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Sample records for oligonucleotide cgh array

  1. A robust method to analyze copy number alterations of less than 100 kb in single cells using oligonucleotide array CGH.

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    Birte Möhlendick

    Full Text Available Comprehensive genome wide analyses of single cells became increasingly important in cancer research, but remain to be a technically challenging task. Here, we provide a protocol for array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH of single cells. The protocol is based on an established adapter-linker PCR (WGAM and allowed us to detect copy number alterations as small as 56 kb in single cells. In addition we report on factors influencing the success of single cell aCGH downstream of the amplification method, including the characteristics of the reference DNA, the labeling technique, the amount of input DNA, reamplification, the aCGH resolution, and data analysis. In comparison with two other commercially available non-linear single cell amplification methods, WGAM showed a very good performance in aCGH experiments. Finally, we demonstrate that cancer cells that were processed and identified by the CellSearch® System and that were subsequently isolated from the CellSearch® cartridge as single cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS could be successfully analyzed using our WGAM-aCGH protocol. We believe that even in the era of next-generation sequencing, our single cell aCGH protocol will be a useful and (cost- effective approach to study copy number alterations in single cells at resolution comparable to those reported currently for single cell digital karyotyping based on next generation sequencing data.

  2. Application of oligonucleotide array CGH to the simultaneous detection of a deletion in the nuclear TK2 gene and mtDNA depletion.

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    Zhang, Shulin; Li, Fang-Yuan; Bass, Harold N; Pursley, Amber; Schmitt, Eric S; Brown, Blaire L; Brundage, Ellen K; Mardach, Rebecca; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), encoded by the TK2 gene on chromosome 16q22, is one of the deoxyribonucleoside kinases responsible for the maintenance of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide pools. Defects in TK2 mainly cause a myopathic form of the mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDDS). Currently, only point mutations and small insertions and deletions have been reported in TK2 gene; gross rearrangements of TK2 gene and possible hepatic involvement in patients with TK2 mutations have not been described. We report a non-consanguineous Jordanian family with three deceased siblings due to mtDNA depletion. Sequence analysis of the father detected a heterozygous c.761T>A (p.I254N) mutation in his TK2 gene; however, point mutations in the mother were not detected. Subsequent gene dosage analysis using oligonucleotide array CGH identified an intragenic approximately 5.8-kb deletion encompassing the 5'UTR to intron 2 of her TK2 gene. Sequence analysis confirmed that the deletion spans c.1-495 to c.283-2899 of the TK2 gene (nucleotide 65,136,256-65,142,086 of chromosome 16). Analysis of liver and muscle specimens from one of the deceased infants in this family revealed compound heterozygosity for the paternal point mutation and maternal intragenic deletion. In addition, a significant reduction of the mtDNA content in liver and muscle was detected (10% and 20% of age- and tissue-matched controls, respectively). Prenatal diagnosis was performed in the third pregnancy. The fetus was found to carry both the point mutation and the deletion. This child died 6months after birth due to myopathy. A serum specimen demonstrated elevated liver transaminases in two of the infants from whom results were available. This report expands the mutation spectrum associated with TK2 deficiency. While the myopathic form of MDDS appears to be the main phenotype of TK2 mutations, liver dysfunction may also be a part of the mitochondrial depletion syndrome caused by TK2 gene defects.

  3. Spatial normalization of array-CGH data

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    Brennetot Caroline

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH is a recently developed technique for analyzing changes in DNA copy number. As in all microarray analyses, normalization is required to correct for experimental artifacts while preserving the true biological signal. We investigated various sources of systematic variation in array-CGH data and identified two distinct types of spatial effect of no biological relevance as the predominant experimental artifacts: continuous spatial gradients and local spatial bias. Local spatial bias affects a large proportion of arrays, and has not previously been considered in array-CGH experiments. Results We show that existing normalization techniques do not correct these spatial effects properly. We therefore developed an automatic method for the spatial normalization of array-CGH data. This method makes it possible to delineate and to eliminate and/or correct areas affected by spatial bias. It is based on the combination of a spatial segmentation algorithm called NEM (Neighborhood Expectation Maximization and spatial trend estimation. We defined quality criteria for array-CGH data, demonstrating significant improvements in data quality with our method for three data sets coming from two different platforms (198, 175 and 26 BAC-arrays. Conclusion We have designed an automatic algorithm for the spatial normalization of BAC CGH-array data, preventing the misinterpretation of experimental artifacts as biologically relevant outliers in the genomic profile. This algorithm is implemented in the R package MANOR (Micro-Array NORmalization, which is described at http://bioinfo.curie.fr/projects/manor and available from the Bioconductor site http://www.bioconductor.org. It can also be tested on the CAPweb bioinformatics platform at http://bioinfo.curie.fr/CAPweb.

  4. CGHPRO – A comprehensive data analysis tool for array CGH

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    Lenzner Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridisation is a molecular cytogenetic technique for the genome wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. It is based on the co-hybridisation of differentially labelled test and reference DNA onto arrays of genomic BAC clones, cDNAs or oligonucleotides, and after correction for various intervening variables, loss or gain in the test DNA can be indicated from spots showing aberrant signal intensity ratios. Now that this technique is no longer confined to highly specialized laboratories and is entering the realm of clinical application, there is a need for a user-friendly software package that facilitates estimates of DNA dosage from raw signal intensities obtained by array CGH experiments, and which does not depend on a sophisticated computational environment. Results We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection and comparative analysis of array-CGH data. CGHPRO is a stand-alone JAVA application that guides the user through the whole process of data analysis. The import option for image analysis data covers several data formats, but users can also customize their own data formats. Several graphical representation tools assist in the selection of the appropriate normalization method. Intensity ratios of each clone can be plotted in a size-dependent manner along the chromosome ideograms. The interactive graphical interface offers the chance to explore the characteristics of each clone, such as the involvement of the clones sequence in segmental duplications. Circular Binary Segmentation and unsupervised Hidden Markov Model algorithms facilitate objective detection of chromosomal breakpoints. The storage of all essential data in a back-end database allows the simultaneously comparative analysis of different cases. The various display options facilitate also the definition of shortest regions of overlap and simplify the

  5. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

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    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  6. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Ramos

    Full Text Available Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb. Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14(q10;q10. Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  7. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  8. Accurate confidence aware clustering of array CGH tumor profiles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houte, B.P.P.; Heringa, J.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Chromosomal aberrations tend to be characteristic for given (sub)types of cancer. Such aberrations can be detected with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Clustering aCGH tumor profiles aids in identifying chromosomal regions of interest and provides useful diagnostic

  9. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of cytogenetic abnormalities by array CGH analysis

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    Array CGH analysis has been shown to be highly accurate for rapid detection of chromosomal aneuploidies and submicroscopic deletions or duplications on fetal DNA samples in a clinical prenatal diagnostic setting. The objective of this study is to present our "post-validation phase" experience with ...

  10. A new normalizing algorithm for BAC CGH arrays with quality control metrics.

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    Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C; Gaile, Daniel P; Liu, Song; Shepherd, Lori; Nowak, Norma

    2011-01-01

    The main focus in pin-tip (or print-tip) microarray analysis is determining which probes, genes, or oligonucleotides are differentially expressed. Specifically in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) experiments, researchers search for chromosomal imbalances in the genome. To model this data, scientists apply statistical methods to the structure of the experiment and assume that the data consist of the signal plus random noise. In this paper we propose "SmoothArray", a new method to preprocess comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays and we show the effects on a cancer dataset. As part of our R software package "aCGHplus," this freely available algorithm removes the variation due to the intensity effects, pin/print-tip, the spatial location on the microarray chip, and the relative location from the well plate. removal of this variation improves the downstream analysis and subsequent inferences made on the data. Further, we present measures to evaluate the quality of the dataset according to the arrayer pins, 384-well plates, plate rows, and plate columns. We compare our method against competing methods using several metrics to measure the biological signal. With this novel normalization algorithm and quality control measures, the user can improve their inferences on datasets and pinpoint problems that may arise in their BAC aCGH technology.

  11. WebaCGH: an interactive online tool for the analysis and display of array comparative genomic hybridisation data.

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    Frankenberger, Casey; Wu, Xiaolin; Harmon, Jerry; Church, Deanna; Gangi, Lisa M; Munroe, David J; Urzúa, Ulises

    2006-01-01

    Gene copy number variations occur both in normal cells and in numerous pathologies including cancer and developmental diseases. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) is an emerging technology that allows detection of chromosomal gains and losses in a high-resolution format. When aCGH is performed on cDNA and oligonucleotide microarrays, the impact of DNA copy number on gene transcription profiles may be directly compared. We have created an online software tool, WebaCGH, that functions to (i) upload aCGH and gene transcription results from multiple experiments; (ii) identify significant aberrant regions using a local Z-score threshold in user-selected chromosomal segments subjected to smoothing with moving averages; and (iii) display results in a graphical format with full genome and individual chromosome views. In the individual chromosome display, data can be zoomed in/out in both dimensions (i.e. ratio and physical location) and plotted features can have 'mouse over' linking to outside databases to identify loci of interest. Uploaded data can be stored indefinitely for subsequent retrieval and analysis. WebaCGH was created as a Java-based web application using the open-source database MySQL. WebaCGH is freely accessible at http://129.43.22.27/WebaCGH/welcome.htm Xiaolin Wu (forestwu@mail.nih.gov) or Ulises Urzúa (uurzua@med.uchile.cl).

  12. A New Normalizing Algorithm for BAC CGH Arrays with Quality Control Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. Miecznikowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus in pin-tip (or print-tip microarray analysis is determining which probes, genes, or oligonucleotides are differentially expressed. Specifically in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH experiments, researchers search for chromosomal imbalances in the genome. To model this data, scientists apply statistical methods to the structure of the experiment and assume that the data consist of the signal plus random noise. In this paper we propose “SmoothArray”, a new method to preprocess comparative genomic hybridization (CGH bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays and we show the effects on a cancer dataset. As part of our R software package “aCGHplus,” this freely available algorithm removes the variation due to the intensity effects, pin/print-tip, the spatial location on the microarray chip, and the relative location from the well plate. removal of this variation improves the downstream analysis and subsequent inferences made on the data. Further, we present measures to evaluate the quality of the dataset according to the arrayer pins, 384-well plates, plate rows, and plate columns. We compare our method against competing methods using several metrics to measure the biological signal. With this novel normalization algorithm and quality control measures, the user can improve their inferences on datasets and pinpoint problems that may arise in their BAC aCGH technology.

  13. Two novel deletions (array CGH findings) in pigment dispersion syndrome.

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    Mikelsaar, Ruth; Molder, Harras; Bartsch, Oliver; Punab, Margus

    2007-12-01

    We report the first male with pigment dispersion syndrome and a balanced translocation t(10;15)(p11.1;q11.1). Cytogenetic analyses using Giemsa banding and FISH methods, and array CGH were performed. Array CGH analyses did not show altered DNA sequences in the breakpoints of the translocation, but revealed two novel deletions in 2q22.1 and 18q22.1. We suppose that the coexistence of t(10;15) and pigment dispersion syndrome in our patient is a coincidence. The deletion in 2q22.1, where the gene LRP1B has been located, may play a major role in the dysembryogenesis of the eye and cause the disorder.

  14. CGHnormaliter: an iterative strategy to enhance normalization of array CGH data with imbalanced aberrations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houte, B.P.P.; Binsl, T.W.; Hettling, H.; Pirovano, W.A.; Heringa, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a popular technique for detection of genomic copy number imbalances. These play a critical role in the onset of various types of cancer. In the analysis of aCGH data, normalization is deemed a critical pre-processing step. In general,

  15. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

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    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  16. Genome-Wide Screening of Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients Using Array-CGH Technique: A Czech Multicenter Experience

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    Jan Smetana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic recurrent copy number aberrations (CNAs play a key role in multiple myeloma (MM pathogenesis and have important prognostic significance for MM patients. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH provides a powerful tool for genome-wide classification of CNAs and thus should be implemented into MM routine diagnostics. We demonstrate the possibility of effective utilization of oligonucleotide-based aCGH in 91 MM patients. Chromosomal aberrations associated with effect on the prognosis of MM were initially evaluated by I-FISH and were found in 93.4% (85/91. Incidence of hyperdiploidy was 49.5% (45/91; del(13(q14 was detected in 57.1% (52/91; gain(1(q21 occurred in 58.2% (53/91; del(17(p13 was observed in 15.4% (14/91; and t(4;14(p16;q32 was found in 18.6% (16/86. Genome-wide screening using Agilent 44K aCGH microarrays revealed copy number alterations in 100% (91/91. Most common deletions were found at 13q (58.9%, 1p (39.6%, and 8p (31.1%, whereas gain of whole 1q was the most often duplicated region (50.6%. Furthermore, frequent homozygous deletions of genes playing important role in myeloma biology such as TRAF3, BIRC1/BIRC2, RB1, or CDKN2C were observed. Taken together, we demonstrated the utilization of aCGH technique in clinical diagnostics as powerful tool for identification of unbalanced genomic abnormalities with prognostic significance for MM patients.

  17. High-resolution SNP array analysis of patients with developmental disorder and normal array CGH results

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    Siggberg Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic analysis of patients with developmental disorders has improved over recent years largely due to the use of microarray technology. Array methods that facilitate copy number analysis have enabled the diagnosis of up to 20% more patients with previously normal karyotyping results. A substantial number of patients remain undiagnosed, however. Methods and Results Using the Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0, we analyzed 35 patients with a developmental disorder of unknown cause and normal array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH results, in order to characterize previously undefined genomic aberrations. We detected no seemingly pathogenic copy number aberrations. Most of the vast amount of data produced by the array was polymorphic and non-informative. Filtering of this data, based on copy number variant (CNV population frequencies as well as phenotypically relevant genes, enabled pinpointing regions of allelic homozygosity that included candidate genes correlating to the phenotypic features in four patients, but results could not be confirmed. Conclusions In this study, the use of an ultra high-resolution SNP array did not contribute to further diagnose patients with developmental disorders of unknown cause. The statistical power of these results is limited by the small size of the patient cohort, and interpretation of these negative results can only be applied to the patients studied here. We present the results of our study and the recurrence of clustered allelic homozygosity present in this material, as detected by the SNP 6.0 array.

  18. Phenotype in patients with intellectual disability and pathological results in array CGH.

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    Caballero Pérez, V; López Pisón, F J; Miramar Gallart, M D; González Álvarez, A; García Jiménez, M C; García Iñiguez, J P; Orden Rueda, C; Gil Hernández, I; Fuertes Rodrigo, C; Fernando Martínez, R; Rodríguez Valle, A; Alcaine Villarroya, M J

    Global developmental delay (GDD) and intellectual disability (ID) are frequent reasons for consultation in paediatric neurology departments. Nowadays, array comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) is one of the most widely used techniques for diagnosing these disorders. Our purpose was to determine the phenotypic features associated with pathological results in this genetic test. We conducted a blind study of the epidemiological, clinical, anthropometric, and morphological features of 80 patients with unexplained ID to determine which features were associated with pathological results in array-CGH. Pathological results were found in 27.5% of the patients. Factors associated with pathological results in array-CGH were a family history of GDD/ID (OR = 12.1), congenital malformations (OR = 5.33), having more than 3 facial dysmorphic features (OR = 20.9), and hypotonia (OR = 3.25). Our findings are consistent with those reported by other published series. We therefore conclude that the probability of having pathological results in array-CGH increases with the presence of any of the features mentioned above in patients with ID/GDD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. CGHnormaliter: a bioconductor package for normalization of array CGH data with many CNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houte, B.P.P.; Binsl, T.W.; Hettling, H.; Heringa, J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: CGHnormaliter is a package for normalization of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data. It uses an iterative procedure that effectively eliminates the influence of imbalanced copy numbers. This leads to a more reliable assessment of copy number alterations (CNAs). CGHnormaliter

  20. Genome-wide comparison of paired fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gliomas by custom BAC and oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization: facilitating analysis of archival gliomas.

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    Mohapatra, Gayatry; Engler, David A; Starbuck, Kristen D; Kim, James C; Bernay, Derek C; Scangas, George A; Rousseau, Audrey; Batchelor, Tracy T; Betensky, Rebecca A; Louis, David N

    2011-04-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for detecting DNA copy number alterations (CNA). Because diffuse malignant gliomas are often sampled by small biopsies, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks are often the only tissue available for genetic analysis; FFPE tissues are also needed to study the intratumoral heterogeneity that characterizes these neoplasms. In this paper, we present a combination of evaluations and technical advances that provide strong support for the ready use of oligonucleotide aCGH on FFPE diffuse gliomas. We first compared aCGH using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays in 45 paired frozen and FFPE gliomas, and demonstrate a high concordance rate between FFPE and frozen DNA in an individual clone-level analysis of sensitivity and specificity, assuring that under certain array conditions, frozen and FFPE DNA can perform nearly identically. However, because oligonucleotide arrays offer advantages to BAC arrays in genomic coverage and practical availability, we next developed a method of labeling DNA from FFPE tissue that allows efficient hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. To demonstrate utility in FFPE tissues, we applied this approach to biphasic anaplastic oligoastrocytomas and demonstrate CNA differences between DNA obtained from the two components. Therefore, BAC and oligonucleotide aCGH can be sensitive and specific tools for detecting CNAs in FFPE DNA, and novel labeling techniques enable the routine use of oligonucleotide arrays for FFPE DNA. In combination, these advances should facilitate genome-wide analysis of rare, small and/or histologically heterogeneous gliomas from FFPE tissues.

  1. Phenotype and 244k array-CGH characterization of chromosome 13q deletions: an update of the phenotypic map of 13q21.1-qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Stoeva, Radka

    2009-01-01

    Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 lead to variable phenotypes dependant on the size and position of the deleted region. In order to update the phenotypic map of chromosome 13q21.1-qter deletions, we applied 244k Agilent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact break......-genotype correlation on chromosome 13. In contrast to previous reports of carriers of 13q32 band deletions as the most seriously affected patients, we present two such individuals with long-term survival, 28 and 2.5 years....

  2. Array CGH analysis of a cohort of Russian patients with intellectual disability.

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    Kashevarova, Anna A; Nazarenko, Lyudmila P; Skryabin, Nikolay A; Salyukova, Olga A; Chechetkina, Nataliya N; Tolmacheva, Ekaterina N; Sazhenova, Elena A; Magini, Pamela; Graziano, Claudio; Romeo, Giovanni; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lebedev, Igor N

    2014-02-15

    The use of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) as a diagnostic tool in molecular genetics has facilitated the identification of many new microdeletion/microduplication syndromes (MMSs). Furthermore, this method has allowed for the identification of copy number variations (CNVs) whose pathogenic role has yet to be uncovered. Here, we report on our application of array CGH for the identification of pathogenic CNVs in 79 Russian children with intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-six pathogenic or likely pathogenic changes in copy number were detected in 22 patients (28%): 8 CNVs corresponded to known MMSs, and 17 were not associated with previously described syndromes. In this report, we describe our findings and comment on genes potentially associated with ID that are located within the CNV regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated high-resolution array CGH and SKY analysis of homozygous deletions and other genomic alterations present in malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

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    Klorin, Geula; Rozenblum, Ester; Glebov, Oleg; Walker, Robert L; Park, Yoonsoo; Meltzer, Paul S; Kirsch, Ilan R; Kaye, Frederic J; Roschke, Anna V

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) were applied to a panel of malignant mesothelioma (MMt) cell lines. SKY has not been applied to MMt before, and complete karyotypes are reported based on the integration of SKY and aCGH results. A whole genome search for homozygous deletions (HDs) produced the largest set of recurrent and non-recurrent HDs for MMt (52 recurrent HDs in 10 genomic regions; 36 non-recurrent HDs). For the first time, LINGO2, RBFOX1/A2BP1, RPL29, DUSP7, and CCSER1/FAM190A were found to be homozygously deleted in MMt, and some of these genes could be new tumor suppressor genes for MMt. Integration of SKY and aCGH data allowed reconstruction of chromosomal rearrangements that led to the formation of HDs. Our data imply that only with acquisition of structural and/or numerical karyotypic instability can MMt cells attain a complete loss of tumor suppressor genes located in 9p21.3, which is the most frequently homozygously deleted region. Tetraploidization is a late event in the karyotypic progression of MMt cells, after HDs in the 9p21.3 region have already been acquired. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Array-CGH Analysis in a Cohort of Phenotypically Well-Characterized Individuals with "Essential" Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Napoli, Eleonora; Russo, Serena; Casula, Laura; Alesi, Viola; Amendola, Filomena Alessandra; Angioni, Adriano; Novelli, Antonio; Valeri, Giovanni; Menghini, Deny; Vicari, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are associated with susceptibility to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To detect the presence of CNVs, we conducted an array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis in 133 children with "essential" ASD phenotype. Genetic analyses documented that 12 children had causative CNVs (C-CNVs), 29…

  5. Identification of clinically relevant viridans streptococci by an oligonucleotide array.

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    Chen, Chao Chien; Teng, Lee Jene; Kaiung, Seng; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2005-04-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are common etiologic agents of subacute infective endocarditis and are capable of causing a variety of pyogenic infections. Many species of VS are difficult to differentiate by phenotypic traits. An oligonucleotide array based on 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences was developed to identify 11 clinically relevant VS. These 11 species were Streptococcus anginosus, S. constellatus, S. gordonii, S. intermedius, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. oralis, S. parasanguinis, S. salivarius, S. sanguinis, and S. uberis. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the ITS regions by using a pair of universal primers, followed by hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane. After 120 strains of the 11 species of VG and 91 strains of other bacteria were tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the oligonucleotide array were found to be 100% (120 of 120 strains) and 95.6% (87 of 91 strains), respectively. S. pneumoniae cross-hybridized to the probes used for the identification of S. mitis, and simple biochemical tests such as optochin susceptibility or bile solubility should be used to differentiate S. pneumoniae from S. mitis. In conclusion, identification of species of VS by use of the present oligonucleotide array is accurate and could be used as an alternative reliable method for species identification of strains of VS.

  6. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quimsiyeh Mazin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG. Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9(p22.1p24 [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance.

  7. High-resolution array CGH clarifies events occurring on 8p in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Susanna L; Pole, Jessica CM; Chin, Suet-Feung; Ellis, Ian O; Caldas, Carlos; Edwards, Paul AW

    2008-01-01

    Rearrangement of the short arm of chromosome 8 (8p) is very common in epithelial cancers such as breast cancer. Usually there is an unbalanced translocation breakpoint in 8p12 (29.7 Mb – 38.5 Mb) with loss of distal 8p, sometimes with proximal amplification of 8p11-12. Rearrangements in 8p11-12 have been investigated using high-resolution array CGH, but the first 30 Mb of 8p are less well characterised, although this region contains several proposed tumour suppressor genes. We analysed the whole of 8p by array CGH at tiling-path BAC resolution in 32 breast and six pancreatic cancer cell lines. Regions of recurrent rearrangement distal to 8p12 were further characterised, using regional fosmid arrays. FISH, and quantitative RT-PCR on over 60 breast tumours validated the existence of similar events in primary material. We confirmed that 8p is usually lost up to at least 30 Mb, but a few lines showed focal loss or copy number steps within this region. Three regions showed rearrangements common to at least two cases: two regions of recurrent loss and one region of amplification. Loss within 8p23.3 (0 Mb – 2.2 Mb) was found in six cell lines. Of the genes always affected, ARHGEF10 showed a point mutation of the remaining normal copies in the DU4475 cell line. Deletions within 12.7 Mb – 19.1 Mb in 8p22, in two cases, affected TUSC3. A novel amplicon was found within 8p21.3 (19.1 Mb – 23.4 Mb) in two lines and one of 98 tumours. The pattern of rearrangements seen on 8p may be a consequence of the high density of potential targets on this chromosome arm, and ARHGEF10 may be a new candidate tumour suppressor gene

  8. The development of a mini-array for estimating the disease state of gastric adenocarcinoma by array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oga Atsunori

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment strategy usually depends on the disease state in the individual patient. However, it is difficult to estimate the disease state before treatment in many patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome mini-array allowing for the estimation of node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination and the depth of tumor invasion in gastric cancers. Methods Initially, the DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs were analyzed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in 83 gastric adenocarcinomas as a training-sample set. Next, two independent analytical methods were applied to the aCGH data to identify the BAC clones with DNA copy number aberrations that were linked with the disease states. One of the methods, a decision-tree model classifier, identified 6, 4, 4, 4, and 7 clones for estimating lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, depth of tumor invasion, and histological type, respectively. In the other method, a clone-by-clone comparison of the frequency of the DNA copy number aberrations selected 26 clones to estimate the disease states. Results By spotting these 50 clones together with 26 frequently or rarely involved clones and 62 reference clones, a mini-array was made to estimate the above parameters, and the diagnostic performance of the mini-array was evaluated for an independent set of 30 gastric cancers (blinded – sample set. In comparison to the clinicopathological features, the overall accuracy was 66.7% for node metastasis, 86.7% for liver metastasis, 86.7% for peritoneal dissemination, and 96.7% for depth of tumor invasion. The intratumoral heterogeneity barely affected the diagnostic performance of the mini-array. Conclusion These results suggest that the mini-array makes it possible to determine an optimal treatment for each of the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

  9. The development of a mini-array for estimating the disease state of gastric adenocarcinoma by array CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Tomoko; Uchiyama, Tetsuji; Adachi, Atsushi; Okada, Takae; Nakao, Motonao; Oga, Atsunori; Yang, Song-Ju; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Sasaki, Kohsuke

    2008-01-01

    The treatment strategy usually depends on the disease state in the individual patient. However, it is difficult to estimate the disease state before treatment in many patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) mini-array allowing for the estimation of node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination and the depth of tumor invasion in gastric cancers. Initially, the DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) were analyzed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 83 gastric adenocarcinomas as a training-sample set. Next, two independent analytical methods were applied to the aCGH data to identify the BAC clones with DNA copy number aberrations that were linked with the disease states. One of the methods, a decision-tree model classifier, identified 6, 4, 4, 4, and 7 clones for estimating lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, depth of tumor invasion, and histological type, respectively. In the other method, a clone-by-clone comparison of the frequency of the DNA copy number aberrations selected 26 clones to estimate the disease states. By spotting these 50 clones together with 26 frequently or rarely involved clones and 62 reference clones, a mini-array was made to estimate the above parameters, and the diagnostic performance of the mini-array was evaluated for an independent set of 30 gastric cancers (blinded – sample set). In comparison to the clinicopathological features, the overall accuracy was 66.7% for node metastasis, 86.7% for liver metastasis, 86.7% for peritoneal dissemination, and 96.7% for depth of tumor invasion. The intratumoral heterogeneity barely affected the diagnostic performance of the mini-array. These results suggest that the mini-array makes it possible to determine an optimal treatment for each of the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

  10. CGHregions: Dimension Reduction for Array CGH Data with Minimal Information Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. van de Wiel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm to reduce multi-sample array CGH data from thousands of clones to tens or hundreds of clone regions is introduced. This reduction of the data is performed such that little information is lost, which is possible due to the high dependencies between neighboring clones. The algorithm is explained using a small example. The potential beneficial effects of the algorithm for downstream analysis are illustrated by re-analysis of previously published colorectal cancer data. Using multiple testing corrections suitable for these data, we provide statistical evidence for genomic differences on several clone regions between MSI+ and CIN+ tumors. The algorithm, named CGHregions, is available as an easy-to-use script in R.

  11. CGH and SNP array using DNA extracted from fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon Ruth N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of nucleic acids is limited by the availability of archival specimens and the quality and amount of the extracted material. Archived cytogenetic preparations are stored in many laboratories and are a potential source of total genomic DNA for array karyotyping and other applications. Array CGH using DNA from fixed cytogenetic preparations has been described, but it is not known whether it can be used for SNP arrays. Diagnostic bone marrow specimens taken during the assessment of hematological malignancies are also a potential source of DNA, but it is generally assumed that DNA must be extracted, or the specimen frozen, within a day or two of collection, to obtain DNA suitable for further analysis. We have assessed DNA extracted from these materials for both SNP array and array CGH. Results We show that both SNP array and array CGH can be performed on genomic DNA extracted from cytogenetic specimens stored in Carnoy's fixative, and from bone marrow which has been stored unfrozen, at 4°C, for at least 36 days. We describe a procedure for extracting a usable concentration of total genomic DNA from cytogenetic suspensions of low cellularity. Conclusions The ability to use these archival specimens for DNA-based analysis increases the potential for retrospective genetic analysis of clinical specimens. Fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow both provide DNA suitable for array karyotyping, and may be suitable for a wider range of analytical procedures.

  12. Array CGH Analysis and Developmental Delay: A Diagnostic Tool for Neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, F; Xu, J; Jung, J; Prasad, C

    2013-11-01

    Developmental delay occurs in 1-3% of the population, with unknown etiology in approximately 50% of cases. Initial genetic work up for developmental delay previously included chromosome analysis and subtelomeric FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) has emerged as a tool to detect genetic copy number changes and uniparental disomy and is the most sensitive test in providing etiological diagnosis in developmental delay. aCGH allows for the provision of prognosis and recurrence risks, improves access to resources, helps limit further investigations and may alter medical management in many cases. aCGH has led to the delineation of novel genetic syndromes associated with developmental delay. An illustrative case of a 31-year-old man with long standing global developmental delay and recently diagnosed 4q21 deletion syndrome with a deletion of 20.8 Mb genomic interval is provided. aCGH is now recommended as a first line test in children and adults with undiagnosed developmental delay and congenital anomalies. Puce d'hybridation génomique comparative et retard de développement : un outil diagnostic pour les neurologues. Le retard de développement survient chez 1 à 3% de la population et son étiologie est inconnue chez à peu près 50% des cas. L'évaluation génétique initiale pour un retard de développement incluait antérieurement une analyse chromosomique et une analyse par FISH (hybridation in situ en fluorescence) de régions subtélomériques. La puce d'hybridation génomique comparative (CGHa) est devenue un outil de détection des changements du nombre de copies géniques ainsi que de la disomie uniparentale et elle est le test le plus sensible pour fournir un diagnostic étiologique dans le retard de développement. Le CGHa permet d'offrir un pronostic et un risque de récurrence, améliore l'accès aux ressources, aide à limiter les évaluations et peut modifier le traitement médical dans bien des cas

  13. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Human Genome Project is to sequence all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. Progress in this has been rapid; GenBank(reg s ign) finished 1994 with 286 million bases of sequence and grew by 2470 in the first quarter of 1995. The challenge to the scientific community is to understand the biological relevance of this genetic information. In most cases the sequence being generated for any single region of the genome represents the genotype of a single individual. A complete understanding of the function of specific genes and other regions of the genome and their role in human disease and development will only become apparent when the sequence of many more individuals is known. Access to genetic information is ultimately limited by the ability to screen DNA sequence. Although the pioneering sequencing methods of Sanger et al. (15) and Maxam and Gilbert (11) have become standard in virtually all molecular biology laboratories, the basic protocols remain largely unchanged. The throughput of this sequencing technology is now becoming the rate-limiting step in both large-scale sequencing projects such as the Human Genome Project and the subsequent efforts to understand genetic diversity. This has inspired the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies (9), Incremental improvements to Sanger sequencing have been made in DNA labeling and detection. High-speed electrophoresis methods using ultrathin gels or capillary arrays are now being more widely employed. However, these methods are throughput-limited by their sequential nature and the speed and resolution of separations. This limitation will become more pronounced as the need to rapidly screen newly discovered genes for biologically relevant polymorphisms increases. An alternative to gel-based sequencing is to use high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Oligonucleotide probe arrays display specific oligonucleotide probes at precise locations in a high density, information-rich format (5

  14. Combining gene expression data from different generations of oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Sek

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the important challenges in microarray analysis is to take full advantage of previously accumulated data, both from one's own laboratory and from public repositories. Through a comparative analysis on a variety of datasets, a more comprehensive view of the underlying mechanism or structure can be obtained. However, as we discover in this work, continual changes in genomic sequence annotations and probe design criteria make it difficult to compare gene expression data even from different generations of the same microarray platform. Results We first describe the extent of discordance between the results derived from two generations of Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, as revealed in cluster analysis and in identification of differentially expressed genes. We then propose a method for increasing comparability. The dataset we use consists of a set of 14 human muscle biopsy samples from patients with inflammatory myopathies that were hybridized on both HG-U95Av2 and HG-U133A human arrays. We find that the use of the probe set matching table for comparative analysis provided by Affymetrix produces better results than matching by UniGene or LocusLink identifiers but still remains inadequate. Rescaling of expression values for each gene across samples and data filtering by expression values enhance comparability but only for few specific analyses. As a generic method for improving comparability, we select a subset of probes with overlapping sequence segments in the two array types and recalculate expression values based only on the selected probes. We show that this filtering of probes significantly improves the comparability while retaining a sufficient number of probe sets for further analysis. Conclusions Compatibility between high-density oligonucleotide arrays is significantly affected by probe-level sequence information. With a careful filtering of the probes based on their sequence overlaps, data from different

  15. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

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    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  16. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80 % of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68 % of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways.

  17. Salivary gland carcinosarcoma: oligonucleotide array CGH reveals similar genomic profiles in epithelial and mesenchymal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vékony, H.; Leemans, C.R.; Ylstra, B.; Meijer, G.A.; van der Waal, I.; Bloemena, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a case of parotid gland de novo carcinosarcoma. Salivary gland carcinosarcoma (or true malignant mixed tumor) is a rare biphasic neoplasm, composed of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal components. It is yet unclear whether these two phenotypes occur by

  18. Combined use of expression and CGH arrays pinpoints novel candidate genes in Ewing sarcoma family of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savola, Suvi; Knuutila, Sakari; Klami, Arto; Tripathi, Abhishek; Niini, Tarja; Serra, Massimo; Picci, Piero; Kaski, Samuel; Zambelli, Diana; Scotlandi, Katia

    2009-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT), characterized by t(11;22)(q24;q12), is one of the most common tumors of bone in children and young adults. In addition to EWS/FLI1 gene fusion, copy number changes are known to be significant for the underlying neoplastic development of ESFT and for patient outcome. Our genome-wide high-resolution analysis aspired to pinpoint genomic regions of highest interest and possible target genes in these areas. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and expression arrays were used to screen for copy number alterations and expression changes in ESFT patient samples. A total of 31 ESFT samples were analyzed by aCGH and in 16 patients DNA and RNA level data, created by expression arrays, was integrated. Time of the follow-up of these patients was 5–192 months. Clinical outcome was statistically evaluated by Kaplan-Meier/Logrank methods and RT-PCR was applied on 42 patient samples to study the gene of the highest interest. Copy number changes were detected in 87% of the cases. The most recurrent copy number changes were gains at 1q, 2, 8, and 12, and losses at 9p and 16q. Cumulative event free survival (ESFT) and overall survival (OS) were significantly better (P < 0.05) for primary tumors with three or less copy number changes than for tumors with higher number of copy number aberrations. In three samples copy number imbalances were detected in chromosomes 11 and 22 affecting the FLI1 and EWSR1 loci, suggesting that an unbalanced t(11;22) and subsequent duplication of the derivative chromosome harboring fusion gene is a common event in ESFT. Further, amplifications on chromosomes 20 and 22 seen in one patient sample suggest a novel translocation type between EWSR1 and an unidentified fusion partner at 20q. In total 20 novel ESFT associated putative oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were found in the integration analysis of array CGH and expression data. Quantitative RT-PCR to study the expression levels of the most interesting

  19. Correction of Spatial Bias in Oligonucleotide Array Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Serhal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oligonucleotide microarrays allow for high-throughput gene expression profiling assays. The technology relies on the fundamental assumption that observed hybridization signal intensities (HSIs for each intended target, on average, correlate with their target’s true concentration in the sample. However, systematic, nonbiological variation from several sources undermines this hypothesis. Background hybridization signal has been previously identified as one such important source, one manifestation of which appears in the form of spatial autocorrelation. Results. We propose an algorithm, pyn, for the elimination of spatial autocorrelation in HSIs, exploiting the duality of desirable mutual information shared by probes in a common probe set and undesirable mutual information shared by spatially proximate probes. We show that this correction procedure reduces spatial autocorrelation in HSIs; increases HSI reproducibility across replicate arrays; increases differentially expressed gene detection power; and performs better than previously published methods. Conclusions. The proposed algorithm increases both precision and accuracy, while requiring virtually no changes to users’ current analysis pipelines: the correction consists merely of a transformation of raw HSIs (e.g., CEL files for Affymetrix arrays. A free, open-source implementation is provided as an R package, compatible with standard Bioconductor tools. The approach may also be tailored to other platform types and other sources of bias.

  20. Correction of Spatial Bias in Oligonucleotide Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oligonucleotide microarrays allow for high-throughput gene expression profiling assays. The technology relies on the fundamental assumption that observed hybridization signal intensities (HSIs) for each intended target, on average, correlate with their target's true concentration in the sample. However, systematic, nonbiological variation from several sources undermines this hypothesis. Background hybridization signal has been previously identified as one such important source, one manifestation of which appears in the form of spatial autocorrelation. Results. We propose an algorithm, pyn, for the elimination of spatial autocorrelation in HSIs, exploiting the duality of desirable mutual information shared by probes in a common probe set and undesirable mutual information shared by spatially proximate probes. We show that this correction procedure reduces spatial autocorrelation in HSIs; increases HSI reproducibility across replicate arrays; increases differentially expressed gene detection power; and performs better than previously published methods. Conclusions. The proposed algorithm increases both precision and accuracy, while requiring virtually no changes to users' current analysis pipelines: the correction consists merely of a transformation of raw HSIs (e.g., CEL files for Affymetrix arrays). A free, open-source implementation is provided as an R package, compatible with standard Bioconductor tools. The approach may also be tailored to other platform types and other sources of bias. PMID:23573083

  1. Genotype-phenotype analysis of recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome: an array-CGH study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat, Morteza; Hemmat, Omid; Anguiano, Arturo; Boyar, Fatih Z; El Naggar, Mohammed; Wang, Jia-Chi; Wang, Borris T; Sahoo, Trilochan; Owen, Renius; Haddadin, Mary

    2013-05-02

    Recombinant chromosome 4, a rare constitutional rearrangement arising from pericentric inversion, comprises a duplicated segment of 4p13~p15→4pter and a deleted segment of 4q35→4qter. To date, 10 cases of recombinant chromosome 4 have been reported. We describe the second case in which array-CGH was used to characterize recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome. The patient was a one-year old boy with consistent clinical features. Conventional cytogenetics and FISH documented a recombinant chromosome 4, derived from a paternal pericentric inversion, leading to partial trisomy 4p and partial monosomy of 4q. Array-CGH, performed to further characterize the rearranged chromosome 4 and delineate the breakpoints, documented a small (4.36 Mb) 4q35.1 terminal deletion and a large (23.81 Mb) 4p15.1 terminal duplication. Genotype-phenotype analysis of 10 previously reported cases and the present case indicated relatively consistent clinical features and breakpoints. This consistency was more evident in our case and another characterized by array-CGH, where both showed the common breakpoints of p15.1 and q35.1. A genotype-phenotype correlation study between rec(4), dup(4p), and del(4q) syndromes revealed that urogenital and cardiac defects are probably due to the deletion of 4q whereas the other clinical features are likely due to 4p duplication. Our findings support that the clinical features of patients with rec(4) are relatively consistent and specific to the regions of duplication or deletion. Recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome thus appears to be a discrete entity that can be suspected on the basis of clinical features or specific deleted and duplicated chromosomal regions.

  2. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong R Yang

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS. Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29, had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26, estrogen receptor (ER-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28, and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22. Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12. Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  3. BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, Emma; Karlsson, Sara; Partheen, Karolina; Nilsson, Staffan; Szpirer, Claude; Behboudi, Afrouz

    2012-01-01

    Development of breast cancer is a multistage process influenced by hormonal and environmental factors as well as by genetic background. The search for genes underlying this malignancy has recently been highly productive, but the etiology behind this complex disease is still not understood. In studies using animal cancer models, heterogeneity of the genetic background and environmental factors is reduced and thus analysis and identification of genetic aberrations in tumors may become easier. To identify chromosomal regions potentially involved in the initiation and progression of mammary cancer, in the present work we subjected a subset of experimental mammary tumors to cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Mammary tumors were induced with DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrazene) in female rats from the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and from crosses and backcrosses between this strain and the resistant WKY strain. We first produced a general overview of chromosomal aberrations in the tumors using conventional kartyotyping (G-banding) and Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH) analyses. Particular chromosomal changes were then analyzed in more details using an in-house developed BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) CGH-array platform. Tumors appeared to be diploid by conventional karyotyping, however several sub-microscopic chromosome gains or losses in the tumor material were identified by BAC CGH-array analysis. An oncogenetic tree analysis based on the BAC CGH-array data suggested gain of rat chromosome (RNO) band 12q11, loss of RNO5q32 or RNO6q21 as the earliest events in the development of these mammary tumors. Some of the identified changes appear to be more specific for DMBA-induced mammary tumors and some are similar to those previously reported in ACI rat model for estradiol-induced mammary tumors. The later group of changes is more interesting, since they may represent anomalies that involve genes with a critical role in mammary tumor development. Genetic

  4. A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Naja; Gjørup, Vibike; Christensen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH......A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH...

  5. Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Aravena, Andrés; Tapia, Teresa; Rozenblum, Ester; Solís, Luisa; Corvalán, Alejandro; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Munroe, David; Maass, Alejandro; Carvallo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Array CGH analysis of breast tumors has contributed to the identification of different genomic profiles in these tumors. Loss of DNA repair by BRCA1 functional deficiency in breast cancer has been proposed as a relevant contribution to breast cancer progression for tumors with no germline mutation. Identifying the genomic alterations taking place in BRCA1 not expressing tumors will lead us to a better understanding of the cellular functions affected in this heterogeneous disease. Moreover, specific genomic alterations may contribute to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and offer a more personalized treatment to breast cancer patients. Forty seven tumors from hereditary breast cancer cases, previously analyzed for BRCA1 expression, and screened for germline BRCA1 and 2 mutations, were analyzed by Array based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) using Agilent 4x44K arrays. Overall survival was established for tumors in different clusters using Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Test. Gene lists obtained from aCGH analysis were analyzed for Gene Ontology enrichment using GOrilla and DAVID tools. Genomic profiling of the tumors showed specific alterations associated to BRCA1 or 2 mutation status, and BRCA1 expression in the tumors, affecting relevant cellular processes. Similar cellular functions were found affected in BRCA1 not expressing and BRCA1 or 2 mutated tumors. Hierarchical clustering classified hereditary breast tumors in four major, groups according to the type and amount of genomic alterations, showing one group with a significantly poor overall survival (p = 0.0221). Within this cluster, deletion of PLEKHO1, GDF11, DARC, DAG1 and CD63 may be associated to the worse outcome of the patients. These results support the fact that BRCA1 lack of expression in tumors should be used as a marker for BRCAness and to select these patients for synthetic lethality approaches such as treatment with PARP inhibitors. In addition, the identification of specific

  6. Genomic analysis of CD8+ NK/T cell line, ‘SRIK-NKL’, with array-based CGH (aCGH), SKY/FISH and molecular mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael; LaDuca, Jeff; Cowell, John; Srivastava, Bejai I.S.; Matsui, Sei-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We performed aCGH, SKY /FISH, molecular mapping and expression analyses on a permanent CD8+ NK/T cell line, ‘SRIK-NKL’ established from a lymphoma (ALL) patient, in attempt to define the fundamental genetic profile of its unique NK phenotypes. aCGH revealed hemizygous deletion of 6p containing genes responsible for hematopoietic functions. The SKY demonstrated that a constitutive reciprocal translocation, rcpt(5;14)(p13.2;q11) is a stable marker. Using somatic hybrids containing der(5) derived from SRIK-NKL, we found that the breakpoint in one homologue of no. 5 is located upstream of IL7R and also that the breakpoint in no. 14 is located within TRA@. The FISH analysis using BAC which contains TRA@ and its flanking region further revealed a ~231 kb deletion within 14q11 in the der(5) but not in the normal homologue of no. 14. The RT-PCR analysis detected mRNA for TRA@ transcripts which were extending across, but not including, the deleted region. IL7R was detected at least at mRNA levels. These findings were consistent with the immunological findings that TRA@ and IL7R are both expressed at mRNA levels and TRA@ at cytoplasmic protein levels in SRIK-NKL cells. In addition to rept(5;14), aCGH identified novel copy number abnormalities suggesting that the unique phenotype of the SRIK-NKL cell line is not solely due to the TRA@ rearrangement. These findings provide supportive evidence for the notion that SRIK-NKL cells may be useful for studying not only the function of NK cells but also genetic deregulations associated with leukemiogenesis. PMID:17640729

  7. Detecting single DNA copy number variations in complex genomes using one nanogram of starting DNA and BAC-array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Valent, Alexander; Soularue, Pascal; Perot, Christine; Inda, Maria Mar; Receveur, Aline; Smaïli, Sadek; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Bénard, Jean; Bernheim, Alain; Gidrol, Xavier; Danglot, Gisèle

    2004-07-29

    Comparative genomic hybridization to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-arrays (array-CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci, and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. We report a genome-wide amplification method allowing the same measurement sensitivity, using 1 ng of starting genomic DNA, instead of the classical 1 microg usually necessary. Using a discrete series of DNA fragments, we defined the parameters adapted to the most faithful ligation-mediated PCR amplification and the limits of the technique. The optimized protocol allows a 3000-fold DNA amplification, retaining the quantitative characteristics of the initial genome. Validation of the amplification procedure, using DNA from 10 tumour cell lines hybridized to BAC-arrays of 1500 spots, showed almost perfectly superimposed ratios for the non-amplified and amplified DNAs. Correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.99 were observed for regions of low-copy-level variations and all regions, respectively (including in vivo amplified oncogenes). Finally, labelling DNA using two nucleotides bearing the same fluorophore led to a significant increase in reproducibility and to the correct detection of one-copy gain or loss in >90% of the analysed data, even for pseudotriploid tumour genomes.

  8. Selection of single blastocysts for fresh transfer via standard morphology assessment alone and with array CGH for good prognosis IVF patients: results from a randomized pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single embryo transfer (SET remains underutilized as a strategy to reduce multiple gestation risk in IVF, and its overall lower pregnancy rate underscores the need for improved techniques to select one embryo for fresh transfer. This study explored use of comprehensive chromosomal screening by array CGH (aCGH to provide this advantage and improve pregnancy rate from SET. Methods First-time IVF patients with a good prognosis (age Results For patients in Group A (n = 55, 425 blastocysts were biopsied and analyzed via aCGH (7.7 blastocysts/patient. Aneuploidy was detected in 191/425 (44.9% of blastocysts in this group. For patients in Group B (n = 48, 389 blastocysts were microscopically examined (8.1 blastocysts/patient. Clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the morphology + aCGH group compared to the morphology-only group (70.9 and 45.8%, respectively; p = 0.017; ongoing pregnancy rate for Groups A and B were 69.1 vs. 41.7%, respectively (p = 0.009. There were no twin pregnancies. Conclusion Although aCGH followed by frozen embryo transfer has been used to screen at risk embryos (e.g., known parental chromosomal translocation or history of recurrent pregnancy loss, this is the first description of aCGH fully integrated with a clinical IVF program to select single blastocysts for fresh SET in good prognosis patients. The observed aneuploidy rate (44.9% among biopsied blastocysts highlights the inherent imprecision of SET when conventional morphology is used alone. Embryos randomized to the aCGH group implanted with greater efficiency, resulted in clinical pregnancy more often, and yielded a lower miscarriage rate than those selected without aCGH. Additional studies are needed to verify our pilot data and confirm a role for on-site, rapid aCGH for IVF patients contemplating fresh SET.

  9. Genome-wide detection of copy number variations among diverse horse breeds by array CGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Recent studies have found that copy number variations (CNVs are widespread in human and animal genomes. CNVs are a significant source of genetic variation, and have been shown to be associated with phenotypic diversity. However, the effect of CNVs on genetic variation in horses is not well understood. In the present study, CNVs in 6 different breeds of mare horses, Mongolia horse, Abaga horse, Hequ horse and Kazakh horse (all plateau breeds and Debao pony and Thoroughbred, were determined using aCGH. In total, seven hundred CNVs were identified ranging in size from 6.1 Kb to 0.57 Mb across all autosomes, with an average size of 43.08 Kb and a median size of 15.11 Kb. By merging overlapping CNVs, we found a total of three hundred and fifty-three CNV regions (CNVRs. The length of the CNVRs ranged from 6.1 Kb to 1.45 Mb with average and median sizes of 38.49 Kb and 13.1 Kb. Collectively, 13.59 Mb of copy number variation was identified among the horses investigated and accounted for approximately 0.61% of the horse genome sequence. Five hundred and eighteen annotated genes were affected by CNVs, which corresponded to about 2.26% of all horse genes. Through the gene ontology (GO, genetic pathway analysis and comparison of CNV genes among different breeds, we found evidence that CNVs involving 7 genes may be related to the adaptation to severe environment of these plateau horses. This study is the first report of copy number variations in Chinese horses, which indicates that CNVs are ubiquitous in the horse genome and influence many biological processes of the horse. These results will be helpful not only in mapping the horse whole-genome CNVs, but also to further research for the adaption to the high altitude severe environment for plateau horses.

