binding chaperon. The carbohydrate, peptide, and fluorescent derivatives display high binding affinity and selectivity...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  1. PTPan--overcoming memory limitations in oligonucleotide string matching for primer/probe design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissler, Tilo; Hodges, Christopher P; Meier, Harald

    2011-10-15

    Nucleic acid diagnostics has high demands for non-heuristic exact and approximate oligonucleotide string matching concerning in silico primer/probe design in huge nucleic acid sequence collections. Unfortunately, public sequence repositories grow much faster than computer hardware performance and main memory capacity do. This growth imposes severe problems on existing oligonucleotide primer/probe design applications necessitating new approaches based on space-efficient indexing structures. We developed PTPan (spoken Peter Pan, 'PT' is for Position Tree, the earlier name of suffix trees), a space-efficient indexing structure for approximate oligonucleotide string matching in nucleic acid sequence data. Based on suffix trees, it combines partitioning, truncation and a new suffix tree stream compression to deal with large amounts of aligned and unaligned data. PTPan operates efficiently in main memory and on secondary storage, balancing between memory consumption and runtime during construction and application. Based on PTPan, applications supporting similarity search and primer/probe design have been implemented, namely FindFamily, ProbeMatch and ProbeDesign. All three use a weighted Levenshtein distance metric for approximative queries to find and rate matches with indels as well as substitutions. We integrated PTPan in the worldwide used software package ARB to demonstrate usability and performance. Comparing PTPan and the original ARB index for the very large ssu-rRNA database SILVA, we recognized a shorter construction time, extended functionality and dramatically reduced memory requirements at the price of expanded, but very reasonable query times. PTPan enables indexing of huge nucleic acid sequence collections at reasonable application response times. Not being limited by main memory, PTPan constitutes a major advancement regarding rapid oligonucleotide string matching in primer/probe design now and in the future facing the enormous growth of molecular

  2. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  3. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  4. Specific 16S ribosomal RNA targeted oligonucleotide probe against Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

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    Mirza, M S; Rademaker, J L; Janse, J D; Akkermans, A D

    1993-11-01

    In this article we report on the polymerase chain reaction amplification of a partial 16S rRNA gene from the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. A partial sequence (about 400 base pairs) of the gene was determined that covered two variable regions important for oligonucleotide probe development. A specific 24mer oligonucleotide probe targeted against the V6 region of 16S rRNA was designed. Specificity of the probe was determined using dot blot hybridization. Under stringent conditions (60 degrees C), the probe hybridized with all 16 Cl. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus strains tested. Hybridization did not occur with 32 plant pathogenic and saprophytic bacteria used as controls under the same conditions. Under less stringent conditions (55 degrees C) the related Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. tesselarius also showed hybridization. At even lower stringency (40 degrees C), all Cl. michiganensis subspecies tested including Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis showed hybridization signal, suggesting that under these conditions the probe may be used as a species-specific probe for Cl. michiganensis.

  5. Human genomic library screened with 17-base oligonucleotide probes yields a novel interferon gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Torczynski, R M; Fuke, M; Bollon, A P

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that has permitted a human genomic library to be screened for low-copy genes using 17-base synthetic oligonucleotides as probes. Parallel screening with two different 17-base probes permitted the unambiguous identification of clones containing interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) genes. The isolated human IFN-alpha genes were sequenced, and one appears to be IFN-alpha L; the other is one not previously described, which we have designated IFN-alpha WA. The IFN-alpha WA sequence d...

  6. Design and verification of a pangenome microarray oligonucleotide probe set for Dehalococcoides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Laura A; Salehi, Maryam; Nuin, Paulo; Tillier, Elisabeth R; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Dehalococcoides spp. are an industrially relevant group of Chloroflexi bacteria capable of reductively dechlorinating contaminants in groundwater environments. Existing Dehalococcoides genomes revealed a high level of sequence identity within this group, including 98 to 100% 16S rRNA sequence identity between strains with diverse substrate specificities. Common molecular techniques for identification of microbial populations are often not applicable for distinguishing Dehalococcoides strains. Here we describe an oligonucleotide microarray probe set designed based on clustered Dehalococcoides genes from five different sources (strain DET195, CBDB1, BAV1, and VS genomes and the KB-1 metagenome). This "pangenome" probe set provides coverage of core Dehalococcoides genes as well as strain-specific genes while optimizing the potential for hybridization to closely related, previously unknown Dehalococcoides strains. The pangenome probe set was compared to probe sets designed independently for each of the five Dehalococcoides strains. The pangenome probe set demonstrated better predictability and higher detection of Dehalococcoides genes than strain-specific probe sets on nontarget strains with pangenome probe set performs more robustly than the combined strain-specific probe sets in the detection of genes not included in the original design. The pangenome probe set represents a highly specific, universal tool for the detection and characterization of Dehalococcoides from contaminated sites. It has the potential to become a common platform for Dehalococcoides-focused research, allowing meaningful comparisons between microarray experiments regardless of the strain examined.

  7. A spatially resolved nucleic acid biochip based on a gradient of density of immobilized probe oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Han [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: ukrull@utm.utoronto.ca

    2006-04-06

    The potential for a new biochip design based on a continuous gradient of density of immobilized single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide probes (ssDNA) is explored. This gradient resolved information platform (GRIP) can provide sequence identification based on the spatial location and extent of hybridization by a target sequence. Surfaces based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) on glass were first functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by attachment of glutaraldehyde, prior to immobilization of oligonucleotide probe that was terminated with amine. The use of Cy{sub 3} and Cy{sub 5} dye-labelled ssDNA probes and targets allowed estimation of density and correlation of the location of binding of labelled targets. Probe molecules of 20 mer lengths were loaded to produce density gradients in the range of 1.0-200 ng/mm{sup 2}. The biochips could resolve a mixture of fully complementary five base-pair mismatched targets by the location of binding on the surface. Thermal control provided additional selectivity. Thermal cycling and washing provided for regeneration of the surface, and the fluorescence intensities showed no deterioration in at least five cycles of hybridization reactions.

  8. Development of specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ identification of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Lucía; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2003-08-08

    A rapid method for the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from wine has been developed. This method is based on fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes, homologous to 16S rDNA of those species of LAB commonly found in wines. The protocol for the specific detection of these bacteria was established through the hybridisation of 36 reference strains. The specificity of the probes was evaluated by using pure cultures. Probes were used to identify species in different wines, making it evident that direct identification and quantification from natural samples without culturing is also possible. The results show that FISH is a promising technique for the rapid identification of LAB, allowing positive identification in a few hours (4-16 h).

  9. Mismatch oligonucleotides in human and yeast: guidelines for probe design on tiling microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Justin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mismatched oligonucleotides are widely used on microarrays to differentiate specific from nonspecific hybridization. While many experiments rely on such oligos, the hybridization behavior of various degrees of mismatch (MM structure has not been extensively studied. Here, we present the results of two large-scale microarray experiments on S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens genomic DNA, to explore MM oligonucleotide behavior with real sample mixtures under tiling-array conditions. Results We examined all possible nucleotide substitutions at the central position of 36-nucleotide probes, and found that nonspecific binding by MM oligos depends upon the individual nucleotide substitutions they incorporate: C→A, C→G and T→A (yielding purine-purine mispairs are most disruptive, whereas A→X were least disruptive. We also quantify a marked GC skew effect: substitutions raising probe GC content exhibit higher intensity (and vice versa. This skew is small in highly-expressed regions (± 0.5% of total intensity range and large (± 2% or more elsewhere. Multiple mismatches per oligo are largely additive in effect: each MM added in a distributed fashion causes an additional 21% intensity drop relative to PM, three-fold more disruptive than adding adjacent mispairs (7% drop per MM. Conclusion We investigate several parameters for oligonucleotide design, including the effects of each central nucleotide substitution on array signal intensity and of multiple MM per oligo. To avoid GC skew, individual substitutions should not alter probe GC content. RNA sample mixture complexity may increase the amount of nonspecific hybridization, magnify GC skew and boost the intensity of MM oligos at all levels.

  10. Group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify thermophilic bacteria in marine hydrothermal vents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, HJM; Prieur, D; Jeanthon, C

    1997-01-01

    Four 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the detection of thermophilic members of the domain Bacteria known to thrive in marine hydrothermal systems, We developed and characterized probes encompassing most of the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus, most species of the

  11. Group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify thermophilic bacteria in marine hydrothermal vents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, HJM; Prieur, D; Jeanthon, C

    1997-01-01

    Four 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the detection of thermophilic members of the domain Bacteria known to thrive in marine hydrothermal systems, We developed and characterized probes encompassing most of the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus, most species of the

  12. Fluoroscence in situ hybridization of chicken intestinal samples with bacterial rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Katja Nyholm; Francesch, M.; Christensen, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to develop a fast and accurate molecular method for the quantification of the intestinal flora in chickens by rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Seven weeks old conventionally reared Lohmann hens were used to set up the method. To sample ileal intestinal content......, the distal part from Meckels diverticulum to the ileo-caecal junction was removed. Fixation was performed in ethanol and phosphate buffered saline. After washing by centrifugation, the sample was resuspended in pre-heated hybridization buffer with oligonucleotide probe labelled with Cy3 (10ng/µl). The cells...... were hybridized for 24-72h, centrifuged, washed with pre-heated hybridization buffer, centrifuged and resuspended in Millipore quality water before filtration onto a 0.22 µm black polycarbonate filter. The probes used in this study were, LGC354A, LGC354B, LGC354C, Strc493, Bacto1080, Sal3, Chis150, EUB...

  13. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  14. Dominant Microbial Composition and Its Vertical Distribution in Saline Meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as Revealed by Quantitative Oligonucleotide Probe Membrane Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-01-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two δ-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a C...

  15. Design, validation and annotation of transcriptome-wide oligonucleotide probes for the oligochaete annelid Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Gong

    Full Text Available High density oligonucleotide probe arrays have increasingly become an important tool in genomics studies. In organisms with incomplete genome sequence, one strategy for oligo probe design is to reduce the number of unique probes that target every non-redundant transcript through bioinformatic analysis and experimental testing. Here we adopted this strategy in making oligo probes for the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a species for which we have sequenced transcriptome-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Our objectives were to identify unique transcripts as targets, to select an optimal and non-redundant oligo probe for each of these target ESTs, and to annotate the selected target sequences. We developed a streamlined and easy-to-follow approach to the design, validation and annotation of species-specific array probes. Four 244K-formatted oligo arrays were designed using eArray and were hybridized to a pooled E. fetida cRNA sample. We identified 63,541 probes with unsaturated signal intensities consistently above the background level. Target transcripts of these probes were annotated using several sequence alignment algorithms. Significant hits were obtained for 37,439 (59% probed targets. We validated and made publicly available 63.5K oligo probes so the earthworm research community can use them to pursue ecological, toxicological, and other functional genomics questions. Our approach is efficient, cost-effective and robust because it (1 does not require a major genomics core facility; (2 allows new probes to be easily added and old probes modified or eliminated when new sequence information becomes available, (3 is not bioinformatics-intensive upfront but does provide opportunities for more in-depth annotation of biological functions for target genes; and (4 if desired, EST orthologs to the UniGene clusters of a reference genome can be identified and selected in order to improve the target gene specificity of designed probes. This approach is

  16. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little attention has thus far been paid to probes containing these dyes internally attached, a fact which is mainly due to the quite challenging synthesis of such oligonucleotide probes. Herein, by using 2'-O-propargyl uridine phosphoramidite and a series of xanthenes and cyanine azide derivatives, we have for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation of novel oligonucleotide probes containing internally positioned xanthene and cyanine dye pairs and thus represents a significant step forward for the preparation of advanced fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the novel xanthene and cyanine labeled probes display unusual and very promising photophysical properties resulting from energy-transfer interactions between the fluorophores controlled by nucleic acid assembly. Potential benefits of using these novel fluorescent probes within, for example, molecular diagnostics and fluorescence microscopy include: Considerable Stokes shifts (40-110 nm), quenched fluorescence of single-stranded probes accompanied by up to 7.7-fold light-up effect of emission upon target DNA/RNA binding, remarkable sensitivity to single-nucleotide mismatches, generally high fluorescence brightness values (FB up to 26), and hence low limit of target detection values (LOD down to <5 nM).

  17. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors.

  18. Cloned polynucleotide and synthetic oligonucleotide probes used in colony hybridization are equally efficient in the identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerfelt, H.; Kalland, K.H.; Raj, P.; Moseley, S.L.; Bhan, M.K.; Bjorvatn, B.

    1988-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease-generated polynucleotide and synthetically produced oligonucleotide gene probes used in colony hybridization assays proved to be efficient for the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. To compare their relative efficiencies, these two sets of probes were radiolabeled with /sup 32/P and were applied to 74 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles and to 156 previously unexamined E. coli isolates. The enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae non-O1 (NAG), Yersinia enterocolitica, and E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were examined for further evaluation of probe specificity. The two classes of probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In the analysis of six strains, the signal strength on autoradiography after hybridization with oligonucleotides was weaker than that obtained after hybridization with polynucleotide probes. The probes did not hybridize with DNA from V. cholerae O1, V. cholerae non-O1 (NAG), or Y. enterocolitica. The strains of E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were, likewise, negative in the hybridization assays.

  19. Detection of human papilloma viruses in paraffin wax sections with biotinylated synthetic oligonucleotide probes and immunogold staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubie, H A; Norval, M

    1989-09-01

    Human papilloma virus was detected by in situ hybridisation in routinely processed paraffin wax sections using a synthetically produced oligonucleotide probe, end-labelled with biotin, and amplified with anti-biotin-immunogold silver staining (anti-biotin-IGSS). This system proved more sensitive than amplification with streptavidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphatase for detecting human papilloma virus type 16 in cervical tissues. The method was successfully combined with antigen staining for papilloma virus common antigens in skin and genital warts. This simple and quick method, using non-radioactively labelled synthetic probes, may be useful for the detection of other viruses in stored material and may be suitable for other double staining procedures.

  20. Environment-responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogue probe for studying oligonucleotide dynamics in a model cell-like compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Maroti G; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2013-11-21

    The majority of fluorescent nucleoside analogue probes that have been used in the in vitro study of nucleic acids are not suitable for cell-based biophysical assays because they exhibit excitation maxima in the UV region and low quantum yields within oligonucleotides. Therefore, we propose that the photophysical characterization of oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorescent nucleoside analogue in reverse micelles (RM), which are good biological membrane models and UV-transparent, could provide an alternative approach to studying the properties of nucleic acids in a cell-like confined environment. In this context, we describe the photophysical properties of an environment-sensitive fluorescent uridine analogue (1), based on the 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrimidine core, in micelles and RM. The emissive nucleoside, which is polarity- and viscosity-sensitive, reports the environment of the surfactant assemblies via changes in its fluorescence properties. The nucleoside analogue, incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide and hybridized to its complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides, exhibits a significantly higher fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy in RM than in aqueous buffer, which is consistent with the environment of RM. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nucleoside 1 could be utilized as a fluorescent label to study the function of nucleic acids in a model cellular milieu.

  1. Immobilization of oligonucleotide probes on silicon surfaces using biotin–streptavidin system examined with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awsiuk, K., E-mail: kamil.awsiuk@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Rysz, J. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Petrou, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Budkowski, A. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Bernasik, A. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Kakabakos, S. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Marzec, M.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Raptis, I. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece)

    2014-01-30

    To immobilize effectively oligonucleotide probes on SiO{sub 2} modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, four procedures based on streptavidin–biotin system are compared with Atomic Force Microscopy, Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The first approach involves: adsorption of biotinylated Bovine Serum Albumin, blocking free surface sites with BSA, binding of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotide (b-oligo). Final steps are exchanged in the second procedure with immobilization of preformed streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate. The third approach consists of streptavidin adsorption, blocking with BSA and b-oligo binding. Finally, streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate is immobilized directly within the fourth method. Surface coverage with biomolecules, determined from ARXPS, accords with average AFM height, and is anti-correlated with the intensity of Si+ ions. Higher biomolecular coverage was achieved during the last steps of the first (2.45(±0.38) mg/m{sup 2}) and second (1.31(±0.22) mg/m{sup 2}) approach, as compared to lower surface density resulting from the third (0.58(±0.20) mg/m{sup 2}) and fourth (0.41(±0.11) mg/m{sup 2}) method. Phosphorus atomic concentration indicates effectiveness of oligonucleotide immobilization. Secondary ions intensities, characteristic for oligonucleotides, streptavidin, BSA, and proteins, allow additional insight into overlayer composition. These measurements verify the ARXPS results and show the superiority of the first two immobilization approaches in terms of streptavidin and oligonucleotide density achieved onto the surface.

  2. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbaj A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5’-bispyrene and 3’-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5’-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  3. Sequence diversity within the HA-1 gene as detected by melting temperature assay without oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattiuz Pier

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags are self-peptides derived from common cellular proteins and presented by MHC class I and II molecules. Disparities in mHags are a potential risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD in the recipients of bone marrow from HLA-identical donors. Two alleles have been identified in the mHag HA-1. The correlation between mismatches of the mHag HA-1 and GvHD has been suggested and methods to facilitate large-scale testing were afterwards developed. Methods We used sequence specific primer (SSP PCR and direct sequencing to detect HA-1 gene polymorphisms in a sample of 131 unrelated Italian subjects. We then set up a novel melting temperature (Tm assay that may help identification of HA-1 alleles without oligonucleotide probes. Results We report the frequencies of HA-1 alleles in the Italian population and the presence of an intronic 5 base-pair deletion associated with the immunogeneic allele HA-1H. We also detected novel variable sites with respect to the consensus sequence of HA-1 locus. Even though recombination/gene conversion events are documented, there is considerable linkage disequilibrium in the data. The gametic associations between HA-1R/H alleles and the intronic 5-bp ins/del polymorphism prompted us to try the Tm analysis with SYBR® Green I. We show that the addition of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO during the assay yields distinct patterns when amplicons from HA-1H homozygotes, HA-1R homozygotes, and heterozygotes are analysed. Conclusion The possibility to use SYBR® Green I to detect Tm differences between allelic variants is attractive but requires great caution. We succeeded in allele discrimination of the HA-1 locus using a relatively short (101 bp amplicon, only in the presence of DMSO. We believe that, at least in certain assets, Tm assays may benefit by the addition of DMSO or other agents affecting DNA strand conformation and stability.

  4. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-beta-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.W.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYE, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S, wolfei LYE was closely related...... to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas, Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid...... fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria-and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities...

  5. Novel oligonucleotide probes for in situ detection of pederin-producing endosymbionts of Paederus riparius rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Matthias; Horn, Marcus A; Dettner, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts from female Paederus rove beetles are hitherto uncultured, phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas sp., and produce the polyketide pederin, which exhibits strong cytotoxic effects and antitumoral activities. The location of such endosymbionts inside beetles and on beetles' eggs is hypothesized based on indirect evidence rather than elucidated. Thus, an endosymbiont-specific and a competitor oligonucleotide probe (Cy3-labelled PAE444 and unlabelled cPAE444, respectively) were designed and utilized for FISH with semi-thin sections of Paederus riparius eggs. Cy3-PAE444-positive cells were densely packed and covered the whole eggshell. Hundred percent of EUB338-Mix-positive total bacterial cells were PAE444 positive, indicating a biofilm dominated by Paederus endosymbionts. Analysis of different egg deposition stadiums by electron microscopy and pks (polyketide synthase gene, a structural gene associated with pederin biosynthesis)-PCR supported results obtained by FISH and revealed that the endosymbiont-containing layer is applied to the eggshell inside the efferent duct. These findings suggest that P. riparius endosymbionts are located inside unknown structures of the female genitalia, which allow for a well-regulated release of endosymbionts during oviposition. The novel oligonucleotide probes developed in this study will facilitate (1) the identification of symbiont-containing structures within genitalia of their beetle hosts and (2) directed cultivation approaches in the future.

  6. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: hybridization assays on polymer particles obtained by direct solid phase assembly of the oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, H; Heinonen, P; Iitiä, A; Lönnberg, H

    1997-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides were assembled by conventional phosphoramidite chemistry on uniformly sized (50 microns) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate (SINTEF) and compact polystyrene (Dynosphere) particles, the aminoalkyl side chains of which were further derivatized with DMTrO-acetyl groups. The linker was completely resistant toward ammonolytic deprotection of the base moieties. The quality of oligonucleotides was assessed by repeating the synthesis on the same particles derivatized with a cleavable ester linker. The ability of the oligonucleotide-coated particles to bind complementary sequences via hybridization was examined by following the attachment of oligonucleotides bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate to the particles. The fluorescence emission was measured directly on a single particle. The effects of the following factors on the kinetics and efficiency of hybridization were studied: number of particles in a given volume of the assay solution, loading of oligonucleotide on the particle, concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution, length of the hybridizing sequence, presence of noncomplementary sequences, and ionic strength. The fluorescence signal measured on a single particle after hybridization was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution over a concentration range of 5 orders of magnitude.

  7. Application of DNA fingerprinting with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5 to analysis of the genetic variation within Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, M; Ueda, H; Hayashi, M; Oku, Y; Kurosawa, T; Kamiya, M

    1995-04-01

    DNA from T. taeniaeformis digested with the restriction endonuclease was hybridized with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5. Metacestode and adult showed same clear multibanding patterns, which were characteristic of multilocus DNA fingerprinting. The fingerprinting patterns were quite different from those of the rodent hosts. Genetic variations in 4 laboratory-reared isolates of T. taeniaeformis, including 3 isolates which have been reported to be indistinguishable by infectivity, morphology and protein composition of metacestode, were investigated using this technique. Each of the 4 isolates exhibited isolate-specific fingerprinting patterns and were easily distinguished from one another, thus it was considered that (CAC)5 was a highly resolvable and informative probe for cestodes. However, it was also indicated that (CAC)5 was so sensitive that applying fingerprinting with (CAC)5 to taxonomical or phylogenetic analysis was limited where habitat of the host was restricted to the small area. In comparison to fingerprinting with 32P-labeled (CAC)5, fingerprinting with digoxigenated (CAC)5 represented more and sharper bands. It was considered that a digoxigenated probe was more useful for genetic analysis of cestodes.

  8. Use of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for differentiation between Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii in yeast and mycelial phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Thales Domingos; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) associated with Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) using oligonucleotides labeled with non-radioactive fluorophores is a promising technique for detection and differentiation of fungal species in environmental or clinical samples, being suitable for microorganisms which are difficult or even impossible to culture. OBJECTIVE In this study, we aimed to standardise an in situ hybridisation technique for the differentiation between the pathogenic species Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii, by using species-specific DNA probes targeting the internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) of the rRNA gene. METHODS Yeast and mycelial phase of each Paracoccidioides species, were tested by two different detection/differentiation techniques: TSA-FISH for P. brasiliensis with HRP (Horseradish Peroxidase) linked to the probe 5’ end; and FISH for P. lutzii with the fluorophore TEXAS RED-X® also linked to the probe 5’ end. After testing different protocols, the optimised procedure for both techniques was accomplished without cross-positivity with other pathogenic fungi. FINDINGS The in silico and in vitro tests show no reaction with controls, like Candida and Cryptococcus (in silico) and Histoplasma capsulatum and Aspergillus spp. (in vitro). For both phases (mycelial and yeast) the in situ hybridisation showed dots of hybridisation, with no cross-reaction between them, with a lower signal for Texas Red probe than HRP-TSA probe. The dots of hybridisation was confirmed with genetic material marked with 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), visualised in a different filter (WU) on fluorescent microscopic. MAIN CONCLUSION Our results indicated that TSA-FISH and/or FISH are suitable for in situ detection and differentiation of Paracoccidioides species. This approach has the potential for future application in clinical samples for the improvement of paracoccidioidomycosis patients prognosis. PMID:28177048

  9. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    microscopy and nucleic acid analogues have been proposed so far. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here we report a novel enzyme-free approach to efficiently detect cancer mutations. This assay includes gene-specific target enrichment followed by annealing to oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs...... 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. CONCLUSION: Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay...... of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence...

  10. Fluorescence detection of natural RNA using rationally designed "clickable" oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders; Kjems, Jørgen; Astakhova, Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein a reliable approach to the design of effective fluorescent probes for RNA detection is described. The fluorescence signalling of hybridization by internally positioned polyaromatic hydrocarbons and rhodamine dyes was achieved with a low fluorescence background signal, high fluorescence...

  11. Dominant microbial composition and its vertical distribution in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as revealed by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-08-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two delta-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a Chloroflexi-specific probe were used after optimization of their washing conditions. The abundance of the sum of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with probes specific for three groups of Chlorobiaceae relative to total SSU rRNA peaked in the chemocline, accounting for up to 68%. The abundance of the delta-proteobacterial SSU rRNA relative to total SSU rRNA rapidly increased just below the chemocline up to 29% in anoxic water and peaked at the 2- to 3-cm sediment depth at ca. 34%. The abundance of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with the probe specific for the phylum Chloroflexi relative to total SSU rRNA was highest (31 to 54%) in the top of the sediment but then steeply declined with depth and became stable at 11 to 19%, indicating the robust coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and Chloroflexi in the top of the sediment. Any SSU rRNA of Chloroflexi in the water column was under the detection limit. The summation of the signals of group-specific probes used in this study accounted for up to 89% of total SSU rRNA, suggesting that the DGGE-oligonucleotide probe hybridization approach, in contrast to conventional culture-dependent approaches, was very effective in covering dominant populations.

  12. Programmable oligonucleotide probes design and applications for in situ and in vivo RNA imaging in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheglakov, Zoya

    Unequal spreading of mRNA is a frequent experience observed in varied cell lines. The study of cellular processes dynamics and precise localization of mRNAs offers a vital toolbox to target specific proteins in precise cytoplasmic areas and provides a convenient instrument to uncover their mechanisms and functions. Latest methodological innovations have allowed imaging of a single mRNA molecule in situ and in vivo. Today, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods allow the studying of mRNA expression and offer a vital toolbox for accurate biological models. Studies enable analysis of the dynamics of an individual mRNA, have uncovered the multiplex RNA transport systems. With all current approaches, a single mRNA tracking in the mammalian cells is still challenging. This thesis describes mRNA detection methods based on programmable fluorophore-labeled DNA structures complimentary to native targets providing an accurate mRNA imaging in mammalian cells. First method represents beta-actin (ACTB) transcripts in situ detection in human cells, the technique strategy is based on programmable DNA probes, amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The method reports precise localization of molecule of interest with an accuracy of a single-cell. Visualization and localization of specific endogenous mRNA molecules in real-time in vivo has the promising to innovate cellular biology studies, medical analysis and to provide a vital toolbox in drugs invention area. Second method described in this thesis represents miR-21 miRNA detection within a single live-cell resolution. The method using fluorophore-labeled short synthetic DNAs probes forming a stem-loop shape and generating Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a result of target-probes hybridization. Catalytic nucleic acid (DNAzymes) probes are cooperative tool for precise detection of different mRNA targets. With assistance of a complementary fluorophore-quencher labeled substrate, the DNAzymes provide

  13. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lei, Jing Lei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Hong Qun, E-mail: luohq@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li, Nian Bing, E-mail: linb@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications. - Highlights: • Conformational switch of i-motif is used for the detection of glucose and urea. • The sensor can be regenerated. • The proposed method is successfully applied in real sample assay. • Our method is label-free and inexpensive.

  14. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P;

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probe...

  15. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation...

  16. Using genomic DNA-based probe-selection to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend Henrik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-density oligonucleotide (oligo arrays are a powerful tool for transcript profiling. Arrays based on GeneChip® technology are amongst the most widely used, although GeneChip® arrays are currently available for only a small number of plant and animal species. Thus, we have developed a method to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species and tested the method by analysing the transcriptome of Brassica oleracea L., a species for which no GeneChip® array is available, using a GeneChip® array designed for Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Genomic DNA from B. oleracea was labelled and hybridised to the ATH1-121501 GeneChip® array. Arabidopsis thaliana probe-pairs that hybridised to the B. oleracea genomic DNA on the basis of the perfect-match (PM probe signal were then selected for subsequent B. oleracea transcriptome analysis using a .cel file parser script to generate probe mask files. The transcriptional response of B. oleracea to a mineral nutrient (phosphorus; P stress was quantified using probe mask files generated for a wide range of gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds. An example probe mask file generated with a gDNA hybridisation intensity threshold of 400 removed > 68 % of the available PM probes from the analysis but retained >96 % of available A. thaliana probe-sets. Ninety-nine of these genes were then identified as significantly regulated under P stress in B. oleracea, including the homologues of P stress responsive genes in A. thaliana. Increasing the gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds up to 500 for probe-selection increased the sensitivity of the GeneChip® array to detect regulation of gene expression in B. oleracea under P stress by up to 13-fold. Our open-source software to create probe mask files is freely available http://affymetrix.arabidopsis.info/xspecies/ and may be used to facilitate transcriptomic analyses of a wide range of plant and animal

  17. Design and evaluation of 16S rRNA sequence based oligonucleotide probes for the detection and quantification of Comamonas testosteroni in mixed microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathe Stephan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-proteobacterial species Comamonas testosteroni is capable of biotransformation and also biodegradation of a range of chemical compounds and thus potentially useful in chemical manufacturing and bioremediation. The ability to detect and quantify members of this species in mixed microbial communities thus may be desirable. Results We have designed an oligonucleotide probe for use in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and two pairs of PCR primers targeting a C. testosteroni subgroup. The FISH probe and one of the PCR primer pairs are suitable for quantification of C. testosteroni in mixed microbial communities using FISH followed by quantitative image analysis or real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. This has been shown by analysis of samples from an enrichment of activated sludge on testosterone resulting in an increase in abundance and finally isolation of C. testosteroni. Additionally, we have successfully used quantitative PCR to follow the C. testosteroni abundance during a laboratory scale wastewater bioaugmentation experiment. Conclusion The oligonucleotides presented here provide a useful tool to study C. testosteroni population dynamics in mixed microbial communities.

  18. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells ...... mismatches may be detected in the PCR and typing for HLA-DP gene variants, which differ for only one base, may be performed.......The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...

  19. Sequence determination of rRNA genes of pathogenic Vibrio species and whole-cell identification of Vibrio vulnificus with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, R; Ludwig, W; Amann, R I; Schleifer, K H

    1994-04-01

    A comparative analysis of seven new 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic Vibrio species with previously published vibrio sequences confirmed that Vibrio vulnificus represents a group that is not closely related to the core organisms of the genus Vibrio. In addition, we found that V. vulnificus, Listonella (Vibrio) anguillarum and Vibrio diazotrophicus branch off separately from the core group. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of V. vulnificus strains belonging to biotypes 1 and 2 revealed that the sequences of all but four biotype 1 strains were identical to each other but slightly different (17 bases) from the sequences of the rest of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. In addition, the sequences of variable regions of the 23S rRNA genes of Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio furnissii, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio cholerae, and V. vulnificus C7184 and TW1 were determined, aligned, and compared with all available bacterial 23S rRNA sequences in order to search for specific target sites. As a result, four oligonucleotide probes specific for V. vulnificus were synthesized, and the specificities of these probes were evaluated by dot blot hybridization to membrane-bound RNAs from 21 V. vulnificus strains, 13 strains belonging to other Vibrio species, 61 strains belonging to species that are members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria, and 3 eucaryotic microorganisms. Two probes hybridized with all of the V. vulnificus strains tested, and the other two probes distinguished V. vulnificus biotype 1 strains from all other organisms. In situ identification of V. vulnificus by using tetramethylrhodamine- or fluorescein-labelled oligonucleotides is now possible.

  20. Effect of LNA- and OMeN-modified oligonucleotide probes on the stability and discrimination of mismatched base pairs of duplexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Yan; Jing Yan; Xianyu Piao; Tianbiao Zhang; Yifu Guan

    2012-06-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2′--methyl nucleotide (OMeN) are the most extensively studied nucleotide analogues. Although both LNA and OMeN are characterized by the C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation, which is dominant in A-form DNA and RNA nucleotides, they demonstrate different binding behaviours. Previous studies have focused attention on their properties of duplex stabilities, hybridization kinetics and resistance against nuclease digestion; however, their ability to discriminate mismatched hybridizations has been explored much less. In this study, LNA- and OMeN-modified oligonucleotide probes have been prepared and their effects on the DNA duplex stability have been examined: LNA modifications can enhance the duplex stability, whereas OMeN modifications reduce the duplex stability. Next, we studied how the LNA:DNA and OMeN:DNA mismatches reduced the duplex stability. Melting temperature measurement showed that different LNA:DNA or OMeN:DNA mismatches indeed influence the duplex stability differently. LNA purines can discriminate LNA:DNA mismatches more effectively than LNA pyrimidines as well as DNA nucleotides. Furthermore, we designed five LNA- and five OMeN-modified oligonucleotide probes to simulate realistic situations where target–probe duplexes contain a complementary LNA:DNA or OMeN:DNA base pairs and a DNA:DNA mismatch simultaneously. The measured collective effect showed that the duplex stability was enhanced by the complementary LNA:DNA base pair but decreased by the DNA:DNA mismatch in a position-dependent manner regardless of the chemical identity and position of the complementary LNA:DNA base pair. On the other hand, the OMeN-modified probes also showed that the duplex stability was reduced by both the OMeN modification and the OMeN:DNA mismatch in a position-dependent manner.

  1. Large Scale Explorative Oligonucleotide Probe Selection for Thousands of Genetic Groups on a Computing Grid: Application to Phylogenetic Probe Design Using a Curated Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faouzi Jaziri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic Oligonucleotide Arrays (POAs were recently adapted for studying the huge microbial communities in a flexible and easy-to-use way. POA coupled with the use of explorative probes to detect the unknown part is now one of the most powerful approaches for a better understanding of microbial community functioning. However, the selection of probes remains a very difficult task. The rapid growth of environmental databases has led to an exponential increase of data to be managed for an efficient design. Consequently, the use of high performance computing facilities is mandatory. In this paper, we present an efficient parallelization method to select known and explorative oligonucleotide probes at large scale using computing grids. We implemented a software that generates and monitors thousands of jobs over the European Computing Grid Infrastructure (EGI. We also developed a new algorithm for the construction of a high-quality curated phylogenetic database to avoid erroneous design due to bad sequence affiliation. We present here the performance and statistics of our method on real biological datasets based on a phylogenetic prokaryotic database at the genus level and a complete design of about 20,000 probes for 2,069 genera of prokaryotes.

  2. Steady-State Fluorescence and Lifetime Emission Study of pH-Sensitive Probes Based on i-motif Forming Oligonucleotides Single and Double Labeled with Pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dembska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine-rich nucleic acids undergo pH-stimulated structural transitions leading to formation of an i-motif architecture at an acidic pH. Thus, i-motifs are good foundation for designing simple pH-sensitive fluorescent probes. We report here steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies of pyrene-labeled probes based on RET sequence: C4GC4GC4GC4TA (RET21, AC4GC4GC4GC4TA (RET21A and C4GC4GC4GC4T (RET20. Comparative studies with single- and double-labeled i-motif probes were carried out. For each probe, we have measured fluorescence spectra and decays for emission wavelength of 390 nm over a wide range of pH (from 4.0 to 8.0. Effect of the oligonucleotide sequence and the number of pyrene labels on the spectral characteristics of probes were discussed.

  3. Highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for mercury(II) ions by using a mercury-specific oligonucleotide probe and gold nanoparticle-based amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Su, Yuanyuan; Li, Jiang; Li, Di; Zhang, Jiong; Song, Shiping; Zhao, Yun; Li, Genxi; Fan, Chunhai

    2009-09-15

    We report a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solution by using a thymine (T)-rich, mercury-specific oligonucleotide (MSO) probe and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs)-based signal amplification. The MSO probe contains seven thymine bases at both ends and a "mute" spacer in the middle, which, in the presence of Hg(2+), forms a hairpin structure via the Hg(2+)-mediated coordination of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs. The thiolated MSO probe is immobilized on Au electrodes to capture free Hg(2+) in aqueous media, and the MSO-bound Hg(2+) can be electrochemically reduced to Hg(+), which provides a readout signal for quantitative detection of Hg(2+). This direct immobilization strategy leads to a detection limit of 1 microM. In order to improve the sensitivity, MSO probe-modified Au NPs are employed to amplify the electrochemical signals. Au NPs are comodified with the MSO probe and a linking probe that is complementary to a capture DNA probe immobilized on gold electrodes. We demonstrated that this Au NPs-based sensing strategy brings about an amplification factor of more than 3 orders of magnitude, leading to a limit of detection of 0.5 nM (100 ppt), which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity requirement of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This Au NPs-based Hg(2+) sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity over a spectrum of interference metal ions. Considering the high sensitivity and selectivity of this sensor, as well as the cost-effective and portable features of electrochemical techniques, we expect this Au NPs amplified electrochemical sensor will be a promising candidate for field detection of environmentally toxic mercury.

  4. Highly Sensitive Fluorometric Hg2+ Biosensor with a Mercury(Ⅱ)-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) Probe and Water-Soluble Graphene Oxide (WSGO)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xingfen; Miao Likun; Jiang Xu; Ma Yanwen; Fan Quli; Huang Wei

    2011-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective, "turn-on" and simple Hg2+ biosensor is reported by using water-soluble gra-phene oxide (WSGO) and dye-labeled mercury(Ⅱ)-specific oligonucleotide (MSO) probe. The probe is rich of thymine (T) and can readily form the stem-loop structure which consists of the T-Hg2+-T configuration. In the ab-sence of Hg2+, the probe exists as a random coil conformation which can be readily adsorbed on the surface of WSGO by strong noncovalent binding of bases, as a result, the fluorescence of the dye labeled on the terminus of the MSO is strongly quenched by the efficient electron/energy transfer from the dye to WSGO. Upon addition of Hg2+, the formation of the T-Hg2+-T structure releases the MSO from the surface of WSGO, resulting in a restora-tion of the fluorescence of dye-labeled MSO probe. Based on this observation, a highly sensitive and selective Hg2+ sensor is developed, which can work with "turn-on" mode in aqueous solutions at room temperature. By using the fluorometric method, the limit of detection for Hg2+ can reach picomolar range (187 pmol·L-1), and it is demonstrated that the biosensor is highly selective and only minimally perturbed by a wide range of non-specific metal ions.

  5. Evaluation of sequence alignments and oligonucleotide probes with respect to three-dimensional structure of ribosomal RNA using ARB software package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Harald

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of high-resolution RNA crystal structures for the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits and the subsequent validation of comparative secondary structure models have prompted the biologists to use three-dimensional structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA for evaluating sequence alignments of rRNA genes. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structural features of rRNA are highly useful and successfully employed in designing rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes intended for in situ hybridization experiments. RNA3D, a program to combine sequence alignment information with three-dimensional structure of rRNA was developed. Integration into ARB software package, which is used extensively by the scientific community for phylogenetic analysis and molecular probe designing, has substantially extended the functionality of ARB software suite with 3D environment. Results Three-dimensional structure of rRNA is visualized in OpenGL 3D environment with the abilities to change the display and overlay information onto the molecule, dynamically. Phylogenetic information derived from the multiple sequence alignments can be overlaid onto the molecule structure in a real time. Superimposition of both statistical and non-statistical sequence associated information onto the rRNA 3D structure can be done using customizable color scheme, which is also applied to a textual sequence alignment for reference. Oligonucleotide probes designed by ARB probe design tools can be mapped onto the 3D structure along with the probe accessibility models for evaluation with respect to secondary and tertiary structural conformations of rRNA. Conclusion Visualization of three-dimensional structure of rRNA in an intuitive display provides the biologists with the greater possibilities to carry out structure based phylogenetic analysis. Coupled with secondary structure models of rRNA, RNA3D program aids in validating the sequence alignments of rRNA genes and evaluating

  6. Transcript-based redefinition of grouped oligonucleotide probe sets using AceView: High-resolution annotation for microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cam Margaret C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting biological information from high-density Affymetrix arrays is a multi-step process that begins with the accurate annotation of microarray probes. Shortfalls in the original Affymetrix probe annotation have been described; however, few studies have provided rigorous solutions for routine data analysis. Results Using AceView, a comprehensive human transcript database, we have reannotated the probes by matching them to RNA transcripts instead of genes. Based on this transcript-level annotation, a new probe set definition was created in which every probe in a probe set maps to a common set of AceView gene transcripts. In addition, using artificial data sets we identified that a minimal probe set size of 4 is necessary for reliable statistical summarization. We further demonstrate that applying the new probe set definition can detect specific transcript variants contributing to differential expression and it also improves cross-platform concordance. Conclusion We conclude that our transcript-level reannotation and redefinition of probe sets complement the original Affymetrix design. Redefinitions introduce probe sets whose sizes may not support reliable statistical summarization; therefore, we advocate using our transcript-level mapping redefinition in a secondary analysis step rather than as a replacement. Knowing which specific transcripts are differentially expressed is important to properly design probe/primer pairs for validation purposes. For convenience, we have created custom chip-description-files (CDFs and annotation files for our new probe set definitions that are compatible with Bioconductor, Affymetrix Expression Console or third party software.

  7. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Wilkes, Jon G; Moskal, Ted J; Williams, Anna J; Cooper, Willie M; Nayak, Rajesh; Rafii, Fatemeh; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC) assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts.

  8. Development of a Flow Cytometry-Based Method for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli and Shigella Spp. Using an Oligonucleotide Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xue

    Full Text Available Standard methods to detect Escherichia coli contamination in food use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and agar culture plates. These methods require multiple incubation steps and take a long time to results. An improved rapid flow-cytometry based detection method was developed, using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe specifically binding a16S rRNA sequence. The method positively detected 51 E. coli isolates as well as 4 Shigella species. All 27 non-E. coli strains tested gave negative results. Comparison of the new genetic assay with a total plate count (TPC assay and agar plate counting indicated similar sensitivity, agreement between cytometry cell and colony counts. This method can detect a small number of E.coli cells in the presence of large numbers of other bacteria. This method can be used for rapid, economical, and stable detection of E. coli and Shigella contamination in the food industry and other contexts.

  9. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  10. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide tide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Christensen, H.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    -embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific oligonucleotide...

  11. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurnheer Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of

  12. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-beta-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.W.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    1999-01-01

    -beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature of-dissociation and specificity studies, To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated......Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYE, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S, wolfei LYE was closely related...... fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria-and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities...