  10. Recurrence, submicroscopic complexity, and potential clinical relevance of copy gains detected by array CGH that are shown to be unbalanced insertions by FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Nicholas J; Ballif, Blake C; Lamb, Allen N; Parikh, Sumit; Ravnan, J Britt; Schultz, Roger A; Torchia, Beth S; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2011-04-01

    Insertions occur when a segment of one chromosome is translocated and inserted into a new region of the same chromosome or a non-homologous chromosome. We report 71 cases with unbalanced insertions identified using array CGH and FISH in 4909 cases referred to our laboratory for array CGH and found to have copy-number abnormalities. Although the majority of insertions were non-recurrent, several recurrent unbalanced insertions were detected, including three der(Y)ins(Y;18)(q?11.2;p11.32p11.32)pat inherited from parents carrying an unbalanced insertion. The clinical significance of these recurrent rearrangements is unclear, although the small size, limited gene content, and inheritance pattern of each suggests that the phenotypic consequences may be benign. Cryptic, submicroscopic duplications were observed at or near the insertion sites in two patients, further confounding the clinical interpretation of these insertions. Using FISH, linear amplification, and array CGH, we identified a 126-kb duplicated region from 19p13.3 inserted into MECP2 at Xq28 in a patient with symptoms of Rett syndrome. Our results demonstrate that although the interpretation of most non-recurrent insertions is unclear without high-resolution insertion site characterization, the potential for an otherwise benign duplication to result in a clinically relevant outcome through the disruption of a gene necessitates the use of FISH to determine whether copy-number gains detected by array CGH represent tandem duplications or unbalanced insertions. Further follow-up testing using techniques such as linear amplification or sequencing should be used to determine gene involvement at the insertion site after FISH has identified the presence of an insertion.

  11. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Djama, Zeinab Robleh; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Radmer, Lorien; Denton, Geoff; Lévesque, C André

    2013-01-01

    Most Phytophthora spp. are destructive plant pathogens; therefore, effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of diseases. In the current study, a membrane-based oligonucleotide array was developed that can detect Phytophthora spp. reliably using three DNA regions; namely, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 5' end of cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1), and the intergenic region between cytochrome c oxidase 2 gene (cox2) and cox1 (cox2-1 spacer). Each sequence data set contained ≈250 sequences representing 98 described and 15 undescribed species of Phytophthora. The array was validated with 143 pure cultures and 35 field samples. Together, nonrejected oligonucleotides from all three markers have the ability to reliably detect 82 described and 8 undescribed Phytophthora spp., including several quarantine or regulated pathogens such as Phytophthora ramorum. Our results showed that a DNA array containing signature oligonucleotides designed from multiple genomic regions provided robustness and redundancy for the detection and differentiation of closely related taxon groups. This array has the potential to be used as a routine diagnostic tool for Phytophthora spp. from complex environmental samples without the need for extensive growth of cultures.

  12. New insights in the interpretation of array-CGH: autism spectrum disorder and positive family history for intellectual disability predict the detection of pathogenic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Vitiello, Francesco; Casertano, Alberto; Fontana, Paolo; Genesio, Rita; Bruzzese, Dario; Ginocchio, Virginia Maria; Mormile, Angela; Nitsch, Lucio; Andria, Generoso; Melis, Daniela

    2016-04-12

    Array-CGH (aCGH) is presently used into routine clinical practice for diagnosis of patients with intellectual disability (ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ACGH could detect small chromosomal imbalances, copy number variations (CNVs), and closely define their size and gene content. ACGH detects pathogenic imbalances in 14-20 % of patients with ID. The aims of this study were: to establish clinical clues potentially associated with pathogenic CNVs and to identify cytogenetic indicators to predict the pathogenicity of the variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) in a large cohort of paediatric patients. We enrolled 214 patients referred for either: ID, and/or ASD and/or MCA to genetic services at the Federico II University of Naples, Department of Translational Medicine. For each patient we collected clinical and imaging data. All the patients were tested with aCGH or as first-tier test or as part of a wider diagnostic work-up. Pathologic data were detected in 65 individuals (30 %) and 46 CNVs revealed a known syndrome. The pathological CNVs were usually deletions showing the highest gene-dosage content. The positive family history for ID/ASD/MCA and ASD were good indicators for detecting pathological chromosomal rearrangements. Other clinical features as eyes anomalies, hearing loss, neurological signs, cutaneous dyscromia and endocrinological problems seem to be potential predictors of pathological CNVs. Among patients carrying VOUS we analyzed genetic features including CNVs size, presence of deletion or duplication, genic density, multiple CNVs, to clinical features. Higher gene density was found in patients affected by ID. This result suggest that higher gene content has more chances to include pathogenic gene involved and causing ID in these patients. Our study suggest the use of aCGH as first-tier test in patients with neurdevelopmental phenotypes. The inferred results have been used for building a flow-chart to be

  13. Genome-wide comparison of paired fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gliomas by custom BAC and oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization: facilitating analysis of archival gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Gayatry; Engler, David A.; Starbuck, Kristen D.; Kim, James C.; Bernay, Derek C.; Scangas, George A.; Rousseau, Audrey; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Louis, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of cancer is rapidly evolving as a result of improvement in genomic technologies and the growing applicability of such analyses to clinical oncology. Array based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for detecting DNA copy number alterations (CNA), particularly in solid tumors, and has been applied to the study of malignant gliomas. In the clinical setting, however, gliomas are often sampled by small biopsies and thus formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks are often the only tissue available for genetic analysis, especially for rare types of gliomas. Moreover, the biological basis for the marked intratumoral heterogeneity in gliomas is most readily addressed in FFPE material. Therefore, for gliomas, the ability to use DNA from FFPE tissue is essential for both clinical and research applications. In this study, we have constructed a custom bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array and show excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting CNAs in a panel of paired frozen and FFPE glioma samples. Our study demonstrates a high concordance rate between CNAs detected in FFPE compared to frozen DNA. We have also developed a method of labeling DNA from FFPE tissue that allows efficient hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. This labeling technique was applied to a panel of biphasic anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (AOA) to identify genetic changes unique to each component. Together, results from these studies suggest that BAC and oligonucleotide aCGH are sensitive tools for detecting CNAs in FFPE DNA, and can enable genome-wide analysis of rare, small and/or histologically heterogeneous gliomas. PMID:21080181

  14. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  15. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma derived from recurrent pleomorphic adenoma shows important difference by array CGH compared to recurrent pleomorphic adenoma without malignant transformation

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    Fernanda Viviane Mariano

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A key step of cancer development is the progressive accumulation of genomic changes resulting in disruption of several biological mechanisms. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA is an aggressive neoplasm that arises from a pleomorphic adenoma. CXPA derived from a recurrent PA (RPA has been rarely reported, and the genomic changes associated with these tumors have not yet been studied. Objective: We analyzed CXPA from RPAs and RPAs without malignant transformation using array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to identify somatic copy number alterations and affected genes. Methods: DNA samples extracted from FFPE tumors were submitted to array-CGH investigation, and data was analyzed by Nexus Copy Number Discovery Edition v.7. Results: No somatic copy number alterations were found in RPAs without malignant transformation. As for CXPA from RPA, although genomic profiles were unique for each case, we detected some chromosomal regions that appear to be preferentially affected by copy number alterations. The first case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive myoepithelial carcinoma showed copy number alterations affecting 1p36.33p13, 5p and chromosomes 3 and 8. The second case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma showed several alterations at chromosomes 3, 8, and 16, with two amplifications at 8p12p11.21 and 12q14.3q21.2. The third case of CXPA-RPA (minimally invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma exhibited amplifications at 12q13.3q14.1, 12q14.3, and 12q15. Conclusion: The occurrence of gains at chromosomes 3 and 8 and genomic amplifications at 8p and 12q, mainly those encompassing the HMGA2, MDM2, WIF1, WHSC1L1, LIRG3, CDK4 in CXAP from RPA can be a significant promotional factor in malignant transformation.

  16. Whole genome DNA copy number changes identified by high density oligonucleotide arrays

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    Huang Jing

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in DNA copy number are one of the hallmarks of the genetic instability common to most human cancers. Previous micro-array-based methods have been used to identify chromosomal gains and losses; however, they are unable to genotype alleles at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Here we describe a novel algorithm that uses a recently developed high-density oligonucleotide array-based SNP genotyping method, whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA, to identify genome-wide chromosomal gains and losses at high resolution. WGSA simultaneously genotypes over 10,000 SNPs by allele-specific hybridisation to perfect match (PM and mismatch (MM probes synthesised on a single array. The copy number algorithm jointly uses PM intensity and discrimination ratios between paired PM and MM intensity values to identify and estimate genetic copy number changes. Values from an experimental sample are compared with SNP-specific distributions derived from a reference set containing over 100 normal individuals to gain statistical power. Genomic regions with statistically significant copy number changes can be identified using both single point analysis and contiguous point analysis of SNP intensities. We identified multiple regions of amplification and deletion using a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. We verified these results using an independent method based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that our approach is both sensitive and specific and can tolerate samples which contain a mixture of both tumour and normal DNA. In addition, by using known allele frequencies from the reference set, statistically significant genomic intervals can be identified containing contiguous stretches of homozygous markers, potentially allowing the detection of regions undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH without the need for a matched normal control sample. The coupling of LOH analysis, via SNP genotyping, with copy number

  17. Tiling array-CGH for the assessment of genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs

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    Ringnér Markus

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, no objective criteria exist to differentiate between individual primary tumors and intra- or intermammary dissemination respectively, in patients diagnosed with two or more synchronous breast cancers. To elucidate whether these tumors most likely arise through clonal expansion, or whether they represent individual primary tumors is of tumor biological interest and may have clinical implications. In this respect, high resolution genomic profiling may provide a more reliable approach than conventional histopathological and tumor biological factors. Methods 32 K tiling microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH was used to explore the genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs, and was compared with histopathological and tumor biological parameters. Results Based on global copy number profiles and unsupervised hierarchical clustering, five of ten (p = 1.9 × 10-5 unilateral tumor pairs displayed similar genomic profiles within the pair, while only one of eight bilateral tumor pairs (p = 0.29 displayed pair-wise genomic similarities. DNA index, histological type and presence of vessel invasion correlated with the genomic analyses. Conclusion Synchronous unilateral tumor pairs are often genomically similar, while synchronous bilateral tumors most often represent individual primary tumors. However, two independent unilateral primary tumors can develop synchronously and contralateral tumor spread can occur. The presence of an intraductal component is not informative when establishing the independence of two tumors, while vessel invasion, the presence of which was found in clustering tumor pairs but not in tumor pairs that did not cluster together, supports the clustering outcome. Our data suggest that genomically similar unilateral tumor pairs may represent a more aggressive disease that requires the addition of more severe treatment modalities, and

  18. Application of high resolution SNP arrays in patients with congenital ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TING-YING LEI

    lent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact breakpoints in 14 patients with partial deletions of chromo- some 13q21.1-qter. They were able to refine the smallest deletion region linked to cleft lip/palate (13q31.3–13q33.1). Except for the arrays that measure DNA copy number differ- ences only, SNP arrays, ...

  19. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Xuan; Beyer, Richard P; Hudson, Francesca N; Linford, Nancy J; Morris, Daryl E; Kerr, Kathleen F

    2006-01-17

    There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch) and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA) as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods using mismatch probes for low-intensity genes

  20. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR

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    Morris Daryl E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. Results We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods

  1. Design of oligonucleotides for microarrays and perspectives for design of multi-transcriptome arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Wernersson, Rasmus; Knudsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    with an overview of these parameters. We present here a flexible tool named OligoWiz for designing oligonucleotides for multiple purposes. OligoWiz presents a set of parameter scores in a graphical interface to facilitate an overview for the user. Additional custom parameter scores can easily be added......Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer...... to the program to extend the default parameters: homology, DeltaTm, low-complexity, position and GATC-only. Furthermore we present an analysis of the limitations in designing oligonucleotide sets that can detect transcripts from multiple organisms. OligoWiz is available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/OligoWiz/....

  2. High-resolution array CGH profiling identifies Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 (NKAIN2) as a predisposing candidate gene in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romania, Paolo; Castellano, Aurora; Surace, Cecilia; Citti, Arianna; De Ioris, Maria Antonietta; Sirleto, Pietro; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Boldrini, Renata; Angioni, Adriano; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid cancer in early childhood, usually occurs sporadically but also its familial occurance is known in 1-2% of NB patients. Germline mutations in the ALK and PHOX2B genes have been found in a subset of familial NBs. However, because some individuals harbouring mutations in these genes do not develop this tumor, additional genetic alterations appear to be required for NB pathogenesis. Herein, we studied an Italian family with three NB patients, two siblings and a first cousin, carrying an ALK germline-activating mutation R1192P, that was inherited from their unaffected mothers and with no mutations in the PHOX2B gene. A comparison between somatic and germline DNA copy number changes in the two affected siblings by a high resolution array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) analysis revealed a germline gain at NKAIN2 (Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2) locus in one of the sibling, that was inherited from the parent who does not carry the ALK mutation. Surprisingly, NKAIN2 was expressed at high levels also in the affected sibling that lacks the genomic gain at this locus, clearly suggesting the existance of other regulatory mechanisms. High levels of NKAIN2 were detected in the MYCN-amplified NB cell lines and in the most aggressive NB lesions as well as in the peripheral blood of a large cohort of NB patients. Consistent with a role of NKAIN2 in NB development, NKAIN2 was down-regulated during all-trans retinoic acid differentiation in two NB cell lines. Taken together, these data indicate a potential role of NKAIN2 gene in NB growth and differentiation.

  3. High-resolution array CGH profiling identifies Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 (NKAIN2 as a predisposing candidate gene in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Romania

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common solid cancer in early childhood, usually occurs sporadically but also its familial occurance is known in 1-2% of NB patients. Germline mutations in the ALK and PHOX2B genes have been found in a subset of familial NBs. However, because some individuals harbouring mutations in these genes do not develop this tumor, additional genetic alterations appear to be required for NB pathogenesis. Herein, we studied an Italian family with three NB patients, two siblings and a first cousin, carrying an ALK germline-activating mutation R1192P, that was inherited from their unaffected mothers and with no mutations in the PHOX2B gene. A comparison between somatic and germline DNA copy number changes in the two affected siblings by a high resolution array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH analysis revealed a germline gain at NKAIN2 (Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 locus in one of the sibling, that was inherited from the parent who does not carry the ALK mutation. Surprisingly, NKAIN2 was expressed at high levels also in the affected sibling that lacks the genomic gain at this locus, clearly suggesting the existance of other regulatory mechanisms. High levels of NKAIN2 were detected in the MYCN-amplified NB cell lines and in the most aggressive NB lesions as well as in the peripheral blood of a large cohort of NB patients. Consistent with a role of NKAIN2 in NB development, NKAIN2 was down-regulated during all-trans retinoic acid differentiation in two NB cell lines. Taken together, these data indicate a potential role of NKAIN2 gene in NB growth and differentiation.

  4. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

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    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  5. Custom CGH array profiling of copy number variations (CNVs) on chromosome 6p21.32 (HLA locus) in patients with venous malformations associated with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder thought to result from an interaction between environmental and genetic predisposing factors which have not yet been characterised, although it is known to be associated with the HLA region on 6p21.32. Recently, a picture of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), consequent to stenosing venous malformation of the main extra-cranial outflow routes (VM), has been described in patients affected with MS, introducing an additional phenotype with possible pathogenic significance. Methods In order to explore the presence of copy number variations (CNVs) within the HLA locus, a custom CGH array was designed to cover 7 Mb of the HLA locus region (6,899,999 bp; chr6:29,900,001-36,800,000). Genomic DNA of the 15 patients with CCSVI/VM and MS was hybridised in duplicate. Results In total, 322 CNVs, of which 225 were extragenic and 97 intragenic, were identified in 15 patients. 234 known polymorphic CNVs were detected, the majority of these being situated in non-coding or extragenic regions. The overall number of CNVs (both extra- and intragenic) showed a robust and significant correlation with the number of stenosing VMs (Spearman: r = 0.6590, p = 0.0104; linear regression analysis r = 0.6577, p = 0.0106). The region we analysed contains 211 known genes. By using pathway analysis focused on angiogenesis and venous development, MS, and immunity, we tentatively highlight several genes as possible susceptibility factor candidates involved in this peculiar phenotype. Conclusions The CNVs contained in the HLA locus region in patients with the novel phenotype of CCSVI/VM and MS were mapped in detail, demonstrating a significant correlation between the number of known CNVs found in the HLA region and the number of CCSVI-VMs identified in patients. Pathway analysis revealed common routes of interaction of several of the genes involved in angiogenesis and immunity contained within this region. Despite the small

  6. Development of a novel ozone- and photo-stable HyPer5 red fluorescent dye for array CGH and microarray gene expression analysis with consistent performance irrespective of environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kille Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and gene expression profiling have become vital techniques for identifying molecular defects underlying genetic diseases. Regardless of the microarray platform, cyanine dyes (Cy3 and Cy5 are one of the most widely used fluorescent dye pairs for microarray analysis owing to their brightness and ease of incorporation, enabling high level of assay sensitivity. However, combining both dyes on arrays can become problematic during summer months when ozone levels rise to near 25 parts per billion (ppb. Under such conditions, Cy5 is known to rapidly degrade leading to loss of signal from either "homebrew" or commercial arrays. Cy5 can also suffer disproportionately from dye photobleaching resulting in distortion of (Cy5/Cy3 ratios used in copy number analysis. Our laboratory has been active in fluorescent dye research to find a suitable alternative to Cy5 that is stable to ozone and resistant to photo-bleaching. Here, we report on the development of such a dye, called HyPer5, and describe its' exceptional ozone and photostable properties on microarrays. Results Our results show HyPer5 signal to be stable to high ozone levels. Repeated exposure of mouse arrays hybridized with HyPer5-labeled cDNA to 300 ppb ozone at 5, 10 and 15 minute intervals resulted in no signal loss from the dye. In comparison, Cy5 arrays showed a dramatic 80% decrease in total signal during the same interval. Photobleaching experiments show HyPer5 to be resistant to light induced damage with 3- fold improvement in dye stability over Cy5. In high resolution array CGH experiments, HyPer5 is demonstrated to detect chromosomal aberrations at loci 2p21-16.3 and 15q26.3-26.2 from three patient sample using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays. The photostability of HyPer5 is further documented by repeat array scanning without loss of detection. Additionally, HyPer5 arrays are shown to preserve sensitivity and

  7. Array-based gene expression, CGH and tissue data defines a 12q24 gain in neuroblastic tumors with prognostic implication

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    Kilpinen Sami

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma has successfully served as a model system for the identification of neuroectoderm-derived oncogenes. However, in spite of various efforts, only a few clinically useful prognostic markers have been found. Here, we present a framework, which integrates DNA, RNA and tissue data to identify and prioritize genetic events that represent clinically relevant new therapeutic targets and prognostic biomarkers for neuroblastoma. Methods A single-gene resolution aCGH profiling was integrated with microarray-based gene expression profiling data to distinguish genetic copy number alterations that were strongly associated with transcriptional changes in two neuroblastoma cell lines. FISH analysis using a hotspot tumor tissue microarray of 37 paraffin-embedded neuroblastoma samples and in silico data mining for gene expression information obtained from previously published studies including up to 445 healthy nervous system samples and 123 neuroblastoma samples were used to evaluate the clinical significance and transcriptional consequences of the detected alterations and to identify subsequently activated gene(s. Results In addition to the anticipated high-level amplification and subsequent overexpression of MYCN, MEIS1, CDK4 and MDM2 oncogenes, the aCGH analysis revealed numerous other genetic alterations, including microamplifications at 2p and 12q24.11. Most interestingly, we identified and investigated the clinical relevance of a previously poorly characterized amplicon at 12q24.31. FISH analysis showed low-level gain of 12q24.31 in 14 of 33 (42% neuroblastomas. Patients with the low-level gain had an intermediate prognosis in comparison to patients with MYCN amplification (poor prognosis and to those with no MYCN amplification or 12q24.31 gain (good prognosis (P = 0.001. Using the in silico data mining approach, we identified elevated expression of five genes located at the 12q24.31 amplicon in neuroblastoma (DIABLO, ZCCHC

  8. Subclassification and Detection of New Markers for the Discrimination of Primary Liver Tumors by Gene Expression Analysis Using Oligonucleotide Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Holger G; Vogel, Ulrich; Scheurlen, Michael; Jobst, Jürgen

    2017-12-26

    The failure to correctly differentiate between intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma [CC] and hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] is a significant clinical problem, particularly in terms of the different treatment goals for both cancers. In this study a specific gene expression profile to discriminate these two subgroups of liver cancer was established and potential diagnostic markers for clinical use were analyzed. To evaluate the gene expression profiles of HCC and intrahepatic CC, Oligonucleotide arrays ( Affymetrix U133A) were used. Overexpressed genes were checked for their potential use as new markers for discrimination and their expression values were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry analyses. 695 genes/expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in HCC (245 up-/450 down-regulated) and 552 genes/ESTs in CC (221 up-/331 down-regulated) were significantly dysregulated (p〈0.05, fold change >2, ≥70%). Using a supervised learning method, and one-way analysis of variance a specific 270-gene expression profile that enabled rapid, reproducible differentiation between both tumors and non-malignant liver tissues was established. A panel of 12 genes (e.g. HSP90β, ERG1, GPC3, TKT, ACLY, and NME1 for HCC; SPT2, T4S3, CNX43, TTD1, HBD01 for CC) were detected and partly described for the first time as potential discrimination markers. A specific gene expression profile for discrimination of primary liver cancer was identified and potential marker genes with feasible clinical impact were described.

  9. Oligonucleotide array discovery of polymorphisms in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. reveals patterns of SNP variation associated with breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Tong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. has narrow genetic diversity that makes it difficult to identify polymorphisms between elite germplasm. We explored array-based single feature polymorphism (SFP discovery as a high-throughput approach for marker development in cultivated tomato. Results Three varieties, FL7600 (fresh-market, OH9242 (processing, and PI114490 (cherry were used as a source of genomic DNA for hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. Identification of SFPs was based on outlier detection using regression analysis of normalized hybridization data within a probe set for each gene. A subset of 189 putative SFPs was sequenced for validation. The rate of validation depended on the desired level of significance (α used to define the confidence interval (CI, and ranged from 76% for polymorphisms identified at α ≤ 10-6 to 60% for those identified at α ≤ 10-2. Validation percentage reached a plateau between α ≤ 10-4 and α ≤ 10-7, but failure to identify known SFPs (Type II error increased dramatically at α ≤ 10-6. Trough sequence validation, we identified 279 SNPs and 27 InDels in 111 loci. Sixty loci contained ≥ 2 SNPs per locus. We used a subset of validated SNPs for genetic diversity analysis of 92 tomato varieties and accessions. Pairwise estimation of θ (Fst suggested significant differentiation between collections of fresh-market, processing, vintage, Latin American (landrace, and S. pimpinellifolium accessions. The fresh-market and processing groups displayed high genetic diversity relative to vintage and landrace groups. Furthermore, the patterns of SNP variation indicated that domestication and early breeding practices have led to progressive genetic bottlenecks while modern breeding practices have reintroduced genetic variation into the crop from wild species. Finally, we examined the ratio of non-synonymous (Ka to synonymous substitutions (Ks for 20 loci with multiple SNPs (≥ 4 per

  10. Small regions of overlapping deletions on 6q26 in human astrocytic tumours identified using chromosome 6 tile path array CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Koichi; Mungall, Andrew J; Fiegler, Heike; Pearson, Danita M.; Dunham, Ian; Carter, Nigel P; Collins, V. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 6 are a common abnormality in diverse human malignancies including astrocytic tumours, suggesting the presence of tumour suppressor genes (TSG). In order to help identify candidate TSGs, we have constructed a chromosome 6 tile path microarray. The array contains 1780 clones (778 PACs and 1002 BACs) that cover 98.3% of the published chromosome 6 sequences. A total of 104 adult astrocytic tumours (10 diffuse astrocytomas, 30 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 64 glioblastomas (GB)) were analysed using this array. Single copy number change was successfully detected and the result was in general concordant with a microsatellite analysis. The pattern of copy number change was complex with multiple interstitial deletions/gains. However, a predominance of telomeric 6q deletions was seen. Two small common and overlapping regions of deletion at 6q26 were identified. One was 1002 kb in size and contained PACRG and QKI, while the second was 199 kb and harbours a single gene, ARID1B. The data show that the chromosome 6 tile path array is useful in mapping copy number changes with high resolution and accuracy. We confirmed the high frequency of chromosome 6 deletions in AA and GB, and identified two novel commonly deleted regions that may harbour TSGs. PMID:16205629

  11. Using genomic DNA-based probe-selection to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend Henrik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-density oligonucleotide (oligo arrays are a powerful tool for transcript profiling. Arrays based on GeneChip® technology are amongst the most widely used, although GeneChip® arrays are currently available for only a small number of plant and animal species. Thus, we have developed a method to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species and tested the method by analysing the transcriptome of Brassica oleracea L., a species for which no GeneChip® array is available, using a GeneChip® array designed for Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Genomic DNA from B. oleracea was labelled and hybridised to the ATH1-121501 GeneChip® array. Arabidopsis thaliana probe-pairs that hybridised to the B. oleracea genomic DNA on the basis of the perfect-match (PM probe signal were then selected for subsequent B. oleracea transcriptome analysis using a .cel file parser script to generate probe mask files. The transcriptional response of B. oleracea to a mineral nutrient (phosphorus; P stress was quantified using probe mask files generated for a wide range of gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds. An example probe mask file generated with a gDNA hybridisation intensity threshold of 400 removed > 68 % of the available PM probes from the analysis but retained >96 % of available A. thaliana probe-sets. Ninety-nine of these genes were then identified as significantly regulated under P stress in B. oleracea, including the homologues of P stress responsive genes in A. thaliana. Increasing the gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds up to 500 for probe-selection increased the sensitivity of the GeneChip® array to detect regulation of gene expression in B. oleracea under P stress by up to 13-fold. Our open-source software to create probe mask files is freely available http://affymetrix.arabidopsis.info/xspecies/ and may be used to facilitate transcriptomic analyses of a wide range of plant and animal

  12. Array-CGH in patients with Kabuki-like phenotype: identification of two patients with complex rearrangements including 2q37 deletions and no other recurrent aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuscó, Ivon; del Campo, Miguel; Vilardell, Mireia; González, Eva; Gener, Blanca; Galán, Enrique; Toledo, Laura; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2008-04-11

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by specific facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation, postnatal growth delay, skeletal abnormalities, and unusual dermatoglyphic patterns with prominent fingertip pads. A 3.5 Mb duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was once reported as a specific alteration in KS but has not been confirmed in other patients. The molecular basis of KS remains unknown. We have studied 16 Spanish patients with a clinical diagnosis of KS or KS-like to search for genomic imbalances using genome-wide array technologies. All putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH, microsatellite markers and/or MLPA assays, which also determined whether the imbalance was de novo or inherited. No duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was observed in our patients. We detected complex rearrangements involving 2q in two patients with Kabuki-like features: 1) a de novo inverted duplication of 11 Mb with a 4.5 Mb terminal deletion, and 2) a de novo 7.2 Mb-terminal deletion in a patient with an additional de novo 0.5 Mb interstitial deletion in 16p. Additional copy number variations (CNV), either inherited or reported in normal controls, were identified and interpreted as polymorphic variants. No specific CNV was significantly increased in the KS group. Our results further confirmed that genomic duplications of 8p23 region are not a common cause of KS and failed to detect other recurrent rearrangement causing this disorder. The detection of two patients with 2q37 deletions suggests that there is a phenotypic overlap between the two conditions, and screening this region in the Kabuki-like patients should be considered.

  13. Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH: revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xin-Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Studies have suggested that tumors with PL morphology represent a group of neoplasms with clinopathologic characteristics corresponding to different entities including extramedullary plasmablastic tumors associated with plasma cell myeloma (PCM. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the genetic similarities and differences among PL, DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related and PCM using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Results Examination of genomic data in PL revealed that the most frequent segmental gain (> 40% include: 1p36.11-1p36.33, 1p34.1-1p36.13, 1q21.1-1q23.1, 7q11.2-7q11.23, 11q12-11q13.2 and 22q12.2-22q13.3. This correlated with segmental gains occurring in high frequency in DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related cases. There were some segmental gains and some segmental loss that occurred in PL but not in the other types of lymphoma suggesting that these foci may contain genes responsible for the differentiation of this lymphoma. Additionally, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and AIDS associated DLBCL suggesting that these foci may be associated with HIV infection. Furthermore, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and PCM suggesting that these lesions may be related to plasmacytic differentiation. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first genomic exploration of PL. The genomic aberration pattern of PL appears to be more similar to that of DLBCL (AIDS-related or non AIDS-related than to PCM. Our findings suggest that PL may remain best classified as a subtype of DLBCL at least at the genome level.

  14. MYC and MYCN amplification can be reliably assessed by aCGH in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeaut, Franck; Grison, Camille; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Laquerriere, Annie; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Michalak, Sophie; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Doz, François; Richer, Wilfrid; Pierron, Gaelle; Miquel, Catherine; Delattre, Olivier; Couturier, Jérôme

    2013-04-01

    As prognostic factors, MYC and MYCN amplifications are routinely assessed in medulloblastomas. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is currently considered as the technique of reference. Recently, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been developed as an alternative technique to evaluate genomic abnormalities in other tumor types; however, this technique has not been widely adopted as a replacement for FISH in medulloblastoma. In this study, 34 tumors were screened by both FISH and aCGH. In all cases showing amplification by FISH, aCGH also unambiguously revealed the abnormality. The aCGH technique was also performed on tumors showing no amplification by FISH, and the absence of amplification was confirmed in all cases. Interestingly, one tumor showed a subclonal MYC amplification by FISH. This subclonal amplification was observed in approximately 20% of tumor cells and was clearly evident on aCGH. In conclusion, our analysis confirms that aCGH is as safe as FISH for the detection of MYC/MYCN gene amplification. Given its cost efficiency in comparison to two FISH tests and the global genomic information additionally provided by an aCGH experiment, this reproducible technique can be safely retained as an alternative to FISH for routine investigation of medulloblastoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oligo-based High-resolution aCGH Analysis Enhances Routine Cytogenetic Diagnostics in Haematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of genomic aberrations in haematological malignancies using oligobased array-CGH (oaCGH) analysis in combination with karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, and its feasibility in a clinical pragmatic approach. The 4x180K Cancer Cytochip array was applied in 96 patients with various haematological malignancies in a prospective setting and in 41 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients retrospectively. Combined use of oaCGH analysis and karyotyping improved the overall detection rate in comparison to karyotyping-alone and vice versa. In cases with normal karyotypes oaCGH analysis detected genomic aberrations in 66% (39/60) of cases. In the group of simple karyotypes oaCGH analysis extended karyotypic findings in 39% (12/31) while oaCGH analysis extended the karyotypic findings in 89% (39/44) of cases with complex karyotypes. In 7% (5/75) of cases oaCGH analysis failed in detecting the observed abnormalities by karyotyping. oaCGH analysis is a valuable asset in routine cytogenetics of haematological malignancies. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. CARAT: A novel method for allelic detection of DNA copy number changes using high density oligonucleotide arrays

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    Ishikawa Shumpei

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number alterations are one of the main characteristics of the cancer cell karyotype and can contribute to the complex phenotype of these cells. These alterations can lead to gains in cellular oncogenes as well as losses in tumor suppressor genes and can span small intervals as well as involve entire chromosomes. The ability to accurately detect these changes is central to understanding how they impact the biology of the cell. Results We describe a novel algorithm called CARAT (Copy Number Analysis with Regression And Tree that uses probe intensity information to infer copy number in an allele-specific manner from high density DNA oligonuceotide arrays designed to genotype over 100, 000 SNPs. Total and allele-specific copy number estimations using CARAT are independently evaluated for a subset of SNPs using quantitative PCR and allelic TaqMan reactions with several human breast cancer cell lines. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm are characterized using DNA samples containing differing numbers of X chromosomes as well as a test set of normal individuals. Results from the algorithm show a high degree of agreement with results from independent verification methods. Conclusion Overall, CARAT automatically detects regions with copy number variations and assigns a significance score to each alteration as well as generating allele-specific output. When coupled with SNP genotype calls from the same array, CARAT provides additional detail into the structure of genome wide alterations that can contribute to allelic imbalance.

  17. ADaCGH: A parallelized web-based application and R package for the analysis of aCGH data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Díaz-Uriarte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Copy number alterations (CNAs in genomic DNA have been associated with complex human diseases, including cancer. One of the most common techniques to detect CNAs is array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The availability of aCGH platforms and the need for identification of CNAs has resulted in a wealth of methodological studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ADaCGH is an R package and a web-based application for the analysis of aCGH data. It implements eight methods for detection of CNAs, gains and losses of genomic DNA, including all of the best performing ones from two recent reviews (CBS, GLAD, CGHseg, HMM. For improved speed, we use parallel computing (via MPI. Additional information (GO terms, PubMed citations, KEGG and Reactome pathways is available for individual genes, and for sets of genes with altered copy numbers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ADACGH represents a qualitative increase in the standards of these types of applications: a all of the best performing algorithms are included, not just one or two; b we do not limit ourselves to providing a thin layer of CGI on top of existing BioConductor packages, but instead carefully use parallelization, examining different schemes, and are able to achieve significant decreases in user waiting time (factors up to 45x; c we have added functionality not currently available in some methods, to adapt to recent recommendations (e.g., merging of segmentation results in wavelet-based and CGHseg algorithms; d we incorporate redundancy, fault-tolerance and checkpointing, which are unique among web-based, parallelized applications; e all of the code is available under open source licenses, allowing to build upon, copy, and adapt our code for other software projects.

  18. CGH Supports World Cancer Day Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    We celebrate World Cancer Day every year on February 4th. This year the theme “We can. I can.” invites us to think not only about how we can work with one another to reduce the global burden of cancer, but how we as individuals can make a difference. Every day the staff at CGH work to establish and build upon programs that are aimed at improving the lives of people affected by cancer.

  19. Analysis of aCGH Integrating Different Sources of Information by Means of a CBR

    OpenAIRE

    Zato Domínguez, Carolina; de Paz Santana, Juan F.; Bajo Pérez, Javier; Corchado Rodríguez, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management is a key element in medical environments. Arrays CGH make possible the realization of tests on patients for the detection of mutations in chromosomal regions. The detection of the regions with mutations associated to different pathologies is an important step for the selection of relevant genes, proteins or diseases. The corresponding information of the mutations and genes is distributed in dif- ferent public sources and databases, so it is necessary the use of systems th...

  20. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  1. Optical alignment using a CGH and an autostigmatic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Robert E.

    2017-08-01

    We show how custom computer generated holograms (CGH) are used along with an autostigmatic microscope (ASM) to align both optical and mechanical components relative to the CGH. The patterns in the CGHs define points and lines in space when interrogated with the focus of the ASM. Once the ASM is aligned to the CGH, an optical or mechanical component such as a lens, a well-polished ball or a cylinder can be aligned to the ASM in 3 or 4 degrees of freedom and thus to the CGH. In this case we show how a CGH is used to make a fixture for cementing a doublet lens without the need for a rotary table or a precision vertical stage.

  2. Array-CGH detection of three cryptic submicroscopic imbalances in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, Guangdong Province. 518020, People's Republic of China ... Here, we describe a phenotypically normal prenatal case who was found to carry an apparently balanced .... Precise definitions of CCRs and their real complexity can only be ...

  3. Improved analysis of bacterial CGH data beyond the log-ratio paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakra Ågot

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing methods for analyzing bacterial CGH data from two-color arrays are based on log-ratios only, a paradigm inherited from expression studies. We propose an alternative approach, where microarray signals are used in a different way and sequence identity is predicted using a supervised learning approach. Results A data set containing 32 hybridizations of sequenced versus sequenced genomes have been used to test and compare methods. A ROC-analysis has been performed to illustrate the ability to rank probes with respect to Present/Absent calls. Classification into Present and Absent is compared with that of a gaussian mixture model. Conclusion The results indicate our proposed method is an improvement of existing methods with respect to ranking and classification of probes, especially for multi-genome arrays.

  4. CGH Celebrates Take Your Child To Work Day 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady Grove celebrated Take Your Child To Work Day this year with a variety of activities and sessions aimed at inspiring school-aged children to explore career paths in science and public service. CGH hosted its inaugural Take Your Child To Work Day session: An Introduction to Global Health.

  5. Massively parallel sequencing, aCGH, and RNA-Seq technologies provide a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Lach, Francis P; Kimble, Danielle C; Kamat, Aparna; Teer, Jamie K; Donovan, Frank X; Flynn, Elizabeth; Sen, Shurjo K; Thongthip, Supawat; Sanborn, Erica; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-05-30

    Current methods for detecting mutations in Fanconi anemia (FA)-suspected patients are inefficient and often miss mutations. We have applied recent advances in DNA sequencing and genomic capture to the diagnosis of FA. Specifically, we used custom molecular inversion probes or TruSeq-enrichment oligos to capture and sequence FA and related genes, including introns, from 27 samples from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at The Rockefeller University. DNA sequencing was complemented with custom array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. aCGH identified deletions/duplications in 4 different FA genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed lack of allele specific expression associated with a deletion and splicing defects caused by missense, synonymous, and deep-in-intron variants. The combination of TruSeq-targeted capture, aCGH, and RNA-seq enabled us to identify the complementation group and biallelic germline mutations in all 27 families: FANCA (7), FANCB (3), FANCC (3), FANCD1 (1), FANCD2 (3), FANCF (2), FANCG (2), FANCI (1), FANCJ (2), and FANCL (3). FANCC mutations are often the cause of FA in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) ancestry, and we identified 2 novel FANCC mutations in 2 patients of AJ ancestry. We describe here a strategy for efficient molecular diagnosis of FA.

  6. Cross-platform array comparative genomic hybridization meta-analysis separates hematopoietic and mesenchymal from epithelial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.; Marchiori, E.; van der Vaart, A.W.; Chin, S.F.; Carvalho, B; Tijssen, M.; Eijk, P.P.; van den IJssel, P.; Grabsch, H.; Quirke, P.; Oudejans, J.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Caldas, C.; Ylstra, B.

    2007-01-01

    A series of studies have been published that evaluate the chromosomal copy number changes of different tumor classes using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH); however, the chromosomal aberrations that distinguish the different tumor classes have not been fully characterized.

  7. Asterias: A Parallelized Web-based Suite for the Analysis of Expression and aCGH Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Díaz-Uriarte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of expression and CGH arrays plays a central role in the study of complex diseases, especially cancer, including finding markers for early diagnosis and prognosis, choosing an optimal therapy, or increasing our understanding of cancer development and metastasis. Asterias (http://www.asterias.info is an integrated collection of freely-accessible web tools for the analysis of gene expression and aCGH data. Most of the tools use parallel computing (via MPI and run on a server with 60 CPUs for computation; compared to a desktop or server-based but not parallelized application, parallelization provides speed ups of factors up to 50. Most of our applications allow the user to obtain additional information for user-selected genes (chromosomal location, PubMed ids, Gene Ontology terms, etc. by using clickable links in tables and/or fi gures. Our tools include: normalization of expression and aCGH data (DNMAD; converting between different types of gene/clone and protein identifi ers (IDconverter/IDClight; fi ltering and imputation (preP; finding differentially expressed genes related to patient class and survival data (Pomelo II; searching for models of class prediction (Tnasas; using random forests to search for minimal models for class prediction or for large subsets of genes with predictive capacity (GeneSrF; searching for molecular signatures and predictive genes with survival data (SignS; detecting regions of genomic DNA gain or loss (ADaCGH. The capability to send results between different applications, access to additional functional information, and parallelized computation make our suite unique and exploit features only available to web-based applications.

  8. Analysis of human HPRT- deletion mutants by the microarray-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, M.; Sasaki, K.; Tagawa, H.; Omine, H.; Kushiro, J.; Takahashi, N.; Katayama, H.

    2003-01-01

    We are trying to evaluate genetic effects of radiation on human using mutation frequency as an indicator. For the efficient detection of mutations, it is important to understand the mechanism and the characteristics of radiation-induced mutations. We have started the analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants induced by X-ray in order to clarify the deletion size and the mutation-distribution. We analyzed 39 human X-ray induced HPRT-deletion mutants by using the microarray-CGH. The array for this analysis contains 57 BAC clones covering as much as possible of the 4Mb of the 5' side and 10Mb of the 3' side of the HPRT gene based on the NCBI genome database. DNA from parent strain and each HPRT-mutant strain are labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 respectively, and were mixed and hybridized on the array. Fluorescent intensity ratio of the obtained spots was analyzed using software we developed to identify clones corresponding to the deletion region. The deletion in these strains ranged up to 3.5 Mb on the 5' side and 6 Mb on the 3' side of the HPRT gene. Deletions in 13 strains ended around BAC clones located at about 3 Mb on the 5' side. On the 3' side, deletions extended up to the specific clones located at 1.5 Mb in 11 strains. The mutations seem to be complex on the 3' end of deletion; some accompanied duplications with deletions and others could not be explained by one mutation event. We need to confirm these results, taking into account the experimental reproducibility and the accuracy of the published genetic map. The results of the research using the microarray-CGH help us to search the regions where deletions are easily induced and to identify the factors affecting the range of deletions

  9. A web server for mining Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Ranka, Sanjay; Kahveci, Tamer

    2007-11-01

    Advances in cytogenetics and molecular biology has established that chromosomal alterations are critical in the pathogenesis of human cancer. Recurrent chromosomal alterations provide cytological and molecular markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. They also facilitate the identification of genes that are important in carcinogenesis, which in the future may help in the development of targeted therapy. A large amount of publicly available cancer genetic data is now available and it is growing. There is a need for public domain tools that allow users to analyze their data and visualize the results. This chapter describes a web based software tool that will allow researchers to analyze and visualize Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) datasets. It employs novel data mining methodologies for clustering and classification of CGH datasets as well as algorithms for identifying important markers (small set of genomic intervals with aberrations) that are potentially cancer signatures. The developed software will help in understanding the relationships between genomic aberrations and cancer types.

  10. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes iterative sets of oligonucleotides and a translational frame check strategy to ensure the high efficiency and accuracy of TALE-gene synthesis. TALE arrays of more than 20 repeats can be constructed, and the majority of the synthesized constructs have perfect sequences. In addition, this novel oligonucleotide-based method can readily accommodate design changes to the TALE repeats. We demonstrated an increased gene targeting efficiency against a genomic site containing a potentially methylated cytosine by incorporating non-conventional repeat variable di-residue (RVD) sequences.

  11. Fully automated parallel oligonucleotide synthesizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebl, M.; Burger, Ch.; Ellman, B.; Heiner, D.; Ibrahim, G.; Jones, A.; Nibbe, M.; Thompson, J.; Mudra, Petr; Pokorný, Vít; Poncar, Pavel; Ženíšek, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 8 (2001), s. 1299-1314 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : automated oligonucleotide synthesizer Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  12. Systematic validation and atomic force microscopy of non-covalent short oligonucleotide barcode microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular barcode arrays provide a powerful means to analyze cellular phenotypes in parallel through detection of short (20-60 base unique sequence tags, or "barcodes", associated with each strain or clone in a collection. However, costs of current methods for microarray construction, whether by in situ oligonucleotide synthesis or ex situ coupling of modified oligonucleotides to the slide surface are often prohibitive to large-scale analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that unmodified 20mer oligonucleotide probes printed on conventional surfaces show comparable hybridization signals to covalently linked 5'-amino-modified probes. As a test case, we undertook systematic cell size analysis of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome-wide deletion collection by size separation of the deletion pool followed by determination of strain abundance in size fractions by barcode arrays. We demonstrate that the properties of a 13K unique feature spotted 20 mer oligonucleotide barcode microarray compare favorably with an analogous covalently-linked oligonucleotide array. Further, cell size profiles obtained with the size selection/barcode array approach recapitulate previous cell size measurements of individual deletion strains. Finally, through atomic force microscopy (AFM, we characterize the mechanism of hybridization to unmodified barcode probes on the slide surface. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies push the lower limit of probe size in genome-scale unmodified oligonucleotide microarray construction and demonstrate a versatile, cost-effective and reliable method for molecular barcode analysis.

  13. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  14. Electronic Structures of LNA Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Shim, Irene; Stein, Cy

    2017-01-01

    Important oligonucleotides in anti-sense research have been investigated in silico and experimentally. This involves quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and chromatography experiments on locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotides. iso-potential electrostatic surfaces...

  15. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  16. Novel applications of array comparative genomic hybridization in molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sau W; Bi, Weimin

    2018-05-31

    In 2004, the implementation of array comparative genomic hybridization (array comparative genome hybridization [CGH]) into clinical practice marked a new milestone for genetic diagnosis. Array CGH and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays enable genome-wide detection of copy number changes in a high resolution, and therefore microarray has been recognized as the first-tier test for patients with intellectual disability or multiple congenital anomalies, and has also been applied prenatally for detection of clinically relevant copy number variations in the fetus. Area covered: In this review, the authors summarize the evolution of array CGH technology from their diagnostic laboratory, highlighting exonic SNP arrays developed in the past decade which detect small intragenic copy number changes as well as large DNA segments for the region of heterozygosity. The applications of array CGH to human diseases with different modes of inheritance with the emphasis on autosomal recessive disorders are discussed. Expert commentary: An exonic array is a powerful and most efficient clinical tool in detecting genome wide small copy number variants in both dominant and recessive disorders. However, whole-genome sequencing may become the single integrated platform for detection of copy number changes, single-nucleotide changes as well as balanced chromosomal rearrangements in the near future.

  17. Recommendations of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group's Formulated Oligonucleotide Subcommittee for the Safety Assessment of Formulated Oligonucleotide-Based Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Jennifer L; Akopian, Violetta; Karmali, Priya; Kornbrust, Douglas; Lockridge, Jennifer; Semple, Sean

    2017-08-01

    The use of lipid formulations has greatly improved the ability to effectively deliver oligonucleotides and has been instrumental in the rapid expansion of therapeutic development programs using oligonucleotide drugs. However, the development of such complex multicomponent therapeutics requires the implementation of unique, scientifically sound approaches to the nonclinical development of these drugs, based upon a hybrid of knowledge and experiences drawn from small molecule, protein, and oligonucleotide therapeutic drug development. The relative paucity of directly applicable regulatory guidance documents for oligonucleotide therapeutics in general has resulted in the generation of multiple white papers from oligonucleotide drug development experts and members of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG). The members of the Formulated Oligonucleotide Subcommittee of the OSWG have utilized their collective experience working with a variety of formulations and their associated oligonucleotide payloads, as well as their insights into regulatory considerations and expectations, to generate a series of consensus recommendations for the pharmacokinetic characterization and nonclinical safety assessment of this unique class of therapeutics. It should be noted that the focus of Subcommittee discussions was on lipid nanoparticle and other types of particulate formulations of therapeutic oligonucleotides and not on conjugates or other types of modifications of oligonucleotide structure intended to facilitate delivery.

  18. Chromosomal aberrations in bladder cancer: fresh versus formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue and targeted FISH versus wide microarray-based CGH analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Panzeri

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinogenesis is believed to follow two alternative pathways driven by the loss of chromosome 9 and the gain of chromosome 7, albeit other nonrandom copy number alterations (CNAs were identified. However, confirmation studies are needed since many aspects of this model remain unclear and considerable heterogeneity among cases has emerged. One of the purposes of this study was to evaluate the performance of a targeted test (UroVysion assay widely used for the detection of Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, in two different types of material derived from the same tumor. We compared the results of UroVysion test performed on Freshly Isolated interphasic Nuclei (FIN and on Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE tissues from 22 TCCs and we didn't find substantial differences. A second goal was to assess the concordance between array-CGH profiles and the targeted chromosomal profiles of UroVysion assay on an additional set of 10 TCCs, in order to evaluate whether UroVysion is an adequately sensitive method for the identification of selected aneuploidies and nonrandom CNAs in TCCs. Our results confirmed the importance of global genomic screening methods, that is array based CGH, to comprehensively determine the genomic profiles of large series of TCCs tumors. However, this technique has yet some limitations, such as not being able to detect low level mosaicism, or not detecting any change in the number of copies for a kind of compensatory effect due to the presence of high cellular heterogeneity. Thus, it is still advisable to use complementary techniques such as array-CGH and FISH, as the former is able to detect alterations at the genome level not excluding any chromosome, but the latter is able to maintain the individual data at the level of single cells, even if it focuses on few genomic regions.

  19. The Medicinal Chemistry of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W Brad; Seth, Punit P

    2016-11-10

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have made rapid progress in the clinic for treatment of a variety of disease indications. Unmodified oligonucleotides are polyanionic macromolecules with poor drug-like properties. Over the past two decades, medicinal chemists have identified a number of chemical modification and conjugation strategies which can improve the nuclease stability, RNA-binding affinity, and pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides for therapeutic applications. In this perspective, we present a summary of the most commonly used nucleobase, sugar and backbone modification, and conjugation strategies used in oligonucleotide medicinal chemistry.

  20. A multi-sample based method for identifying common CNVs in normal human genomic structure using high-resolution aCGH data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihyun Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is difficult to identify copy number variations (CNV in normal human genomic data due to noise and non-linear relationships between different genomic regions and signal intensity. A high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH containing 42 million probes, which is very large compared to previous arrays, was recently published. Most existing CNV detection algorithms do not work well because of noise associated with the large amount of input data and because most of the current methods were not designed to analyze normal human samples. Normal human genome analysis often requires a joint approach across multiple samples. However, the majority of existing methods can only identify CNVs from a single sample. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a multi-sample-based genomic variations detector (MGVD that uses segmentation to identify common breakpoints across multiple samples and a k-means-based clustering strategy. Unlike previous methods, MGVD simultaneously considers multiple samples with different genomic intensities and identifies CNVs and CNV zones (CNVZs; CNVZ is a more precise measure of the location of a genomic variant than the CNV region (CNVR. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We designed a specialized algorithm to detect common CNVs from extremely high-resolution multi-sample aCGH data. MGVD showed high sensitivity and a low false discovery rate for a simulated data set, and outperformed most current methods when real, high-resolution HapMap datasets were analyzed. MGVD also had the fastest runtime compared to the other algorithms evaluated when actual, high-resolution aCGH data were analyzed. The CNVZs identified by MGVD can be used in association studies for revealing relationships between phenotypes and genomic aberrations. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows format in the STL library. It is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/mgvd.php.

  1. A French multicenter study of over 700 patients with 22q11 deletions diagnosed using FISH or aCGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirsier, Céline; Besseau-Ayasse, Justine; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Toutain, Jérôme; Missirian, Chantal; Le Caignec, Cédric; Bazin, Anne; de Blois, Marie Christine; Kuentz, Paul; Catty, Marie; Choiset, Agnès; Plessis, Ghislaine; Basinko, Audrey; Letard, Pascaline; Flori, Elisabeth; Jimenez, Mélanie; Valduga, Mylène; Landais, Emilie; Lallaoui, Hakima; Cartault, François; Lespinasse, James; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Callier, Patrick; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Portnoi, Marie-France; Busa, Tiffany; Receveur, Aline; Amblard, Florence; Yardin, Catherine; Harbuz, Radu; Prieur, Fabienne; Le Meur, Nathalie; Pipiras, Eva; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Vialard, François; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2016-06-01

    Although 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most recurrent human microdeletion syndrome associated with a highly variable phenotype, little is known about the condition's true incidence and the phenotype at diagnosis. We performed a multicenter, retrospective analysis of postnatally diagnosed patients recruited by members of the Association des Cytogénéticiens de Langue Française (the French-Speaking Cytogeneticists Association). Clinical and cytogenetic data on 749 cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2013 were collected by 31 French cytogenetics laboratories. The most frequent reasons for referral of postnatally diagnosed cases were a congenital heart defect (CHD, 48.6%), facial dysmorphism (49.7%) and developmental delay (40.7%). Since 2007 (the year in which array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was introduced for the routine screening of patients with intellectual disability), almost all cases have been diagnosed using FISH (96.1%). Only 15 cases (all with an atypical phenotype) were diagnosed with aCGH; the deletion size ranged from 745 to 2904 kb. The deletion was inherited in 15.0% of cases and was of maternal origin in 85.5% of the latter. This is the largest yet documented cohort of patients with 22q11.2DS (the most commonly diagnosed microdeletion) from the same population. French cytogenetics laboratories diagnosed at least 108 affected patients (including fetuses) per year from among a national population of ∼66 million. As observed for prenatal diagnoses, CHDs were the most frequently detected malformation in postnatal diagnoses. The most common CHD in postnatal diagnoses was an isolated septal defect.

  2. Sparsity-based fast CGH generation using layer-based approach for 3D point cloud model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Gu; Jeong, Hyunwook; Ro, Yong Man

    2017-03-01

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) is becoming increasingly important for a 3-D display in various applications including virtual reality. In the CGH, holographic fringe patterns are generated by numerically calculating them on computer simulation systems. However, a heavy computational cost is required to calculate the complex amplitude on CGH plane for all points of 3D objects. This paper proposes a new fast CGH generation based on the sparsity of CGH for 3D point cloud model. The aim of the proposed method is to significantly reduce computational complexity while maintaining the quality of the holographic fringe patterns. To that end, we present a new layer-based approach for calculating the complex amplitude distribution on the CGH plane by using sparse FFT (sFFT). We observe the CGH of a layer of 3D objects is sparse so that dominant CGH is rapidly generated from a small set of signals by sFFT. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method is one order of magnitude faster than recently reported fast CGH generation.

  3. Bridging the gap from prenatal karyotyping to whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization in Hong Kong: survey on knowledge and acceptance of health-care providers and pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hiu Yee Heidi; Kan, Anita Sik-Yau; Hui, Pui Wah; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2017-12-01

    The use of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been increasingly widespread. The challenge of integration of this technology into prenatal diagnosis was the interpretation of results and communicating findings of unclear clinical significance. This study assesses the knowledge and acceptance of prenatal aCGH in Hong Kong obstetricians and pregnant women. The aim is to identify the needs and gaps before implementing the replacement of karyotyping with aCGH. Questionnaires with aCGH information in the form of pamphlets were sent by post to obstetrics and gynecology doctors. For the pregnant women group, a video presentation, pamphlets on aCGH and a self-administered questionnaire were provided at the antenatal clinic. The perception of aCGH between doctors and pregnant women was similar. Doctors not choosing aCGH were more concerned about the difficulty in counseling of variants of unknown significance and adult-onset disease in pregnant women, whereas pregnant women not choosing aCGH were more concerned about the increased waiting time leading to increased anxiety. Prenatal aCGH is perceived as a better test by both doctors and patients. Counseling support, training, and better understanding and communication of findings of unclear clinical significance are necessary to improve doctor-patient experience.

  4. Clinical Utility of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Karen R.; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Yu, Alexander; Folsom, Matthew R.; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Plon, Sharon E.; Naeem, Rizwan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate detection of recurrent chromosomal abnormalities is critical to assign patients to risk-based therapeutic regimens for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Procedure We investigated the utility of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) for detection of chromosomal abnormalities compared to standard clinical evaluation with karyotype and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). Fifty pediatric ALL diagnostic bone marrows were analyzed by bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array, and findings compared to standard clinical evaluation. Results Sensitivity of aCGH was 79% to detect karyotypic findings other than balanced translocations, which cannot be detected by aCGH because they involve no copy number change. aCGH also missed abnormalities occurring in subclones constituting less than 25% of cells. aCGH detected 44 additional abnormalities undetected or misidentified by karyotype, 21 subsequently validated by FISH, including abnormalities in 4 of 10 cases with uninformative cytogenetics. aCGH detected concurrent terminal deletions of both 9p and 20q in three cases, in two of which the 20q deletion was undetected by karyotype. A narrow region of loss at 7p21 was detected in two cases. Conclusions An array with increased BAC density over regions important in ALL, combined with PCR for fusion products of balanced translocations, could minimize labor- and time-intensive cytogenetic assays and provide key prognostic information in the approximately 35% of cases with uninformative cytogenetics. PMID:18253961

  5. Detection of Genetic Alterations in Breast Sentinel Lymph Node by Array-CGH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalli, Luciane R

    2005-01-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) is the first node in the mammary gland to harbor malignant cells in breast tumors with metastasis, and SLN positivity is an indication for axillary lymph node dissection...

  6. Detection of Genetic Alterations in Breast Sentinel Lymph Node by Array-CGH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalli, Luciane R

    2006-01-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) is the first node in the mammary gland to harbor malignant cells in breast tumors with metastasis, and SLN positivity is an indication for axillary lymph node dissection...

  7. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address t...

  8. Fine-tiling array CGH to improve diagnostics for alpha- and beta-thalassemia rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Chaibunruang, A.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Balak, J.R.; Schaap, R.A.; Ariyurek, Y.; Fucharoen, S.; den Dunnen, J.T.; Giordano, P.C.; Bakker, E.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for thalassemia causing deletions has lead to the detection of new rearrangements. Knowledge of the exact breakpoint sequences should give more insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, and would

  9. Direct microcontact printing of oligonucleotides for biochip applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trévisiol E

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical step in the fabrication of biochips is the controlled placement of probes molecules on solid surfaces. This is currently performed by sequential deposition of probes on a target surface with split or solid pins. In this article, we present a cost-effective procedure namely microcontact printing using stamps, for a parallel deposition of probes applicable for manufacturing biochips. Results Contrary to a previous work, we showed that the stamps tailored with an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane material did not require any surface modification to be able to adsorb oligonucleotides or PCR products. The adsorbed DNA molecules are subsequently printed efficiently on a target surface with high sub-micron resolution. Secondly, we showed that successive stamping is characterized by an exponential decay of the amount of transferred DNA molecules to the surface up the 4th print, then followed by a second regime of transfer that was dependent on the contact time and which resulted in reduced quality of the features. Thus, while consecutive stamping was possible, this procedure turned out to be less reproducible and more time consuming than simply re-inking the stamps between each print. Thirdly, we showed that the hybridization signals on arrays made by microcontact printing were 5 to 10-times higher than those made by conventional spotting methods. Finally, we demonstrated the validity of this microcontact printing method in manufacturing oligonucleotides arrays for mutations recognition in a yeast gene. Conclusion The microcontact printing can be considered as a new potential technology platform to pattern DNA microarrays that may have significant advantages over the conventional spotting technologies as it is easy to implement, it uses low cost material to make the stamp, and the arrays made by this technology are 10-times more sensitive in term of hybridization signals than those manufactured by conventional spotting

  10. Computer holography: 3D digital art based on high-definition CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, K; Arima, Y; Nishi, H; Yamashita, H; Yoshizaki, Y; Ogawa, K; Nakahara, S

    2013-01-01

    Our recent works of high-definition computer-generated holograms (CGH) and the techniques used for the creation, such as the polygon-based method, silhouette method and digitized holography, are summarized and reviewed in this paper. The concept of computer holography is proposed in terms of integrating and crystalizing the techniques into novel digital art.

  11. Functionalization and Self-Assembly of DNA Bidimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Eritja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotides carrying amino, thiol groups, as well as fluorescein, c-myc peptide sequence and nanogold at internal positions were prepared and used for the assembly of bidimensional DNA arrays.

  12. Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Targeting Liver Disease: TTR Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Niemietz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The liver has become an increasingly interesting target for oligonucleotide therapy. Mutations of the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR, expressed in vast amounts by the liver, result in a complex degenerative disease, termed familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP. Misfolded variants of TTR are linked to the establishment of extracellular protein deposition in various tissues, including the heart and the peripheral nervous system. Recent progress in the chemistry and formulation of antisense (ASO and small interfering RNA (siRNA designed for a knockdown of TTR mRNA in the liver has allowed to address the issue of gene-specific molecular therapy in a clinical setting of FAP. The two therapeutic oligonucleotides bind to RNA in a sequence specific manner but exploit different mechanisms. Here we describe major developments that have led to the advent of therapeutic oligonucleotides for treatment of TTR-related disease.

  13. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  14. Enzymatic production of 'monoclonal stoichiometric' single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M; Högberg, Björn

    2013-07-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools, as diagnostic probes, in gene therapy and in DNA nanotechnology. Oligonucleotides are typically produced via solid-phase synthesis, using polymer chemistries that are limited relative to what biological systems produce. The number of errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and the resulting diversity of sequences can be a problem. Here we present the 'monoclonal stoichiometric' (MOSIC) method for enzyme-mediated production of DNA oligonucleotides. We amplified oligonucleotides from clonal templates derived from single bacterial colonies and then digested cutter hairpins in the products, which released pools of oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We prepared 14-378-nucleotide MOSIC oligonucleotides either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification or by amplification of phagemid DNA in Escherichia coli. Analyses of the formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides.

  15. Microdeletion and microduplication analysis of chinese conotruncal defects patients with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Gong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to develop a reliable targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect microdeletions and microduplications in congenital conotruncal defects (CTDs, especially on 22q11.2 region, and for some other chromosomal aberrations, such as 5p15-5p, 7q11.23 and 4p16.3. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with CTDs, including 12 pulmonary atresia (PA, 10 double-outlet right ventricle (DORV, 3 transposition of great arteries (TGA, 1 tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and one ventricular septal defect (VSD, were enrolled in this study and screened for pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs, using Agilent 8 x 15K targeted aCGH. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was performed to test the molecular results of targeted aCGH. RESULTS: Four of 27 patients (14.8% had 22q11.2 CNVs, 1 microdeletion and 3 microduplications. qPCR test confirmed the microdeletion and microduplication detected by the targeted aCGH. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal abnormalities were a well-known cause of multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. This aCGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions can detect genomic imbalances including 22q11.2 and other 10 kinds CNVs effectively and quickly. This approach has the potential to be applied to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/microduplication syndromes on a single microarray.

  16. Radio-marking and in vivo imagery of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnast, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis is part of activities aimed at the development of new molecules like oligonucleotides. Its first objective was the development and validation of a marking method with fluorine-18 of oligonucleotides for their in-vivo pharmacological assessment with positron emission tomography (PET). Further investigations addressed the use of iodine-125 for oligonucleotide marking purpose. This radio-marking, and in vivo and ex vivo imagery techniques are described, and their potential is highlighted for the pharmacological assessment of different oligonucleotides

  17. Electronic Structures of LNA Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik G. Bohr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Important oligonucleotides in anti-sense research have been investigated in silico and experimentally. This involves quantum mechanical (QM calculations and chromatography experiments on locked nucleic acid (LNA phosphorothioate (PS oligonucleotides. iso-potential electrostatic surfaces are essential in this study and have been calculated from the wave functions derived from the QM calculations that provide binding information and other properties of these molecules. The QM calculations give details of the electronic structures in terms of e.g., energy and bonding, which make them distinguish or differentiate between the individual PS diastereoisomers determined by the position of sulfur atoms. Rules are derived from the electronic calculations of these molecules and include the effects of the phosphorothioate chirality and formation of electrostatic potential surfaces. Physical and electrochemical descriptors of the PS oligonucleotides are compared to the experiments in which chiral states on these molecules can be distinguished. The calculations demonstrate that electronic structure, electrostatic potential, and topology are highly sensitive to single PS configuration changes and can give a lead to understanding the activity of the molecules. Keywords: LNA phosphorothioate, DNA/LNA oligonucleotide, diastereoisomers, Hartree-Fock calculations, iso-potential surface, anion chromatograms

  18. Associating Oligonucleotides with Positively Charged Liposomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurkiewicz, P.; Okruszek, A.; Hof, Martin; Langner, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2003), s. 77-84 ISSN 1425-8153 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : oligonucleotides * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * DOTAP Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.455, year: 2003

  19. Triplex-forming ability of modified oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højland, Torben; Babu, Bolle Ravindra; Bryld, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    We present our studies on the ability of several different nucleotide analogs as triplex-forming oligonucleotides. The modifications tested include 4'-C-hydroxymethyl, LNA, 2'-amino-LNA and N2'-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA. Triplexes containing monomers of N2'-glycyl-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA ar...

  20. An application of CART algorithm in genetics: IGFs and cGH polymorphisms in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Selçuk

    2017-04-01

    The avian insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGFs) and avian growth hormone (cGH) genes are the most important genes that can affect bird performance traits because of its important function in growth and metabolism. Understanding the molecular genetic basis of variation in growth-related traits is of importance for continued improvement and increased rates of genetic gain. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of cGH and IGFs genes in Japanese quail using conventional least square method (LSM) and CART algorithm. Therefore, this study was aimed to demonstrate at determining the polymorphisms of two genes related growth characteristics via CART algorithm. A simulated data set was generated to analyze by adhering the results of some poultry genetic studies which it includes live weights at 5 weeks of age, 3 alleles and 6 genotypes of cGH and 2 alleles and 3 genotypes of IGFs. As a result, it has been determined that the CART algorithm has some advantages as for that LSM.

  1. Array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of boys with X linked hypopituitarism identifies a 3.9 Mb duplicated critical region at Xq27 containing SOX3.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solomon, N.M.; Ross, S.; Morgan, T.; Belsky, J.L.; Hol, F.A.; Karnes, P.; Hopwood, N.J.; Myers, S.E.; Tan, A.; Warne, G.L.; Forrest, S.M.; Thomas, P.Q.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) is a powerful method that detects alteration of gene copy number with greater resolution and efficiency than traditional methods. However, its ability to detect disease causing duplications in constitutional genomic DNA has not been

  2. Chromosomal minimal critical regions in therapy-related leukemia appear different from those of de novo leukemia by high-resolution aCGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Itzhar

    Full Text Available Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML, is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML. Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case. In primary leukemia with a previously "normal" karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40 kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1 Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML.

  3. Detection and identification of intestinal pathogenic bacteria by hybridization to oligonucleotide microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lian-Qun; Li, Jun-Wen; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Chao, Fu-Huan; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yuan, Zheng-Quan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the common intestinal pathogenic bacteria quickly and accurately. METHODS: A rapid (<3 h) experimental procedure was set up based upon the gene chip technology. Target genes were amplified and hybridized by oligonucleotide microarrays. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy strains of bacteria in pure culture belonging to 11 genera were successfully discriminated under comparatively same conditions, and a series of specific hybridization maps corresponding to each kind of bacteria were obtained. When this method was applied to 26 divided cultures, 25 (96.2%) were identified. CONCLUSION: Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus sp., Bacillus cereus, Vibrio cholerae, Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter jejuni can be detected and identified by our microarrays. The accuracy, range, and discrimination power of this assay can be continually improved by adding further oligonucleotides to the arrays without any significant increase of complexity or cost. PMID:16437687

  4. A comparative analysis of measles virus RNA by oligonucleotide fingerprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, J.R.; Meulen, V. ter

    1982-01-01

    Isolates from two cases of acute measles, one case of acute measles encephalitis and three patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were compared. This comparison was based upon the electrophoretic analysis of T 1 oligonucleotides from single-stranded, full-length RNA isolated from cytoplasmic nucleocapsids. Although all viruses have oligonucleotides in common, each isolate generated a unique pattern of oligonucleotides. However, no group of oligonucleotides was observed which would allow differentiation between viruses isolated from acute infections and those isolated from CNS diseases; indicating that probably all measles viruses differ in their nucleotide sequence, regardless of origin. (Author)

  5. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss 'hot spots' included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca.) and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites). Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction

  6. A study of glasses-type color CGH using a color filter considering reduction of blurring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Saki; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a glasses-type color computer generated hologram (CGH) by using a color filter. The proposed glasses consist of two "lenses" made of overlapping holograms and color filters. The holograms, which are calculated to reconstruct images in each primary color, are divided to small areas, which we called cells, and superimposed on one hologram. In the same way, colors of the filter correspond to the hologram cells. We can configure it very simply without a complex optical system, and the configuration yields a small and light weight system suitable for glasses. When the cell is small enough, the colors are mixed and reconstructed color images are observed. In addition, color expression of reconstruction images improves, too. However, using small cells blurrs reconstructed images because of the following reasons: (1) interference between cells because of the correlation with the cells, and (2) reduction of resolution caused by the size of the cell hologram. We are investigating in order to make a hologram that has high resolution reconstructed color images without ghost images. In this paper, we discuss (1) the details of the proposed glasses-type color CGH, (2) appropriate cell size for an eye system, (3) effects of cell shape on the reconstructed images, and (4) a new method to reduce the blurring of the images.

  7. Identification of chromosome aberrations in sporadic microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers using array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Dyrsø; Li, Jian; Wang, Kai

    2011-01-01

    cancers constitute approximately 85% of sporadic cases, whereas microsatellite unstable (MSI) cases constitute the remaining 15%. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify genomic hotspot regions that harbor recurrent copy number changes. The study material...

  8. High resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridisation of medulloblastomas and supra-tentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Martin Gerard; Ichimura, Koichi; Liu, Lu; Plant, Karen; Bäcklund, L Magnus; Pearson, Danita M; Collins, Vincent Peter

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours are aggressive childhood tumours. We report our findings using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) on a whole-genome BAC/PAC/cosmid array with a median clone separation of 0.97Mb to study 34 medulloblastomas and 7 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours. Array CGH allowed identification and mapping of numerous novel small regions of copy number change to genomic sequence, in addition to the large regions already known from previous studies. Novel amplifications were identified, some encompassing oncogenes, MYCL1, PDGFRA, KIT and MYB, not previously reported to show amplification in these tumours. In addition, one supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour had lost both copies of the tumour suppressor genes CDKN2A & CDKN2B. Ten medulloblastomas had findings suggestive of isochromosome 17q. In contrast to previous reports using conventional CGH, array CGH identified three distinct breakpoints in these cases: Ch 17: 17940393-19251679 (17p11.2, n=6), Ch 17: 20111990-23308272 (17p11.2-17q11.2, n=4) and Ch 17: 38425359-39091575 (17q21.31, n=1). Significant differences were found in the patterns of copy number change between medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours, providing further evidence that these tumours are genetically distinct despite their morphological and behavioural similarities. PMID:16783165

  9. A comparison of alternative 60-mer probe designs in an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Benjamin D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays have proven powerful for functional genomics studies. Several technologies exist for the generation of whole-genome arrays. It is well documented that 25mer probes directed against different regions of the same gene produce variable signal intensity values. However, the extent to which this is true for probes of greater length (60mers is not well characterized. Moreover, this information has not previously been reported for whole-genome arrays designed against bacteria, whose genomes may differ substantially in characteristics directly affecting microarray performance. Results We report here an analysis of alternative 60mer probe designs for an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide array for the GC rich, β-proteobacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. Probes were designed using the ArrayOligoSel3.5 software package and whole-genome microarrays synthesized by Agilent, Inc. using their in-situ, ink-jet technology platform. We first validated the quality of the microarrays as demonstrated by an average signal to noise ratio of >1000. Next, we determined that the variance of replicate probes (1178 total probes examined of identical sequence was 3.8% whereas the variance of alternative probes (558 total alternative probes examined designs was 9.5%. We determined that depending upon the definition, about 2.4% of replicate and 7.8% of alternative probes produced outlier conclusions. Finally, we determined none of the probe design subscores (GC content, internal repeat, binding energy and self annealment produced by ArrayOligoSel3.5 were predictive or probes that produced outlier signals. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrated that the use of multiple probes per target sequence is not essential for in-situ synthesized 60mer oligonucleotide arrays designed against bacteria. Although probes producing outlier signals were identified, the use of ratios results in less than 10% of such outlier conclusions. We also determined that

  10. Comparison of gene coverage of mouse oligonucleotide microarray platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medrano Juan F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing use of DNA microarrays for genetical genomics studies generates a need for platforms with complete coverage of the genome. We have compared the effective gene coverage in the mouse genome of different commercial and noncommercial oligonucleotide microarray platforms by performing an in-house gene annotation of probes. We only used information about probes that is available from vendors and followed a process that any researcher may take to find the gene targeted by a given probe. In order to make consistent comparisons between platforms, probes in each microarray were annotated with an Entrez Gene id and the chromosomal position for each gene was obtained from the UCSC Genome Browser Database. Gene coverage was estimated as the percentage of Entrez Genes with a unique position in the UCSC Genome database that is tested by a given microarray platform. Results A MySQL relational database was created to store the mapping information for 25,416 mouse genes and for the probes in five microarray platforms (gene coverage level in parenthesis: Affymetrix430 2.0 (75.6%, ABI Genome Survey (81.24%, Agilent (79.33%, Codelink (78.09%, Sentrix (90.47%; and four array-ready oligosets: Sigma (47.95%, Operon v.3 (69.89%, Operon v.4 (84.03%, and MEEBO (84.03%. The differences in coverage between platforms were highly conserved across chromosomes. Differences in the number of redundant and unspecific probes were also found among arrays. The database can be queried to compare specific genomic regions using a web interface. The software used to create, update and query the database is freely available as a toolbox named ArrayGene. Conclusion The software developed here allows researchers to create updated custom databases by using public or proprietary information on genes for any organisms. ArrayGene allows easy comparisons of gene coverage between microarray platforms for any region of the genome. The comparison presented here

  11. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

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    Chen Feng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria, we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at

  12. Chromosomes of Iberian Leuciscinae (Cyprinidae) Revisited: Evidence of Genome Restructuring in Homoploid Hybrids Using Dual-Color FISH and CGH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pereira, C. S.; Ráb, Petr; Collares-Pereira, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 141, 2/3 (2013), s. 143-152 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-37277S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : CGH/GISH * Chondrostoma s.I. * genome reshuffling hybridization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.905, year: 2013

  13. Comparing temporally-focused GPC and CGH for two-photon excitation and optogenetics in turbid media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    a 4f setup that directly converts phase information to intensity. The GPC method has been used with temporal focusing for excitation in two-photon optogenetics [1-3]. The computer generated hologram (CGH) is also used to generate arbitrary light patterns and has been used for optical manipulation...

  14. Analysis of Chinese women with primary ovarian insufficiency by high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Can; Fu, Fang; Yang, Xin; Sun, Yi-Min; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea) or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years. The etiology of primary ovarian insufficiency in human female patients is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential genetic causes in primary amenorrhea patients by high resolution array based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. Following the standard karyotyping analysis, genomic DNA from whole blood of 15 primary amenorrhea patients and 15 normal control women was hybridized with Affymetrix cytogenetic 2.7M arrays following the standard protocol. Copy number variations identified by array-CGH were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction. All the 30 samples were negative by conventional karyotyping analysis. Microdeletions on chromosome 17q21.31-q21.32 with approximately 1.3 Mb were identified in four patients by high resolution array-CGH analysis. This included the female reproductive secretory pathway related factor N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) gene. The results of the present study suggest that there may be critical regions regulating primary ovarian insufficiency in women with a 17q21.31-q21.32 microdeletion. This effect might be due to the loss of function of the NSF gene/genes within the deleted region or to effects on contiguous genes.

  15. Mismatch oligonucleotides in human and yeast: guidelines for probe design on tiling microarrays

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    Jee Justin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mismatched oligonucleotides are widely used on microarrays to differentiate specific from nonspecific hybridization. While many experiments rely on such oligos, the hybridization behavior of various degrees of mismatch (MM structure has not been extensively studied. Here, we present the results of two large-scale microarray experiments on S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens genomic DNA, to explore MM oligonucleotide behavior with real sample mixtures under tiling-array conditions. Results We examined all possible nucleotide substitutions at the central position of 36-nucleotide probes, and found that nonspecific binding by MM oligos depends upon the individual nucleotide substitutions they incorporate: C→A, C→G and T→A (yielding purine-purine mispairs are most disruptive, whereas A→X were least disruptive. We also quantify a marked GC skew effect: substitutions raising probe GC content exhibit higher intensity (and vice versa. This skew is small in highly-expressed regions (± 0.5% of total intensity range and large (± 2% or more elsewhere. Multiple mismatches per oligo are largely additive in effect: each MM added in a distributed fashion causes an additional 21% intensity drop relative to PM, three-fold more disruptive than adding adjacent mispairs (7% drop per MM. Conclusion We investigate several parameters for oligonucleotide design, including the effects of each central nucleotide substitution on array signal intensity and of multiple MM per oligo. To avoid GC skew, individual substitutions should not alter probe GC content. RNA sample mixture complexity may increase the amount of nonspecific hybridization, magnify GC skew and boost the intensity of MM oligos at all levels.

  16. Regulation of Gene Expression with Double-Stranded Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska, Anna; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Zhang, Liquan; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-11-01

    Alteration of gene transcription by inhibition of specific transcriptional regulatory proteins is necessary for determining how these factors participate in cellular differentiation. The functions of these proteins can be antagonized by several methods, each with specific limitations. Inhibition of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins was achieved with double-stranded (ds) phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained octamer or kappaB consensus sequences. The phosphorothioate oligonucleotides specifically bound either octamer transcription factor or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. The modified oligonucleotides accumulated in cells more effectively than standard ds oligonucleotides and modulated gene expression in a specific manner. Octamer-dependent activation of a reporter plasmid or NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enhancer was inhibited when the appropriate phosphorothioate oligonucleotide was added to a transiently transfected B cell line. Addition of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained the octamer consensus to Jurkat T leukemia cells inhibited interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion to a degree similar to that observed with a mutated octamer site in the IL-2 enhancer. The ds phosphorothioate oligonucleotides probably compete for binding of specific transcription factors and may provide anti-viral, immunosuppressive, or other therapeutic effects.

  17. A pilot study of transcription unit analysis in rice using oligonucleotide tiling-path microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolc, Viktor; Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2005-01-01

    As the international efforts to sequence the rice genome are completed, an immediate challenge and opportunity is to comprehensively and accurately define all transcription units in the rice genome. Here we describe a strategy of using high-density oligonucleotide tiling-path microarrays to map...... transcription of the japonica rice genome. In a pilot experiment to test this approach, one array representing the reverse strand of the last 11.2 Mb sequence of chromosome 10 was analyzed in detail based on a mathematical model developed in this study. Analysis of the array data detected 77% of the reference...... gene models in a mixture of four RNA populations. Moreover, significant transcriptional activities were found in many of the previously annotated intergenic regions. These preliminary results demonstrate the utility of genome tiling microarrays in evaluating annotated rice gene models...

  18. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstege, Henne; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos; Beers, Erik van; Velds, Arno; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Schut, Eva; Kerkhoven, Ron; Klijn, Christiaan N

    2010-01-01

    Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ , Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ and p53 Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. The selection of the oncogenome during

  19. Modern methods for the synthesis of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubin, Evgenii M; Oretskaya, Tat'yana S; Romanova, Elena A

    2002-01-01

    The published data on the methods of chemical solution and solid-phase synthesis of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates are reviewed. The known methods are systematised and their advantages and disadvantages are considered. The approaches to the solution synthesis of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates are systematised according to the type of chemical bonds between the fragments, whereas those to the solid-phase synthesis are classified according to the procedure used for the preparation of conjugates, viz., stepwise elongation of oligonucleotide and peptide chains on the same polymeric support or solid-phase condensation of two presynthesised fragments. The bibliography includes 141 references.

  20. Optical Characterization of Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  1. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Xu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype.

  2. Polar body array CGH for prediction of the status of the corresponding oocyte. Part II: technical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magli, M. Cristina; Montag, Markus; Köster, Maria; Muzi, Luigi; Geraedts, Joep; Collins, John; Goossens, Veerle; Handyside, Alan H.; Harper, Joyce; Repping, Sjoerd; Schmutzler, Andreas; Vesela, Katerina; Gianaroli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical aspects related to polar body (PB) biopsy, which might have an influence on the results of the microarray comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Furthermore, a comparison was made between two biopsy methods (mechanical and laser). Biopsy of

  3. Polar body array CGH for prediction of the status of the corresponding oocyte. Part I: clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, Joep; Montag, Markus; Magli, M. Cristina; Repping, Sjoerd; Handyside, Alan; Staessen, Catherine; Harper, Joyce; Schmutzler, Andreas; Collins, John; Goossens, Veerle; van der Ven, Hans; Vesela, Katerina; Gianaroli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Several randomized controlled trials have not shown a benefit from preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) biopsy of cleavage-stage embryos and assessment of up to 10 chromosomes for aneuploidy. Therefore, a proof-of-principle study was planned to determine the reliability of alternative form of

  4. Intragenic rearrangements in X-linked intellectual deficiency: results of a-CGH in a series of 54 patients and identification of TRPC5 and KLHL15 as potential XLID genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon-Ravix, Cécile; Cacciagli, Pierre; Choucair, Nancy; Popovici, Cornel; Missirian, Chantal; Milh, Mathieu; Mégarbané, André; Busa, Tiffany; Julia, Sophie; Girard, Nadine; Badens, Catherine; Sigaudy, Sabine; Philip, Nicole; Villard, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) enables the detection of intragenic rearrangements, such as single exon deletion or duplication. This approach can lead to the identification of new disease genes. We report on the analysis of 54 male patients presenting with intellectual deficiency (ID) and a family history suggesting X-linked (XL) inheritance or maternal skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), using a home-made X-chromosome-specific microarray covering the whole human X-chromosome at high resolution. The majority of patients had whole genome array-CGH prior to the selection and we did not include large rearrangements such as MECP2 and FMR1 duplications. We identified four rearrangements considered as causative or potentially pathogenic, corresponding to a detection rate of 8%. Two CNVs affected known XLID genes and were therefore considered as causative (IL1RAPL1 and OPHN1 intragenic deletions). Two new CNVs were considered as potentially pathogenic as they affected interesting candidates for ID. The first CNV is a deletion of the first exon of the TRPC5 gene, encoding a cation channel implicated in dendrite growth and patterning, in a child presenting with ID and an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The second CNV is a partial deletion of KLHL15, in a patient with severe ID, epilepsy, and anomalies of cortical development. In both cases, in spite of strong arguments for clinical relevance, we were not able at this stage to confirm pathogenicity of the mutations, and the causality of the variants identified in XLID remains to be confirmed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization as the First-line Investigation for Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease: Experience in a Single Tertiary Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Geum; Hwang, Su Kyung; Kwon, Jung Eun; Kim, Yeo Hyang

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of verifying genetic abnormalities using array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) immediately after diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD). Among neonates under the age of 28 days who underwent echocardiography from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2016, neonates whose chromosomal and genomic abnormalities were tested using a-CGH in cases of an abnormal finding on echocardiography were enrolled. Of the 166 patients diagnosed with CHD, 81 underwent a-CGH and 11 patients (11/81, 13.5%) had abnormal findings on a-CGH. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was the most common (4/11, 36.4%). On the first a-CGH, 4 patients were negative (4/81, 5%). Three of them were finally diagnosed with Williams syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), 1 patient was diagnosed with Noonan syndrome through exome sequencing. All of them exhibited diffuse pulmonary artery branch hypoplasia, as well as increased velocity of blood flow, on repeated echocardiography. Five patients started rehabilitation therapy at mean 6 months old age in outpatient clinics and epilepsy was diagnosed in 2 patients. Parents of 2 patients (22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Patau syndrome) refused treatment due to the anticipated prognosis. Screening tests for genetic abnormalities using a-CGH in neonates with CHD has the advantage of early diagnosis of genetic abnormality during the neonatal period in which there is no obvious symptom of genetic abnormality. However, there are disadvantages that some genetic abnormalities cannot be identified on a-CGH. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  6. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions

  7. Oligonucleotide-based theranostic nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Reza; Ozpolat, Bulent; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic approaches, combining the functionality of both therapy and imaging, have shown potential in cancer nanomedicine. Oligonucleotides such as small interfering RNA and microRNA, which are powerful therapeutic agents, have been effectively employed in theranostic systems against various cancers. Nanoparticles are used to deliver oligonucleotides into tumors by passive or active targeting while protecting the oligonucleotides from nucleases in the extracellular environment. The use of quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles and tagging with contrast agents, like fluorescent dyes, optical or magnetic agents and various radioisotopes, has facilitated early detection of tumors and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we review the advantages of theranostic applications in cancer therapy and imaging, with special attention to oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:27102380

  8. Hole hopping rates in single strand oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Raffaele [Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali e Alimentari, Università di Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, I-10095 Grugliasco, TO (Italy); Capobianco, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Peluso, Andrea, E-mail: apeluso@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • DNA hole transfer rates have been computed. • Delocalized adenine domains significantly affect hole transfer rates in DNA. • Franck–Condon weighted density of state from DFT normal modes. • DNA application in molecular electronics. - Abstract: The rates of hole transfer between guanine and adenine in single strand DNA have been evaluated by using Fermi’s golden rule and Kubo’s generating function approach for the Franck–Condon weighted density of states. The whole sets of the normal modes and vibrational frequencies of the two nucleobases, obtained at DFT/B3LYP level of calculation, have been considered in computations. The results show that in single strand the pyramidalization/planarization mode of the amino groups of both nucleobases plays the major role. At room temperature, the Franck–Condon density of states extends over a wide range of hole site energy difference, 0–1 eV, giving some hints about the design of oligonucleotides of potential technological interest.

  9. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weizhong; Zhou, Huafu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  10. Explorative data analysis of MCL reveals gene expression networks implicated in survival and prognosis supported by explorative CGH analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenk, Steffen; Engelmann, Julia C; Pinkert, Stefan; Weniger, Markus; Schultz, Jörg; Rosenwald, Andreas; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Müller, Tobias; Dandekar, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an incurable B cell lymphoma and accounts for 6% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. On the genetic level, MCL is characterized by the hallmark translocation t(11;14) that is present in most cases with few exceptions. Both gene expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data vary considerably between patients with implications for their prognosis. We compare patients over and below the median of survival. Exploratory principal component analysis of gene expression data showed that the second principal component correlates well with patient survival. Explorative analysis of CGH data shows the same correlation. On chromosome 7 and 9 specific genes and bands are delineated which improve prognosis prediction independent of the previously described proliferation signature. We identify a compact survival predictor of seven genes for MCL patients. After extensive re-annotation using GEPAT, we established protein networks correlating with prognosis. Well known genes (CDC2, CCND1) and further proliferation markers (WEE1, CDC25, aurora kinases, BUB1, PCNA, E2F1) form a tight interaction network, but also non-proliferative genes (SOCS1, TUBA1B CEBPB) are shown to be associated with prognosis. Furthermore we show that aggressive MCL implicates a gene network shift to higher expressed genes in late cell cycle states and refine the set of non-proliferative genes implicated with bad prognosis in MCL. The results from explorative data analysis of gene expression and CGH data are complementary to each other. Including further tests such as Wilcoxon rank test we point both to proliferative and non-proliferative gene networks implicated in inferior prognosis of MCL and identify suitable markers both in gene expression and CGH data

  11. Clinical trial involving sufferers and non-sufferers of cervicogenic headache (CGH): potential mechanisms of action of photobiomodulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Ann D.; Bicknell, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) is an effective tool for the management of spinal pain including inflammation of facet joints. Apart from cervical and lumbar joint pain the upper cervical spine facet joint inflammation can result in the CGH (traumatic or atraumatic in origin). This condition affects children, adults and elders and is responsible for 19% of chronic headache and up to 33% of patients in pain clinics. The condition responds well to physiotherapy, facet joint injection, radiofrequency neurotomy and surgery at a rate of 75%. The other 25% being unresponsive to treatment with no identified features of unresponsiveness. In other conditions of chronic unresponsive cervical pain have responded to photobiomodulation at a level of 80% in the short and medium term. A clinical trial was therefore conducted on a cohort of atraumatic patients from the ages of 5-93 (predominantly Neurologist referred / familial sufferers 2/3 generations vertically and laterally) who had responded to a course of PBM and physiotherapy. The CGH sufferers and their non CGH suffering relatives over these generations were then compared for features that distinguish the two groups. Fifty parameters were tested (anthropmetric, movement and neural tension tests included) and there was a noted difference in tandem stance between the groups (.04 significance with repeated measures). As this impairment is common to benign ataxia and migrainous vertigo and in these conditions there is an ion channelopathy (especially potassium channelopathy). A postulated mechanism of action of PBM would involve modulation of ion channels and this is discussed in this presentation.

  12. Calculation method of CGH for Binocular Eyepiece-Type Electro Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chanyoung; Yoneyama, Takuo; Sakamoto, Yuji; Okuyama, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    We had researched about eyepiece-type electro holography to display 3-D images of larger objects at wider angle. We had enlarged visual field considering depth of object with Fourier optical system using two lenses. In this paper, we extend our system for binocular. In the binocular system, we use two different holograms for each eye. The 3-D image for left eye should be observed like the real object observed using left eye and the same for right eye. So, we propose a method of calculation of computer-generated hologram (CGH) transforming the coordinate system of the model data to make two holograms for binocular eyepiece-type electro holography. The coordinate system of original model data is called the world coordinate system. The left and the right coordinate system are transformed from the world coordinate system. We also propose the method for correcting the installation error that occurs when placing the electronic and optical devices. The installation error is calculated and the model data is corrected using the distance between measured position and setup position of the reconstructed image Optical reconstruction experiments were carried out to verify the proposed method.

  13. Defibrotide: An Oligonucleotide for Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, May T; Kakadiya, Payal P; Kush, Samantha M; Weigel, Kylie; Lowe, Denise K

    2018-02-01

    To review the efficacy and safety of defibrotide as well as its pharmacology, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics (PK), drug-drug interactions, dosing, cost considerations, and place in therapy. A PubMed search was performed through August 2017 using the terms defibrotide, oligonucleotide, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Other data sources were from references of identified studies, review articles, and conference abstracts plus manufacturer product labeling and website, the Food and Drug Administration website, and clinicaltrials.gov. English-language trials that examined defibrotide's pharmacodynamics, mechanism, PK, efficacy, safety, dosing, and cost-effectiveness were included. Trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of defibrotide for treatment of VOD/SOS in adult and pediatric HCT patients, with complete response rates and day +100 overall survival rates ranging from 25.5% to 76% and 35% to 64%, respectively. The British Committee for Standards in Haematology/British Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Guidelines recommend defibrotide prophylaxis in pediatric and adult HCT patients with risk factors for VOD/SOS; however, its prophylactic use in the United States is controversial. Although there are efficacy data to support this strategy, cost-effectiveness data have not shown it to be cost-effective. Defibrotide has manageable toxicities, with low rates of grade 3 to 4 adverse effects. Defibrotide is the first medication approved in the United States for the treatment of adults and children with hepatic VOD/SOS, with renal or pulmonary dysfunction following HCT. Data evaluating defibrotide for VOD/SOS prevention are conflicting and have not shown cost-effectiveness.

  14. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  15. [Analysis of clinical outcomes of different embryo stage biopsy in array comparative genomic hybridization based preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, J D; Wu, W; Shu, L; Cai, L L; Xie, J Z; Ma, L; Sun, X P; Cui, Y G; Liu, J Y

    2017-12-25

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of the application of array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) in preimplantation genetic diagnosis or screening (PGD/PGS), and compare the clinical outcomes of different stage embryo biopsy. Methods: The outcomes of 381 PGD/PGS cycles referred in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from July 2011 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 320 PGD cycles with 156 cleavage-stage-biopsy cycles and 164 trophectoderm-biopsy cycles, 61 PGS cycles with 23 cleavage-stage-biopsy cycles and 38 trophectoderm-biopsy cycles. Chromosomal analysis was performed by array-CGH technology combined with whole genome amplification. Single embryo transfer was performed in all transfer cycles. Live birth rate was calculated as the main clinical outcomes. Results: The embryo diagnosis rate of PGD/PGS by array-CGH were 96.9%-99.1%. In PGD biopsy cycles, the live birth rate per embryo transfer cycle and live birth rate per embryo biopsy cycle were 50.0%(58/116) and 37.2%(58/156) in cleavage-stage-biopsy group, 67.5%(85/126) and 51.8%(85/164) in trophectoderm-biopsy group (both P 0.05). Conclusions: High diagnosis rate and idea live birth rate are achieved in PGD/PGS cycles based on array-CGH technology. The live birth rate of trophectoderm-biopsy group is significantly higher than that of cleavage-stage-biopsy group in PGD cycles; the efficiency of trophectoderm-biopsy is better.

  16. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordeos Alicia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of genomic deletions by physical- or chemical- agents is an easy and inexpensive means to generate a genome-saturating collection of mutations. Different mutagens can be selected to ensure a mutant collection with a range of deletion sizes. This would allow identification of mutations in single genes or, alternatively, a deleted group of genes that might collectively govern a trait (e.g., quantitative trait loci, QTL. However, deletion mutants have not been widely used in functional genomics, because the mutated genes are not tagged and therefore, difficult to identify. Here, we present a microarray-based approach to identify deleted genomic regions in rice mutants selected from a large collection generated by gamma ray or fast neutron treatment. Our study focuses not only on the utility of this method for forward genetics, but also its potential as a reverse genetics tool through accumulation of hybridization data for a collection of deletion mutants harboring multiple genetic lesions. Results We demonstrate that hybridization of labeled genomic DNA directly onto the Affymetrix Rice GeneChip® allows rapid localization of deleted regions in rice mutants. Deletions ranged in size from one gene model to ~500 kb and were predicted on all 12 rice chromosomes. The utility of the technique as a tool in forward genetics was demonstrated in combination with an allelic series of mutants to rapidly narrow the genomic region, and eventually identify a candidate gene responsible for a lesion mimic phenotype. Finally, the positions of mutations in 14 mutants were aligned onto the rice pseudomolecules in a user-friendly genome browser to allow for rapid identification of untagged mutations http://irfgc.irri.org/cgi-bin/gbrowse/IR64_deletion_mutants/. Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of oligonucleotide arrays to discover deleted genes in rice. The density and distribution of deletions suggests the feasibility of a

  17. Challenges to oligonucleotides-based therapeutics for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyenvalle Aurélie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antisense oligonucleotides are short nucleic acids designed to bind to specific messenger RNAs in order to modulate splicing patterns or inhibit protein translation. As such, they represent promising therapeutic tools for many disorders and have been actively developed for more than 20 years as a form of molecular medicine. Although significant progress has been made in developing these agents as drugs, they are yet not recognized as effective therapeutics and several hurdles remain to be overcome. Within the last few years, however, the prospect of successful oligonucleotides-based therapies has moved a step closer, in particular for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Clinical trials have recently been conducted for this myopathy, where exon skipping is being used to achieve therapeutic outcomes. In this review, the recent developments and clinical trials using antisense oligonucleotides for Duchenne muscular dystrophy are discussed, with emphasis on the challenges ahead for this type of therapy, especially with regards to delivery and regulatory issues.

  18. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wupeng Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO, small interfering RNA (siRNA, and microRNA (miRNA are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  19. Versatile functionalization of nanoelectrodes by oligonucleotides via pyrrole electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Emeline; Nguyen, Khoa; Bouchain-Gautier, Christelle; Filoramo, Arianna; Goux-Capes, Laurence; Goffman, Marcello; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2010-11-15

    Surface modification at the nanometer scale is a challenge for the future of molecular electronics. In particular, the precise anchoring and electrical addressing of biological scaffolds such as complex DNA nanonetworks is of importance for generating bio-directed assemblies of nano-objects for nanocircuit purposes. Herein, we consider the individual modification of nanoelectrodes with different oligonucleotide sequences by an electrochemically driven co-polymerization process of pyrrole and modified oligonucleotide sequences bearing pyrrole monomers. We demonstrate that this one-step technique presents the advantages of simplicity, localization of surface modification, mechanical, biological and chemical stability of the coatings, and high lateral resolution.

  20. Analysis of genomic alterations in neuroblastoma by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array comparative genomic hybridization: a comparison of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combaret, Valérie; Iacono, Isabelle; Bréjon, Stéphanie; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Pierron, Gäelle; Couturier, Jérôme; Bergeron, Christophe; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-12-01

    In cases of neuroblastoma, recurring genetic alterations--losses of the 1p, 3p, 4p, and 11q and/or gains of 1q, 2p, and 17q chromosome arms--are currently used to define the therapeutic strategy in therapeutic protocols for low- and intermediate-risk patients. Different genome-wide analysis techniques, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), have been suggested for detecting chromosome segmental abnormalities. In this study, we compared the results of the two technologies in the analyses of the DNA of tumor samples from 91 neuroblastoma patients. Similar results were obtained with the two techniques for 75 samples (82%). In five cases (5.5%), the MLPA results were not interpretable. Discrepancies between the aCGH and MLPA results were observed in 11 cases (12%). Among the discrepancies, a 18q21.2-qter gain and 16p11.2 and 11q14.1-q14.3 losses were detected only by aCGH. The MLPA results showed that the 7p, 7q, and 14q chromosome arms were affected in six cases, while in two cases, 2p and 17q gains were observed; these results were confirmed by neither aCGH nor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Because of the higher sensitivity and specificity of genome-wide information, reasonable cost, and shorter time of aCGH analysis, we recommend the aCGH procedure for the analysis of genomic alterations in neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factor XI Antisense Oligonucleotide for Prevention of Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Harry R.; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P.; Raskob, Gary E.; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Weitz, Jeffrey; Prins, Martin; Beenen, Ludo; Otten, Hans-Martin; Roos, Yvo; Slagboom, Ton; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Vanassche, Thomas; Dani, Vidhi; Schulz, Dan; Shapiro, Cara; Kwoh, Katherine; Jung, Bill; Gawinek-Samelczak, Agata; Kaemmer, Christina; Angelov, S.; Stavrev, V.; Kinov, P.; Dessouki, E.; Abuzgaya, F.; Baurovskis, A.; Peredistijs, A.; Petronis, S.; Danilyak, V.; Driagin, V.; Kuropatkin, G.; Parfeev, S.; Safronov, A.; Ankin, M.; Korzh, M.; Olinichenko, G.; Polivoda, A.; Shevchenko, V.; Sulyma, V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that

  2. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  3. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, S; Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, E B

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. As its inactivation leads to tumour regression, mutant KRAS is considered an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this study we report a new delivery strategy for a G4-decoy oligonucleotide that sequesters MAZ, a transcription fa...