  13. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quevedo, Beatrice; Giertsen, Elin; Zijnge, Vincent; Luethi-Schaller, Helga; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotroph

  14. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quevedo, Beatrice; Giertsen, Elin; Zijnge, Vincent; Luethi-Schaller, Helga; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotroph

  15. Quantifying filamentous microorganisms in activated sludge before, during, and after an incident of foaming by oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and antibody staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerther, D B; de los Reyes, F L; de los Reyes, M F; Raskin, L

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridizations, immunostaining, and a simple foaming potential test were used to follow an incident of seasonal filamentous foaming at the Urbana-Champaign Sanitary District, Northeast Wastewater Treatment Plant. A positive correlation was observed between an increase in foaming potential and the appearance of foam on the surfaces of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. In addition, during the occurrence of foaming, the mass and activity of Gordonia spp. increased as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization, antibody staining, and quantitative membrane hybridization of RNA extracts. An increase in Gordonia spp. rRNA levels from 0.25 to 1.4% of total rRNA was observed using quantitative membrane hybridizations, whereas during the same period, the fraction of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids attributed to Gordonia spp. increased from 4% to more than 32% of the total mixed liquor volatile suspended solids. These results indicate that both the activity and biomass level of Gordonia spp. in activated sludge increased relative to the activity aid the biomass level of the complete microbial community during a seasonal occurrence of filamentous foaming. Thus, Gordonia spp. may represent a numerically dominant but metabolically limited fraction of the total biomass, and the role of Gordonia spp. in filamentous foaming may be linked more tightly to the physical presence of filamentous microorganisms than to the metabolic activity of the cells.

  16. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  17. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of open lactic acid fermentation of kitchen refuse using rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Mori, Masatsugu; Fujii, Akira; Iwami, Yuko; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2004-01-01

    Reproducible amounts of lactic acid accumulate in minced kitchen refuse under open conditions with intermittent pH neutralization [Sakai et al., Food Sci. Technol. Res., 6, 140 (2000)]. Here, we showed that such pH-controlled open fermentation of kitchen refuse reproducibly resulted a selective proliferation of a major lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species. In one experiment, the predominant microorganisms isolated during the early phase (6 h) were Gammaproteobacteria. In contrast, those that predominated during the late phase (48 h) were always Lactobacillus plantarum in three independent experiments. To further quantify the microbial community within open lactic acid fermentation, we performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis targeting 16S (23S) rRNA. We designed two new group-specific DNA probes: LAC722(L) was active for most LAB including the genera Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Weisella, whereas Lplan477 was specific for L. plantarum and its related species. We then optimized sample preparation using lysozyme and hybridization conditions including temperature, as well as the formamide concentration and the salt concentration in the washing buffer. We succeeded in quantification of microorganisms in semi-solid, complex biological materials such as minced kitchen refuse by taking color microphotographs in modified RGB balance on pre-coated slides. FISH analysis of the fermentation of kitchen refuse indicated that control of the pH swing leads to domination by the LAB population in minced kitchen refuse under open conditions. We also confirmed that L. plantarum, which generates lactic acid in high quantities but with low optical activity, became the dominant microorganism in kitchen refuse during the late phase of open fermentation.

  18. Design of species-specific oligonucleotide probes for the detection of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides by fluorescence in situ hybridization and their application to the analysis of mouse caecal Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Y; Park, S H; Miyamoto, Y; Itoh, K

    2011-07-01

    To develop species-specific monitoring techniques for rapid detection of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides inhabiting the mouse intestine by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The specificity of oligonucleotide probes was evaluated by fluorescence whole-cell hybridization. Oligonucleotide probes specific for each species hybridized only with the target bacteria. Using these probes, caecal Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota of conventional mice and specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice from three different breeders were analysed. It was shown that Bacteroides acidifaciens Group-1, Group-2 and Group-3 were dominant in conventional mice and SPF mice from two out of three breeders. Bacteroides vulgatus and Parabacteroides distasonis were detected in one of these two SPF breeding colonies in addition to Bact. acidifaciens. SPF mice of the remaining breeder harboured characteristic Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota, consisting of Bacteroides sp. ASF519 and Bacteroides caccae. Bacteroides acidifaciens is the dominant and most typical species in the mouse Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota. The Group-3 was identified as a novel group and revealed to occupy a major niche together with Bact. acidifaciens Group-1 and Group-2. The species-specific probe set developed in this study was the efficient tool for rapid detection of target bacterial groups inhabiting the mouse intestine. The results of this study provide important new information on the mouse Bacteroides-Parabacteroides community. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. One-year monitoring of an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel laboratory-developed test for bladder cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinawi-Aljundi R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rima Tinawi-Aljundi,1 Lauren King,2 Shannon T Knuth,2 Michael Gildea,2 Carrie Ng,2 Josh Kahl,2 Jacqueline Dion,2 Chris Young,2 Edward W Schervish,1 J Rene Frontera,1 Jason Hafron,1 Kenneth M Kernen,1 Robert Di Loreto,1 Joan Aurich-Costa21Michigan Institute of Urology, St Claire Shores, MI, USA; 2Cellay, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA Background: Previously, we had developed and manufactured an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (OligoFISH probe panel based on the most clinically sensitive chromosomes found in a reference set of bladder carcinoma cases. The panel was clinically validated for use as a diagnostic and monitoring assay for bladder cancer, reaching 100% correlation with the results of the UroVysion test. After 1 year of using this probe panel, we present here the comparison of cytology, cystoscopy, and pathology findings to the OligoFISH probe panel results to calculate its clinical performance. Materials and methods: In order to calculate clinical performance, we compared the OligoFISH results to the cytology and cystoscopy/pathology findings for 147 initial diagnoses and 399 recurrence monitorings. Finally, we compared clinical performance to published values for the UroVysion test, including both low- and high-grade tumors. Results: Chromosomes 3, 6, 7, and 20 were highly involved in bladder carcinoma aneuploidy. At the initial diagnosis, we obtained 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.5%–94.7% accuracy, 96.8% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%–99.3%, 79.2% specificity (95% CI: 65.9%–87.8%, 89.2% positive predictive value (PPV; 95% CI: 81.5%–94.5%, and 93.3% negative predictive value (NPV; 95% CI: 81.7%–97.3%. When monitoring for recurrence, we obtained 85.2% accuracy (95% CI: 81.3%–88.5%, 82.0% sensitivity (95% CI: 76.0%–87.1%, 88.4% specificity (95% CI: 83.2%–92.5%, 87.7% PPV (95% CI: 82.1%–92.0%, and 83.0% NPV (95% CI: 77.3%–87.8%. When looking at low- and high-grade tumors, the test showed 100

  20. Problems connected with the use of oligonucleotide probes with a high degree of degeneracy. Identification of mRNA and of cDNA clones corresponding to the gene of the. cap alpha. -subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Grishin, A.V.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Broude, N.E.; Grinkevich, V.A.; Filippova, L.Yu.; Severtsova, I.V.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-10-01

    To identify and search for nucleotide sequences containing the structural part of the gene of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase, 17-membered oligonucleotide probes corresponding to the peptide Lys-Asp-Ala-Phe-Gln-Asn have been synthesized. It has been shown that, with a 64-fold degeneracyd, the 17-membered probe is suitable only for the identification of a specific sequence in mRNA. To search for clones containing cDNA fragments, preliminary fractionation of the probes with the aid of HPLC or the resynthesis of groups of oligonucleotides with a lower degeneracy is necessary.

  1. A signal-on electrochemical DNA biosensor based on potential-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition mediated labeling of hairpin-like oligonucleotide with electroactive probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiong; Kong, Jinming; Li, Yajie; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensor was developed for the signal-on detection of sequence-specific DNA by exploiting potential-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (φCuAAC) as an efficient approach for the labeling of hairpin-like oligonucleotide (hairpin) with electroactive probe. The hairpins, dually labeled with thiol and azide at either terminal, were firstly self-assembled on gold electrode and served as the capture probes for the specific recognition of target DNA. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the surface-confined hairpins were unfolded, liberating the azide-containing terminals away from electrode surface. Subsequently, the unfolded hairpins were conveniently and efficiently labeled with ethynylferrocene (EFC) via the φCuAAC. The quantitatively labeled EFC was finally measured via differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for the signal-on electrochemical detection of sequence-specific DNA. The biosensor presented a good linear response over the range from 1pM to 1nM with a detection limit of 0.62pM. Results also revealed that it was highly specific and held a good detection capability in serum samples. Furthermore, the ability to chemoselectively label hairpin-like oligonucleotide with signal reporter by electrical addressing, together with the simplicity and efficiency of the φCuAAC, makes it compatible with microfluidic devices and microelectrode arrays to achieve the miniaturized and multiplexed detections.

  2. Mechanism of antisense oligonucleotide interaction with natural RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, R; Petyuk, V; Vorobijev, Y; Koval, V; Fedorova, O; Vlassov, V; Zenkova, M

    2011-08-01

    Oligonucleotides find several numbers of applications: as diagnostic probes, RT and PCR primers and antisense agents due to their ability of forming specific interactions with complementary nucleotide sequences within nucleic acids. These interactions are strongly affected by accessibility of the target sequence in the RNA structure. In the present work the mechanism of invasion of RNA structure by oligonucleotide was investigated using a model system: yeast tRNA(Phe) and oligonucleotides complementary to the 3'-part of this molecule. Kinetics of interaction of oligonucleotides with in vitro transcript of yeast tRNAPhe was studied using stopped-flow technique with fluorescence quenching detection, 5'-DABCYL labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized with 3'-fluorescein labeled tRNA(Phe). The results evidence for a four-step invasion process of the oligonucleotide-RNA complex formation. The process is initiated by formation of transition complexes with nucleotides in the T-loop and ACCA sequence. This complex formation is followed by RNA unfolding and formation of an extended heteroduplex with the oligonucleotide via strand displacement process. Computer modeling of oligonucleotide-tRNA(Phe) interaction revealed potential factors that could favor transition complexes formation and confirmed the proposed mechanism, showing the oligonucleotide to be a molecular "wedge". Our data evidence that oligonucleotide invasion into structured RNA is initiated by loop-single strand interactions, similar to the initial step of the antisense RNA-RNA interactions. The obtained results can be used for choosing efficient oligonucleotide probes.

  3. Evolution of the MIDTAL microarray: the adaption and testing of oligonucleotide 18S and 28S rDNA probes and evaluation of subsequent microarray generations with Prymnesium spp. cultures and field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard T A; Raine, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The toxic microalgal species Prymnesium parvum and Prymnesium polylepis are responsible for numerous fish kills causing economic stress on the aquaculture industry and, through the consumption of contaminated shellfish, can potentially impact on human health. Monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is traditionally carried out by light microscopy. However, molecular methods of identification and quantification are becoming more common place. This study documents the optimisation of the novel Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) microarray from its initial stages to the final commercial version now available from Microbia Environnement (France). Existing oligonucleotide probes used in whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for Prymnesium species from higher group probes to species-level probes were adapted and tested on the first-generation microarray. The combination and interaction of numerous other probes specific for a whole range of phytoplankton taxa also spotted on the chip surface caused high cross reactivity, resulting in false-positive results on the microarray. The probe sequences were extended for the subsequent second-generation microarray, and further adaptations of the hybridisation protocol and incubation temperatures significantly reduced false-positive readings from the first to the second-generation chip, thereby increasing the specificity of the MIDTAL microarray. Additional refinement of the subsequent third-generation microarray protocols with the addition of a poly-T amino linker to the 5' end of each probe further enhanced the microarray performance but also highlighted the importance of optimising RNA labelling efficiency when testing with natural seawater samples from Killary Harbour, Ireland.

  4. Functionalization of magnetic gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles with oligonucleotides and magnetic separation of specific target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Takuya [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: t-kinoshita@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Seino, Satoshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mizukoshi, Yoshiteru [Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takao A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic composite nanoparticles of gold and iron-oxide synthesized with gamma-rays or ultrasonics were functionalized with thiol-modified oligonucleotides. The amount of oligonucleotides bound to the functionalized nanoparticle probes via hybridization was quantified with fluorescently-labeled target oligonucleotides. Our composite nanoparticles magnetically separated the specific target oligonucleotides without the non-specific adsorption.

  5. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  6. Design and application of oligonucleotide probes for fluorescent in situ identification of the filamentous bacterial morphotype Nostocoida limicola in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J R; Seviour, R J

    2001-09-01

    16S rRNA targeted probes, designed using sequence data from pure cultures of the three morphotypes of the filamentous bulking bacteria Nostocoida limicola I, II and III and their successful application to the in situ identification of these bacteria in activated sludge biomass samples are described here. Two probes were required to detect all the sequenced N. limicola II isolates. Results from fluorescent in situ hybridization suggest that the morphotypes N. limicola I and II contain at least two phylogenetically unrelated bacteria. The N. limicola II filaments that did not respond to the probes designed in this study fluoresced instead with the probes previously designed for the alpha-Proteobacteria. The data also suggest that both N. limicola I and III can exist in activated sludge as single, paired or clumped cells and thus in a form not recognizable microscopically as this morphotype. Some N. limicola II filaments which responded to the probes designed here were much thinner than the filaments conventionally 'identified' as this morphotype and better fitted the descriptions often used in the literature for N. limicola I.

  7. A universal oligonucleotide microarray with a minimal number of probes for the detection and identification of viroids at the genus level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiang Zhang

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the agricultural industry is the development of techniques that can screen plant samples for viroid infection. Microarrays are promising in this regard, as their high throughput nature can potentially allow for the detection of a range of viroids in a single test. In this paper we present a microarray that can detect a wide spectrum of all 8 reported viroid genera including 37 known plant viroid species. The array was constructed using an automated probe design protocol which generated a minimal number of probes to detect viroids at the genus level. The designed microarray showed a high specificity and sensitivity when tested with a set of standard virus samples. Finally, the microarray was applied to screen infected field samples, with Hop stunt viroid infection identified as the major disease causing pathogen for an infected citrus sample.

  8. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  9. Submolecular Structure and Orientation of Oligonucleotide Duplexes Tethered to Gold Electrodes Probed by Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy: Effect of the Electrode Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kékedy-Nagy, László; Ferapontova, Elena E; Brand, Izabella

    2017-02-23

    at a submolecular level. These pioneer results on the potential-driven changes in the submolecular structure of double stranded DNA adsorbed on conductive supports contribute to further understanding of the potential-driven sequence-specific electronic properties of surface-tethered oligonucleotides.

  10. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinhopl, N; Mostegl, M M; Richter, B; Nedorost, N; Maderner, A; Fragner, K; Weissenböck, H

    2011-11-12

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues.

  11. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Rudolph L

    2016-08-19

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotides in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Stein, Cy A

    2014-11-01

    Over the past several dozen years, regardless of the substantial effort directed toward developing rational oligonucleotide strategies to silence gene expression, antisense oligonucleotide-based cancer therapy has not been successful. This review focuses on the most likely reasons for this lack of success, and on the barriers that still need to be overcome to make a clinical cancer treatment reality out of the promise of antisense therapy. Considerable progress has been made in the design and delivery of nucleic acid fragments. Chemical modifications have considerably improved oligonucleotide absorption, distribution and metabolism while at the same time reducing toxicity. Nevertheless, the delivery and the cellular uptake of these molecules are still not adequate to provide the desired therapeutic outcome. Recent therapeutic interventional phase III trials of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides for a cancer indication will be discussed, in addition to those studies that markedly improve the scientific understanding of the properties of these molecules. We still do not have a marketed antisense oligonucleotide for a cancer indication. This is because critical aspects of the cellular, tumor pharmacology and delivery properties of these agents are still not well understood.

  13. A New Achiral Linker Reagent for the Incorporation of Multiple Amino Groups Into Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new functionalized achiral linker reagent for incorporating multiple primary amino groups or reporter groups into oligonucleotides following the phosphoramidite methodology. It is possible to substitute any ribodeoxynucleotide, deoxynucleotide, or nucleotide wit......, to a method for preparing a labelled oligonucleotide, and to the use of the labelled oligonucleotide as hybridisation probe, in polymerase chain reactions (PCR), in nucleic acid sequencing, in cloning recombinant DNA and $i(in vitro) mutagenesis....

  14. Utilization of a labeled tracking oligonucleotide for visualization and quality control of spotted 70-mer arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shehnaz

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spotted 70-mer oligonucleotide arrays offer potentially greater specificity and an alternative to expensive cDNA library maintenance and amplification. Since microarray fabrication is a considerable source of data variance, we previously directly tagged cDNA probes with a third fluorophore for prehybridization quality control. Fluorescently modifying oligonucleotide sets is cost prohibitive, therefore, a co-spotted Staphylococcus aureus-specific fluorescein-labeled "tracking" oligonucleotide is described to monitor fabrication variables of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis oligonucleotide microarray. Results Significantly (p M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. tuberculosis mprA. Linearity between the mean log Cy3/Cy5 ratios of genes differentially expressed from arrays either possessing or lacking the tracking oligonucleotide was observed (R2 = 0.90, p Conclusions This novel approach enables prehybridization array visualization for spotted oligonucleotide arrays and sets the stage for more sophisticated slide qualification and data filtering applications.

  15. Improving signal intensities for genes with low-expression on oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Limei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays using long oligonucleotide probes are widely used to evaluate gene expression in biological samples. These oligonucleotides are pre-synthesized and sequence-optimized to represent specific genes with minimal cross-hybridization to homologous genes. Probe length and concentration are critical factors for signal sensitivity, particularly when genes with various expression levels are being tested. We evaluated the effects of oligonucleotide probe length and concentration on signal intensity measurements of the expression levels of genes in a target sample. Results Selected genes of various expression levels in a single cell line were hybridized to oligonucleotide arrays of four lengths and four concentrations of probes to determine how these critical parameters affected the intensity of the signal representing their expression. We found that oligonucleotides of longer length significantly increased the signals of genes with low-expression in the target. High-expressing gene signals were also boosted but to a lesser degree. Increasing the probe concentration, however, did not linearly increase the signal intensity for either low- or high-expressing genes. Conclusions We conclude that the longer the oligonuclotide probe the better the signal intensities of low expressing genes on oligonucleotide arrays.

  16. 'Specific' oligonucleotides often recognize more than one gene: the limits of in situ hybridization applied to GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladinic, M; Didelon, F; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-05-15

    As exquisite probes for gene sequences, oligonucleotides are one of the most powerful tools of recombinant molecular biology. In studying the GABA receptor subunits in the neonatal hippocampus we have used oligonucleotide probes in in situ hybridization and cloning techniques. The oligonucleotides used and assumed to be specific for the target gene, actually recognized more than one gene, leading to surprising and contradictory results. In particular, we found that a GABA(A)-rho specific oligonucleotide recognized an abundant, previously unknown, transcription factor in both in situ and library screening, while oligos 'specific' for GABA(A) subunits were able to recognize 30 additional unrelated genes in library screening. This suggests that positive results obtained with oligonucleotides should be interpreted with caution unless confirmed by identical results with oligonucleotides from different parts of the same gene, or cDNA library screening excludes the presence of other hybridizing species.

  17. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  18. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  19. Typing of enteroviruses by use of microwell oligonucleotide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, P; Hattara, L; Waris, M; Luoma-Aho, T; Siitari, H; Hyypiä, T; Saviranta, P

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a straightforward assay for the rapid typing of enteroviruses using oligonucleotide arrays in microtiter wells. The viral nucleic acids are concomitantly amplified and labeled during reverse transcription-PCR, and unpurified PCR products are used for hybridization. DNA strands are separated by alkaline denaturation, and hybridization is started by neutralization. The microarray hybridization reactions and the subsequent washes are performed in standard 96-well microtiter plates, which makes the method easily adaptable to high-throughput analysis. We describe here the assay principle and its potential in clinical laboratory use by correctly identifying 10 different enterovirus reference strains. Furthermore, we explore the detection of unknown sequence variants using serotype consensus oligonucleotide probes. With just two consensus probes for the coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9) serotype, we detected 23 out of 25 highly diverse CVA9 isolates. Overall, the assay involves several features aiming at ease of performance, robustness, and applicability to large-scale studies.

  20. A statistical multiprobe model for analyzing cis and trans genes in genetical genomics experiments with short-oligonucleotide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Haan, Gerald de; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2005-01-01

    Short-oligonucleotide arrays typically contain multiple probes per gene. In genetical genomics applications a statistical model for the individual probe signals can help in separating ‘‘true’’ differential mRNA expression from ‘‘ghost’’ effects caused by polymorphisms, misdesigned probes, and batch

  1. 新型纳米金荧光双标survivin反义寡核苷酸探针的合成及其对人恶性黑素瘤A375细胞的影响%Synthesis of the probe of survivin antisens oligonucleotide modified gold nanoparticles and its impact on A375 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萍; 王梅; 肖生祥; 王冰; 霍佳

    2013-01-01

    目的 利用纳米金独特的生物和光学特性,合成一种新型纳米金荧光双标survivin反义寡核苷酸探针,观察其对人恶性黑素瘤A375细胞的影响.方法 用柠檬酸钠还原法制备纳米金,将巯基修饰后的survivin反义寡核苷酸结合在纳米金表面,合成纳米金survivin反义寡核苷酸探针;再结合互补的带荧光标记的报告序列,制成纳米金荧光双标survivin反义寡核苷酸探针;将制备的探针转染人恶性黑素瘤A375细胞,荧光显微镜观察细胞内荧光图像,MTT法及流式细胞仪检测A375细胞的增殖及凋亡情况.结果 制备的纳米金荧光双标survivin反义寡核苷酸探针转染A375细胞后,可观察到清晰的细胞内荧光图像,可以抑制A375细胞的增殖,与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),诱导细胞凋亡增多.结论 寡核苷酸功能化的纳米金颗粒可有效转染进人恶性黑素瘤A375细胞,通过反义封闭作用诱导人恶性黑素瘤A375细胞凋亡增多.%Objective To synthesize the probe of survivin antisense oligonucleotide modified gold nanoparticles by making use of the biological and optical characteristics of gold nanoparticles and to analyze its impact on A375 cells. Methods Citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were prepared using published procedures. Thiol-modified oligonucleotides were added to gold colloids to make nano-probes. Then the complementary reporter sequence was combined to prepare "nano-flare" probes. A375 cells were grown with media containing nano-flares probes. Fluorescent images were observed under the fluorescence microscope. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT and cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/PI double staining method. Results The nano-probes could inhibit A375 cell proliferation significantly (P<0.05) and induce cell apoptosis. Conclusion The nano-probes that can be stably synthesized can inhibit proliferation of A375 cells and induce their apoptosis.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  3. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  4. Combining gene expression data from different generations of oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Sek

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the important challenges in microarray analysis is to take full advantage of previously accumulated data, both from one's own laboratory and from public repositories. Through a comparative analysis on a variety of datasets, a more comprehensive view of the underlying mechanism or structure can be obtained. However, as we discover in this work, continual changes in genomic sequence annotations and probe design criteria make it difficult to compare gene expression data even from different generations of the same microarray platform. Results We first describe the extent of discordance between the results derived from two generations of Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, as revealed in cluster analysis and in identification of differentially expressed genes. We then propose a method for increasing comparability. The dataset we use consists of a set of 14 human muscle biopsy samples from patients with inflammatory myopathies that were hybridized on both HG-U95Av2 and HG-U133A human arrays. We find that the use of the probe set matching table for comparative analysis provided by Affymetrix produces better results than matching by UniGene or LocusLink identifiers but still remains inadequate. Rescaling of expression values for each gene across samples and data filtering by expression values enhance comparability but only for few specific analyses. As a generic method for improving comparability, we select a subset of probes with overlapping sequence segments in the two array types and recalculate expression values based only on the selected probes. We show that this filtering of probes significantly improves the comparability while retaining a sufficient number of probe sets for further analysis. Conclusions Compatibility between high-density oligonucleotide arrays is significantly affected by probe-level sequence information. With a careful filtering of the probes based on their sequence overlaps, data from different

  5. Polymerase-Endonuclease Amplification Reaction (PEAR) for Large-Scale Enzymatic Production of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gou, Deming; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR), for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI) cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. PMID:20062528

  6. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  7. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  8. Sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos by oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Zhong, Fagang; Yang, Yonglin; Wang, Xinhua; Liu, Shouren; Zhu, Bin

    2013-06-01

    The aim has been to set up a rapid and accurate microarray assay using sandwich mode for sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos. Twelve sequence-specific oligonucleotide capture probes used to discriminate 12 samples were spotted onto the aldehyde-modified glass slides by Arrayer. The 2 recognition probes used to identify coding regions of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome gene (SRY) and β-casein (CSN2) reference gene were coupled with biotin. The assay was optimized by using genomic DNA extracted from blood samples of known sex individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the fragments in the HMG box region of SRY gene and CSN2 gene with sequence-specific primers. The sex of samples was identified by detecting both the SRY and CSN2 genes simultaneously in 2 reaction cells of microarrays, with the male having SRY and CSN2 signals and the female only CSN2. The sex of 20 bovine preimplantation embryos was determined by oligonucleotide microarray. The protocol was run with a blind test that showed a 100% (82/82) specificity and accuracy in sexing of leukocytes. The bovine embryos were transferred into 20 bovine recipients, with a pregnant rate of 40% (8/20). Three calves were born at term, and 5 fetuses were miscarried. Their sexes were fully in accordance with the embryonic sex predetermination predicted by oligonucleotide microarray. This suggests that the oligonucleotide microarray method of SRY gene analysis can be used in early sex prediction of bovine embryos in breeding programs.

  9. LNA-modified isothermal oligonucleotide microarray for differentiating bacilli of similar origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Yuan, Ying; Mu, Runqing; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    Oligonucleotide microarray has been one of the most powerful tools in the 'Post-Genome Era' for its high sensitivity, high throughput and parallel processing capability. To achieve high detection specificity, we fabricated an isothermal microarray using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes, since LNA has demonstrated the advanced ability to enhance the binding affinity toward their complementary nucleotides. After designing the nucleotide sequences of these oligonucleotide probes for gram-positive bacilli of similar origin (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus circulans), we unified the melting temperatures of these oligonucleotide probes by modifying some nucleotides using LNA. Furthermore, we optimized the experimental procedures of hydrating microarray slides, blocking side surface as well as labelling the PCR products. Experimental results revealed that KOD Dash DNA polymerase could efficiently incorporate Cy3-dCTP into the PCR products, and the LNA-isothermal oligonucleotide microarray were able to distinguish the bacilli of similar origin with a high degree of accuracy and specificity under the optimized experimental condition.

  10. LNA-modified isothermal oligonucleotide microarray for differentiating bacilli of similar origin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Yan; Ying Yuan; Runqing Mu; Hong Shang; Yifu Guan

    2014-12-01

    Oligonucleotide microarray has been one of the most powerful tools in the ‘Post-Genome Era’ for its high sensitivity, high throughput and parallel processing capability. To achieve high detection specificity, we fabricated an isothermal microarray using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes, since LNA has demonstrated the advanced ability to enhance the binding affinity toward their complementary nucleotides. After designing the nucleotide sequences of these oligonucleotide probes for gram-positive bacilli of similar origin (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus circulans), we unified the melting temperatures of these oligonucleotide probes by modifying some nucleotides using LNA. Furthermore, we optimized the experimental procedures of hydrating microarray slides, blocking side surface as well as labelling the PCR products. Experimental results revealed that KOD Dash DNA polymerase could efficiently incorporate Cy3-dCTP into the PCR products, and the LNA-isothermal oligonucleotide microarray were able to distinguish the bacilli of similar origin with a high degree of accuracy and specificity under the optimized experimental condition.

  11. Diseño de oligonucléotidos para el estudio de genes celulolíticos y solventogénicos en cepas colombianas de Clostridium sp. (CLOSTRIDIACEAE Oligonucleotide Probe Design for the Study of Cellulolytic and Solventogenic Genes in Colombian Clostridiumsp. strains (Clostridiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez Moreno Zulma Rocío

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar las rutas metabólicas para la producción de solventes y degradación de celulosa en cepas colombianas promisorias del género Clostridium. Para ello se diseñaron sondas de hibridación que sirvieran para posteriores estudios de mejoramiento genético de las cepas. Se construyó la base de datos denominada MULTICLOST en Microsoft Access® con las secuencias de 485 genes involucrados en las rutas metabólicas arriba mencionadas, provenientes de 45 especies bacterianas y 10 especies fúngicas. Los genes fueron agrupados de acuerdo al tipo de enzima y a los dominios catalíticos o de unión a sustrato en el caso de las celulasas. Cada grupo se sometió a alineamiento múltiple en ClustalW 1.83 y con base en los resultados se crearon subgrupos de similitud mayor al 50%. Se localizaron secuencias conservadas de longitud mayor a 19 nucleótidos en GeneDoc 2.6.002 y sus valores termodinámicos fueron estimados con GeneRunner v3.05, mientras que la sensibilidad y especificidad fue verificada por búsquedas en GenBank usando BLASTN 2.2.8. En total se obtuvieron 94 secuencias conservadas con las siguientes características: longitud promedio de 24 nucleótidos, Tm promedio de 65,8 ºC y contenido de (G+C entre 14,3 y 60,0%. Se determinó que ninguna de las sondas diseñadas forma estructuras secundarias estables con Tm superior a 36,1 ºC. De acuerdo a sus características y valores termodinámicos, todas las sondas podrían ser utilizadas en la construcción de un microarreglo o en reacciones de PCR para la identificación de regiones relevantes en el mejoramiento del proceso por ingeniería metabólica.The goal of the present study was to analyze the metabolic pathways involved in solvent production and cellulose consumption by promising Colombian native strains of the genus Clostridium. Therefore a set of oligonucleotide probes was designed, with the aim of analyzing potential targets for genetic

  12. DISEÑO DE OLIGONUCLEÓTIDOS PARA EL ESTUDIO DE GENES CELULOLÍTICOS Y SOLVENTOGÉNICOS EN CEPAS COLOMBIANAS DE Clostridiumsp. (CLOSTRIDIACEAE Oligonucleotide Probe Design for the Study of Cellulolytic and Solventogenic Genes in Colombian Clostridiumsp. strains (Clostridiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ DAVID MONTOYA SOLANO

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar las rutas metabólicas para la producción de solventes y degradación de celulosa en cepas colombianas promisorias del género Clostridium. Para ello se diseñaron sondas de hibridación que sirvieran para posteriores estudios de mejoramiento genético de las cepas. Se construyó la base de datos denominada MULTICLOST en Microsoft Access® con las secuencias de 485 genes involucrados en las rutas metabólicas arriba mencionadas, provenientes de 45 especies bacterianas y 10 especies fúngicas. Los genes fueron agrupados de acuerdo al tipo de enzima y a los dominios catalíticos o de unión a sustrato en el caso de las celulasas. Cada grupo se sometió a alineamiento múltiple en ClustalW 1.83 y con base en los resultados se crearon subgrupos de similitud mayor al 50%. Se localizaron secuencias conservadas de longitud mayor a 19 nucleótidos en GeneDoc 2.6.002 y sus valores termodinámicos fueron estimados con GeneRunner v3.05, mientras que la sensibilidad y especificidad fue verificada por búsquedas en GenBank usando BLASTN 2.2.8. En total se obtuvieron 94 secuencias conservadas con las siguientes características: longitud promedio de 24 nucleótidos, Tm promedio de 65,8 ºC y contenido de (G+C entre 14,3 y 60,0%. Se determinó que ninguna de las sondas diseñadas forma estructuras secundarias estables con Tm superior a 36,1 ºC. De acuerdo a sus características y valores termodinámicos, todas las sondas podrían ser utilizadas en la construcción de un microarreglo o en reacciones de PCR para la identificación de regiones relevantes en el mejoramiento del proceso por ingeniería metabólica.The goal of the present study was to analyze the metabolic pathways involved in solvent production and cellulose consumption by promising Colombian native strains of the genus Clostridium. Therefore a set of oligonucleotide probes was designed, with the aim of analyzing potential targets for genetic improvement

  13. An oligonucleotide-tagged microarray for routine diagnostics of colon cancer by genotyping KRAS mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuliang; Guðnason, Haukur; Li, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    or spiked fecal samples. The immobilized tag-probes were stable under multiple thermal cycling treatments, allowing re-use of the tag-microarray and further optimization to solid PCR. Our results demonstrated that a novel oligonucleotide-tagged microarray system has been developed which would be suitable...

  14. nuID: a universal naming scheme of oligonucleotides for Illumina, Affymetrix, and other microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibbe Warren A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligonucleotide probes that are sequence identical may have different identifiers between manufacturers and even between different versions of the same company's microarray; and sometimes the same identifier is reused and represents a completely different oligonucleotide, resulting in ambiguity and potentially mis-identification of the genes hybridizing to that probe. Results We have devised a unique, non-degenerate encoding scheme that can be used as a universal representation to identify an oligonucleotide across manufacturers. We have named the encoded representation 'nuID', for nucleotide universal identifier. Inspired by the fact that the raw sequence of the oligonucleotide is the true definition of identity for a probe, the encoding algorithm uniquely and non-degenerately transforms the sequence itself into a compact identifier (a lossless compression. In addition, we added a redundancy check (checksum to validate the integrity of the identifier. These two steps, encoding plus checksum, result in an nuID, which is a unique, non-degenerate, permanent, robust and efficient representation of the probe sequence. For commercial applications that require the sequence identity to be confidential, we have an encryption schema for nuID. We demonstrate the utility of nuIDs for the annotation of Illumina microarrays, and we believe it has universal applicability as a source-independent naming convention for oligomers. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Itai Yanai, Rong Chen (nominated by Mark Gerstein, and Gregory Schuler (nominated by David Lipman.

  15. Ultrathin oligonucleotide layers for fluorescence-based DNA sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furch, M.; Ueberfeld, J.; Hartmann, Andreas; Bock, Daniel; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-11-01

    Preliminary investigations into the design of an affinity sensor using evanescent wave technology concentrate upon the means of immobilization of the receptor molecules. In this work DNA served as the selective recognition element. The molecular principle of a sequence-selective biosensor for DNA is based on a sandwich-hybridization assay wherein the analyte, a single-stranded (ss)DNA, bound specifically to both an immobilized capture probe and a dye-labeled oligonucleotide in free solution. The efficiency of the capture array depends on the density of highly organized oligonucleotides on the waveguide surface and correlates therefore directly with the specificity and the sensitivity of the sensor. In the present approach using the Langmuir- Blodgett technique cinnamoylbutylether-cellulose monolayers were transferred onto optical fibers or planar waveguides. These films served as matrices for the immobilization of biotinylated oligonucleotides via streptavidin. For the first time streptavidin was immobilized by that manner. The specificity of the streptavidin layer or the following bounded nucleic acid molecules were controlled by an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, this application has also shown to be suitable for the detection of Salmonella, which is an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritidis and food borne diseases.

  16. Electrochemical Detection of a Dengue-related Oligonucleotide Sequence Using Ferrocenium as a Hybridization Indicator

    OpenAIRE

    José Luiz de Lima-Filho; Duarte Miguel França dos Prazeres; ernando Rodrigues Ribeiro Teles

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for electrochemical detection of a synthetic 20-bp oligonucleotide sequence related with dengue virus genome was developed. A complimentary DNA probe sequence was electrostatically immobilized onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with chitosan. Electrochemical detection of hybridization between probe and target was performed by cyclic voltammetry, using ferrocene (Fc+) as a hybridization label. After hybridization, the peak current response of Fc+ oxidation increased around...

  17. 应用Alexa Fluor 488与BHQ1双标记寡核苷酸荧光探针测量辐射吸收剂量的可行性研究%The feasibility study of radiation absorbed dose measurement using oligonucleotide dually labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 and BHQ1 probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林温文; 史盼影; 张保国

    2016-01-01

    目的 研究荧光探针Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1用于辐射吸收剂量测量的可行性.方法 在寡核苷酸的5 '与3’端分别标记荧光分子Alexa Fluor 488与其特异性荧光抑制剂BHQ1,制备Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1的DNA双标记荧光探针.用X射线照射其水溶液,检测照射后溶液的荧光强度.结果 浓度为0.5~1 μmol/L时,该荧光探针对剂量0.1~30 Gy之间线性响应最好(R2=0.99).在辐照后40~80 min检测探针,荧光强度基本不变.4℃条件下保存受照后的荧光探针的荧光稳定性较好.结论 荧光探针Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1可以应用于0.1 ~30 Gy范围内辐射吸收剂量的测量.%Objective To study the feasibility of measuring radiation absorbed dose with the fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1.Methods An oligonucleotide dually labeled at its 5'-and 3'-end with fluorescent molecular Alexa Fluor 488 and specific fluorescence inhibitors BHQ1 was prepared.The Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1 aqueous solution was exposed with X-ray and its fluorescence intensity was measured.Results When the concentration of Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1 was between 0.5 and 1 μmol/L,the fluorescence intensity of its aqueous solution had excellent linear dose response from 0.1 to 30 Gy (R2 =0.99) and it was stably maintained after 40-80 min of irradiation especially at 4℃.Conclusions In the dose range of 0.1-30 Gy,the Alexa Fluor 488-DNA-BHQ1 fluorescent probe can be used to measure radiation absorbed dose.

  18. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  19. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  20. The Chemistry and Biology of Oligonucleotide Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, R.L.; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Short DNA or RNA oligonucleotides have tremendous potential as therapeutic agents. Because of their ability to engage in Watson-Crick base pairing they can interact with messenger mRNA or pre-mRNA targets with high selectivity and thus offer the possibility of precise manipulation of gene expression. This possibility has engendered extensive efforts to develop oligonucleotides as drugs, with many candidates already in clinical trials. However, a major impediment to the maturation of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics is the fact that these relatively large and usually highly charged molecules have great difficulty crossing cellular membranes and thus in penetrating to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. In this Account we first summarize some basic aspects of the biology of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides and then discuss chemical conjugation as an approach to improving the intracellular delivery and therapeutic potential of these agents. Our emphasis will be on the pharmacological ramifications of oligonucleotide conjugates rather than the details of conjugation chemistry. One important approach has been conjugation with ligands designed to bind to particular receptors and thus provide specificity to the interaction of cells with oligonucleotides. Another approach has been to couple antisense or siRNA with agents such as cell penetrating peptides that are designed to provoke escape of the conjugate from intracellular vesicular compartments. Both of these approaches have enjoyed some success. However, there remains much to be learned before oligonucleotide conjugates can find an important place in human therapeutics. PMID:22353142

  1. Streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles: critical role of oligonucleotides on stability and fractal aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta D'Agata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs exhibit unique properties that can be modulated through a tailored surface functionalization, enabling their targeted use in biochemical sensing and medical diagnostics. In particular, streptavidin-modified AuNPs are increasingly used for biosensing purposes. We report here a study of AuNPs surface-functionalized with streptavidin-biotinylated oligonucleotide, focussing on the role played by the oligonucleotide probes in the stabilization/destabilization of the functionalized nanoparticle dispersion. The behaviour of the modified AuNP dispersion as a consequence of the competitive displacement of the biotinylated oligonucleotide has been investigated and the critical role of displaced oligonucletides in triggering the quasi one-dimensional aggregation of nanoparticles is demonstrated for the first time. The thorough understanding of the fundamental properties of bioconjugated AuNPs is of great importance for the design of highly sensitive and reliable functionalized AuNP-based assays.

  2. Injection site reactions after subcutaneous oligonucleotide therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, L. (Leonie); M. Moerland (Matthijs); Gallagher, J. (Jolie); M.B.A. van Doorn (Martijn); E.P. Prens (Errol); A.F. Cohen; Rissmann, R. (Robert); J. Burggraaf (Jacobus)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractOligonucleotides (ONs) are short fragments of nucleic acids, currently being investigated as therapeutic agents. When administered subcutaneously (sc), ONs cause a specific local reaction originating around the injection site, such as erythema, itching, discomfort and pain, including

  3. Direct microcontact printing of oligonucleotides for biochip applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trévisiol E

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical step in the fabrication of biochips is the controlled placement of probes molecules on solid surfaces. This is currently performed by sequential deposition of probes on a target surface with split or solid pins. In this article, we present a cost-effective procedure namely microcontact printing using stamps, for a parallel deposition of probes applicable for manufacturing biochips. Results Contrary to a previous work, we showed that the stamps tailored with an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane material did not require any surface modification to be able to adsorb oligonucleotides or PCR products. The adsorbed DNA molecules are subsequently printed efficiently on a target surface with high sub-micron resolution. Secondly, we showed that successive stamping is characterized by an exponential decay of the amount of transferred DNA molecules to the surface up the 4th print, then followed by a second regime of transfer that was dependent on the contact time and which resulted in reduced quality of the features. Thus, while consecutive stamping was possible, this procedure turned out to be less reproducible and more time consuming than simply re-inking the stamps between each print. Thirdly, we showed that the hybridization signals on arrays made by microcontact printing were 5 to 10-times higher than those made by conventional spotting methods. Finally, we demonstrated the validity of this microcontact printing method in manufacturing oligonucleotides arrays for mutations recognition in a yeast gene. Conclusion The microcontact printing can be considered as a new potential technology platform to pattern DNA microarrays that may have significant advantages over the conventional spotting technologies as it is easy to implement, it uses low cost material to make the stamp, and the arrays made by this technology are 10-times more sensitive in term of hybridization signals than those manufactured by conventional spotting

  4. Experimental analysis of oligonucleotide microarray design criteria to detect deletions by comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moerman Donald G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is currently one of the most powerful techniques to measure DNA copy number in large genomes. In humans, microarray CGH is widely used to assess copy number variants in healthy individuals and copy number aberrations associated with various diseases, syndromes and disease susceptibility. In model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans the technique has been applied to detect mutations, primarily deletions, in strains of interest. Although various constraints on oligonucleotide properties have been suggested to minimize non-specific hybridization and improve the data quality, there have been few experimental validations for CGH experiments. For genomic regions where strict design filters would limit the coverage it would also be useful to quantify the expected loss in data quality associated with relaxed design criteria. Results We have quantified the effects of filtering various oligonucleotide properties by measuring the resolving power for detecting deletions in the human and C. elegans genomes using NimbleGen microarrays. Approximately twice as many oligonucleotides are typically required to be affected by a deletion in human DNA samples in order to achieve the same statistical confidence as one would observe for a deletion in C. elegans. Surprisingly, the ability to detect deletions strongly depends on the oligonucleotide 15-mer count, which is defined as the sum of the genomic frequency of all the constituent 15-mers within the oligonucleotide. A similarity level above 80% to non-target sequences over the length of the probe produces significant cross-hybridization. We recommend the use of a fairly large melting temperature window of up to 10°C, the elimination of repeat sequences, the elimination of homopolymers longer than 5 nucleotides, and a threshold of -1 kcal/mol on the oligonucleotide self-folding energy. We observed very little difference in data

  5. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  6. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  7. A review of statistical methods for preprocessing oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijin

    2009-12-01

    Microarrays have become an indispensable tool in biomedical research. This powerful technology not only makes it possible to quantify a large number of nucleic acid molecules simultaneously, but also produces data with many sources of noise. A number of preprocessing steps are therefore necessary to convert the raw data, usually in the form of hybridisation images, to measures of biological meaning that can be used in further statistical analysis. Preprocessing of oligonucleotide arrays includes image processing, background adjustment, data normalisation/transformation and sometimes summarisation when multiple probes are used to target one genomic unit. In this article, we review the issues encountered in each preprocessing step and introduce the statistical models and methods in preprocessing.