  4. Effects of Atelocollagen Formulation Containing Oligonucleotide on Endothelial Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hanai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atelocollagen is a major animal protein that is used as a highly biocompatible biomaterial. To date, atelocollagen has been used as an effective drug delivery technology to sustain the release of antitumor proteins and to enhance the antitumor activity of oligonucleotides in in vivo models. However, the biological effects of this technology are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of atelocollagen on endothelial paracellular barrier function. An atelocollagen formulation containing oligonucleotides specifically increased the permeability of two types of endothelial cells, and the change was dependent on the molecular size, structure of the oligonucleotides used and the concentrations of the oligonucleotide and atelocollagen in the formulation. An immunohistochemical examination revealed that the formulation had effects on the cellular skeleton and intercellular structure although it did not affect the expression of adherens junction or tight junction proteins. These changes were induced through p38 MAP kinase signaling. It is important to elucidate the biological functions of atelocollagen in order to be able to exploit its drug delivery properties.

  5. NF2 tumor suppressor gene: a comprehensive and efficient detection of somatic mutations by denaturing HPLC and microarray-CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szijan, Irene; Rochefort, Daniel; Bruder, Carl; Surace, Ezequiel; Machiavelli, Gloria; Dalamon, Viviana; Cotignola, Javier; Ferreiro, Veronica; Campero, Alvaro; Basso, Armando; Dumanski, Jan P; Rouleau, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    The NF2 tumor suppressor gene, located in chromosome 22q12, is involved in the development of multiple tumors of the nervous system, either associated with neurofibromatosis 2 or sporadic ones, mainly schwannomas and meningiomas. In order to evaluate the role of the NF2 gene in sporadic central nervous system (CNS) tumors, we analyzed NF2 mutations in 26 specimens: 14 meningiomas, 4 schwannomas, 4 metastases, and 4 other histopathological types of neoplasms. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (denaturing HPLC) and comparative genomic hybridization on a DNA microarray (microarray- CGH) were used as scanning methods for small mutations and gross rearrangements respectively. Small mutations were identified in six out of seventeen meningiomas and schwannomas, one mutation was novel. Large deletions were detected in six meningiomas. All mutations were predicted to result in truncated protein or in the absence of a large protein domain. No NF2 mutations were found in other histopathological types of CNS tumors. These results provide additional evidence that mutations in the NF2 gene play an important role in the development of sporadic meningiomas and schwannomas. Denaturing HPLC analysis of small mutations and microarray-CGH of large deletions are complementary, fast, and efficient methods for the detection of mutations in tumor tissues.

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Jensen, Knud J.

    2017-01-01

    Specific target binding and stability in diverse biological media is of crucial importance for applications of synthetic oligonucleotides as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. So far, these issues have been addressed by chemical modification of oligonucleotides and by conjugation with a peptide, m...... and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media.......Specific target binding and stability in diverse biological media is of crucial importance for applications of synthetic oligonucleotides as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. So far, these issues have been addressed by chemical modification of oligonucleotides and by conjugation with a peptide......, most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides...

  7. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (Prooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  8. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-03-20

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene syndrome that is typically caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4. However, there are few reports about the features of Chinese WHS patients. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and molecular cytogenetic features of Chinese WHS patients using the combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Clinical information was collected from ten patients with WHS. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the patients. The deletions were analyzed by MLPA and array CGH. All patients exhibited the core clinical symptoms of WHS, including severe growth delay, a Greek warrior helmet facial appearance, differing degrees of intellectual disability, and epilepsy or electroencephalogram anomalies. The 4p deletions ranged from 2.62 Mb to 17.25 Mb in size and included LETM1, WHSC1, and FGFR3. The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype.

  9. Correlation test to assess low-level processing of high-density oligonucleotide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Jonas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently a number of competing techniques for low-level processing of oligonucleotide array data. The choice of technique has a profound effect on subsequent statistical analyses, but there is no method to assess whether a particular technique is appropriate for a specific data set, without reference to external data. Results We analyzed coregulation between genes in order to detect insufficient normalization between arrays, where coregulation is measured in terms of statistical correlation. In a large collection of genes, a random pair of genes should have on average zero correlation, hence allowing a correlation test. For all data sets that we evaluated, and the three most commonly used low-level processing procedures including MAS5, RMA and MBEI, the housekeeping-gene normalization failed the test. For a real clinical data set, RMA and MBEI showed significant correlation for absent genes. We also found that a second round of normalization on the probe set level improved normalization significantly throughout. Conclusion Previous evaluation of low-level processing in the literature has been limited to artificial spike-in and mixture data sets. In the absence of a known gold-standard, the correlation criterion allows us to assess the appropriateness of low-level processing of a specific data set and the success of normalization for subsets of genes.

  10. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Cao

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  11. A New Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  12. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of stage 4 neuroblastoma reveals high frequency of 11q deletion in tumors lacking MYCN amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantaz, D.; Vandesompele, J.; van Roy, N.; Lastowska, M.; Bown, N.; Combaret, V.; Favrot, M. C.; Delattre, O.; Michon, J.; Bénard, J.; Hartmann, O.; Nicholson, J. C.; Ross, F. M.; Brinkschmidt, C.; Laureys, G.; Caron, H.; Matthay, K. K.; Feuerstein, B. G.; Speleman, F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence and association of 11q deletions with other chromosomal imbalances in Stage 4 neuroblastomas. To this purpose we have performed comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis on 50 Stage 4 neuroblastomas and these data were analyzed together with those from 33

  13. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  14. Oligonucleotide aptamers against tyrosine kinase receptors: Prospect for anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Fedele, Monica; Cerchia, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play crucial roles in cancer cell proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation. Area of intense research is searching for effective anticancer therapies targeting these receptors and, to date, several monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have entered the clinic. However, some of these drugs show limited efficacy and give rise to acquired resistance. Emerging highly selective compounds for anticancer therapy are oligonucleotide aptamers that interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure. Because of their nucleic acid nature, the rational design of advanced strategies to manipulate aptamers for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications is greatly simplified over antibodies. In this manuscript, we will provide a comprehensive overview of oligonucleotide aptamers as next generation strategies to efficiently target RTKs in human cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Biella, Serena; Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  16. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriano, Raffaella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Biella, Serena, E-mail: serena.biella@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  17. THERAPEUTIC ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES AGAINST CANCER: HURDLING TO THE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miguel Duarte Moreno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  18. Peroxide-mediated desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotz, Achim H; Mehta, Rahul C; Hardee, Gregory E

    2005-02-01

    Desulfurization at the internucleotide phosphorothioate linkage of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in dermatological formulations has been investigated using strong ion exchange chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The formation of phosphate diester linkages appeared to arise from a reaction between the phosphorothioate oligonucleotide and a potent oxidizing agent. Screening of excipients used in the formulation indicated that the cause of desulfurization was related to the presence of polyethylene glycol-derived nonionic surfactants MYRJ 52 or BRIJ 58. Autoxidation of the polyethylene glycol chain is suggested as the probable origin for the observed incompatibility. The ability of various antioxidants to prevent oxidative degradation of ASO-1 in simple test systems and in oil-in-water emulsions is described. It is found that in test systems both lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants are effective. However, in cream formulation (oil-in-water emulsions) of ASO-1 the addition of hydrophilic antioxidants L-cysteine or DL-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown to be superior in protecting the oligonucleotide from desulfurization upon storage. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  20. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  1. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  2. “Distributed hybrid” MH–CGH2 system for hydrogen storage and its supply to LT PEMFC power modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Tolj, I.; Davids, M.W.; Bujlo, P. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Smith, F. [Impala Platinum Ltd, Springs (South Africa); Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Prototype hydrogen storage and supply system for LTPEMFC applications was developed. • Combination of MH and CGH2 tanks with common gas manifold was used. • Thermal coupling of fuel cell stack and MH tank was applied. • The system uses AB2-type MH; H2 equilibrium pressure ∼10 bar at room temperature. • Shorter H2 charge time and stable H2 supply at a fluctuating load were observed. - Abstract: This paper describes the layout and presents the results of the testing of a novel prototype “distributed hybrid” hydrogen storage and supply system that has the potential to be used for Low Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (LT-PEMFC) applications. The system consists of individual Metal Hydride (MH) and Compressed Gas (CGH2) tanks with common gas manifold, and a thermal management system where heat exchanger of the liquid heated-cooled MH tank is integrated with the cooling system of the LT-PEMFC BoP. The MH tank is filled with a medium-stability AB{sub 2}-type MH material (H{sub 2} equilibrium pressure of about 10 bar at room temperature). This innovative solution allows for (i) an increase in hydrogen storage capacity of the whole gas storage system and the reduction of H{sub 2} charge pressure; (ii) shorter charging times in the refuelling mode and smoother peaks of H{sub 2} consumption during its supply to the fuel cell stack; (iii) the use of standard parts with simple layout and lower costs; and (iv) adding flexibility in the layout and placement of the components of the hydrogen storage and supply system.

  3. “Distributed hybrid” MH–CGH2 system for hydrogen storage and its supply to LT PEMFC power modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lototskyy, M.; Tolj, I.; Davids, M.W.; Bujlo, P.; Smith, F.; Pollet, B.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Prototype hydrogen storage and supply system for LTPEMFC applications was developed. • Combination of MH and CGH2 tanks with common gas manifold was used. • Thermal coupling of fuel cell stack and MH tank was applied. • The system uses AB2-type MH; H2 equilibrium pressure ∼10 bar at room temperature. • Shorter H2 charge time and stable H2 supply at a fluctuating load were observed. - Abstract: This paper describes the layout and presents the results of the testing of a novel prototype “distributed hybrid” hydrogen storage and supply system that has the potential to be used for Low Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (LT-PEMFC) applications. The system consists of individual Metal Hydride (MH) and Compressed Gas (CGH2) tanks with common gas manifold, and a thermal management system where heat exchanger of the liquid heated-cooled MH tank is integrated with the cooling system of the LT-PEMFC BoP. The MH tank is filled with a medium-stability AB 2 -type MH material (H 2 equilibrium pressure of about 10 bar at room temperature). This innovative solution allows for (i) an increase in hydrogen storage capacity of the whole gas storage system and the reduction of H 2 charge pressure; (ii) shorter charging times in the refuelling mode and smoother peaks of H 2 consumption during its supply to the fuel cell stack; (iii) the use of standard parts with simple layout and lower costs; and (iv) adding flexibility in the layout and placement of the components of the hydrogen storage and supply system

  4. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  5. Optimization of oligonucleotide arrays and RNA amplification protocols for analysis of transcript structure and alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John; Garrett-Engele, Phil; Armour, Christopher D; Duenwald, Sven J; Loerch, Patrick M; Meyer, Michael R; Schadt, Eric E; Stoughton, Roland; Parrish, Mark L; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Johnson, Jason M

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays offer a high-resolution means for monitoring pre-mRNA splicing on a genomic scale. We have developed a novel, unbiased amplification protocol that permits labeling of entire transcripts. Also, hybridization conditions, probe characteristics, and analysis algorithms were optimized for detection of exons, exon-intron edges, and exon junctions. These optimized protocols can be used to detect small variations and isoform mixtures, map the tissue specificity of known human alternative isoforms, and provide a robust, scalable platform for high-throughput discovery of alternative splicing.

  6. [Sequencing by hybridization methods to generate large arrays of oligonucleotides]. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The subject of this project is to address a pressing need for custom DNA microarrays (chips) which can be easily and at low cost formatted and revised for research. In this sense, the term custom means chips for which there is need for limited quantities (less than hundreds) of any particular chip design which contains a large number of different, users defined sequences. Of the three principal approaches to fabricate DNA microarrays, the two which have been commercialized (a and b below) are not particularly suited to research purposes because of the significant time and costs required, once a result is obtained, to utilize that result in the design of a new and better chip: (a) the photodeprotection scheme used by Affymetrix; and (b) the spotting of pre-synthesized oligos or c-DNA onto surfaces.

  7. Oligonucleotide assisted light-emitting Alq3 microrods: energy transfer effect with fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chunzhi; Park, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Jeongyong; Joo, Jinsoo; Ahn, Dong June

    2013-06-14

    Oligonucleotide assisted tri(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3) microrods were prepared for the first time. When hybridized with oligonucleotide labeled by Cy3 fluorescent dye, a significant photoluminescence variation of the Alq3 microrods was observed due to Förster resonance energy transfer, unlike when Cy5-oligonucleotide was used. Versatile nucleotide manipulation would open up wider applications of Alq3-based materials, based on this fundamental observation.

  8. Transcriptional landscape estimation from tiling array data using a model of signal shift and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Nicolas, P

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: High-density oligonucleotide tiling array technology holds the promise of a better description of the complexity and the dynamics of transcriptional landscapes. In organisms such as bacteria and yeasts, transcription can be measured on a genome-wide scale with a resolution >25 bp...

  9. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  10. Folding Topology of a Short Coiled-Coil Peptide Structure Templated by an Oligonucleotide Triplex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Christensen, Niels Johan; Martos Maldonado, Manuel Cristo

    2017-01-01

    by oligonucleotide duplex and triplex formation. POC synthesis was achieved by copper-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition between three oligonucleotides and a 23-mer peptide, which by itself exhibited multiple oligomeric states in solution. The oligonucleotide domain was designed to furnish a stable parallel triplex......, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and molecular modeling. Stabilizing cooperativity was observed between the trimeric peptide and the oligonucleotide triplex domains, and the overall molecular size (ca. 12nm) in solution was revealed to be independent of concentration. The topological folding...

  11. Chemically modified oligonucleotides with efficient RNase H response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Boel, Anne Marie; Lobedanz, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Ten different chemically modified nucleosides were incorporated into short DNA strands (chimeric oligonucleotides ON3-ON12 and ON15-ON24) and then tested for their capacity to mediate RNAse H cleavage of the complementary RNA strand. The modifications were placed at two central positions directly...... in the RNase H cleaving region. The RNA strand of duplexes with ON3, ON5 and ON12 were cleaved more efficiently than the RNA strand of the DNA:RNA control duplex. There seems to be no correlation between the thermal stability between the duplexes and RNase H cleavage....

  12. Characterization of peptide-oligonucleotide heteroconjugates by mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, O N; Kulkarni, S; Aldrich, J V; Barofsky, D F

    1996-01-01

    Two peptide-oligothymidylic acids, prepared by joining an 11 residue synthetic peptide containing one internal carboxyl group (Asp side chain) to amino-linker-5'pdT6 and amino-linker-5'pdT10 oligonucleotides, were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) on a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer and by electrospray ionization (ESI) on a triple-quadrupole system. These synthetic compounds model peptide-nucleic acid heteroconjugates encountered in antisense research an...

  13. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  14. electrode array

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    A geoelectric investigation employing vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the Ajayi - Makinde Two-Electrode array and the ... arrangements used in electrical D.C. resistivity survey. These include ..... Refraction Tomography to Study the.

  15. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  16. Combined M-FISH and CGH analysis allows comprehensive description of genetic alterations in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roy, N; Van Limbergen, H; Vandesompele, J; Van Gele, M; Poppe, B; Salwen, H; Laureys, G; Manoel, N; De Paepe, A; Speleman, F

    2001-10-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential gene discovery tools and have often served as models in genetic and functional studies of particular tumor types. One of the future challenges is comparison and interpretation of gene expression data with the available knowledge on the genomic abnormalities in these cell lines. In this context, accurate description of these genomic abnormalities is required. Here, we show that a combination of M-FISH with banding analysis, standard FISH, and CGH allowed a detailed description of the genetic alterations in 16 neuroblastoma cell lines. In total, 14 cryptic chromosome rearrangements were detected, including a balanced t(2;4)(p24.3;q34.3) translocation in cell line NBL-S, with the 2p24 breakpoint located at about 40 kb from MYCN. The chromosomal origin of 22 marker chromosomes and 41 cytogenetically undefined translocated segments was determined. Chromosome arm 2 short arm translocations were observed in six cell lines (38%) with and five (31%) without MYCN amplification, leading to partial chromosome arm 2p gain in all but one cell line and loss of material in the various partner chromosomes, including 1p and 11q. These 2p gains were often masked in the GGH profiles due to MYCN amplification. The commonly overrepresented region was chromosome segment 2pter-2p22, which contains the MYCN gene, and five out of eleven 2p breakpoints clustered to the interface of chromosome bands 2p16 and 2p21. In neuroblastoma cell line SJNB-12, with double minutes (dmins) but no MYCN amplification, the dmins were shown to be derived from 16q22-q23 sequences. The ATBF1 gene, an AT-binding transcription factor involved in normal neurogenesis and located at 16q22.2, was shown to be present in the amplicon. This is the first report describing the possible implication of ATBF1 in neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that a combined approach of M-FISH, cytogenetics, and CGH allowed a more complete and accurate description of the genetic alterations occurring in the

  17. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy.

  18. The use of oligonucleotide probes for meningococcal serotype characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SACCHI Claudio Tavares

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examine the potential use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize Neisseria meningitidis serotypes without the use of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Antigenic diversity on PorB protein forms the bases of serotyping method. However, the current panel of MAbs underestimated, by at least 50% the PorB variability, presumably because reagents for several PorB variable regions (VRs are lacking, or because a number of VR variants are not recognized by serotype-defining MAbs12. We analyzed the use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize serotype 10 and serotype 19 of N. meningitidis. The porB gene sequence for the prototype strain of serotype 10 was determined, aligned with 7 other porB sequences from different serotypes, and analysis of individual VRs were performed. The results of DNA probes 21U (VR1-A and 615U (VR3-B used against 72 N. meningitidis strains confirm that VR1 type A and VR3 type B encode epitopes for serotype-defined MAbs 19 and 10, respectively. The use of probes for characterizing serotypes possible can type 100% of the PorB VR diversity. It is a simple and rapid method specially useful for analysis of large number of samples.

  19. Differentiation of the seven major lyssavirus species by oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jin; Guo, Huancheng; Feng, Ye; Xu, Yunbin; Shao, Mingfu; Su, Nan; Wan, Jiayu; Li, Jiping; Tu, Changchun

    2012-03-01

    An oligonucleotide microarray, LyssaChip, has been developed and verified as a highly specific diagnostic tool for differentiation of the 7 major lyssavirus species. As with conventional typing microarray methods, the LyssaChip relies on sequence differences in the 371-nucleotide region coding for the nucleoprotein. This region was amplified using nested reverse transcription-PCR primers that bind to the 7 major lyssaviruses. The LyssaChip includes 57 pairs of species typing and corresponding control oligonucleotide probes (oligoprobes) immobilized on glass slides, and it can analyze 12 samples on a single slide within 8 h. Analysis of 111 clinical brain specimens (65 from animals with suspected rabies submitted to the laboratory and 46 of butchered dog brain tissues collected from restaurants) showed that the chip method was 100% sensitive and highly consistent with the "gold standard," a fluorescent antibody test (FAT). The chip method could detect rabies virus in highly decayed brain tissues, whereas the FAT did not, and therefore the chip test may be more applicable to highly decayed brain tissues than the FAT. LyssaChip may provide a convenient and inexpensive alternative for diagnosis and differentiation of rabies and rabies-related diseases.

  20. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) reveals a neo-X chromosome and biased gene movement in stalk-eyed flies (genus Teleopsis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2010-09-16

    Chromosomal location has a significant effect on the evolutionary dynamics of genes involved in sexual dimorphism, impacting both the pattern of sex-specific gene expression and the rate of duplication and protein evolution for these genes. For nearly all non-model organisms, however, knowledge of chromosomal gene content is minimal and difficult to obtain on a genomic scale. In this study, we utilized Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH), using probes designed from EST sequence, to identify genes located on the X chromosome of four species in the stalk-eyed fly genus Teleopsis. Analysis of log(2) ratio values of female-to-male hybridization intensities from the CGH microarrays for over 3,400 genes reveals a strongly bimodal distribution that clearly differentiates autosomal from X-linked genes for all four species. Genotyping of 33 and linkage mapping of 28 of these genes in Teleopsis dalmanni indicate the CGH results correctly identified chromosomal location in all cases. Syntenic comparison with Drosophila indicates that 90% of the X-linked genes in Teleopsis are homologous to genes located on chromosome 2L in Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting the formation of a nearly complete neo-X chromosome from Muller element B in the dipteran lineage leading to Teleopsis. Analysis of gene movement both relative to Drosophila and within Teleopsis indicates that gene movement is significantly associated with 1) rates of protein evolution, 2) the pattern of gene duplication, and 3) the evolution of eyespan sexual dimorphism. Overall, this study reveals that diopsids are a critical group for understanding the evolution of sex chromosomes within Diptera. In addition, we demonstrate that CGH is a useful technique for identifying chromosomal sex-linkage and should be applicable to other organisms with EST or partial genomic information.

  1. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH reveals a neo-X chromosome and biased gene movement in stalk-eyed flies (genus Teleopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Baker

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal location has a significant effect on the evolutionary dynamics of genes involved in sexual dimorphism, impacting both the pattern of sex-specific gene expression and the rate of duplication and protein evolution for these genes. For nearly all non-model organisms, however, knowledge of chromosomal gene content is minimal and difficult to obtain on a genomic scale. In this study, we utilized Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH, using probes designed from EST sequence, to identify genes located on the X chromosome of four species in the stalk-eyed fly genus Teleopsis. Analysis of log(2 ratio values of female-to-male hybridization intensities from the CGH microarrays for over 3,400 genes reveals a strongly bimodal distribution that clearly differentiates autosomal from X-linked genes for all four species. Genotyping of 33 and linkage mapping of 28 of these genes in Teleopsis dalmanni indicate the CGH results correctly identified chromosomal location in all cases. Syntenic comparison with Drosophila indicates that 90% of the X-linked genes in Teleopsis are homologous to genes located on chromosome 2L in Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting the formation of a nearly complete neo-X chromosome from Muller element B in the dipteran lineage leading to Teleopsis. Analysis of gene movement both relative to Drosophila and within Teleopsis indicates that gene movement is significantly associated with 1 rates of protein evolution, 2 the pattern of gene duplication, and 3 the evolution of eyespan sexual dimorphism. Overall, this study reveals that diopsids are a critical group for understanding the evolution of sex chromosomes within Diptera. In addition, we demonstrate that CGH is a useful technique for identifying chromosomal sex-linkage and should be applicable to other organisms with EST or partial genomic information.

  2. Chromosome copy analysis by single-cell comparative genomic hybridization technique based on primer extension preamplification and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR%引物延伸预扩增结合简并引物PCR在单细胞比较基因组杂交分析染色体异常中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭珂; 狄玉芬; 程德华; 徐芳; 卢光绣; 谭跃球

    2010-01-01

    Objective To establish a single-cell whole genome amplification (WGA) technique, in combination with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), for analyzing chromosomal copy number changes, and to explore its clinical application in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Methods Twelve single cell samples with known karyotypes, including 5 chorionic villus samples, 4 human embryonic stem cell (hESC) samples and 3 peripheral lymphocyte samples, and 4 single blastomere samples carrying chromosomal abnormalities detected by PGD, were collected for whole genome amplification by combining primer extension preamplification (PEP) with degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR)amplification. The amplified products labeled by red fluorescence were mixed with control DNA labeled by green fluorescence, and then the mixture was analyzed by CGH. As a comparison, 10 single cell samples were amplified by DOP-PCR only and then CGH analysis was performed. Results The amplification using PEP-DOP-PCR was more stable than traditional DOP-PCR. The products of PEP-DOP-PCR range from 100 bp to 1000 bp, with the mean size being about 400 bp. The CGH results were consistent with analyses by other methods. However, only 6 out of 10 single cell samples were successfully amplified by DOP-PCR,and CGH analysis showed a high background and 2 samples showed inconsistent results from other methods. Conclusion PEP-DOP-PCR can effectively amplify the whole genome DNA of single cell.Combined with CGH, this WGA method can successfully detect single-cell chromosomal copy number changes, while DOP-PCR was easy to fail to amplify and amplify inhomogeneousty, and CGH analysis using this PCR product usually showed high background. These results suggest that PEP-DOP-CGH is a promising method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis.%目的 建立一种可信的单细胞全基因组扩增(whole genome amplification.WGA)技术,结合比较基因组杂交(comparative genomic hybridization,CGH)分析单细

  3. Design, validation and annotation of transcriptome-wide oligonucleotide probes for the oligochaete annelid Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Gong

    Full Text Available High density oligonucleotide probe arrays have increasingly become an important tool in genomics studies. In organisms with incomplete genome sequence, one strategy for oligo probe design is to reduce the number of unique probes that target every non-redundant transcript through bioinformatic analysis and experimental testing. Here we adopted this strategy in making oligo probes for the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a species for which we have sequenced transcriptome-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Our objectives were to identify unique transcripts as targets, to select an optimal and non-redundant oligo probe for each of these target ESTs, and to annotate the selected target sequences. We developed a streamlined and easy-to-follow approach to the design, validation and annotation of species-specific array probes. Four 244K-formatted oligo arrays were designed using eArray and were hybridized to a pooled E. fetida cRNA sample. We identified 63,541 probes with unsaturated signal intensities consistently above the background level. Target transcripts of these probes were annotated using several sequence alignment algorithms. Significant hits were obtained for 37,439 (59% probed targets. We validated and made publicly available 63.5K oligo probes so the earthworm research community can use them to pursue ecological, toxicological, and other functional genomics questions. Our approach is efficient, cost-effective and robust because it (1 does not require a major genomics core facility; (2 allows new probes to be easily added and old probes modified or eliminated when new sequence information becomes available, (3 is not bioinformatics-intensive upfront but does provide opportunities for more in-depth annotation of biological functions for target genes; and (4 if desired, EST orthologs to the UniGene clusters of a reference genome can be identified and selected in order to improve the target gene specificity of designed probes. This approach is

  4. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  5. Nucleobase-modified antisense oligonucleotides containing 5-(phenyltriazol)-2′-deoxyuridine nucleotides induce exon-skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Bao T.; Hornum, Mick; Sharma, Pawan K.

    2017-01-01

    Chemically-modified antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping has been validated as a therapeutic strategy for tackling several disease pathologies, particularly duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date, only sugar-modified and internucleotide linkage-modified oligonucleotide chemistries have...

  6. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. I. Covalent immobilization of oligonucleotide probes onto the nylon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, E V; Pyshnaia, I A; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The features of UV-induced immobilization of oligonucleotides on a nylon membranes and the effectiveness of enzymatic labeling of immobilized probes at heterophase detection of nucleic acids are studied. Short terminal oligothymidilate (up to 10 nt) sequences are suggested to attach to the probe via a flexible ethylene glycol based linker. The presence of such fragment enhances the intensity of immobilization and reduces UV-dependent degradation of the targeted (sequence-specific) part of the probe by reducing the dose needed for the immobilization of DNA. The optimum dose of UV-irradiation is determined to be ~0.4 J/cm(2) at the wavelength 254 nm. This dose provides high level of hybridization signal for immobilized probes with various nucleotide composition of the sequence specific moiety. The amide groups of the polyamide are shown to play the key role in the photoinduced immobilization of nucleic acids, whereas the primary amino groups in the structure of PA is not the center responsible for the covalent binding of DNA by UV-irradiation, as previously believed. Various additives in the soaking solution during the membrane of UV-dependent immobilization of probes are shown to influence its effectiveness. The use of alternative to UV-irradiation system of radical generation are shown to provide the immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the nylon membrane.

  7. Oral tongue cancer gene expression profiling: Identification of novel potential prognosticators by oligonucleotide microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estilo, Cherry L; Boyle, Jay O; Kraus, Dennis H; Patel, Snehal; Shaha, Ashok R; Wong, Richard J; Huryn, Joseph M; Shah, Jatin P; Singh, Bhuvanesh; O-charoenrat, Pornchai; Talbot, Simon; Socci, Nicholas D; Carlson, Diane L; Ghossein, Ronald; Williams, Tijaana; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Ramanathan, Yegnanarayana

    2009-01-01

    The present study is aimed at identifying potential candidate genes as prognostic markers in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by large scale gene expression profiling. The gene expression profile of patients (n=37) with oral tongue SCC were analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Patients (n=20) from which there were available tumor and matched normal mucosa were grouped into stage (early vs. late) and nodal disease (node positive vs. node negative) subgroups and genes differentially expressed in tumor vs. normal and between the subgroups were identified. Three genes, GLUT3, HSAL2, and PACE4, were selected for their potential biological significance in a larger cohort of 49 patients via quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Hierarchical clustering analyses failed to show significant segregation of patients. In patients (n=20) with available tumor and matched normal mucosa, 77 genes were found to be differentially expressed (P< 0.05) in the tongue tumor samples compared to their matched normal controls. Among the 45 over-expressed genes, MMP-1 encoding interstitial collagenase showed the highest level of increase (average: 34.18 folds). Using the criterion of two-fold or greater as overexpression, 30.6%, 24.5% and 26.5% of patients showed high levels of GLUT3, HSAL2 and PACE4, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that GLUT3 over-expression correlated with depth of invasion (P<0.0001), tumor size (P=0.024), pathological stage (P=0.009) and recurrence (P=0.038). HSAL2 was positively associated with depth of invasion (P=0.015) and advanced T stage (P=0.047). In survival studies, only GLUT3 showed a prognostic value with disease-free (P=0.049), relapse-free (P=0.002) and overall survival (P=0.003). PACE4 mRNA expression failed to show correlation with any of the relevant parameters. The characterization of genes identified to be significant predictors of prognosis by oligonucleotide microarray and further validation by

  8. Filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  9. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  10. Oligonucleotides with 1,4-dioxane-based nucleotide monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas S; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    An epimeric mixture of H-phosphonates 5R and 5S has been synthesized in three steps from known secouridine 1. Separation of the epimers has been accomplished by RP-HPLC, allowing full characterization and incorporation of monomers X and Y into 9-mer oligonucleotides using H-phosphonates building...... blocks 5R and 5S, respectively. A single incorporation of either monomer X or monomer Y in the central position of a DNA 9-mer results in decreased thermal affinity toward both DNA and RNA complements (ΔT(m) = -3.5 °C/-3.5 °C for monomer X and ΔT(m) = -11.0 °C/-6.5 °C for monomer Y). CD measurements do...

  11. The Spectral Properties and Photostability of DNA, RNA and Oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudrya, V.Yu.; Yashchuk, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present work discusses the results of comparative investigations of the optical absorption, luminescence, and photostability of the biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA), as well as synthetic poly- and oligonucleotides. The separate nucleotides in DNA and RNA are examined as almost independent absorbing centers. It is confirmed that the main triplet excitons traps responsible for the DNA phosphorescence emission are AT-complexes in DNA. In contrast to DNA, the main triplet excitons traps in RNA are adenosine bases. These bases are the most photostable against UV-irradiation as compared with all other nucleotides in both DNA and RNA. The fact of the photostability of adenosine bases and the AT-complex provides the existence of the DNA/RNA self-protection mechanisms against a damage caused by UV-irradiation. It is found the deoxyribonucleotides are more photostable than the corresponding ribonucleotides. So, the results presented here show that DNA is more photostable than RNA.

  12. Chemical Ligation Reactions of Oligonucleotides for Biological and Medicinal Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yasuaki

    2018-01-01

    Chemical ligation of oligonucleotides (ONs) is the key reaction for various ON-based technologies. We have tried to solve the problems of RNA interference (RNAi) technology by applying ON chemical ligation to RNAi. We designed a new RNAi system, called intracellular buildup RNAi (IBR-RNAi), where the RNA fragments are built up into active small-interference RNA (siRNA) in cells through a chemical ligation reaction. Using the phosphorothioate and iodoacetyl groups as reactive functional groups for the ligation, we achieved RNAi effects without inducing immune responses. Additionally, we developed a new chemical ligation for IBR-RNAi, which affords a more native-like structure in the ligated product. The new ligation method should be useful not only for IBR-RNAi but also for the chemical synthesis of biofunctional ONs.

  13. Electrical manipulation of oligonucleotides grafted to charged surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2006-09-21

    The electrical manipulation of short DNA molecules on surfaces offers novel functionalities with fascinating possibilities in the field of bio-interfaces. Here we present systematic investigations of the electrical interactions which govern the structure of oligonucleotides on charged gold surfaces. Successively, we address influences of the applied field strength, the role of DC electrode potentials, in particular for polycrystalline surfaces, as well as screening effects of the surrounding electrolyte solution. Data obtained for single and double stranded DNA exhibit differences which can be attributed to the dissimilar flexibility of the different molecular conformations. A comparison of the experimental results with a basic model shows how the alignment of the molecules adjusts according to a balance between electrically induced ordering and stochastic thermal motions. The presented conclusions are expected to be of general relevance for the behaviour of polyelectrolytes exposed to localized electric fields at interfaces.

  14. TIA-1 RRM23 binding and recognition of target oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Saboora; García-Mauriño, Sofía M; Sivakumaran, Andrew; Beckham, Simone A; Loughlin, Fionna E; Gorospe, Myriam; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Wilce, Matthew C J; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2017-05-05

    TIA-1 (T-cell restricted intracellular antigen-1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in splicing and translational repression. It mainly interacts with RNA via its second and third RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), with specificity for U-rich sequences directed by RRM2. It has recently been shown that RRM3 also contributes to binding, with preferential binding for C-rich sequences. Here we designed UC-rich and CU-rich 10-nt sequences for engagement of both RRM2 and RRM3 and demonstrated that the TIA-1 RRM23 construct preferentially binds the UC-rich RNA ligand (5΄-UUUUUACUCC-3΄). Interestingly, this binding depends on the presence of Lys274 that is C-terminal to RRM3 and binding to equivalent DNA sequences occurs with similar affinity. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that, upon complex formation with target RNA or DNA, TIA-1 RRM23 adopts a compact structure, showing that both RRMs engage with the target 10-nt sequences to form the complex. We also report the crystal structure of TIA-1 RRM2 in complex with DNA to 2.3 Å resolution providing the first atomic resolution structure of any TIA protein RRM in complex with oligonucleotide. Together our data support a specific mode of TIA-1 RRM23 interaction with target oligonucleotides consistent with the role of TIA-1 in binding RNA to regulate gene expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Dissecting the hybridization of oligonucleotides to structured complementary sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchi, Alessio

    2016-06-01

    When oligonucleotides hybridize to long target molecules, the process is slowed by the secondary structure in the targets. The phenomenon has been analyzed in several previous studies, but many details remain poorly understood. I used a spectrofluorometric strategy, focusing on the formation/breaking of individual base pairs, to study the kinetics of association between a DNA hairpin and >20 complementary oligonucleotides ('antisenses'). Hybridization rates differed by over three orders of magnitude. Association was toehold-mediated, both for antisenses binding to the target's ends and for those designed to interact with the loop. Binding of these latter, besides being consistently slower, was affected to variable, non-uniform extents by the asymmetric loop structure. Divalent metal ions accelerated hybridization, more pronouncedly when nucleation occurred at the loop. Incorporation of locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues in the antisenses substantially improved the kinetics only when LNAs participated to the earliest hybridization steps. The effects of individual LNAs placed along the antisense indicated that the reaction transition state occurred after invading at least the first base pair of the stem. The experimental approach helps dissect hybridization reactions involving structured nucleic acids. Toehold-dependent, nucleation-invasion models appear fully appropriate for describing such reactions. Estimating the stability of nucleation complexes formed at internal toeholds is the major hurdle for the quantitative prediction of hybridization rates. While analyzing the mechanisms of a fundamental biochemical process (hybridization), this work also provides suggestions for the improvement of technologies that rely on such process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stereospecificity of oligonucleotide interactions revisited: no evidence for heterochiral hybridization and ribozyme/DNAzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hoehlig

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications.

  17. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  18. Photolithographic Synthesis of High-Density DNA and RNA Arrays on Flexible, Transparent, and Easily Subdivided Plastic Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Matthew T; Carter, Matthew C D; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Wolfer, Jamison; Codner, Eric; Sussman, Michael R; Lynn, David M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2015-11-17

    The photolithographic fabrication of high-density DNA and RNA arrays on flexible and transparent plastic substrates is reported. The substrates are thin sheets of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) coated with cross-linked polymer multilayers that present hydroxyl groups suitable for conventional phosphoramidite-based nucleic acid synthesis. We demonstrate that by modifying array synthesis procedures to accommodate the physical and chemical properties of these materials, it is possible to synthesize plastic-backed oligonucleotide arrays with feature sizes as small as 14 μm × 14 μm and feature densities in excess of 125 000/cm(2), similar to specifications attainable using rigid substrates such as glass or glassy carbon. These plastic-backed arrays are tolerant to a wide range of hybridization temperatures, and improved synthetic procedures are described that enable the fabrication of arrays with sequences up to 50 nucleotides in length. These arrays hybridize with S/N ratios comparable to those fabricated on otherwise identical arrays prepared on glass or glassy carbon. This platform supports the enzymatic synthesis of RNA arrays and proof-of-concept experiments are presented showing that the arrays can be readily subdivided into smaller arrays (or "millichips") using common laboratory-scale laser cutting tools. These results expand the utility of oligonucleotide arrays fabricated on plastic substrates and open the door to new applications for these important bioanalytical tools.

  19. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...

  20. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic hybridizat......Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... from several 100 kb, including large flanking regions, to rearrangements, allowing convenient design...

  1. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  2. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  3. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for chromosomal rearrangements with the use of array comparative genomic hybridization at the blastocyst stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Christodoulos; Dheedene, Annelies; Heindryckx, Björn; van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; De Sutter, Petra; Menten, Björn; Van den Abbeel, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    To establish the value of array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in embryos of translocation carriers in combination with vitrification and frozen embryo transfer in nonstimulated cycles. Retrospective data analysis study. Academic centers for reproductive medicine and genetics. Thirty-four couples undergoing PGD for chromosomal rearrangements from October 2013 to December 2015. Trophectoderm biopsy at day 5 or day 6 of embryo development and subsequently whole genome amplification and array CGH were performed. This approach revealed a high occurrence of aneuploidies and structural rearrangements unrelated to the parental rearrangement. Nevertheless, we observed a benefit in pregnancy rates of these couples. We detected chromosomal abnormalities in 133/207 embryos (64.2% of successfully amplified), and 74 showed a normal microarray profile (35.7%). In 48 of the 133 abnormal embryos (36.1%), an unbalanced rearrangement originating from the parental translocation was identified. Interestingly, 34.6% of the abnormal embryos (46/133) harbored chromosome rearrangements that were not directly linked to the parental translocation in question. We also detected a combination of unbalanced parental-derived rearrangements and aneuploidies in 27 of the 133 abnormal embryos (20.3%). The use of trophectoderm biopsy at the blastocyst stage is less detrimental to the survival of the embryo and leads to a more reliable estimate of the genomic content of the embryo than cleavage-stage biopsy. In this small cohort PGD study, we describe the successful implementation of array CGH analysis of blastocysts in patients with a chromosomal rearrangement to identify euploid embryos for transfer. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthetic Method for Oligonucleotide Block by Using Alkyl-Chain-Soluble Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Yuki; Shoji, Takao; Kim, Shokaku; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-19

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of oligonucleotide blocks using a Cbz-type alkyl-chain-soluble support (Z-ACSS) attached to the 3'-OH group of 3'-terminal nucleosides was developed. The Z-ACSS allowed for the preparation of fully protected deoxyribo- and ribo-oligonucleotides without chromatographic purification and released dimer- to tetramer-size oligonucleotide blocks via hydrogenation using a Pd/C catalyst without significant loss or migration of protective groups such as 5'-end 4,4'-dimethoxtrityl, 2-cyanoethyl on internucleotide bonds, or 2'-TBS.

  5. Solid-phase synthesis of 2{sup '}-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides using dimeric phosphoramidate blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Gi Weon; Kang, Yong Han [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This research focused on the method of using dimeric phosphoramidite blocks to synthesize oligonucleotides for development as oligonucleotide drugs. A 16-mer oligonucleotide with the randomly selected sequence of C*C*T*C*G*C *T*C*T*C*G*C*C* C*G*C was synthesized using CC, GC, and TC dimers, a combination of monomers and dimers, or only monomers as building blocks. Using dimer blocks in this synthetic method provided a significant decrease in critical impurities that had similar properties to the main product, which was confirmed by LC-MS and HPLC analysis.

  6. Dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotides on the surface of silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, N. T., E-mail: bagraev@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Chernev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Klyachkin, L. E. [St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Malyarenko, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Emel’yanov, A. K.; Dubina, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Planar silicon nanostructures that are formed as a very narrow silicon quantum well confined by δ barriers heavily doped with boron are used to study the dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotides deposited onto the surface of the nanostructures. The capacitance characteristics of the silicon nanostructures with oligonucleotides deposited onto their surface are determined by recording the local tunneling current–voltage characteristics by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. The results show the possibility of identifying the local dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotide segments consisting of repeating G–C pairs. These properties apparently give grounds to correlate the segments with polymer molecules exhibiting the properties of multiferroics.

  7. Comparative analysis of human conjunctival and corneal epithelial gene expression with oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Helen C; Budak, Murat T; Akinci, M A Murat; Wolosin, J Mario

    2007-05-01

    To determine global mRNA expression levels in corneal and conjunctival epithelia and identify transcripts that exhibit preferential tissue expression. cDNA samples derived from human conjunctival and corneal epithelia were hybridized in three independent experiments to a commercial oligonucleotide array representing more than 22,000 transcripts. The resultant signal intensities and microarray software transcript present/absent calls were used in conjunction with the local pooled error (LPE) statistical method to identify transcripts that are preferentially or exclusively expressed in one of the two tissues at significant levels (expression >1% of the beta-actin level). EASE (Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer software) was used to identify biological systems comparatively overrepresented in either epithelium. Immuno-, and cytohistochemistry was performed to validate or expand on selected results of interest. The analysis identified 332 preferential and 93 exclusive significant corneal epithelial transcripts. The corresponding numbers of conjunctival epithelium transcripts were 592 and 211, respectively. The overrepresented biological processes in the cornea were related to cell adhesion and oxiredox equilibria and cytoprotection activities. In the conjunctiva, the biological processes that were most prominent were related to innate immunity and melanogenesis. Immunohistochemistry for antigen-presenting cells and melanocytes was consistent with these gene signatures. The transcript comparison identified a substantial number of genes that have either not been identified previously or are not known to be highly expressed in these two epithelia, including testican-1, ECM1, formin, CRTAC1, and NQO1 in the cornea and, in the conjunctiva, sPLA(2)-IIA, lipocalin 2, IGFBP3, multiple MCH class II proteins, and the Na-Pi cotransporter type IIb. Comparative gene expression profiling leads to the identification of many biological processes and previously unknown genes that

  8. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons,

  9. Novel approaches to study low-energy electron-induced damage to DNA oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, Jenny; Bald, Ilko; Ranković, Miloš Lj; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R

    2015-01-01

    The novel approach of DNA origami structures as templates for precise quantification of various well- defined oligonucleotides provides the opportunity to determine the sensitivity of complex DNA sequences towards low-energy electrons. (paper)

  10. Functionalization of PVC membrane with ss oligonucleotides for a potentiometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkanova, T V; Volf, R; Krondak, M; Král, V

    2007-05-15

    A novel application of a single stranded (ss) oligonucleotide as an active component of polymeric membrane in an ion-selective electrode (ISE) is described. The original oligonucleotides, oligo(dA)(15), modified by cholesterol, triphenylmethyl and hexadecyl derivatives, were immobilized into poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane using extraction protocol. In parallel, the adsorption protocol was used to immobilize unmodified oligo(dA)(15) on the PVC membrane based on tridodecylmethyammonium chloride (TDDMA(+)Cl(-)). Immobilization of ss oligonucleotide probe through spacer was more effective for the potentiometric detection of the hybridization between complementary oligonucleotides. It was found that cholesterol-oligo(dA)(15) modified membranes were sensitive toward complementary oligo(dT)(15) in the concentration range 2-80 nM at pH 7. An explanation for the detection mechanism is proposed.

  11. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors for in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Il Young; Lee, Eun Hee; Suh, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-04-01

    Oligonucleotide-based biosensors have drawn much attention because of their broad applications in in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection. They are particularly of interest to many researchers because of their high specificity as well as excellent sensitivity. Recently, oligonucleotide-based biosensors have been used to achieve not only genetic detection of targets but also the detection of small molecules, peptides, and proteins. This has further broadened the applications of these sensors in the medical and health care industry. In this review, we highlight various examples of oligonucleotide-based biosensors for the detection of diseases, drugs, and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Each example is provided with detailed schematics of the detection mechanism in addition to the supporting experimental results. Furthermore, future perspectives and new challenges in oligonucleotide-based biosensors are discussed.

  12. Thermal Stability of Modified i-Motif Oligonucleotides with Naphthalimide Intercalating Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Ali; Pedersen, Erik B.; Khaireldin, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    In continuation of our investigation of characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the i-motif 5′-d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT)] upon insertion of intercalating nucleotides into the cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, this article evaluates the stabilities of i-motif oligonucleotides upon insertion of naphtha......In continuation of our investigation of characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the i-motif 5′-d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT)] upon insertion of intercalating nucleotides into the cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, this article evaluates the stabilities of i-motif oligonucleotides upon insertion...... of naphthalimide (1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione) as the intercalating nucleic acid. The stabilities of i-motif structures with inserted naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides were studied using UV melting temperatures (Tm) and circular dichroism spectra at different pH values and conditions (crowding...

  13. Rapid Induction of Protective Immunity Against Biothreat Agents Using CPG-Based Oligonucleotides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klinman, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    This research project examines the ability of synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory "CpG motifs' to trigger the innate immune system, thereby improving the host's ability to survive infection by biowarfare agents...

  14. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. III. Synthesis and investigation of properties of oligonucleotides, bearing bifunctional non-nucleotide insert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriushkin, M S; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2012-01-01

    Non-nucleotide phosporamidites were synthetized, having branched backbone with different position of functional groups. Obtained phosphoramidite monomers contain intercalator moiety--6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine, and additional hydroxyl residue protected with dimethoxytrityl group or with tert-butyldimethylsilyl group for post-synthetic modification. Synthesized oligothymidilates contain one or more modified units in different positions of sequence. Melting temperature and thermodynamic parameters of formation of complementary duplexes formed by modified oligonucleotides was defined (change in enthalpy and entropy). The introduction of intercalating residue causes a significant stabilization of DNA duplexes. It is shown that the efficiency of the fluorescence of acridine residue in the oligonucleotide conjugate significantly changes upon hybridization with DNA.

  15. Oligonucleotide Length-Dependent Formation of Virus-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maassen, Stan J; de Ruiter, Mark V; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2018-05-23

    Understanding the assembly pathway of viruses can contribute to creating monodisperse virus-based materials. In this study, the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is used to determine the interactions between the capsid proteins of viruses and their cargo. The assembly of the capsid proteins in the presence of different lengths of short, single-stranded (ss) DNA is studied at neutral pH, at which the protein-protein interactions are weak. Chromatography, electrophoresis, microscopy, and light scattering data show that the assembly efficiency and speed of the particles increase with increasing length of oligonucleotides. The minimal length required for assembly under the conditions used herein is 14 nucleotides. Assembly of particles containing such short strands of ssDNA can take almost a month. This slow assembly process enabled the study of intermediate states, which confirmed a low cooperative assembly for CCMV and allowed for further expansion of current assembly theories. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Selective Covalent Conjugation of Phosphorothioate DNA Oligonucleotides with Streptavidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof M. Niemeyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA conjugates have found numerous applications in the field of diagnostics and nanobiotechnology, however, their intrinsic susceptibility to DNA degradation by nucleases represents a major obstacle for many applications. We here report the selective covalent conjugation of the protein streptavidin (STV with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (psDNA containing a terminal alkylthiolgroup as the chemically addressable linking unit, using a heterobifunctional NHS-/maleimide crosslinker. The psDNA-STV conjugates were synthesized in about 10% isolated yields. We demonstrate that the terminal alkylthiol group selectively reacts with the maleimide while the backbone sulfur atoms are not engaged in chemical conjugation. The novel psDNA-STV conjugates retain their binding capabilities for both biotinylated macromolecules and the complementary nucleic acid. Moreover, the psDNA-STV conjugate retained its binding capacity for complementary oligomers even after a nuclease digestion step, which effectively degrades deoxyribonucleotide oligomers and thus the binding capability of regular DNA-STV conjugates. The psDNA-STV therefore hold particular promise for applications e.g. in proteome research and novel biosensing devices, where interfering endogenous nucleic acids need to be removed from analytes by nuclease digestion.