  8. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  9. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fernandez

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de. The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons. The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0 was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01 allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  10. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  11. 用发夹寡核苷酸探针检测新生大鼠脑缺氧缺血时细胞凋亡的变化%Hairpin oligonucleotide probe as a marker of apoptotic change for cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in rat pups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱长连; 王小阳; 杨平; 程秀永

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate temporal and spatial changes of DNA double-stranded break (DSB) detected by biotin-labeled hairpin oligonucleotide probe(HPP) and compare with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) for detectiog DNA DSB in the immature rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia. Methods: 7-day-old rat pups were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. The spatiotemporal pattern of DNA DSB was characterized with HPP in situ labeling. The relation of HPP labeling and brain damage was evaluated by double labeling with microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP 2). The sensitivity of HPP labeling was evaluated by double labeling with TUNEL.Results: HPP labeling localized in the ipsilateral hemisphere within the area of loss MAP 2 staining. The number of positive cells with nucleus condensation and cytoplasm shrinkage were remarkable with prolongation of reperfusion. The number of positive cells increased and reached peak at 24h post-HI. But in the nucleus habenularis displayed a faster time course. Hippocampus CA3, however, shows a more delayed time course. Double labeling of HPP and TUNEL showed more HPP labeling than TUNEL in the early reperfusion.Conclusion: HPP labeling shows typical apoptotic nucleus changes with different timepoints after HI. It is a sensitive marker for detecting apoptotic changes.%目的:观察用生物素标记的发夹寡核苷酸探针(HPP)检测未成熟大鼠脑缺氧缺血后DNA双链断裂(DSB)的短暂空间改变,并与TdT介导的dUTP缺口末端标记(TUNEL)的DNA DSB比较。方法:使7 d龄幼鼠缺氧缺血,用HPP位点标记显示DNA DSB短暂空间形式,用微管相关蛋白(MAP-2)双标记评价HPP标记和脑损伤的关系,用双标记的TUNEL评价HPP标记的灵敏度。结果:HPP标记局限在同侧半球MAP-2染色阴性区域;阳性细胞数与再灌注时间有关,在缺氧缺血后24 h,阳性细胞数上升达到高峰,但在松果体细胞核变化更早,而海马CA3区域细胞变化延迟。HPP和TUNEL双

  12. A novel route for immobilization of oligonucleotides onto modified silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Kota Sreenivasa [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Sanken, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)]. E-mail: kotas_1999@yahoo.com; Rani, Sikhakolli Usha [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Sanken, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Charyulu, Devarayapalli Kamakshaiah [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji (Japan); Kumar, Kamisetty Nagendra [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji (Japan); Lee, Bong-Kuk [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Sanken, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Lee, Hea-Yeon [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Sanken, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Kawai, Tomoji [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Sanken, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-08-25

    A novel approach for immobilization of probe oligonucleotides that uses zirconium phosphate modified silica nanoparticles is proposed. The surface modification of nanoparticles was carried out in two stages. Initially binding of Zr{sup 4+} to the surface of silica nanoparticles and later treated with phosphoric acid for terminal phosphate groups. Oligonucleotide probes modified with amine group at 5'-end were strongly binds to the phosphate terminated silica nanoparticles with imidazole in presence of 0.1 mol L{sup -1} EDC [N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide], as phosphate groups are more reactive towards amine group. Various studies, i.e., synthesis of silica nanoparticles, their surface modification, probe immobilization, measurement of hybridization and effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were carried out during optimization of reaction conditions. The significant reduction in the background signal was observed by treating the probe modified silica nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin prior to hybridization. The probe modified silica nanoparticles were retained their properties and the hybridization was induced by exposure of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) containing silica nanoparticles to the complementary DNA in solution. The decrease in the fluorescence signal for one mismatch and three mismatch was observed upon hybridization of probe with target DNAs, while there was no response for the random target ssDNA under the same experimental conditions. The intensity of fluorescence signal was linear to the concentration of target DNA ranging from 3.9 x 10{sup -9} to 3.0 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}. A detection limit of 1.22 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1} of oligonucleotides can be estimated. The proposed hybridization assay is simple and possesses good analytical characteristics and it can provide an effective and efficient route in the development of DNA biosensors and biochips.

  13. A sensitive method to detect the hepatitis B virus mutations by using solid phase PCR on oligonucleotide array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN QIN LU; JIN XIANG HAN; ZHONG LIN SHEN; CHUAN XI WANG

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive method based on solid phase PCR on oligonucleotide array was established to detect two point mutations 1896G-A and 1901G-A in hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, in which 6 probes including these two point mutations were immobilized on modified glass slides through 5' terminal linker,while the 3' terminal was made to be free. The mutated loci were designed to locate on the last nucleotides of 3' terminal respectively, and the positive control probes lacked the last nucleotide of 3' terminal in comparison with the probes used for detection. Probes fixed on oligonucleotide array were also the solid phase amplification primers. One pair of liquid primers was used to amplify the short template product from whole HBV DNA. Using target DNA as template, the solid primers were extended under the action of Taq DNA polymerase and incorporated with Cy-3dCTP as marker. During the thermal cycling reaction,probes served as solid phase amplification primers and amplification products bound to the oligonucleotide array, which could be visualized by incorporation with fluorescent dyes. After amplification, the oligonucleotide array was washed, performed with laser scanning, and then used for quantitative analysis to obtain the information for mutations. The hybridization results were compared with DNA sequencing. It was demonstrated that in case of sample A, the ratios of fluorescence intensities in wide type and in the muin these two loci. These results correlated to those obtained from DNA sequencing analysis in which the fluorescence intensity ratios in wide type and in the mutated types of 1996G-A and 1901D-A mutations in using solid phase PCR based on oligonucleotide array appears to be a sensitive and promising way to detect mutations with low-density.

  14. Screening for oligonucleotide binding affinity by a convenient fluorescence competition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J G; Liu, X; Balasubramanian, S

    1999-09-01

    A competitive homogeneous quenched fluorescence assay system is described for the high throughput screening of DNA conjugates that bind to single-stranded DNA. Fluorescence signal is generated by competitive binding of the sample molecule to a target strand labelled with a quencher probe, which is otherwise hybridised to a complementary strand containing a fluorescent probe. Thus fluorescence generated is related to the affinity of the sample. Competitive analysis of a number of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates gave data that correlated well with the corresponding UV melting data. The assay will be useful for screening of large numbers of potential single-stranded binding molecules.

  15. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  16. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example.

  17. Methidium intercalator inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, E. N.; Smirnov, I. P.; Haff, L. A.; Tishchenko, E. I.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Florentiev, V. L.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; PerSeptive BioSystems Inc.

    1996-01-01

    A new methidium intercalator phosphoramidite has been synthesized. Methidium incorporation into an oligonucleotide during the synthesis was confirmed by UV and MALDI TOF MS data. UV melting experiments showed enhanced stability of a duplex, containing internal methidium. Methidium phosphoramidite has been synthesized and used for insertion of intercalator into the deoxyoligonucleotides.

  18. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Development and production of an oligonucleotide MuscleChip: use for validation of ambiguous ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the development, validation, and use of a highly redundant 120,000 oligonucleotide microarray (MuscleChip containing 4,601 probe sets representing 1,150 known genes expressed in muscle and 2,075 EST clusters from a non-normalized subtracted muscle EST sequencing project (28,074 EST sequences. This set included 369 novel EST clusters showing no match to previously characterized proteins in any database. Each probe set was designed to contain 20–32 25 mer oligonucleotides (10–16 paired perfect match and mismatch probe pairs per gene, with each probe evaluated for hybridization kinetics (Tm and similarity to other sequences. The 120,000 oligonucleotides were synthesized by photolithography and light-activated chemistry on each microarray. Results Hybridization of human muscle cRNAs to this MuscleChip (33 samples showed a correlation of 0.6 between the number of ESTs sequenced in each cluster and hybridization intensity. Out of 369 novel EST clusters not showing any similarity to previously characterized proteins, we focused on 250 EST clusters that were represented by robust probe sets on the MuscleChip fulfilling all stringent rules. 102 (41% were found to be consistently "present" by analysis of hybridization to human muscle RNA, of which 40 ESTs (39% could be genome anchored to potential transcription units in the human genome sequence. 19 ESTs of the 40 ESTs were furthermore computer-predicted as exons by one or more than three gene identification algorithms. Conclusion Our analysis found 40 transcriptionally validated, genome-anchored novel EST clusters to be expressed in human muscle. As most of these ESTs were low copy clusters (duplex and triplex in the original 28,000 EST project, the identification of these as significantly expressed is a robust validation of the transcript units that permits subsequent focus on the novel proteins encoded by these genes.

  20. Dramatically improved RNA in situ hybridization signals using LNA-modified probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Nielsen, Peter Stein; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2005-01-01

    In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues. This incre......In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues....... This increases the thermal stability of hybrids formed with RNA. The LNA-based probes detect specific RNAs in fixed yeast cells with an efficiency far better than conventional DNA oligonucleotide probes of the same sequence. Using this probe design, we were also able to detect poly(A)+ RNA accumulation within...

  1. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  2. The detection of HBV DNA with gold nanoparticle gene probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Xi; Xiaoping Luo; Qin Ning; Qianghua Lu; Kailun Yao; Zuli Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Gold nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Methods:Alkanethiol modified oligonucleotide was bound with self-made Au nanoparticles to form nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes, through covalent binding of Au-S. By using a fluorescence-based method, the number of thiol-derivatized, single-stranded oligonucleotides and their hybridization efficiency with complementary oligonucleotides in solution was determined. With the aid of Au nanoparticle-supported mercapto-modified oligonucleotides serving as detection probes, and oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane surface acting as capturing probes,HBV DNA was detected visually by sandwich hybridization based on highly sensitive aggregation and silver staining. The modified nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were also used to detect the HBV DNA extracted from serum in patients with hepatitis B. Results:Compared with bare Au nanoparticles, oligonucleotide modified nanoparticles had a higher stability in NaCl solution or under high temperature environment and the absorbance peak of modified Au nanoparticles shifted from 520nm to 524nm. For Au nanoparticles, the maximal oligonucleotide surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotide was (132 ± 10) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and the percentage of hybridization strands on nanoparticles was (22 ± 3% ). Based on a two-probe sandwich hybridization/nanoparticle amplification/silver staining enhancement method, Au nanoparticle gene probes could detect as low as 10-11 mol/L composite HBV DNA molecules on a nylon membrane and the PCR products of HBV DNA visually. As made evident by transmission electron microscopy, the nanoparticles assembled into large network aggregates when nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were applied to detect HBV DNA molecules in liquid. Conclusion:Our results showed that successfully prepared Au nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes could be used to

  3. Ultrahigh molecular recognition specificity of competing DNA oligonucleotide strands in thermal equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Schenkelberger, Marc; Mai, Timo; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    The specificity of molecular recognition is important to molecular self-organization. A prominent example is the biological cell where, within a highly crowded molecular environment, a myriad of different molecular receptor pairs recognize their binding partner with astonishing accuracy. In thermal equilibrium it is usually admitted that the affinity of recognizer pairs only depends on the nature of the two binding molecules. Accordingly, Boltzmann factors of binding energy differences relate the molecular affinities among different target molecules that compete for the same probe. Here, we consider the molecular recognition of short DNA oligonucleotide single strands. We show that a better matching oligonucleotide strand can prevail against a disproportionally more concentrated competitor that exhibits reduced affinity due to a mismatch. The magnitude of deviation from the simple picture above may reach several orders of magnitude. In our experiments the effective molecular affinity of a given strand remains...

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A novel modification of real-time AS-qPCR by using locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotide probe as wild type allele amplification blockers for quantitative detection of the JAK2 V617F mutation%评价AS-LNA-qPCR法检测JAK2 V617F突变率的临床应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵冬华; 梁国威; 何美琳; 曹清芸

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a novel real-time PCR for sensitively quantitative detection of JAK2 V617F allele burden in peripheral blood.Methods Based on the real-time allele-specific PCR (AS-qPCR),the locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probe was used for selectively blocking amplification of wild-type alleles in AS-qPCR,and then a novel AS-LNA-qPCR method was established.The percentages of sample JAK2 V617F alleles were directly calculated by its threshold cycle (Ct) values according to the standard curve which generated by JAK2 V617F alleles with its Ct values.We validated intra-and inter-assay variability for quantifying JAK2 V617F.We also assayed 623 apparent healthy donors by our method to validate its clinical application value.Results The quantitative lower limit of this method for JAK2 V617F was 0.01%,and the intra-and inter-assay average variability for quantifying percentage of JAK2 V617F in total DNA was 6.3% and 8.6%,respectively.Nineteen JAK2 V617F-positive individuals were identified using AS-LNA-qPCR in blood of 623 apparently healthy donors,and the range of percentages of JAK2 V617F alleles were 0.01%-5.49%.Conclusion The AS-LNA-qPCR with highly sensitive and reproducible quantification of JAK2 V617F mutant burden can be used clinically for diagnosis as well as evaluation of disease prognosis and efficacy of therapy in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.%目的 建立一种定量检测外周血细胞酪氨酸激酶2(JAK2)基因V617F突变率的等位基因特异性实时荧光定量PCR(AS-qPCR)方法.方法 在AS-qPCR基础上,引入1条锁核酸(LNA)修饰的寡核苷酸探针,用以选择性抑制AS-qPCR中突变引物对野生等位基因的非特异性扩增,定量检测JAK2 V617F突变率,称之为AS-LNA-qPCR法.通过AS-LNA-qPCR法测定样本的循环阈值(Ct值),根据AS-LNA-qPCR法检测不同JAK2 V617F突变率标准品的Ct值,绘制标准曲线,根据标准曲线直接获得检测样本中JAK2 V617F突变率.

  6. 流式细胞仪结合序列特异性寡核苷酸探针基因分型方法在血小板供者资料库建立中的应用%Genotyping by Flow-Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probes to Establish a Human Platelet Donor Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丹; 庄乃宝; 孔令魁

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨高通量流式细胞仪结合序列特异性寡核苷酸探针(FLOW-SSO)技术在人类血小板抗原( HPA)基因分型中的应用.方法 采用FLOW-SSO技术对1378例汉族血小板捐献者HPA1~6,15系统的基因型进行检测;并以10份国际输血协会(ISBT)第12届血小板免疫学术研讨会提供的质控样品对FLOW-SSO技术的可靠性进行考核.以3家供应商提供的不同聚合酶链反应-序列特异引物法(PCR-SSP)试剂,对50份血小板样品的基因分型结果进行比对试验.分型结果采用x2检验考察HPA系统的基因型频率分布是否符合Hardy-Weinberg遗传平衡定律.结果 通过FLOW-SSO方法获得的1379例血小板供者HPA等位基因频率如下,HPA-1a为0.9927,HPA-1b为0.0073,HPA-2a为0.9536,HPA-2b为0.0464,HPA-3a为0.5700,HPA-3b为0.4300,HPA-4a为0.9982,HPA -4b为0.0018,HPA-5a为0.9804,HPA-5b为0.0196,HPA-6a为0.9822,HPA-6b为0.0178,HPA- 15a为0.5337及HPA-15b为0.4663.基因频率检测结果经x2检验,其分布符合Hardy-Weinberg遗传平衡定律.ISBT提供的10份样品考核结果相符率为100%.50份血小板样本采用3种不同的PCR-SSP试剂测定的HPA1~6,15基因分型结果,与FLOW-SSO技术测定结果完全一致.结论 FLOW-SSO基因分型技术有便捷、重复性好及高通量等特点,适用于血小板供者资料库的血小板基因分型.%Objective To explore the application of the high-throughput flow-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (FLOW-SSO) technology in human platelet antigen (HPA) genotyping. Method A total of 1378 platelet donors of Han ethnic group were genotyped by FLOW-SSO for HPA system 1-6 and 15 Ten reference samples provided from 12th platelet immunology workshop of International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) were tested as control group, and 50 samples were detected by the PCR-SSP with 3 different manufacturing sources reagents as the comparison test. x2 test was used to study the genotype frequencies of the HPA system

  7. Detection of hepatitis B virus genotypes using oligonucleotide chip among hepatitis B virus carriers in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Rong Tang; Ji-Shen Zhang; Hui Zhao; Yu-Hua Gong; Yong-Zhong Wang; Jian-Long Zhao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with a newly oligonucleotide chip assay among the HBV carriers in Eastern China.METHODS: An assay using oligonucleotide chip was developed for detection of HBV genotypes in serum samples from HBV DNA-positive patients in Eastern China. This method is based on the principle of reverse hybridization with Cy5-labeled amplicons hybridizing to type-specific oligonucleotide probes that are immobilized on slides. The results of 80 randomly chosen sera were confirmed by direct sequencing.RESULTS: HBV genotype B, C and mixed genotype were detected in 400 serum samples, accounting for8.3% (n = 33), 83.2% (n = 333), and 8.5% (n = 34),respectively. The evaluation of the oligonucleotide assay showed 100% concordance with the amplicon phylogenetic analysis except 9 mixed genotype infections undetected by sequencing.CONCLUSION: The study indicates that HBV genotype C and B prevail in the Eastern China. It is suggested that the oligonucleotide chip is a reliable and convenient tool for the detection of HBV genotyping.

  8. Electrochemical study of hepta–oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Balcarova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the description and characterization of twohepta–oligonucleotides (DNA and RNA forming special structures.We studied their electrochemical behaviour by means of cyclicvoltammetry (CV and elimination voltammetry with linear scan(EVLS in combination with adsorptive stripping (AdS technique.Differences in electrochemical behaviour of hepta–deoxyribonucleotide and its RNA analog were discussed with regardto their different structures in solutions and their melting points.

  9. Abundant oligonucleotides common to most bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin F Davenport

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria show a bias in their genomic oligonucleotide composition far beyond that dictated by G+C content. Patterns of over- and underrepresented oligonucleotides carry a phylogenetic signal and are thus diagnostic for individual species. Patterns of short oligomers have been investigated by multiple groups in large numbers of bacteria genomes. However, global distributions of the most highly overrepresented mid-sized oligomers have not been assessed across all prokaryotes to date. We surveyed overrepresented mid-length oligomers across all prokaryotes and normalised for base composition and embedded oligomers using zero and second order Markov models. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a presumably ancient set of oligomers conserved and overrepresented in nearly all branches of prokaryotic life, including Archaea. These oligomers are either adenine rich homopurines with one to three guanine nucleosides, or homopyridimines with one to four cytosine nucleosides. They do not show a consistent preference for coding or non-coding regions or aggregate in any coding frame, implying a role in DNA structure and as polypeptide binding sites. Structural parameters indicate these oligonucleotides to be an extreme and rigid form of B-DNA prone to forming triple stranded helices under common physiological conditions. Moreover, the narrow minor grooves of these structures are recognised by DNA binding and nucleoid associated proteins such as HU. CONCLUSION: Homopurine and homopyrimidine oligomers exhibit distinct and unusual structural features and are present at high copy number in nearly all prokaryotic lineages. This fact suggests a non-neutral role of these oligonucleotides for bacterial genome organization that has been maintained throughout evolution.

  10. Synthesis and hybridization properties of inverse oligonucleotides.

    OpenAIRE

    Marangoni, M.; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Augustijns, Patrick; Rozenski, Jef; Herdewijn , Piet

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of adenine and thymine cyclopentylethyl nucleosides is presented. This novel constrained monomeric building block is very difficult to incorporate into oligonucleotides. It was introduced in 13mer oligodeoxynucleotide sequences at a single position using H-phosphonate chemistry. Phosphoramidite chemistry completely failed in this particular case. The H-phosphonate building blocks were obtained starting from the corresponding phosphoramidites. Stability of duplexes with RNA and D...

  11. Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of the Specific Oligonucleotide Sequence of Dengue Virus Type 1 on Pencil Graphite Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine; Nascimento, Gustavo; Santana, Nataly; Ferreira, Danielly; Lima, Manoel; Natividade, Edna; Martins, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor that relies on the adsorption immobilization of the 18-mer single-stranded nucleic acid related to dengue virus gene 1 on activated pencil graphite was developed. Hybridization between the probe and its complementary oligonucleotides (the target) was investigated by monitoring guanine oxidation by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The pencil graphite electrode was made of ordinary pencil lead (type 4B). The polished surface of the working electrode was activated by applying a potential of 1.8 V for 5 min. Afterward, the dengue oligonucleotides probe was immobilized on the activated electrode by applying 0.5 V to the electrode in 0.5 M acetate buffer (pH 5.0) for 5 min. The hybridization process was carried out by incubating at the annealing temperature of the oligonucleotides. A time of five minutes and concentration of 1 μM were found to be the optimal conditions for probe immobilization. The electrochemical detection of annealing between the DNA probe (TS-1P) immobilized on the modified electrode, and the target (TS-1T) was achieved. The target could be quantified in a range from 1 to 40 nM with good linearity and a detection limit of 0.92 nM. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was tested using non-complementary sequences of dengue virus 2 and 3. PMID:22163916

  12. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  13. A Tandem Oligonucleotide Approach for SNP-Selective RNA Degradation Using Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been studied for many years as a tool for gene silencing. One of the most difficult cases of selective RNA silencing involves the alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, in which the allele sequence is differentiated by a single nucleotide. A new approach to improve the performance of allele selectivity for antisense oligonucleotides is proposed. It is based on the simultaneous application of two oligonucleotides. One is complementary to the mutated form of the targeted RNA and is able to activate RNase H to cleave the RNA. The other oligonucleotide, which is complementary to the wild type allele of the targeted RNA, is able to inhibit RNase H cleavage. Five types of SNPs, C/G, G/C, G/A, A/G, and C/U, were analyzed within the sequence context of genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and Machado-Joseph disease. For most analyzed cases, the application of the tandem approach increased allele-selective RNA degradation 1.5-15 fold relative to the use of a single antisense oligonucleotide. The presented study proves that differentiation between single substitution is highly dependent on the nature of the SNP and surrounding nucleotides. These variables are crucial for determining the proper length of the inhibitor antisense oligonucleotide. In the tandem approach, the comparison of thermodynamic stability of the favorable duplexes WT RNA-inhibitor and Mut RNA-gapmer with the other possible duplexes allows for the evaluation of chances for the allele-selective degradation of RNA. A larger difference in thermodynamic stability between favorable duplexes and those that could possibly form, usually results in the better allele selectivity of RNA degradation.

  14. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  15. Guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides as synthetic riboregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by short oligonucleotides (antisense oligonucleotides), which can modulate RNA structures and inhibit subsequent associations with the translation machinery, is a potential approach for gene therapy. This chapter describes an alternative antisense strategy using guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides (G-ASs) to introduce a DNA-RNA heteroquadruplex structure at a designated sequence on RNA targets. The feasibility of using G-ASs to modulate RNA conformation may allow control of RNA function by inducing biologically important quadruplex structures. This approach to manipulate quadruplex structures using G-ASs may expand the strategies for regulating RNA structures and the functions of short oligonucleotide riboregulators.

  16. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  17. An anchored framework BAC map of mouse chromosome 11 assembled using multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, W W; Reneker, J; Chow, C W; Vaishnav, M; Bradley, A

    1998-12-15

    Despite abundant library resources for many organisms, physical mapping of these organisms has been seriously limited due to lack of efficient library screening techniques. We have developed a highly efficient strategy for large-scale screening of genomic libraries based on multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization on high-density genomic filters. We have applied this strategy to generate a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) anchored map of mouse chromosome 11. Using the MIT mouse SSLP data, 320 pairs of oligonucleotide probes were designed with an "overgo" computer program that selects new primer sequences that avoid the microsatellite repeat. BACs identified by these probes are automatically anchored to the chromosome. Ninety-two percent of the probes identified positive clones from a 5.9-fold coverage mouse BAC library with an average of 7 positive clones per marker. An average of 4.2 clones was confirmed for 204 markers by PCR. Our data show that a large number of clones can be efficiently isolated from a large genomic library using this strategy with minimal effort. This strategy will have wide application for large-scale mapping and sequencing of human and other large genomes.

  18. A factorial analysis of silanization conditions for the immobilization of oligonucleotides on glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, C M; Cass, A E

    2001-06-01

    The modification of glass surfaces with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane and the application of this to DNA chip technology are described. A range of factors influencing the silanization method, and hence the number of surface-bound, chemically active thiol groups, were investigated using a design of experiment approach based on analysis of variance. The number of thiol groups introduced on glass substrates were measured directly using a specific radiolabel, [14C]cysteamine hydrochloride. For liquid-phase silanization, the number of surface-bound thiol groups was found to be dependent on both postsilanization thermal curing and silanization time and relatively independent of silane concentration, reaction temperature, and sample pretreatment. Depending on the conditions used in liquid-phase silanization, (1.3-9.0) x 10(12) thiol groups/cm2 on the glass samples were bound. The reliability and repeatability of liquid- and vacuum-phase silanization were also investigated. Eighteen-base oligonucleotide probes were covalently attached to the modified surfaces via a 3'-amino modification on the DNA and subsequent reaction with the cross-linking reagent N-(gamma-maleimidobutyryloxy) succinimide ester (GMBS). The resulting probe levels were determined and found to be stoichiometric with that of the introduced thiol groups. These results demonstrate that silanization of glass surfaces under specific conditions, prior to probe attachment, is of great importance in the development of DNA chips that use the simple concept of the covalent attachment of presynthesized oligonucleotides to silicon oxide surfaces.

  19. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  2. Lipid Oligonucleotide Conjugates as Responsive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Amphiphiles, oligonucleotides, lipids...peer-reviewed journals: (c) Presentations 1. Philippe Barthélémy, « Hybrid Lipids for Biomedical Applications », Targeting and Triggering Basic Research ...Steadel C. ; Pierre, N. ; Barthélémy, P. : Oligonucléotides amphiphile : Journée Scientifique de l’IFR 66, Talence, le 2 décembre 2008, France 29. Taib

  3. The tetramethylammonium chloride method for screening of cDNA libraries using highly degenerate oligonucleotides obtained by backtranslation of amino-acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Leffers, H

    1993-01-01

    We describe a method for screening of cDNA libraries with highly degenerate oligonucleotides using tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC). This method is a convenient alternative to using probes generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), especially when these cannot easily be made. Nylon filt...

  4. Application of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Bacterial Source Tracking of Environmental Enterococcus sp. Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Furey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In an effort towards adapting new and defensible methods for assessing and managing the risk posed by microbial pollution, we evaluated the utility of oligonucleotide microarrays for bacterial source tracking (BST of environmental Enterococcus sp. isolates derived from various host sources. Current bacterial source tracking approaches rely on various phenotypic and genotypic methods to identify sources of bacterial contamination resulting from point or non-point pollution. For this study Enterococcus sp. isolates originating from deer, bovine, gull, and human sources were examined using microarrays. Isolates were subjected to Box PCR amplification and the resulting amplification products labeled with Cy5. Fluorescent-labeled templates were hybridized to in-house constructed nonamer oligonucleotide microarrays consisting of 198 probes. Microarray hybridization profiles were obtained using the ArrayPro image analysis software. Principal Components Analysis (PCA and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA were compared for their ability to visually cluster microarray hybridization profiles based on the environmental source from which the Enterococcus sp. isolates originated. The PCA was visually superior at separating origin-specific clusters, even for as few as 3 factors. A Soft Independent Modeling (SIM classification confirmed the PCA, resulting in zero misclassifications using 5 factors for each class. The implication of these results for the application of random oligonucleotide microarrays for BST is that, given the reproducibility issues, factor-based variable selection such as in PCA and SIM greatly outperforms dendrogram-based similarity measures such as in HCA and K-Nearest Neighbor KNN.

  5. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria, we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnik, Peter; Boyer, David S.; Grillone, Lisa R.; Clement, John G.; Henry, Scott P.; Green, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and other parts of the world. Historically, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy surgery have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetic macular edema. Both procedures have proven to be useful under certain conditions but have their limitations. New pathways and processes that promote diabetic retinopathy have been identified, and several new therapeutic approaches are under investigation. These new therapies may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and include antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, corticosteroids, and therapies that may potentially target a number of additional diabetic retinopathy-related factors and processes, including antisense oligonucleotides. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides, such as iCo-007, may offer a significant advantage in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by downregulating the signal pathways of multiple growth factors that seem to play a critical role in the process of ocular angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Benefits of such molecules are expected to include the specificity of the kinase target and an extended half-life, resulting in less frequent intravitreal drug administration, resistance to molecule degradation, and a good safety profile. PMID:20144342

  7. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  8. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  9. Design of oligonucleotides for microarrays and perspectives for design of multi-transcriptome arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Wernersson, Rasmus; Knudsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer with an ......Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer...

  10. Oligonucleotides Containing Aminated 2′-Amino-LNA Nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Samuelsen, Simone V.; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2017-01-01

    Mono- and diaminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. Each modification imparts significant stabilization of nucleic acid duplexes and triplexes, excellent sequence selectivity, and significant nuclease resistance. Molecular modeling suggested...... that structural stabilization occurs via intrastrand electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of the aminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers and the host oligonucleotide backbone....

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and cell uptake of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Norris, Daniel; Yu, Rosie; Bennett, C Frank

    2015-06-29

    Pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides are largely driven by chemistry of the backbone and thus are sequence independent within a chemical class. Tissue bioavailability (% of administered dose) is assisted by plasma protein binding that limits glomerular filtration and ultimate urinary excretion of oligonucleotides. The substitution of one non-bridging oxygen with the more hydrophobic sulfur atom (phosphorothioate) increases both plasma stability and plasma protein binding and thus, ultimately, tissue bioavailability. Additional modifications of the sugar at the 2' position, increase RNA binding affinity and significantly increase potency, tissue half-life and prolong RNA inhibitory activity. Oligonucleotides modified in this manner consistently exhibit the highest tissue bioavailability (>90%). Systemic biodistribution is broad, and organs typically with highest concentrations are liver and kidney followed by bone marrow, adipocytes, and lymph nodes. Cell uptake is predominantly mediated by endocytosis. Both size and charge for most oligonucleotides prevents distribution across the blood brain barrier. However, modified single-strand oligonucleotides administered by intrathecal injection into the CSF distribute broadly in the CNS. The majority of intracellular oligonucleotide distribution following systemic or local administration occurs rapidly in just a few hours following administration and is facilitated by rapid endocytotic uptake mechanisms. Further understanding of the intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides may provide further enhancements in design and ultimate potency of antisense oligonucleotides in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Enhanced fluorescence of silver nanoclusters stabilized with branched oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Lorca, Romina; Zamora, Félix; Somoza, Álvaro

    2013-05-28

    DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are promising optical materials, whose fluorescence properties can be tuned by the selection of the DNA sequence employed. In this work we have used modified oligonucleotides in the preparation of AgNCs. The fluorescent intensity obtained was 60 times higher than that achieved with standard oligonucleotides.

  14. Strong position-dependent effects of sequence mismatches on signal ratios measured using long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulme Helen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important and widely used tool. Applications include capturing genomic DNA for high-throughput sequencing in addition to the traditional monitoring of gene expression and identifying DNA copy number variations. Sequence mismatches between probe and target strands are known to affect the stability of the probe-target duplex, and hence the strength of the observed signals from microarrays. Results We describe a large-scale investigation of microarray hybridisations to murine probes with known sequence mismatches, demonstrating that the effect of mismatches is strongly position-dependent and for small numbers of sequence mismatches is correlated with the maximum length of perfectly matched probe-target duplex. Length of perfect match explained 43% of the variance in log2 signal ratios between probes with one and two mismatches. The correlation with maximum length of perfect match does not conform to expectations based on considering the effect of mismatches purely in terms of reducing the binding energy. However, it can be explained qualitatively by considering the entropic contribution to duplex stability from configurations of differing perfect match length. Conclusion The results of this study have implications in terms of array design and analysis. They highlight the significant effect that short sequence mismatches can have upon microarray hybridisation intensities even for long oligonucleotide probes. All microarray data presented in this study are available from the GEO database 1, under accession number [GEO: GSE9669

  15. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  16. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  17. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  18. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  19. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  20. Direct oligonucleotide-photosensitizer conjugates for photochemical delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ahu; Laing, Brian; Hu, Yiqiao; Ming, Xin

    2015-04-18

    Activation of photosensitizers in endosomes enables release of therapeutic macromolecules into the cytosol of the target cells for pharmacological actions. In this study, we demonstrate that direct conjugation of photosensitizers to oligonucleotides (ONs) allows spatial and temporal co-localization of the two modalities in the target cells, and thus leads to superior functional delivery of ONs. Further, light-activated delivery of an anticancer ON caused cancer cell killing via modulation of an oncogene and photodynamic therapy.

  1. Preparation and application of triple helix forming oligonucleotides and single strand oligonucleotide donors for gene correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rowshon; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for site-specific modulation of genomic sequences in mammalian cells require two components. One must be capable of recognizing and activating a specific target sequence in vivo, driving that site into an exploitable repair pathway. Information is transferred to the site via participation in the pathway by the second component, a donor nucleic acid, resulting in a permanent change in the target sequence. We have developed biologically active triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as site-specific gene targeting reagents. These TFOs, linked to DNA reactive compounds (such as a cross-linking agent), activate pathways that can engage informational donors. We have used the combination of a psoralen-TFO and single strand oligonucleotide donors to generate novel cell lines with directed sequence changes at the target site. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of bioactive psoralen-linked TFOs, their co-introduction into mammalian cells with donor nucleic acids, and the identification of cells with sequence conversion of the target site. We have emphasized details in the synthesis and purification of the oligonucleotides that are essential for preparation of reagents with optimal activity.

  2. Oligonucleotide fishing for STAT6: cross-talk between IL-4 and chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K W; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K

    2001-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is essential for the biological activities of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and the development of allergic responses in mice. Here we report on a sensitive and specific assay for STAT6 activation in response to IL-4. We took advantage of double-stranded...... oligonucleotide probes containing a STAT6-binding gene-sequence from the promotor of the immunoglobulin heavy chain germline epsilon transcript to study the IL-4-induced DNA binding of STAT6. Using these probes, we show that repeated adjacent STAT6-binding sites result in enhanced STAT6-DNA binding. Moreover......, the distance between the binding sites is critical for STAT-DNA binding, i.e. STAT6 binding is decreased at distances above 20 nucleotides between neighbouring binding sites. Using this assay to study cross-talk between IL-4 and chemokines, we provide evidence that MIP-1beta and MIG inhibit IL-4-induced STAT6...

  3. The "Clickable" Method for Oligonucleotide Immobilization Onto Azide-Functionalized Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Tomasz; Uszczyńska, Barbara; Frydrych-Tomczak, Emilia; Chmielewski, Marcin K

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technique was supposed to help identifying and analyzing the expression level of tens of thousands of genes in the whole genome. But there is a serious problem concerning fabrication of the microarrays by chemical synthesis, such as specific and efficient linking of probes to a solid support. Therefore, we reckon that applying "click" chemistry to covalently anchor oligonucleotides on chemically modified supports may help construct microarrays in applications such as gene identification. Silanization of the glass support with organofunctional silane makes it possible to link azide groups on glass surface and the nucleic acid probe that is equipped with a pentynyl group. This is followed by direct spotting of the nucleic acid on the azide-modified glass support in the presence of copper ions, and this is a frequently applied method of "click" chemistry.

  4. COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT ENZYMES AND PROBES AND THEIR COMBINATIONS IN DNA FINGERPRINTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, eight combinations of restriction enzymes and oligonucleotide probes were tested for detecting VNTR polymorphism. More than a hundred loci were detected by all enzyme-probe combi nations. The influences of breed, enzyme and probe as well as their interactions were analysed, and the mean value of DNA fingerprint data was calculated for the enzymes and probes. The results will provide some valu- able information for studying the genetic relationship of individuals or populations using DNA fingerprinting.

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Valentina; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Falzarano, Maria Sofia

    2017-04-05

    Neuromuscular disorders such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy are neurodegenerative genetic diseases characterized primarily by muscle weakness and wasting. Until recently there were no effective therapies for these conditions, but antisense oligonucleotides, a new class of synthetic single stranded molecules of nucleic acids, have demonstrated promising experimental results and are at different stages of regulatory approval. The antisense oligonucleotides can modulate the protein expression via targeting hnRNAs or mRNAs and inducing interference with splicing, mRNA degradation, or arrest of translation, finally, resulting in rescue or reduction of the target protein expression. Different classes of antisense oligonucleotides are being tested in several clinical trials, and limitations of their clinical efficacy and toxicity have been reported for some of these compounds, while more encouraging results have supported the development of others. New generation antisense oligonucleotides are also being tested in preclinical models together with specific delivery systems that could allow some of the limitations of current antisense oligonucleotides to be overcome, to improve the cell penetration, to achieve more robust target engagement, and hopefully also be associated with acceptable toxicity. This review article describes the chemical properties and molecular mechanisms of action of the antisense oligonucleotides and the therapeutic implications these compounds have in neuromuscular diseases. Current strategies and carrier systems available for the oligonucleotides delivery will be also described to provide an overview on the past, present and future of these appealing molecules.

  6. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  8. A comparative analysis of existing oligonucleotides selection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-04

    Jul 4, 2007 ... In system biology, DNA microarray technology is an indispensable tool for the ... the microarray probes are of critical importance for the hybridization experiments as ... at unraveling molecular systems (the function of the gen-.

  9. Optical Characterization of Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  10. Hole hopping rates in single strand oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Raffaele [Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali e Alimentari, Università di Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, I-10095 Grugliasco, TO (Italy); Capobianco, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Peluso, Andrea, E-mail: apeluso@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • DNA hole transfer rates have been computed. • Delocalized adenine domains significantly affect hole transfer rates in DNA. • Franck–Condon weighted density of state from DFT normal modes. • DNA application in molecular electronics. - Abstract: The rates of hole transfer between guanine and adenine in single strand DNA have been evaluated by using Fermi’s golden rule and Kubo’s generating function approach for the Franck–Condon weighted density of states. The whole sets of the normal modes and vibrational frequencies of the two nucleobases, obtained at DFT/B3LYP level of calculation, have been considered in computations. The results show that in single strand the pyramidalization/planarization mode of the amino groups of both nucleobases plays the major role. At room temperature, the Franck–Condon density of states extends over a wide range of hole site energy difference, 0–1 eV, giving some hints about the design of oligonucleotides of potential technological interest.

  11. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  12. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation in non-small cell lung cancer by allelespecific oligonucleotide-PCR and bi-loop probe specific primer quantitative PCR%等位基因特异性寡核苷酸和双环探针特异引物荧光聚合酶链反应检测非小细胞肺癌表皮生长因子受体基因突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓磊; 李甘地; 卢铀; 唐源; 林静; 陆小军; 薛建新; 王立帅; 周麟; 邹艳; 应斌武

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the detection sensitivity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations between allele specific oligonucleotide PCR(ASO-PCR) and bi-loop probe and specific primer quantitative PCR (BPSP-qPCR).Methods A total of 96 non-small cell lung cancer specimens were selected from West China Hospital from September 2009 to December 2010.ASO-PCR was developed to detect the presence of classical EGFR mutations.A total 39 available specimens were also tested by BPSP- qPCR.Results EGFR mutation detection rate was 30.2% (26/96) by ASO-PCR.The mutation rate was higher in female than in male patients[45.5% (20/44) vs.17.3% (9/52),P =0.003],non-smokers than smokers[ 44.1% (26/59) vs.8.1% (3/37),P < 0.001 ] and adenocarcinomas than other subtypes of lung cancer [ 37.0% ( 27/73 ) vs.8.7% (2/23),P =0.01 ].Among mutation negative cases by ASO-PCR,BPSP-qPCR increased the rate of detection of 19-del and L858R mutation by 10.3% (4/39) inadenocarcinomas and non-smoking subset.Overall,the mutation detection rate of BPSP-qPCR was higher than that of ASO-PCR [66.7% (26/39) vs.41.0% (16/39),P=0.02].Conclusion BPSP-qPCR has a better detection sensitivity than that of ASO-PCR.%目的 分析比较等位基因特异性寡核苷酸聚合酶链反应( ASO -PCR)和双环探针特异引物荧光PCR (BPSP-qPCR)的表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)基因突变检测敏感性.方法 收集2009年9月至2010年12月在四川大学华西医院病理科留存非小细胞肺癌标本96例,行ASO-PCR检测EGFR突变,其中39例再行BPSP-qPCR检测.结果 ASO-PCR测得突变率为30.2% (29/96).其中女性高于男性[45.5% (20/44)比17.3% (9/52),P=0.003],不吸烟者高于吸烟者[44.1% (26/59)比8.1% (3/37),P<0.001],腺癌高于非腺癌[37.0% (27/73)比8.7% (2/23),P=0.01].ASO-PCR检测阴性标本中,具有腺癌和不吸烟特征,BPSP-qPCR检测19-del和L.858R阳性的检出率可提高10.3% (4/39),BPSP-qPCR检

  13. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Tang

    Full Text Available To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA, (dC, (dG and (dT to silver staining could be ranged as (dA > (dG > (dC > (dT from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt. The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  14. Dynamic probe selection for studying microbial transcriptome with high-density genomic tiling microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tsute

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current commercial high-density oligonucleotide microarrays can hold millions of probe spots on a single microscopic glass slide and are ideal for studying the transcriptome of microbial genomes using a tiling probe design. This paper describes a comprehensive computational pipeline implemented specifically for designing tiling probe sets to study microbial transcriptome profiles. Results The pipeline identifies every possible probe sequence from both forward and reverse-complement strands of all DNA sequences in the target genome including circular or linear chromosomes and plasmids. Final probe sequence lengths are adjusted based on the maximal oligonucleotide synthesis cycles and best isothermality allowed. Optimal probes are then selected in two stages - sequential and gap-filling. In the sequential stage, probes are selected from sequence windows tiled alongside the genome. In the gap-filling stage, additional probes are selected from the largest gaps between adjacent probes that have already been selected, until a predefined number of probes is reached. Selection of the highest quality probe within each window and gap is based on five criteria: sequence uniqueness, probe self-annealing, melting temperature, oligonucleotide length, and probe position. Conclusions The probe selection pipeline evaluates global and local probe sequence properties and selects a set of probes dynamically and evenly distributed along the target genome. Unique to other similar methods, an exact number of non-redundant probes can be designed to utilize all the available probe spots on any chosen microarray platform. The pipeline can be applied to microbial genomes when designing high-density tiling arrays for comparative genomics, ChIP chip, gene expression and comprehensive transcriptome studies.