  17. Characterization of adjacent breast tumors using oligonucleotide microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, Meredith A; Rishi, Mazhar; Clemmer, Virginia B; Hartman, Jennifer L; Keiper, Elizabeth A; Greshock, Joel D; Chodosh, Lewis A; Liebman, Michael N; Weber, Barbara L

    2001-01-01

    Current methodology often cannot distinguish second primary breast cancers from multifocal disease, a potentially important distinction for clinical management. In the present study we evaluated the use of oligonucleotide-based microarray analysis in determining the clonality of tumors by comparing gene expression profiles. Total RNA was extracted from two tumors with no apparent physical connection that were located in the right breast of an 87-year-old woman diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The RNA was hybridized to the Affymetrix Human Genome U95A Gene Chip ® (12,500 known human genes) and analyzed using the Gene Chip Analysis Suite ® 3.3 (Affymetrix, Inc, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and JMPIN ® 3.2.6 (SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, NC, USA). Gene expression profiles of tumors from five additional patients were compared in order to evaluate the heterogeneity in gene expression between tumors with similar clinical characteristics. The adjacent breast tumors had a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.987, and were essentially indistinguishable by microarray analysis. Analysis of gene expression profiles from different individuals, however, generated a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.710. Transcriptional profiling may be a useful diagnostic tool for determining tumor clonality and heterogeneity, and may ultimately impact on therapeutic decision making

  18. Antineoplastic Effect of Decoy Oligonucleotide Derived from MGMT Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refael, Miri; Zrihan, Daniel; Siegal, Tali; Lavon, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1) within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA) modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN). Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25460932

  19. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Canello

    Full Text Available Silencing of O(6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1 within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN. Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  20. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Effect of oligonucleotide primers in determining viral variability within hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variability in viral populations is usually estimated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR based methods in which the relative abundance of each amplicon is assumed to be proportional to the frequency of the corresponding template in the initial sample. Although bias in template-to-product ratios has been described before, its relevance in describing viral genetic variability at the intrapatient level has not been fully assessed yet. Results To investigate the role of oligonucleotide design in estimating viral variability within hosts, genetic diversity in hepatitis C virus (HCV populations from eight infected patients was characterised by two parallel PCR amplifications performed with two slightly different sets of primers, followed by cloning and sequencing (mean = 89 cloned sequences per patient. Population genetics analyses of viral populations recovered by pairs of amplifications revealed that in seven patients statistically significant differences were detected between populations sampled with different set of primers. Conclusions Genetic variability analyses demonstrates that PCR selection due to the choice of primers, differing in their degeneracy degree at some nucleotide positions, can eclipse totally or partially viral variants, hence yielding significant different estimates of viral variability within a single patient and therefore eventually producing quite different qualitative and quantitative descriptions of viral populations within each host.

  2. Effect of oligonucleotide primers in determining viral variability within hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Maria Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Jiménez, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2004-12-09

    Genetic variability in viral populations is usually estimated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods in which the relative abundance of each amplicon is assumed to be proportional to the frequency of the corresponding template in the initial sample. Although bias in template-to-product ratios has been described before, its relevance in describing viral genetic variability at the intrapatient level has not been fully assessed yet. To investigate the role of oligonucleotide design in estimating viral variability within hosts, genetic diversity in hepatitis C virus (HCV) populations from eight infected patients was characterised by two parallel PCR amplifications performed with two slightly different sets of primers, followed by cloning and sequencing (mean = 89 cloned sequences per patient). Population genetics analyses of viral populations recovered by pairs of amplifications revealed that in seven patients statistically significant differences were detected between populations sampled with different set of primers. Genetic variability analyses demonstrates that PCR selection due to the choice of primers, differing in their degeneracy degree at some nucleotide positions, can eclipse totally or partially viral variants, hence yielding significant different estimates of viral variability within a single patient and therefore eventually producing quite different qualitative and quantitative descriptions of viral populations within each host.

  3. Methods for the preparation of protein-oligonucleotide-lipid constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Jennifer; Raney, Sameersingh G; Chikh, Ghania; Sekirov, Laura; Brodsky, Irina; Tam, Ying; Ansell, Steven M

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of ionizable cationic lipids, steric barrier lipids, and colipids is used to encapsulate oligonucleotide DNA in lipidic particles called SALP. This material is under development as an adjuvant for vaccines. Previously we have shown that coupling the antigen directly to the surface of SALP can lead to enhanced immunological responses in vivo. Two different methods for preparing ovalbumin-SALP were assessed in this work. Originally the conjugates were prepared by treating SALP containing a maleimide-derivatized lipid with thiolated ovalbumin, a method we refer to as active coupling. This reaction was found to be difficult to control and generally resulted in low coupling efficiencies. The issues relating to this approach were characterized. We have recently developed alternative techniques based on first coupling ovalbumin to a micelle and then incubating the resultant product with SALP, methods we refer to as passive coupling. We have shown that this method allows accurate control of the levels of protein associated SALP and does not suffer from surface saturation effects seen with the active coupling method that places maximum limits on the amount of protein that can be coupled to the SALP surface. The products from the passive coupling protocol are shown to have activity comparable to those derived from the active coupling protocol in investigations of in vivo immune responses.

  4. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  5. Recent advances in antisense oligonucleotide therapy in genetic neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic neuromuscular diseases are caused by defective expression of nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mutant genes may reduce expression of wild-type proteins, and strategies to activate expression of the wild-type proteins might provide therapeutic benefits. Also, a toxic mutant protein may cause cell death, and strategies that reduce mutant gene expression may provide therapeutic benefit. Synthetic antisense oligonucleotide (ASO can recognize cellular RNA and control gene expression. In recent years, advances in ASO chemistry, creation of designer ASO molecules to enhance their safety and target delivery, and scientific controlled clinical trials to ascertain their therapeutic safety and efficacy have led to an era of plausible application of ASO technology to treat currently incurable neuromuscular diseases. Over the past 1 year, for the first time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved two ASO therapies in genetic neuromuscular diseases. This overview summarizes the recent advances in ASO technology, evolution and use of synthetic ASOs as a therapeutic platform, and the mechanism of ASO action by exon-skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and exon-inclusion in spinal muscular atrophy, with comments on their advantages and limitations.

  6. The use of oligonucleotide aptamers in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Odrzywolski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a new class of molecules which originated in the 1990s. They are usually RNA or DNA oligonucleotides, the length of which ranges between 20 and 80 nt. They are produced using the SELEX method that allows one to obtain aptamers that bind to virtually any molecule of interest, providing a high specificity. Aptamers are an alternative to antibodies because on the one hand, their sensitivity is at a similar or sometimes even higher level, while on the other hand they do not show immunogenicity, and may be synthesized in vitro. To date, a broad range of different applications of aptamers has been described: as components of biosensors, or use in various laboratory techniques, such as microarrays or chromatography. One of the most important is the use of aptamers in medicine, especially in the fight against cancer. They can be used both for diagnosis and for the eradication of cancers – particularly through the delivery of drugs. Currently, most transport-related research is devoted to the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as doxorubicin. This was used in research on liver cancer cells, prostate, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blast cells. Another possibility is to use aptamers to deliver siRNAs. In this way inhibition of the quality control process of the mRNA in tumor cells is possible. An aptamer complex with the drug allows for direct delivery of the active substance in a particular cell type, substantially eliminating the non-specific effect of the drug.

  7. Syntheses of prodrug-type phosphotriester oligonucleotides responsive to intracellular reducing environment for improvement of cell membrane permeability and nuclease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Junsuke; Samezawa, Yusuke; Ochi, Yosuke; Wada, Shun-Ichi; Urata, Hidehito

    2017-07-15

    We synthesized prodrug-type phosphotriester (PTE) oligonucleotides containing the six-membered cyclic disulfide moiety by using phosphoramidite chemistry. Prodrug-type oligonucleotides named "Reducing-Environment-Dependent Uncatalyzed Chemical Transforming (REDUCT) PTE oligonucleotides" were converted into natural oligonucleotides under cytosol-mimetic reductive condition. Furthermore, the REDUCT PTE oligonucleotides were robust to nuclease digestion and exhibited good cell membrane permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro transcription in the presence of DNA oligonucleotides can generate strong anomalous initiation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, C W; Clark, M P; Rinaldo, J E; Chalkley, R

    1996-03-01

    In the present study, we have explored an unexpected observation in transcription initiation that is mediated by single-stranded oligonucleotides. Initially, our goal was to understand the function of different upstream regulatory elements/initiation sites in the rat xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase (XDH/XO) promoter. We performed in vitro transcription with HeLa nuclear extracts in the presence of different double-stranded oligonucleotides against upstream elements as competitors. A new and unusual transcription initiation site was detected by primer extension. This new initiation site maps to the downstream region of the corresponding competitor. Subsequent analyses have indicated that the induction of a new transcription initiation site is anomalous which is due to the presence of a small amount of single-stranded oligonucleotide in the competitor. We found that this anomalous initiation site is insensitive to the orientation of the promoter and requires only a small amount of single-stranded oligonucleotide (< 2-fold molar excess relative to template). We surmise that a complementary interaction between the single-stranded oligonucleotide and transiently denatured promoter template may be responsible for this sequence-specific transcription initiation artifact. To study the regulation of transcription initiation by in vitro transcription approaches, we propose that one should probe the effect of removing transacting factors by adding an excess of a cognate oligonucleotide which does not bear exact sequence identity to the template.

  9. Functional oligonucleotide recognition nanomodules for electrochemical DNA biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Campàs i Homs, Mònica

    2002-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis ha sido diseñar, caracterizar y optimizar un array de sensores de ADN electroquímico. Para el estudio de la inmovilización de las sondas de oligonucleótidos y la detección de la hibridación se realizaron experimentos preliminares con un sistema simplificado. Dicho sistema demostró que las monocapas auto-ensambladas (SAMs) en superficies de oro eran apropiadas como método de inmovilización. Debido al rápido desarrollo de los sensores de ADN hacia los arrays de ADN, se...

  10. Prognostic Impact of Array-based Genomic Profiles in Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jönsson, Göran; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Falkenback, Dan; Halvarsson, Britta; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a genetically complex tumor type and a major cause of cancer related mortality. Although distinct genetic alterations have been linked to ESCC development and prognosis, the genetic alterations have not gained clinical applicability. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential interdependent alterations and deranged pathways were identified and copy number changes were correlated to stage, differentiation and survival. Copy number alterations affected median 19% of the genome and included recurrent gains of chromosome regions 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 10q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19p, 19q, and 20q and losses of 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p and 11q. High-level amplifications were observed in 30 regions and recurrently involved 7p11 (EGFR), 11q13 (MYEOV, CCND1, FGF4, FGF3, PPFIA, FAD, TMEM16A, CTTS and SHANK2) and 11q22 (PDFG). Gain of 7p22.3 predicted nodal metastases and gains of 1p36.32 and 19p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict survival, suggesting clinical applicability of genomic profiling in ESCC

  11. Antitumor effects of radioiodinated antisense oligonucleotide mediated by VIP receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong; Tan Tianzhi; Li Yunchun; Kuang Anren

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: we had constructed a targeting delivery system based on intestinal peptide (VIP) for antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) transfer into VIP receptor-positive cells in previous study. The aims of present studies are to observe the antitumor effect of VIP-131I-ASON in HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts. Methods: A 15-met phosphorothioate ASON, which was complementary to the translation start region of the C-myc oncogene mRNA, was labeled with 131I and the labelled compound was linked to the VIP bound covalently 'to a polylysine chain so as to deliver oligonucleotide into tumor cells. Distribution experiments for evaluating the radiolabeled antisense complexe uptake in tumor tissue were performed in BALB/c nude mice bearing with HT29 tumor xenografts. Nude mice beating HT29 tumor xenografts were adminstered VIP-131I-ASON (3.7,7.4 MBq) or 131I-ASON (3.7 MBq), 131I labeled control sense and nosense DNA (3.7 MBq), or saline. Antitumor effects were assessed using endpoints of tumor growth delay. C-myc-encoded protein expression of tumor was measured by immunocytohistochemical staining. Results: Distribution experiment performed with athymic mice bearing human colon tumor xenografts revealed maximal accumulation of conjugated ASON in the tumor tissue 2 h after administration and significantly higher than that in nude mice injected unconjngated ASON [(5.89±1.03)%ID/g and(1.56±0.31)%ID/g, respectively; t=7.7954 P<0.001]. The radioratio of tumor to muscle was peaked 4h after administration. VIP-131I-ASON exhibited strong antitumor effects against HT29 xenografts, decreasing their growth rate 7-fold compare with that in saline-treated mice(tumor growth delay, 25.4±0.89 day). The antitumor effects of unconjugated 131I-ASON were much less profound than VIP-131I-ASON (tumor growth delay, 3.2±1.3 and 25.4±0.89 day, respectively; q=51.4126 P<0.01). Sense, nosense control ON with VIP carder caused no therapeutic effect. There was no progressive weight loss or

  12. A dystrophic Duchenne mouse model for testing human antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Veltrop

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle-wasting disease generally caused by reading frame disrupting mutations in the DMD gene resulting in loss of functional dystrophin protein. The reading frame can be restored by antisense oligonucleotide (AON-mediated exon skipping, allowing production of internally deleted, but partially functional dystrophin proteins as found in the less severe Becker muscular dystrophy. Due to genetic variation between species, mouse models with mutations in the murine genes are of limited use to test and further optimize human specific AONs in vivo. To address this we have generated the del52hDMD/mdx mouse. This model carries both murine and human DMD genes. However, mouse dystrophin expression is abolished due to a stop mutation in exon 23, while the expression of human dystrophin is abolished due to a deletion of exon 52. The del52hDMD/mdx model, like mdx, shows signs of muscle dystrophy on a histological level and phenotypically mild functional impairment. Local administration of human specific vivo morpholinos induces exon skipping and dystrophin restoration in these mice. Depending on the number of mismatches, occasional skipping of the murine Dmd gene, albeit at low levels, could be observed. Unlike previous models, the del52hDMD/mdx model enables the in vivo analysis of human specific AONs targeting exon 51 or exon 53 on RNA and protein level and muscle quality and function. Therefore, it will be a valuable tool for optimizing human specific AONs and genome editing approaches for DMD.

  13. Profiled support vector machines for antisense oligonucleotide efficacy prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Guerrero José D

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs for prediction and analysis of antisense oligonucleotide (AO efficacy. The collected database comprises 315 AO molecules including 68 features each, inducing a problem well-suited to SVMs. The task of feature selection is crucial given the presence of noisy or redundant features, and the well-known problem of the curse of dimensionality. We propose a two-stage strategy to develop an optimal model: (1 feature selection using correlation analysis, mutual information, and SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE, and (2 AO prediction using standard and profiled SVM formulations. A profiled SVM gives different weights to different parts of the training data to focus the training on the most important regions. Results In the first stage, the SVM-RFE technique was most efficient and robust in the presence of low number of samples and high input space dimension. This method yielded an optimal subset of 14 representative features, which were all related to energy and sequence motifs. The second stage evaluated the performance of the predictors (overall correlation coefficient between observed and predicted efficacy, r; mean error, ME; and root-mean-square-error, RMSE using 8-fold and minus-one-RNA cross-validation methods. The profiled SVM produced the best results (r = 0.44, ME = 0.022, and RMSE= 0.278 and predicted high (>75% inhibition of gene expression and low efficacy (http://aosvm.cgb.ki.se/. Conclusions The SVM approach is well suited to the AO prediction problem, and yields a prediction accuracy superior to previous methods. The profiled SVM was found to perform better than the standard SVM, suggesting that it could lead to improvements in other prediction problems as well.

  14. Application of heteronuclear couplings to conformational analysis of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, G.; Live, D.; Bax, A.

    1994-01-01

    The value of vicinal coupling constants extracted from NMR spectra in deducing torsion angles for conformational analysis is well recognized. Due to the abundance of protons, their couplings have been mostly widely used. In many instances, couplings between protons and other nuclei may be a valuable complement to proton-proton couplings or, in some instances, may be the only coupling available to characterize the torsion angle about a bond. Recently, heteronuclear couplings have been used to great benefit in studies of isotopically enriched proteins, and this general approach has been extended to peptides at natural abundance. The possibility of using this approach to study oligonucleotides is also attractive but has not as yet been widely exploited. With the development of strategies for labeling such molecules, particularly RNAs, this may become an important component in conformational analysis. For DNA, labeling is less accessible, but sufficient quantities of unlabeled material are readily available for measuring these couplings at natural abundance. We chose several DNA systems to explore the usefulness of heteronuclear couplings in addressing the sugar conformation and the glycosidic torsion angle. Intensities of cross peaks in long-range HMQC experiments can be related to the couplings. Crosspeaks involving H1' and C1' atoms have been emphasized because of the superior shift dispersion at these positions between sugar protons and carbon atoms. Results will be shown for the self-complementary Dickerson duplex dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and for d(GGTCGG), which dimerizes to form a G-tetrad structure incorporating both syn and anti base orientations. The couplings provide a clear discrimination between presence of C3'-endo and C2'-endo conformations of the sugars and syn and anti bases arrangements

  15. Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Giovanni; Neurath, Markus F; Ardizzone, Sandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Fantini, Massimo C; Castiglione, Fabiana; Scribano, Maria L; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Caprioli, Flavio; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Rogai, Francesca; Vecchi, Maurizio; Atreya, Raja; Bossa, Fabrizio; Onali, Sara; Fichera, Maria; Corazza, Gino R; Biancone, Livia; Savarino, Vincenzo; Pica, Roberta; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Crohn's disease-related inflammation is characterized by reduced activity of the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) due to high levels of SMAD7, an inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Preclinical studies and a phase 1 study have shown that an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, mongersen, targets ileal and colonic SMAD7. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we evaluated the efficacy of mongersen for the treatment of persons with active Crohn's disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10, 40, or 160 mg of mongersen or placebo per day for 2 weeks. The primary outcomes were clinical remission at day 15, defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of less than 150, with maintenance of remission for at least 2 weeks, and the safety of mongersen treatment. A secondary outcome was clinical response (defined as a reduction of 100 points or more in the CDAI score) at day 28. The proportions of patients who reached the primary end point were 55% and 65% for the 40-mg and 160-mg mongersen groups, respectively, as compared with 10% for the placebo group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants reaching clinical remission between the 10-mg group (12%) and the placebo group. The rate of clinical response was significantly greater among patients receiving 10 mg (37%), 40 mg (58%), or 160 mg (72%) of mongersen than among those receiving placebo (17%) (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). Most adverse events were related to complications and symptoms of Crohn's disease. We found that study participants with Crohn's disease who received mongersen had significantly higher rates of remission and clinical response than those who received placebo. (Funded by Giuliani; EudraCT number, 2011-002640-27.).

  16. Application of heteronuclear couplings to conformational analysis of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Live, D. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bax, A. [NIDDK National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The value of vicinal coupling constants extracted from NMR spectra in deducing torsion angles for conformational analysis is well recognized. Due to the abundance of protons, their couplings have been mostly widely used. In many instances, couplings between protons and other nuclei may be a valuable complement to proton-proton couplings or, in some instances, may be the only coupling available to characterize the torsion angle about a bond. Recently, heteronuclear couplings have been used to great benefit in studies of isotopically enriched proteins, and this general approach has been extended to peptides at natural abundance. The possibility of using this approach to study oligonucleotides is also attractive but has not as yet been widely exploited. With the development of strategies for labeling such molecules, particularly RNAs, this may become an important component in conformational analysis. For DNA, labeling is less accessible, but sufficient quantities of unlabeled material are readily available for measuring these couplings at natural abundance. We chose several DNA systems to explore the usefulness of heteronuclear couplings in addressing the sugar conformation and the glycosidic torsion angle. Intensities of cross peaks in long-range HMQC experiments can be related to the couplings. Crosspeaks involving H1{prime} and C1{prime} atoms have been emphasized because of the superior shift dispersion at these positions between sugar protons and carbon atoms. Results will be shown for the self-complementary Dickerson duplex dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and for d(GGTCGG), which dimerizes to form a G-tetrad structure incorporating both syn and anti base orientations. The couplings provide a clear discrimination between presence of C3{prime}-endo and C2{prime}-endo conformations of the sugars and syn and anti bases arrangements.

  17. A Kinetic Model Explains Why Shorter and Less Affine Enzyme-recruiting Oligonucleotides Can Be More Potent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykke Pedersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to RNA targets promise generality and ease of drug design. The first systemically administered antisense drug was recently approved for treatment and others are in clinical development. Chemical modifications that increase the hybridization affinity of oligonucleotides are reasoned to confer higher potency, i.e., modified oligonucleotides can be dosed at lower concentrations to achieve the same effect. Surprisingly, shorter and less affine oligonucleotides sometimes display increased potency. To explain this apparent contradiction, increased uptake or decreased propensity to form structures have been suggested as possible mechanisms. Here, we provide an alternative explanation that invokes only the kinetics behind oligonucleotide-mediated cleavage of RNA targets. A model based on the law of mass action predicts, and experiments support, the existence of an optimal binding affinity. Exaggerated affinity, and not length per se, is detrimental to potency. This finding clarifies how to optimally apply high-affinity modifications in the discovery of potent antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  18. Degradation product characterization of therapeutic oligonucleotides using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzahar, N M; Magdy, N; El-Kosasy, Amira M; Bartlett, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    Synthetic antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS) have undergone rapid development as novel therapeutic agents. The increasing significance of this class of drugs requires significant investment in the development of quality control methods. The determination of the many degradation pathways of such complex molecules presents a significant challenge. However, an understanding of the potential impurities that may arise is necessary to continue to advance these powerful new therapeutics. In this study, four different antisense oligonucleotides representing several generations of oligonucleotide therapeutic agents were evaluated under various stress conditions (pH, thermal, and oxidative stress) using ion-pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IP-RPLC-MS/MS) to provide in-depth characterization and identification of the degradation products. The oligonucleotide samples were stressed under different pH values at 45 and 90 °C. The main degradation products were observed to be losses of nucleotide moieties from the 3'- and 5'-terminus, depurination, formation of terminal phosphorothioates, and production of ribose, ribophosphorothioates (Rp), and phosphoribophosphorothioates (pRp). Moreover, the effects of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were studied resulting in primarily extensive desulfurization and subsequent oxidation of the phosphorothioate linkage to produce the corresponding phosphodiester. The reaction kinetics for the degradation of the oligonucleotides under the different stress conditions were studied and were found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics. Differences in rates exist even for oligonucleotides of similar length but consisting of different sequences. Graphical abstract Identification of degradation products across several generations of oligonucleotide therapeutics using LC-MS.

  19. Prevention of Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinoma by Elucidating Its Early Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array instead of the oligonucleotide Agilent 1M CGH array for somatic copy number alterations, due to familiarity and reliable...epithelium. As a result, a significant effort has been placed on determining the menstrual status of samples collected – this has included reviewing the...HRT at time of surgery o Unknown menstrual cycle status at time of surgery The tissue microarray includes the following permutations (2 cores per

  20. Copy number alterations in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors determined by array comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Jamileh; Fotouhi, Omid; Sulaiman, Luqman; Kjellman, Magnus; Höög, Anders; Zedenius, Jan; Larsson, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are typically slow-growing tumors that have metastasized already at the time of diagnosis. The purpose of the present study was to further refine and define regions of recurrent copy number (CN) alterations (CNA) in SI-NETs. Genome-wide CNAs was determined by applying array CGH (a-CGH) on SI-NETs including 18 primary tumors and 12 metastases. Quantitative PCR analysis (qPCR) was used to confirm CNAs detected by a-CGH as well as to detect CNAs in an extended panel of SI-NETs. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to detect tumor groups with similar patterns of chromosomal alterations based on recurrent regions of CN loss or gain. The log rank test was used to calculate overall survival. Mann–Whitney U test or Fisher’s exact test were used to evaluate associations between tumor groups and recurrent CNAs or clinical parameters. The most frequent abnormality was loss of chromosome 18 observed in 70% of the cases. CN losses were also frequently found of chromosomes 11 (23%), 16 (20%), and 9 (20%), with regions of recurrent CN loss identified in 11q23.1-qter, 16q12.2-qter, 9pter-p13.2 and 9p13.1-11.2. Gains were most frequently detected in chromosomes 14 (43%), 20 (37%), 4 (27%), and 5 (23%) with recurrent regions of CN gain located to 14q11.2, 14q32.2-32.31, 20pter-p11.21, 20q11.1-11.21, 20q12-qter, 4 and 5. qPCR analysis confirmed most CNAs detected by a-CGH as well as revealed CNAs in an extended panel of SI-NETs. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of recurrent regions of CNAs revealed two separate tumor groups and 5 chromosomal clusters. Loss of chromosomes 18, 16 and 11 and again of chromosome 20 were found in both tumor groups. Tumor group II was enriched for alterations in chromosome cluster-d, including gain of chromosomes 4, 5, 7, 14 and gain of 20 in chromosome cluster-b. Gain in 20pter-p11.21 was associated with short survival. Statistically significant differences were observed between primary

  1. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, B.; Aslan, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials. Rapid surface modification of SNFs with oligonucleotides was carried out using two strategies (1) Strategy 1: for ss-oligonucleotides, surface hybridization and (2) Strategy 2: for ds-oligonucleotides, solution hybridization, where the samples were exposed to 10, 15, 30 and 60 seconds microwave heating. To assess the efficacy of our new rapid surface modification technique, identical experiments carried out without the microwave heating (i.e., conventional method), which requires 24 hours for the completion of the identical steps. It was found that SNFs can be modified with ss- and ds-oligonucleotides in 10 seconds, which typically requires several hours of incubation time for the chemisorption of thiol groups on to the planar metal surface using conventional techniques. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (psunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  3. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n=203; repetitive implantation failure (n=188; severe male factor (n=116; previous trisomic pregnancy (n=33; and advanced maternal age (n=880. CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n=774; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n=320; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n=235; and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n=91. Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2% and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9% were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1% due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3% and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%. We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  4. An aCGH classifier derived from BRCA1-mutated breast cancer and benefit of high-dose platinum-based chemotherapy in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, M. A.; Lips, E. H.; Nederlof, P. M.; Wessels, L. F. A.; Schmidt, M. K.; van Beers, E. H.; Cornelissen, S.; Holtkamp, M.; Froklage, F. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Schrama, J. G.; Wesseling, J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; van Tinteren, H.; de Bruin, Michiel; Hauptmann, M.; Rodenhuis, S.; Linn, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer cells deficient for BRCA1 are hypersensitive to agents inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), such as bifunctional alkylators and platinum agents. Earlier, we had developed a comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) classifier based on BRCA1-mutated breast cancers. We hypothesised

  5. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  6. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  7. Streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles: critical role of oligonucleotides on stability and fractal aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta D'Agata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs exhibit unique properties that can be modulated through a tailored surface functionalization, enabling their targeted use in biochemical sensing and medical diagnostics. In particular, streptavidin-modified AuNPs are increasingly used for biosensing purposes. We report here a study of AuNPs surface-functionalized with streptavidin-biotinylated oligonucleotide, focussing on the role played by the oligonucleotide probes in the stabilization/destabilization of the functionalized nanoparticle dispersion. The behaviour of the modified AuNP dispersion as a consequence of the competitive displacement of the biotinylated oligonucleotide has been investigated and the critical role of displaced oligonucletides in triggering the quasi one-dimensional aggregation of nanoparticles is demonstrated for the first time. The thorough understanding of the fundamental properties of bioconjugated AuNPs is of great importance for the design of highly sensitive and reliable functionalized AuNP-based assays.

  8. Reliability and applications of statistical methods based on oligonucleotide frequencies in bacterial and archaeal genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, J; Skjerve, E; Ussery, David

    2008-01-01

    with here are mainly used to examine similarities between archaeal and bacterial DNA from different genomes. These methods compare observed genomic frequencies of fixed-sized oligonucleotides with expected values, which can be determined by genomic nucleotide content, smaller oligonucleotide frequencies......, or be based on specific statistical distributions. Advantages with these statistical methods include measurements of phylogenetic relationship with relatively small pieces of DNA sampled from almost anywhere within genomes, detection of foreign/conserved DNA, and homology searches. Our aim was to explore...... the reliability and best suited applications for some popular methods, which include relative oligonucleotide frequencies (ROF), di- to hexanucleotide zero'th order Markov methods (ZOM) and 2.order Markov chain Method (MCM). Tests were performed on distant homology searches with large DNA sequences, detection...

  9. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Jensen, Knud J.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized synthetic oligonucleotides are finding growing applications in research, clinical studies, and therapy. However, it is not easy to prepare them in a biocompatible and highly efficient manner. We report a new strategy to synthesize oligonucleotides with promising nucleic acid...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  10. Detection of DNA oligonucleotides with base mutations by terahertz spectroscopy and microstructures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Tang

    Full Text Available DNA oligonucleotides with a 5-base mutation at the 3'-terminus were investigated by terahertz (THz spectroscopy in a marker-free manner. The four single-stranded oligonucleotides with 17nt have been detected with specificity on a microfluidic chip, and corroborated by spectral measurements with split-ring resonators. The number of hydrogen bonds formed between the oligonucleotide and its surrounding water molecules, deemed a key contribution to the THz absorption of biological solutions, was explored by molecular dynamics simulations to explain the experimental findings. Our work underlies the feasibility of THz spectroscopy combined with microstructures for marker-free detection of DNA, which may form the basis of a prospective diagnostic tool for studying genic mutation.

  11. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-09-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed preliminary grouping of three new hyperthermophilic isolates. Together with other group-specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, these probes will facilitate rapid in situ monitoring of the populations present in hydrothermal systems and support cultivation attempts.

  12. Polynucleotides. XXXII. Further studies on the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing 8,2'-S-cycloadenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, M; Tezuka, T

    1975-01-01

    A dinucleoside monophosphate, 8,2'-anhydro-8-mercapto-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine phosphoryl-(3'-5')-inosine (AspI) was synthesized by the condensation of protected 8-mercapto-adenosine 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 2',3'-isopropylideneinosine with diphenylphosphorochloridate. 8-Mercaptoadenosine 2',3'-cyclic phosphate was polymerized by using tetraphenyl pyrophosphate as the condensing reagent. As oligonucleotides, thus obtained, contained some uncyclized 8-mercaptoadenosine residues and were cleaved at these sites with 0.3N KOH. As 5'-phosphate was synthesized and polymerized with DCC to give oligonucleotides with chain lengths 2 to 9. PMID:170595

  13. Functional regulation of RNA-induced silencing complex by photoreactive oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Yohei; Yamayoshi, Asako; Kobori, Akio; Murakami, Akira

    2014-02-01

    We developed a novel method for regulation of RISC function by photoreactive oligonucleotides (Ps-Oligo) containing 2'-O-psoralenylmethoxyethyl adenosine (Aps). We observed that inhibitory effects of Ps-Oligos on RISC function were enhanced by UV-irradiation compared with 2'-O-methyl-oligonucleotide without Aps. These results suggest Ps-Oligo inhibited RISC function by cross-linking effect, and we propose that the concept described in this report may be promising and applicable one to regulate the small RNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  15. Oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals: Non-clinical and clinical safety signals and non-clinical testing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Enni-Kaisa; Palomäki, Tiina; Pasanen, Markku

    2017-11-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and aptamers are oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals with a promising role in targeted therapies. Currently, five oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals have achieved marketing authorization in Europe or USA and many more are undergoing clinical testing. However, several safety concerns have been raised in non-clinical and clinical studies. Oligonucleotides share properties with both chemical and biological pharmaceuticals and therefore they pose challenges also from the regulatory point of view. We have analyzed the safety data of oligonucleotides and evaluated the applicability of current non-clinical toxicological guidelines for assessing the safety of oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals. Oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals display a similar toxicological profile, exerting adverse effects on liver and kidney, evoking hematological alterations, as well as causing immunostimulation and prolonging the coagulation time. It is possible to extrapolate some of these effects from non-clinical studies to humans. However, evaluation strategies for genotoxicity testing of "non-natural" oligonucleotides should be revised. Additionally, the selective use of surrogates and prediction of clinical endpoints for non-clinically observed immunostimulation is complicated by its multiple potential manifestations, demanding improvements in the testing strategies. Utilizing more relevant and mechanistic-based approaches and taking better account of species differences, could possibly improve the prediction of relevant immunological/proinflammatory effects in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and Biophysical Investigations of Oligonucleotides Containing Galactose-Modified DNA, LNA and 2'-Amino-LNA Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Annika; Kumar, Rajesh; Lou, Chenguang

    2016-01-01

    Galactose-modified thymidine, LNA-T and 2'-amino-LNA-T nucleosides were synthesized, converted into the corresponding phosphoramidite derivatives and introduced into short oligonucleotides. Compared to the unmodified control strands, the galactose-modified oligonucleotides in general, and the N2'...

  17. An oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer: Development and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martien, Ronny; Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Schnürch, Andreas Bernkop

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer/reduced glutathione (GSH) system providing a protective effect toward nucleases and permeation enhancement. A polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (PCP-Cys) was synthesized. Enzymatic degradation of a model oligonucleotide by DNase I and within freshly collected intestinal fluid was investigated in the absence and presence of PCP-Cys. Permeation studies with PCP-Cys/GSH versus control were performed in vitro on Caco-2 cell monolayers and ex vivo on rat intestinal mucosa. PCP-Cys displayed 223 ± 13.8 μmol thiol groups per gram polymer. After 4h, 61% of the free oligonucleotides were degraded by DNase I and 80% within intestinal fluid. In contrast, less than 41% (DNase I) and 60% (intestinal fluid) were degraded in the presence of 0.02% (m/v) PCP-Cys. Permeation studies revealed an 8-fold (Caco-2) and 10-fold (intestinal mucosa) increase in apparent permeability compared to buffer control. Hence, this PCP-Cys/GSH system might be a promising tool for the oral administration of oligonucleotides as it allows a significant protection toward degrading enzymes and facilitates their transport across intestinal membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. N-Branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonates as monomers for the synthesis of modified oligonucleotides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocková, Dana; Rosenbergová, Šárka; Ménová, Petra; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Novák, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 15 (2015), s. 4449-4458 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108; GA ČR GA13-26526S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * oligonucleotides * solid phase synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.559, year: 2015

  19. Photodynamic antisense regulation of mRNA having a point mutation with psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Maiko; Yamayoshi, Asako; Kobori, Akio; Murakami, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based drugs, such as antisense oligonucleotide, ribozyme, and small interfering RNA, are specific compounds that inhibit gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. To develop more effective nucleic acid-based drugs, we focused on photo-reactive antisense oligonucleotides. We have optimized the structure of psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide to improve their sequence selectivity and photo-crosslinking efficiency. Previously, we reported that photo reactive oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-psoralenyl-methoxyethyl adenosine (2'-Ps-eom) showed drastic photo-reactivity with a strictly sequence specific manner in vitro. In this report, we evaluated the binding ability toward intracellular target mRNA. The 2'-Ps-eom selectively photo-cross-linked to the target mRNA extracted from cells. The 2'-Ps-eom also cross-linked to target mRNA in cells. Furthermore, 2'-Ps-eom did not cross-link to mRNA having a mismatch base. These results suggest that 2'-Ps-eom is a powerful antisense molecule to inhibit the expression of mRNA having a point mutation.

  20. A new achiral reagent for the incorporation of multiple amino groups into oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Carsten; Petersen, Kenneth H.; Egholm, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of a new functionalized achiral linker reagent (10) for the incorporation of multiple primary amino groups into oligonucleotides is described. The linker reagent is compatible with conventional DNA-synthesis following the phosphoramidite methodology, and the linker can be incorporated...

  1. Short Oligonucleotides Aligned in Stretched Humid Matrix: Secondary DNA Structure in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Å kerman, Bjö rn; Nordé n, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    ) spectroscopy. Oligonucleotides of lengths varying between 10 (3.4 nm) and 60 bases (20.4 nm) were investigated with respect to structural properties in the gel-like polymer environment. The DNA conformation as a function of relative humidity reveals a strong

  2. Methods for the preparation of large quantities of complex single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf E; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan

    2014-01-01

    Custom-defined oligonucleotide collections have a broad range of applications in fields of synthetic biology, targeted sequencing, and cytogenetics. Also, they are used to encode information for technologies like RNA interference, protein engineering and DNA-encoded libraries. High-throughput parallel DNA synthesis technologies developed for the manufacture of DNA microarrays can produce libraries of large numbers of different oligonucleotides, but in very limited amounts. Here, we compare three approaches to prepare large quantities of single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries derived from microarray synthesized collections. The first approach, alkaline melting of double-stranded PCR amplified libraries with a biotinylated strand captured on streptavidin coated magnetic beads results in little or no non-biotinylated ssDNA. The second method wherein the phosphorylated strand of PCR amplified libraries is nucleolyticaly hydrolyzed is recommended when small amounts of libraries are needed. The third method combining in vitro transcription of PCR amplified libraries to reverse transcription of the RNA product into single-stranded cDNA is our recommended method to produce large amounts of oligonucleotide libraries. Finally, we propose a method to remove any primer binding sequences introduced during library amplification.

  3. Review on investigations of antisense oligonucleotides with the use of mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studzińska, Sylwia

    2018-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been investigated as potential drugs for years. They inhibit target gene or protein expression. The present review summarizes their modifications, modes of action, and applications of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for qualitative and quantitative analysis of these compounds. The most recent reports on a given topic were given prominence, while some early studies were reviewed in order to provide a theoretical background. The present review covers the issues of using ion-exchange chromatography, ion-pair reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction chromatography for the separation of antisense oligonucleotides. The application of mass spectrometry was described with regard to the ionization type used for the determination of these potential therapeutics. Moreover, the current approaches and applications of mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of antisense oligonucleotides and their metabolites as well as their impurities during in vitro and in vivo studies were discussed. Finally, certain conclusions and perspectives on the determination of therapeutic oligonucleotides in various samples were briefly described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M

    2014-01-01

    , splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we...

  5. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  6. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale-up by ...

  7. Synthesis and Excellent Duplex Stability of Oligonucleotides Containing 2'-Amino-LNA Functionalized with Galactose Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ries, Annika; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of oligonucleotides containing internally-attached galactose and triantennary galactose units has been developed based on click chemistry between 2'-N-alkyne 2'-amino-LNA nucleosides and azido-functionalized galactosyl building blocks. The synthesized...

  8. Effective intracellular delivery of oligonucleotides in order to make sense of antisense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, FX; Hoekstra, D

    2004-01-01

    For more than two decades, antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) have been used to modulate gene expression for the purpose of applications in cell biology and for development of novel sophisticated medical therapeutics. Conceptually, the antisense approach represents an elegant strategy, involving the

  9. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a

  10. Synthetic Nucleic Acid Analogues in Gene Therapy: An Update for Peptide–Oligonucleotide Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Mantsiou, Anna; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide an update on synthetic nucleic acid analogues and nanoassemblies as tools in gene therapy. In particular, the synthesis and properties of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs), which have high potential in research and as therapeutics, are described...

  11. Quantitation of ultraviolet-induced single-strand breaks using oligonucleotide chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sukdeb; Kim, Min Jung; Choo, Jaebum; Kang, Seong Ho; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Song, Joon Myong

    2008-01-01

    A simple, accurate and robust methodology was established for the direct quantification of ultraviolet (UV)-induced single-strand break (SSB) using oligonucleotide chip. Oligonucleotide chips were fabricated by covalently anchoring the fluorescent-labeled ssDNAs onto silicon dioxide chip surfaces. Assuming that the possibility of more than one UV-induced SSB to be generated in a small oligonucleotide is extremely low, SSB formation was investigated quantifying the endpoint probe density by fluorescence measurement upon UV irradiation. The SSB yields obtained based on the highly sensitive laser-induced fluorometric determination of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides were found to coincide well with that predicted from a theoretical extrapolation of the results obtained for plasmid DNAs using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. The developed method has the potential to serve as a high throughput, sample-thrifty, and time saving tool to realize more realistic, and direct quantification of radiation and chemical-induced strand breaks. It will be especially useful for determining the frequency of SSBs or lesions convertible to SSBs by specific cleaving reagents or enzymes

  12. Cellular Internalization of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides by Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers and Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Gunay, Gokhan; Tekinay, Turgay; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-05-11

    Oligonucleotides are promising drug candidates due to the exceptionally high specificity they exhibit toward their target DNA and RNA sequences. However, their poor pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, in conjunction with problems associated with their internalization by cells, necessitates their delivery through specialized carrier systems for efficient therapy. Here, we investigate the effects of carrier morphology on the cellular internalization mechanisms of oligonucleotides by using self-assembled fibrous or spherical peptide nanostructures. Size and geometry were both found to be important parameters for the oligonucleotide internalization process; direct penetration was determined to be the major mechanism for the internalization of nanosphere carriers, whereas nanofibers were internalized by clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathways. We further showed that glucose conjugation to carrier nanosystems improved cellular internalization in cancer cells due to the enhanced glucose metabolism associated with oncogenesis, and the internalization of the glucose-conjugated peptide/oligonucleotide complexes was found to be dependent on glucose transporters present on the surface of the cell membrane.

  13. Pd0-Catalyzed Methyl Transfer on Nucleosides and Oligonucleotides, Envisaged as a PET Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fouquet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The methyl transfer reaction from activated monomethyltin, via a modified Stille coupling reaction, was studied under “ligandless” conditions on fully deprotected 5'-modified nucleosides and one dinucleotide. The reaction was optimized to proceed in a few minutes and quantitative yield, even under dilute conditions, thus affording a rapid and efficient new method for oligonucleotide labelling with carbon-11.

  14. High-frequency genome editing using ssDNA oligonucleotides with zinc-finger nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fuqiang; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Huang, Yuping

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have enabled highly efficient gene targeting in multiple cell types and organisms. Here we describe methods for using simple ssDNA oligonucleotides in tandem with ZFNs to efficiently produce human cell lines with three distinct genetic outcomes: (i) targeted point...

  15. Labelling of nucleosides and oligonucleotides by solvatochromic 4-aminophthalimide fluorophore for studying DNA–protein interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedl, Jan; Pohl, Radek; Ernsting, N. P.; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2012), s. 2797-2806 ISSN 2041-6520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA * oligonucleotides * polymerase * phthalimide * nucleotides * fluorescent labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 8.314, year: 2012

  16. Stability of non-Watson-Crick G-A/A-G base pair in synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuko; Sone, Yumiko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2004-03-01

    A non-Watson-Crick G-A/A-G base pair is found in SECIS (selenocysteine-insertion sequence) element in the 3'-untranslated region of Se-protein mRNAs and in the functional site of the hammerhead ribozyme. We studied the stability of G-A/A-G base pair (bold) in 17mer GT(U)GACGGAAACCGGAAC synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides by thermal melting experiments and gel electrophoresis. The measured Tm value of DNA oligonucleotide having G-A/A-G pair showed an intermediate value (58 degrees C) between that of Watson-Crick G-C/C-G base pair (75 degrees C) and that of G-G/A-A of non-base-pair (40 degrees C). Similar thermal melting patterns were obtained with RNA oligonucleotides. This result indicates that the secondary structure of oligonucleotide having G-A/A-G base pair is looser than that of the G-C type Watson-Crick base pair. In the comparison between RNA and DNA having G-A/A-G base pair, the Tm value of the RNA oligonucleotide was 11 degrees C lower than that of DNA, indicating that DNA has a more rigid structure than RNA. The stained pattern of oligonucleotide on polyacrylamide gel clarified that the mobility of the DNA oligonucleotide G-A/A-G base pair changed according to the urea concentration from the rigid state (near the mobility of G-C/C-G oligonucleotide) in the absence of urea to the random state (near the mobility of G-G/A-A oligonucleotide) in 7 M urea. However, the RNA oligonucleotide with G-A/A-G pair moved at an intermediate mobility between that of oligonucleotide with G-C/C-G and of the oligonucleotide with G-G/A-A, and the mobility pattern did not depend on urea concentration. Thus, DNA and RNA oligonucleotides with the G-A/A-G base pair showed a pattern indicating an intermediate structure between the rigid Watson-Crick base pair and the random structure of non-base pair. RNA with G-A/A-G base pair has the intermediate structure not influenced by urea concentration. Finally, this study indicated that the intermediate rigidity imparted by Non

  17. Phage annealing proteins promote oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in Escherichia coli and mouse ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyrers Joep PP

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phage protein pairs, RecE/RecT from Rac or Redα/Redβ from λ, initiate efficient double strand break repair (DSBR in Escherichia coli that has proven very useful for DNA engineering. These phage pairs initiate DSBR either by annealing or by another mechanism that is not defined. Results Here we report that these proteins also mediate single strand oligonucleotide repair (ssOR at high efficiencies. The ssOR activity, unlike DSBR, does not require a phage exonuclease (RecE or Redα but only requires a phage annealing protein (RecT or Redβ. Notably, the P22 phage annealing protein Erf, which does not mediate the same DSBR reactions, also delivers ssOR activity. By altering aspects of the oligonucleotides, we document length and design parameters that affect ssOR efficiency to show a simple relationship to homologies either side of the repair site. Notably, ssOR shows strand bias. Oligonucleotides that can prime lagging strand replication deliver more ssOR than their leading complements. This suggests a model in which the annealing proteins hybridize the oligonucleotides to single stranded regions near the replication fork. We also show that ssOR is a highly efficient way to engineer BACs and can be detected in a eukaryotic cell upon expression of a phage annealing protein. Conclusion Phage annealing proteins can initiate the recombination of single stranded oligonucleotides into endogenous targets in Escherichia coli at very high efficiencies. This expands the repertoire of useful DNA engineering strategies, shows promise for applications in eukaryotic cells, and has implications for the unanswered questions regarding DSBR mediated by RecE/RecT and Redα/Redβ.

  18. Modulation of 5' splice site selection using tailed oligonucleotides carrying splicing signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elela Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the use of tailed oligonucleotides as a means of reprogramming alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and in vivo. The tailed oligonucleotides that were used interfere with splicing because they contain a portion complementary to sequences immediately upstream of the target 5' splice site combined with a non-hybridizing 5' tail carrying binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. In the present study, we have tested the inhibitory activity of RNA oligonucleotides carrying different tail structures. Results We show that an oligonucleotide with a 5' tail containing the human β-globin branch site sequence inhibits the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-xL, albeit less efficiently than a tail containing binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. A branch site-containing tail positioned at the 3' end of the oligonucleotide also elicited splicing inhibition but not as efficiently as a 5' tail. The interfering activity of a 3' tail was improved by adding a 5' splice site sequence next to the branch site sequence. A 3' tail carrying a Y-shaped branch structure promoted similar splicing interference. The inclusion of branch site or 5' splice site sequences in the Y-shaped 3' tail further improved splicing inhibition. Conclusion Our in vitro results indicate that a variety of tail architectures can be used to elicit splicing interference at low nanomolar concentrations, thereby broadening the scope and the potential impact of this antisense technology.

  19. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fernandez

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de. The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons. The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0 was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01 allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  20. Drop drying on surfaces determines chemical reactivity - the specific case of immobilization of oligonucleotides on microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Drop drying is a key factor in a wide range of technical applications, including spotted microarrays. The applied nL liquid volume provides specific reaction conditions for the immobilization of probe molecules to a chemically modified surface. Results We investigated the influence of nL and μL liquid drop volumes on the process of probe immobilization and compare the results obtained to the situation in liquid solution. In our data, we observe a strong relationship between drop drying effects on immobilization and surface chemistry. In this work, we present results on the immobilization of dye labeled 20mer oligonucleotides with and without an activating 5′-aminoheptyl linker onto a 2D epoxysilane and a 3D NHS activated hydrogel surface. Conclusions Our experiments identified two basic processes determining immobilization. First, the rate of drop drying that depends on the drop volume and the ambient relative humidity. Oligonucleotides in a dried spot react unspecifically with the surface and long reaction times are needed. 3D hydrogel surfaces allow for immobilization in a liquid environment under diffusive conditions. Here, oligonucleotide immobilization is much faster and a specific reaction with the reactive linker group is observed. Second, the effect of increasing probe concentration as a result of drop drying. On a 3D hydrogel, the increasing concentration of probe molecules in nL spotting volumes accelerates immobilization dramatically. In case of μL volumes, immobilization depends on whether the drop is allowed to dry completely. At non-drying conditions, very limited immobilization is observed due to the low oligonucleotide concentration used in microarray spotting solutions. The results of our study provide a general guideline for microarray assay development. They allow for the initial definition and further optimization of reaction conditions for the immobilization of oligonucleotides and other probe molecule classes to different

  1. Short G-rich oligonucleotides as a potential therapeutic for Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parekh-Olmedo Hetal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's Disease (HD is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which neuronal tissue degenerates. The pathogenesis of the disease appears to center on the development of protein aggregates that arise initially from the misfolding of the mutant HD protein. Mutant huntingtin (Htt is produced by HD genes that contain an increased number of glutamine codons within the first exon and this expansion leads to the production of a protein that misfolds. Recent studies suggest that mutant Htt can nucleate protein aggregation and interfere with a multitude of normal cellular functions. Results As such, efforts to find a therapy for HD have focused on agents that disrupt or block the mutant Htt aggregation pathway. Here, we report that short guanosine monotonic oligonucleotides capable of adopting a G-quartet structure, are effective inhibitors of aggregation. By utilizing a biochemical/immunoblotting assay as an initial screen, we identified a 20-mer, all G-oligonucleotide (HDG as an active molecule. Subsequent testing in a cell-based assay revealed that HDG was an effective inhibitor of aggregation of a fusion protein, comprised of a mutant Htt fragment and green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Taken together, our results suggest that a monotonic G-oligonucleotide, capable of adopting a G-quartet conformation is an effective inhibitor of aggregation. This oligonucleotide can also enable cell survival in PC12 cells overexpressing a mutant Htt fragment fusion gene. Conclusion Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides capable of forming stable G-quartets can inhibit aggregation of the mutant Htt fragment protein. This activity maybe an important part of the pathogenecity of Huntington's Disease. Our results reveal a new class of agents that could be developed as a therapeutic approach for Huntington's Disease.