  15. Simultaneous detection of several oligonucleotides by time-resolved fluorometry: the use of a mixture of categorized microparticles in a sandwich type mixed-phase hybridization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, H; Virta, P; Salo, H; Lönnberg, H

    1998-12-15

    Porous, uniformly sized (50 micrometer) glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate particles (SINTEF) were used as a solid phase to construct a sandwich type hybridization assay that allowed simultaneous detection of up to six oligonucleotides from a single sample. The assay was based on categorization of the particles by two organic prompt fluorophores, viz. fluorescein and dansyl, and quantification of the oligonucleotide hybridization by time-resolved fluorometry. Accordingly, allele-specific oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes were assembled on the particles by conventional phosphoramidite strategy using a non-cleavable linker, and the category defining fluorescein and/or dansyl tagged building blocks were inserted in the 3'-terminal sequence. An oligonucleotide bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate was hybridized to the complementary 3'-terminal sequence of the target oligonucleotide, and the resulting duplex was further hybridized to the particle-bound allele-specific probes via the 5'-terminal sequence of the target. After hybridization each individual particle was subjected to three different fluorescence intensity measurements. The intensity of the prompt fluorescence signals of fluorescein and dansyl defined the particle category, while the europium(III) chelate emission quantified the hybridization. The length of the complementary region between the target oligonucleotide and the particle-bound probe was optimized to achieve maximal selectivity. Furthermore, the kinetics of hybridization and the effect of the concentration of the target oligomer on the efficiency of hybridization were evaluated. By this approach the possible presence of a three base deletion (DeltaF508), point mutation (G542X) and point deletion (1078delT) related to cystic fibrosis could unequivocally be detected from a single sample.

  16. Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides through metal-induced cyclization of short complementary strands : Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Freville, Fabrice; Richard, Tristan; Bathany, Katell; Moreau, Serge

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A new strategy to cyclize a short synthetic oligonucleotide on a DNA or a RNA target strand is described. This one relies on a metal-mediated cyclization of short synthetic oligonucleotides conjugated with two chelating 2,2':6',2”-terpyridine moieties at their 3' and 5' ends. Cyclization following metal addition (Zn2+, Fe2+) was demonstrated using UV monitored thermal denaturation experiments, mass spectrometry analysis and gel shift assays. NMR experiments were used t...

  17. Development and validation of an oligonucleotide microarray to characterise ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reich Marlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In forest ecosystems, communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM are influenced by several biotic and abiotic factors. To understand their underlying dynamics, ECM communities have been surveyed with ribosomal DNA-based sequencing methods. However, most identification methods are both time-consuming and limited by the number of samples that can be treated in a realistic time frame. As a result of ongoing implementation, the array technique has gained throughput capacity in terms of the number of samples and the capacity for parallel identification of several species. Thus far, although phylochips (microarrays that are used to detect species have been mostly developed to trace bacterial communities or groups of specific fungi, no phylochip has been developed to carry oligonucleotides for several ectomycorrhizal species that belong to different genera. Results We have constructed a custom ribosomal DNA phylochip to identify ECM fungi. Specific oligonucleotide probes were targeted to the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions from 95 fungal species belonging to 21 ECM fungal genera. The phylochip was first validated using PCR amplicons of reference species. Ninety-nine percent of the tested oligonucleotides generated positive hybridisation signals with their corresponding amplicons. Cross-hybridisation was mainly restricted at the genus level, particularly for Cortinarius and Lactarius species. The phylochip was subsequently tested with environmental samples that were composed of ECM fungal DNA from spruce and beech plantation fungal communities. The results were in concordance with the ITS sequencing of morphotypes and the ITS clone library sequencing results that were obtained using the same PCR products. Conclusion For the first time, we developed a custom phylochip that is specific for several ectomycorrhizal fungi. To overcome cross-hybridisation problems, specific filter and evaluation strategies that used spot

  18. Reversing Antisense Oligonucleotide Activity with a Sense Oligonucleotide Antidote: Proof of Concept Targeting Prothrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Zhang, Hong; MacLeod, A Robert; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2015-12-01

    The tissue half-life of second-generation antisense oligonucleotide drugs (ASOs) is generally longer than traditional small molecule therapeutics. Thus, a strategy to reverse the activity of antisense drugs is warranted in certain settings. In this study, we describe a strategy employing the administration of a complementary sense oligonucleotide antidote (SOA). As a model system we have chosen to target the coagulation factor and antithrombotic drug target, prothrombin, to assess the feasibility of this approach. ASO targeting mouse prothrombin specifically suppressed >90% hepatic prothrombin mRNA levels and circulating prothrombin protein in mice. These effects were dose- and time-dependent, and as expected produced predictable increases in anticoagulation activity [prothrombin time/activated partial thromboplastin time (PT/aPTT)]. Treatment with prothrombin SOAs resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of ASO activity, as measured by a return in prothrombin mRNA levels and thrombin activity, and normalization of aPTT and PT. The antithrombotic activity of prothrombin ASOs was demonstrated in a FeCl3-induced thrombosis mouse model, and as predicted for this target, the doses required for antithrombotic activity were also associated with increased bleeding. Treatment with SOA was able to prevent prothrombin ASO-induced bleeding in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of SOAs to selectively and specifically reverse the intracellular effects of an antisense therapy.

  19. Antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maartje E; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S G; Kastelein, John J P

    2012-06-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are short synthetic analogues of natural nucleic acids designed to specifically bind to a target messenger RNA (mRNA) by Watson-Crick hybridization, inducing selective degradation of the mRNA or prohibiting translation of the selected mRNA into protein. Antisense technology has the ability to inhibit unique targets with high specificity and can be used to inhibit synthesis of a wide range of proteins that could influence lipoprotein levels and other targets. A number of different classes of antisense agents are under development. To date, mipomersen, a 2'-O-methoxyethyl phosphorothioate 20-mer ASO, is the most advanced ASO in clinical development. It is a second-generation ASO developed to inhibit the synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-100 in the liver. In Phase 3 clinical trials, mipomersen has been shown to significantly reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) as well as other atherogenic apoB containing lipoproteins such as lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and small-dense LDL particles. Although concerns have been raised because of an increase in intrahepatic triglyceride content, preliminary data from long-term studies suggest that with continued treatment, liver fat levels tend to stabilize or decline. Further studies are needed to evaluate potential clinical relevance of these changes. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) is another promising novel target for lowering LDL-c by ASOs. Both second-generation ASOs and ASOs using locked nucleic acid technology have been developed to inhibit PCSK9 and are under clinical development. Other targets currently being addressed include apoC-III and apo(a) or Lp(a). By directly inhibiting the synthesis of specific proteins, ASO technology offers a promising new approach to influence the metabolism of lipids and to control lipoprotein levels. Its application to a wide variety of potential targets can be expected if these agents prove to be clinically safe and

  20. Fluorescent Probes for Nucleic Acid Visualization in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre S. Boutorine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review analyses the literature concerning non-fluorescent and fluorescent probes for nucleic acid imaging in fixed and living cells from the point of view of their suitability for imaging intracellular native RNA and DNA. Attention is mainly paid to fluorescent probes for fluorescence microscopy imaging. Requirements for the target-binding part and the fluorophore making up the probe are formulated. In the case of native double-stranded DNA, structure-specific and sequence-specific probes are discussed. Among the latest, three classes of dsDNA-targeting molecules are described: (i sequence-specific peptides and proteins; (ii triplex-forming oligonucleotides and (iii polyamide oligo(N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole minor groove binders. Polyamides seem to be the most promising targeting agents for fluorescent probe design, however, some technical problems remain to be solved, such as the relatively low sequence specificity and the high background fluorescence inside the cells. Several examples of fluorescent probe applications for DNA imaging in fixed and living cells are cited. In the case of intracellular RNA, only modified oligonucleotides can provide such sequence-specific imaging. Several approaches for designing fluorescent probes are considered: linear fluorescent probes based on modified oligonucleotide analogs, molecular beacons, binary fluorescent probes and template-directed reactions with fluorescence probe formation, FRET donor-acceptor pairs, pyrene excimers, aptamers and others. The suitability of all these methods for living cell applications is discussed.

  1. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  2. Rapid identification of allergenic and pathogenic molds in environmental air by an oligonucleotide array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu Lin-Yi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airborne fungi play an important role in causing allergy and infections in susceptible people. Identification of these fungi, based on morphological characteristics, is time-consuming, expertise-demanding, and could be inaccurate. Methods We developed an oligonucleotide array that could accurately identify 21 important airborne fungi (13 genera that may cause adverse health problems. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions, hybridization of the PCR products to a panel of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a nylon membrane, and detection of the hybridization signals with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibodies. Results A collection of 72 target and 66 nontarget reference strains were analyzed by the array. Both the sensitivity and specificity of the array were 100%, and the detection limit was 10 pg of genomic DNA per assay. Furthermore, 70 fungal isolates recovered from air samples were identified by the array and the identification results were confirmed by sequencing of the ITS and D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit RNA gene. The sensitivity and specificity of the array for identification of the air isolates was 100% (26/26 and 97.7% (43/44, respectively. Conclusions Identification of airborne fungi by the array was cheap and accurate. The current array may contribute to decipher the relationship between airborne fungi and adverse health effect.

  3. Design and application of 60mer oligonucleotide microarray in SARS coronavirus detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The 60mer oligonucleotide microarray was designed and applied to detecting of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus. Thirty 60mer specific oligos were designed to cover the whole genome of the first submitted coronavirus strain, according to the sequence of TOR2 (GENEBANK Accession: AY274119). These primers were synthesized and printed into a microarray with 12×12 spots. RNAs were extracted from the throat swab and gargling fluid of SARS patients and reverse-transcripted into the double strand cDNAs. The cDNAs were prepared as restricted cDNA fragments by the restriction display (RD) technique and labeled by PCR with the Cy5-universal primer. The labeled samples were then applied to the oligo microarray for hybridization. The diagnostic capability of the microarray was evaluated after the washing and scanning steps. The scanning result showed that samples of SARS patients were hybridized with multiple SARS probes on the microarray, and there is no signal on the negative and blank controls. These results indicate that the genome of SARS coronavirus can be detected in parallel by the 60mer oligonucleotide microarray, which can improve the positive ratio of the diagnosis. The oligo microarray can also be used for monitoring the behavior of the virus genes in different stages of the disease status.

  4. Dramatically improved RNA in situ hybridization signals using LNA-modified probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Nielsen, Peter Stein; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2005-01-01

    In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues. This incre...... the nucleus/ nucleolus of wild-type cells. LNA-based probes should be readily applicable to a diverse array of cells and tissue samples....

  5. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  6. Fabrication of Unimolecular Double-stranded DNA Microarrays on Solid Surfaces for Probing DNA-Protein/Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for fabricating unimole cular double-stranded DNA microarrays on solid surfaces, which were used to probe sequence-specific DNA/protein interactions. For manufacturing the unimolecular double-stranded DNA microarrays, two kinds of special single-stranded oligonucleotides, constant oligonucleotide and target oligonucleotide, were chemically synthesized. The constant oligonucleotides with internal aminated dT were used to capture and immobilize the target oligonucleotides onto the solid surface, and also to provide a primer for later enzymatic extension reactions, while target oligonucleotides took the role of harbouring DNA-binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. The variant target oligonucleotides were annealed and ligated with the constant oligonucleotides to form the new unimolecular oligonucleotides for microspotting. The prepared unimolecular oligonucleotides were microspotted on aldehyde-derivatized glass slides to make partial-dsDNA microarrays. Finally, the partial-dsDNA microarrays were converted into a unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray by a DNA polymerase extension reaction. The efficiency and accuracy of the polymerase synthesis were demonstrated by the fluorescent-labeled dUTP incorporation in the enzymatic extension reaction and the restriction endonuclease digestion of the fabricated unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray. The accessibility and specificity of the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins binding to the immobilized unimolecular dsDNA probes were demonstrated by the binding of Cy3 labeled NF-?B (p50·p50 to the unimolecular dsDNA microarray. This unimolecular dsDNA microarray provides a general technique for high-throughput DNA-protein or DNA-drugs interactions.

  7. Inhibition of microRNA function by antimiR oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Petri, Andreas; Lindow, Morten

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in many developmental and cellular processes. Moreover, there is now ample evidence that perturbations in the levels of individual or entire families of miRNAs are strongly associated...... with the pathogenesis of a wide range of human diseases. Indeed, disease-associated miRNAs represent a new class of targets for the development of miRNA-based therapeutic modalities, which may yield patient benefits unobtainable by other therapeutic approaches. The recent explosion in miRNA research has accelerated...... the development of several computational and experimental approaches for probing miRNA functions in cell culture and in vivo. In this review, we focus on the use of antisense oligonucleotides (antimiRs) in miRNA inhibition for loss-of-function studies. We provide an overview of the currently employed antisense...

  8. Investigations of oligonucleotide usage variance within and between prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, J.; Skjerve, E.; Ussery, David

    2008-01-01

    Oligonucleotide usage in archaeal and bacterial genomes can be linked to a number of properties, including codon usage (trinucleotides), DNA base-stacking energy (dinucleotides), and DNA structural conformation (di-to tetranucleotides). We wanted to assess the statistical information potential...... was that prokaryotic chromosomes can be described by hexanucleotide frequencies, suggesting that prokaryotic DNA is predominantly short range correlated, i. e., information in prokaryotic genomes is encoded in short oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide usage varied more within AT-rich and host-associated genomes than...... in GC-rich and free-living genomes, and this variation was mainly located in non-coding regions. Bias (selectional pressure) in tetranucleotide usage correlated with GC content, and coding regions were more biased than non-coding regions. Non-coding regions were also found to be approximately 5.5% more...

  9. Delivery of RNAi-Based Oligonucleotides by Electropermeabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Golzio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than a decade, understanding of RNA interference (RNAi has been a growing field of interest. The potent gene silencing ability that small oligonucleotides have offers new perspectives for cancer therapeutics. One of the present limits is that many biological barriers exist for their efficient delivery into target cells or tissues. Electropermeabilization (EP is one of the physical methods successfully used to transfer small oligonucleotides into cells or tissues. EP consists in the direct application of calibrated electric pulses to cells or tissues that transiently permeabilize the plasma membranes, allowing efficient in vitro and in vivo. cytoplasmic delivery of exogenous molecules. The present review reports on the type of therapeutic RNAi-based oligonucleotides that can be electrotransferred, the mechanism(s of their electrotransfer and the technical settings for pre-clinical purposes.

  10. Retro-1 Analogues Differentially Affect Oligonucleotide Delivery and Toxin Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Ming, Xin; Abdelkafi, Hajer; Pons, Valerie; Michau, Aurelien; Gillet, Daniel; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Barbier, Julien; Juliano, Rudy

    2016-11-21

    Retro-1 is a small molecule that displays two important biological activities: First, it blocks the actions of certain toxins by altering their intracellular trafficking. Second, it enhances the activity of oligonucleotides by releasing them from entrapment in endosomes. This raises the question of whether the two actions involve the same cellular target. Herein we report the effects of several Retro-1 analogues on both toxins and oligonucleotides. We found analogues that affect toxins but not oligonucleotides and vice-versa, while Retro-1 is the only compound that affects both. This indicates that the molecular target(s) involved in the two processes are distinct. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes iterative sets of oligonucleotides and a translational frame check strategy to ensure the high efficiency and accuracy of TALE-gene synthesis. TALE arrays of more than 20 repeats can be constructed, and the majority of the synthesized constructs have perfect sequences. In addition, this novel oligonucleotide-based method can readily accommodate design changes to the TALE repeats. We demonstrated an increased gene targeting efficiency against a genomic site containing a potentially methylated cytosine by incorporating non-conventional repeat variable di-residue (RVD) sequences.

  12. Identification of upper respiratory tract pathogens using electrochemical detection on an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Lodes

    Full Text Available Bacterial and viral upper respiratory infections (URI produce highly variable clinical symptoms that cannot be used to identify the etiologic agent. Proper treatment, however, depends on correct identification of the pathogen involved as antibiotics provide little or no benefit with viral infections. Here we describe a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay and microarray for URI identification using standard amplification and hybridization techniques, with electrochemical detection (ECD on a semiconductor-based oligonucleotide microarray. The assay was developed to detect four bacterial pathogens (Bordetella pertussis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae and 9 viral pathogens (adenovirus 4, coronavirus OC43, 229E and HK, influenza A and B, parainfluenza types 1, 2, and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus. This new platform forms the basis for a fully automated diagnostics system that is very flexible and can be customized to suit different or additional pathogens. Multiple probes on a flexible platform allow one to test probes empirically and then select highly reactive probes for further iterative evaluation. Because ECD uses an enzymatic reaction to create electrical signals that can be read directly from the array, there is no need for image analysis or for expensive and delicate optical scanning equipment. We show assay sensitivity and specificity that are excellent for a multiplexed format.

  13. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wupeng Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO, small interfering RNA (siRNA, and microRNA (miRNA are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  14. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wupeng; Dong, Jinrui; Peh, Hong Yong; Tan, Lay Hong; Lim, Kah Suan; Li, Li; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred

    2017-01-17

    Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA (miRNA) are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir) has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  15. A novel catechol-based universal support for oligonucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Keith M; Jaquinod, Laurent; Jensen, Michael A; Ngo, Nam; Davis, Ronald W

    2007-12-21

    A novel universal support for deoxyribo- and ribonucleic acid synthesis has been developed. The support, constructed from 1,4-dimethoxycatechol, represents an improvement over existing universal supports because of its ability to cleave and deprotect under mild conditions in standard reagents. Because no nonvolatile additives are required for cleavage and deprotection, the synthesized oligonucleotides do not require purification prior to use in biochemical assays. Using reverse phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectroscopy, it was determined that oligonucleotides synthesized on the universal support (UL1) 3'-dephosphorylate quickly (9 h in 28-30% ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) at 55 degrees C, 2 h in 28-30% NH4OH at 80 degrees C, or <1 h in ammonium hydroxide/methylamine (1:1) (AMA) at 80 degrees C). Oligonucleotides used as primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay were found to perform identically to control primers, demonstrating full biological compatibility. In addition, a method was developed for sintering the universal support directly into a filter plug which can be pressure fit into the synthesis column of a commercial synthesizer. The universal support plugs allow the synthesis of high-quality oligonucleotides at least 120 nucleotides in length, with purity comparable to non-universal commercial supports and approximately 50% lower reagent consumption. The universal support plugs are routinely used to synthesize deoxyribo-, ribo-, 3'-modified, 5'-modified, and thioated oligonucleotides. The flexibility of the universal support and the efficiency of 3'-dephosphorylation are expected to increase the use of universal supports in oligonucleotide synthesis.

  16. Detection and identification of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139 using oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zheng

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid and accurate detection and identification of the new subtype of the pathogens is crucial for diagnosis, treatment and control of the contagious disease outbreak. Here, in this study, an approach to detect and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139 was established using oligonucleotide microarray. We coupled multiplex PCR with oligonucleotide microarray to construct an assay suitable for simultaneous identification of two subtypes of the pathogens. Results The stx1, stx2 gene and uidA gene having the specific mutant spot were chosen as the targets for Escherichia coli O157:H7, and meanwhile the ctxA, tcpA, and LPSgt gene for Vibrio cholerae O139. The oligonucleotide microarray was composed of eight probes including negative control and positive control from 16S rDNA gene. The six primers were designed to amplify target fragments in two triplex PCR, and then hybridized with oligonucleotide microarray. An internal control would be to run a PCR reaction in parallel. Multiplex PCR did not produce any non-specific amplicons when 149 related species or genera of standard bacteria were tested (100% specificity. In addition, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Escherichia coli O157:non-H7, Vibrio cholerae O139 and Vibrio cholerae O1 had been discriminated respectively. Using recombinant plasmid and target pathogens, we were able to detect positive hybridization signals with 102 copies/μL and 103 cfu/mL per reaction. Conclusion The DNA microarray assay reported here could detect and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139, and furthermore the subtype was distinguished. This assay was a specific and sensitive tool for simultaneous detection and identification of the new subtype of two pathogens causing diarrhea in human.

  17. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, S; Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, E B

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. As its inactivation leads to tumour regression, mutant KRAS is considered an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this study we report a new delivery strategy for a G4-decoy oligonucleotide that sequesters MAZ, a transcription...... factor essential for KRAS transcription. It is based on the use of palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes functionalized with lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotides and a lipid-modified cell penetrating TAT peptide. The potency of the strategy in pancreatic cancer cells is demonstrated...

  18. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  19. Synthesis of Peptide-Oligonucleotide Conjugates Using a Heterobifunctional Crosslinker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Berea A.R.; Chaput, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are molecular chimeras composed of a nucleic acid moiety covalently attached to a polypeptide moiety. POCs have been used in numerous applications from therapeutics to nanotechnology, and most recently as combinatorial agents in the assembly of bivalent protein affinity reagents. This unit describes the synthesis and purification of POC molecules using the heterobifunctional crosslinking reagent succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC), which enables amine-modified oligonucleotides to become covalently linked to cysteine-modified polypeptides. This solution-based protocol consists of a two-step synthesis followed by a single purification step. PMID:20827717

  20. Chemical phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides and thermolytic DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausín, Cristina; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Cieślak, Jacek; Beaucage, Serge L

    2006-10-01

    The phosphorylating reagent bis[S-(4,4'-dimethoxytrityl)-2-mercaptoethyl]-N,N-diisopropylphosphoramidite is prepared in three steps from commercial methyl thioglycolate and diisopropylphosphoramidous dichloride. The phosphorylating reagent has been used successfully in the solid-phase synthesis of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-/3'-phosphate or -thiophosphate monoesters and oligonucleotide 5'-phosphate/-thiophosphate monoesters. Bis[S-(4,4'-dimethoxytrityl)-2-mercaptoethyl]-N,N-diisopropylphosphoramidite has also been employed in the construction of a thermolytic dinucleotide prodrug model to evaluate the ability of the reagent to produce thermosentive oligonucleotide prodrugs under mild temperature conditions ( approximately 25 degrees C) for potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Versatile functionalization of nanoelectrodes by oligonucleotides via pyrrole electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Emeline; Nguyen, Khoa; Bouchain-Gautier, Christelle; Filoramo, Arianna; Goux-Capes, Laurence; Goffman, Marcello; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2010-11-15

    Surface modification at the nanometer scale is a challenge for the future of molecular electronics. In particular, the precise anchoring and electrical addressing of biological scaffolds such as complex DNA nanonetworks is of importance for generating bio-directed assemblies of nano-objects for nanocircuit purposes. Herein, we consider the individual modification of nanoelectrodes with different oligonucleotide sequences by an electrochemically driven co-polymerization process of pyrrole and modified oligonucleotide sequences bearing pyrrole monomers. We demonstrate that this one-step technique presents the advantages of simplicity, localization of surface modification, mechanical, biological and chemical stability of the coatings, and high lateral resolution.

  2. Mapping genomic library clones using oligonucleotide arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapolsky, R.J.; Lipshutz, R.J. [Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a high-density DNA probe array and accompanying biochemical and informatic methods to order clones from genomic libraries. This approach involves a series of enzymatic steps for capturing a set of short dispersed sequence markers scattered throughout a high-molecular-weight DNA. By this process, all the ambiguous sequences lying adjacent to a given Type IIS restriction site are ligated between two DNA adaptors. These markers, once amplified and labeled by PCR, can be hybridized and detected on a high-density olligonucleotide array bearing probes complementary to all possible markers. The array is synthesized using light-directed combinatorial chemistry. For each clone in a genomic library, a characteristic set of sequence markers can be determined. On the basis of the similarity between the marker sets for each pair of clones, their relative overlap can be measured. The library can be sequentially ordered into a contig map using this overlap information. This new methodology does not require gel-based methods or prior sequence information and involves manipulations that should allow for easy adaptation to automated processing and data collection. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Anti sense and sensibility : renal and skin effects of (antisense) oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the clinical investigation of a novel treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (t2dm) using an antisense oligonucleotide(aon)to inhibit the sglt2 receptor. Furthermore it describes skin effects of oligonucleotides

  4. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides using cholesterol-modified sense dendrimers and cationic lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaltin, Patrick; Margineanu, Anca; Marchand, Damien; Aerschot, Arthur Van; Rozenski, Jef; Schryver, Frans De; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Juliano, Rudolph; Fisher, Michael H.; Kang, Hyunmin; Feyter, Steven De; Herdewijn, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Cholesterol modified mono-, di-, and tetrameric oligonucleotides were synthesized and hybridized with antisense oligonucleotides to study their incorporation in cationic liposomes together with the influence of this dendrimeric delivery system on biological activity. Electrostatic interactions seem

  5. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  6. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  7. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  9. Effects of fluid flow on the oligonucleotide folding in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, M C G; Zhong, Z W

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA oligonucleotide and water molecules translocating through carbon nanotube (CNT) channels. An induced pressure difference is applied to the system by pushing a layer of water molecules toward the flow direction to drive the oligonucleotide and other molecules. This MD simulation investigates the changes that occur in the conformation of the oligonucleotide due to water molecules in nanochannels while controlling the temperature and volume of the system in a canonical ensemble. The results show that the oligonucleotide in the (8,8)-(12,12) CNT channel forms a folded state at a lower pressure, whereas the oligonucleotide in the (10,10)-(14,14) CNT channel forms a folded state at a higher pressure instead. The van der Waals forces between the water molecules and the oligonucleotide suggest that the attraction between these two types of molecules results in the linear arrangements of the bases of the oligonucleotide. For a larger nanotube channel, the folding of the oligonucleotide is mainly dependent on the solvent (water molecules), whereas pressure, the size of the nanotube junction, and water molecules are the considering factors of the folding of the oligonucleotide at a smaller nanotube channel. For a folded oligonucleotide, the water distribution around the oligonucleotide is concentrated at a smaller range than that for the distribution around an unfolded oligonucleotide.

  10. Folding Topology of a Short Coiled-Coil Peptide Structure Templated by an Oligonucleotide Triplex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Christensen, Niels Johan; Martos Maldonado, Manuel Cristo

    2017-01-01

    by oligonucleotide duplex and triplex formation. POC synthesis was achieved by copper-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition between three oligonucleotides and a 23-mer peptide, which by itself exhibited multiple oligomeric states in solution. The oligonucleotide domain was designed to furnish a stable parallel triplex...

  11. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  12. Differential oligonucleotide activity in cell culture versus mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, E; Tyson, F L

    1997-01-01

    The usual course of drug discovery begins with the demonstration of compound activity in cells and, usually, a lower level of activity in animals. Successive rounds of drug design may result in a compound with sufficient activity in animals to justify clinical trials. The basic endpoints of therapeutic oligonucleotide experiments include target antigen reduction, target messenger reduction and inhibition of transformed cell proliferation or viral replication. However, one should expect oligonucleotides to exhibit pleiotropic behaviour, as do all other drugs. In an animal oligonucleotides will necessarily bind to and dissociate from all macromolecules encountered in the blood, in tissues, on cell surfaces and within cellular compartments. Contrary to expectations, oligonucleotides designed to be complementary to certain transcripts have sometimes been found moderately effective in cell-free extracts, more effective in cell culture and most effective in animal models. If greater potency against standard endpoints is reported in mouse models than was observed in cell culture, critical examination must consider alternate modes of action in animals that may not apply in cell culture. This counterintuitive paradox will be examined, based on studies of Ha-ras expression in bladder cancer, Ki-ras expression in pancreatic cancer, erbB2 expression in ovarian cancer and c-myc expression in B cell lymphoma.

  13. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  14. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havens, Mallory A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA-RNA base-pairing or protein-RNA...

  15. Antithrombotic effect of antisense factor XI oligonucleotide treatment in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeffrey R; Marzec, Ulla; Revenko, Alexey S; Zhao, Chenguang; Gao, Dacao; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David; MacLeod, A Robert; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, Andras; Hanson, Stephen R; Monia, Brett P

    2013-07-01

    During coagulation, factor IX (FIX) is activated by 2 distinct mechanisms mediated by the active proteases of either FVIIa or FXIa. Both coagulation factors may contribute to thrombosis; FXI, however, plays only a limited role in the arrest of bleeding. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of FXI may produce an antithrombotic effect with relatively low hemostatic risk. We have reported that reducing FXI levels with FXI antisense oligonucleotides produces antithrombotic activity in mice, and that administration of FXI antisense oligonucleotides to primates decreases circulating FXI levels and activity in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Here, we evaluated the relationship between FXI plasma levels and thrombogenicity in an established baboon model of thrombosis and hemostasis. In previous studies with this model, antibody-induced inhibition of FXI produced potent antithrombotic effects. In the present article, antisense oligonucleotides-mediated reduction of FXI plasma levels by ≥ 50% resulted in a demonstrable and sustained antithrombotic effect without an increased risk of bleeding. These results indicate that reducing FXI levels using antisense oligonucleotides is a promising alternative to direct FXI inhibition, and that targeting FXI may be potentially safer than conventional antithrombotic therapies that can markedly impair primary hemostasis.

  16. Systematic design of mouse Vh gene family-specific oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijen, AM; Seijen, HG; Bos, NA

    2001-01-01

    Kabat's database has often been used to design mouse Vh gene-specific 5 ' primers. The emphasis was mostly on constructing a universal (degenerate) 5 ' primer or 5 ' primer set, which would be able to match every mouse Vh gene. We were interested in finding oligonucleotides that could be used as pri

  17. Regioselective immobilization of short oligonucleotides to acrylic copolymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, E; Kochetkova, S V; Mirzabekov, A D; Florentiev, V L

    1996-01-01

    Four types of polyacrylamide or polydimethyl-acrylamide gels for regioselective (by immobilization at the 3' end) of short oligonucleotides have been designed for use in manufacturing oligonucleotide microchips. Two of these supports contain amino or aldehyde groups in the gel, allowing coupling with oligonucleotides bearing aldehyde or amino groups, respectively, in the presence of a reducing agent. The aldehyde gel support showed a higher immobilization efficiency relative to the amino gel. Of all reducing agents tested, the best results were obtained with a pyridine-borane complex. The other supports are based on an acrylamide gel activated with glutaraldehyde or a hydroxyalkyl-functionalized gel treated with mesyl chloride. The use of dimethylacrylamide instead of acrylamide allows subsequent gel modifications in organic solvents. All the immobilization methods are easy and simple to perform, give high and reproducible yields, allow long durations of storage of the activated support, and provide high stability of attachment and low non-specific binding. Although these gel supports have been developed for preparing oligonucleotide microchips, they may be used for other purposes as well. PMID:8774893

  18. LNA 5'-phosphoramidites for 5'→3'-oligonucleotide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Kumar, Santhosh T.; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Hereby we report an efficient synthesis of LNA thymine and LNA 5-methylcytosine 5′-phosphoramidites, allowing incorporation of LNA thymine and LNA 5-methylcytosine into oligonucleotides synthesized in the 5′→3′ direction. Key steps include regioselective enzymatic benzoylation of the 5′-hydroxy...

  19. Systematic design of mouse Vh gene family-specific oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijen, AM; Seijen, HG; Bos, NA

    2001-01-01

    Kabat's database has often been used to design mouse Vh gene-specific 5 ' primers. The emphasis was mostly on constructing a universal (degenerate) 5 ' primer or 5 ' primer set, which would be able to match every mouse Vh gene. We were interested in finding oligonucleotides that could be used as pri

  20. A strategy for detection of known and unknown SNP using a minimum number of oligonucleotides applicable in the clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Harvey

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Detection of unknown single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP relies on large scale sequencing expeditions of genomic fragments or complex high-throughput chip technology. We describe a simplified strategy for fluorimetric detection of known and unknown SNP by proportional hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays based on optimization of the established principle of signal loss or gain that requires a drastically reduced number of matched or mismatched probes. The array consists of two sets of 18-mer oligonucleotide probes. One set includes overlapping oligos with 4-nucleotide tiling representing an arbitrarily selected "consensus" sequence (consensus-oligos, the other includes oligos specific for known SNP within the same genomic region (variant-oligos. Fluorescence-labeled DNA amplified from a homozygous source identical to the consensus represents the reference target and is co-hybridized with a differentially-labeled test sample. Lack of hybridization of the test sample to consensus- with simultaneous hybridization to variant-oligos designates a known allele. Lack of hybridization to consensus- and variant-oligos indicates a new allele. Detection of unknown variants in heterozygous samples depends upon fluorimetric analysis of signal intensity based on the principle that homozygous samples generate twice the amount of signal. This method can identify unknown SNP in heterozygous conditions with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 90%. This strategy should dramatically increase the efficiency of SNP detection throughout the human genome and will decrease the cost and complexity of applying genomic wide analysis in the context of clinical trials.

  1. Specific detection of very low concentrations of DNA oligonucleotides with DNA-coated long-period grating biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Karolina H.; Dominik, Magdalena; Janczuk-Richter, Marta; Niedziółka-Jönsson, Joanna; Bock, Wojtek J.; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2017-04-01

    Label-free biosensing using optical long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in optical fiber and coated with biological compound enables for detection and monitoring the kinetics of reactions taking places on the sensor's surface. The labelfree detection effect for the LPG biosensor working near the dispersion turning point (DTP) of higher order cladding modes can be observed as resonance wavelength shift induced by binding of biomolecules to fiber surface. In this study we analyzed shift of the resonance wavelength for LPG after its functionalization with DNA layer and during DNA hybridization. It has seen found that the LPG is able to be functionalized with DNA oligonucleotide, acting as a probe and after the functionalization can selectively bind specific complementary DNA oligonucleotides in a very low concentration. DNA-coated LPG can be used as a probe capturing specific DNA sequences with wide ranges of concentrations from 0.1 to 10 pM. Hybridization of the DNA on the fiber surface has also been verified with Midorii Green florescent marker.

  2. Glycoclusters on oligonucleotide and PNA scaffolds: synthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Nicolas; Defrancq, Eric; Morvan, François

    2013-06-07

    Conjugation of oligonucleotides (ONs) to a variety of reporter groups has been the subject of intensive research during the last decade. Conjugation is indeed of great interest because it can be used not only to improve the existing ONs properties but also to impart new ones. In this context tremendous efforts have been made to conjugate carbohydrate moieties to ONs. Indeed carbohydrates play an important role in biological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion through the recognition with sugar-binding proteins (i.e. lectins) located on the surface of cells. For this reason, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) have been first developed for improving the poor cellular uptake or tissue specific delivery of ONs through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Besides the targeted ONs delivery, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) are also evaluated in the context of carbohydrate biochips in which surface coating with carbohydrates is achieved by using the DNA-directed immobilization strategy (DDI). Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have also been extensively investigated as a surrogate of DNA for diverse applications. Therefore attachment of carbohydrate moieties to this class of molecules has been studied. The aforementioned applications of COCs require mimicking of the natural processes, in which the weak individual protein-carbohydrate binding is overcome by using multivalent interactions. This tutorial review focuses on the recent advances in carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates and describes the major synthetic approaches available. In addition, an overview of applications that have been developed using various scaffolds allowing multivalent interactions is provided. Finally recent results on the use of peptide nucleic acids as oligonucleotides surrogate are described.

  3. Development of an oligonucleotide microarray for the detection and monitoring of marine dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Luca; Cegna, Alessandra; Casabianca, Silvia; Penna, Antonella; Saunders, Nick; Magnani, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), mainly caused by dinoflagellates and diatoms, have great economic and sanitary implications. An important contribution for the comprehension of HAB phenomena and for the identification of risks related to toxic algal species is given by the monitoring programs. In the microscopy-based monitoring methods, harmful species are distinguished through their morphological characteristics. This can be time consuming and requires great taxonomic expertise due to the existence of morphologically close-related species. The high throughput, automation possibility and specificity of microarray-based detection assay, makes this technology very promising for qualitative detection of HAB species. In this study, an oligonucleotide microarray targeted to the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region of nine toxic dinoflagellate species/clades was designed and evaluated. Two probes (45-47 nucleotides in length) were designed for each species/clade to reduce the potential for false positives. The specificity and sensitivity of the probes were evaluated with ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 PCR amplicons obtained from 20 dinoflagellates cultured strains. Cross hybridization experiments confirmed the probe specificity; moreover, the assay showed a good sensitivity, allowing the detection of up to 2 ng of labeled PCR product. The applicability of the assay with field samples was demonstrated using net concentrated seawater samples, un-spiked or spiked with known amounts of cultured cells. Despite the general application of microarray technology for harmful algae detection is not new, a peculiar group of target species/clades has been included in this new-format assay. Moreover, novelties regarding mainly the probes and the target rDNA region have allowed sensitivity improvements in comparison to previously published studies.

  4. Development of the large-scale oligonucleotide chip for the diagnosis of plant viruses and its practical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Moon; Kim, Jeong-Seon; Lim, Seungmo; Park, Chung Youl; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Su-Heon

    2014-03-01

    A large-scale oligonucleotide (LSON) chip was developed for the detection of the plant viruses with known genetic information. The LSON chip contains two sets of 3,978 probes for 538 species of targets including plant viruses, satellite RNAs and viroids. A hundred forty thousand probes, consisting of isolate-, species- and genus-specific probes respectively, are designed from 20,000 of independent nucleotide sequence of plant viruses. Based on the economic importance, the amount of genome information, and the number of strains and/or isolates, one to fifty-one probes for each target virus are selected and spotted on the chip. The standard and field samples for the analysis of the LSON chip have been prepared and tested by RT-PCR. The probe's specific and/or nonspecific reaction patterns by LSON chip allow us to diagnose the unidentified viruses. Thus, the LSON chip in this study could be highly useful for the detection of unexpected plant viruses, the monitoring of emerging viruses and the fluctuation of the population of major viruses in each plant.

  5. Hepatotoxic Potential of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Can Be Predicted from Their Sequence and Modification Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H.; Yakimov, Victor; Ottosen, Søren; Kammler, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels F.; Høg, Anja M.; Hedtjärn, Maj; Meldgaard, Michael; Møller, Marianne R.; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides that recruit RNase H and thereby cleave complementary messenger RNAs are being developed as therapeutics. Dose-dependent hepatic changes associated with hepatocyte necrosis and increases in serum alanine-aminotransferase levels have been observed after treatment with certain oligonucleotides. Although general mechanisms for drug-induced hepatic injury are known, the characteristics of oligonucleotides that determine their hepatotoxic potential are not well understood. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the hepatotoxic potential of locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides in mice. We developed a random forests classifier, in which oligonucleotides are regarded as being composed of dinucleotide units, which distinguished between 206 oligonucleotides with high and low hepatotoxic potential with 80% accuracy as estimated by out-of-bag validation. In a validation set, 17 out of 23 oligonucleotides were correctly predicted (74% accuracy). In isolation, some dinucleotide units increase, and others decrease, the hepatotoxic potential of the oligonucleotides within which they are found. However, a complex interplay between all parts of an oligonucleotide can influence the hepatotoxic potential. Using the classifier, we demonstrate how an oligonucleotide with otherwise high hepatotoxic potential can be efficiently redesigned to abate hepatotoxic potential. These insights establish analysis of sequence and modification patterns as a powerful tool in the preclinical discovery process for oligonucleotide-based medicines. PMID:23952551

  6. Oligonucleotide-stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for the specific and sensitive detection of biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Jingjin; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-02-21

    A novel biotin fluorescent probe based on oligonucleotide-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) was synthesized by employing a biotinylated cytosine-rich sequence as a synthesized template. The fluorescence properties of the DNA-AgNCs are related to the modified position of the DNA. When biotin is linked to the middle thymine base of the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNCs emit the strongest fluorescence. Moreover, the stability of the DNA-AgNCs was affected by avidin through biotin-avidin binding, quenching the fluorescence of the DNA-AgNCs. In contrast, if free biotin is further introduced into this system, the quenching is apparently weakened by competition, leading to the restoration of fluorescence. This phenomenon can be utilized for the detection of biotin. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery is linearly proportional to the concentration of biotin in the range of 10 nM-1.0 μM with a detection limit of 6.0 nM. This DNA-AgNCs probe with excellent fluorescent properties is sensitive and selective for the detection of biotin and has been applied for the determination of biotin in wheat flour.

  7. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-09-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples.

  8. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Ming, X.; Cao, C.; Laing, B.; Yuan, A.; Porter, M. A.; Hull-Ryde, E. A.; Maddry, J.; Suto, M.; Janzen, W. P.; Juliano, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides has been constrained by the limited ability of these membrane-impermeable molecules to reach their intracellular sites of action. We sought to address this problem using small organic molecules to enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by modulating their intracellular trafficking and release from endosomes. A high-throughput screen of multiple small molecule libraries yielded several hits that markedly potentiated the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. These compounds also enhanced the effects of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides. The hit compounds preferentially caused release of fluorescent oligonucleotides from late endosomes rather than other intracellular compartments. Studies in a transgenic mouse model indicated that these compounds could enhance the in vivo effects of a splice-switching oligonucleotide without causing significant toxicity. These observations suggest that selected small molecule enhancers may eventually be of value in oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:25662226

  9. Biophysical and RNA Interference Inhibitory Properties of Oligonucleotides Carrying Tetrathiafulvalene Groups at Terminal Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Pérez-Rentero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide conjugates carrying a single functionalized tetrathiafulvalene (TTF unit linked through a threoninol molecule to the 3′ or 5′ ends were synthesized together with their complementary oligonucleotides carrying a TTF, pyrene, or pentafluorophenyl group. TTF-oligonucleotide conjugates formed duplexes with higher thermal stability than the corresponding unmodified oligonucleotides and pyrene- and pentafluorophenyl-modified oligonucleotides. TTF-modified oligonucleotides are able to bind to citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and produce stable gold AuNPs functionalized with oligonucleotides. Finally, TTF-oligoribonucleotides have been synthesized to produce siRNA duplexes carrying TTF units. The presence of the TTF molecule is compatible with the RNA interference mechanism for gene inhibition.

  10. Combining ligation reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis to obtain reliable long DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Mondello, Monica; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-05-01

    New DNA amplification methods are continuously developed for sensitive detection and quantification of specific DNA target sequences for, e.g. clinical, environmental or food applications. These new applications often require the use of long DNA oligonucleotides as probes for target sequences hybridization. Depending on the molecular technique, the length of DNA probes ranges from 40 to 450 nucleotides, solid-phase chemical synthesis being the strategy generally used for their production. However, the fidelity of chemical synthesis of DNA decreases for larger DNA probes. Defects in the oligonucleotide sequence result in the loss of hybridization efficiency, affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of the amplification method. In this work, an enzymatic procedure has been developed as an alternative to solid-phase chemical synthesis for the production of long oligonucleotides. The enzymatic procedure for probe production was based on ligation of short DNA sequences. Long DNA probes were obtained from smaller oligonucleotides together with a short sequence that acts as bridge stabilizing the molecular complex for DNA ligation. The ligation reactions were monitored by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF) using a bare fused-silica capillary. The capillary gel electrophoresis-LIF method demonstrated to be very useful and informative for the characterization of the ligation reaction, providing important information about the nature of some impurities, as well as for the fine optimization of the ligation conditions (i.e. ligation cycles, oligonucleotide and enzyme concentration). As a result, the yield and quality of the ligation product were highly improved. The in-lab prepared DNA probes were used in a novel multiplex ligation-dependent genome amplification (MLGA) method for the detection of genetically modified maize in samples. The great possibilities of the whole approach were demonstrated by the specific and sensitive

  11. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  12. Hybridization probe for femtomolar quantification of selected nucleic acid sequences on a disposable electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Chami, Bilal; Kreuzer, Matthias; Presting, Gernot; Alvarez, Anne M; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2006-04-01

    Mixed monolayers of electroactive hybridization probes on gold surfaces of a disposable electrode were investigated as a technology for simple, sensitive, selective, and rapid gene identification. Hybridization to the ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes reproducibly diminished cyclic redox currents, presumably due to a displacement of the label from the electrode. Observed peak current densities were roughly 1000x greater than those observed in previous studies, such that results could easily be interpreted without the use of algorithms to correct for background polarization currents. Probes were sensitive to hybridization with a number of oligonucleotide sequences with varying homology, but target oligonucleotides could be distinguished from competing nontarget sequences based on unique "melting" profiles from the probe. Detection limits were demonstrated down to nearly 100 fM, which may be low enough to identify certain genetic conditions or infections without amplification. This technology has rich potential for use in field devices for gene identification as well as in gene microarrays.

  13. Comparison of three microarray probe annotation pipelines: differences in strategies and their effect on downstream analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, P.B.T.; Casel, P.; Prickett, D.; Nie, H.; Watson, M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Klopp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Reliable annotation linking oligonucleotide probes to target genes is essential for functional biological analysis of microarray experiments. We used the IMAD, OligoRAP and sigReannot pipelines to update the annotation for the ARK-Genomics Chicken 20 K array as part of a joined EADGENE/

  14. Comparison of three microarray probe annotation pipelines: differences in strategies and their effect on downstream analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, P.B.T.; Casel, P.; Prickett, D.; Nie, H.; Watson, M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Klopp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Reliable annotation linking oligonucleotide probes to target genes is essential for functional biological analysis of microarray experiments. We used the IMAD, OligoRAP and sigReannot pipelines to update the annotation for the ARK-Genomics Chicken 20 K array as part of a joined EADGENE/

  15. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  16. Fluorescence quenching of TMR by guanosine in oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide-specific fluorescence quenching in fluorescently labeled DNA has many applications in biotechnology. We have studied the inter-and intra-molecular quenching of tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) by nucleotides to better understand their quenching mechanism and influencing factors. In agreement with previous work, dGMP can effectively quench TMR, while the quenching of TMR by other nucleotides is negligible. The Stern-Volmer plot between TMR and dGMP delivers a bimolecular quenching constant of Ks=52.3 M-1. The fluorescence of TMR in labeled oligonucleotides decreases efficiently through photoinduced electron transfer by guanosine. The quenching rate constant between TMR and guanosine was measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In addition, our data show that the steric hindrance by bases around guanosine has significant effect on the G-quenching. The availability of these data should be useful in designing fluorescent oligonucleotides and understanding the G-quenching process.

  17. One-oligonucleotide method for constructing vectors for RNA interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos Fabian FLORES-JASSO; Ines VELAZQUEZ-QUESADA; Carlos LANDA-SOLIS; Andres A GUTIERREZ; Luis VACA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To develop an easy, fast, automated, and inexpensive method for constructing short-hairpin-RNA cassettes for RNAi studies. Methods: Using single oligonucleotides, a variety of DNA cassettes for RNAi vectors were constructed in only few minutes in an automated manner. The cassettes, targeting the eGFP,were cloned into plasmids driven by RNA polymerase Ⅲ promoter H 1. Then, the plasmids were transfected into HeLa cells that were later infected with a recombinant adenovirus encoding the eGFP gene. The level of eGFP fluorescence was evaluated by confocal imaging and flow cytometry. Results: The plasmids constructed with the DNA cassettes made by the one-oligonucleotide method inhibited eGFP with different potencies, ranging from 55% to 75%. Conclusion: By using the method reported here, it is possible to simultaneously construct hundreds of different DNA cassettes for RNAi experiments in an inexpensive, automated way. This method will facilitate functional genomics studies on mammalian cells.

  18. Inhibition of HTLV-III by exogenous oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodchild, J.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described of detecting the presence of HTLV-III virus in a sample by demonstrating inhibition of replication of the virus in cells which are normally killed by the HTLV-III virus after the cells have been (a) combined with the sample and an oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication and capable of hybridizing with at least the highly conserved region, the highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome being a nucleotide sequence present in the genomes of HTLV-III isolates and the oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication being complementary to a region of the HTLV-III genome.

  19. Solid-phase synthesis of siRNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Serge L

    2008-03-01

    Since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) as a means to silence the expression of specific genes, small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides have been recognized as powerful tools for targeting therapeutically important mRNAs and eliciting their destruction. This discovery has created a high demand for synthetic oligoribonucleotides as potential therapeutics and has spurred a renaissance in the development of rapid, efficient methods for solid-phase RNA synthesis. The design and implementation of 2'-hydroxyl protecting groups that provide ribonucleoside phosphoramidites with coupling kinetics and coupling efficiencies comparable to those of deoxyribonucleoside phosphoramidites are key to the production of RNA oligonucleotides in sufficient quantity and purity for pharmaceutical applications. In this context, various siRNAs were chemically modified to identify the biophysical and biochemical parameters necessary for effective and stable RNAi-mediated gene-silencing activities.

  20. 16S ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for monitoring of intestinal tract bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, GW; Elfferich, P; Raangs, GC; WildeboerVeloo, ACM; Jansen, GJ; Degener, JE

    1997-01-01

    Background. The composition of a sample of faecal bacteria can be determined by culturing different dilutions on specific media. However, not all bacteria can be cultured and media are not always specific. With a culture-independent approach a more accurate picture of the composition of the intestin

  1. Design and application of group-specific oligonucleotide probes for detecting and monitoring mouse clostridia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Momose, Yoshika; Park, Sang-Hee; Niwa, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Teruko; Maruyama, Aya; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Itoh, Kikuji

    2011-01-01

    Clostridia dominate the rodent intestinal bacterial community and play an important role in physiological functions of the host. However, their ecology and diversity are still unclear. In our previous report, we showed that phylogenetically novel groups of clostridia inhabit the mouse intestine and

  2. Characterization of rat brain NCAM mRNA using DNA oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1990-01-01

    A number of different isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been identified. The difference between these is due to alternative splicing of a single NCAM gene. In rat brain NCAM mRNAs with sizes of 7.4, 6.7, 5.2, 4.3 and 2.9 kb have been reported. We have synthesized six DNA...... the five NCAM mRNAs in rat brain....

  3. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriano, Raffaella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Biella, Serena, E-mail: serena.biella@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  4. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of ANGPTL3 Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Brandt, Teresa A; Tai, Li-Jung; Fu, Wuxia; Peralta, Raechel; Yu, Rosie; Hurh, Eunju; Paz, Erika; McEvoy, Bradley W; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen C; Digenio, Andres; Hughes, Steven G; Geary, Richard S; Witztum, Joseph L; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-07-20

    Epidemiologic and genomewide association studies have linked loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL3, encoding angiopoietin-like 3, with low levels of plasma lipoproteins. We evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting Angptl3 messenger RNA (mRNA) for effects on plasma lipid levels, triglyceride clearance, liver triglyceride content, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis in mice. Subsequently, 44 human participants (with triglyceride levels of either 90 to 150 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 1.7 mmol per liter] or >150 mg per deciliter, depending on the dose group) were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo or an antisense oligonucleotide targeting ANGPTL3 mRNA in a single dose (20, 40, or 80 mg) or multiple doses (10, 20, 40, or 60 mg per week for 6 weeks). The main end points were safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures, and changes in levels of lipids and lipoproteins. The treated mice had dose-dependent reductions in levels of hepatic Angptl3 mRNA, Angptl3 protein, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as reductions in liver triglyceride content and atherosclerosis progression and increases in insulin sensitivity. After 6 weeks of treatment, persons in the multiple-dose groups had reductions in levels of ANGPTL3 protein (reductions of 46.6 to 84.5% from baseline, Pantisense oligonucleotide and three who received placebo reported dizziness or headache. There were no serious adverse events. Oligonucleotides targeting mouse Angptl3 retarded the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in mice. Use of the same strategy to target human ANGPTL3 reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in humans. (Funded by Ionis Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02709850 .).

  5. Voltammetric behaviour of oligonucleotide lipoplexes adsorbed onto glassy carbon electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Piedade, J. A. P.; M. Mano; Lima, M. C. Pedroso de; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira-Brett, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The voltammetric behaviour of oligonucleotide lipoplexes (ODN-lipoplexes) prepared from short oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), with different base compositions, and liposomes of the cationic lipid DOTAP, was studied by differential pulse voltammetry with a glassy carbon mini-electrode. It was found that the ODN base composition influences the ODN-lipoplex voltammetric response. Differential pulse voltammograms for ODN-lipoplexes of the ODN adenosine nucleotides present two different features when...

  6. Thermodynamic treatment of oligonucleotide duplex–simplex equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzy, Richard; Dunietz, Isard; Behlke, Mark A.; Klotz, Irving M.; Walder, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermodynamic formulations have been devised to obtain ΔG° values directly from spectroscopic data at a fixed common temperature in nucleic acid duplex–simplex melting curves. In addition, the dependence of melting on salt concentration has been expressed in terms of a stepwise stoichiometric representation, which leads to a specific equation for the partition of the added sodium ions between the different oligonucleotide forms. PMID:14657395

  7. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, John A; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. T...

  8. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, J Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of th...

  9. Functionalization of silicon oxide using supercritical fluid deposition of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane for the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Jordi; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Costa, Guillaume; Fontelaye, Caroline; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Ménage, Stéphane; Marchand, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The functionalization of silicon oxide based substrates using silanes is generally performed through liquid phase methodologies. These processes involve a huge quantity of potentially toxic solvents and present some important disadvantages for the functionalization of microdevices or porous materials, for example the low diffusion. To overcome this drawback, solvent-free methodologies like molecular vapor deposition (MVD) or supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) have been developed. In this paper, the deposition process of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) on silicon oxide using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent is studied for the first time. The oxirane ring of epoxy silanes readily reacts with amine group and is of particular interest for the grafting of amino-modified oligonucleotides or antibodies for diagnostic application. Then the ability of this specific EBTMOS layer to react with amine functions has been evaluated using the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide probes. The presence of the probes is revealed by fluorescence using hybridization with a fluorescent target oligonucleotide. The performances of SFD of EBTMOS have been optimized and then compared with the dip coating and molecular vapor deposition methods, evidencing a better grafting efficiency and homogeneity, a lower reaction time in addition to the eco-friendly properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The epoxysilane layers have been characterized by surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast optical technique, atomic force microscopy, multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shelf life of the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane coating layer has also been studied. Finally, two different strategies of NH2-oligonucleotide grafting on EBTMOS coating layer have been compared, i.e. reductive amination and nucleophilic substitution, SN2. This EBTMOS based coating layer can be used for a wide range of applications

  10. Differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva Oleg N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete sequencing of bacterial genomes has become a common technique of present day microbiology. Thereafter, data mining in the complete sequence is an essential step. New in silico methods are needed that rapidly identify the major features of genome organization and facilitate the prediction of the functional class of ORFs. We tested the usefulness of local oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns to recognize and differentiate types of atypical oligonucleotide composition in DNA sequences of bacterial genomes. Results A total of 163 bacterial genomes of eubacteria and archaea published in the NCBI database were analyzed. Local OU patterns exhibit substantial intrachromosomal variation in bacteria. Loci with alternative OU patterns were parts of horizontally acquired gene islands or ancient regions such as genes for ribosomal proteins and RNAs. OU statistical parameters, such as local pattern deviation (D, pattern skew (PS and OU variance (OUV enabled the detection and visualization of gene islands of different functional classes. Conclusion A set of approaches has been designed for the statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of bacterial genomes. These methods are useful for the visualization and differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition prior to or accompanying gene annotation.

  11. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  12. Recursive construction of perfect DNA molecules from imperfect oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linshiz, Gregory; Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Kaplan, Shai; Gronau, Ilan; Ravid, Sivan; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Making faultless complex objects from potentially faulty building blocks is a fundamental challenge in computer engineering, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, we show for the first time how recursion can be used to address this challenge and demonstrate a recursive procedure that constructs error-free DNA molecules and their libraries from error-prone oligonucleotides. Divide and Conquer (D&C), the quintessential recursive problem-solving technique, is applied in silico to divide the target DNA sequence into overlapping oligonucleotides short enough to be synthesized directly, albeit with errors; error-prone oligonucleotides are recursively combined in vitro, forming error-prone DNA molecules; error-free fragments of these molecules are then identified, extracted and used as new, typically longer and more accurate, inputs to another iteration of the recursive construction procedure; the entire process repeats until an error-free target molecule is formed. Our recursive construction procedure surpasses existing methods for de novo DNA synthesis in speed, precision, amenability to automation, ease of combining synthetic and natural DNA fragments, and ability to construct designer DNA libraries. It thus provides a novel and robust foundation for the design and construction of synthetic biological molecules and organisms.

  13. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Maerkle, Frieder; Hahn, Lothar; Foertsch, Tobias; Schillo, Sebastian; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Weber, Laura K; Ridder, Barbara; Soehindrijo, Miriam; Muenster, Bastian; Striffler, Jakob; Bischoff, F Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F

    2014-10-28

    In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches.

  14. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Nesterov-Mueller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches.

  15. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  16. THERAPEUTIC ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES AGAINST CANCER: HURDLING TO THE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miguel Duarte Moreno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  17. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P.; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C. Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  18. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin M Evers

    Full Text Available To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUGn triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG(7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well.

  19. Characterization of self-assembled DNA concatemers from synthetic oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies of DNA–ligand interaction on a single molecule level provide opportunities to understand individual behavior of molecules. Construction of DNA molecules with repetitive copies of the same segments of sequences linked in series could be helpful for enhancing the interaction possibility for sequence-specific binding ligand to DNA. Here we report on the use of synthetic oligonucleotides to self-assembly into duplex DNA concatemeric molecules. Two strands of synthetic oligonucleotides used here were designed with 50-mer in length and the sequences are semi-complimentary so to hybridize spontaneously into concatemers of double stranded DNA. In order to optimize the length of the concatemers the oligonucleotides were incubated at different oligomer concentrations, ionic strengths and temperatures for different durations. Increasing the salt concentration to 200 mM NaCl was found to be the major optimizing factor because at this enhanced ionic strength the concatemers formed most quickly and the other parameters had no detectable effect. The size and shape of formed DNA concatemers were studied by gel electrophoresis in agarose, polyacrylamide gels and by AFM. Our results show that linear DNA constructs up to several hundred base pairs were formed and could be separated from a substantial fraction of non-linear constructs.

  20. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Synthesis of triazole-linked oligonucleotides with high affinity to DNA complements and an analysis of their compatibility with biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varizhuk, Anna M; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Novikov, Roman A; Chizhov, Alexandr O; Smirnov, Igor P; Chuvilin, Andrey N; Tatarinova, Olga N; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Pozmogova, Galina E; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2013-06-21

    New oligonucleotide analogues with triazole internucleotide linkages were synthesized, and their hybridization properties were studied. The analogues demonstrated DNA binding affinities similar to those of unmodified oligonucleotides. The modification was shown to protect the oligonucleotides from nuclease hydrolysis. The modified oligonucleotides were tested as PCR primers. Modifications remote from the 3'-terminus were tolerated by polymerases. Our results suggest that these new oligonucleotide analogues are among the most promising triazole DNA mimics characterized to date.

  2. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Laurie D; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-02-07

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have high complexity and cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotide sequence-dependent segment and a unique "target sequence-independent" 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  3. A study of oligonucleotide occurrence distributions in DNA coding segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, T; Colosimo, A; Morante, S; Parisi, V; Rossi, G C

    1997-02-21

    In this paper we present a general strategy designed to study the occurrence frequency distributions of oligonucleotides in DNA coding segments and to deal with the problem of detecting possible patterns of genomic compositional inhomogeneities and disuniformities. Identifying specific tendencies or peculiar deviations in the distributions of the effective occurrence frequencies of oligonucleotides, with respect to what can be a priori expected, is of the greatest importance in biology. Differences between expected and actual distributions may in fact suggest or confirm the existence of specific biological mechanisms related to them. Similarly, a marked deviation in the occurrence frequency of an oligonucleotide may suggest that it belongs to the class of so-called "DNA signal (target) sequences". The approach we have elaborated is innovative in various aspects. Firstly, the analysis of the genomic data is carried out in the light of the observation that the distribution of the four nucleotides along the coding regions of the genoma is biased by the existence of a well-defined "reading frame". Secondly, the "experimental" numbers found by counting the occurrences of the various oligonucleotide sequences are appropriately corrected for the many kinds of mistakes and redundancies present in the available genetic Data Bases. A methodologically significant further improvement of our approach over the existing searching strategies is represented by the fact that, in order to decide whether or not the (corrected) "experimental" value of the occurrence frequency of a given oligonucleotide is within statistical expectations, a measure of the strength of the selective pressure, having acted on it in the course of the evolution, is assigned to the sequence, in a way that takes into account both the value of the "experimental" occurrence frequency of the sequence and the magnitude of the probability that this number might be the result of statistical fluctuations. If the

  4. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  5. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Kimura

    Full Text Available Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download.

  6. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yasumasa; Soma, Takahiro; Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download.

  7. Effect of unlabeled helper probes on detection of an RNA target by bead-based sandwich hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, K.B.; Cabig-Ciminska, M.; Holmgren, A.;

    2004-01-01

    Unlabeled helper oligonucleotides assisting a bead-based sandwich hybridization assay were tested for the optimal placement of the capture and detection probes. The target used was a full-length in vitro synthesized mRNA molecule. Helper probes complementary to regions adjacent to the binding sit....... Using an electrical chip linked to the detection probe for the detection of p-ominophenol, which is produced by alkaline phosphatase, a detection limit of 2 x 10(-13) M mRNA molecules was reached without the use of a nucleic acid amplification step.......Unlabeled helper oligonucleotides assisting a bead-based sandwich hybridization assay were tested for the optimal placement of the capture and detection probes. The target used was a full-length in vitro synthesized mRNA molecule. Helper probes complementary to regions adjacent to the binding site...

  8. Preparation of liposome-coated oligonucleotide labeled with 99mTc and its uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To explore the preparation method of liposome-coated 99mTc-labeled antisense oligonucleotide (ASON),targeteing the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and to explore the biological characteristics and the uptake kinetics of a radiolabeled probe in vascular smooth muscle cells, an 18-base single-stranded antisense oligonucleotide targeting PCNA mRNA and the complementary strand (sense oligonucleotide, SON) were synthesized. The ASON (SON) was labeled with 99mTc, by conjugating the bifunctional chelator (hydrazino nicotinamide, HYNIC), and purified through a gel filtration column of Sephadex G-25. The product was then encapsulated in cationic liposome (oligofectamineTM). The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON in a phosphate buffered solution (PBS), and fresh human serum and its uptake rate were studied. There was no significant difference between the 99mTc radiolabeling efficiencies of HYNIC-ASON and HYNIC-SON, which were 60.04% ± 1.92% and 59.60% ± 2.53%, respectively (P > 0.05, n = 5). The radiochemical purity of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON was 94.70% ± 1.90% (n = 5). And after incubation with PBS and fresh human seAt 90 min after transfection, the uptake rate of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON reached its peak of 83.8% ±5.92% in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and was much higher than that of the nonliposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON, which was 11.16% ± 0.54% (P < 0.01, n = 4). The labeling method of PCNA ASON (SON) conjugated by HYNIC has been proved successful. The liposome was able to enhance the ASON (SON) uptake in VSMCs,and could be widely used as a safe, convenient, effective gene transfer carrier.

  9. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  10. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  11. Modulating anti-MicroRNA-21 activity and specificity using oligonucleotide derivatives and length optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munoz-Alarcon, Andres; Guterstam, Peter; Romero, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    but reduced specificity when incorporating locked nucleic acid monomers, whereas the opposite was observed when introducing unlocked nucleic acid monomers. Our data suggest that phosphorothioate anti-microRNA oligonucleotides yield a greater activity than their phosphodiester counterparts and that a moderate...... truncation of the anti-microRNA oligonucleotide improves specificity without significantly losing activity. These results provide useful insights for design of anti-microRNA oligonucleotides to achieve both high activity as well as efficient mismatch discrimination....

  12. Synthesis of triazole-nucleoside phosphoramidites and their use in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Brandon J; Efthymiou, Tim C; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-19

    Triazole-backbone oligonucleotides are macromolecules that have one or more triazole units that are acting as a backbone mimic. Triazoles within the backbone have been used within oligonucleotides for a variety of applications. This unit describes the preparation and synthesis of two triazole-nucleoside phosphoramidites [uracil-triazole-uracil (UtU) and cytosine-triazole-uracil (CtU)] based on a PNA-like scaffold, and their incorporation within oligonucleotides.

  13. Hemopoiesis-stimulating activity of immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Zhdanov, V V; Khmelevskaya, A M; Andreeva, T V; Poponina, A M; Zjuzkov, G N; Udut, E V; Khrichkova, T Ju; Simanina, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Stavrova, L A; Tchaikovsky, A S; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V; Brjushinina, O S; Slepichev, V A

    2011-03-01

    The hemopoiesis-stimulating effect of combined treatment with immobilized oligonucleotides and hyaluronidase preparations was studied during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression caused by cyclophosphamide administration. Immobilized hyaluronidase was shown to increase the efficiency of correction of changes in the erythroid and granulocytic hemopoietic stems with immobilized oligonucleotides. This potentiation of the effect of immobilized oligonucleotides by immobilized hyaluronidase was related to an increase in functional activity of committed hemopoietic precursors.

  14. Specific discrimination of three pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes by carB-based oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-01-01

    It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes.

  15. Synthesis, hybridization characteristics, and fluorescence properties of oligonucleotides modified with nucleobase-functionalized locked nucleic acid adenosine and cytidine monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaura, Mamta; Kumar, Pawan; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-07-03

    Conformationally restricted nucleotides such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) are very popular as affinity-, specificity-, and stability-enhancing modifications in oligonucleotide chemistry to produce probes for nucleic acid targeting applications in molecular biology, biotechnology, and medicinal chemistry. Considerable efforts have been devoted in recent years to optimize the biophysical properties of LNA through additional modification of the sugar skeleton. We recently introduced C5-functionalization of LNA uridines as an alternative and synthetically more straightforward approach to improve the biophysical properties of LNA. In the present work, we set out to test the generality of this concept by studying the characteristics of oligonucleotides modified with four different C5-functionalized LNA cytidine and C8-functionalized LNA adenosine monomers. The results strongly suggest that C5-functionalization of LNA pyrimidines is indeed a viable approach for improving the binding affinity, target specificity, and/or enzymatic stability of LNA-modified ONs, whereas C8-functionalization of LNA adenosines is detrimental to binding affinity and specificity. These insights will impact the future design of conformationally restricted nucleotides for nucleic acid targeting applications.

  16. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  17. Efficient assembly of very short oligonucleotides using T4 DNA Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Robert A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In principle, a pre-constructed library of all possible short oligonucleotides could be used to construct many distinct gene sequences. In order to assess the feasibility of such an approach, we characterized T4 DNA Ligase activity on short oligonucleotide substrates and defined conditions suitable for assembly of a plurality of oligonucleotides. Findings Ligation by T4 DNA Ligase was found to be dependent on the formation of a double stranded DNA duplex of at least five base pairs surrounding the site of ligation. However, ligations could be performed effectively with overhangs smaller than five base pairs and oligonucleotides as small as octamers, in the presence of a second, complementary oligonucleotide. We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous oligonucleotide phosphorylation and ligation and, as a proof of principle for DNA synthesis through the assembly of short oligonucleotides, we performed a hierarchical ligation procedure whereby octamers were combined to construct a target 128-bp segment of the beta-actin gene. Conclusions Oligonucleotides as short as 8 nucleotides can be efficiently assembled using T4 DNA Ligase. Thus, the construction of synthetic genes, without the need for custom oligonucleotide synthesis, appears feasible.

  18. Determination of optimal sites of antisense oligonucleotide cleavage within TNFα mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. H.; Giles, R. V.; Spiller, D. G.; Grzybowski, J.; Tidd, D. M.; Sibson, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides provide a powerful tool in order to determine the consequences of the reduced expression of a selected target gene and may include target validation and therapeutic applications. Methods of predicting optimum antisense sites are not always effective. We have compared the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides, which were selected in vitro using random combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries of differing length and complexity, upon putative target sites within TNFα mRNA. The relationship of specific target site accessibility and oligonucleotide efficacy with respect to these parameters proved to be complex. Modification of the length of the recognition sequence of the oligonucleotide library illustrated that independent target sites demonstrated a preference for antisense oligonucleotides of a defined and independent optimal length. The efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide sequences selected in vitro paralleled that observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated U937 cells. The application of methylphosphonate:phosphodiester chimaeric oligonucleotides to U937 cells reduced mRNA levels to up to 19.8% that of the untreated cell population. This approach provides a predictive means to profile any mRNA of known sequence with respect to the identification and optimisation of sites accessible to antisense oligonucleotide activity. PMID:11522838

  19. Label-free detection of hybridization of oligonucleotides by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The microarrays of 20-base oligonucleotide with different concentrations are detected before and after hybridization by the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method. The experimental results prove that OI-RD is a label-free method which can not only distinguish the concentration difference of oligonucleotides before and after the hybridization but also detect the hybridization of short oligonucleotides. At present the OI-RD method can detect 0.39 μmol/L 20-base oligonucleotide or less. These results suggest that the OI-RD method is a promising and potential technique for label-free detection of biological microarrays.

  20. Alternative mapping of probes to genes for Affymetrix chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friis-Hansen Lennart

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short oligonucleotide arrays have several probes measuring the expression level of each target transcript. Therefore the selection of probes is a key component for the quality of measurements. However, once probes have been selected and synthesized on an array, it is still possible to re-evaluate the results using an updated mapping of probes to genes, taking into account the latest biological knowledge available. Methods We investigated how probes found on recent commercial microarrays for human genes (Affymetrix HG-U133A were matching a recent curated collection of human transcripts: the NCBI RefSeq database. We also built mappings and used them in place of the original probe to genes associations provided by the manufacturer of the arrays. Results In a large number of cases, 36%, the probes matching a reference sequence were consistent with the grouping of probes by the manufacturer of the chips. For the remaining cases there were discrepancies and we show how that can affect the analysis of data. Conclusions While the probes on Affymetrix arrays remain the same for several years, the biological knowledge concerning the genomic sequences evolves rapidly. Using up-to-date knowledge can apparently change the outcome of an analysis.

  1. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (PSK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  2. Chemically modified oligonucleotides with efficient RNase H response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Boel, Anne Marie; Lobedanz, Sune;

    2008-01-01

    Ten different chemically modified nucleosides were incorporated into short DNA strands (chimeric oligonucleotides ON3-ON12 and ON15-ON24) and then tested for their capacity to mediate RNAse H cleavage of the complementary RNA strand. The modifications were placed at two central positions directly...... in the RNase H cleaving region. The RNA strand of duplexes with ON3, ON5 and ON12 were cleaved more efficiently than the RNA strand of the DNA:RNA control duplex. There seems to be no correlation between the thermal stability between the duplexes and RNase H cleavage....

  3. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipu...

  4. In silico evaluation of molecular probes for detection and identification of Ralstonia solanacearum and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arahal, David R; Llop, Pablo; Alonso, Manuel Pérez; López, María M

    2004-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacerum and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus are the two most relevant bacterial pathogens of potato for which a large number of molecular diagnostic methods using specific DNA sequences have been developed. About one hundred oligonucleotides have been described and thoroughly tested experimentally. After having compiled and evaluated all these primers and probes in silico to check their specificity, many discrepancies were found. A detailed analysis permitted the recognition of different possible reasons for such discrepancies: sequencing errors in public sequences, wrong supposed specificity (sometimes due to more recent sequences than the oligonucleotides being evaluated) or even typing errors in the oligonucleotides. Although this study is an exercise about in silico evaluation using two potato bacterial pathogens as a model, the conclusions reflect not only information useful for phytopathologists but, in a broader scope, draw the main situations that can be found during an evaluation of probes, which can be surely found in other scenarios.

  5. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer under...... electrochemical potential control (in situ STM). 2,20,60,200-Terpyridine (terpy) onto which the transition metal ions Fe2+/3+, Os2+/3+ and Ru2+/3+ could be coordinated after UNA monolayer formation was attached to UNA via a flexible linker. The metal centres offer CV probes and in situ STM contrast markers...

  6. Electrochemiluminescent biosensor of ATP using tetrahedron structured DNA and a functional oligonucleotide for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation and target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Gao, Ai; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2013-05-15

    Restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure are the main limitations in single-stranded DNA aptamer-based electrochemical sensors. Chemical labeling of the aptamer with a probe at the end of aptamer is inefficient and time-consuming. In this work, tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) and a functionalized oligonucleotide (FO) were used to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a model target. The ts-DNA was formed with three thiolated oligonucleotides and one oligonucleotide containing anti-ATP aptamer. The FO contained a complementary strand to the anti-ATP aptamer and an intermolecular duplex for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation. After the ts-DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through gold-thiol interactions, hybridization between the anti-ATP aptamer and its complementary strand introduced the intercalated Ru(phen)3(2+) to the electrode. ECL emission from Ru(phen)3(2+) was observed with tripropylamine as a co-reactant. Once ATP reacted with its aptamer, the aptamer-complimentary strand duplex dissociated and the intermolecular duplex containing Ru(phen)3(2+) was released. The difference in emission before and after reaction with ATP was used to quantify ATP with a detection limit of 0.2nM. The ts-DNA increased the sensitivity compared to conventional methods, and the intercalation strategy avoided a complex chemical labeling procedure.

  7. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  8. Detection of mammalian microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Monika; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Tippens, Melissa; Turner, David L

    2006-09-01

    We have developed an in situ hybridization procedure for the detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) in tissue sections from mouse embryos and adult organs. The method uses highly specific washing conditions for RNA oligonucleotide probes conjugated to a fluorescein hapten. We show that this method detects predominantly mature miRNAs rather than the miRNA precursors or primary transcripts. We have determined expression patterns for several miRNAs expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, including miR-124a, miR-9, miR-92, and miR-204. Whereas miR-124a is expressed in neurons, miR-9 is expressed in neural progenitors and some neurons, and miR-204 is expressed in the choroid plexus, retinal pigment epithelium, and ciliary body. miR-204 is located in an intron of the TRPM3 gene, and the TRPM3 mRNA is coexpressed with miR-204 in the choroid plexus. We also find that primary transcripts for miR-124a and miR-9 genes are expressed in patterns similar to their respective mature miRNAs. The ability to visualize expression of specific miRNAs in embryos and tissues should aid studies on miRNA function. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Oligonucleotide microarray identifies genes differentially expressed during tumorigenesis of DMBA-induced pancreatic cancer in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Chao Guo

    Full Text Available The extremely dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC is attributed, at least in part, to lack of early diagnosis. Therefore, identifying differentially expressed genes in multiple steps of tumorigenesis of PC is of great interest. In the present study, a 7,12-dimethylbenzanthraene (DMBA-induced PC model was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The gene expression profile was screened using an oligonucleotide microarray, followed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining validation. A total of 661 differentially expressed genes were identified in stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis. According to GO classification, these genes were involved in multiple molecular pathways. Using two-way hierarchical clustering analysis, normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis, PanIN, early and advanced pancreatic cancer were completely discriminated. Furthermore, 11 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes (probes were found by Mann-Kendall trend Monotone test, indicating homologous genes of rat and human. The qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of CXCR7 and UBe2c, two of the identified genes, confirmed the microarray results. In human PC cell lines, knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, our data identified several promising markers and therapeutic targets of PC based on a comprehensive screening and systemic validation.

  10. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  11. [Identification of genetically modified vegetable sources in food and feed using hydrogel oligonucleotide microchip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griadunov, D A; Getman, I A; Chizhova, S I; Mikhaĭlovich, V M; Zasedatelev, A S; Romanov, G A

    2011-01-01

    A method of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by the hybridization on a hydrogel oligonucleotide biochip was developed for simultaneous identification of ten different transgenic elements of plant DNA in feed and food products. The biochip contained 22 immobilized probes intended for (i) detection of plant DNA; (ii) plant species determination (soybean, maize, potato, rice); (iii) identification of transgenic elements, including 35S CaMV, 35S FMV, rice actine gene promoters, nos, 35S CaMV, ocs, pea rbcS1 gene terminators, and bar, gus, nptII marker genes. The limit of detection was 0.5% of genetically modified (GM) soybean and maize in analyzed samples. Identification of transgenic DNA in food and feed products using either the developed approach or real-time PCR led to virtually identical results. The assay can be used for selection of GM samples by screening food and feed products for subsequent quantitative determination of the GM component based on the identified transgene.

  12. Oligonucleotide microarray identifies genes differentially expressed during tumorigenesis of DMBA-induced pancreatic cancer in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Li, Jian; Yang, Ying-Chi; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2013-01-01

    The extremely dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) is attributed, at least in part, to lack of early diagnosis. Therefore, identifying differentially expressed genes in multiple steps of tumorigenesis of PC is of great interest. In the present study, a 7,12-dimethylbenzanthraene (DMBA)-induced PC model was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The gene expression profile was screened using an oligonucleotide microarray, followed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining validation. A total of 661 differentially expressed genes were identified in stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis. According to GO classification, these genes were involved in multiple molecular pathways. Using two-way hierarchical clustering analysis, normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis, PanIN, early and advanced pancreatic cancer were completely discriminated. Furthermore, 11 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes (probes) were found by Mann-Kendall trend Monotone test, indicating homologous genes of rat and human. The qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of CXCR7 and UBe2c, two of the identified genes, confirmed the microarray results. In human PC cell lines, knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, our data identified several promising markers and therapeutic targets of PC based on a comprehensive screening and systemic validation.

  13. A Versatile Vector for Gene and Oligonucleotide Transfer into Cells in Culture and in vivo: Polyethylenimine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussif, Otmane; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Zanta, Maria Antonietta; Djavaheri Mergny, Mojgan; Scherman, Daniel; Demeneix, Barbara; Behr, Jean-Paul

    1995-08-01

    Several polycations possessing substantial buffering capacity below physiological pH, such as lipopolyamines and polyamidoamine polymers, are efficient transfection agents per se-i.e., without the addition of cell targeting or membrane-disruption agents. This observation led us to test the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) for its genedelivery potential. Indeed, every third atom of PEI is a protonable amino nitrogen atom, which makes the polymeric network an effective "proton sponge" at virtually any pH. Luciferase reporter gene transfer with this polycation into a variety of cell lines and primary cells gave results comparable to, or even better than, lipopolyamines. Cytotoxicity was low and seen only at concentrations well above those required for optimal transfection. Delivery of oligonucleotides into embryonic neurons was followed by using a fluorescent probe. Virtually all neurons showed nuclear labeling, with no toxic effects. The optimal PEI cation/anion balance for in vitro transfection is only slightly on the cationic side, which is advantageous for in vivo delivery. Indeed, intracerebral luciferase gene transfer into newborn mice gave results comparable (for a given amount of DNA) to the in vitro transfection of primary rat brain endothelial cells or chicken embryonic neurons. Together, these properties make PEI a promising vector for gene therapy and an outstanding core for the design of more sophisticated devices. Our hypothesis is that its efficiency relies on extensive lysosome buffering that protects DNA from nuclease degradation, and consequent lysosomal swelling and rupture that provide an escape mechanism for the PEI/DNA particles.

  14. Inference of subgenomic origin of BACs in an interspecific hybrid sugarcane cultivar by overlapping oligonucleotide hybridizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changsoo; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2011-09-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeders in the early 20th century made remarkable progress in increasing yield and disease resistance by crossing Saccharum spontaneum L., a wild relative, to Saccharum officinarum L., a traditional cultivar. Modern sugarcane cultivars have approximately 71%-83% of their chromosomes originating from S. officinarum, approximately 10%-21% from S. spontaneum, and approximately 2%-13% recombinant or translocated chromosomes. In the present work, C(0)t-based cloning and sequencing (CBCS) was implemented to further explore highly repetitive DNA and to seek species-specific repeated DNA in both S. officinarum and S. spontaneum. For putatively species-specific sequences, overlappping oligonucleotide probes (overgos) were designed and hybridized to BAC filters from the interspecific hybrid sugarcane cultivar 'R570' to try to deduce parental origins of BAC clones. We inferred that 12 967 BACs putatively originated from S. officinarum and 5117 BACs from S. spontaneum. Another 1103 BACs were hybridized by both species-specific overgos, too many to account for by conventional recombination, thus suggesting ectopic recombination and (or) translocation of DNA elements. Constructing a low C(0)t library is useful to collect highly repeated DNA sequences and to search for potentially species-specific molecular markers, especially among recently diverged species. Even in the absence of repeat families that are species-specific in their entirety, the identification of localized variations within consensus sequences, coupled with the site specificity of short synthetic overgos, permits researchers to monitor species-specific or species-enriched variants.

  15. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  16. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liang

    Full Text Available A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1% of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s, partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal

  17. A 16S rRNA-targeted Probe for Detection of Lactobacilli and Enterococci in Faecal Samples by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Elfferich, Peter; Schut, Frits; Welling, Gjalt W

    2011-01-01

    A group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe S-G-Lab-0158-a-A20 (Lab158) was designed and validated to quantify species of the phylogenetic group lactobacilli-enterococci. The Lab158 probe detects nearly all species of the genera Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Pediococcus, Weissella, Vagococcus, Leuconostoc and Oenococcus. The specificity of the probe was tested on various species of the target group and on a range of common intestinal bacteria. For these experiments, procedures to ...

  18. An overview of sugar-modified oligonucleotides for antisense therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Thazha P

    2011-09-01

    Among the multitude of chemical modifications that have been described over the past two decades, oligonucleotide analogs that are modified at the 2'-position of the furanose sugar have been especially useful for improving the drug-like properties of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). These modifications bias the sugar pucker towards the 3'-endo-conformation and improve ASO affinity for its biological target (i.e., mRNA). In addition, antisense drugs incorporating 2'-modified nucleotides exhibit enhanced metabolic stability, and improved pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. Further conformational restriction of the 2'-substituent to the 4'-position of the furanose ring yielded the 2',4'-bridged nucleic acid (BNA) analogs. ASOs containing BNA modifications showed unprecedented increase in binding affinity for target RNA, while also improved nuclease resistance, in vitro and in vivo potency. Several ASO drug candidates containing 2'-modified nucleotides have entered clinical trials and continue to make progress in the clinic for a variety of therapeutic indications. 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  19. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy.