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing Using a Knowledge Base Coupled with a High-Throughput Oligonucleotide Probe Array Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Lin, Hong Huang; DeLuca, David S.; Leppanen, Scott; Milford, Edgar L.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are important biomarkers because multiple diseases, drug toxicity, and vaccine responses reveal strong HLA associations. Current clinical HLA typing is an elimination process requiring serial testing. We present an alternative in situ synthesized DNA-based microarray method that contains hundreds of thousands of probes representing a complete overlapping set covering 1,610 clinically relevant HLA class I alleles accompanied by computational tools for assigning HLA type to 4-digit resolution. Our proof-of-concept experiment included 21 blood samples, 18 cell lines, and multiple controls. The method is accurate, robust, and amenable to automation. Typing errors were restricted to homozygous samples or those with very closely related alleles from the same locus, but readily resolved by targeted DNA sequencing validation of flagged samples. High-throughput HLA typing technologies that are effective, yet inexpensive, can be used to analyze the world’s populations, benefiting both global public health and personalized health care. PMID:25505899

  3. Binding of Dumbbell Oligonucleotides to MoMuLV Reverse Transcriptase: Inhibitory Properties of RNase H Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dumbbell oligonucleotides with loops of various chemistry were synthesized. Incubation of dumbbell oligonucleotides containing phosphorothioate bonds or trimethylene phosphate linkages in loops with S1 nuclease did not result in significant cleavage under conditions which led to the degradation of dumbbell oligonucleotide containing phophodiester bonds in the loops. The binding of reverse transcriptase of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV was evaluated with all the five oligonucleotides. The protein binds to all the dumbbell oligonucleotides with similar affinity. The dissociation constants evaluated using PAGE band mobility shift assays were of the order of 10-7. The inhibitory properties of the retroviral RNase H activity was evaluated using 3H –UTP-labeled RNA:RNA-DNA hybrid. It was found that the best dumbbell oligonucleotide, inhibitor contained phosphorothioate residues in both the loops. Our value studies demonstrated that this particularly designed oligonucleotide displays an IC50 of 18 nM in its inhibition on the reverse transcriptase RNase H activity, a magnitude lower than that of first nucleotide reverse transcriptase of HIV-1, tenofovir, introduced by Gilead Science in the market.

  4. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid E C Verhaart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks. Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days. Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days. Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD.

  5. Preliminary analysis of numerical chromosome abnormalities in reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation preimplantation genetic diagnosis cases with 24-chromosomal analysis with an aCGH/SNP microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanxin; Xu, Yanwen; Wang, Jing; Miao, Benyu; Zeng, Yanhong; Ding, Chenhui; Gao, Jun; Zhou, Canquan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an interchromosomal effect (ICE) occurred in embryos obtained from reciprocal translocation (rcp) and Robertsonian translocation (RT) carriers who were following a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with whole chromosome screening with an aCGH and SNP microarray. We also analyzed the chromosomal numerical abnormalities in embryos with aneuploidy in parental chromosomes that were not involved with a translocation and balanced in involved parental translocation chromosomes. This retrospective study included 832 embryos obtained from rcp carriers and 382 embryos from RT carriers that were biopsied in 139 PGD cycles. The control group involved embryos obtained from age-matched patient karyotypes who were undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with non-translocation, and 579 embryos were analyzed in the control group. A single blastomere at the cleavage stage or trophectoderm from a blastocyst was biopsied, and 24-chromosomal analysis with an aCGH/SNP microarray was conducted using the PGD/PGS protocols. Statistical analyses were implemented on the incidences of cumulative aneuploidy rates between the translocation carriers and the control group. Reliable results were obtained from 138 couples, among whom only one patient was a balanced rcp or RT translocation carrier, undergoing PGD testing in our center from January 2012 to June 2014. For day 3 embryos, the aneuploidy rates were 50.7% for rcp carriers and 49.1% for RT carriers, compared with the control group, with 44.8% at a maternal age < 36 years. When the maternal age was ≥ 36 years, the aneuploidy rates were increased to 61.1% for rcp carriers, 56.7% for RT carriers, and 60.3% for the control group. There were no significant differences. In day 5 embryos, the aneuploidy rates were 24.5% for rcp carriers and 34.9% for RT carriers, compared with the control group with 53.6% at a maternal age < 36 years. When the maternal age was ≥ 36

  6. Application of the micro-array comparative genomic hybridization technology in preimplantation genetic diagnosis%Array-CGH技术在胚胎植入前遗传学诊断中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丹; 陈大蔚; 曹云霞; 周平

    2015-01-01

    As a new kind high-throughput genomics technology, micro array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has brought the huge change for molecular biology and medical research. Because of the detection range covers the whole genome, high efficiency, easy operation etc, aCGH has been widely used in many areas of human genetic disease diagnosis, tumor genomics, systems biology and prenatal diagnosis. Human preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an important part of assisted reproductive technology, with the development of molecular genetics technology, its application range is continuously widening. Based on aCGH technology in PGD for embryonic whole genome screening for aneuploidy and structural abnormalities, human PGD/human preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate have improved significantly. In this article, we discussed the advantages, disadvantages and prospects of aCGH in prenatal diagnosis.%微阵列比较基因组杂交(aCGH)作为一种新兴的高通量检测技术,给分子生物学及医学研究带来了巨大变化,因其检测范围覆盖全基因组、高效率、操作简便等特点,在人类遗传疾病诊断,肿瘤基因组学,系统生物学研究及产前诊断中已有了广泛应用。植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是辅助生殖技术的重要组成部分,随着分子遗传学技术的发展,其应用范围也不断拓宽。基于aCGH技术在PGD中对胚胎全染色体组非整倍体及结构异常的筛查,PGD/植入前遗传学筛查(PGS)胚胎植入率和临床妊娠率均有显著提高,本文就aCGH技术在胚胎植入前遗传学诊断中的应用进行综述。

  7. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  8. CGI: Java software for mapping and visualizing data from array-based comparative genomic hybridization and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Joyce Xiuweu-Xu; Wei, Michael Yang; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Lau, Ching C; Behl, Sanjiv; Man, Tsz-Kwong

    2007-10-06

    With the increasing application of various genomic technologies in biomedical research, there is a need to integrate these data to correlate candidate genes/regions that are identified by different genomic platforms. Although there are tools that can analyze data from individual platforms, essential software for integration of genomic data is still lacking. Here, we present a novel Java-based program called CGI (Cytogenetics-Genomics Integrator) that matches the BAC clones from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to genes from RNA expression profiling datasets. The matching is computed via a fast, backend MySQL database containing UCSC Genome Browser annotations. This program also provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface for visualizing and summarizing the correlation of DNA copy number changes and RNA expression patterns from a set of experiments. In addition, CGI uses a Java applet to display the copy number values of a specific BAC clone in aCGH experiments side by side with the expression levels of genes that are mapped back to that BAC clone from the microarray experiments. The CGI program is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for biologists. It is cross-platform compatible and the source code is freely available under the General Public License.

  9. CGI: Java Software for Mapping and Visualizing Data from Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization and Expression Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Xiuweu-Xu Gu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing application of various genomic technologies in biomedical research, there is a need to integrate these data to correlate candidate genes/regions that are identified by different genomic platforms. Although there are tools that can analyze data from individual platforms, essential software for integration of genomic data is still lacking. Here, we present a novel Java-based program called CGI (Cytogenetics-Genomics Integrator that matches the BAC clones from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to genes from RNA expression profiling datasets. The matching is computed via a fast, backend MySQL database containing UCSC Genome Browser annotations. This program also provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface for visualizing and summarizing the correlation of DNA copy number changes and RNA expression patterns from a set of experiments. In addition, CGI uses a Java applet to display the copy number values of a specifi c BAC clone in aCGH experiments side by side with the expression levels of genes that are mapped back to that BAC clone from the microarray experiments. The CGI program is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for biologists. It is cross-platform compatible and the source code is freely available under the General Public License.

  10. Array based characterization of a terminal deletion involving chromosome subband 15q26.2: an emerging syndrome associated with growth retardation, cardiac defects and developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkhem Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric regions are gene rich and deletions in these chromosomal segments have been demonstrated to account for approximately 2.5% of patients displaying mental retardation with or without association of dysmorphic features. However, cases that report de novo terminal deletions on chromosome arm 15q are rare. Methods In this study we present the first example of a detailed molecular genetic mapping of a de novo deletion in involving 15q26.2-qter, caused by the formation of a dicentric chromosome 15, using metaphase FISH and tiling resolution (32 k genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Results After an initial characterization of the dicentric chromosome by metaphase FISH, array CGH analysis mapped the terminal deletion to encompass a 6.48 megabase (Mb region, ranging from 93.86–100.34 Mb on chromosome 15. Conclusion In conclusion, we present an additional case to the growing family of reported cases with 15q26-deletion, thoroughly characterized at the molecular cytogenetic level. In the deleted regions, four candidate genes responsible for the phenotype of the patient could be delineated: IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3. Further characterization of additional patients harboring similar 15q-aberrations might hopefully in the future lead to the description of a clear cut clinically recognizable syndrome.

  11. Replicate high-density rat genome oligonucleotide microarrays reveal hundreds of regulated genes in the dorsal root ganglion after peripheral nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannion James W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat oligonucleotide microarrays were used to detect changes in gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG 3 days following sciatic nerve transection (axotomy. Two comparisons were made using two sets of triplicate microarrays, naïve versus naïve and naïve versus axotomy. Results Microarray variability was assessed using the naïve versus naïve comparison. These results support use of a P 1.5-fold expression change and P 1.5-fold and P in situ hybridization verified the expression of 24 transcripts. These data showed an 83% concordance rate with the arrays; most mismatches represent genes with low expression levels reflecting limits of array sensitivity. A significant correlation was found between actual mRNA differences and relative changes between microarrays (r2 = 0.8567. Temporal patterns of individual genes regulation varied. Conclusions We identify parameters for microarray analysis which reduce error while identifying many putatively regulated genes. Functional classification of these genes suggest reorganization of cell structural components, activation of genes expressed by immune and inflammatory cells and down-regulation of genes involved in neurotransmission.

  12. Application of hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE) to assess relative abundances of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso; Cheng, Hong; Harb, Moustapha; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2017-01-01

    for ensuring the efficiency of nitrification in water treatment systems. Hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE), previously developed to rapidly quantify relative abundances of specific microbial groups of interest, was applied in this study

  13. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little...

  14. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  15. Dose-Dependent Lowering of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides in Huntington Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C; Roos, Raymund A C; de Bot, Susanne T

    2018-04-01

    On December 11 of 2017, Ionis Pharmaceuticals published a press release announcing dose-dependent reductions of mutant huntingtin protein in their HTTRx Phase 1/2a study in Huntington disease (HD) patients. The results from this Ionis trial have gained much attention from the patient community and the oligonucleotide therapeutics field, since it is the first trial targeting the cause of HD, namely the mutant huntingtin protein, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). The press release also states that the primary endpoints of the study (safety and tolerability) were met, but does not contain data. This news follows the approval of another therapeutic ASO nusinersen (trade name Spinraza) for a neurological disease, spinal muscular atrophy, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, in 2016 and 2017, respectively. Combined, this offers hope for the development of the HTTRx therapy for HD patients.

  16. Characterization of rat brain NCAM mRNA using DNA oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Gaardsvoll, H; Giladi, E

    1990-01-01

    A number of different isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been identified. The difference between these is due to alternative splicing of a single NCAM gene. In rat brain NCAM mRNAs with sizes of 7.4, 6.7, 5.2, 4.3 and 2.9 kb have been reported. We have synthesized six DNA...... oligonucleotides, that hybridize to different exons in the NCAM gene. Furthermore we have constructed three oligonucleotides, that exclusively hybridize to mRNAs lacking certain exons, by letting them consist of sequences adjacent to both sides of the splice sites. By means of these probes we have characterized...... the five NCAM mRNAs in rat brain....

  17. Single-Labeled Oligonucleotides Showing Fluorescence Changes upon Hybridization with Target Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Tae Hwang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific detection of nucleic acids has been intensively studied in the field of molecular diagnostics. In particular, the detection and analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs is crucial for the identification of disease-causing genes and diagnosis of diseases. Sequence-specific hybridization probes, such as molecular beacons bearing the fluorophore and quencher at both ends of the stem, have been developed to enable DNA mutation detection. Interestingly, DNA mutations can be detected using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes with only one fluorophore. This review summarizes recent research on single-labeled oligonucleotide probes that exhibit fluorescence changes after encountering target nucleic acids, such as guanine-quenching probes, cyanine-containing probes, probes containing a fluorophore-labeled base, and microenvironment-sensitive probes.

  18. LNA-modified oligonucleotides mediate specific inhibition of microRNA function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørom, Ulf Andersson; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H

    2006-01-01

    microRNAs are short, endogenous non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression. Important functions for microRNAs have been found in the regulation of development, cellular proliferation and differentiation, while perturbed miRNA expression patterns have been...... observed in many human cancers. Here we present a method for specific inhibition of miRNA function through interaction with LNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides and report the specificity of this application. We show that LNA-modified oligonucleotides can inhibit exogenously introduced miRNAs with high...... specificity using a heterologous reporter assay, and furthermore demonstrate their ability to inhibit an endogenous miRNA in Drosophila melanogaster cells, leading to up-regulation of the cognate target protein. The method shows stoichiometric and reliable inhibition of the targeted miRNA and can thus...

  19. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-01-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed prelim...

  20. Oligonucleotide fishing for STAT6: cross-talk between IL-4 and chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K W; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K

    2001-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is essential for the biological activities of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and the development of allergic responses in mice. Here we report on a sensitive and specific assay for STAT6 activation in response to IL-4. We took advantage of double-s...... activation, whereas other chemokines and cytokines do not. In conclusion, our data show that oligonucleotide fishing is a supplementary tool for studying cytokine cross-talk at a genomic level....

  1. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  2. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  3. Genome dynamics of short oligonucleotides: the example of bacterial DNA uptake enhancing sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Bakkali

    Full Text Available Among the many bacteria naturally competent for transformation by DNA uptake-a phenomenon with significant clinical and financial implications- Pasteurellaceae and Neisseriaceae species preferentially take up DNA containing specific short sequences. The genomic overrepresentation of these DNA uptake enhancing sequences (DUES causes preferential uptake of conspecific DNA, but the function(s behind this overrepresentation and its evolution are still a matter for discovery. Here I analyze DUES genome dynamics and evolution and test the validity of the results to other selectively constrained oligonucleotides. I use statistical methods and computer simulations to examine DUESs accumulation in Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomes. I analyze DUESs sequence and nucleotide frequencies, as well as those of all their mismatched forms, and prove the dependence of DUESs genomic overrepresentation on their preferential uptake by quantifying and correlating both characteristics. I then argue that mutation, uptake bias, and weak selection against DUESs in less constrained parts of the genome combined are sufficient enough to cause DUESs accumulation in susceptible parts of the genome with no need for other DUES function. The distribution of overrepresentation values across sequences with different mismatch loads compared to the DUES suggests a gradual yet not linear molecular drive of DNA sequences depending on their similarity to the DUES. Other genomically overrepresented sequences, both pro- and eukaryotic, show similar distribution of frequencies suggesting that the molecular drive reported above applies to other frequent oligonucleotides. Rare oligonucleotides, however, seem to be gradually drawn to genomic underrepresentation, thus, suggesting a molecular drag. To my knowledge this work provides the first clear evidence of the gradual evolution of selectively constrained oligonucleotides, including repeated, palindromic and protein

  4. Hetero-oligonucleotide Nanoscale Tiles Capable of Two-Dimensional Lattice Formation as Testbeds for a Rapid, Affordable Purification Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    devices; however, DNA is not the only polymer that can take advantage of the specicity of the Watson – Crick base-pair to achieve these goals. Central to...14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: New nanoscale hetero-oligonucleotide tiles are assembled from DNA , RNA and morpholino oligos and...purified using size exclusion filtration. Homo-oligonucleotide tiles assembled from RP-cartridge processed DNA oligos are purified by nondenaturing gel

  5. Selective Detection of Peptide-Oligonucleotide Heteroconjugates Utilizing Capillary HPLC-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catron, Brittany; Caruso, Joseph A.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2012-06-01

    A method for the selective detection and quantification of peptide:oligonucleotide heteroconjugates, such as those generated by protein:nucleic acid cross-links, using capillary reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (cap-RPHPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (ICPMS) is described. The selective detection of phosphorus as 31P+, the only natural isotope, in peptide-oligonucleotide heteroconjugates is enabled by the elemental detection capabilities of the ICPMS. Mobile phase conditions that allow separation of heteroconjugates while maintaining ICPMS compatibility were investigated. We found that trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) mobile phases, used in conventional peptide separations, and hexafluoroisopropanol/triethylamine (HFIP/TEA) mobile phases, used in conventional oligonucleotide separations, both are compatible with ICPMS and enable heteroconjugate separation. The TFA-based separations yielded limits of detection (LOD) of ~40 ppb phosphorus, which is nearly seven times lower than the LOD for HFIP/TEA-based separations. Using the TFA mobile phase, 1-2 pmol of a model heteroconjugate were routinely separated and detected by this optimized capLC-ICPMS method.

  6. Optical properties and electronic transitions of DNA oligonucleotides as a function of composition and stacking sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimelman, Jacob B; Dryden, Daniel M; Poudel, Lokendra; Krawiec, Katherine E; Ma, Yingfang; Podgornik, Rudolf; Parsegian, V Adrian; Denoyer, Linda K; Ching, Wai-Yim; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H

    2015-02-14

    The role of base pair composition and stacking sequence in the optical properties and electronic transitions of DNA is of fundamental interest. We present and compare the optical properties of DNA oligonucleotides (AT)10, (AT)5(GC)5, and (AT-GC)5 using both ab initio methods and UV-vis molar absorbance measurements. Our data indicate a strong dependence of both the position and intensity of UV absorbance features on oligonucleotide composition and stacking sequence. The partial densities of states for each oligonucleotide indicate that the valence band edge arises from a feature associated with the PO4(3-) complex anion, and the conduction band edge arises from anti-bonding states in DNA base pairs. The results show a strong correspondence between the ab initio and experimentally determined optical properties. These results highlight the benefit of full spectral analysis of DNA, as opposed to reductive methods that consider only the 260 nm absorbance (A260) or simple purity ratios, such as A260/A230 or A260/A280, and suggest that the slope of the absorption edge onset may provide a useful metric for the degree of base pair stacking in DNA. These insights may prove useful for applications in biology, bioelectronics, and mesoscale self-assembly.

  7. Diamond cubic phase of monoolein and water as an amphiphilic matrix for electrophoresis of oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Nils; Winge, Ann-Sofie; Engström, Sven; Akerman, Björn

    2005-10-06

    We used a cubic liquid crystal formed by the nonionic monoglyceride monoolein and water as a porous matrix for the electrophoresis of oligonucleotides. The diamond cubic phase is thermodynamically stable when in contact with a water-rich phase, which we exploit to run the electrophoresis in the useful submarine mode. Oligonucleotides are separated according to size and secondary structure by migration through the space-filling aqueous nanometer pores of the regular liquid crystal, but the comparatively slow migration means the cubic phase will not be a replacement for the conventional DNA gels. However, our demonstration that the cubic phase can be used in submarine electrophoresis opens up the possibility for a new matrix for electrophoresis of amphiphilic molecules. From this perspective, the results on the oligonucleotides show that water-soluble particles of nanometer size, typical for the hydrophilic parts of membrane-bound proteins, may be a useful separation motif. A charged contamination in the commercial sample of monoolein, most likely oleic acid that arises from its hydrolysis, restricts useful buffer conditions to a pH below 5.6.

  8. 18F-labelling of oligonucleotides using succinimido 4-[18F]fluorobenzoat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, Elisabeth; Laangstroem, Bengt

    1998-01-01

    A general method for the labelling of oligodeoxynucleotide and oligonucleoside phosphorothioates in the 5'-position with the positron-emitting radionuclide 18 F (t 1/2 = 110 min) is described. The label was incorporated by the reaction of succinimido 4 -[ 18 F]fluorobenzoate 4 with oligonucleotides (18- and 20-mers) modified in the 5'-position with a hexylamine linker. Oligodeoxynucleotides 5'-GCT,AAG,CGA,TGC,CTC,CGT-3' (MTCa) and 5'-GAA,CCT,CTG,AGA,GTT,CAT,CT-3' (CROa) were labelled in 20±3 % (MTCa) and 13±3 % (CROa) radiochemical yields (non-isolated, decay-corrected and based on 4). Oligonucleoside phosphorotioates MTCa (S-MTCa) and CROa (S-CROa) were labelled in 9 and 7% isolated radiochemical yield, respectively (decay-corrected and based on 4). Labelled oligonucleotides and phosphorothioate analogues were separated from their unlabelled counterparts using reversed-phase perfusion chromatography. The molecular mass of a labelled oligonucleotide CROa was determined by ESI-MS after a mixed 18 F/ 19 F fluorobenzoate labelling experiment and corresponded with the expected structure. (au)

  9. Sequence-Dependent Mechanism of DNA Oligonucleotide Dehybridization Resolved through Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanstead, Paul J; Stevenson, Paul; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-09-14

    Despite its important role in biology and nanotechnology, many questions remain regarding the molecular mechanism and dynamics by which oligonucleotides recognize and hybridize to their complementary sequence. The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA oligonucleotide hybridization and dehybridization are often assumed to involve an all-or-nothing two-state dissociation pathway, but deviations from this behavior can be considerable even for short sequences. We introduce a new strategy to characterize the base-pair-specific thermal dissociation mechanism of DNA oligonucleotides through steady-state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Experiments are interpreted with a lattice model to provide a structure-specific interpretation. This method is applied to a model set of self-complementary 10-base-pair sequences in which the placement of GC base pairs is varied in an otherwise AT strand. Through a combination of Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, experiments reveal varying degrees of deviation from simple two-state behavior. As the temperature is increased, duplexes dissociate through a path in which the terminal bases fray, without any significant contribution from loop configurations. Transient temperature jump experiments reveal time scales of 70-100 ns for fraying and 10-30 μs for complete dissociation near the melting temperature. Whether or not frayed states are metastable intermediates or short-lived configurations during the full dissociation of the duplex is dictated by the nucleobase sequence.

  10. i-Genome: A database to summarize oligonucleotide data in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yu-Chung

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of sequence features in genomes is crucial to comparative genomics, evolutionary analysis, the analyses of regulatory sequences and the quantitative evaluation of sequences. Computing the frequencies and the occurrences of a pattern in complete genomes is time-consuming. Results The proposed database provides information about sequence features generated by exhaustively computing the sequences of the complete genome. The repetitive elements in the eukaryotic genomes, such as LINEs, SINEs, Alu and LTR, are obtained from Repbase. The database supports various complete genomes including human, yeast, worm, and 128 microbial genomes. Conclusions This investigation presents and implements an efficiently computational approach to accumulate the occurrences of the oligonucleotides or patterns in complete genomes. A database is established to maintain the information of the sequence features, including the distributions of oligonucleotide, the gene distribution, the distribution of repetitive elements in genomes and the occurrences of the oligonucleotides. The database can provide more effective and efficient way to access the repetitive features in genomes.

  11. Specificity tests of an oligonucleotide probe against food-outbreak salmonella for biosensor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-H.; Horikawa, S.; Xi, J.; Wikle, H. C.; Barbaree, J. M.; Chin, B. A.

    2017-05-01

    Phage based magneto-elastic (ME) biosensors have been shown to be able to rapidly detect Salmonella in various food systems to serve food pathogen monitoring purposes. In this ME biosensor platform, the free-standing strip-shaped magneto-elastic sensor is the transducer and the phage probe that recognizes Salmonella in food serves as the bio-recognition element. According to Sorokulova et al. at 2005, a developed oligonucleotide probe E2 was reported to have high specificity to Salmonella enterica Typhimurium. In the report, the specificity tests were focused in most of Enterobacterace groups outside of Salmonella family. Here, to understand the specificity of phage E2 to different Salmonella enterica serotypes within Salmonella Family, we further tested the specificity of the phage probe to thirty-two Salmonella serotypes that were present in the major foodborne outbreaks during the past ten years (according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). The tests were conducted through an Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) format. This assay can mimic probe immobilized conditions on the magnetoelastic biosensor platform and also enable to study the binding specificity of oligonucleotide probes toward different Salmonella while avoiding phage/ sensor lot variations. Test results confirmed that this oligonucleotide probe E2 was high specific to Salmonella Typhimurium cells but showed cross reactivity to Salmonella Tennessee and four other serotypes among the thirty-two tested Salmonella serotypes.

  12. Development of Multiexon Skipping Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable, X-linked progressive muscle degenerative disorder that results from the absence of dystrophin protein and leads to premature death in affected individuals due to respiratory and/or cardiac failure typically by age of 30. Very recently the exciting prospect of an effective oligonucleotide therapy has emerged which restores dystrophin protein expression to affected tissues in DMD patients with highly promising data from a series of clinical trials. This therapeutic approach is highly mutation specific and thus is personalised. Therefore DMD has emerged as a model genetic disorder for understanding and overcoming of the challenges of developing personalised genetic medicines. One of the greatest weaknesses of the current oligonucleotide approach is that it is a mutation-specific therapy. To address this limitation, we have recently demonstrated that exons 45–55 skipping therapy has the potential to treat clusters of mutations that cause DMD, which could significantly reduce the number of compounds that would need to be developed in order to successfully treat all DMD patients. Here we discuss and review the latest preclinical work in this area as well as a variety of accompanying issues, including efficacy and potential toxicity of antisense oligonucleotides, prior to human clinical trials. PMID:23984357

  13. Structural properties of oligonucleotide monolayers on gold surfaces probed by fluorescence investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2004-11-09

    We present optical investigations on the conformation of oligonucleotide layers on Au surfaces. Our studies concentrate on the effect of varying surface coverage densities on the structural properties of layers of 12- and 24mer single-stranded DNA, tethered to the Au surface at one end while being labeled with a fluorescent marker at the opposing end. The distance-dependent energy transfer from the marker dye to the metal surface, which causes quenching of the observed fluorescence, is used to provide information on the orientation of the DNA strands relative to the surface. Variations in the oligonucleotide coverage density, as determined from electrochemical quantification, over 2 orders of magnitude are achieved by employing different preparation conditions. The observed enhancement in fluorescence intensity with increasing DNA coverage can be related to a model involving mutual steric interactions of oligonucleotides on the surface, as well as fluorescence quenching theory. Finally, the applicability of the presented concepts for investigations of heterogeneous monolayers is demonstrated by means of studying the coadsorption of mercaptohexanol onto DNA-modified Au surfaces.

  14. Ultrasensitive Detection of Ebola Virus Oligonucleotide Based on Upconversion Nanoprobe/Nanoporous Membrane System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ming-Kiu; Ye, WeiWei; Wang, Guojing; Li, Jingming; Yang, Mo; Hao, Jianhua

    2016-01-26

    Ebola outbreaks are currently of great concern, and therefore, development of effective diagnosis methods is urgently needed. The key for lethal virus detection is high sensitivity, since early-stage detection of virus may increase the probability of survival. Here, we propose a luminescence scheme of assay consisting of BaGdF5:Yb/Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) conjugated with oligonucleotide probe and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) linked with target Ebola virus oligonucleotide. As a proof of concept, a homogeneous assay was fabricated and tested, yielding a detection limit at picomolar level. The luminescence resonance energy transfer is ascribed to the spectral overlapping of upconversion luminescence and the absorption characteristics of AuNPs. Moreover, we anchored the UCNPs and AuNPs on a nanoporous alumina (NAAO) membrane to form a heterogeneous assay. Importantly, the detection limit was greatly improved, exhibiting a remarkable value at the femtomolar level. The enhancement is attributed to the increased light-matter interaction throughout the nanopore walls of the NAAO membrane. The specificity test suggested that the nanoprobes were specific to Ebola virus oligonucleotides. The strategy combining UCNPs, AuNPs, and NAAO membrane provides new insight into low-cost, rapid, and ultrasensitive detection of different diseases. Furthermore, we explored the feasibility of clinical application by using inactivated Ebola virus samples. The detection results showed great potential of our heterogeneous design for practical application.

  15. Fabrication of DNA nanotubes with an array of exterior magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Adele; Zarrabi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2017-10-01

    Described here a methodology for arraying of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on the surface of DNA nanotubes (DNTs). Positioning of magnetic nanoparticles at exterior surface of DNTs were shaped after self-assembling of oligonucleotide staples within an M13mp18 DNA scaffold via an origami process. The staples were partially labeled with biotin to be arrayed at the surface of DNTs. Gel retardation assay of the DNTs carrying magnetic nanoparticles indicated a reversely behavioral electrophoretic movement in comparison to the nanotubes have been demonstrated previously. Also, high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed positioning magnetic nanoparticles at the exterior surface of DNTs, correctly. Ultrastructural characteristics of these DNA nanotubes using atomic force microscopy demonstrated topographic heights on their surfaces formed through positioning of magnetic nanoparticles outside the tubules. This nanoarchitecture would be potential for multiple arraying of nanoparticles that those be useful as functionalized chimeric nanocarriers for developing novel nanodrugs and nanobiosensors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev Hansen, J.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this review we intend to cover recent work involving arrays of Josephson junctions. The work on such arrays falls naturally into three main areas of interest: 1. Technical applications of Josephson junction arrays for high-frequency devices. 2. Experimental studies of 2-D model systems (Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition, commensurate-incommensurate transition in frustrated (flux) lattices). 3. Investigations of phenomena associated with non-equilibrium superconductivity in and around Josephson junctions (with high current density). (orig./BUD)

  18. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  19. Characterization of canine osteosarcoma by array comparative genomic hybridization and RT-qPCR: signatures of genomic imbalance in canine osteosarcoma parallel the human counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstadt, Andrea Y; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Thomas, Rachael; Kisseberth, William C; Guillermo Couto, C; Duval, Dawn L; Nielsen, Dahlia M; Modiano, Jaime F; Breen, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most commonly diagnosed malignant bone tumor in humans and dogs, characterized in both species by extremely complex karyotypes exhibiting high frequencies of genomic imbalance. Evaluation of genomic signatures in human OS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has assisted in uncovering genetic mechanisms that result in disease phenotype. Previous low-resolution (10-20 Mb) aCGH analysis of canine OS identified a wide range of recurrent DNA copy number aberrations, indicating extensive genomic instability. In this study, we profiled 123 canine OS tumors by 1 Mb-resolution aCGH to generate a dataset for direct comparison with current data for human OS, concluding that several high frequency aberrations in canine and human OS are orthologous. To ensure complete coverage of gene annotation, we identified the human refseq genes that map to these orthologous aberrant dog regions and found several candidate genes warranting evaluation for OS involvement. Specifically, subsequenct FISH and qRT-PCR analysis of RUNX2, TUSC3, and PTEN indicated that expression levels correlated with genomic copy number status, showcasing RUNX2 as an OS associated gene and TUSC3 as a possible tumor suppressor candidate. Together these data demonstrate the ability of genomic comparative oncology to identify genetic abberations which may be important for OS progression. Large scale screening of genomic imbalance in canine OS further validates the use of the dog as a suitable model for human cancers, supporting the idea that dysregulation discovered in canine cancers will provide an avenue for complementary study in human counterparts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  1. The EUROBALL array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of the multidetector array EUROBALL is described, with emphasis on the history and formal organization of the related European collaboration. The detector layout is presented together with the electronics and Data Acquisition capabilities. The status of the instrument, its performances and the main features of some recently developed ancillary detectors will also be described. The EUROBALL array is operational in Legnaro National Laboratory (Italy) since April 1997 and is expected to run up to November 1998. The array represents a significant improvement in detector efficiency and sensitivity with respect to the previous generation of multidetector arrays

  2. Rectenna array measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining were demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  3. Arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual; Sales, Salvador; Pastor, Daniel; Ortega, Beatriz; Martinez, Alfonso

    2003-02-01

    We present a novel device, an arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer, that combines the flexibility of arrayed waveguides and the wide application range of fiber or integrated optics Sagnac loops. We form the device by closing an array of wavelength-selective light paths provided by two arrayed waveguides with a single 2 x 2 coupler in a Sagnac configuration. The equations that describe the device's operation in general conditions are derived. A preliminary experimental demonstration is provided of a fiber prototype in passive operation that shows good agreement with the expected theoretical performance. Potential applications of the device in nonlinear operation are outlined and discussed.

  4. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  5. DETECTING LOW-LEVEL SYNTHESIS IMPURITIES IN MODIFIED PHOSPHOROTHIOATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY – HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Wyrzykiewicz, Tadeusz K.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary An LC-MS method based on the use of high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS) for profiling oligonucleotides synthesis impurities is described. Oligonucleotide phosphorothioatediesters (phosphorothioate oligonucleotides), in which one of the non-bridging oxygen atoms at each phosphorus center is replaced by a sulfur atom, are now one of the most popular oligonucleotide modifications due to their ease of chemical synthesis and advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Despite significant progress in the solid-phase oligomerization chemistry used in the manufacturing of these oligonucleotides, multiple classes of low-level impurities always accompany synthetic oligonucleotides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for the identification of these synthesis impurities. However, impurity profiling, where the entire complement of low-level synthetic impurities is identified in a single analysis, is more challenging. Here we present an LC-MS method based the use of high resolution-mass spectrometry, specifically Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS or FTMS). The optimal LC-FTMS conditions, including the stationary phase and mobile phases for the separation and identification of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were found. The characteristics of FTMS enable charge state determination from single m/z values of low-level impurities. Charge state information then enables more accurate modeling of the detected isotopic distribution for identification of the chemical composition of the detected impurity. Using this approach, a number of phosphorothioate impurities can be detected by LC-FTMS including failure sequences carrying 3′-terminal phosphate monoester and 3′-terminal phosphorothioate monoester, incomplete backbone sulfurization and desulfurization products, high molecular weight impurities, and chloral, isobutyryl, and N3 (2-cyanoethyl) adducts

  6. Short locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides potently reduce apolipoprotein B mRNA and serum cholesterol in mice and non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Fisker, Niels; Hedtjärn, Maj

    2010-01-01

    -life as longer oligonucleotides. Pharmacology studies in both mice and non-human primates were conducted with a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide against apoB, and the data showed that repeated dosing of the 13-mer at 1-2 mg/kg/week was sufficient to provide a significant and long lasting lowering of non...... using the LNA chemistry. Conclusively, we present a 13-mer LNA oligonucleotide with therapeutic potential that produce beneficial cholesterol lowering effect in non-human primates....

  7. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  8. ISS Solar Array Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  9. Development and production of an oligonucleotide MuscleChip: use for validation of ambiguous ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the development, validation, and use of a highly redundant 120,000 oligonucleotide microarray (MuscleChip containing 4,601 probe sets representing 1,150 known genes expressed in muscle and 2,075 EST clusters from a non-normalized subtracted muscle EST sequencing project (28,074 EST sequences. This set included 369 novel EST clusters showing no match to previously characterized proteins in any database. Each probe set was designed to contain 20–32 25 mer oligonucleotides (10–16 paired perfect match and mismatch probe pairs per gene, with each probe evaluated for hybridization kinetics (Tm and similarity to other sequences. The 120,000 oligonucleotides were synthesized by photolithography and light-activated chemistry on each microarray. Results Hybridization of human muscle cRNAs to this MuscleChip (33 samples showed a correlation of 0.6 between the number of ESTs sequenced in each cluster and hybridization intensity. Out of 369 novel EST clusters not showing any similarity to previously characterized proteins, we focused on 250 EST clusters that were represented by robust probe sets on the MuscleChip fulfilling all stringent rules. 102 (41% were found to be consistently "present" by analysis of hybridization to human muscle RNA, of which 40 ESTs (39% could be genome anchored to potential transcription units in the human genome sequence. 19 ESTs of the 40 ESTs were furthermore computer-predicted as exons by one or more than three gene identification algorithms. Conclusion Our analysis found 40 transcriptionally validated, genome-anchored novel EST clusters to be expressed in human muscle. As most of these ESTs were low copy clusters (duplex and triplex in the original 28,000 EST project, the identification of these as significantly expressed is a robust validation of the transcript units that permits subsequent focus on the novel proteins encoded by these genes.

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor based on the oligonucleotide self-assembled monolayer-mediated immunosensing interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dengyou; Luo, Qimei [Science College of Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Deng, Fawen [The Fourth Hospital of Chansha, Changsha 410006 (China); Li, Zhen [Science College of Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Li, Benxiang, E-mail: 172170960@qq.com [Science College of Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Shen, Zhifa, E-mail: shenzhifa@wmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medicine, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, College of Laboratory Medicine and Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2017-06-08

    Highly sensitive and selective quantitation of a variety of proteins over a wide concentration range is highly desirable for increased accuracy of biomarker detection or for multidisease diagnostics. In the present contribution, using human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) as the model target protein, an electrochemical ultrasensitive immunosensing platform was developed based on the oligonucleotide self-assembled monolayer-mediated (OSAM) sensing interface. For this immunosensor, the “signal-on” signaling mechanism and enzymatic signal amplification effect were integrated into one sensing architecture. Moreover, the thiolated flexible single-stranded DNAs immobilized onto gold electrode surface not only performs the wobbling motion to facilitate the electron transfer between the electrode surface and biosensing layer but also fundamentally prohibiting the direct interaction of proteins with gold substrate. Thus, the electrochemical signal could be efficiently enhanced and the unspecific adsorption or cross-reaction might be eliminated. As a result, utilizing the newly-proposed immunosensor, the HIgG can be detected down to 0.5 ng/mL, and the high detection specificity is offered. The successful design of OSAM and the highly desirable detection capability of new immunosensor are expected to provide a perspective for fabricating new robust immunosensing platform and for promising potential of oligonucleotide probe in biological research and biomedical diagnosis. - Highlights: • An electrochemical ultrasensitive immunosensing platform was developed based on the oligonucleotide self-assembled monolayer (OASM). • OASM severs as a flexible monolayer to promote electron transfer and prohibits the direct interaction of proteins with gold substrate. • The electrochemical signal is efficiently enhanced and the unspecific adsorption or cross-reaction is eliminated. • Target protein can be detected down to 0.5 ng/mL, and the high detection specificity can be obtained.

  11. Structure Activity Relationships of α-L-LNA Modified Phosphorothioate Gapmer Antisense Oligonucleotides in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit P Seth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the structure activity relationships of short 14-mer phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs modified with α-L-locked nucleic acid (LNA and related modifications targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN messenger RNA in mice. α-L-LNA represents the α-anomer of enantio-LNA and modified oligonucleotides show LNA like binding affinity for complementary RNA. In contrast to sequence matched LNA gapmer ASOs which showed elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels indicative of hepatotoxicity, gapmer ASOs modified with α-L-LNA and related analogs in the flanks showed potent downregulation of PTEN messenger RNA in liver tissue without producing elevations in plasma ALT levels. However, the α-L-LNA ASO showed a moderate dose-dependent increase in liver and spleen weights suggesting a higher propensity for immune stimulation. Interestingly, replacing α-L-LNA nucleotides in the 3′- and 5′-flanks with R-5′-Me-α-L-LNA but not R-6′-Me- or 3′-Me-α-L-LNA nucleotides, reversed the drug induced increase in organ weights. Examination of structural models of dinucleotide units suggested that the 5′-Me group increases steric bulk in close proximity to the phosphorothioate backbone or produces subtle changes in the backbone conformation which could interfere with recognition of the ASO by putative immune receptors. Our data suggests that introducing steric bulk at the 5′-position of the sugar-phosphate backbone could be a general strategy to mitigate the immunostimulatory profile of oligonucleotide drugs. In a clinical setting, proinflammatory effects manifest themselves as injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. Thus, a mitigation of these effects could increase patient comfort and compliance when treated with ASOs.

  12. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A.; Chung, Michael H.; Kiarie, James N.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR) variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1) lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2) amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3) ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4) analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD). The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A) in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories. PMID:26751207

  13. NAA-modified DNA oligonucleotides with zwitterionic backbones: stereoselective synthesis of A-T phosphoramidite building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtgall, Boris; Höbartner, Claudia; Ducho, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of the nucleic acid backbone are essential for the development of oligonucleotide-derived bioactive agents. The NAA-modification represents a novel artificial internucleotide linkage which enables the site-specific introduction of positive charges into the otherwise polyanionic backbone of DNA oligonucleotides. Following initial studies with the introduction of the NAA-linkage at T-T sites, it is now envisioned to prepare NAA-modified oligonucleotides bearing the modification at X-T motifs (X = A, C, G). We have therefore developed the efficient and stereoselective synthesis of NAA-linked 'dimeric' A-T phosphoramidite building blocks for automated DNA synthesis. Both the (S)- and the (R)-configured NAA-motifs were constructed with high diastereoselectivities to furnish two different phosphoramidite reagents, which were employed for the solid phase-supported automated synthesis of two NAA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. This represents a significant step to further establish the NAA-linkage as a useful addition to the existing 'toolbox' of backbone modifications for the design of bioactive oligonucleotide analogues.

  14. Resolving prokaryotic taxonomy without rRNA: longer oligonucleotide word lengths improve genome and metagenome taxonomic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Eric B; Raymond, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide signatures, especially tetranucleotide signatures, have been used as method for homology binning by exploiting an organism's inherent biases towards the use of specific oligonucleotide words. Tetranucleotide signatures have been especially useful in environmental metagenomics samples as many of these samples contain organisms from poorly classified phyla which cannot be easily identified using traditional homology methods, including NCBI BLAST. This study examines oligonucleotide signatures across 1,424 completed genomes from across the tree of life, substantially expanding upon previous work. A comprehensive analysis of mononucleotide through nonanucleotide word lengths suggests that longer word lengths substantially improve the classification of DNA fragments across a range of sizes of relevance to high throughput sequencing. We find that, at present, heptanucleotide signatures represent an optimal balance between prediction accuracy and computational time for resolving taxonomy using both genomic and metagenomic fragments. We directly compare the ability of tetranucleotide and heptanucleotide world lengths (tetranucleotide signatures are the current standard for oligonucleotide word usage analyses) for taxonomic binning of metagenome reads. We present evidence that heptanucleotide word lengths consistently provide more taxonomic resolving power, particularly in distinguishing between closely related organisms that are often present in metagenomic samples. This implies that longer oligonucleotide word lengths should replace tetranucleotide signatures for most analyses. Finally, we show that the application of longer word lengths to metagenomic datasets leads to more accurate taxonomic binning of DNA scaffolds and have the potential to substantially improve taxonomic assignment and assembly of metagenomic data.

  15. Resolving prokaryotic taxonomy without rRNA: longer oligonucleotide word lengths improve genome and metagenome taxonomic classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric B Alsop

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide signatures, especially tetranucleotide signatures, have been used as method for homology binning by exploiting an organism's inherent biases towards the use of specific oligonucleotide words. Tetranucleotide signatures have been especially useful in environmental metagenomics samples as many of these samples contain organisms from poorly classified phyla which cannot be easily identified using traditional homology methods, including NCBI BLAST. This study examines oligonucleotide signatures across 1,424 completed genomes from across the tree of life, substantially expanding upon previous work. A comprehensive analysis of mononucleotide through nonanucleotide word lengths suggests that longer word lengths substantially improve the classification of DNA fragments across a range of sizes of relevance to high throughput sequencing. We find that, at present, heptanucleotide signatures represent an optimal balance between prediction accuracy and computational time for resolving taxonomy using both genomic and metagenomic fragments. We directly compare the ability of tetranucleotide and heptanucleotide world lengths (tetranucleotide signatures are the current standard for oligonucleotide word usage analyses for taxonomic binning of metagenome reads. We present evidence that heptanucleotide word lengths consistently provide more taxonomic resolving power, particularly in distinguishing between closely related organisms that are often present in metagenomic samples. This implies that longer oligonucleotide word lengths should replace tetranucleotide signatures for most analyses. Finally, we show that the application of longer word lengths to metagenomic datasets leads to more accurate taxonomic binning of DNA scaffolds and have the potential to substantially improve taxonomic assignment and assembly of metagenomic data.

  16. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, E.F.J. de E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@pet.azg.nl; Vroegh, Joke; Elsinga, P.H.; Vaalburg, Willem

    2003-04-01

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons, {alpha}-bromo-{alpha}'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-m-xylene and N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide were found to be the most promising. Labeling with the former synthon was less complicated and time consuming and gave higher uncorrected overall yields. The latter synthon required smaller amounts of the costly precursor to achieve acceptable labeling yields.

  17. Chemosensitization of Human Renal Cell Cancer Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Antiapoptotic Gene Clusterin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zellweger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal cell cancer (RCC is a chemoresistant disease with no active chemotherapeutic agent achieving objective response rates higher than 15%. Clusterin is a cell survival gene that increases in human renal tubular epithelial cells after various states of injury and disease. Downregulation of clusterin, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, has recently been shown to increase chemosensitivity in several prostate cancer models. The objectives in this study were to evaluate clusterin expression levels in human RCC and normal kidney tissue, and to test whether clusterin ASO could also enhance chemosensitivity in human RCC Caki-2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used to characterize clusterin expression in 67 RCC and normal kidney tissues obtained from radical nephrectomy specimens. Northern blot analysis was used to assess changes in clusterin mRNA expression after ASO and paclitaxel treatment. The effects of combined clusterin ASO and paclitaxel treatment on Caki-2 cell growth was examined using an MTT assay. Athymic mice bearing Caki-2 tumors were treated with clusterin ASO alone, clusterin ASO plus paclitaxel, and mismatch control oligonucleotides plus paclitaxel, over a period of 28 days with measurement of tumor volumes once weekly over 8 weeks. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry of normal and malignant kidney tissue sections of 67 patients demonstrated positive clusterin staining for almost all RCC (98% and an overexpression, compared to normal tissue, in a majority of RCC (69%. Clusterin ASO, but not mismatch control oligonucleotides, decreased clusterin mRNA expression in Caki-2 cells in a dosedependent and sequence-specific manner. Pretreatment of Caki-2 cells with clusterin ASO significantly enhanced chemosensitivity to paclitaxel in vitro. Characteristic apoptotic DNA laddering was observed after combined treatment with ASO plus paclitaxel, but not with either agent alone. In vivo

  18. A New Achiral Linker Reagent for the Incorporation of Multiple Amino Groups Into Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new functionalized achiral linker reagent for incorporating multiple primary amino groups or reporter groups into oligonucleotides following the phosphoramidite methodology. It is possible to substitute any ribodeoxynucleotide, deoxynucleotide, or nucleotide......-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine), TEMPO (N-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine), dinitrophenyl, texas red, tetramethyl rhodamine, 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1-diazole (NBD), or pyrene. The present invention also relates to a solid phase support, e.g. a Controlled Pore Glass (CPG), immobilized linker reagent...

  19. Information Limited Oligonucleotide Amplification Assay for Affinity-Based, Parallel Detection Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Bokkasam

    Full Text Available Molecular communication systems encounter similar constraints as telecommunications. In either case, channel crosstalk at the receiver end will result in information loss that statistical analysis cannot compensate. This is because in any communication channel there is a physical limit to the amount of information that can be transmitted. We present a novel and simple modified end amplification (MEA technique to generate reduced and defined amounts of specific information in form of short fragments from an oligonucleotide source that also contains unrelated and redundant information. Our method can be a valuable tool to investigate information overflow and channel capacity in biomolecular recognition systems.