  20. Introduction on Using the FastPCR Software and the Related Java Web Tools for PCR and Oligonucleotide Assembly and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Tselykh, Timofey V; Khassenov, Bekbolat; Ramanculov, Erlan M

    2017-01-01

    This chapter introduces the FastPCR software as an integrated tool environment for PCR primer and probe design, which predicts properties of oligonucleotides based on experimental studies of the PCR efficiency. The software provides comprehensive facilities for designing primers for most PCR applications and their combinations. These include the standard PCR as well as the multiplex, long-distance, inverse, real-time, group-specific, unique, overlap extension PCR for multi-fragments assembling cloning and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). It also contains a built-in program to design oligonucleotide sets both for long sequence assembly by ligase chain reaction and for design of amplicons that tile across a region(s) of interest. The software calculates the melting temperature for the standard and degenerate oligonucleotides including locked nucleic acid (LNA) and other modifications. It also provides analyses for a set of primers with the prediction of oligonucleotide properties, dimer and G/C-quadruplex detection, linguistic complexity as well as a primer dilution and resuspension calculator. The program consists of various bioinformatical tools for analysis of sequences with the GC or AT skew, CG% and GA% content, and the purine-pyrimidine skew. It also analyzes the linguistic sequence complexity and performs generation of random DNA sequence as well as restriction endonucleases analysis. The program allows to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites for coding sequences and supports the clustering of sequences. It performs efficient and complete detection of various repeat types with visual display. The FastPCR software allows the sequence file batch processing that is essential for automation. The program is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html , and its online version is located at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  1. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  2. Dry-reagent disposable biosensor for visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by oligonucleotide ligation reaction: application to pharmacogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Gravanis, Achille

    2008-08-01

    Most genotyping methods for known single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are based on hybridization with allele-specific probes, oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR), primer extension or invasive cleavage. OLR offers superior specificity because it involves two recognition events; namely, the hybridization of an allele-specific probe and a common probe to adjacent positions on target DNA. OLR products can be detected by microtiter well-based colorimetric, time-resolved fluorimetric or chemiluminometric assays, electrophoresis, microarrays, microspheres, and homogeneous fluorimetric or colorimetric assays. We have developed a simple, robust, and low-cost disposable biosensor in dry-reagent format, which allows visual genotyping with no need for instrumentation. The OLR mixture contains a biotinylated common probe and an allele-specific probe with a (dA)(20) segment at the 3'-end. OLR products are denatured and applied to the biosensor next to gold nanoparticles that are decorated with oligo(dT) strands. The sensor is immersed in the appropriate buffer and all components migrate by capillary action. The OLR product is captured by immobilized streptavidin at the test zone (TZ) of the sensor and hybridizes with the oligo(dT) strands of the nanoparticles. A characteristic red line is generated due to the accumulation of nanoparticles. The excess nanoparticles are captured by immobilized oligo(dA) at the control zone of the strip, giving a second red line. We have applied successfully the proposed OLR-dipstick assay to the genotyping of four SNPs in the drug-metabolizing enzyme genes CYP2D6 ((*)3 and (*)4) and CYP2C19 ((*)2 and (*)3). The results were in agreement with direct sequencing.

  3. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris.

  4. The MOX/SUC precursor strategies: robust ways to construct functionalized oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polushin, N

    2001-01-01

    The use of phosphoramidites bearing one or more methoxyoxalamido (MOX) or succinimido (SUC) reactive groups for construction of functionalized oligonucleotides is described. The efficiency of the new precursor strategy was demonstrated in the synthesis of oligonucleotide containing up to 16 imidazole residues.

  5. Multicellular Tumor Spheroids as a Model for Assessing Delivery of Oligonucleotides in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle; Ming, Xin; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2014-01-01

    Oligonucleotides have shown promise in selectively manipulating gene expression in vitro, but that success has not translated to the clinic for cancer therapy. A potential reason for this is that cells behave differently in monolayer than in the three-dimensional tumor, resulting in limited penetration and distribution of oligonucleotides in the tumor. This may be especially true when oligonucleotides are associated with nanocarriers such as lipoplexes and polyplexes, commonly used delivery vehicles for oligonucleotides. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a three-dimensional model that closely resembles small avascular tumors and micrometastases, has been utilized as an intermediate between monolayer culture and in vivo studies for the screening of small-molecule drugs. However, spheroids have been little used for the study of various oligonucleotide delivery formulations. Here, we have evaluated the uptake and efficacy of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides using various delivery modalities in two- and three-dimensional culture models. We find that the size of the delivery agent dramatically influences penetration into the spheroid and thus the biological effect of the oligonucleotides. We hypothesize that the MCTS model will prove to be a useful tool in the future development of oligonucleotide delivery formulations. PMID:24618852

  6. Nucleobase azide-ethynylribose click chemistry contributes to stabilizing oligonucleotide duplexes and stem-loop structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Asakura, Ryo; Terazawa, Koki; Shibata, Aya; Ikeda, Masato; Kitade, Yukio

    2017-06-15

    The formation of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles through copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in oligonucleotides bearing 1-deoxy-1-ethynyl-β-d-ribofuranose (R(E)) can have a positive impact on the stability of oligonucleotide duplexes and stem-loop structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Studies on the Syntheses and Properties of 5'-Branched-sugar Isonucleosides and the Related Oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Xiaobing; Zhang Lihe; Min Jimei

    2001-01-01

    @@ The chemistry of nucleosides and oligonucleotides is an actively investigated field in the search for new drugs. Thesyntheses and the properties of isonucleosides and oligonucleotides have been investigated to improve their stability,antitumor and antiviral activities, and to reduce their toxicity.

  8. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  9. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Antisense and siRNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, RL; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress is being made concerning the development of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Studies with antisense, siRNA, and other forms of oligonucleotides have shown promise in cellular and animal models and in some clinical studies. Nonetheless our understanding of how oligonucleotides function in cells and tissues is really quite limited. One major issue concerns the modes of uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides, whether as ‘free’ molecules, or linked to various delivery moieties such as nanoparticles or targeting ligands. In this review we examine the recent literature on oligonucleotide internalization and subcellular trafficking in the context of current insights into the basic machinery for endocytosis and intracellular vesicular traffic. PMID:21992697

  10. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  11. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  12. Minimum probe length for unique identification of all open reading frames in a microbial genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Ng, J; Fitch, J P

    2000-03-05

    In this paper, we determine the minimum hybridization probe length to uniquely identify at least 95% of the open reading frame (ORF) in an organism. We analyze the whole genome sequences of 17 species, 11 bacteria, 4 archaea, and 2 eukaryotes. We also present a mathematical model for minimum probe length based on assuming that all ORFs are random, of constant length, and contain an equal distribution of bases. The model accurately predicts the minimum probe length for all species, but it incorrectly predicts that all ORFs may be uniquely identified. However, a probe length of just 9 bases is adequate to identify over 95% of the ORFs for all 15 prokaryotic species we studied. Using a minimum probe length, while accepting that some ORFs may not be identified and that data will be lost due to hybridization error, may result in significant savings in microarray and oligonucleotide probe design.

  13. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Daryl E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. Results We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods

  14. Oligonucleotides with 1,4-dioxane-based nucleotide monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas S; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    An epimeric mixture of H-phosphonates 5R and 5S has been synthesized in three steps from known secouridine 1. Separation of the epimers has been accomplished by RP-HPLC, allowing full characterization and incorporation of monomers X and Y into 9-mer oligonucleotides using H-phosphonates building...... blocks 5R and 5S, respectively. A single incorporation of either monomer X or monomer Y in the central position of a DNA 9-mer results in decreased thermal affinity toward both DNA and RNA complements (ΔT(m) = -3.5 °C/-3.5 °C for monomer X and ΔT(m) = -11.0 °C/-6.5 °C for monomer Y). CD measurements do...

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Transcript Knockdown in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pauli

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are synthetic, single-strand RNA-DNA hybrids that induce catalytic degradation of complementary cellular RNAs via RNase H. ASOs are widely used as gene knockdown reagents in tissue culture and in Xenopus and mouse model systems. To test their effectiveness in zebrafish, we targeted 20 developmental genes and compared the morphological changes with mutant and morpholino (MO-induced phenotypes. ASO-mediated transcript knockdown reproduced the published loss-of-function phenotypes for oep, chordin, dnd, ctnnb2, bmp7a, alk8, smad2 and smad5 in a dosage-sensitive manner. ASOs knocked down both maternal and zygotic transcripts, as well as the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA MALAT1. ASOs were only effective within a narrow concentration range and were toxic at higher concentrations. Despite this drawback, quantitation of knockdown efficiency and the ability to degrade lncRNAs make ASOs a useful knockdown reagent in zebrafish.

  16. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Xiang Wang; Xing Yao; Yong-Liang Lu; Jin-Liang Ping; Jian-Fang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) andin situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylineosin (HE) staining.RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues.CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  18. Tetramerization of an RNA oligonucleotide containing a GGGG sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Cheong, C; Moore, P B

    1991-05-23

    Poly rG can form four-stranded helices. The Hoogsteen-paired quartets of G residues on which such structures depend are so stable that they will form in 5'-GMP solutions, provided that Na+ or K+ are present (see for example, refs 2-4). Telomeric DNA sequences, which are G-rich, adopt four-stranded antiparallel G-quartet conformations in vitro, and parallel tetramerization of G-rich sequences may be involved in meiosis. Here we show that RNAs containing short runs of Gs can also tetramerize. A 19-base oligonucleotide derived from the 5S RNA of Escherichia coli (strand III), 5'GCCGAUGGUAGUGUGGGGU3', forms a K(+)-stabilized tetrameric aggregate that depends on the G residues at its 3' end. This complex is so stable that it would be surprising if similar structures do not occur in nature.

  19. Design and development of thermolytic DNA oligonucleotide prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajkowski, Andrzej; Pedras-Vasconcelos, Joao; Ausín, Cristina; Verthelyi, Daniela; Beaucage, Serge L

    2005-11-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside phosphoramidites functionalized with the thermolytic 2-(N-formyl-N-methyl)aminoethyl group for phosphorus protection (1a-d) have been prepared and employed in the solid-phase synthesis of CpG ODN fma1555. Given that this modified oligonucleotide can be converted to the immunomodulatory CpG ODN 1555 under neutral conditions at 37 degrees C, its biologic activity was demonstrated in vivo by studies showing that intraperitoneal administration of CpG ODN fma1555 in mice resulted in the activation of cytokine-secreting splenocytes. Furthermore, administration of CpG ODN fma1555 to mice that were challenged intradermally in the ear with live L. major metacyclic promastigotes, reduced the severity of Leishmania skin lesions over time to an extent similar to that obtained with CpG ODN 1555. In another infectious model experiment, CpG ODN fma1555 protected newborn mice from death (65% survival) when administered 3 days before infection with the aggressive Tacaribe (TCRV) virus. A comparable immunoprotection was obtained by treatment of TCRV-infected mice with CpG ODN 1555 administered on the same day of infection (45% survival). However, when TCRV-infected mice were treated with CpG ODN fma1555 on the day of infection, they died as a consequence of the relatively slow conversion of the oligonucleotide prodrug to the bioactive CpG ODN 1555. Co-administration of both CpG ODN 1555 and CpG ODN fma1555 to mice 3 days prior to TCRV infection or on the day of infection provided protection from death (45-65% survival) and thus widened the immunoprotection window against TCRV-infection.

  20. Optimization of candidate-gene SNP-genotyping by flexible oligonucleotide microarrays; analyzing variations in immune regulator genes of hay-fever samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beier Markus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in immune regulator genes have been associated with numerous diseases, including allergies and cancer. Increasing evidence suggests a substantially elevated disease risk in individuals who carry a combination of disease-relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. For the genotyping of immune regulator genes, such as cytokines, chemokines and transcription factors, an oligonucleotide microarray for the analysis of 99 relevant SNPs was established. Since the microarray design was based on a platform that permits flexible in situ oligonucleotide synthesis, a set of optimally performing probes could be defined by a selection approach that combined computational and experimental aspects. Results While the in silico process eliminated 9% of the initial probe set, which had been picked purely on the basis of potential association with disease, the subsequent experimental validation excluded more than twice as many. The performance of the optimized microarray was demonstrated in a pilot study. The genotypes of 19 hay-fever patients (aged 40–44 with high IgE levels against inhalant antigens were compared to the results obtained with 19 age- and sex-matched controls. For several variants, allele-frequency differences of more than 10% were identified. Conclusion Based on the ability to improve empirically a chip design, the application of candidate-SNP typing represents a viable approach in the context of molecular epidemiological studies.

  1. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: quantitation and optimization of a sandwich type assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, H; Mäki, E; Lönnberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Uniformly sized (50 micro m) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate particles (SINTEF) were used as the solid phase in a sandwich type mixed-phase hybridization assay based on time-resolved fluorescence detection on a single particle. These particles were coated with oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes by conventional phosphoramidite chain assembly. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate, ¿2,2',2",2"'-¿¿4'-¿4"'-[(4, 6-dichloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]phenyl¿-2,2':6',2"-terpyrid ine-6, 6"-diyl¿bis(methylenenitrilo)¿tetrakis(acetato)¿eur opi um(III), was hybridized to a complementary sequence of the target oligonucleotide, and the resulting duplex was further hybridized to the particle-bound probes. The latter binding was quantified by time-resolved measurement of the emission signal of a single particle. Kinetics of hybridization and the effect of the concentration of the target oligomer and the fluorescently tagged probe on the efficiency of hybridization were studied. The intensity of the emission signal was linearly related to the concentration of the target oligomer over a range of 5 orders of magnitude. The length of the complementary region between the target oligomer and the particle-bound probe was varied, and the effect of point mutations and deletions on the hybridization efficiency was determined in each case. The maximal selectivity was observed with 10-16-base pair complementary sequences, the optimal length depending on the oligonucleotide loading on the particle. Discrimination between the complete matches and point mismatches was unequivocal, a single point mutation and/or deletion decreasing the efficiency of hybridization by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  2. Stereospecificity of oligonucleotide interactions revisited: no evidence for heterochiral hybridization and ribozyme/DNAzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hoehlig

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications.

  3. Managing the sequence-specificity of antisense oligonucleotides in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Hansen, Bo R; Koch, Troels; Lindow, Morten

    2017-03-17

    All drugs perturb the expression of many genes in the cells that are exposed to them. These gene expression changes can be divided into effects resulting from engaging the intended target and effects resulting from engaging unintended targets. For antisense oligonucleotides, developments in bioinformatics algorithms, and the quality of sequence databases, allow oligonucleotide sequences to be analyzed computationally, in terms of the predictability of their interactions with intended and unintended RNA targets. Applying these tools enables selection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides where no- or only few unintended RNA targets are expected. To evaluate oligonucleotide sequence-specificity experimentally, we recommend a transcriptomics protocol where two or more oligonucleotides targeting the same RNA molecule, but with entirely different sequences, are evaluated together. This helps to clarify which changes in cellular RNA levels result from downstream processes of engaging the intended target, and which are likely to be related to engaging unintended targets. As required for all classes of drugs, the toxic potential of oligonucleotides must be evaluated in cell- and animal models before clinical testing. Since potential adverse effects related to unintended targeting are sequence-dependent and therefore species-specific, in vitro toxicology assays in human cells are especially relevant in oligonucleotide drug discovery. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  5. Release of DNA oligonucleotides and their conjugates from controlled-pore glass under thermolytic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajkowski, Andrzej; Cieślak, Jacek; Norris, Scott; Freedberg, Darón I; Kauffman, Jon S; Duff, Robert J; Beaucage, Serge L

    2008-12-01

    The sequential functionalization of long-chain alkylamine controlled-pore glass (CPG) with a 3-hydroxypropyl-(2-cyanoethyl)thiophosphoryl linker and a dinucleoside phosphorotetrazolide leads to a uniquely engineered support for solid-phase synthesis. Unlike conventional succinylated-CPG supports, this support is designed to allow oligonucleotide deprotection and elimination of deprotection side-products to proceed without release of the oligonucleotide. When needed, the DNA oligonucleotide can be thermolytically released in 2 hr under essentially neutral conditions. The modified CPG support has been successfully employed in the synthesis of both native and fully phosphorothioated DNA 20-mers. On the basis of reversed-phase HPLC and electrophoretic analyses, the purity of the released oligonucleotides is comparable to that of identical oligonucleotides synthesized from succinylated-CPG supports, in terms of both shorter-than-full-length oligonucleotide contaminants and overall yields. The detailed preparation of DNA oligonucleotides conjugated with exemplary reporter or functional groups, either at the 3'-terminus or at both 3'- and 5'-termini, is also described.

  6. RNA probes, transcribed from synthetic DNA, for in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brysch, W.; Hagendorff, G.; Schlingensiepen, K.H.

    1988-03-25

    Single stranded cRNA probes are ideal for in-situ-hybridization. Synthetic oligodesoxy-ribonucleotides on the other hand allow one to chose nucleotide sequences independently of restriction sites and availability of cloned templates. To combine the advantages of these two methods, the authors used an oligonucleotide, containing a T7-RNA-polymerase promotor sequence and a starting sequence of 6 bases as a template for an in-vitro-transcription reaction with T7-RNA-polymerase. A second oligonucleotide, complementary to basepairs 1-101 was also synthesized and the two strands heated to 95/sup 0/ for 3 min, then kept at 65/sup 0/C for one hour in 80 mM Tris, 12mM MgCl, 4 mM Spermidine, 0,04% Triton and finally cooled on ice. The resulting double stranded DNA was used as a template to transcribe /sup 35/S-labelled cRNA, using DNA, T7-Polymerase, /sup 35/S-UTP, ATP, GTP and CTP and RNasin (Promega). No difference could be observed comparing the resulting hybridization pattern with that obtained by using a plasmid derived cRNA probe of rat brain sodium channel II. Moreover the hybridization signal was clearly distinct from the background labelling resulting from hybridization with a sense control probe of the same specific activity.

  7. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  8. Chimeric RNA Oligonucleotides with Triazole and Phosphate Linkages: Synthesis and RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tomoko; Kogashi, Kanako; Okada, Koudai; Mattarella, Martin; Suzuki, Takeru; Yasumoto, Kenichi; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric RNA oligonucleotides with an artificial triazole linker were synthesized using solution-phase click chemistry and solid-phase automated synthesis. Scalable synthesis methods for jointing units for the chimeric structure have been developed, and after click-coupling of the jointing units with triazole linkers, a series of chimeric oligonucleotides was prepared by utilizing the well-established phosphoramidite method for the elongation. The series of chimeric 21-mer oligonucleotides that possessed the triazole linker at different strands and positions allowed for a screening study of the RNA interference to clarify the preference of the triazole modifications in small-interfering RNA molecules.

  9. Solid-phase synthesis of 2{sup '}-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides using dimeric phosphoramidate blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Gi Weon; Kang, Yong Han [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This research focused on the method of using dimeric phosphoramidite blocks to synthesize oligonucleotides for development as oligonucleotide drugs. A 16-mer oligonucleotide with the randomly selected sequence of C*C*T*C*G*C *T*C*T*C*G*C*C* C*G*C was synthesized using CC, GC, and TC dimers, a combination of monomers and dimers, or only monomers as building blocks. Using dimer blocks in this synthetic method provided a significant decrease in critical impurities that had similar properties to the main product, which was confirmed by LC-MS and HPLC analysis.

  10. Hydrogel-based protein and oligonucleotide microchips on metal-coated surfaces: enhancement of fluorescence and optimization of immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubtsova, Zh I; Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Stomakhin, A A; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S; Rubina, A Yu

    2009-10-26

    Manufacturing of hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates significantly enhances fluorescent signals upon binding of labeled target molecules. This observation holds true for both oligonucleotide and protein microchips. When Cy5 is used as fluorophore, this enhancement is 8-10-fold in hemispherical gel elements and 4-5-fold in flattened gel pads, as compared with similar microchips manufactured on uncoated glass slides. The effect also depends on the hydrophobicity of metal-coated substrate and on the presence of a layer of liquid over the gel pads. The extent of enhancement is insensitive to the nature of formed complexes and immobilized probes and remains linear within a wide range of fluorescence intensities. Manufacturing of gel-based protein microarrays on metal-coated substrates improves their sensitivity using the same incubation time for immunoassay. Sandwich immunoassay using these microchips allows shortening the incubation time without loss of sensitivity. Unlike microchips with probes immobilized directly on a surface, for which the plasmon mechanism is considered responsible for metal-enhanced fluorescence, the enhancement effect observed using hydrogel-based microchips on metal-coated substrates might be explained within the framework of geometric optics.

  11. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  12. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  13. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  14. [Transfection of hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro with (99)Tc(m)-labeled antisense miR208b oligonucleotide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Feng, Huijuan; Ou, Yangwei; Sun, Yungang; Wu, Juqing; Chen, Pan

    2015-08-01

    To test the efficiency of transfecting (99)Tc(m)-labeled anti-miR208b oligonucleotide into early hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro. The anti-oligonucleotide targeting miR208b (AMO) was synthesized and modified with LNA followed by conjugation with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl S-acetyl-meraptoacetyl triglycine (NHS-MAG3) and radiolabeling with (99)Tc(m). NHS-MAG3-LNA-AMO and labeled AMO were purified with Sep-Pak C18 column chromatography, and the former was examined for UV absorption at the 260 nm using Gene Quant DNA/RNA calculator. The labeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability and molecular hybridization activity were analyzed. An angiotensin II-induced cell model of hypertrophic cardiac myocytes was transfected with (99)Tc(m)-NHS-MAG3-LNA-AMO via liposome, and the relative expression of miRNA208b and retention ratio of the labeled AMO in early hypertrophic cells were determined. The labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of the labeled AMO after purification exceeded 84% and 86%, respectively. The radio- chemical purities of the labeled AMO incubated in serum and normal saline for 12 h were both higher than 80%, and the labeled AMO showed a capacity to hybridize with the target gene. In the hypertrophic model of cardiac myocytes, the retention ratio of labeled AMO at 6 h was higher than 20%. The (99)Tc(m)-labeled antisense probe can be efficiently transfected into hypertrophic cardiac myocytes in vitro, which provides an experimental basis for subsequent radionuclide imaging studies.

  15. Screening the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Patients with Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis by Oligonucleotide-Based Custom DNA Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early screening of individuals considered to be at risk for severe internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis is an important strategy for preventing ischemic cerebral stroke. The purpose of this study is to screening candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with severe ICA stenosis using a newly developed oligonucleotide-based custom DNA array. The subjects consisted of 47 controls and 46 patients with severe ICA stenosis (70% who underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Subjects gave informed consent and we obtained samples of blood and genomic DNA. We studied 8 candidate genes: renin-angiotensin system [angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1, nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3]; growth factor [hepatocyte growth factor (HGF]; transgelin (SM22; cytokine [chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2]; coagulation-fibrinolysis system [5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR]; and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1. Genotyping of candidate SNPs was done with a line probe assay (LiPA based on an oligonucleotide-based DNA array. Results: The allele frequency of PAI-1 –1965 delG (odds ratio (OR, 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.2–0.6 and MTHFR (OR 1.3, 95% CI, 1.0–1.5 were significantly different between controls and cases with ICA stenosis by Fisher’s exact test. Multiple logistic analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM, SNPs in PAI-1 –1965 delG and MTHFR were an independent risk for ICA stenosis. In conclusion, genetic factors of coagulation-fibrinolysis as well as diabetes mellitus (DM were relevant in ICA stenosis.

  16. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  17. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-05

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  18. Conjugation with receptor-targeted histidine-rich peptides enhances the pharmacological effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Juliano, Rudy

    2014-01-15

    Ineffective delivery to intracellular sites of action is one of the key limitations to the use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Here, we describe molecular scale antisense oligonucleotide conjugates that bind selectively to a cell surface receptor, are internalized, and then partially escape from nonproductive endosomal locations to reach their sites of action in the nucleus. Peptides that include bombesin sequences for receptor targeting and a run of histidine residues for endosomal disruption were covalently linked to a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide. The conjugates were tested for their ability to correct splicing and up-regulate expression of a luciferase reporter in prostate cancer cells that express the bombesin receptor. We found that trivalent conjugates that included both the targeting sequence and several histidine residues were substantially more effective than conjugates containing only the bombesin or histidine moieties. This demonstrates the potential of creating molecular scale oligonucleotide conjugates with both targeting and endosome escape capabilities.

  19. Chemically robust fluoroalkyl phthalocyanine-oligonucleotide bioconjugates and their GRP78 oncogene photocleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pradeepkumar; Patel, Hemantbhai H; Borland, Emily; Gorun, Sergiu M; Sabatino, David

    2014-06-18

    The first representative of functionalized fluoroalkyl phthalocyanines, F48H7(COOH)PcZn, is reported. The complex generates (1)O2 affording long-lasting photooxidation of an external substrate without self-decomposition. The carboxylic group couples with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting GRP78 oncogenes, resulting in the F48H7PcZn-cancer targeting oligonucleotide (CTO). The bioconjugated fluorophthalocyanine effectively hybridizes complementary GRP78 DNA and mRNA sequences. Piperidine cleavage assays reveal desired photochemical oligonucleotide oxidative degradation for both F48H7PcZn-CTO:DNA and F48H7PcZn-CTO:mRNA hybrids. This new materials strategy could be extended to other functional fluorinated phthalocyanines-antisense oligonucleotide combinations for long-lasting oncogene-targeting photodynamic therapy.

  20. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors for in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Il Young; Lee, Eun Hee; Suh, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-04-01

    Oligonucleotide-based biosensors have drawn much attention because of their broad applications in in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection. They are particularly of interest to many researchers because of their high specificity as well as excellent sensitivity. Recently, oligonucleotide-based biosensors have been used to achieve not only genetic detection of targets but also the detection of small molecules, peptides, and proteins. This has further broadened the applications of these sensors in the medical and health care industry. In this review, we highlight various examples of oligonucleotide-based biosensors for the detection of diseases, drugs, and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Each example is provided with detailed schematics of the detection mechanism in addition to the supporting experimental results. Furthermore, future perspectives and new challenges in oligonucleotide-based biosensors are discussed.

  1. Exploiting Protected Maleimides to Modify Oligonucleotides, Peptides and Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Paris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  2. Nucleoside, nucleotide and oligonucleotide based amphiphiles: a successful marriage of nucleic acids with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissot, Arnaud; Camplo, Michel; Grinstaff, Mark W; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2008-04-21

    Amphiphilic molecules based on nucleosides, nucleotides and oligonucleotides are finding more and more biotechnological applications. This Perspective highlights their synthesis, supramolecular organization as well as their applications in the field of biotechnology.

  3. Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides using artificial neural network and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiun-Ching

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides (oligos is a computationally-intensive task and is a requirement for designing microarray probes, primers, and siRNAs. An artificial neural network (ANN is a machine learning technique that can effectively process complex and high noise data. Here, ANNs are applied to process the unique subsequence distribution for prediction of specific oligos. Results We present a novel and efficient algorithm, named the integration of ANN and BLAST (IAB algorithm, to identify specific oligos. We establish the unique marker database for human and rat gene index databases using the hash table algorithm. We then create the input vectors, via the unique marker database, to train and test the ANN. The trained ANN predicted the specific oligos with high efficiency, and these oligos were subsequently verified by BLAST. To improve the prediction performance, the ANN over-fitting issue was avoided by early stopping with the best observed error and a k-fold validation was also applied. The performance of the IAB algorithm was about 5.2, 7.1, and 6.7 times faster than the BLAST search without ANN for experimental results of 70-mer, 50-mer, and 25-mer specific oligos, respectively. In addition, the results of polymerase chain reactions showed that the primers predicted by the IAB algorithm could specifically amplify the corresponding genes. The IAB algorithm has been integrated into a previously published comprehensive web server to support microarray analysis and genome-wide iterative enrichment analysis, through which users can identify a group of desired genes and then discover the specific oligos of these genes. Conclusion The IAB algorithm has been developed to construct SpecificDB, a web server that provides a specific and valid oligo database of the probe, siRNA, and primer design for the human genome. We also demonstrate the ability of the IAB algorithm to predict specific oligos through

  4. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  5. Development of peptide nucleic acid probes for detection of the HER2 oncogene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhu Metaferia

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes.

  6. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  7. Sheath liquid effects in capillary high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry of oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C G; Krajete, A

    2000-02-18

    Fused-silica capillary columns of 200 microm inner diameter were packed with micropellicular, octadecylated, 2.3 microm poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles and applied to the separation of oligonucleotides by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Oligonucleotides were eluted at 50 degrees C with gradients of 3-13% acetonitrile in 50 mM triethylammonium bicarbonate. Addition of sheath liquid to the column effluent allowed the detection of oligonucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using full-scan data acquisition with a detectability comparable to that obtained with UV detection. The signal-to-noise ratios with different sheath liquids increased in the order isopropanololigonucleotides longer than 20 nucleotide units whereas no significant effect was observed with shorter oligonucleotides. Organic acids and bases in the sheath liquid generally deteriorated the signal-to-noise ratios in the chromatograms and mass spectra mainly because of increased background noise. Only a few charge states were observed in the mass spectra of oligonucleotides because of charge state reduction due to the presence of carbonic acid in the eluent. With triethylammonium hydrogencarbonate as chromatographic eluent and acetonitrile as sheath liquid, very few cation adducts of oligonucleotides were observed in the mass spectra. However, the presence of small amounts of monopotassium adducts enabled the calculation of the charge state of multiply charged ions. With acetonitrile as sheath liquid, 710 amol of a 16-mer oligonucleotide were detected using selected ion monitoring data acquisition with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. Finally, capillary ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was

  8. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  9. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  10. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-05-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours.

  11. Enzymic synthesis of oligonucleotides containing methylphosphonate internucleotide linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, H; Endo, T; Kaji, A

    1990-09-18

    Thymidine 5'-O-(pyrophosphoryl methylphosphonate) (dTTP alpha CH3) has been chemically synthesized by condensation of thymidine 5'-O-(methylphosphonate) with pyrophosphate. This novel nucleotide, which contained an alpha-phosphorus atom as methylphosphonate, was used as a substrate of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TDTase) in the presence of oligonucleotide (5'-GCTGTATCGTCAAGGCACTC-3') as an initiator. The reaction products were separated into two components by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). These products were, after purification, digested with nuclease P1 and alkaline phosphatase followed by separation of digested products by RP-HPLC. The result showed the presence of one of the isomers of 2'-deoxycytidyl-3'-methylphosphonyl-5'-thymidine (dCpCH3T) and 2'-deoxycytidyl-3'-methylphosphonyl-5'-thymidyl-3'-methyl phosphonyl-5'-thymidin e (dCpCH3TpCH3T), respectively. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of these products further supported identification of the dinucleotide and the trinucleotide. These results indicated that dTTP alpha CH3 was used as a substrate of TDTase, resulting in methylphosphonate linkages. Produced oligomers were resistant to hydrolysis by snake venom phosphodiesterase I.

  12. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  13. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Canello

    Full Text Available Silencing of O(6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1 within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN. Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  14. Nanoexplosive gene therapy using triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eun Jung; Min, Hye Jung; Choe, Jae Gol; Park, Gil Hong; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFO) labeled with Auger emitter could be ideal vehicles for delivering radiation energy to specific DNA sequences, and followed by double-stranded DNA breaks and subsequent inactivation of targeted genes. We designed TFOs targeting the selected DNA fragments (i.e., estrogen receptors and N-myc promoter) and labeled with {sup 125}I and {sup 111}In. Various Cancer cells, e.g., MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), MCF-10A (immortalized breast cells), Jurkat (T-cell leukemia), ARO (thyroid cancer), SNU-449 (Colon Caner), and HL-60 (polymyelocytic leukemia), were prepared and treated with radiolabeled TFO for 24 h. After the incubation, subcellular fractions (i.e., cell nucleus, cytoplasm and cultured medium) were collected and measured radioactivity by a gamma scintillation counter, respectively. The mean value of % injected dose for each fraction was ranged as follows: nucleus, 4.4-20%; cytoplasm, 8.2-29%; and medium, 64-87%. Therefore, we speculated that TFO labeled with Auger emitter could be a next-generation therapeutic tool in nanoexplosive gene therapy.

  15. Efficient in vivo delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Wenying; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Nishina, Tomoko; Sakata, Mina; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2013-03-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) is present on the ventricular walls of the brain, produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains many blood vessels, and is a major functional component of the blood-CSF barrier. The CP is an important site in the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and meningeal amyloidosis. We performed gene silencing in the CP in vivo by using an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). A short ASO of length 12 nucleotides was intravenously injected into rats. The ASO was not delivered to neurons or glia in the central nervous system, but was successfully delivered into the CP, and resulted in a significant reduction of endogenous target gene expression in epithelial cells within the CP. Although the mechanism of uptake of the ASO by the CP was not elucidated, the ASO bound to albumin in vivo, and the distribution of ASO delivery was similar to that of albumin delivery. These findings suggest that we inhibited target gene expression in the epithelial cells of the CP via albumin-ASO conjugates. This strategy should be useful for investigations of the function of CP, and for the development of new gene-silencing therapies for diseases with pathophysiology related to the CP.

  16. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canello, Tamar; Ovadia, Haim; Refael, Miri; Zrihan, Daniel; Siegal, Tali; Lavon, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1) within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA) modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN). Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  17. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences.

  18. Kinetic Hairpin Oligonucleotide Blockers for Selective Amplification of Rare Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanwei; Sanchez, J. Aquiles; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of rare mutant alleles in an excess of wild type alleles is increasingly important in cancer diagnosis. Several methods for selective amplification of a mutant allele via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported, but each of these methods has its own limitations. A common problem is that Taq DNA polymerase errors early during amplification generate false positive mutations which also accumulate exponentially. In this paper, we described a novel method using hairpin oligonucleotide blockers that can selectively inhibit the amplification of wild type DNA during LATE-PCR amplification. LATE-PCR generates double-stranded DNA exponentially followed by linear amplification of single-stranded DNA. The efficiency of the blocker is optimized by adjusting the LATE-PCR temperature cycling profile. We also demonstrate that it is possible to minimize false positive signals caused by Taq DNA polymerase errors by using a mismatched excess primer plus a modified PCR profile to preferentially enrich for mutant target sequences prior to the start of the exponential phase of LATE-PCR amplification. In combination these procedures permit amplification of specific KRAS mutations in the presence of more than 10,000 fold excess of wild type DNA without false positive signals. PMID:25082368

  19. The development of bioactive triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael M; Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Alam, Rowshon

    2005-11-01

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-conjugated TFOs containing 2'-O-methyl (2'OMe) and 2'-O-aminoethoxy (AE) ribose substitutions. TFOs with a cluster of 3-4 AE residues, with all other sugars as 2'OMe, were bioactive in a gene knockout assay in mammalian cells. In contrast, TFOs with one or two clustered, or three dispersed, AE residues were inactive. Thermal stability analysis of the triplexes indicated that there were only incremental differences between the active and inactive TFOs. However the active and inactive TFOs could be distinguished by their association kinetics. The bioactive TFOs showed markedly greater on-rates than the inactive TFOs. It appears that the on-rate is a better predictor of TFO bioactivity than thermal stability. Our data are consistent with a model in which a cluster of 3-4 AE residues stabilizes the nucleation event that precedes formation of a complete triplex. It is likely that triplexes in cells are much less stable than triplexes in vitro probably as a result of elution by chromatin-associated translocases and helicases. Consequently the biologic assay will favor TFOs that can bind and rebind genomic targets quickly.

  20. Effect of oligonucleotide primers in determining viral variability within hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variability in viral populations is usually estimated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR based methods in which the relative abundance of each amplicon is assumed to be proportional to the frequency of the corresponding template in the initial sample. Although bias in template-to-product ratios has been described before, its relevance in describing viral genetic variability at the intrapatient level has not been fully assessed yet. Results To investigate the role of oligonucleotide design in estimating viral variability within hosts, genetic diversity in hepatitis C virus (HCV populations from eight infected patients was characterised by two parallel PCR amplifications performed with two slightly different sets of primers, followed by cloning and sequencing (mean = 89 cloned sequences per patient. Population genetics analyses of viral populations recovered by pairs of amplifications revealed that in seven patients statistically significant differences were detected between populations sampled with different set of primers. Conclusions Genetic variability analyses demonstrates that PCR selection due to the choice of primers, differing in their degeneracy degree at some nucleotide positions, can eclipse totally or partially viral variants, hence yielding significant different estimates of viral variability within a single patient and therefore eventually producing quite different qualitative and quantitative descriptions of viral populations within each host.

  1. Advantages of ion-exchange chromatography for oligonucleotide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ken; Thayer, Jim

    2011-05-01

    The rapid development of therapeutic oligonucleotides (ONs) has created a need for in-depth characterization of ONs, beyond previous requirements. The natural migration to LC-MS requires the use of chromatography with MS-compatible eluents to introduce the large, highly charged biopolymers into the mass spectrometer. Most frequently this employs ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography, which may leave gaps in the characterization, but these can be filled with the use of high-resolution ion-exchange chromatography. Several classes of isobaric isomers are among the impurities that will require further separation prior to MS analysis. This review shows how the use of ion exchange as an additional orthogonal analytical method can be used as standalone or interfaced with MS to achieve the highest possible analytical coverage in the characterization and quantification of impurities present in single- and double-stranded ON formulations. Some of these techniques have been in use for some time and the importance of others is just being recognized.

  2. Porous silicon-cell penetrating peptide hybrid nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytkönen, Jussi; Arukuusk, Piret; Xu, Wujun; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Langel, Ulo; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Närvänen, Ale

    2014-02-01

    The largest obstacle to the use of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents is the delivery of these large and negatively charged biomolecules through cell membranes into intracellular space. Mesoporous silicon (PSi) is widely recognized as a potential material for drug delivery purposes due to its several beneficial features like large surface area and pore volume, high loading capacity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In the present study, PSi nanoparticles stabilized by thermal oxidation or thermal carbonization and subsequently modified by grafting aminosilanes on the surface are utilized as an oligonucleotide carrier. Splice correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs), a model oligonucleotide drug, were loaded into the positively charged PSi nanoparticles with a loading degree as high as 14.3% (w/w). Rapid loading was achieved by electrostatic interactions, with the loading efficiencies reaching 100% within 5 min. The nanoparticles were shown to deliver and release SCOs, in its biologically active form, inside cells when formulated together with cell penetrating peptides (CPP). The biological effect was monitored with splice correction assay and confocal microscopy utilizing HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Furthermore, the use of PSi carrier platform in oligonucleotide delivery did not reduce the cell viability. Additionally, the SCO-CPP complexes formed in the pores of the carrier were stabilized against proteolytic digestion. The advantageous properties of protecting and releasing the cargo and the possibility to further functionalize the carrier surface make the hybrid nanoparticles a potential system for oligonucleotide delivery.

  3. Investigation of the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/antisense oligonucleotide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxel, Fernanda; Vilela, José Mario Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Malachias, Ângelo; Perez, Carlos A; Magalhães-Paniago, Rogério; Oliveira, Mônica Cristina; Teixeira, Helder F

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments were used to investigate the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes. Oligonucleotides targeting topoisomerase II gene were adsorbed on cationic nanoemulsions obtained by means of spontaneous emulsification procedure. Topographical analysis by atomic force microscopy allowed the observation of the nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes through three-dimensional high-resolution images. Flattening of the oil droplets was observed, which was reduced in the complexes obtained at high amount of adsorbed oligonucleotides. In such conditions, complexes exhibit droplet size in the 600nm range. The oligonucleotides molecules were detected on the surface of the droplets, preventing their fusion during aggregation. A lamellar structure organization was identified by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments. The presence of the nucleic acid molecules led to a disorganization of the lipid arrangement and an expansion in the lattice spacing, which was proportional to the amount of oligonucleotides added. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fragment-based solid-phase assembly of oligonucleotide conjugates with peptide and polyethylene glycol ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirin, Mehrdad; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R; Winkler, Johannes

    2016-10-04

    Ligand conjugation to oligonucleotides is an attractive strategy for enhancing the therapeutic potential of antisense and siRNA agents by inferring properties such as improved cellular uptake or better pharmacokinetic properties. Disulfide linkages enable dissociation of ligands and oligonucleotides in reducing environments found in endosomal compartments after cellular uptake. Solution-phase fragment coupling procedures for producing oligonucleotide conjugates are often tedious, produce moderate yields and reaction byproducts are frequently difficult to remove. We have developed an improved method for solid-phase coupling of ligands to oligonucleotides via disulfides directly after solid-phase synthesis. A 2'-thiol introduced using a modified nucleotide building block was orthogonally deprotected on the controlled pore glass solid support with N-butylphosphine. Oligolysine peptides and a short monodisperse ethylene glycol chain were successfully coupled to the deprotected thiol. Cleavage from the resin and full removal of oligonucleotide protection groups were achieved using methanolic ammonia. After standard desalting, and without further purification, homogenous conjugates were obtained as demonstrated by HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The attachment of both amphiphilic and cationic ligands proves the versatility of the conjugation procedure. An antisense oligonucleotide conjugate with hexalysine showed pronounced gene silencing in a cell culture tumor model in the absence of a transfection reagent and the corresponding ethylene glycol conjugate resulted in down regulation of the target gene to nearly 50% after naked application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The small molecule Retro-1 enhances the pharmacological actions of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Fisher, Michael; Noel, Romain; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Barbier, Julien; Cao, Canhong; Bauman, John; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2013-04-01

    The attainment of strong pharmacological effects with oligonucleotides is hampered by inefficient access of these molecules to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Attempts to address this problem with lipid or polymeric delivery systems have been only partially successful. Here, we describe a novel alternative approach involving the use of a non-toxic small molecule to enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides. The compound Retro-1 was discovered in a screen for small molecules that reduce the actions of bacterial toxins and has been shown to block the retrograde trafficking pathway. We demonstrate that Retro-1 can also substantially enhance the effectiveness of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. This effect occurs at the level of intracellular trafficking or processing and is correlated with increased oligonucleotide accumulation in the nucleus but does not involve the perturbation of lysosomal compartments. We also show that Retro-1 can alter the effectiveness of splice switching oligonucleotides in the in vivo setting. These observations indicate that it is possible to enhance the pharmacological actions of oligonucleotides using non-toxic and non-lysosomotropic small molecule adjuncts.

  6. Oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Zhong Wang; Guo-Xiang Wu; Li-Bo Luo; Min Chen; Li-Hua Ruan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: Mixture of samples with different genotypes and clinical serum samples from 126 chronic hepatitis B patients was tested for hepatitis B virus genotypes by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing of PCR products, respectively. Clinical performances, time required and costs of the three assays were evaluated.RESULTS: Oligonucleotide chips and real-time PCR detected 1% and 0.1% genotypes, respectively, in mixed samples. Of the 126 clinical samples from patients with chronic hepatitis B, genotype B was detected in 41(33%), 41 (33%) and 45 (36%) samples, and genotype C in 76 (60%), 76 (60%) and 81 (64%) samples, by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing,respectively. Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR detected mixed genotypes B and C in 9 samples. Realtime PCR was the rapidest and cheapest among the three assays.CONCLUSION: Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR are able to detect mixed genotypes, while sequencing only detects the dominant genotype in clinical samples.