  20. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides that contain purine and pyrimidine radio-induced base lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romieu, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Different factors as oxidizing or carcinogenesis agents, UV and ionizing radiations,.... can generate a wide, spectrum of DNA base damages. In order to study the biochemical and structural features of these DNA damages, it is important to prepare short DNA fragments (20 to 50 bases long) bearing a single or several modifications at specific sites in their sequences. The chemical synthesis is a powerful tool to prepare such modified DNA fragments. This work focusses on the chemical incorporation of several modified nucleosides formed in DNA by ionizing radiations or by photo-sensitization. The first part of this study describes the preparation of a phosphoramidite synthon of 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxyuridine and its subsequent incorporation into synthetic oligonucleotides ranging from 14 to 33 bases long. In a second part (chapters Ill and IV), the synthesis and incorporation of original radiation-induced tandem lesions: the carbon-bridged cyclo-nucleosides are presented. Both (5'R)- and (5'S) diastereomers of 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine have been individually inserted into various different oligonucleotides (3 to 22 bases long) by using the standard phosphoramidite chemistry. The chemical incorporation of a pyrimidine analogue: (5'S, 6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-thymidine has been also achieved. The loss of aromaticity of this modified nucleoside and its poor reactivity required the development of a synthetic strategy entirely different from that used for the preparation and subsequent incorporation of the phosphoramidite synthons of 5',8-cyclo-purine-2'-deoxyribo-nucleosides. The third part of this study deals with the synthesis of a phosphoramidite synthon of 4-hydroxy-8-oxo-4,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine. The two (4R)- and (4S)- diastereomers of this oxidized purine have been separated and individually inserted in several synthetic DNA fragments. No epimerization of C-4 position was observed during the solid-phase synthesis and during the

  1. CTG repeat-targeting oligonucleotides for down-regulating Huntingtin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaghloul, Eman M; Gissberg, Olof; Moreno, Pedro M D

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder in which patients suffer from mobility, psychological and cognitive impairments. Existing therapeutics are only symptomatic and do not significantly alter the disease progression or increase life expectancy. HD is caused by expansion....... Thus, reduction of both muHTT mRNA and protein levels would ideally be the most useful therapeutic option. We herein present a novel strategy for HD treatment using oligonucleotides (ONs) directly targeting the HTT trinucleotide repeat DNA. A partial, but significant and potentially long-term, HTT...

  2. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome confirmed by comparative genomic hybridization array: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifakis Stavros

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a well known genetic condition caused by a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4. The great variability in the extent of the 4p deletion and the possible contribution of additional genetic rearrangements lead to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The majority of the reports of prenatally diagnosed WHS cases are associated with large 4p deletions identified by conventional chromosome analysis; however, the widespread clinical use of novel molecular techniques such as array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH has increased the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations associated with WHS phenotype. We provide a report of two fetuses with WHS presenting with intrauterine growth restriction as an isolated finding or combined with oligohydramnios and abnormal Doppler waveform in umbilical artery and uterine arteries. Standard karyotyping demonstrated a deletion on chromosome 4 in both cases [del(4(p15.33 and del(4(p15.31, respectively] and further application of a-CGH confirmed the diagnosis and offered a precise characterization of the genetic defect. A detailed review of the currently available literature on the prenatal diagnostic approach of WHS in terms of fetal sonographic assessment and molecular cytogenetic investigation is also provided.

  4. A novel deletion in the thyrotropin Beta-subunit gene identified by array comparative genomic hybridization analysis causes central congenital hypothyroidism in a boy originating from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Pia; Couch, Robert; Leonard, Norma; Klotz, Cherise; Pohlenz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Isolated central congenital hypothyroidism (ICCH) is rare but important. Most ICCH patients are diagnosed later, which results in severe growth failure and intellectual disability. We describe a boy with ICCH due to a large homozygous TSHβ gene deletion. A 51-day-old male Turkish infant, whose parents were first cousins, was admitted for evaluation of prolonged jaundice. His clinical appearance was compatible with hypothyroidism. Venous thyrotropin (TSH) was undetectably low, with a subsequent low free T4 and a low free T3, suggestive of central hypothyroidism. Using different PCR protocols, we could not amplify both coding exons of the boy's TSHβ gene, which suggested a deletion. An array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using specific probes around the TSHβ gene locus showed him to be homozygous for a 6-kb deletion spanning all exons and parts of the 5' untranslated region of the gene. Infants who are clinically suspected of having hypothyroidism should be evaluated thoroughly, even if their TSH-based screening result is normal. In cases with ICCH and undetectably low TSH serum concentrations, a TSHβ gene deletion should be considered; aCGH should be performed when gene deletions are suspected. In such cases, PCR-based sequencing techniques give negative results.

  5. Non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening using array comparative genomic hybridization on spent culture media: a proof-of-concept pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Michael; Vaccari, Enrico; Carli, Luca; Wallner, Elisabeth; Mädel, Ulrike; Figl, Katharina; Palini, Simone; Feichtinger, Wilfried

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess if array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) on blastocyst culture media is feasible. Therefore, aCGH analysis was carried out on 22 spent blastocyst culture media samples after polar body PGS because of advanced maternal age. All oocytes were fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and all embryos underwent assisted hatching. Concordance of polar body analysis and culture media genetic results was assessed. Thirteen out of 18 samples (72.2%) revealed general concordance of ploidy status (euploid or aneuploid). At least one chromosomal aberration was found concordant in 10 out of 15 embryos found to be aneuploid by both polar body and culture media analysis. Overall, 17 out of 35 (48.6%) single chromosomal aneuploidies were concordant between the culture media and polar body analysis. By analysing negative controls (oocytes with fertilization failure), notable maternal contamination was observed. Therefore, non-invasive PGS could serve as a second matrix after polar body or cleavage stage PGS; however, in euploid results, maternal contamination needs to be considered and results interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  7. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotides Promote Exon Inclusion and Correct the Common c.-32-13T>G GAA Splicing Variant in Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van der Wal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common variant causing Pompe disease is c.-32-13T>G (IVS1 in the acid α-glucosidase (GAA gene, which weakens the splice acceptor of GAA exon 2 and induces partial and complete exon 2 skipping. It also allows a low level of leaky wild-type splicing, leading to a childhood/adult phenotype. We hypothesized that cis-acting splicing motifs may exist that could be blocked using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs to promote exon inclusion. To test this, a screen was performed in patient-derived primary fibroblasts using a tiling array of U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA-based AONs. This resulted in the identification of a splicing regulatory element in GAA intron 1. We designed phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer-based AONs to this element, and these promoted exon 2 inclusion and enhanced GAA enzyme activity to levels above the disease threshold. These results indicate that the common IVS1 GAA splicing variant in Pompe disease is subject to negative regulation, and inhibition of a splicing regulatory element using AONs is able to restore canonical GAA splicing and endogenous GAA enzyme activity.

  9. Automated synthesis of an {sup 18}F-labelled pyridine-based alkylating agent for high yield oligonucleotide conjugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Sader, Jayden A.; Wilson, John S.; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Wuest, Frank [Edmonton PET Centre, Division of Oncologic Imaging, Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Mercer, John R. [Edmonton PET Centre, Division of Oncologic Imaging, Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)], E-mail: johnmerc@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2009-09-15

    Alkylating agents have been shown to be very promising for the radiolabelling of oligonucleotides with fluorine-18. In this report we describe the fully automated synthesis of 2-bromo-N-[3-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoropyridin-3-yloxy)propyl]acetamide ([{sup 18}F]FPyBrA) utilizing a modular synthesis unit. Reaction conditions for the coupling of this pyridine-based alkylating agent at the 5' end of a fully phosphorothioated random 20-mer DNA sequence were optimized to achieve very high radiochemical yields (>90%) and a maximum specific activity of 5-6 GBq/{mu}moL. The potential for rapid purification by solid phase extraction without need of chromatographic isolation of the radiolabelled oligonucleotide presents an overall benefit for the application of oligonucleotides in preclinical studies and potential clinical applications.

  10. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds' vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field.

  11. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    Full Text Available Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100, is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT. As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds' vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field.

  12. Fluorescent oligonucleotides containing a novel perylene 2′-amino-α-L-LNA monomer: Synthesis and analytical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina; Kumar, Santhosh T.; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    efficiency of the resulting perylene-2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA monomer (T*) into synthetic oligonucleotides was significantly improved by replacement of the typically used 1H-tetrazole activator with pyridine hydrochloride. Generally, oligonucleotides containing monomer T* showed high binding affinity towards...... incorporations of monomers T* was quenched (quantum yield Phi(F) = 0.21) relative to duplexes of this probe with complementary DNA and RNA (Phi(F) = 0.42 and 0.35, respectively). On the contrary, a strong fluorescence quenching upon target binding was demonstrated by two short oligonucleotides of analogues...... sequences containing monomers T* at 5'- and 3'-terminal positions. We explain the hybridization-induced light-up effect observed for double-labeled probe by a reduction of fluorescence quenching due to precise positioning of the fluorophores within the double-stranded complexes. Furthermore, we propose...

  13. DNA suspension arrays: silencing discrete artifacts for high-sensitivity applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of low frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs has important implications in early screening for tumorgenesis, genetic disorders and pathogen drug resistance. Nucleic acid arrays are a powerful tool for genome-scale SNP analysis, but detection of low-frequency SNPs in a mixed population on an array is problematic. We demonstrate a model assay for HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, wherein ligase discrimination products are collected on a suspension array. In developing this system, we discovered that signal from multiple polymorphisms was obscured by two discrete hybridization artifacts. Specifically: 1 tethering of unligated probes on the template DNA elicited false signal and 2 unpredictable probe secondary structures impaired probe capture and suppressed legitimate signal from the array. Two sets of oligonucleotides were used to disrupt these structures; one to displace unligated reporter labels from the bead-bound species and another to occupy sequences which interfered with array hybridization. This artifact silencing system resulted in a mean 21-fold increased sensitivity for 29 minority variants of 17 codons in our model assay for mutations most commonly associated with HIV-1 drug resistance. Furthermore, since the artifacts we characterized are not unique to our system, their specific inhibition might improve the quality of data from solid-state microarrays as well as from the growing number of multiple analyte suspension arrays relying on sequence-specific nucleic acid target capture.

  14. Detection of chromogranins A and B in endocrine tissues with radioactive and biotinylated oligonucleotide probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.V.; Jin, L.; Fields, K.

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution of chromogranins A and B in normal and neoplastic endocrine tissues with secretory granules using 35 S-labeled and biotin-labeled oligonucleotide probes by in situ hybridization (ISH). Both radioactive and nonradioactive probes detected messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in frozen and paraffin tissue sections. Endocrine tissues with variable immunoreactivities for chromogranin A protein, such as small-cell lung carcinomas, neuroblastomas, insulinomas, and parathyroid adenomas, expressed the mRNA for chromogranins A and B in most cells. Some technical problems with the biotinylated probes included nonspecific nuclear staining and endogenous alkaline phosphatase, which was not completely abolished by levamisole pretreatment. A differential distribution of chromogranins A and B was seen in pituitary prolactinomas, which expressed abundant chromogranin B but not chromogranin A mRNAs, and in parathyroid adenomas, which expressed abundant chromogranin A but only small amounts of chromogranin B mRNAs. These results indicate that ISH can be used to detect chromogranins A and B in endocrine tissues with radioactive and biotinylated oligonucleotide probes and that the mRNAs for chromogranin A and B are demonstrable in some tumors even when the chromogranin proteins cannot be detected by immunohistochemistry

  15. Cy3 and Cy5 dyes attached to oligonucleotide terminus stabilize DNA duplexes: predictive thermodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Bernardo G; You, Yong; Owczarzy, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Cyanine dyes are important chemical modifications of oligonucleotides exhibiting intensive and stable fluorescence at visible light wavelengths. When Cy3 or Cy5 dye is attached to 5' end of a DNA duplex, the dye stacks on the terminal base pair and stabilizes the duplex. Using optical melting experiments, we have determined thermodynamic parameters that can predict the effects of the dyes on duplex stability quantitatively (ΔG°, Tm). Both Cy dyes enhance duplex formation by 1.2 kcal/mol on average, however, this Gibbs energy contribution is sequence-dependent. If the Cy5 is attached to a pyrimidine nucleotide of pyrimidine-purine base pair, the stabilization is larger compared to the attachment to a purine nucleotide. This is likely due to increased stacking interactions of the dye to the purine of the complementary strand. Dangling (unpaired) nucleotides at duplex terminus are also known to enhance duplex stability. Stabilization originated from the Cy dyes is significantly larger than the stabilization due to the presence of dangling nucleotides. If both the dangling base and Cy3 are present, their thermodynamic contributions are approximately additive. New thermodynamic parameters improve predictions of duplex folding, which will help design oligonucleotide sequences for biophysical, biological, engineering, and nanotechnology applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  17. Reliable Assessment and Quantification of the Fluorescence-Labeled Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Munisso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of fluorescent dyes and the advances in the optical systems for in vivo imaging have stimulated an increasing interest in developing new methodologies to study and quantify the biodistribution of labeled agents. However, despite these great achievements, we are facing significant challenges in determining if the observed fluorescence does correspond to the quantity of the dye in the tissues. In fact, although the far-red and near-infrared lights can propagate through several centimetres of tissue, they diffuse within a few millimetres as consequence of the elastic scattering of photons. In addition, when dye-labeled oligonucleotides form stable complex with cationic carriers, a large change in the fluorescence intensity of the dye is observed. Therefore, the measured fluorescence intensity is altered by the tissue heterogeneity and by the fluctuation of dye intensity. Hence, in this study a quantification strategy for fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides was developed to solve these disadvantageous effects. Our results proved that upon efficient homogenization and dilution with chaotropic agents, such as guanidinium thiocyanate, it is possible to achieve a complete fluorescence intensity recovery. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this method has the advantage of good sensitivity and reproducibility, as well as easy handling of the tissue samples.

  18. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15% creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2’-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy.

  19. Detection of chromogranins A and B in endocrine tissues with radioactive and biotinylated oligonucleotide probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, R.V.; Jin, L.; Fields, K. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution of chromogranins A and B in normal and neoplastic endocrine tissues with secretory granules using {sup 35}S-labeled and biotin-labeled oligonucleotide probes by in situ hybridization (ISH). Both radioactive and nonradioactive probes detected messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in frozen and paraffin tissue sections. Endocrine tissues with variable immunoreactivities for chromogranin A protein, such as small-cell lung carcinomas, neuroblastomas, insulinomas, and parathyroid adenomas, expressed the mRNA for chromogranins A and B in most cells. Some technical problems with the biotinylated probes included nonspecific nuclear staining and endogenous alkaline phosphatase, which was not completely abolished by levamisole pretreatment. A differential distribution of chromogranins A and B was seen in pituitary prolactinomas, which expressed abundant chromogranin B but not chromogranin A mRNAs, and in parathyroid adenomas, which expressed abundant chromogranin A but only small amounts of chromogranin B mRNAs. These results indicate that ISH can be used to detect chromogranins A and B in endocrine tissues with radioactive and biotinylated oligonucleotide probes and that the mRNAs for chromogranin A and B are demonstrable in some tumors even when the chromogranin proteins cannot be detected by immunohistochemistry.

  20. Detection of tmRNA molecules on microarrays at low temperatures using helper oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palta Priit

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hybridization of synthetic Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA on a detection microarray is slow at 34°C resulting in low signal intensities. Results We demonstrate that adding specific DNA helper oligonucleotides (chaperones to the hybridization buffer increases the signal strength at a given temperature and thus makes the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA more sensitive. No loss of specificity was observed at low temperatures compared to hybridization at 46°C. The effect of the chaperones can be explained by disruption of the strong secondary and tertiary structure of the target RNA by the selective hybridization of helper molecules. The amplification of the hybridization signal strength by chaperones is not necessarily local; we observed increased signal intensities in both local and distant regions of the target molecule. Conclusions The sensitivity of the detection of tmRNA at low temperature can be increased by chaperone oligonucleotides. Due to the complexity of RNA secondary and tertiary structures the effect of any individual chaperone is currently not predictable.

  1. Antiproliferation effects of an androgen receptor triple-helix forming oligonucleotide on prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Chen Weizhen; Xie Yao; Gao Jinhui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To provide experimental basis for antigene radiation therapy through exploring the effects of antigene strategy on androgen receptor (AR) expression and proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Methods: The triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) targeting 2447-2461nt of AR cDNA was designed and transfected LNCaP prostate cancer cells with liposome. 24-72 h after transfection, the cellular proliferation was detected by 3 H-thymidine (TdR) incorporation test, the expression of AR gene was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and expression of AR protein was performed by radioligand binding assay. The results of TFO were compared with antisense oligonucleotide (ASON). Results: At all time points, the AR expression levels in TFO group were markedly lower than that of ASON group (P<0.05). The inhibitory rate of TFO for cellular proliferation was significantly higher than that of ASON (P<0.05). Conclusion: The TFO was a potent inhibitor for AR expression and cell proliferation of LNCaP cells , and could be used in antigene radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. The detection and differentiation of canine respiratory pathogens using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Kuo, Ya-Ting; Chueh, Ling-Ling; Huang, Dean; Lin, Jiunn-Horng

    2017-05-01

    Canine respiratory diseases are commonly seen in dogs along with co-infections with multiple respiratory pathogens, including viruses and bacteria. Virus infections in even vaccinated dogs were also reported. The clinical signs caused by different respiratory etiological agents are similar, which makes differential diagnosis imperative. An oligonucleotide microarray system was developed in this study. The wild type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV), influenza virus, canine herpesvirus (CHV), Bordetella bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma cynos were detected and differentiated simultaneously on a microarray chip. The detection limit is 10, 10, 100, 50 and 50 copy numbers for CDV, influenza virus, CHV, B. bronchiseptica and M. cynos, respectively. The clinical test results of nasal swab samples showed that the microarray had remarkably better efficacy than the multiplex PCR-agarose gel method. The positive detection rate of microarray and agarose gel was 59.0% (n=33) and 41.1% (n=23) among the 56 samples, respectively. CDV vaccine strain and pathogen co-infections were further demonstrated by the microarray but not by the multiplex PCR-agarose gel. The oligonucleotide microarray provides a highly efficient diagnosis alternative that could be applied to clinical usage, greatly assisting in disease therapy and control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pretreatment of Mice with Oligonucleotide prop5 Protects Them from Influenza Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a successful parasite and requires host factors to complete its life cycle. Prop5 is an antisense oligonucleotide, targeting programmed cell death protein 5 (PDCD5. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of prop5 against mouse-adapted A/FM/1/47 strain of influenza A virus in a mouse model. Prop5 intranasally administered the mice at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d at 24 h and 30 min before infection, provided 80% and 100% survival rates and prolonged mean survival days in comparison with influenza virus-infected mice (both p < 0.01. Moreover, viral titres in mice pretreated with prop5, at dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d, had declined significantly on day two, four, and six post-infection compared with the yields in infected mice (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01; lung index in mice pretreated with prop5 (20 mg/kg/d had been inhibited on day six post-infection (p < 0.05. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that prop5 could down-regulate the PDCD5 protein expression levels in lung tissues of infected mice. These data indicate that antisense oligonucleotide prop5 is a promising drug for prophylaxis and control influenza virus infections and provides an insight into the host-pathogen interaction.

  4. Template-Independent Enzymatic Oligonucleotide Synthesis (TiEOS): Its History, Prospects, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael A; Davis, Ronald W

    2018-03-27

    There is a growing demand for sustainable methods in research and development, where instead of hazardous chemicals, an aqueous medium is chosen to perform biological reactions. In this Perspective, we examine the history and current methodology of using enzymes to generate artificial single-stranded DNA. By using traditional solid-phase phosphoramidite chemistry as a metric, we also explore criteria for the method of template-independent enzymatic oligonucleotide synthesis (TiEOS). As its key component, we delve into the biology of one of the most enigmatic enzymes, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). As TdT is found to exponentially increase antigen receptor diversity in the vertebrate immune system by adding nucleotides in a template-free manner, researchers have exploited this function as an alternative to the phosphoramidite synthesis method. Though TdT is currently the preferred enzyme for TiEOS, its random nucleotide incorporation presents a barrier in synthesis automation. Taking a closer look at the TiEOS cycle, particularly the coupling step, we find it is comprised of additions > n+1 and deletions. By tapping into the physical and biochemical properties of TdT, we strive to further elucidate its mercurial behavior and offer ways to better optimize TiEOS for production-grade oligonucleotide synthesis.

  5. Molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques with technetium-99m-labelled antisense oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Guangming; Zhang Yongxue; Cao Wei; An Rui; Gao Zairong; Xu Wendai; Zhang Kaijun; Li Guiling; Li Shuren

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to visualise experimental atherosclerotic lesions using radiolabelled antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs). Atherosclerosis was induced in New Zealand White rabbits fed 1% cholesterol for approximately 60 days. In vivo and ex vivo imaging was performed in atherosclerotic rabbits and normal control rabbits after i.v. injection of 92.5±18.5 MBq 99m Tc-labelled ASON or 99m Tc-labelled sense oligonucleotides. Immediately after the in vivo imaging, the animals were sacrificed and ex vivo imaging of the aortic specimens was performed. Biodistribution of radiolabelled c-mycASON was evaluated in vivo in atherosclerotic rabbits. Planar imaging revealed accumulation of 99m Tc-labelled c-mycASON in atherosclerotic lesions along the artery wall. Ex vivo imaging further demonstrated that the area of activity accumulation matched the area of atherosclerotic lesions. In contrast, no atherosclerotic lesions were found in the vessel wall and no positive imaging results were obtained in animals of the control group. This molecular imaging approach has potential for non-invasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaques at an early stage. (orig.)

  6. Detection and genotyping of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium parvum by oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Vora, Gary J; Stenger, David A

    2004-07-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium parvum are the most frequently identified protozoan parasites causing waterborne disease outbreaks. The morbidity and mortality associated with these intestinal parasitic infections warrant the development of rapid and accurate detection and genotyping methods to aid public health efforts aimed at preventing and controlling outbreaks. In this study, we describe the development of an oligonucleotide microarray capable of detecting and discriminating between E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, G. lamblia assemblages A and B, and C. parvum types 1 and 2 in a single assay. Unique hybridization patterns for each selected protozoan were generated by amplifying six to eight diagnostic sequences/organism by multiplex PCR; fluorescent labeling of the amplicons via primer extension; and subsequent hybridization to a set of genus-, species-, and subtype-specific covalently immobilized oligonucleotide probes. The profile-based specificity of this methodology not only permitted for the unequivocal identification of the six targeted species and subtypes, but also demonstrated its potential in identifying related species such as Cryptosporidium meleagridis and Cryptosporidium muris. In addition, sensitivity assays demonstrated lower detection limits of five trophozoites of G. lamblia. Taken together, the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray-based approach suggest that this methodology may provide a promising tool to detect and genotype protozoa from clinical and environmental samples.

  7. Short Oligonucleotides Aligned in Stretched Humid Matrix: Secondary DNA Structure in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2012-04-24

    We report that short, synthetic, double- as well as single-stranded DNA can be aligned in stretched humid poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix, and the secondary structure (nucleobase orientation) can be characterized with linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Oligonucleotides of lengths varying between 10 (3.4 nm) and 60 bases (20.4 nm) were investigated with respect to structural properties in the gel-like polymer environment. The DNA conformation as a function of relative humidity reveals a strong dependence of helical structure of DNA on PVA hydration level, results of relevance for nanotechnical studies of DNA-based supramolecular systems. Also, the PVA gel could provide possibilities to test models for nucleic acid interactions and distribution in cell contexts, including structural stability of genetic material in the cell and PVA-packaging for gene delivery. A method by which duplex oligonucleotides, with sequences designed to provide specific binding sites, become amenable to polarized-light spectroscopy opens up new possibilities for studying structure in DNA complexes with small adduct molecules as well as proteins. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. A non-covalent peptide-based strategy for ex vivo and in vivo oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombez, Laurence; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic acid-based therapeutic molecules such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) and peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) analogues has provided new perspectives for therapeutic targeting of specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. However, the poor cellular uptake of nucleic acids together with the low permeability of the cell membrane to negatively charged molecules remain major obstacles to their clinical development. Several non-viral strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of synthetic short oligonucleotides both in cultured cells and in vivo. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute very promising tools for non-invasive cellular import of oligonucleotides and analogs. We recently described a non-covalent strategy based on short amphiphatic peptides (MPG8/PEP3) that have been successfully applied ex vivo and in vivo for the delivery of therapeutic siRNA and PNA molecules. PEP3 and MPG8 form stable nanoparticles with PNA analogues and siRNA, respectively, and promote their efficient cellular uptake, independently of the endosomal pathway, into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. This chapter describes easy-to-handle protocols for the use of MPG-8 or PEP-3-nanoparticle technologies for PNA and siRNA delivery into adherent and suspension cell lines as well as in vivo into cancer mouse models.

  9. Efficacy and Safety Profile of Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotides in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Relizani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases. However, despite advances in AON chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is limited due to poor tissue uptake and sufficient therapeutic efficacy is still difficult to achieve. A novel class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA is considered very promising for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a neuromuscular disease typically caused by frameshifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene-encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure in addition to cognitive impairment. Herein, we report the efficacy and toxicology profile of a 13-mer tcDNA in mdx mice. We show that systemic delivery of 13-mer tcDNA allows restoration of dystrophin in skeletal muscles and to a lower extent in the brain, leading to muscle function improvement and correction of behavioral features linked to the emotional/cognitive deficiency. More importantly, tcDNA treatment was generally limited to minimal glomerular changes and few cell necroses in proximal tubules, with only slight variation in serum and urinary kidney toxicity biomarker levels. These results demonstrate an encouraging safety profile for tcDNA, albeit typical of phosphorothiate AONs, and confirm its therapeutic potential for the systemic treatment of DMD patients. Keywords: antisense oligonucleotides, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, preclinical, splice switching, tcDNA-AONs

  10. Pharmacokinetics on a microscale: visualizing Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide release from poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate nanocapsules in cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomcin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Tomcin,1 Grit Baier,1 Katharina Landfester,1 Volker Mailänder1,21Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 2University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, III Medical Clinic, Mainz, GermanyAbstract: For successful design of a nanoparticulate drug delivery system, the fate of the carrier and cargo need to be followed. In this work, we fluorescently labeled poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate (PBCA nanocapsules as a shell and separately an oligonucleotide (20 mer as a payload. The nanocapsules were formed by interfacial anionic polymerization on aqueous droplets generated by an inverse miniemulsion process. After uptake, the PBCA capsules were shown to be round-shaped, endosomal structures and the payload was successfully released. Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides accumulated at the mitochondrial membrane due to a combination of the high mitochondrial membrane potential and the specific molecular structure of Cy5. The specificity of this accumulation at the mitochondria was shown as the uncoupler dinitrophenol rapidly diminished the accumulation of the Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide. Importantly, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigation showed that the dye-labeled cargo (Cy3/Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides reached its target site without degradation during escape from an endosomal compartment to the cytoplasm. The time course of accumulation of fluorescent signals at the mitochondria was determined by evaluating the colocalization of Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides and mitochondrial markers for up to 48 hours. As oligonucleotides are an ideal model system for small interfering RNA PBCA nanocapsules demonstrate to be a versatile delivery platform for small interfering RNA to treat a variety of diseases.Keywords: drug delivery, mitochondria, miniemulsion, colocalization

  11. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  12. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  13. Technetium-99m labeled antisense oligonucleotide-noninvasive tumor imaging in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, G.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; An, R.; Gao, Z.R.; Cao, W.; Cao, G.X.; Hnatowich, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA and DNA oligonucleotides may be useful as radiopharmaceuticals for antisense and other in vivo applications if convenient methods for stably attaching radionuclides such as 99m Tc can be developed. The c-myc oncogene works in cooperation with other oncogenes in a variety of malignant tumors. The concentration of c-myc messenger RNA increases rapidly 30 to 50 fold during DNA synthesis, thus making it a suitable target for following the progression of malignancy by noninvasive imaging with radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide probes. Methods: 1 Oligonucleotide Conjugation: A solution of single stranded amine-derivatized DNA (100-1000μg) was prepared at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in 0.25M sodium bicarbonate, 1 M sodium chloride, 1mM EDTA, pH8.5. 2 Oligonucleotide Labeling: A fresh 50mg/ml solution of sodium tartrate was prepared in sterile 0.5 M ammonium The ability of the labeled DNA to hybridize to its complement was analyzed by Sep-Pak column chromatography before and after the addition of the complementary DNA. 3 Biodistribution and Tumor Imaging Studies: A colony of KM mice (15-20g) were inoculated with 1x10 6 Ehrlich carcinoma tumor cells in the right thigh, and the tumors were allowed to grow for 6-7 days to a size of 1.0-1.5 cm in diameter. Biodistribution studies were performed in 32 KM mice after 50 μCi per mouse of 99m Tc-labeled oncogene probes were injected intravenously. A total of 8 mice were injected intravenously in the tail vein with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled sense or antisense probes, immobilized with ketamine hydrochloride and imaged periodically from 0.5hr to 24hr with a gamma camera. Results: Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The labeled antisense DNA still remained the ability to hybridize with its complementary DNA. The highest accumulation of label was in the liver first, with the kidney and small bowel next. The injected activity localized in the lesion

  14. Nucleoside-O-Methyl-(H)-Phosphinates: Novel Monomers for the Synthesis of Methylphosphonate Oligonucleotides Using H-Phosphonate Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Ondřej; Páv, Ondřej; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2017-09-18

    This unit comprises the straightforward synthesis of protected 2'-deoxyribonucleoside-O-methyl-(H)-phosphinates in both 3'- and 5'-series. These compounds represent a new class of monomers compatible with the solid-phase synthesis of oligonucleotides using H-phosphonate chemistry and are suitable for the preparation of both 3'- and 5'-O-methylphosphonate oligonucleotides. The synthesis of 4-toluenesulfonyloxymethyl-(H)-phosphinic acid as a new reagent for the preparation of O-methyl-(H)-phosphinic acid derivatives is described. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, S; Mahrholz, T; Wierach, P; Sinapius, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750–2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs. (paper)

  16. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  17. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Pedro M D; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasi...

  18. Correlating In Vitro Splice Switching Activity With Systemic In Vivo Delivery Using Novel ZEN-modified Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M Hammond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs induce alternative splicing of pre-mRNA and typically employ chemical modifications to increase nuclease resistance and binding affinity to target pre-mRNA. Here we describe a new SSO non-base modifier (a naphthyl-azo group, “ZEN™” to direct exon exclusion in mutant dystrophin pre-mRNA to generate functional dystrophin protein. The ZEN modifier is placed near the ends of a 2′-O-methyl (2′OMe oligonucleotide, increasing melting temperature and potency over unmodified 2′OMe oligonucleotides. In cultured H2K cells, a ZEN-modified 2′OMe phosphorothioate (PS oligonucleotide delivered by lipid transfection greatly enhanced dystrophin exon skipping over the same 2′OMePS SSO lacking ZEN. However, when tested using free gymnotic uptake in vitro and following systemic delivery in vivo in dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the same ZEN-modified SSO failed to enhance potency. Importantly, we show for the first time that in vivo activity of anionic SSOs is modelled in vitro only when using gymnotic delivery. ZEN is thus a novel modifier that enhances activity of SSOs in vitro but will require improved delivery methods before its in vivo clinical potential can be realized.

  19. Development of a general methodology for labelling peptide-morpholino oligonucleotide conjugates using alkyne-azide click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Gait, Michael J

    2013-11-11

    We describe a general methodology for fluorescent labelling of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMOs) by alkyne functionalization of peptides, subsequent conjugation to PMOs and labelling with a fluorescent compound (Cy5-azide). Two peptide-PMO (PPMO) examples are shown. No detrimental effect of such labelled PMOs was seen in a biological assay.

  20. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain ...

  1. Detection of recurrent transmission of 17q12 microdeletion by array comparative genomic hybridization in a fetus with prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and multicystic kidney, and variable clinical spectrum in the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wang, Liang-Kai; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Liu, Yu-Peng; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at detection of recurrent transmission of the 17q12 microdeletion in a fetus with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A 35-year-old woman was referred to the hospital at 20 weeks' gestation because of hydronephrosis in the fetus. The mother was normal and healthy. Her second child was a girl who had bilateral dysplastic kidneys that required hemodialysis, and died at the age of 5 years. During this pregnancy, the woman underwent amniocentesis at 18 weeks' gestation because of advanced maternal age. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XY. Prenatal ultrasound showed left hydronephrosis with a tortuous ureter, right hydronephrosis, and increased echogenicity of the kidneys. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging showed right dilated renal calyces, left hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and multicystic kidney. The pregnancy was subsequently terminated. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization were applied for genetic analysis using umbilical cord, maternal blood, and cultured amniocytes. aCGH analysis on umbilical cord detected a 1.75-Mb deletion at 17q12 including haploinsufficiency of LHX1 and HNF1B. aCGH analysis on maternal blood detected a 1.54-Mb deletion at 17q12 including haploinsufficiency of LHX1 and HNF1B. Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on cultured amniocytes and maternal blood lymphocytes using 17q12-specific bacterial artificial chromosome probe showed 17q12 microdeletion in the fetus and the mother. Prenatal diagnosis of recurrent renal and urinary tract abnormalities in the fetus should include a differential diagnosis of familial 17q12 microdeletion. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Summarization on the synthesis and radionuclide-labeling of peptide nucleic acid for an oligonucleotide analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hongtao; Zhang, Huaming; Gao, Hui

    2009-04-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is one kind of antisense nucleic acid compounds and an oligonucleotide analogue that binds strongly to DNA and RNA in a sequence specific manner, has its unique advantages in the field of molecular diagnostics and treatment of diseases. Now, people gradually attach more importance to PNA. To optimize the application of PNA in genetic re- search and therapy, a great number of backbone modifications on the newly- type structures of PNA were synthesized to improve its physicochemical proper- ties, such as hybridization speciality, solubility in biofluid, or cell permeability. The modified PNA labeled with radionuclides, which can obtain the aim at specific target and minimal non-target trauma, has important role in research and application of tumorous genitherapy. Here a review on the basic synthesis idea and several primary synthetic methods of PNA analogs was given, and also correlative studies and expectation on the compounds belonging to PNA series labeled with radionuclides were included. (authors)

  3. Detection of autoimmune antibodies in localized scleroderma by synthetic oligonucleotide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone; Jørgensen, Christian Damsgaard; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we developed a series of synthetic oligonucleotides that allowed us to investigate the details on the antigen recognition by autoimmune antibodies in localized scleroderma subjects. Besides dramatically improved analytical specificity of the assay, our data suggests a potential...... linking for antibodies to DNA to the biological status of disease state in localized scleroderma. Moreover, introducing chemical modifications into short synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules completely changed the binding titers of corresponding antibodies...... and their clinical relevance. The strongest observed effect was registered for the localized scleroderma skin damage index (LoSDI) on the IgG antibodies to TC dinucleotide-rich double-stranded antigen (p

  4. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of 2'-Fluoro-α-L-RNA-Modified Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard Jensen, Troels; Pasternak, Anna; Stahl Madsen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    with the smallest destabilization towards RNA. Thermodynamic data show that the duplex formation with 2'-fluoro-α-L-RNA nucleotides is enthalpically disfavored but entropically favored. 2'-Fluoro-α-L-RNA nucleotides exhibit very good base pairing specificity following Watson-Crick rules. The 2'-fluoro......-α-L-RNA monomer was designed as a monocyclic mimic of the bicyclic α-L-LNA, and molecular modeling showed that this indeed is the case as the 2'-fluoro monomer adopts a C3'-endo/C2'-exo sugar pucker. Molecular modeling of modified duplexes show that the 2'-fluoro-α-L-RNA nucleotides partake in Watson-Crick base......We describe the synthesis and binding properties of oligonucleotides that contain one or more 2'-fluoro-α-L-RNA thymine monomer(s). Incorporation of 2'-fluoro-α-L-RNA thymine into oligodeoxynucleotides decreased thermal binding stability slightly upon hybridization with complementary DNA and RNA...

  5. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole-cell hybridization of Methanosarcina cells with two new oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A.H.; Torsvik, V.L.; Torsvik, T.

    1997-01-01

    Two new oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of the methanogenic genus Methanosarcina were developed. The probes have the following sequences (Escherichia coli numbering): probe SARCI551, 5'-GAC CCAATAATCACGATCAC-3', and probe SARCI645, 5'-TCCCGGTTCCAAGTCTGGC-3'. In situ hybridization...... with the fluorescently labelled probes required several modifications of standard procedures. Cells of Methanosarcina mazeii S-6 were found to lyse during the hybridization step if fixed in 3% formaldehyde and stored in 50% ethanol. Lysis was, however, not observed with cells fixed and stored in 1.6% formaldehyde-0.......85% NaCl. Extensive autofluorescence of the cells was found upon hybridization in the presence of 5 mM EDTA, but successful hybridization could be obtained without addition of this compound. The mounting agent Citifluor AF1, often used in conjugation with the fluorochrome fluorescein, was found to wash...

  7. Two-dimensional condensation of pyrimidine oligonucleotides during their self-assemblies at mercury based surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Stanislav [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Kralovopolska 135, CZ-612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: hasons@ibp.cz; Vetterl, Vladimir [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Kralovopolska 135, CZ-612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Fojta, Miroslav [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Kralovopolska 135, CZ-612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: fojta@ibp.cz

    2008-02-15

    For the first time it is shown that homopyrimidine oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) adsorbed at mercury or amalgam electrode surface can condensate upon applying negative potentials (around -1.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl/3M KCl). This 2D condensation resulted in formation of capacitance pits on the C-E curves resembling those observed earlier with monomeric nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and nucleotides. Differences in behavior of the condensed layers of dT{sub 30} and dC{sub 30} ODNs, reflecting different physico-chemical and electrochemical properties of thymine and cytosine, were observed. Formation of the ODN condensed film involved reorientation of the oligonucleotide molecules firmly adsorbed at the electrode and took place even in the absence of any ODN in the bulk of solution. Homopurine ODNs did not form these two-dimensional (2D) condensed monolayers under the same conditions. A preliminary thermodynamic analysis of the condensed ODN layers is presented.

  8. Higher order structure of short immunostimulatory oligonucleotides studied by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Dionne C.G., E-mail: dionne.c.g.klein@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Latz, Eicke [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Institute of Innate Immunity, University Hospitals, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Espevik, Terje [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Stokke, Bjorn T. [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    Immunostimulatory CpG-DNA activates the innate immune system by binding to Toll-like receptor 9. Structurally different CpG-containing oligonucleotides trigger a different type of immune response while activating the same receptor. We therefore investigated the higher order structure of two different classes of immunostimulatory CpG-DNA. Class A, which contains a partly self-complementary sequence and poly-G ends, forms duplexes and nanoparticles in salt solution, while class B, which does not contain these features and is purely linear, does not form a duplex or nanoparticles. Results obtained here by high-resolution atomic force microscopy of classes A and B CpG-DNA, reflect these differences in secondary structure. Detailed structural analysis of the atomic force microscopy topographs is presented for two different sample preparation methods.

  9. Development of dansyl-modified oligonucleotide probes responding to structural changes in a duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kowata, Keiko; Komatsu, Yasuo

    2013-11-15

    We have synthesized a nonnucleoside amidite block of dansyl fluorophore to prepare dansyl-modified oligonucleotides (ONTs). The fluorescence intensities of dansyl-ONT specifically increased by the presence of adjacent guanosine residues but, significantly reduced in a dansyl-flipping duplex. These changes were caused by solvatochromism effect due to the number of guanine which is hydrophobic functional group and the external environment of dansyl group. The fluorescence intensities could be plotted as a function of the ONTs concentrations and the increase in the fluorescence was observed to equimolar concentrations of target DNA. This duplex exhibited higher melting temperature relative to the corresponding duplexes containing other base pairs. Similar changes in fluorescence could be detected upon hybridization with complementary RNAs. Thus, the dansyl-modified ONTs provide sequence specific fluorescent probe of DNA and RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Higher order structure of short immunostimulatory oligonucleotides studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Dionne C.G.; Latz, Eicke; Espevik, Terje; Stokke, Bjorn T.

    2010-01-01

    Immunostimulatory CpG-DNA activates the innate immune system by binding to Toll-like receptor 9. Structurally different CpG-containing oligonucleotides trigger a different type of immune response while activating the same receptor. We therefore investigated the higher order structure of two different classes of immunostimulatory CpG-DNA. Class A, which contains a partly self-complementary sequence and poly-G ends, forms duplexes and nanoparticles in salt solution, while class B, which does not contain these features and is purely linear, does not form a duplex or nanoparticles. Results obtained here by high-resolution atomic force microscopy of classes A and B CpG-DNA, reflect these differences in secondary structure. Detailed structural analysis of the atomic force microscopy topographs is presented for two different sample preparation methods.

  11. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, V.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    We have prepared a [32P]-labled oligonucleotide probe carrying a free primary amine at its 3'-terminus. This probe is used to initiate polymerization of aziridine (ethyleneimine) in aqueous solution. The nature of the oligomeric products and the kinetics of their formation are then monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally consistent with those obtained using conventional techniques. We have also investigated the effect of polyanionic templates on the rate of oligomerization of aziridine. We find that water-soluble polyanions generally accelerate the polymerization. The sodium salt of polymethacrylic acid is the most effective of the templates that we studied. The methods introduced in this paper should be applicable to a variety of polymerization reactions in aqueous solution. They should greatly simplify the screening of potentially prebiotic polymerization reactions.

  12. Photochemical immobilization of anthraquinone conjugated oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons on solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Jacobsen, N.; Fensholdt, J.

    2000-01-01

    Ligand immobilization on solid surfaces is an essential step in fields such as diagnostics, bio sensor manufacturing, and new material sciences in general. In this paper a photochemical approach based on anthraquinone as the chromophore is presented. Photochemical procedures offer special...... advantages as they are able to generate highly reactive species in an orientation specific manner. As presented here, anthraquinone (AQ) mediated covalent DNA immobilization appears to be superior to currently known procedures. A synthetic procedure providing AQ-phosphoramidites is presented. These reagents...... facilitate AQ conjugation during routine DNA synthesis, thus enabling the AQ-oligonucleotides to be immobilized in a very convenient and efficient manner. AQ-conjugated PCR primers can be used directly in PCR. When the PCR is performed in solution, the amplicons can be immobilized after the PCR. Moreover...

  13. Microsatellite and HLA class II oligonucleotide typing in a population of Yanomami Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roewer, L; Nagy, M; Schmidt, P; Epplen, J T; Herzog-Schröder, G

    1993-01-01

    We have used three different microsatellites (on chromosome 12 and Y) together with HLA class II oligonucleotide typing (DQA and DQB) to analyze families of Yanomami indians settling in villages in Southern Venezuela. There exist complex networks of biological relationship between villages as a result of wife exchange, village fissioning and changing patterns of alliances associated with inter-village warfare. Social status in this society is largely determined by the kinship system. Polygyny is common, especially among headmen, with additional wives, frequently being chosen among the sisters of the first wife. Our preliminary results mainly obtained from inhabitants of the village HAP show the expected allele distribution in populations with a high degree of consanguinity: (i) deficiency of observed heterozygotes at the autosomal loci and (ii) almost all men carry the same Y chromosomal allele. Nevertheless in the Yanomami village two thirds of the described autosomal microsatellite alleles were identified. Several paternities were clarified.

  14. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  15. Merlin: Computer-Aided Oligonucleotide Design for Large Scale Genome Engineering with MAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintin, Michael; Ma, Natalie J; Ahmed, Samir; Bhatia, Swapnil; Lewis, Aaron; Isaacs, Farren J; Densmore, Douglas

    2016-06-17

    Genome engineering technologies now enable precise manipulation of organism genotype, but can be limited in scalability by their design requirements. Here we describe Merlin ( http://merlincad.org ), an open-source web-based tool to assist biologists in designing experiments using multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE). Merlin provides methods to generate pools of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for MAGE experiments by performing free energy calculation and BLAST scoring on a sliding window spanning the targeted site. These oligos are designed not only to improve recombination efficiency, but also to minimize off-target interactions. The application further assists experiment planning by reporting predicted allelic replacement rates after multiple MAGE cycles, and enables rapid result validation by generating primer sequences for multiplexed allele-specific colony PCR. Here we describe the Merlin oligo and primer design procedures and validate their functionality compared to OptMAGE by eliminating seven AvrII restriction sites from the Escherichia coli genome.

  16. Plume characteristics and dynamics of UV and IR laser-desorbed oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrigan, Tony L; Timson, David J; Hunniford, C Adam; Catney, Martin; McCullough, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Laser desorption of dye-tagged oligonucleotides was studied using laser-induced fluorescence imaging. Desorption with ultra violet (UV) and infra-red (IR) lasers resulted in forward directed plumes of molecules. In the case of UV desorption, the initial shot desorbed approximately seven-fold more material than subsequent shots. In contrast, the initial shot in IR desorption resulted in the ejection of less material compared to subsequent shots and these plumes had a component directed along the path of the laser. Thermal equilibrium of the molecules in the plume was achieved after approximately 25 μs with a spread in molecular temperature which was described by a modified Maxwell-Boltzmann equation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus detection in blood samples by silica nanoparticle-oligonucleotides conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Baris A; Tuna, Bilge G; Hernandez, Frank J; Hernandez, Luiza I; Bayramoglu, Gulay; Arica, M Yakup; Ozalp, V Cengiz

    2016-12-15

    A fast, specific and sensitive homogeneous assay for Staphylococcus aureus detection was developed by measuring the activity of secreted nuclease from the bacteria via a modified DNA oligonucleotide. As biosensor format, an effective system, Nanokeepers as previously reported, were used for triggered release of confined fluorophores, and hence specific detection of S. aureus on nuclease activity was obtained. The interference from blood components for fluorescent quantification was eliminated by a pre-purification by aptamer-functionalized silica magnetic nanoparticles. The reported assay system was exclusively formed by nucleic acid oligos and magnetic or mesoporous silica nanoparticles, that can be used on blood samples in a stepwise manner. The assay was successfully used as a sensing platform for the specific detection of S. aureus cells as low as 682 CFU in whole blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, N; Marchand, C; Liu, J; Mitra, R; Hogan, M E; Pommier, Y

    2000-07-14

    The G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides and have been identified as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) activity (Rando, R. F., Ojwang, J., Elbaggari, A., Reyes, G. R., Tinder, R., McGrath, M. S., and Hogan, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1754-1760; Mazumder, A., Neamati, N., Ojwang, J. O., Sunder, S., Rando, R. F., and Pommier, Y. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 13762-13771; Jing, N., and Hogan, M. E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 34992-34999). To understand the inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by the G-quartet inhibitors, we have designed the oligonucleotides and, composed of three and four G-quartets with stem lengths of 19 and 24 A, respectively. The fact that increasing the G-quartet stem length from 15 to 24 A kept inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity unchanged suggests that the binding interaction occurs between a GTGT loop domain of the G-quartet inhibitors and a catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, referred to as a face-to-face interaction. Docking the NMR structure of (Jing and Hogan (1998)) into the x-ray structure of the core domain of HIV-1 IN, HIV-1 IN-(51-209) (Maignan, S., Guilloteau, J.-P. , Qing, Z.-L., Clement-Mella, C., and Mikol, V. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 282, 359-368), was performed using the GRAMM program. The statistical distributions of hydrogen bonding between HIV-1 IN and were obtained from the analyses of 1000 random docking structures. The docking results show a high probability of interaction between the GTGT loop residues of the G-quartet inhibitors and the catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, in agreement with the experimental observation.

  19. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  20. Immobilization of oligonucleotide probes on silicon surfaces using biotin–streptavidin system examined with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awsiuk, K., E-mail: kamil.awsiuk@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Rysz, J. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Petrou, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Budkowski, A. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Bernasik, A. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Kakabakos, S. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Marzec, M.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Raptis, I. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece)

    2014-01-30

    To immobilize effectively oligonucleotide probes on SiO{sub 2} modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, four procedures based on streptavidin–biotin system are compared with Atomic Force Microscopy, Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The first approach involves: adsorption of biotinylated Bovine Serum Albumin, blocking free surface sites with BSA, binding of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotide (b-oligo). Final steps are exchanged in the second procedure with immobilization of preformed streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate. The third approach consists of streptavidin adsorption, blocking with BSA and b-oligo binding. Finally, streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate is immobilized directly within the fourth method. Surface coverage with biomolecules, determined from ARXPS, accords with average AFM height, and is anti-correlated with the intensity of Si+ ions. Higher biomolecular coverage was achieved during the last steps of the first (2.45(±0.38) mg/m{sup 2}) and second (1.31(±0.22) mg/m{sup 2}) approach, as compared to lower surface density resulting from the third (0.58(±0.20) mg/m{sup 2}) and fourth (0.41(±0.11) mg/m{sup 2}) method. Phosphorus atomic concentration indicates effectiveness of oligonucleotide immobilization. Secondary ions intensities, characteristic for oligonucleotides, streptavidin, BSA, and proteins, allow additional insight into overlayer composition. These measurements verify the ARXPS results and show the superiority of the first two immobilization approaches in terms of streptavidin and oligonucleotide density achieved onto the surface.

  1. Immobilization of oligonucleotide probes on silicon surfaces using biotin–streptavidin system examined with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awsiuk, K.; Rysz, J.; Petrou, P.; Budkowski, A.; Bernasik, A.; Kakabakos, S.; Marzec, M.M.; Raptis, I.