  7. Conceptual "Heat-Driven" approach to the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides on microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajkowski, A; Cieślak, J; Chmielewski, M K; Marchán, V; Phillips, L R; Wilk, A; Beaucage, S L

    2003-12-01

    The discovery of deoxyribonucleoside cyclic N-acylphosphoramidites, a novel class of phosphoramidite monomers for solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, has led to the development of a number of phosphate protecting groups that can be cleaved from DNA oligonucleotides under thermolytic neutral conditions. These include the 2-(N-formyl-N-methyl)aminoethyl, 4-oxopentyl, 3-(N-tert-butyl)carboxamido-1-propyl, 3-(2-pyridyl)-1-propyl, 2-[N-methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)]aminoethyl, and 4-methythiobutyl groups. When used for 5'-hydroxyl protection of nucleosides, the analogous 1-phenyl-2-[N-methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)]aminoethyloxycarbonyl group exhibited excellent thermolytic properties, which may permit an iterative "heat-driven" synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides on microarrays. In this regard, progress has been made toward the use of deoxyribonucleoside cyclic N-acylphosphoramidites in solid-phase oligonucleotide syntheses without nucleobase protection. Given that deoxyribonucleoside cyclic N-acylphosphoramidites produce oligonucleotides with heat-sensitive phosphate protecting groups, blocking the 5'-hydroxyl of these monomers with, for example, the thermolabile 1-phenyl-2-[N-methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)]aminoethyloxycarbonyl group may provide a convenient thermo-controlled method for the synthesis of oligonucleotides on microarrays.

  8. Strategies in the preparation of DNA oligonucleotide arrays for diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, S L

    2001-08-01

    This report emphasizes the interfacial chemistry that is required to ensure proper attachment of oligonucleotides onto the surface of microarrays. For example, strategies for the covalent attachment of pre-synthesized oligonucleotides to glass slides, gold films, polyacrylamide gel pads, polypyrrole films, and optical fibers are surveyed in an attempt to better define the parameters for optimal formation and detection of DNA hybrids. These parameters include among others, the nature and length of the linkers attaching oligonucleotides to the arrays, and the surface density of oligonucleotides required for unhindered hybridization with DNA targets. Sensitive detection methods such as the use of light-scattering techniques, molecular beacons, surface plasmon resonance, attenuated total internal reflection-FTIR, and the evanescent field excitation of fluorescence from surface-bound fluorophores have been developed to study the kinetics and specificity of hybridization events. Finally, the synthesis of oligonucleotides directly on glass surfaces and polypropylene sheets has been investigated to enable DNA sequencing by hybridization and achieve oligonucleotide densities of ca. 10(6) sequences per cm(2) on DNA chips.

  9. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  10. Identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by the oligonucleotide ligation reaction: a DNA biosensor for simultaneous visual detection of both alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Flordellis, Christodoulos S

    2009-01-01

    Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be identified by direct hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes, enzyme-based genotyping methods offer much higher specificity and robustness. Among enzymatic methods, the oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR) offers the highest specificity for allele discrimination because two hybridization events are required for ligation. We report the development of a DNA biosensor that offers significant advantages over currently available methods for detection of OLR products: It allows simultaneous visual discrimination of both alleles using a single ligation reaction. Detection is complete within minutes without the need for any specialized instruments. It does not involve multiple cycles of incubation and washing. The dry-reagent format minimizes the pipetting steps. The need for qualified personnel is much lower than current methods. The principle of the assay is as follows: Following PCR amplification, a single OLR is performed using a biotinylated common probe and two allele-specific probes labeled with the haptens digoxigenin and fluorescein. Ligation products corresponding to the normal and mutant allele are double-labeled with biotin and either digoxigenin or fluorescein, respectively. The products are captured by antidigoxigenin or antifluorescein antibodies, or both, that are immobilized at the two test zones of the biosensor and react with antibiotin-functionalized gold nanoparticle reporters. The excess nanoparticles bind to biotinylated albumin that is immobilized at the control zone of the biosensor. The genotype is assigned by the characteristic red lines that appear at the two test zones. The proposed DNA biosensor constitutes a significant step toward point-of-care SNP genotyping.

  11. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  12. DNA sequence analysis by hybridization with oligonucleotide microchips : MALDI mass spectrometry identification of 5mers contiguously stacked to microchip oligonucleotides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomakhin, A. A.; Vasiliskov, V. A.; Timofeev, E.; Schulga, D.; Cotter, R. J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology; Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab.; Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been applied to increase the informational output from DNA sequence analysis. It has been used to analyze DNA by hybridization with microarrays of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides extended with stacked 5mers. In model experiments, a 28 nt long DNA fragment was hybridized with 10 immobilized, overlapping 8mers. Then, in a second round of hybridization DNA-8mer duplexes were hybridized with a mixture of 10 5mers. The stability of the 5mer complex with DNA was increased to raise the melting temperature of the duplex by 10-15{sup o}C as a result of stacking interaction with 8mers. Contiguous 13 bp duplexes containing an internal break were formed. MALDI MS identified one or, in some cases, two 5mers contiguously stacked to each DNA-8mer duplex formed on the microchip. Incorporating a mass label into 5mers optimized MALDI MS monitoring. This procedure enabled us to reconstitute the sequence of a model DNA fragment and identify polymorphic nucleotides. The application of MALDI MS identification of contiguously stacked 5mers to increase the length of DNA for sequence analysis is discussed.

  13. Diffusion of Oligonucleotides from within Iron-Crosslinked Polyelectrolyte-Modified Alginate Beads: A Model System for Drug Release

    CERN Document Server

    Privman, Vladimir; Luz, Roberto A S; Guz, Nataliia; Glasser, M Lawrence; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We developed and experimentally verified an analytical model to describe diffusion of oligonucleotides from stable hydrogel beads. The synthesized alginate beads are Fe3+-cross-linked as well as polyelectrolyte-doped for uniformity and stability at physiological pH. Data on diffusion of oligonucleotides from inside the beads provide physical insights into the volume nature of the immobilization of a fraction of oligonucleotides due to polyelectrolyte cross-linking, i.e., the absence of the surface-layer barrier in this case. Furthermore, our results suggest a new simple approach to measuring the diffusion coefficient of the mobile oligonucleotide molecules inside hydrogel. The considered alginate beads provide a model for a well-defined component in drug release systems and for the oligonucleotide-release transduction steps in drug-delivering and biocomputing applications. This is illustrated by destabilizing the beads with citrate that induces full oligonucleotide release with non-diffusional kinetics.

  14. A Novel Family of Small Molecules that Enhance the Intracellular Delivery and Pharmacological Effectiveness of Antisense and Splice Switching Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Ariyarathna, Yamuna; Ming, Xin; Yang, Bing; James, Lindsey I; Kreda, Silvia M; Porter, Melissa; Janzen, William; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2017-08-18

    The pharmacological effectiveness of oligonucleotides has been hampered by their tendency to remain entrapped in endosomes, thus limiting their access to cytosolic or nuclear targets. We have previously reported a group of small molecules that enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by causing their release from endosomes. Here, we describe a second novel family of oligonucleotide enhancing compounds (OECs) that is chemically distinct from the compounds reported previously. We demonstrate that these molecules substantially augment the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in cell culture. We also find enhancement of SSO effects in a murine model. These new compounds act by increasing endosome permeability and causing partial release of entrapped oligonucleotides. While they also affect the permeability of lysosomes, they are clearly different from typical lysosomotropic agents. Current members of this compound family display a relatively narrow window between effective dose and toxic dose. Thus, further improvements are necessary before these agents can become suitable for therapeutic use.

  15. Profiled support vector machines for antisense oligonucleotide efficacy prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Guerrero José D

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs for prediction and analysis of antisense oligonucleotide (AO efficacy. The collected database comprises 315 AO molecules including 68 features each, inducing a problem well-suited to SVMs. The task of feature selection is crucial given the presence of noisy or redundant features, and the well-known problem of the curse of dimensionality. We propose a two-stage strategy to develop an optimal model: (1 feature selection using correlation analysis, mutual information, and SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE, and (2 AO prediction using standard and profiled SVM formulations. A profiled SVM gives different weights to different parts of the training data to focus the training on the most important regions. Results In the first stage, the SVM-RFE technique was most efficient and robust in the presence of low number of samples and high input space dimension. This method yielded an optimal subset of 14 representative features, which were all related to energy and sequence motifs. The second stage evaluated the performance of the predictors (overall correlation coefficient between observed and predicted efficacy, r; mean error, ME; and root-mean-square-error, RMSE using 8-fold and minus-one-RNA cross-validation methods. The profiled SVM produced the best results (r = 0.44, ME = 0.022, and RMSE= 0.278 and predicted high (>75% inhibition of gene expression and low efficacy (http://aosvm.cgb.ki.se/. Conclusions The SVM approach is well suited to the AO prediction problem, and yields a prediction accuracy superior to previous methods. The profiled SVM was found to perform better than the standard SVM, suggesting that it could lead to improvements in other prediction problems as well.

  16. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  17. Liposome-coated lipoplex-based carrier for antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrozumska, Paulina; Meissner, Justyna; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Szarawarska, Marta; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Ugorski, Maciej; Walasek, Marta A; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-01-01

    The chemical nature of genetic drugs (e.g. antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA, vectors) requires a suitable carrier system to protect them from enzymatic degradation without changing their properties and enable efficient delivery into target cells. Lipid vectors for nucleic acid delivery that have been widely investigated for years can be very effective. As the majority of attempts made in the field of cancer gene therapy have focused on solid tumors, while blood cancer cells have attracted less attention, the latter became the subject of our investigation. The lipid carrier proposed here is based on liposomes constructed by others but the lipid composition is original. A liposome-coated lipoplex (L-cL) consists of a core arising from complexation of positively charged lipid and negatively charged oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) or plasmid DNA coated by a neutral or anionic lipid bilayer. Moreover, our lipid vector demonstrates size stability and is able to retain a high content of enclosed plasmid DNA or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asODNs). Observed transfection efficacies of the tested preparation using a plasmid coding for fluorescent protein were up to 60-85% of examined leukemia cells (Jurkat T and HL-60 lines) in the absence or the presence of serum. When BCL‑2 asODN was encapsulated in the L-cL, specific silencing of this gene product at both the mRNA and protein level and also a markedly decreased cell survival rate were observed in vitro. Moreover, biodistribution analysis in mice indicates prolonged circulation characteristic for PEG-modified liposomal carriers. Experiments on tumor-engrafted animals indicate substantial inhibition of tumor growth.

  18. Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Giovanni; Neurath, Markus F; Ardizzone, Sandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Fantini, Massimo C; Castiglione, Fabiana; Scribano, Maria L; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Caprioli, Flavio; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Rogai, Francesca; Vecchi, Maurizio; Atreya, Raja; Bossa, Fabrizio; Onali, Sara; Fichera, Maria; Corazza, Gino R; Biancone, Livia; Savarino, Vincenzo; Pica, Roberta; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Crohn's disease-related inflammation is characterized by reduced activity of the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) due to high levels of SMAD7, an inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Preclinical studies and a phase 1 study have shown that an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, mongersen, targets ileal and colonic SMAD7. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we evaluated the efficacy of mongersen for the treatment of persons with active Crohn's disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10, 40, or 160 mg of mongersen or placebo per day for 2 weeks. The primary outcomes were clinical remission at day 15, defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of less than 150, with maintenance of remission for at least 2 weeks, and the safety of mongersen treatment. A secondary outcome was clinical response (defined as a reduction of 100 points or more in the CDAI score) at day 28. The proportions of patients who reached the primary end point were 55% and 65% for the 40-mg and 160-mg mongersen groups, respectively, as compared with 10% for the placebo group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants reaching clinical remission between the 10-mg group (12%) and the placebo group. The rate of clinical response was significantly greater among patients receiving 10 mg (37%), 40 mg (58%), or 160 mg (72%) of mongersen than among those receiving placebo (17%) (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). Most adverse events were related to complications and symptoms of Crohn's disease. We found that study participants with Crohn's disease who received mongersen had significantly higher rates of remission and clinical response than those who received placebo. (Funded by Giuliani; EudraCT number, 2011-002640-27.).

  19. Application of heteronuclear couplings to conformational analysis of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Live, D. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bax, A. [NIDDK National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The value of vicinal coupling constants extracted from NMR spectra in deducing torsion angles for conformational analysis is well recognized. Due to the abundance of protons, their couplings have been mostly widely used. In many instances, couplings between protons and other nuclei may be a valuable complement to proton-proton couplings or, in some instances, may be the only coupling available to characterize the torsion angle about a bond. Recently, heteronuclear couplings have been used to great benefit in studies of isotopically enriched proteins, and this general approach has been extended to peptides at natural abundance. The possibility of using this approach to study oligonucleotides is also attractive but has not as yet been widely exploited. With the development of strategies for labeling such molecules, particularly RNAs, this may become an important component in conformational analysis. For DNA, labeling is less accessible, but sufficient quantities of unlabeled material are readily available for measuring these couplings at natural abundance. We chose several DNA systems to explore the usefulness of heteronuclear couplings in addressing the sugar conformation and the glycosidic torsion angle. Intensities of cross peaks in long-range HMQC experiments can be related to the couplings. Crosspeaks involving H1{prime} and C1{prime} atoms have been emphasized because of the superior shift dispersion at these positions between sugar protons and carbon atoms. Results will be shown for the self-complementary Dickerson duplex dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and for d(GGTCGG), which dimerizes to form a G-tetrad structure incorporating both syn and anti base orientations. The couplings provide a clear discrimination between presence of C3{prime}-endo and C2{prime}-endo conformations of the sugars and syn and anti bases arrangements.

  20. LINE-1 repetitive DNA probes for species-specific cloning from Mus spretus and Mus domesticus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikke, B A; Hardies, S C

    1991-12-01

    Mus domesticus and Mus spretus mice are closely related subspecies. For genetic investigations involving hybrid mice, we have developed a set of species-specific oligonucleotide probes based on the detection of LINE-1 sequence differences. LINE-1 is a repetitive DNA family whose many members are interspersed among the genes. In this study, library screening experiments were used to fully characterize the species specificity of four M. domesticus LINE-1 probes and three M. spretus LINE-1 probes. It was found that the nucleotide differences detected by the probes define large, species-specific subfamilies. We show that collaborative use of such probes can be employed to selectively detect thousands of species-specific library clones. Consequently, these probes could be exploited to monitor and access almost any given species-specific region of interest within hybrid genomes.

  1. Animal Viruses Probe dataset (AVPDS) for microarray-based diagnosis and identification of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Vasishtha, Dinesh P; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-03-01

    AVPDS (Animal Viruses Probe dataset) is a dataset of virus-specific and conserve oligonucleotides for identification and diagnosis of viruses infecting animals. The current dataset contain 20,619 virus specific probes for 833 viruses and their subtypes and 3,988 conserved probes for 146 viral genera. Dataset of virus specific probe has been divided into two fields namely virus name and probe sequence. Similarly conserved probes for virus genera table have genus, and subgroup within genus name and probe sequence. The subgroup within genus is artificially divided subgroups with no taxonomic significance and contains probes which identifies viruses in that specific subgroup of the genus. Using this dataset we have successfully diagnosed the first case of Newcastle disease virus in sheep and reported a mixed infection of Bovine viral diarrhea and Bovine herpesvirus in cattle. These dataset also contains probes which cross reacts across species experimentally though computationally they meet specifications. These probes have been marked. We hope that this dataset will be useful in microarray-based detection of viruses. The dataset can be accessed through the link https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/94060831/avpds/HOME.html.

  2. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  3. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Pawel Bialk; Brett Sansbury; Natalia Rivera-Torres; Kevin Bloh; Dula Man; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRIS...

  4. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Pawel Bialk; Brett Sansbury; Natalia Rivera-Torres; Kevin Bloh; Dula Man; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRIS...

  5. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  6. LNA probes substantially improve the detection of bacterial endosymbionts in whole mount of insects by fluorescent in-situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Natarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of unculturable bacteria and their localization in the host, by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH, is a powerful technique in the study of host-bacteria interaction. FISH probes are designed to target the 16 s rRNA region of the bacteria to be detected. LNA probes have recently been used in FISH studies and proven to be more efficient. To date no report has employed LNA probes for FISH detection of bacterial endosymbiont in the whole mount tissues. Further, though speculated, bacteriocytes have not been reported from males of Bemisia tabaci. Results In this study, we compared the efficiency in detecting bacteria by fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides versus modified probes containing Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA substitution in their structure. We used the insect Bemisia tabaci as the experimental material since it carried simultaneous infection by two bacteria: one a primary endosymbiont, Portiera (and present in more numbers while the other a secondary endosymbiont Arsenophonus (and present in less numbers. Thus a variation in the abundance of bacteria was expected. While detecting both the bacteria, we found a significant increase in the signal whenever LNA probes were used. However, the difference was more pronounced in detecting the secondary endosymbiont, wherein DNA probes gave weak signals when compared to LNA probes. Also, signal to noise ratio for LNA probes was higher than DNA probes. We found that LNA considerably improved sensitivity of FISH, as compared to the commonly used DNA oligonucleotide probe. Conclusion By employing LNA probes we could detect endosymbiotic bacteria in males, which have never been reported previously. We were able to detect bacteriocytes containing Portiera and Arsenophonus in the males of B. tabaci. Thus, employing LNA probes at optimized conditions will help to significantly improve detection of bacteria at the lowest concentration and may give a comprehensible depiction

  7. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roh C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Changhyun RohDivision of Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, Jeongeup, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 µg mL–1, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.Keywords: SARS, RNA oligonucleotide, quantum dots, inhibitor, screening

  8. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, B.; Aslan, K. [Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, 1700 East Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials. Rapid surface modification of SNFs with oligonucleotides was carried out using two strategies (1) Strategy 1: for ss-oligonucleotides, surface hybridization and (2) Strategy 2: for ds-oligonucleotides, solution hybridization, where the samples were exposed to 10, 15, 30 and 60 seconds microwave heating. To assess the efficacy of our new rapid surface modification technique, identical experiments carried out without the microwave heating (i.e., conventional method), which requires 24 hours for the completion of the identical steps. It was found that SNFs can be modified with ss- and ds-oligonucleotides in 10 seconds, which typically requires several hours of incubation time for the chemisorption of thiol groups on to the planar metal surface using conventional techniques. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Novel Efficient Cell-Penetrating, Peptide-Mediated Strategy for Enhancing Telomerase Inhibitor Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Alarcón, Andrés; Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2015-12-01

    At present, there are several therapeutic approaches for targeting telomerase in tumors. One in particular, currently undergoing clinical trials, is based on synthetic lipid-modified oligonucleotide antagonists aimed at inhibiting the ribonucleoprotein subunit of human telomerase. However, while enabling efficient uptake, the lipid modifications reduce the potency of the therapeutic oligonucleotides compared to nonmodified oligonucleotides. Moreover, lipid modification may increase oligonucleotide accumulation in the liver causing undesirable hepatotoxicity. Noncovalent complexation strategies for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated delivery present an option to circumvent the need for potency-reducing modifications, while allowing for a highly efficient uptake, and could significantly improve the efficiency of telomerase-targeting cancer therapeutics. Delivery of a nonlipidated locked nucleic acid/2'-O-methyl mixmer significantly inhibits the telomerase activity in treated HeLa cells. The inhibitory effect was further improved through addition of a CPP. Furthermore, calculated IC50-values for the oligonucleotide delivered by CPPs into HeLa cells are more than 20 times lower than telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat, currently undergoing clinical trials. These results emphasize the potential of CPP-mediated delivery of future pharmaceuticals and provide means by which to enhance an already promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment.

  10. Aspects of oligonucleotide and peptide sequencing with MALDI and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, D R; Bothner, B; Phung, Q; Harris, K; Siuzdak, G

    1998-09-01

    Biopolymer sequencing with mass spectrometry has become increasingly important and accessible with the development of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). Here we examine the use of sequential digestion for the rapid identification of proteolytic fragments, in turn highlighting the general utility of enzymatic MALDI ladder sequencing and ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Analyses were performed on oligonucleotides ranging in size from 2 to 50 residues, on peptides ranging in size from 7 to 44 residues and on viral coat proteins. MALDI ladder sequencing using exonuclease digestion generated a uniform distribution of ions and provided complete sequence information on the oligonucleotides 2-30 nucleic acid residues long. Only partial sequence information was obtained on the longer oligonucleotides. C-terminal peptide ladder sequencing typically provided information from 4 to 7 amino acids into the peptide. Sequential digestion, or endoprotease followed by exoprotease exposure, was also successfully applied to a trypsin digest of viral proteins. Analysis of ladder sequenced peptides by LCMS generated less information than in the MALDI-MS analysis and ESI-MS2 normally provided partial sequence information on both the small oligonucleotides and peptides. In general, MALDI ladder sequencing offered information on a broader mass range of biopolymers than ESI-MS2 and was relatively straightforward to interpret, especially for oligonucleotides.

  11. Efficient gene silencing by delivery of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides, unassisted by transfection reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C A; Hansen, J Bo; Lai, Johnathan; Wu, SiJian; Voskresenskiy, Anatoliy; Høg, Anja; Worm, Jesper; Hedtjärn, Maj; Souleimanian, Naira; Miller, Paul; Soifer, Harris S; Castanotto, Daniella; Benimetskaya, Luba; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2010-01-01

    For the past 15-20 years, the intracellular delivery and silencing activity of oligodeoxynucleotides have been essentially completely dependent on the use of a delivery technology (e.g. lipofection). We have developed a method (called 'gymnosis') that does not require the use of any transfection reagent or any additives to serum whatsoever, but rather takes advantage of the normal growth properties of cells in tissue culture in order to promote productive oligonucleotide uptake. This robust method permits the sequence-specific silencing of multiple targets in a large number of cell types in tissue culture, both at the protein and mRNA level, at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Optimum results were obtained with locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate gap-mers. By appropriate manipulation of oligonucleotide dosing, this silencing can be continuously maintained with little or no toxicity for >240 days. High levels of oligonucleotide in the cell nucleus are not a requirement for gene silencing, contrary to long accepted dogma. In addition, gymnotic delivery can efficiently deliver oligonucleotides to suspension cells that are known to be very difficult to transfect. Finally, the pattern of gene silencing of in vitro gymnotically delivered oligonucleotides correlates particularly well with in vivo silencing. The establishment of this link is of particular significance to those in the academic research and drug discovery and development communities.

  12. Conjugates of Phthalocyanines With Oligonucleotides as Reagents for Sensitized or Catalytic DNA Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several conjugates of metallophthalocyanines with deoxyribooligonucleotides were synthesized to investigate sequence-specific modification of DNA by them. Oligonucleotide parts of these conjugates were responsible for the recognition of selected complementary sequences on the DNA target. Metallophthalocyanines were able to induce the DNA modification: phthalocyanines of Zn(II and Al(III were active as photosensitizers in the generation of singlet oxygen 1 O 2 , while phthalocyanine of Co(II promoted DNA oxidation by molecular oxygen through the catalysis of formation of reactive oxygen species ( ⋅ O 2 − , O 2 H 2 , OH. Irradiation of the reaction mixture containing either Zn(II- or Al(III-tetracarboxyphthalocyanine conjugates of oligonucleotide pd(TCTTCCCA with light of > 340 nm wavelength (Hg lamp or He/Ne laser resulted in the modification of the 22-nucleotide target d(TGAATGGGAAGAGGGTCAGGTT. A conjugate of Co(II-tetracarboxyphthalocyanine with the oligonucleotide was found to modify the DNA target in the presence of O 2 and 2-mercaptoethanol or in the presence of O 2 H 2 . Under both sensitized and catalyzed conditions, the nucleotides G 13 – G 15 were mainly modified, providing evidence that the reaction proceeded in the double-stranded oligonucleotide. These results suggest the possible use of phthalocyanine-oligonucleotide conjugates as novel artificial regulators of gene expression and therapeutic agents for treatment of cancer.

  13. Oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor reduces food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shen, Manli; Gresch, Paul J; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Emeson, Ronald B; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor regulates food uptake, and its activity is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative exon skipping is predicted to generate a truncated receptor protein isoform, whose existence was confirmed with a new antiserum. The truncated receptor sequesters the full-length receptor in intracellular membranes. We developed an oligonucleotide that promotes exon inclusion, which increases the ratio of the full-length to truncated receptor protein. Decreasing the amount of truncated receptor results in the accumulation of full-length, constitutively active receptor at the cell surface. After injection into the third ventricle of mice, the oligonucleotide accumulates in the arcuate nucleus, where it changes alternative splicing of the serotonin 2C receptor and increases pro-opiomelanocortin expression. Oligonucleotide injection reduced food intake in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Unexpectedly, the oligonucleotide crossed the blood-brain barrier and its systemic delivery reduced food intake in wild-type mice. The physiological effect of the oligonucleotide suggests that a truncated splice variant regulates the activity of the serotonin 2C receptor, indicating that therapies aimed to change pre-mRNA processing could be useful to treat hyperphagia, characteristic for disorders like Prader-Willi syndrome.

  14. A Strategy to Optimize the Oligo-Probes for Microarray-based Detection of Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarrays have been acknowledged to represent a promising approach for the detection of viral pathogens. However, the probes designed for current arrays could cover only part of the given viral variants, that could result in false-negative or ambiguous data. If all the variants are to be covered, the requirement for more probes would render much higher spot density and thus higher cost of the arrays. Here we have developed a new strategy for oligonucleotide probe design. Using type I human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) tat gene as an example, we designed the array probes and validated the optimized parameters in silico. Results show that the oligo number is significantly reduced comparing with the existing methods, while specificity and hybridization efficiency remain intact. The adoption of this method in reducing the oligo numbers could increase the detection capacity for DNA microarrays, and would significantly lower the manufacturing cost for making array chips.

  15. Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büller, Harry R; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-15

    Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).

  16. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to the cornea by iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo, M; Valamanesh, F; Andrieu, C; Klein, C; Benezra, D; Courtois, Y; Behar-Cohen, F

    2003-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the potential of iontophoresis to promote the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) directed at the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 receptor (KDR/Flk) to the cornea of the rat eye. Fluorescence (CY5)-labeled ODNs in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (20 microM) were locally administered to rat eyes, and their fate within the anterior segment was studied. Thirty-four male, 5-week-old Wistar rats were used for all experiments. The rats were divided in four groups. In group I (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered by iontophoresis (300 microA for 5 minutes) using a specially designed corneal applicator. In group II (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered using the same applicator, but no electrical current was applied. In group III (6 rats, 6 eyes), a corneal neovascular reaction was induced prior to the application of ODNs (20 microM), and iontophoresis electrical current was delivered as for group I rats. Group IV (4 rats, 4 eyes) received ODN (60 microM) iontophoresis application (300 microA for 5 minutes) and were used for ODN integrity studies. The animals were killed 5 minutes, 90 minutes, and 24 hours after a single ODN application and studied. Topically applied ODNs using the same iontophoresis applicator but without current do not penetrate the cornea and remain confined to the superficial epithelial layer. ODNs delivered with transcorneoscleral iontophoresis penetrate into all corneal layers and are also detected in the iris. In corneas with neovascularization, ODNs were particularly localized within the vascular endothelial cells of the stroma. ODNs extracted from eye tissues 24 hours after iontophoresis remained unaltered. The iontophoresis current did not cause any detectable ocular damage under these conditions. Iontophoresis promotes the delivery of ODNs to the anterior segment of the eye, including all corneal layers. Iontophoresis of ODNs directed at VEGF-R2 may be used for the

  17. Properties of Ultrasound Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement properties of ultrasound probes. Ultrasound probes and their parameters significantly affect the quality of the final image. In this work there are described the possibility of measuring the spatial resolution, sensitivity of the probe and measuring the length of the dead zone. Ultrasound phantom ATS Multi Purpose Phantom Type 539 was used for measurements.

  18. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  19. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants.

  20. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  1. Simultaneous and sensitive detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) drug resistant genotypes by multiplex oligonucleotide ligation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Giovanina M; Vlaskin, Tatyana A; Koth, Andrew; Vaz, Louise E; Dross, Sandra E; Beck, Ingrid A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2013-09-01

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a highly specific and relatively simple method to detect point mutations encoding HIV-1 drug-resistance, which can detect mutants comprising ≥2-5% of the viral population. Nevirapine (NVP), tenofovir (TDF) and lamivudine (3TC) are antiretroviral (ARV) drugs used worldwide for treatment of HIV infection and prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Adapting the OLA to detect multiple mutations associated with HIV resistance to these ARV simultaneously would provide an efficient tool to monitor drug resistance in resource-limited settings. Known proportions of mutant and wild-type plasmids were used to optimize a multiplex OLA for detection of K103N, Y181C, K65R, and M184V in HIV subtypes B and C, and V106M and G190A in subtype C. Simultaneous detection of two mutations was impaired if probes annealed to overlapping regions of the viral template, but was sensitive to ≥2-5% when testing codons using non-overlapping probes. PCR products from HIV-subtype B- and C-infected individuals were tested by multiplex-OLA and compared to results of single-codon OLA. Multiplex-OLA detected mutations at codon pairs 103/181, 106/190 and 65/184 reliably when compared to singleplex-OLA in clinical specimens. The multiplex-OLA is sensitive and specific and reduces the cost of screening for NVP, TDF and/or 3TC resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  3. Oligonucleotides conjugated with short chemically defined polyethylene glycol chains are efficient antisense agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrzadeh, Nasrin; Winkler, Anna-Maria; Dirin, Mehrdad; Winkler, Johannes

    2014-12-15

    Ligand conjugation is an attractive approach to rationally modify the poor pharmacokinetic behavior and cellular uptake properties of antisense oligonucleotides. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) attachment is a method to increase solubility of oligonucleotides and prevent the rapid elimination, thus increasing tissue distribution. On the other hand, the attachment of long PEG chains negatively influences the pharmacodynamic effect by reducing the hybridization efficiency. We examined the use of short PEG ligands on the in vitro effect of antisense agents. Circular dichroism showed that the tethering of PEG12-chains to phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides had no influence on their secondary structure and did not reduce the affinity to the counter strand. In an in vitro tumor model, a luciferase reporter assay indicated unchanged gene silencing activity compared to unmodified compounds, and even slightly superior target down regulation was found after treatment with a phosphorothioate modified conjugate. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene silencing by siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides in the laboratory and the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acids are commonly used laboratory tools for modulating gene expression and have the potential to be widely used in the clinic. Progress towards nucleic acid drugs, however, has been slow and many challenges remain to be overcome before their full impact on patient care can be understood. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the two most widely used strategies for silencing gene expression. We first describe these two approaches and contrast their relative strengths and weaknesses for laboratory applications. We then review the choices faced during development of clinical candidates and the current state of clinical trials. Attitudes towards clinical development of nucleic acid silencing strategies have repeatedly swung from optimism to depression during the past twenty years. Our goal is to provide the information needed to design robust studies with oligonucleotides, making use of the strengths of each oligonucleotide technology. PMID:22069063

  5. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  6. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  7. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    , most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides...... by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA...... and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media....

  9. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  10. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA.

  11. Acute kidney injury during therapy with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poelgeest, Eveline P; Swart, Reinout M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Moerland, Matthijs; Weening, Jan J; Tessier, Yann; Hodges, Michael R; Levin, Arthur A; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2013-10-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been explored widely in clinical trials and generally are considered to be nontoxic for the kidney, even at high concentrations. We report a case of toxic acute tubular injury in a healthy 56-year-old female volunteer after a pharmacologically active dose of a locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide was administered. The patient received 3 weekly subcutaneous doses of experimental drug SPC5001, an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) that is under investigation as an agent to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Five days after the last dose, the patient's serum creatinine level increased from 0.81 mg/dL at baseline (corresponding to an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] of 78 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to 2.67 mg/dL (eGFR, 20 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and this increase coincided with the presence of white blood cells, granular casts, and minimal hematuria on urine microscopy. The patient's serum creatinine level peaked at 3.81 mg/dL (eGFR, 13 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) 1 week after the last oligonucleotide dose. Kidney biopsy showed multifocal tubular necrosis and signs of oligonucleotide accumulation. Upon conservative treatment, the patient's serum creatinine level gradually decreased and reached her baseline level 44 days after the last oligonucleotide was administered. The patient recovered fully and kidney function was normal at every follow-up visit. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of thiolated oligonucleotides as anti-fouling diluents in electrochemical peptide-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuistan, Adam; Zaitouna, Anita J; Echeverria, Elena; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-05-11

    We incorporated short thiolated oligonucleotides as passivating diluents in the fabrication of electrochemical peptide-based (E-PB) sensors, with the goal of creating a negatively charged layer capable of resisting non-specific adsorption of matrix contaminants. The E-PB HIV sensors fabricated using these diluents were found to be more specific and selective, while retaining attributes similar to the sensor fabricated without these diluents. Overall, these results highlight the advantages of using oligonucleotides as anti-fouling diluents in self-assembled monolayer-based sensors.

  13. Oligonucleotide-templated chemical reactions: pushing the boundaries of a nature-inspired process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivalle, Claudia; Bartolo, Jean-François; Ladame, Sylvain

    2013-01-07

    Widespread in nature, oligonucleotide-templated reactions of phosphodiester bond formation have inspired chemists who are now applying this elegant strategy to the catalysis of a broad range of otherwise inefficient reactions. This review highlights the increasing diversity of chemical reactions that can be efficiently catalysed by an oligonucleotide template, using Watson-Crick base-pairing to bring both reagents in close enough proximity to react, thus increasing significantly their effective molarity. The applications of this elegant concept for nucleic acid sensing and controlled organic synthesis will also be discussed.

  14. Transcriptional inhibition of the bacteriophage T7 early promoter region by oligonucleotide triple helix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C; Samuel, M; Broitman, S L

    1992-12-30

    We have identified a purine-rich triplex binding sequence overlapping a -35 transcriptional early promoter region of the bacteriophage T7. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide designed to bind this target was annealed to T7 templates and introduced into in vitro transcription systems under conditions favoring specific initiation from this promoter. These templates demonstrated significant transcriptional inhibition relative to naked genomic templates and templates mixed with non-triplex-forming oligonucleotide. It is suggested that triplex formation along this target interferes with transcriptional initiation, and this mechanism may hold potential to disrupt bacteriophage T7 early transcription in vivo.

  15. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  16. Sequence selective naked-eye detection of DNA harnessing extension of oligonucleotide-modified nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Daniela; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    DNA polymerases can efficiently and sequence selectively incorporate oligonucleotide (ODN)-modified nucleotides and the incorporated oligonucleotide strand can be employed as primer in rolling circle amplification (RCA). The effective amplification of the DNA primer by Φ29 DNA polymerase allows the sequence-selective hybridisation of the amplified strand with a G-quadruplex DNA sequence that has horse radish peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings we develop a system that allows DNA detection with single-base resolution by naked eye.

  17. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    OpenAIRE

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L.

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacteri...

  18. Synthesis, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and PCR Amplification of 3'-5' and 3'-6' Disulfide-linked Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Jul; Manuguerra, Ilenia; Kjelstrup, Michael Brøndum;

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide dithymidines linked 3'-5' or 3'-6' were synthesized and incorporated into oligonucleotides through a combined phosphotriester and phosphoramidite solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis approach. The disulfide links are cleaved and formed reversibly in the presence of thiols and oligonucl...

  19. Studies on the Syntheses and Properties of 5'-Branched-sugar Isonucleosides and the Related Oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TianXiaobing; ZhangLihe; MinJimei

    2001-01-01

    The chemistry of nucleosides and oligonucleotides is an actively investigated field in the search for new drugs. Thesyntheses and the properties of isonucleosides and oligonucleotides have been investigated to improve their stability,antitumor and antiviral activities, and to reduce their toxicity.

  20. Oligonucleotides Containing Aminated 2'-Amino-LNA Nucleotides: Synthesis and Strong Binding to Complementary DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chenguang; Samuelsen, Simone V; Christensen, Niels Johan; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-04-05

    Mono- and diaminated 2'-amino-LNA monomers were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. Each modification imparts significant stabilization of nucleic acid duplexes and triplexes, excellent sequence selectivity, and significant nuclease resistance. Molecular modeling suggested that structural stabilization occurs via intrastrand electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of the aminated 2'-amino-LNA monomers and the host oligonucleotide backbone.

  1. Assessment of phylloplane yeasts on selected Mediterranean plants by FISH with group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, João; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Spencer-Martins, Isabel; Fonseca, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    A previous culture-dependent survey of phylloplane yeasts from selected Mediterranean plants showed that a few species were present in high densities in almost all leaf samples, regardless of the plant type, location or sampling season. However, a few species appeared to be restricted to Cistus albidus leaves, namely Cryptococcus cistialbidi. Here, we describe a culture-independent FISH assay to detect and quantify whole yeast cells in leaf washings. After optimization, the technique was used to check the apparent association between C. albidus leaves and C. cistialbidi and the abundance and ubiquity of other basidiomycetous yeast species such as Erythrobasidium hasegawianum and Sporobolomyces spp. in leaf samples from this and other neighboring plants (Acer monspessulanum and Quercus faginea). No yeast cells were detected in Pistacia lentiscus leaf samples. We were also able to demonstrate that three phylloplane yeasts (C. cistialbidi, E. hasegawianum and Sporobolomyces spp.) appeared to be log-normally distributed among individual C. albidus leaves. The log-normal distribution has important implications for the quantification of phylloplane yeasts based on the washing and plating of bulk leaf samples, which will tend to overestimate the size of the respective populations and become an error source in yeast surveys or related biocontrol studies.

  2. Comparison of a commercial biochemical kit and an oligonucleotide probe for identification of environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, A.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Høi, L.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for the identification and isolation of environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus were evaluated. Alkaline peptone water supplemented with polymyxin B and colistin-polymyxin B- cellobiose agar were employed for the isolation of suspected V. vulnificus from water, sediment and shellfish...

  3. A general framework for optimization of probes for gene expression microarray and its application to the fungus Podospora anserina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidard Frédérique

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of new microarray technologies makes custom long oligonucleotide arrays affordable for many experimental applications, notably gene expression analyses. Reliable results depend on probe design quality and selection. Probe design strategy should cope with the limited accuracy of de novo gene prediction programs, and annotation up-dating. We present a novel in silico procedure which addresses these issues and includes experimental screening, as an empirical approach is the best strategy to identify optimal probes in the in silico outcome. Findings We used four criteria for in silico probe selection: cross-hybridization, hairpin stability, probe location relative to coding sequence end and intron position. This latter criterion is critical when exon-intron gene structure predictions for intron-rich genes are inaccurate. For each coding sequence (CDS, we selected a sub-set of four probes. These probes were included in a test microarray, which was used to evaluate the hybridization behavior of each probe. The best probe for each CDS was selected according to three experimental criteria: signal-to-noise ratio, signal reproducibility, and representative signal intensities. This procedure was applied for the development of a gene expression Agilent platform for the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina and the selection of a single 60-mer probe for each of the 10,556 P. anserina CDS. Conclusions A reliable gene expression microarray version based on the Agilent 44K platform was developed with four spot replicates of each probe to increase statistical significance of analysis.

  4. Improved elucidation of biological processes linked to diabetic nephropathy by single probe-based microarray data analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens D Cohen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a complex and chronic metabolic disease that evolves into a progressive fibrosing renal disorder. Effective transcriptomic profiling of slowly evolving disease processes such as DN can be problematic. The changes that occur are often subtle and can escape detection by conventional oligonucleotide DNA array analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined microdissected human renal tissue with or without DN using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A by standard Robust Multi-array Analysis (RMA. Subsequent gene ontology analysis by Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID showed limited detection of biological processes previously identified as central mechanisms in the development of DN (e.g. inflammation and angiogenesis. This apparent lack of sensitivity may be associated with the gene-oriented averaging of oligonucleotide probe signals, as this includes signals from cross-hybridizing probes and gene annotation that is based on out of date genomic data. We then examined the same CEL file data using a different methodology to determine how well it could correlate transcriptomic data with observed biology. ChipInspector (CI is based on single probe analysis and de novo gene annotation that bypasses probe set definitions. Both methods, RMA and CI, used at default settings yielded comparable numbers of differentially regulated genes. However, when verified by RT-PCR, the single probe based analysis demonstrated reduced background noise with enhanced sensitivity and fewer false positives. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using a single probe based analysis approach with de novo gene annotation allowed an improved representation of the biological processes linked to the development and progression of DN. The improved analysis was exemplified by the detection of Wnt signaling pathway activation in DN, a process not previously reported to be involved in this disease.

  5. Negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of synthetic and chemically modified oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potier, N.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Cordier, Y.; Roch, O.; Bischoff, Rainer

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the analysis of synthetic oligonucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). After intensive removal of salt ions (especially sodium cations), negative ion mass spectra, allowing mass measurement with an accuracy of 0.01%, were obtained on several oligonucleoti

  6. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    operons in E. coli using this method, which we call Microarray-Oligonucleotide (MO)-MAGE. The resulting mutant library was characterized by high-throughput sequencing to show that all attempted insertions were estimated to have occurred at an average frequency of 0.02 % per loci with 0.4 average...

  7. Obstructive Effects of Ultrasonic Microbubble Intensifier on CHG-5 Cell with Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hong-ying; CAO You-de; WANG Zhi-gang; LI Pan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects on human glioma cell line CHG-5 by ultrasonic microbubble intensifier with survivin antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN)transfection. Methods: Antisense oligonucleotides targeting survivin mRNA was designed and synthesized.Four regimen groups were designed,group A:survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with ultrasonic microbubble intensifier combined with ultrasound irradiation,group B: survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with lipofectamine combined with ultrasound irradiation,group C:survivin antisense oligonucelotides with lipofectamine transfection.group D:blank control.The expression changes of surviving protein were measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting,and MTr assay was used to measure the changes of proliferation.Results:Survivin protein expression in group A was decreased significantly in human glioma cell line CHG-5 than other groups(P<0.05),and the proliferating rate of CHG-5 in group A was also significantly inhibited(P<0.05).Conclusion:Ultrasonic microbubble intensifier transfection combined with ultrasound irradiation is a promising method in gene transfection effectively and noninvasively.

  8. Application of decoy oligonucleotides as novel therapeutic strategy: a contemporary overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Akhter, Sohail; Mallik, Neha; Anwar, Mohammad; Tabassum, Wajda; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2013-03-01

    Molecular therapy is emerging as a potential strategy for the treatment of many diseases. Correct regulation of gene expression is essential for both, to normal development and proper functioning of the all the organisms. Even after four decades of intensive research, it is still a major problem from regulatory and technical point of view, to replace defective genes. The technology of decoy oligonucleotides has received considerable attention to treat and cure a variety of diseases and abnormal physiological conditions, because they provide a rational way to design and selective regulation of a specific gene expression. Decoy oligonucleotides are widely used as inhibitors of specific gene expression because they can offer exciting possibility of expression and blocking of a particular gene without any changes in the functions of other genes. Advances in the decoy oligonucleotides are rapidly paving the way to new insights into the origin and treatment of inflammatory, cancer and/or other immune disorders. The review covers the progress achieved towards the development of decoy oligonucleotides as a potential strategy in a new class of molecular therapy.

  9. Cellular Internalization of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides by Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers and Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Gunay, Gokhan; Tekinay, Turgay; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-05-11

    Oligonucleotides are promising drug candidates due to the exceptionally high specificity they exhibit toward their target DNA and RNA sequences. However, their poor pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, in conjunction with problems associated with their internalization by cells, necessitates their delivery through specialized carrier systems for efficient therapy. Here, we investigate the effects of carrier morphology on the cellular internalization mechanisms of oligonucleotides by using self-assembled fibrous or spherical peptide nanostructures. Size and geometry were both found to be important parameters for the oligonucleotide internalization process; direct penetration was determined to be the major mechanism for the internalization of nanosphere carriers, whereas nanofibers were internalized by clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathways. We further showed that glucose conjugation to carrier nanosystems improved cellular internalization in cancer cells due to the enhanced glucose metabolism associated with oncogenesis, and the internalization of the glucose-conjugated peptide/oligonucleotide complexes was found to be dependent on glucose transporters present on the surface of the cell membrane.

  10. Methods for the preparation of large quantities of complex single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf E Murgha

    Full Text Available Custom-defined oligonucleotide collections have a broad range of applications in fields of synthetic biology, targeted sequencing, and cytogenetics. Also, they are used to encode information for technologies like RNA interference, protein engineering and DNA-encoded libraries. High-throughput parallel DNA synthesis technologies developed for the manufacture of DNA microarrays can produce libraries of large numbers of different oligonucleotides, but in very limited amounts. Here, we compare three approaches to prepare large quantities of single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries derived from microarray synthesized collections. The first approach, alkaline melting of double-stranded PCR amplified libraries with a biotinylated strand captured on streptavidin coated magnetic beads results in little or no non-biotinylated ssDNA. The second method wherein the phosphorylated strand of PCR amplified libraries is nucleolyticaly hydrolyzed is recommended when small amounts of libraries are needed. The third method combining in vitro transcription of PCR amplified libraries to reverse transcription of the RNA product into single-stranded cDNA is our recommended method to produce large amounts of oligonucleotide libraries. Finally, we propose a method to remove any primer binding sequences introduced during library amplification.

  11. Methods for the preparation of large quantities of complex single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf E; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan

    2014-01-01

    Custom-defined oligonucleotide collections have a broad range of applications in fields of synthetic biology, targeted sequencing, and cytogenetics. Also, they are used to encode information for technologies like RNA interference, protein engineering and DNA-encoded libraries. High-throughput parallel DNA synthesis technologies developed for the manufacture of DNA microarrays can produce libraries of large numbers of different oligonucleotides, but in very limited amounts. Here, we compare three approaches to prepare large quantities of single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries derived from microarray synthesized collections. The first approach, alkaline melting of double-stranded PCR amplified libraries with a biotinylated strand captured on streptavidin coated magnetic beads results in little or no non-biotinylated ssDNA. The second method wherein the phosphorylated strand of PCR amplified libraries is nucleolyticaly hydrolyzed is recommended when small amounts of libraries are needed. The third method combining in vitro transcription of PCR amplified libraries to reverse transcription of the RNA product into single-stranded cDNA is our recommended method to produce large amounts of oligonucleotide libraries. Finally, we propose a method to remove any primer binding sequences introduced during library amplification.

  12. Synthesis and antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinghua; Pandey, Sanjay K; Khatri, Hetal; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2014-09-01

    To ascertain whether increasing hydrophobicity can enhance the activity of second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in muscle, we investigated the antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA (2S-MOP)-modified ASOs. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl uridine phosphoramidite was accomplished on a multi-gram scale by Lewis-acid-catalyzed ring opening of 5'-O-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl ether-protected 2,2'-anhydro-5-methyl uridine with 2S-methoxy-1-propanol. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl cytidine nucleoside from the corresponding 5-methyl uridine nucleoside was accomplished by formation and displacement of a 4-triazolide intermediate with aqueous ammonia. 2S-MOP-modified oligonucleotides were prepared on an automated DNA synthesizer and showed similar enhancements in duplex thermal stability as 2'-O-methoxyethyl RNA (MOE)-modified oligonucleotides. 2S-MOP-containing antisense oligonucleotides were evaluated in Balb-c mice and showed good activity for decreasing the expression levels of scavenger receptor B1 (Srb1) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mRNA in liver and muscle tissue. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels; Hansen, Henrik F; Persson, Robert; Møller, Marianne R; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Ørum, Henrik; Straarup, Ellen M; Koch, Troels

    2012-02-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). PCSK9 increases the degradation of the LDL receptor, resulting in high LDL-C in individuals with high PCSK9 activity. Here, we show that two locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50% reduction in circulating LDL-C. Serum total cholesterol (TC) levels were reduced to the same extent as LDL-C with no reduction in high-density lipoprotein levels, demonstrating a specific pharmacological effect on LDL-C. The reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA correlated with liver LNA oligonucleotide content. This verified that anti-PCSK9 LNA oligonucleotides regulated LDL-C through an antisense mechanism. The compounds were well tolerated with no observed effects on toxicological parameters (liver and kidney histology, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine). The pharmacologic evidence and initial safety profile of the compounds used in this study indicate that LNA antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 provide a viable therapeutic strategy and are potential complements to statins in managing high LDL-C.

  14. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    2003-01-01

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons, alpha-bromo-alpha'-[F-18]fluoro-m-xy

  15. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  16. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  17. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50...

  18. Thermal Stability of Modified i-Motif Oligonucleotides with Naphthalimide Intercalating Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Ali; Pedersen, Erik B.; Khaireldin, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    In continuation of our investigation of characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the i-motif 5′-d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT)] upon insertion of intercalating nucleotides into the cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, this article evaluates the stabilities of i-motif oligonucleotides upon insertion of naphtha......In continuation of our investigation of characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the i-motif 5′-d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT)] upon insertion of intercalating nucleotides into the cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, this article evaluates the stabilities of i-motif oligonucleotides upon insertion...... of naphthalimide (1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione) as the intercalating nucleic acid. The stabilities of i-motif structures with inserted naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides were studied using UV melting temperatures (Tm) and circular dichroism spectra at different pH values and conditions (crowding...... and non-crowding). This study indicated a positive effect of the naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides on the stabilities of the i-motif structures compared to the wild-type structure which is in contrast to a previous observation for a pyrene-intercalating nucleotide showing a decrease in Tm values....

  19. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  20. Synthesis and Excellent Duplex Stability of Oligonucleotides Containing 2'-Amino-LNA Functionalized with Galactose Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ries, Annika; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of oligonucleotides containing internally-attached galactose and triantennary galactose units has been developed based on click chemistry between 2'-N-alkyne 2'-amino-LNA nucleosides and azido-functionalized galactosyl building blocks. The synthesized...

  1. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  2. Precise construction of oligonucleotide-Fab fragment conjugate for homogeneous immunoassay using HaloTag technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päkkilä, Henna; Peltomaa, Riikka; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Soukka, Tero

    2015-03-01

    The use of oligonucleotide-protein conjugates enables the development of novel types of bioanalytical assays. However, convenient methods for producing covalent and stoichiometric oligonucleotide-protein conjugates are still rare. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, covalent conjugation of DNA oligonucleotide to Fab fragments with a 1:1 ratio using HaloTag self-labeling technology. The oligonucleotide coupling was carried out while the Fab was attached to protein G matrix, thereby enabling straightforward production of covalent conjugates. Furthermore, it allowed convenient purification of the product because the unreacted components were easily removed before the elution of the high-purity conjugate. The prepared conjugate was employed in a homogeneous immunoassay where prostate-specific antigen was used as a model analyte. Switchable lanthanide luminescence was used for detection, and the obtained limit of detection was 0.27 ng/ml. In the future, the developed method for covalent conjugation and successive purification in protein G column could also be applied for introducing other kinds of modifications to Fab fragments in a simple and site-specific manner.

  3. Pd0-Catalyzed Methyl Transfer on Nucleosides and Oligonucleotides, Envisaged as a PET Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fouquet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The methyl transfer reaction from activated monomethyltin, via a modified Stille coupling reaction, was studied under “ligandless” conditions on fully deprotected 5'-modified nucleosides and one dinucleotide. The reaction was optimized to proceed in a few minutes and quantitative yield, even under dilute conditions, thus affording a rapid and efficient new method for oligonucleotide labelling with carbon-11.

  4. A new achiral reagent for the incorporation of multiple amino groups into oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Carsten; Petersen, Kenneth H.; Egholm, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of a new functionalized achiral linker reagent (10) for the incorporation of multiple primary amino groups into oligonucleotides is described. The linker reagent is compatible with conventional DNA-synthesis following the phosphoramidite methodology, and the linker can be incorporat...

  5. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 μg mL(-1), (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.

  6. A triple-helix forming oligonucleotide targeting genomic DNA fails to induce mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshat, Reshat; Priestley, Catherine C; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2012-11-01

    Purine tracts in duplex DNA can bind oligonucleotide strands in a sequence specific manner to form triple-helix structures. Triple-helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting supFG1 constructs have previously been shown to be mutagenic raising safety concerns for oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals. We have engineered a TFO, TFO27, to target the genomic Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus to define the mutagenic potential of such structures at genomic DNA. We report that TFO27 was resistant to nuclease degradation and readily binds to its target motif in a cell free system. Contrary to previous studies using the supFG1 reporter construct, TFO27 failed to induce mutation within the genomic HPRT locus. We suggest that it is possible that previous reports of triplex-mediated mutation using the supFG1 reporter construct could be confounded by DNA quadruplex formation. Although the present study indicates that a TFO targeting a genomic locus lacks mutagenic activity, it is unclear if this finding can be generalised to all TFOs and their targets. For the present, we suggest that it is prudent to avoid large purine stretches in oligonucleotide pharmaceutical design to minimise concern regarding off-target genotoxicity.

  7. In situ entry of oligonucleotides into brain cells can occur through a nucleic acid channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Fuxin; Gounko, Natasha V.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Ronken, Eric; Hoekstra, Dick

    2007-01-01

    Brain tissue has become a challenging therapeutic target, in part because of failure of conventional treatments of brain tumors and a gradually increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases. Because antisense oligonucleotides are readily internalized by neuronal cells in culture, these compounds c

  8. Effect of iontophoresis on the in vitro trans-scleral transport of three single stranded oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescina, Silvia; Antopolsky, Maxim; Santi, Patrizia; Nicoli, Sara; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2013-05-13

    Oligonucleotides represent a subject of clinical interest due to their potential ability to treat several diseases, including those affecting the posterior segment of the eye. Unfortunately, therapeutic oligonucleotides are currently administered by means of highly invasive approaches, such as intravitreal injections. The aim of the present work was to study in vitro, across isolated bovine sclera, the effect of iontophoresis on the transport of three single stranded oligonucleotides (ssDNA), 12-, 24- and 36-mer, selected as reference compounds in view of a non-invasive drug delivery to the back of the eye. All the three sequences were able to cross bovine sclera in vitro without iontophoresis. When anodal iontophoresis was applied, no change in flux was observed, while in the presence of cathodal iontophoresis the permeability coefficients increased four-fold compared to passive conditions. This behavior can be ascribed to the electrorepulsive mechanism, due to the negative charge of the nucleic acid backbone. It was also observed that the molecular weights of the three sequences did not affect trans-scleral transport, neither in passive, nor in current assisted permeation. Furthermore, increasing the current intensity from 1.75 mA to 3 mA, no effect on the trans-scleral transport of the 24-mer was noticed. Although preliminary, the results demonstrate that cathodal iontophoresis enhances trans-scleral transport of single stranded oligonucleotides and suggest its use as a novel non-invasive approach for the treatment of diseases affecting the posterior segment of the eye.

  9. Stable gene targeting in human cells using single-strand oligonucleotides with modified bases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Rios

    Full Text Available Recent advances allow multiplexed genome engineering in E. coli, employing easily designed oligonucleotides to edit multiple loci simultaneously. A similar technology in human cells would greatly expedite functional genomics, both by enhancing our ability to test how individual variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are related to specific phenotypes, and potentially allowing simultaneous mutation of multiple loci. However, oligo-mediated targeting of human cells is currently limited by low targeting efficiencies and low survival of modified cells. Using a HeLa-based EGFP-rescue reporter system we show that use of modified base analogs can increase targeting efficiency, in part by avoiding the mismatch repair machinery. We investigate the effects of oligonucleotide toxicity and find a strong correlation between the number of phosphorothioate bonds and toxicity. Stably EGFP-corrected cells were generated at a frequency of ~0.05% with an optimized oligonucleotide design combining modified bases and reduced number of phosphorothioate bonds. We provide evidence from comparative RNA-seq analysis suggesting cellular immunity induced by the oligonucleotides might contribute to the low viability of oligo-corrected cells. Further optimization of this method should allow rapid and scalable genome engineering in human cells.

  10. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urakawa, H.; Fantroussi, El S.; Smidt, H.; Smoot, J.C.; Tribou, E.H.; Kelly, J.J.; Noble, P.A.; Stahl, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of

  11. An oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer: Development and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martien, Ronny; Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Schnürch, Andreas Bernkop

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer/reduced glutathione (GSH) system providing a protective effect toward nucleases and permeation enhancement. A polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (PCP-Cys) was synthesized. Enzymatic degradation of a model oligonucleotide by DNase I and within freshly collected intestinal fluid was investigated in the absence and presence of PCP-Cys. Permeation studies with PCP-Cys/GSH versus control were performed in vitro on Caco-2 cell monolayers and ex vivo on rat intestinal mucosa. PCP-Cys displayed 223 ± 13.8 μmol thiol groups per gram polymer. After 4h, 61% of the free oligonucleotides were degraded by DNase I and 80% within intestinal fluid. In contrast, less than 41% (DNase I) and 60% (intestinal fluid) were degraded in the presence of 0.02% (m/v) PCP-Cys. Permeation studies revealed an 8-fold (Caco-2) and 10-fold (intestinal mucosa) increase in apparent permeability compared to buffer control. Hence, this PCP-Cys/GSH system might be a promising tool for the oral administration of oligonucleotides as it allows a significant protection toward degrading enzymes and facilitates their transport across intestinal membranes.

  12. Oligonucleotide array outperforms SNP array on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Soroush; Anjomshoaa, Ahmad; Song, Sarah; Guilford, Parry; McNoe, Les; Black, Michael; Phillips, Vicky; Reeve, Anthony; Humar, Bostjan

    2010-04-01

    Compromised quality of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE)-derived DNA has compounded the use of archival specimens for array-based genomic studies. Recent technological advances have led to first successes in this field; however, there is currently no general agreement on the most suitable platform for the array-based analysis of FFPE DNA. In this study, FFPE and matched fresh-frozen (FF) specimens were separately analyzed with Affymetrix single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 6.0 and Agilent 4x44K oligonucleotide arrays to compare the genomic profiles from the two tissue sources and to assess the relative performance of the two platforms on FFPE material. Genomic DNA was extracted from matched FFPE-FF pairs of normal intestinal epithelium from four patients and were applied to the SNP and oligonucleotide platforms according to the manufacturer-recommended protocols. On the Affymetrix platform, a substantial increase in apparent copy number alterations was observed in all FFPE tissues relative to their matched FF counterparts. In contrast, FFPE and matched FF genomic profiles obtained via the Agilent platform were very similar. Both the SNP and the oligonucleotide platform performed comparably on FF material. This study demonstrates that Agilent oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization generates reliable results from FFPE extracted DNA, whereas the Affymetrix SNP-based array seems less suitable for the analysis of FFPE material.

  13. Tetrahedron-structured DNA and functional oligonucleotide for construction of an electrochemical DNA-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Tang, Chun-Xia; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2011-07-21

    Tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) in combination with a functionalized oligonucleotide was used to develop a "turn-on" biosensor for Hg(2+) ions. The ts-DNA provided an improved sensitivity and was used to block the active sites.

  14. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte S; Jensen, Knud J; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-03-15

    Specific target binding and stability in diverse biological media is of crucial importance for applications of synthetic oligonucleotides as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. So far, these issues have been addressed by chemical modification of oligonucleotides and by conjugation with a peptide, most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides that target the BRAF V600E oncogene, with a library of rationally designed peptides employing CuAAC "click" chemistry. The peptide sequence has an influence on the specificity and affinity of target DNA/RNA binding. We also investigated the impact of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) on the latter. Lysine residues improve binding of POCs to target DNA and RNA, whereas the distance to lysine correlates exclusively with a decrease in binding of mismatched RNA targets. Glycine and tyrosine residues affect target binding as well. Importantly, the resistance of POCs to enzymatic degradation is dramatically improved by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media.

  16. Osmolality of antisense oligonucleotide parenteral formulations: Implications on counterion dissociation and recommended osmometry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Marc; Dibble, Andrew

    2016-12-30

    The intrinsic osmolality of aqueous solutions of sodium salt antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) has been studied to inform formulation practices, understand the molecular basis underlying the difference between theoretical and empirical results, and determine suitable measurement methods. It was found that regardless of nucleotide sequence, ASO concentration of ∼140mg/mL has isotonic osmolality of ∼290mOsm/kg water (SI unit: mmol osmotically-active particles/kg water), such that lower concentration formulations require excipients for tonicity adjustment. The range of osmolality values at a given active ingredient concentration can be ascribed to drug substance lot-to-lot purity differences impacting total oligonucleotide content (i.e., including oligonucleotide-related impurities). Empirical osmolality measurements were found to be ∼70% of theoretical values, which corresponds to an osmotic coefficient value of ∼0.7, thus inferring incomplete counterion dissociation. When comparing theoretical (ideal) osmolality of multiple sequences with various nucleotide compositions and chemistries at the same w/v concentration, the "average osmolar mass" (molar mass of the oligonucleotide, including the sodium counterions, divided by the ideal Van't Hoff factor, i(id)) appears to be the strongest factor governing theoretical osmolality values. Other factors examined were the sequence length, backbone chemistry, 2' sugar chemistry, and nucleotide composition. A head-to-head comparison between two osmolality techniques showed that vapor pressure osmometry is generally more suitable than freezing point osmometry for oligonucleotide solutions greater than ∼150mg/mL due to viscosity effects, but the two techniques are comparable otherwise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phage annealing proteins promote oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in Escherichia coli and mouse ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyrers Joep PP

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phage protein pairs, RecE/RecT from Rac or Redα/Redβ from λ, initiate efficient double strand break repair (DSBR in Escherichia coli that has proven very useful for DNA engineering. These phage pairs initiate DSBR either by annealing or by another mechanism that is not defined. Results Here we report that these proteins also mediate single strand oligonucleotide repair (ssOR at high efficiencies. The ssOR activity, unlike DSBR, does not require a phage exonuclease (RecE or Redα but only requires a phage annealing protein (RecT or Redβ. Notably, the P22 phage annealing protein Erf, which does not mediate the same DSBR reactions, also delivers ssOR activity. By altering aspects of the oligonucleotides, we document length and design parameters that affect ssOR efficiency to show a simple relationship to homologies either side of the repair site. Notably, ssOR shows strand bias. Oligonucleotides that can prime lagging strand replication deliver more ssOR than their leading complements. This suggests a model in which the annealing proteins hybridize the oligonucleotides to single stranded regions near the replication fork. We also show that ssOR is a highly efficient way to engineer BACs and can be detected in a eukaryotic cell upon expression of a phage annealing protein. Conclusion Phage annealing proteins can initiate the recombination of single stranded oligonucleotides into endogenous targets in Escherichia coli at very high efficiencies. This expands the repertoire of useful DNA engineering strategies, shows promise for applications in eukaryotic cells, and has implications for the unanswered questions regarding DSBR mediated by RecE/RecT and Redα/Redβ.

  18. Short G-rich oligonucleotides as a potential therapeutic for Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parekh-Olmedo Hetal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's Disease (HD is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which neuronal tissue degenerates. The pathogenesis of the disease appears to center on the development of protein aggregates that arise initially from the misfolding of the mutant HD protein. Mutant huntingtin (Htt is produced by HD genes that contain an increased number of glutamine codons within the first exon and this expansion leads to the production of a protein that misfolds. Recent studies suggest that mutant Htt can nucleate protein aggregation and interfere with a multitude of normal cellular functions. Results As such, efforts to find a therapy for HD have focused on agents that disrupt or block the mutant Htt aggregation pathway. Here, we report that short guanosine monotonic oligonucleotides capable of adopting a G-quartet structure, are effective inhibitors of aggregation. By utilizing a biochemical/immunoblotting assay as an initial screen, we identified a 20-mer, all G-oligonucleotide (HDG as an active molecule. Subsequent testing in a cell-based assay revealed that HDG was an effective inhibitor of aggregation of a fusion protein, comprised of a mutant Htt fragment and green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Taken together, our results suggest that a monotonic G-oligonucleotide, capable of adopting a G-quartet conformation is an effective inhibitor of aggregation. This oligonucleotide can also enable cell survival in PC12 cells overexpressing a mutant Htt fragment fusion gene. Conclusion Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides capable of forming stable G-quartets can inhibit aggregation of the mutant Htt fragment protein. This activity maybe an important part of the pathogenecity of Huntington's Disease. Our results reveal a new class of agents that could be developed as a therapeutic approach for Huntington's Disease.

  19. Modulation of 5' splice site selection using tailed oligonucleotides carrying splicing signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elela Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the use of tailed oligonucleotides as a means of reprogramming alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and in vivo. The tailed oligonucleotides that were used interfere with splicing because they contain a portion complementary to sequences immediately upstream of the target 5' splice site combined with a non-hybridizing 5' tail carrying binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. In the present study, we have tested the inhibitory activity of RNA oligonucleotides carrying different tail structures. Results We show that an oligonucleotide with a 5' tail containing the human β-globin branch site sequence inhibits the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-xL, albeit less efficiently than a tail containing binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. A branch site-containing tail positioned at the 3' end of the oligonucleotide also elicited splicing inhibition but not as efficiently as a 5' tail. The interfering activity of a 3' tail was improved by adding a 5' splice site sequence next to the branch site sequence. A 3' tail carrying a Y-shaped branch structure promoted similar splicing interference. The inclusion of branch site or 5' splice site sequences in the Y-shaped 3' tail further improved splicing inhibition. Conclusion Our in vitro results indicate that a variety of tail architectures can be used to elicit splicing interference at low nanomolar concentrations, thereby broadening the scope and the potential impact of this antisense technology.

  20. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid E C Verhaart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks. Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days. Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days. Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD.

  1. Triple helix-forming oligonucleotides conjugated to indolocarbazole poisons direct topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage to a specific site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimondo, P B; Bailly, C; Boutorine, A S; Moreau, P; Prudhomme, M; Sun, J S; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    2001-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is an ubiquitous DNA-cleaving enzyme and an important therapeutic target in cancer chemotherapy for camptothecins as well as for indolocarbazole antibiotics such as rebeccamycin. To achieve a sequence-specific cleavage of DNA by topoisomerase I, a triple helix-forming oligonucleotide was covalently linked to indolocarbazole-type topoisomerase I poisons. The three indolocarbazole-oligonucleotide conjugates investigated were able to direct topoisomerase I cleavage at a specific site based upon sequence recognition by triplex formation. The efficacy of topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage depends markedly on the intrinsic potency of the drug. We show that DNA cleavage depends also upon the length of the linker arm between the triplex-forming oligonucleotide and the drug. Based on a known structure of the DNA-topoisomerase I complex, a molecular model of the oligonucleotide conjugates bound to the DNA-topoisomerase I complex was elaborated to facilitate the design of a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor-oligonucleotide conjugate with an optimized linker between the two moieties. The resulting oligonucleotide-indolocarbazole conjugate at 10 nM induced cleavage at the triple helix site 2-fold more efficiently than 5 microM of free indolocarbazole, while the other drug-sensitive sites were not cleaved. The rational design of drug-oligonucleotide conjugates carrying a DNA topoisomerase poison may be exploited to improve the efficacy and selectivity of chemotherapeutic cancer treatments by targeting specific genes and reducing drug toxicity.

  2. Binding of Dumbbell Oligonucleotides to MoMuLV Reverse Transcriptase: Inhibitory Properties of RNase H Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dumbbell oligonucleotides with loops of various chemistry were synthesized. Incubation of dumbbell oligonucleotides containing phosphorothioate bonds or trimethylene phosphate linkages in loops with S1 nuclease did not result in significant cleavage under conditions which led to the degradation of dumbbell oligonucleotide containing phophodiester bonds in the loops. The binding of reverse transcriptase of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV was evaluated with all the five oligonucleotides. The protein binds to all the dumbbell oligonucleotides with similar affinity. The dissociation constants evaluated using PAGE band mobility shift assays were of the order of 10-7. The inhibitory properties of the retroviral RNase H activity was evaluated using 3H –UTP-labeled RNA:RNA-DNA hybrid. It was found that the best dumbbell oligonucleotide, inhibitor contained phosphorothioate residues in both the loops. Our value studies demonstrated that this particularly designed oligonucleotide displays an IC50 of 18 nM in its inhibition on the reverse transcriptase RNase H activity, a magnitude lower than that of first nucleotide reverse transcriptase of HIV-1, tenofovir, introduced by Gilead Science in the market.

  3. Effect of CD44 Suppression by Antisense Oligonucleotide on Attachment of Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells to HA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中国; 张虹

    2004-01-01

    The effects of suppression of CD44 by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronic acid (HA) were observed and the possible relationship between CD44 and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) investigated. CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was delivered with cationic lipid to cultured human trabecular meshwork cells. The expression of CD44 suppressed by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The effect of CD44 suppression by specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of trabecular meshwork cells to HA was measured by MTT assay. Results showed that expression of CD44 was suppressed by CD4, specific antisense oligonucleotide. Antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the adhesion of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA in a concentration dependent manner. It was concluded that attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA was decreased when CD44 was suppressed by specific antisense oligonucleotide. CD44might play a role in pathogenesis of POAG by affecting the adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to HA.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of a fluorine-18 labeled antisense oligonucleotide as a potential PET tracer for iNOS mRNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Erik F.J. de E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@pet.azg.nl; Vroegh, Joke; Dijkstra, Gerard; Moshage, Han; Elsinga, Philip H.; Jansen, Peter L.M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    2004-07-01

    Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel diseases. An antisense oligonucleotide with good hybridization properties for iNOS mRNA was selected using RT-PCR. The oligonucleotide was reliably labeled with fluorine-18 using N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide. Cellular uptake and efflux of oligonucleotide complexed with FuGENE-6 were rapid, unlike naked oligonucleotide, which hardly accumulated. However, neither uptake nor efflux showed any selectivity for iNOS expressing cells. The oligonucleotide showed a high level of non-specific binding, which may have obscured its specific hybridization to iNOS mRNA.

  5. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity).

  6. Characterization of the nanostructure of complexes formed by single- or double-stranded oligonucleotides with a cationic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2010-12-02

    We report the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize the nanostructure of complexes formed by either single- or double-stranded oligonucleotides with a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) in aqueous solution (1 mM Li(2)SO(4)). For single-stranded oligonucleotides 5'-A(20)-3' and 5'-CCCCATTCTAGCAGCCCGGG-3', both the appearance of two Bragg peaks (at 0.14 and 0.28 Å(-1)) in SAXS spectra with a spacing of 1:2 and form factor fits to SANS spectra are consistent with the presence of multilamellar vesicles (with, on average, 6-9 layers with a periodicity of 45-48 Å). Some samples showed evidence of an additional Bragg peak (at 0.20 Å(-1)) associated with periodic packing (with a periodicity of 31 Å) of the oligonucleotides within the lamellae of the nanostructure. The nucleotide composition of the single-stranded oligonucleotides was also found to impact the number and size of the complexes formed with CTAB. In contrast to 5'-A(20)-3' and 5'-CCCCATTCTAGCAGCCCGGG-3', 5'-T(20)-3' did not change the state of aggregation of CTAB (globular micelles) over a wide range of oligonucleotide:CTAB charge ratios. These results support the proposition that hydrophobic interactions, as well as electrostatics, play a central role in the formation of complexes between cationic amphiphiles and single-stranded oligonucleotides and thus give rise to nanostructures that depend on nucleotide composition. In contrast to the single-stranded oligonucleotides, for double-stranded oligonucleotides mixed with CTAB, three Bragg peaks (0.13, 0.23, and 0.25 Å(-1)) in SAXS spectra with a spacing ratio of 1:√3:√4 and characteristic changes in SANS spectra indicate formation of a hexagonal nanostructure. Also, the composition of the double-stranded oligonucleotides did not measurably impact the nanostructure of complexes formed with CTAB, suggesting that electrostatic

  7. Amino acids attached to 2'-amino-LNA: Synthesis of DNA mixmer oligonucleotides with increased duplex stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Marie Willaing; Wengel, Jesper; Wamberg, Michael Chr.;

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of 2'-amino-LNA (locked nucleic acid) opens up exciting possibilities for modification of nucleic acids by conjugation to the 2'-nitrogen. Incorporation of unmodified and N-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA nucleotides improve duplex stability compared to unmodified DNA. 2'-Amino......-LNA nucleosides derivatized with amino acids have been synthesized and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides. Following oligonucleotide synthesis, peptides have been added using solid phase peptide coupling chem. Modification of oligonucleotides with pos. charged residues greatly improves thermal stability....

  8. OligoPrep PVA support for oligonucleotide synthesis in columns on a scale up to 10 micromol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Sheena; Anderson, Emma

    2007-01-01

    OligoPrep is a macroporous polyvinylacetate (PVA) biodegradable support that has been designed for cost-effective automated synthesis of oligonucleotides using standard phosphoramidite chemistry. Originally developed for large-scale oligonucleotide synthesis in beds and reactors, we present here its utility for medium-scale work of 1-10 micromol in column syntheses on standard DNA synthesizers. We show how an increase in scale, and, therefore, yield, can be achieved without significant increase in reagent quantity. Additional deblock and oxidation cycles can provide high coupling yields, and the use of concentrated ammonia in aqueous methylamine (AMA) for oligonucleotide cleavage and deprotection results in excellent recovery.

  9. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  10. Short locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides potently reduce apolipoprotein B mRNA and serum cholesterol in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Fisker, Niels; Hedtjärn, Maj; Lindholm, Marie W; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Aarup, Vibeke; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund; Ørum, Henrik; Hansen, Jens B Rode; Koch, Troels

    2010-11-01

    The potency and specificity of locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides was investigated as a function of length and affinity. The oligonucleotides were designed to target apolipoprotein B (apoB) and were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. The high affinity of LNA enabled the design of short antisense oligonucleotides (12- to 13-mers) that possessed high affinity and increased potency both in vitro and in vivo compared to longer oligonucleotides. The short LNA oligonucleotides were more target specific, and they exhibited the same biodistribution and tissue half-life as longer oligonucleotides. Pharmacology studies in both mice and non-human primates were conducted with a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide against apoB, and the data showed that repeated dosing of the 13-mer at 1-2 mg/kg/week was sufficient to provide a significant and long lasting lowering of non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol without increasing serum liver toxicity markers. The data presented here show that oligonucleotide length as a parameter needs to be considered in the design of antisense oligonucleotide and that potent short oligonucleotides with sufficient target affinity can be generated using the LNA chemistry. Conclusively, we present a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide with therapeutic potential that produce beneficial cholesterol lowering effect in non-human primates.

  11. Identification of osteopontin as the most consistently over-expressed gene in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma:Detection by oligonucleotide microarray and real-time PCR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holger G Hass; Oliver Nehls; Juergen Jobst; Andrea Frilling; Ulrich Vogel; Stephan Kaiser

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular pathways involved in human cholangiocarcinogenesis by gene expression profiling.METHODS: Oligonucleotide arrays (Affymetr/x U133A)were used to establish a specific gene expression profile of intrahepatic CCC in comparison to corresponding nonmalignant liver tissue.To validate the expression values of the most overexpressed genes, RT-PCR experiments were performed.RESULTS: Five hundred and fifty-two statistically differentially expressed genes/ESTs (221 probes significantly up-regulated, 331 probes down-regulated;P2;≥70%) were identified.Using these data and two-dimensional cluster analysis,a specific gene expression profile was obtained allowing fast and reproducible differentiation of CCC, which was confirmed by supervised neuronal network modelling.The most consistently overexpressed gene (median fold change 33.5, significantly overexpressed in 100%)encoded osteopontin.Furthermore, an association of various genes with the histopathological grading could be demonstrated.CONCLUSION: A highly specific gone expression profile for intrahepatic CCC was identified, allowing for its fast and reproducible discrimination against nonmalignant liver tissue and other liver masses.The most overexpressed gene in intrahepatic CCC was the gene encoding osteopontin.These data may lead to a better understanding of human cholangiocarcinogenesis.

  12. PathogenMIPer: a tool for the design of molecular inversion probes to detect multiple pathogens

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    Akhras Michael

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe PathogenMIPer, a software program for designing molecular inversion probe (MIP oligonucleotides for use in pathogen identification and detection. The software designs unique and specific oligonucleotide probes targeting microbial or other genomes. The tool tailors all probe sequence components (including target-specific sequences, barcode sequences, universal primers and restriction sites and combines these components into ready-to-order probes for use in a MIP assay. The system can harness the genetic variability available in an entire genome in designing specific probes for the detection of multiple co-infections in a single tube using a MIP assay. Results PathogenMIPer can accept sequence data in FASTA file format, and other parameter inputs from the user through a graphical user interface. It can design MIPs not only for pathogens, but for any genome for use in parallel genomic analyses. The software was validated experimentally by applying it to the detection of human papilloma virus (HPV as a model system, which is associated with various human malignancies including cervical and skin cancers. Initial tests of laboratory samples using the MIPs developed by the PathogenMIPer to recognize 24 different types of HPVs gave very promising results, detecting even a small viral load of single as well as multiple infections (Akhras et al, personal communication. Conclusion PathogenMIPer is a software for designing molecular inversion probes for detection of multiple target DNAs in a sample using MIP assays. It enables broader use of MIP technology in the detection through genotyping of pathogens that are complex, difficult-to-amplify, or present in multiple subtypes in a sample.

  13. Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA Using Enzymatically Stable Phosphorothioate Invader Probes

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    Brooke A. Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of probes that allow for sequence-unrestricted recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA continues to attract much attention due to the prospect for molecular tools that enable detection, regulation, and manipulation of genes. We have recently introduced so-called Invader probes as alternatives to more established approaches such as triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids and polyamides. These short DNA duplexes are activated for dsDNA recognition by installment of +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides such as 2′-N-(pyren-1-ylmethyl-2′-N-methyl-2′-aminouridine and 2′-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyluridine, which results in violation of the nearest neighbor exclusion principle and duplex destabilization. The individual probes strands have high affinity toward complementary DNA strands, which generates the driving force for recognition of mixed-sequence dsDNA regions. In the present article, we characterize Invader probes that are based on phosphorothioate backbones (PS-DNA Invaders. The change from the regular phosphodiester backbone furnishes Invader probes that are much more stable to nucleolytic degradation, while displaying acceptable dsDNA-recognition efficiency. PS-DNA Invader probes therefore present themselves as interesting probes for dsDNA-targeting applications in cellular environments and living organisms.

  14. How to decide? Different methods of calculating gene expression from short oligonucleotide array data will give different results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voesenek Laurentius ACJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short oligonucleotide arrays for transcript profiling have been available for several years. Generally, raw data from these arrays are analysed with the aid of the Microarray Analysis Suite or GeneChip Operating Software (MAS or GCOS from Affymetrix. Recently, more methods to analyse the raw data have become available. Ideally all these methods should come up with more or less the same results. We set out to evaluate the different methods and include work on our own data set, in order to test which method gives the most reliable results. Results Calculating gene expression with 6 different algorithms (MAS5, dChip PMMM, dChip PM, RMA, GC-RMA and PDNN using the same (Arabidopsis data, results in different calculated gene expression levels. Consequently, depending on the method used, different genes will be identified as differentially regulated. Surprisingly, there was only 27 to 36% overlap between the different methods. Furthermore, 47.5% of the genes/probe sets showed good correlation between the mismatch and perfect match intensities. Conclusion After comparing six algorithms, RMA gave the most reproducible results and showed the highest correlation coefficients with Real Time RT-PCR data on genes identified as differentially expressed by all methods. However, we were not able to verify, by Real Time RT-PCR, the microarray results for most genes that were solely calculated by RMA. Furthermore, we conclude that subtraction of the mismatch intensity from the perfect match intensity results most likely in a significant underestimation for at least 47.5% of the expression values. Not one algorithm produced significant expression values for genes present in quantities below 1 pmol. If the only purpose of the microarray experiment is to find new candidate genes, and too many genes are found, then mutual exclusion of the genes predicted by contrasting methods can be used to narrow down the list of new candidate genes by 64 to 73%.

  15. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Oligonucleotide array discovery of polymorphisms in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) reveals patterns of SNP variation associated with breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sung-Chur; Robbins, Matthew D; Chilcott, Charles; Zhu, Tong; Francis, David M

    2009-10-09

    Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) has narrow genetic diversity that makes it difficult to identify polymorphisms between elite germplasm. We explored array-based single feature polymorphism (SFP) discovery as a high-throughput approach for marker development in cultivated tomato. Three varieties, FL7600 (fresh-market), OH9242 (processing), and PI114490 (cherry) were used as a source of genomic DNA for hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. Identification of SFPs was based on outlier detection using regression analysis of normalized hybridization data within a probe set for each gene. A subset of 189 putative SFPs was sequenced for validation. The rate of validation depended on the desired level of significance (alpha) used to define the confidence interval (CI), and ranged from 76% for polymorphisms identified at alpha or= 2 SNPs per locus. We used a subset of validated SNPs for genetic diversity analysis of 92 tomato varieties and accessions. Pairwise estimation of theta (Fst) suggested significant differentiation between collections of fresh-market, processing, vintage, Latin American (landrace), and S. pimpinellifolium accessions. The fresh-market and processing groups displayed high genetic diversity relative to vintage and landrace groups. Furthermore, the patterns of SNP variation indicated that domestication and early breeding practices have led to progressive genetic bottlenecks while modern breeding practices have reintroduced genetic variation into the crop from wild species. Finally, we examined the ratio of non-synonymous (Ka) to synonymous substitutions (Ks) for 20 loci with multiple SNPs (>or= 4 per locus). Six of 20 loci showed ratios of Ka/Ks >or= 0.9. Array-based SFP discovery was an efficient method to identify a large number of molecular markers for genetics and breeding in elite tomato germplasm. Patterns of sequence variation across five major tomato groups provided insight into to the effect of human selection on genetic variation.

  17. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. A Simple Oligonucleotide Biochip Capable of Rapidly Detecting Known Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Chinese Patients with Leber’S Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Du

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally transmitted disease. Clinically, no efficient assay protocols have been available. In this study, we aimed to develop an oligonucleotide biochip specialized for detection of known base substitution mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing LHON and to investigate frequencies of LHON relevant variants in Anhui region of China. Thirty-two pairs of oligonucleotide probes matched with the mutations potentially linked to LHON were covalently immobilized. Cy5-lablled targets were amplified from blood DNA samples by a multiplex PCR method. Two kinds of primary mutations 11778 G > A and 14484 T > C from six confirmed LHON patients were interrogated to validate this biochip format. Further, fourteen Chinese LHON pedigrees and twenty-five unrelated healthy individuals were investigated by the LHON biochip, direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, respectively. The biochip was found to be able efficiently to discriminate homoplasmic and heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in LHON. Biochip analysis revealed that twelve of eighteen LHON symptomatic cases from the 14 Chinese pedigree harbored the mutations either 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A, respectively, accounting for 66.7%. The mutation 11778G > A in these patients was homoplasmic and prevalent (55.5%, 10 of 18 cases. The mutations 3460G > A and 3394T > C were found to co-exist in one LHON case. The mutation 13708G > A appeared in one LHON pedigree. Smaller amount of sampling and reaction volume, easier target preparation, fast and high-throughput were the main advantages of the biochip over direct DNA sequencing and pyrosequencing. Our findings suggested that primary mutations of 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A are main variants of mtDNA gene leading to LHON in China. The biochip would easily be implemented in clinical diagnosis.

  19. A simple oligonucleotide biochip capable of rapidly detecting known mitochondrial DNA mutations in Chinese patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei-Dong; Chen, Gang; Cao, Hui-Min; Jin, Qing-Hui; Liao, Rong-Feng; He, Xiang-Cheng; Chen, Da-Ben; Huang, Shu-Ren; Zhao, Hui; Lv, Yong-Mei; Tang, Hua-Yang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Wang, Yong-Qing; Sun, Song; Zhao, Jian-Long; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease. Clinically, no efficient assay protocols have been available. In this study, we aimed to develop an oligonucleotide biochip specialized for detection of known base substitution mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing LHON and to investigate frequencies of LHON relevant variants in Anhui region of China. Thirty-two pairs of oligonucleotide probes matched with the mutations potentially linked to LHON were covalently immobilized. Cy5-lablled targets were amplified from blood DNA samples by a multiplex PCR method. Two kinds of primary mutations 11778 G > A and 14484 T > C from six confirmed LHON patients were interrogated to validate this biochip format. Further, fourteen Chinese LHON pedigrees and twenty-five unrelated healthy individuals were investigated by the LHON biochip, direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, respectively. The biochip was found to be able efficiently to discriminate homoplasmic and heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in LHON. Biochip analysis revealed that twelve of eighteen LHON symptomatic cases from the 14 Chinese pedigree harbored the mutations either 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G A, respectively, accounting for 66.7%. The mutation 11778G > A in these patients was homoplasmic and prevalent (55.5%, 10 of 18 cases). The mutations 3460G > A and 3394T > C were found to co-exist in one LHON case. The mutation 13708G > A appeared in one LHON pedigree. Smaller amount of sampling and reaction volume, easier target preparation, fast and high-throughput were the main advantages of the biochip over direct DNA sequencing and pyrosequencing. Our findings suggested that primary mutations of 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A are main variants of mtDNA gene leading to LHON in China. The biochip would easily be implemented in clinical diagnosis.

  20. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Safiye [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush, E-mail: faridbodf@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajloo, Davood [School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10{sup −15} to 1 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL{sup −1} with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.