    2014-01-01

    To immobilize effectively oligonucleotide probes on SiO 2 modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, four procedures based on streptavidin–biotin system are compared with Atomic Force Microscopy, Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The first approach involves: adsorption of biotinylated Bovine Serum Albumin, blocking free surface sites with BSA, binding of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotide (b-oligo). Final steps are exchanged in the second procedure with immobilization of preformed streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate. The third approach consists of streptavidin adsorption, blocking with BSA and b-oligo binding. Finally, streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate is immobilized directly within the fourth method. Surface coverage with biomolecules, determined from ARXPS, accords with average AFM height, and is anti-correlated with the intensity of Si+ ions. Higher biomolecular coverage was achieved during the last steps of the first (2.45(±0.38) mg/m 2 ) and second (1.31(±0.22) mg/m 2 ) approach, as compared to lower surface density resulting from the third (0.58(±0.20) mg/m 2 ) and fourth (0.41(±0.11) mg/m 2 ) method. Phosphorus atomic concentration indicates effectiveness of oligonucleotide immobilization. Secondary ions intensities, characteristic for oligonucleotides, streptavidin, BSA, and proteins, allow additional insight into overlayer composition. These measurements verify the ARXPS results and show the superiority of the first two immobilization approaches in terms of streptavidin and oligonucleotide density achieved onto the surface.

  2. 4p16.1-p15.31 duplication and 4p terminal deletion in a 3-years old Chinese girl: Array-CGH, genotype-phenotype and neurological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Ferrara, Dante; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Ferrara, Ines; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Microscopically chromosome rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4 include the two known clinical entities: partial trisomy 4p and deletions of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 and 2 (WHSCR-1 and WHSCR-2, respectively), which cause cranio-facial anomalies, congenital malformations and developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on clinical findings detected in a Chinese patient with a de novo 4p16.1-p15.32 duplication in association with a subtle 4p terminal deletion of 6 Mb in size. This unusual chromosome imbalance resulted in WHS classical phenotype, while clinical manifestations of 4p trisomy were practically absent. This observation suggests the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of sensitive dosage genes with regulatory function placed in WHS critical region, is more pathogenic than concomitant 4p duplicated segment. Additionally clinical findings in our patient confirm a variable penetrance of major malformations and neurological features in Chinese children despite of WHS critical region's deletion. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complex chromosome rearrangement in a child with microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features and mosaicism for a terminal deletion del(18(q21.32-qter investigated by FISH and array-CGH: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokotas Haris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 7 years and 4 months old Greek boy with mild microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. He was a sociable child with maxillary hypoplasia, epicanthal folds, upslanting palpebral fissures with long eyelashes, and hypertelorism. His ears were prominent and dysmorphic, he had a long philtrum and a high arched palate. His weight was 17 kg (25th percentile and his height 120 cm (50th percentile. High resolution chromosome analysis identified in 50% of the cells a normal male karyotype, and in 50% of the cells one chromosome 18 showed a terminal deletion from 18q21.32. Molecular cytogenetic investigation confirmed a del(18(q21.32-qter in the one chromosome 18, but furthermore revealed the presence of a duplication in q21.2 in the other chromosome 18. The case is discussed concerning comparable previously reported cases and the possible mechanisms of formation.

  4. A review of array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  5. Clinical array-based karyotyping of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 status resolves gene copy number and reveals chromosome 17 complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, Shelly; Gorre, Mercedes; Mohammed, Mansoor; Yeh, I-Tien; Lytvak, Irina; Tirtorahardjo, Budi; Dzidic, Natasha; Zadeh, Soheila; Kim, Jaeweon; McCaskill, Chris; Lim, Lony

    2010-01-01

    HER2 gene copy status, and concomitant administration of trastuzumab (Herceptin), remains one of the best examples of targeted cancer therapy based on understanding the genomic etiology of disease. However, newly diagnosed breast cancer cases with equivocal HER2 results present a challenge for the oncologist who must make treatment decisions despite the patient's unresolved HER2 status. In some cases both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are reported as equivocal, whereas in other cases IHC results and FISH are discordant for positive versus negative results. The recent validation of array-based, molecular karyotyping for clinical oncology testing provides an alternative method for determination of HER2 gene copy number status in cases remaining unresolved by traditional methods. In the current study, DNA extracted from 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from newly diagnosed cases of invasive ductal carcinoma referred to our laboratory with unresolved HER2 status, were analyzed using a clinically validated genomic array containing 127 probes covering the HER2 amplicon, the pericentromeric regions, and both chromosome 17 arms. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analysis of chromosome 17 resolved HER2 gene status in [20/20] (100%) of cases and revealed additional chromosome 17 copy number changes in [18/20] (90%) of cases. Array CGH analysis also revealed two false positives and one false negative by FISH due to 'ratio skewing' caused by chromosomal gains and losses in the centromeric region. All cases with complex rearrangements of chromosome 17 showed genome-wide chromosomal instability. These results illustrate the analytical power of array-based genomic analysis as a clinical laboratory technique for resolution of HER2 status in breast cancer cases with equivocal results. The frequency of complex chromosome 17 abnormalities in these cases suggests that the two

  6. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy, J.G.; Bybee, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  7. Diode lasers and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streifer, W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles of operation of III-V semiconductor diode lasers, the use of distributed feedback, and high power laser arrays. The semiconductor laser is a robust, miniature, versatile device, which directly converts electricity to light with very high efficiency. Applications to pumping solid-state lasers and to fiber optic and point-to-point communications are reviewed

  8. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  9. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Castro, David; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT

  10. Assessing the Interplay between the Physicochemical Parameters of Ion-Pairing Reagents and the Analyte Sequence on the Electrospray Desorption Process for Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, Babak; Murph, Mandi M.; Bartlett, Michael G.

    2017-08-01

    Alkylamines are widely used as ion-pairing agents during LC-MS of oligonucleotides. In addition to a better chromatographic separation, they also assist with the desorption of oligonucleotide ions into the gas phase, cause charge state reduction, and decrease cation adduction. However, the choice of such ion-pairing agents has considerable influence on the MS signal intensity of oligonucleotides as they can also cause significant ion suppression. Interestingly, optimal ion-pairing agents should be selected on a case by case basis as their choice is strongly influenced by the sequence of the oligonucleotide under investigation. Despite imposing major practical difficulties to analytical method development, such a highly variable system that responds very strongly to the nuances of the electrospray composition provides an excellent opportunity for a fundamental study of the electrospray ionization process. Our investigations using this system quantitatively revealed the major factors that influenced the ESI ionization efficiency of oligonucleotides. Parameters such as boiling point, proton affinity, partition coefficient, water solubility, and Henry's law constants for the ion-pairing reagents and the hydrophobic thymine content of the oligonucleotides were found to be the most significant contributors. Identification of these parameters also allowed for the development of a statistical predictive algorithm that can assist with the choice of an optimum IP agent for each particular oligonucleotide sequence. We believe that research in the field of oligonucleotide bioanalysis will significantly benefit from this algorithm (included in Supplementary Material) as it advocates for the use of lesser-known but more suitable ion-pair alternatives to TEA for many oligonucleotide sequences.

  11. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides for repair and replication studies of single and double radio-induced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several oxidative processes induce the formation of DNA lesions. In order to evaluate the biological and structural significance of such damage, several DNA lesions were inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides at defined sites. The research work aimed at describing the preparation of oligonucleotides t hat contained DNA damage and the evaluation of the biological properties of the lesions. A first part described the incorporation of radiation-induced lesions, namely (5'S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and (5'S,5S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-2'-desoxyuridine into oligonucleotides. The modified DNA fragments were characterised by several spectroscopic and biochemical analyses including ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS, CLHP and enzymatic digestions. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase and Klenow exo fragment, the pyrimidine cyclo-nucleosides were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Then, repair studies by ADN N glycosylases, operating in the base excision repair pathway, have shown that the anhydro-nucleoside lesions were not recognised nor excised by Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, yNtg1 yNtg2 and yOgg1. Interestingly, the Latococcus lactis Fpg protein recognises (formation of a non covalent complex) but do not excise the damage. The incorporation into oligonucleotides of the (5R*) and (5S*) diastereoisomers of 1-[2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]-5-hydroxy-hydantoin, generated by several oxidative processes was then described. In vitro DNA replication assays using modified oligonucleotides matrix showed a lethal potential of the latter base damage. Repair studies by ADN N-glycosylases showed that the damage was substrate for Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Fpg-L1. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the Michaelis kinetics constants were found to be affected by the presence of the damage. MALDI-TOF MS was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotides cleavage by the

  12. Concurrent array-based queue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  13. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  14. Study on biodistribution and imaging of radioiodinated antisense oligonucleotides in nude mice bearing human lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R.F.; Shen, J.; Zhang, C.L.; Liu, M.; Guo, F.Q.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of sporadic lymphoma has risen due to an increase in immunosuppressed patients, particularly those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sometimes suspect lymphoma has an undetectable location and we can not get the pathological specimen. Management of lymphoma is also difficult because the persistence of a significant number of residual tumor cells after intensive treatment. These relative failures can be attributed to make us choose this study for opening a new diagnostic and therapeutic field of lymphoma from molecular level. Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain framework region (FR) of V1 family have been verified to be a major determinant of malignant phenotype of V1 family B-cell lymphoma. Most of targets for tumor antisense therapy study are protooncogenes, such as c-myc, bc1-2, which are broad -spectrum tumor imaging agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using radioiodine labeled FR antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs) as an imaging agent or antisense therapeutic radiopharmaceutical in lymphoma. A 18-mer partial phosphorothioate oligonucleotide sequence was synthesized and grafted in 5 ' with a tyramine group which was further labeled with 125 I or 131 I using the chloramine T method. Normal CD-1 mice were injected via a tail vein with 148 kBq of 125 I-FR-ASON (2∼3 μ g). Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4 and 24 h and tissue samples were studied. Liposome-mediated 3.33 MBq of 131 I-FR-ASON (7 ∼ 9μ g) was injected intratumorally into tumor-bearing BALB/c mice (6 weeks after inoculation of 10 7 Namalwa cells) meanwhile liposome-mediated 131 I labeled sense oligonucleotides served as controls. Biodistribution was monitored by sequential scintigraphy and organ radioactivity measurement 24 h after injection. The percentage of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g) of tumor and tumor/ non-tumor tissue ratios (T/NT) were calculated for each group of mice and the difference between two groups was assessed. The 5

  15. The Big Optical Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozurkewich, D.; Johnston, K.J.; Simon, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the capabilities of the Naval Research Laboratory Big Optical Array (BOA), an interferometric optical array for high-resolution imaging of stars, stellar systems, and other celestial objects. There are four important differences between the BOA design and the design of Mark III Optical Interferometer on Mount Wilson (California). These include a long passive delay line which will be used in BOA to do most of the delay compensation, so that the fast delay line will have a very short travel; the beam combination in BOA will be done in triplets, to allow measurement of closure phase; the same light will be used for both star and fringe tracking; and the fringe tracker will use several wavelength channels

  16. A 4 probe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, C E [CEGB, Marchwood Engineering Laboratories, Marchwood, Southampton, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    A NDT system is described which moves away from the present manual method using a single send/receive transducer combination and uses instead an array of four transducers. Four transducers are shown sufficient to define a point reflector with a resolution of m{lambda}z/R where m{lambda} is the minimum detectable path difference in the system (corresponding to a m cycle time resolution), z the range and R the radius of the array. Signal averaging with an input ADC rate of 100 MHz is used with voice output for the range data. Typical resolution measurements in a water tank are presented. We expect a resolution of the order of mm in steel at a range of 80 mm. The system is expected to have applications in automated, high resolution, sizing of defects and in the inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds. (author)

  17. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  18. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  19. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  20. Phased array antenna control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  1. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  2. Lectin-Array Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Raquel; Echevarria, Juan; Hernandez, Alvaro; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune or neurodegenerative disorders. Unlocking the potential of glycans as disease markers will require rapid and unbiased glycoproteomics methods for glycan biomarker discovery. The present method is a facile and rapid protocol for qualitative analysis of protein glycosylation in complex biological mixtures. While traditional lectin arrays only provide an average signal for the glycans in the mixture, which is usually dominated by the most abundant proteins, our method provides individual lectin binding profiles for all proteins separated in the gel electrophoresis step. Proteins do not have to be excised from the gel for subsequent analysis via the lectin array but are transferred by contact diffusion from the gel to a glass slide presenting multiple copies of printed lectin arrays. Fluorescently marked glycoproteins are trapped by the printed lectins via specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions and after a washing step their binding profile with up to 20 lectin probes is analyzed with a fluorescent scanner. The method produces the equivalent of 20 lectin blots in a single experiment, giving detailed insight into the binding epitopes present in the fractionated proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  4. DNA radio-induced tandem lesions: formation, introduction in oligonucleotides and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdat, Anne-Gaelle

    2000-01-01

    Cell killing induced by excited photosensitizers, ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs can not be only explained by the formation of single DNA lesions. Thus, multiply damaged sites, are likely to have harmful biological consequences. One example of tandem base damage induced by ".OH radical in X-irradiated aqueous solution of DNA oligomers is N-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-formyl-amine (dβF)/8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). In order to investigate the biological significance of such a tandem lesion, both 8-oxodGuo and dβF were introduced in synthetic oligonucleotides at vicinal positions using the solid phase phosphoramidite method with the 'Pac phosphoramidite' chemistry. The purity of the synthetic DNA fragments and the integrity of modified nucleosides was confirmed using different complementary techniques: HPLC, PAGE, ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS and capillary electrophoresis. Using the above synthetic substrates, investigations were carried out in order to determine the substrate specificity and the excision mechanism of three glycosylases involved in the base excision repair pathway: endonuclease III, Fpg and yOggl. Both tandem lesions were substrates for the BER enzymes. However, the tandem lesion are not completely excised by the repair enzymes. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the ratios of Vm/Km Michaelis kinetics constants were not found to be significantly affected by the presence of the tandem lesions. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotide cleavage by the BER enzymes. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment exo- and DNA polymerase β, tandem base damage were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Finally, the level of tandem base damage in the DNA exposed to γ-ray using the liquid chromatography coupled to electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was determined. Both dβF-8-oxodGuo and 8

  5. An evaluation of oligonucleotide-based therapeutic strategies for polyQ diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiszer Agnieszka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi and antisense strategies provide experimental therapeutic agents for numerous diseases, including polyglutamine (polyQ disorders caused by CAG repeat expansion. We compared the potential of different oligonucleotide-based strategies for silencing the genes responsible for several polyQ diseases, including Huntington's disease and two spinocerebellar ataxias, type 1 and type 3. The strategies included nonallele-selective gene silencing, gene replacement, allele-selective SNP targeting and CAG repeat targeting. Results Using the patient-derived cell culture models of polyQ diseases, we tested various siRNAs, and antisense reagents and assessed their silencing efficiency and allele selectivity. We showed considerable allele discrimination by several SNP targeting siRNAs based on a weak G-G or G-U pairing with normal allele and strong G-C pairing with mutant allele at the site of RISC-induced cleavage. Among the CAG repeat targeting reagents the strongest allele discrimination is achieved by miRNA-like functioning reagents that bind to their targets and inhibit their translation without substantial target cleavage. Also, morpholino analog performs well in mutant and normal allele discrimination but its efficient delivery to cells at low effective concentration still remains a challenge. Conclusions Using three cellular models of polyQ diseases and the same experimental setup we directly compared the performance of different oligonucleotide-based treatment strategies that are currently under development. Based on the results obtained by us and others we discussed the advantages and drawbacks of these strategies considering them from several different perspectives. The strategy aimed at nonallele-selective inhibiting of causative gene expression by targeting specific sequence of the implicated gene is the easiest to implement but relevant benefits are still uncertain. The gene replacement strategy that

  6. Development of specific oligonucleotide probes for the identification and in situ detection of hydrocarbon-degrading Alcanivorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syutsubo, K; Kishira, H; Harayama, S

    2001-06-01

    The genus Alcanivorax comprises diverse hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria. Novel 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probes (ALV735 and ALV735-b) were developed to quantify two subgroups of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the conditions for the single-mismatch discrimination of the probes were optimized. The specificity of the probes was improved further using a singly mismatched oligonucleotide as a competitor. The growth of Alcanivorax cells in crude oil-contaminated sea water under the biostimulation condition was investigated by FISH with the probe ALV735, which targeted the main cluster of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group. The size of the Alcanivorax population increased with increasing incubation time and accounted for 91% of the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) count after incubation for 2 weeks. The probes developed in this study are useful for detecting Alcanivorax populations in petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortia.

  7. DNA-Catalytically Active Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates-Based Colorimetric Multidimensional Sensor Array for Protein Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangcong; Chen, Zhengbo; Tan, Lulu; Lou, Tianhong; Zhao, Yan

    2017-01-03

    A series of single-strand oligonucleotides functionalized catalytically active gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) as nonspecific receptors have been designed to build a protein sensing array. We take advantage of the correlation between the catalytic activity and the exposed surface area of AuNPs, i.e., DNA-proteins interactions mask the surface area of AuNPs, leading to poor catalytic performance of AuNPs. As the number of DNA-bound proteins increases, the surfaces of AuNPs become more masked; thus, the time of 4- nitrophenol/NaBH 4 reaction for color change (yellow → colorless) of the solution increases. Taking advantage of three nonspecific SH-labeled DNA sequences (A15, C15, and T15) as array sensing elements and the color-change time (CCT) of the solution as signal readout, colorimetric response patterns can be obtained on the array and identified via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Eleven proteins have been completely distinguished with 100% accuracy with the naked eye at the 30 nM level. Remarkably, two similar proteins (bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin), two different proteins (bovine serum albumin and concanavalin) at the same concentration, and the mixtures of the two proteins with different molar ratios have been discriminated with 100%. The practicability of this sensor array is further validated by high accuracy (100%) identification of 11 proteins in human serum samples.

  8. Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of the Specific Oligonucleotide Sequence of Dengue Virus Type 1 on Pencil Graphite Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine; Nascimento, Gustavo; Santana, Nataly; Ferreira, Danielly; Lima, Manoel; Natividade, Edna; Martins, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor that relies on the adsorption immobilization of the 18-mer single-stranded nucleic acid related to dengue virus gene 1 on activated pencil graphite was developed. Hybridization between the probe and its complementary oligonucleotides (the target) was investigated by monitoring guanine oxidation by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The pencil graphite electrode was made of ordinary pencil lead (type 4B). The polished surface of the working electrode was activated by applying a potential of 1.8 V for 5 min. Afterward, the dengue oligonucleotides probe was immobilized on the activated electrode by applying 0.5 V to the electrode in 0.5 M acetate buffer (pH 5.0) for 5 min. The hybridization process was carried out by incubating at the annealing temperature of the oligonucleotides. A time of five minutes and concentration of 1 μM were found to be the optimal conditions for probe immobilization. The electrochemical detection of annealing between the DNA probe (TS-1P) immobilized on the modified electrode, and the target (TS-1T) was achieved. The target could be quantified in a range from 1 to 40 nM with good linearity and a detection limit of 0.92 nM. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was tested using non-complementary sequences of dengue virus 2 and 3. PMID:22163916

  9. New approach to the determination phosphorothioate oligonucleotides by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studzińska, Sylwia; Mounicou, Sandra; Szpunar, Joanna; Łobiński, Ryszard; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-01-15

    This text presents a novel method for the separation and detection of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides with the use of ion pair ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry The research showed that hexafluoroisopropanol/triethylamine based mobile phases may be successfully used when liquid chromatography is coupled with such elemental detection. However, the concentration of both HFIP and TEA influences the final result. The lower concentration of HFIP, the lower the background in ICP-MS and the greater the sensitivity. The method applied for the analysis of serum samples was based on high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Utilization of this method allows determination of fifty times lower quantity of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides than in the case of quadrupole mass analyzer. Monitoring of (31)P may be used to quantify these compounds at the level of 80 μg L(-1), while simultaneous determination of sulfur is very useful for qualitative analysis. Moreover, the results presented in this paper demonstrate the practical applicability of coupling LC with ICP-MS in determining phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and their metabolites in serum within 7 min with a very good sensitivity. The method was linear in the concentration range between 0.2 and 3 mg L(-1). The limit of detection was in the range of 0.07 and 0.13 mg L(-1). Accuracy varied with concentration, but was in the range of 3%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of oligonucleotide microarrays for simultaneous multi-species identification of Phellinus tree-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzean, Yuh; Shu, Po-Yao; Liou, Ruey-Fen; Tzean, Shean-Shong

    2016-03-01

    Polyporoid Phellinus fungi are ubiquitously present in the environment and play an important role in shaping forest ecology. Several species of Phellinus are notorious pathogens that can affect a broad variety of tree species in forest, plantation, orchard and urban habitats; however, current detection methods are overly complex and lack the sensitivity required to identify these pathogens at the species level in a timely fashion for effective infestation control. Here, we describe eight oligonucleotide microarray platforms for the simultaneous and specific detection of 17 important Phellinus species, using probes generated from the internal transcribed spacer regions unique to each species. The sensitivity, robustness and efficiency of this Phellinus microarray system was subsequently confirmed against template DNA from two key Phellinus species, as well as field samples collected from tree roots, trunks and surrounding soil. This system can provide early, specific and convenient detection of Phellinus species for forestry, arboriculture and quarantine inspection, and could potentially help to mitigate the environmental and economic impact of Phellinus-related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Structural Determinants of Photoreactivity of Triplex Forming Oligonucleotides Conjugated to Psoralens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Oh, Dennis H.

    2010-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) with both DNA and 2′-O-methyl RNA backbones can direct psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences. However, the functional consequences of these differing structures on psoralen photoreactivity are unknown. We designed TFO sequences with DNA and 2′-O-methyl RNA backbones conjugated to psoralen by 2-carbon linkers and examined their ability to bind and target damage to model DNA duplexes corresponding to sequences within the human HPRT gene. While TFO binding affinity was not dramatically affected by the type of backbone, psoralen photoreactivity was completely abrogated by the 2′-O-methyl RNA backbone. Photoreactivity was restored when the psoralen was conjugated to the RNA TFO via a 6-carbon linker. In contrast to the B-form DNA of triplexes formed by DNA TFOs, the CD spectra of triplexes formed with 2′-O-methyl RNA TFOs exhibited features of A-form DNA. These results indicate that 2′-O-methyl RNA TFOs induce a partial B-to-A transition in their target DNA sequences which may impair the photoreactivity of a conjugated psoralen and suggest that optimal design of TFOs to target DNA damage may require a balance between binding ability and drug reactivity. PMID:20725628

  12. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs can selectively increase protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Sun, Hong; Shen, Wen; Wang, Shiyu; Yao, Joyee; Migawa, Michael T; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Damle, Sagar S; Riney, Stan; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-09-19

    A variety of diseases are caused by deficiencies in amounts or activity of key proteins. An approach that increases the amount of a specific protein might be of therapeutic benefit. We reasoned that translation could be specifically enhanced using trans-acting agents that counter the function of negative regulatory elements present in the 5' UTRs of some mRNAs. We recently showed that translation can be enhanced by antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target upstream open reading frames. Here we report the amount of a protein can also be selectively increased using ASOs designed to hybridize to other translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs. Levels of human RNASEH1, LDLR, and ACP1 and of mouse ACP1 and ARF1 were increased up to 2.7-fold in different cell types and species upon treatment with chemically modified ASOs targeting 5' UTR inhibitory regions in the mRNAs encoding these proteins. The activities of ASOs in enhancing translation were sequence and position dependent and required helicase activity. The ASOs appear to improve the recruitment of translation initiation factors to the target mRNA. Importantly, ASOs targeting ACP1 mRNA significantly increased the level of ACP1 protein in mice, suggesting that this approach has therapeutic and research potentials. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Nano and Microtechnologies for the Delivery of Oligonucleotides with Gene Silencing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe De Rosa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotides (ONs are synthetic fragments of nucleic acid designed to modulate the expression of target proteins. DNA-based ONs (antisense, antigene, aptamer or decoy and more recently a new class of RNA-based ONs, the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, have gained great attention for the treatment of different disease states, such as viral infections, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer. However, the development of therapeutic strategies based on ONs is hampered by their low bioavailability, poor intracellular uptake and rapid degradation in biological fluids. The use of a non-viral carrier can be a powerful tool to overcome these drawbacks. Lipid or polymer-based nanotechnologies can improve biological stability and cellular uptake of ONs, with possibility of tissue and/or cellular targeting. The use of polymeric devices can also produce a prolonged release of the ON, thus reducing the need of frequent administrations. This review summarizes advantages and issues related to the main non-viral vectors used for ON delivery.

  14. Experimental design, modeling and optimization of polyplex formation between DNA oligonucleotides and branched polyethylenimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, Lilia; Ursu, Elena L; Cojocaru, Corneliu; Rotaru, Alexandru; Barboiu, Mihail; Pinteala, Mariana

    2015-09-28

    The complexes formed by DNA and polycations have received great attention owing to their potential application in gene therapy. In this study, the binding efficiency between double-stranded oligonucleotides (dsDNA) and branched polyethylenimine (B-PEI) has been quantified by processing of the images captured from the gel electrophoresis assays. The central composite experimental design has been employed to investigate the effects of controllable factors on the binding efficiency. On the basis of experimental data and the response surface methodology, a multivariate regression model has been constructed and statistically validated. The model has enabled us to predict the binding efficiency depending on experimental factors, such as concentrations of dsDNA and B-PEI as well as the initial pH of solution. The optimization of the binding process has been performed using simplex and gradient methods. The optimal conditions determined for polyplex formation have yielded a maximal binding efficiency close to 100%. In order to reveal the mechanism of complex formation at the atomic-scale, a molecular dynamic simulation has been carried out. According to the computation results, B-PEI amine hydrogen atoms have interacted with oxygen atoms from dsDNA phosphate groups. These interactions have led to the formation of hydrogen bonds between macromolecules, stabilizing the polyplex structure.

  15. A novel analysis strategy for HLA typing using a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, D I

    2017-11-01

    The technique of reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOPs) is commonly used in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing. In the conventional method for data analysis (exact pattern matching, EPM), the larger is the number of mismatched probes, the longer the time for final typing assignment. A novel strategy, filtering and scoring (FnS), has been developed to easily assign the best-fit allele pair. In the FnS method, candidate alleles and allele pairs were filtered based on (1) subject's ethnicity, and (2) the measured partial reaction pattern with only definitely negative or positive probes. Then, the complete reaction pattern for all probes (CRPoAPs) were compared between the raw sample and expected residual allele pairs to obtain mismatch scores. To compare the FnS and EPM methods, each analysis time (minutes:seconds) for reverse SSOP HLA typing with intermediate resolution (n = 507) was measured. The analysis time with FnS method was shorter than that of the EPM method [00:21 (00:08-01:47) and 01:04 (00:15-23:45), respectively, P typing in a comprehensive and quantitative comparison between measured and expected CRPoAPs of candidate allele pairs. Therefore, this analysis strategy might be useful in a clinical setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Fluorinated Nucleotide Modifications Modulate Allele Selectivity of SNP-Targeting Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Østergaard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs have the potential to discriminate between subtle RNA mismatches such as SNPs. Certain mismatches, however, allow ASOs to bind at physiological conditions and result in RNA cleavage mediated by RNase H. We showed that replacing DNA nucleotides in the gap region of an ASO with other chemical modification can improve allele selectivity. Herein, we systematically substitute every position in the gap region of an ASO targeting huntingtin gene (HTT with fluorinated nucleotides. Potency is determined in cell culture against mutant HTT (mtHTT and wild-type HTT (wtHTT mRNA and RNase H cleavage intensities, and patterns are investigated. This study profiled five different fluorinated nucleotides and showed them to have predictable, site-specific effects on RNase H cleavage, and the cleavage patterns were rationalized from a published X-ray structure of human RNase H1. The results herein can be used as a guide for future projects where ASO discrimination of SNPs is important.

  17. Novel complex MAD phasing and RNase H structural insights using selenium oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdur, Rob; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Gan, Jianhua; Jiang, Jiansheng; Salon, Jozef; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Weber, Irene T.; Huang, Zhen, E-mail: huang@gsu.edu [Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Selenium-derivatized oligonucleotides may facilitate phase determination and high-resolution structure determination for protein–nucleic acid crystallography. The Se atom-specific mutagenesis (SAM) strategy may also enhance the study of nuclease catalysis. The crystal structures of protein–nucleic acid complexes are commonly determined using selenium-derivatized proteins via MAD or SAD phasing. Here, the first protein–nucleic acid complex structure determined using selenium-derivatized nucleic acids is reported. The RNase H–RNA/DNA complex is used as an example to demonstrate the proof of principle. The high-resolution crystal structure indicates that this selenium replacement results in a local subtle unwinding of the RNA/DNA substrate duplex, thereby shifting the RNA scissile phosphate closer to the transition state of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. It was also observed that the scissile phosphate forms a hydrogen bond to the water nucleophile and helps to position the water molecule in the structure. Consistently, it was discovered that the substitution of a single O atom by a Se atom in a guide DNA sequence can largely accelerate RNase H catalysis. These structural and catalytic studies shed new light on the guide-dependent RNA cleavage.

  18. Assignment methodology for larger RNA oligonucleotides: Application to an ATP-binding RNA aptamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Thorsten; Feigon, Juli

    1997-01-01

    The use of uniform 13C, 15N labeling in the NMR spectroscopic study of RNA structures has greatly facilitated the assignment process in small RNA oligonucleotides. For ribose spinsystem assignments, exploitation of these labels has followed previously developed methods for the study of proteins. However, for sequential assignment of the exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons of the nucleotides, it has been necessary to develop a variety of new NMR experiments. Even these are of limited utility in the unambiguous assignment of larger RNAs due to the short carbon relaxation times and extensive spectral overlap for all nuclei.These problems can largely be overcome by the additional use of base-type selectively 13C, 15N-labeled RNA in combination with a judicious use of related RNAs with base substitutions. We report the application of this approach to a 36-nucleotide ATP-binding RNA aptamer in complex with AMP. Complete sequential 1H assignments, as well as the majority of 13C and 15N assignments, were obtained

  19. DNA polymorphisms in the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle revealed by synthetic oligonucleotide probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashikanth; Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 15 randomly selected unrelated animals and from two sire families (11 animals) of the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle were investigated. Four oligonucleotide probes - (GTG) 5 , (TCC) 5 , (GT) 8 and (GT) 12 - were used on genomic DNA digested with restriction enzymes AluI, HinfI, MboI, EcoRI and HaeIII in different combinations. All four probes produced multiloci fingerprints with differing levels of polymorphisms. Total bands and shared bands in the fingerprints of each individual were in the range of 2.5 to 23.0 KB. Band number ranged from 9 to 17, with 0.48 average band sharing. Probes (GT) 8 , (GT) 12 and (TCC) 5 produced fingerprinting patterns of medium to low polymorphism, whereas probe (GTG) 5 produced highly polymorphic patterns. Probe (GTG) 5 in combination with the HaeIII enzyme was highly polymorphic with a heterozygosity level of 0.85, followed by (GT) 8 , (TCC) 5 and (GT) 12 with heterozygosity levels of 0.70, 0.65 and 0.30, respectively. Probe GTG 5 or its complementary sequence CAC 5 produced highly polymorphic fingerprints, indicating that the probe can be used for analysing population structure, parentage verification and identifying loci controlling quantitative traits and fertility status. (author)

  20. Spotting and validation of a genome wide oligonucleotide chip with duplicate measurement of each gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, Mads; Skov, Vibe; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Tan, Qihua; Jochumsen, Kirsten; Fritzner, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Dahlgaard, Jesper; Kruse, Torben A.

    2006-01-01

    The quality of DNA microarray based gene expression data relies on the reproducibility of several steps in a microarray experiment. We have developed a spotted genome wide microarray chip with oligonucleotides printed in duplicate in order to minimise undesirable biases, thereby optimising detection of true differential expression. The validation study design consisted of an assessment of the microarray chip performance using the MessageAmp and FairPlay labelling kits. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to demonstrate that MessageAmp was significantly more reproducible than FairPlay. Further examinations with MessageAmp revealed the applicability of the system. The linear range of the chips was three orders of magnitude, the precision was high, as 95% of measurements deviated less than 1.24-fold from the expected value, and the coefficient of variation for relative expression was 13.6%. Relative quantitation was more reproducible than absolute quantitation and substantial reduction of variance was attained with duplicate spotting. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant day-to-day variation

  1. Specific Increase of Protein Levels by Enhancing Translation Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Upstream Open Frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-01-01

    A number of diseases are caused by low levels of key proteins; therefore, increasing the amount of specific proteins in human bodies is of therapeutic interest. Protein expression is downregulated by some structural or sequence elements present in the 5' UTR of mRNAs, such as upstream open reading frames (uORF). Translation initiation from uORF(s) reduces translation from the downstream primary ORF encoding the main protein product in the same mRNA, leading to a less efficient protein expression. Therefore, it is possible to use antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to specifically inhibit translation of the uORF by base-pairing with the uAUG region of the mRNA, redirecting translation machinery to initiate from the primary AUG site. Here we review the recent findings that translation of specific mRNAs can be enhanced using ASOs targeting uORF regions. Appropriately designed and optimized ASOs are highly specific, and they act in a sequence- and position-dependent manner, with very minor off-target effects. Protein levels can be increased using this approach in different types of human and mouse cells, and, importantly, also in mice. Since uORFs are present in around half of human mRNAs, the uORF-targeting ASOs may thus have valuable potential as research tools and as therapeutics to increase the levels of proteins for a variety of genes.

  2. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  3. Pyrene–nucleobase conjugates: synthesis, oligonucleotide binding and confocal bioimaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Jabłoński

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pyrene–linker–nucleobase (nucleobase = thymine, adenine conjugates with carbonyl and hydroxy functionalities in the linker were synthesized and characterized. X-ray single-crystal structure analysis performed for the pyrene–C(OCH2CH2–thymine (2 conjugate reveals dimers of molecules 2 stabilized by hydrogen bonds between the thymine moieties. The photochemical characterization showed structure-dependent fluorescence properties of the investigated compounds. The conjugates bearing a carbonyl function represent weak emitters as compared to compounds with a hydroxy function in the linker. The self-assembly properties of pyrene nucleobases were investigated in respect to their binding to single and double strand oligonucleotides in water and in buffer solution. In respect to the complementary oligothymidine T10 template in water, compounds 3 and 5 both show a self-assembling behavior according to canonical base–base pairing. However, in buffer solution, derivative 5 was much more effective than 3 in binding to the T10 template. Furthermore the adenine derivative 5 binds to the double-stranded (dA10–T10 template with a self-assembly ratio of 112%. Such a high value of a self-assembly ratio can be rationalized by a triple-helix-like binding, intercalation, or a mixture of both. Remarkably, compound 5 also shows dual staining pattern in living HeLa cells. Confocal microscopy confirmed that 5 predominantly stains mitochondria but it also accumulates in the nucleoli of the cells.

  4. Targeting DMPK with Antisense Oligonucleotide Improves Muscle Strength in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Jauvin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, a dominant hereditary muscular dystrophy, is caused by an abnormal expansion of a (CTGn trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the human dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK gene. As a consequence, mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats are retained in nuclear foci and alter the function of splicing regulatory factors members of the MBNL and CELF families, resulting in alternative splicing misregulation of specific transcripts in affected DM1 tissues. In the present study, we treated DMSXL mice systemically with a 2′-4′-constrained, ethyl-modified (ISIS 486178 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO targeted to the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene, which led to a 70% reduction in CUGexp RNA abundance and foci in different skeletal muscles and a 30% reduction in the heart. Furthermore, treatment with ISIS 486178 ASO improved body weight, muscle strength, and muscle histology, whereas no overt toxicity was detected. This is evidence that the reduction of CUGexp RNA improves muscle strength in DM1, suggesting that muscle weakness in DM1 patients may be improved following elimination of toxic RNAs.

  5. Ammonium and arsenic trioxide are potent facilitators of oligonucleotide function when delivered by gymnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Castanotto, Daniela; Liu, Xueli; Shemi, Amotz; Stein, Cy A

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Oligonucleotide (ON) concentrations employed for therapeutic applications vary widely, but in general are high enough to raise significant concerns for off target effects and cellular toxicity. However, lowering ON concentrations reduces the chances of a therapeutic response, since typically relatively small amounts of ON are taken up by targeted cells in tissue culture. It is therefore imperative to identify new strategies to improve the concentration dependence of ON function. In this work, we have identified ammonium ion (NH4+) as a non-toxic potent enhancer of ON activity in the nucleus and cytoplasm following delivery by gymnosis. NH4+ is a metabolite that has been extensively employed as diuretic, expectorant, for the treatment of renal calculi and in a variety of other diseases. Enhancement of function can be found in attached and suspension cells, including in difficult-to-transfect Jurkat T and CEM T cells. We have also demonstrated that NH4+ can synergistically interact with arsenic trioxide (arsenite) to further promote ON function without producing any apparent increased cellular toxicity. These small, inexpensive, widely distributed molecules could be useful not only in laboratory experiments but potentially in therapeutic ON-based combinatorial strategy for clinical applications. PMID:29522198

  6. [Antiarrhythmic effect of oligonucleotides accompanied by activation of HSP70 protein in the heart of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglov, S V; Terekhina, O L; Smirnova, E A; Kashaeva, O V; Belkina, L M

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of the protective effect of oligonucleotides (OGN) during pathological processes are poorlyunderstood. The goal of this work was to study the effect of OGN on arrhythmias induced by myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, and the HSP70 level in the heart. As a source of OGN was used the drug "Derinat" ("Technomedservis", Russia). In male Wistar rats were pre-treated the drug for 7 days (i/m, 7.5 mg/kg).The intensity of the arrhythmias was assessed by ECG during 10 min occlusion of the left coronary artery and subsequent 5 min of reperfusion. Protein HSP70 determined in the left ventricle of the heart by Western-blot analysis. During ischemia, this drug reduced duration of extrasystolia by 13 times and the incidence of ventricular tachycardia by 1.5 times. During reperfusion the drug reduced the incidence of ventricular fibrillation, a more than 2-fold, as compared with the control (respectively 23% vs 56%) and by 5 times its duration (8,4 ± 2,3 48,1 ± sec vs 18 7 sec). "Derinat" increased the HSP70 level in the heart by 65% compared with control. These data support the fact that the activation of HSP70 synthesis, induced by OGN is one of the mechanisms that increases the heart resistance to the ischemic and reperfusion damages.

  7. Oligonucleotide-stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for the specific and sensitive detection of biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Jingjin; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-02-21

    A novel biotin fluorescent probe based on oligonucleotide-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) was synthesized by employing a biotinylated cytosine-rich sequence as a synthesized template. The fluorescence properties of the DNA-AgNCs are related to the modified position of the DNA. When biotin is linked to the middle thymine base of the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNCs emit the strongest fluorescence. Moreover, the stability of the DNA-AgNCs was affected by avidin through biotin-avidin binding, quenching the fluorescence of the DNA-AgNCs. In contrast, if free biotin is further introduced into this system, the quenching is apparently weakened by competition, leading to the restoration of fluorescence. This phenomenon can be utilized for the detection of biotin. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery is linearly proportional to the concentration of biotin in the range of 10 nM-1.0 μM with a detection limit of 6.0 nM. This DNA-AgNCs probe with excellent fluorescent properties is sensitive and selective for the detection of biotin and has been applied for the determination of biotin in wheat flour.

  8. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity in vitro by oligonucleotides which form intramolecular tetrads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, R F; Ojwang, J; Elbaggari, A; Reyes, G R; Tinder, R; McGrath, M S; Hogan, M E

    1995-01-27

    An oligonucleotide (I100-15) composed of only deoxyguanosine and thymidine was able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in culture assay systems. I100-15 did not block virus entry into cells but did reduce viral-specific transcripts. As assessed by NMR and polyacrylamide gel methods, I100-15 appears to form a structure in which two stacked guanosine tetrads are connected by three two-base long loops. Structure/activity experiments indicated that formation of intramolecular guanosine tetrads was necessary to achieve maximum antiviral activity. The single deoxyguanosine nucleotide present in each loop was found to be extremely important for the overall antiviral activity. The toxicity of I100-15 was determined to be well above the 50% effective dose (ED50) in culture which yielded a high therapeutic index (> 100). The addition of a cholesterol moiety to the 3' terminus of I100-15 (I100-23) reduced the ED50 value to less than 50 nM (from 0.12 microM for I100-15) and increased the duration of viral suppression to greater than 21 days (versus 7-10 days for I100-15) after removal of the drug from infected cell cultures. The favorable therapeutic index of such molecules coupled with the prolonged suppression of HIV-1, suggest that such compounds further warrant investigation as potential therapeutic agents.

  9. Inhaled ENaC antisense oligonucleotide ameliorates cystic fibrosis-like lung disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Jiang, Chong; Bai, Dong; Katz, Melanie; Greenlee, Sarah; Kawabe, Hiroshi; McCaleb, Michael; Rotin, Daniela; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2017-11-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, Scnn1) hyperactivity in the lung leads to airway surface dehydration and mucus accumulation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and in mice with CF-like lung disease. We identified several potent ENaC specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and tested them by inhalation in mouse models of CF-like lung disease. The inhaled ASOs distributed into lung airway epithelial cells and decreased ENaC expression by inducing RNase H1-dependent degradation of the targeted Scnn1a mRNA. Aerosol delivered ENaC ASO down-regulated mucus marker expression and ameliorated goblet cell metaplasia, inflammation, and airway hyper-responsiveness. Lack of systemic activity of ASOs delivered via the aerosol route ensures the safety of this approach. Our results demonstrate that antisense inhibition of ENaC in airway epithelial cells could be an effective and safe approach for the prevention and reversal of lung symptoms in CF and potentially other inflammatory diseases of the lung. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of Structural Flexibility of Damaged DNA Using Thiol-Tethered Oligonucleotide Duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Fujita

    Full Text Available Bent structures are formed in DNA by the binding of small molecules or proteins. We developed a chemical method to detect bent DNA structures. Oligonucleotide duplexes in which two mercaptoalkyl groups were attached to the positions facing each other across the major groove were prepared. When the duplex contained the cisplatin adduct, which was proved to induce static helix bending, interstrand disulfide bond formation under an oxygen atmosphere was detected by HPLC analyses, but not in the non-adducted duplex, when the two thiol-tethered nucleosides were separated by six base pairs. When the insert was five and seven base pairs, the disulfide bond was formed and was not formed, respectively, regardless of the cisplatin adduct formation. The same reaction was observed in the duplexes containing an abasic site analog and the (6–4 photoproduct. Compared with the cisplatin case, the disulfide bond formation was slower in these duplexes, but the reaction rate was nearly independent of the linker length. These results indicate that dynamic structural changes of the abasic site- and (6–4 photoproduct-containing duplexes could be detected by our method. It is strongly suggested that the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, which specifically binds these duplexes and functions at the first step of global-genome nucleotide excision repair, recognizes the easily bendable nature of damaged DNA.

  11. Targeting DMPK with Antisense Oligonucleotide Improves Muscle Strength in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauvin, Dominic; Chrétien, Jessina; Pandey, Sanjay K; Martineau, Laurie; Revillod, Lucille; Bassez, Guillaume; Lachon, Aline; MacLeod, A Robert; Gourdon, Geneviève; Wheeler, Thurman M; Thornton, Charles A; Bennett, C Frank; Puymirat, Jack

    2017-06-16

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a dominant hereditary muscular dystrophy, is caused by an abnormal expansion of a (CTG) n trinucleotide repeat in the 3' UTR of the human dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. As a consequence, mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats are retained in nuclear foci and alter the function of splicing regulatory factors members of the MBNL and CELF families, resulting in alternative splicing misregulation of specific transcripts in affected DM1 tissues. In the present study, we treated DMSXL mice systemically with a 2'-4'-constrained, ethyl-modified (ISIS 486178) antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene, which led to a 70% reduction in CUG exp RNA abundance and foci in different skeletal muscles and a 30% reduction in the heart. Furthermore, treatment with ISIS 486178 ASO improved body weight, muscle strength, and muscle histology, whereas no overt toxicity was detected. This is evidence that the reduction of CUG exp RNA improves muscle strength in DM1, suggesting that muscle weakness in DM1 patients may be improved following elimination of toxic RNAs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Argonaute pull-down and RISC analysis using 2'-O-methylated oligonucleotides affinity matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Guillaume; Vasquez-Rifo, Alejandro; Simard, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, several novel small non-coding RNA pathways have been unveiled, which reach out to many biological processes. Common to all these pathways is the binding of a small RNA molecule to a protein member of the Argonaute family, which forms a minimal core complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex or RISC. The RISC targets mRNAs in a sequence-specific manner, either to induce mRNA cleavage through the intrinsic activity of the Argonaute protein or to abrogate protein synthesis by a mechanism that is still under investigation. We describe here, in details, a method for the affinity chromatography of the let-7 RISC starting from extracts of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our method exploits the sequence specificity of the RISC and makes use of biotinylated and 2'-O-methylated oligonucleotides to trap and pull-down small RNAs and their associated proteins. Importantly, this technique may easily be adapted to target other small RNAs expressed in different cell types or model organisms. This method provides a useful strategy to identify the proteins associated with the RISC, and hence gain insight in the functions of small RNAs.

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Exon Skipping as a Systemic Therapeutic Approach for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Jeroen; Bornert, Olivier; Nyström, Alexander; Gostynski, Antoni; Jonkman, Marcel F; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van den Akker, Peter C; Pasmooij, Anna Mg

    2016-10-18

    The "generalized severe" form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB-gen sev) is caused by bi-allelic null mutations in COL7A1, encoding type VII collagen. The absence of type VII collagen leads to blistering of the skin and mucous membranes upon the slightest trauma. Because most patients carry exonic point mutations or small insertions/deletions, most exons of COL7A1 are in-frame, and low levels of type VII collagen already drastically improve the disease phenotype, this gene seems a perfect candidate for antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping. In this study, we examined the feasibility of AON-mediated exon skipping in vitro in primary cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and systemically in vivo using a human skin-graft mouse model. We show that treatment with AONs designed against exon 105 leads to in-frame exon 105 skipping at the RNA level and restores type VII collagen protein production in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that systemic delivery in vivo induces de novo expression of type VII collagen in skin grafts generated from patient cells. Our data demonstrate strong proof-of-concept for AON-mediated exon skipping as a systemic therapeutic strategy for RDEB.

  14. Accurate and rapid modeling of iron-bleomycin-induced DNA damage using tethered duplex oligonucleotides and electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, A; Marzilli, L A; Bunt, R C; Stubbe, J; Vouros, P

    2000-05-01

    Bleomycin B(2)(BLM) in the presence of iron [Fe(II)] and O(2)catalyzes single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) cleavage of DNA. Electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry was used to monitor these cleavage processes. Two duplex oligonucleotides containing an ethylene oxide tether between both strands were used in this investigation, allowing facile monitoring of all ss and ds cleavage events. A sequence for site-specific binding and cleavage by Fe-BLM was incorporated into each analyte. One of these core sequences, GTAC, is a known hot-spot for ds cleavage, while the other sequence, GGCC, is a hot-spot for ss cleavage. Incubation of each oligo-nucleotide under anaerobic conditions with Fe(II)-BLM allowed detection of the non-covalent ternary Fe-BLM/oligonucleotide complex in the gas phase. Cleavage studies were then performed utilizing O(2)-activated Fe(II)-BLM. No work-up or separation steps were required and direct MS and MS/MS analyses of the crude reaction mixtures confirmed sequence-specific Fe-BLM-induced cleavage. Comparison of the cleavage patterns for both oligonucleotides revealed sequence-dependent preferences for ss and ds cleavages in accordance with previously established gel electrophoresis analysis of hairpin oligonucleotides. This novel methodology allowed direct, rapid and accurate determination of cleavage profiles of model duplex oligonucleotides after exposure to activated Fe-BLM.

  15. Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soluk, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade a great deal of interest has arisen in using sparse arrays of cosmic ray detectors located at schools as a means of doing both outreach and physics research. This approach has the unique advantage of involving grade school students in an actual ongoing experiment, rather then a simple teaching exercise, while at the same time providing researchers with the basic infrastructure for installation of cosmic ray detectors. A survey is made of projects in North America and Europe and in particular the ALTA experiment at the University of Alberta which was the first experiment operating under this paradigm

  16. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water-reflected (i.e. surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established

  17. Cloth-based hybridization array system for expanded identification of the animal species origin of derived materials in feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Johanna; Armour, Jennifer; Blais, Burton W

    2007-12-01

    A cloth-based hybridization array system (CHAS) previously developed for the detection of animal species for which prohibited materials have been specified (cattle, sheep, goat, elk, and deer) has been expanded to include the detection of animal species for which there are no prohibitions (pig and horse) in Canadian and American animal feeds. Animal species were identified by amplification of mitochondrial DNA sequences by PCR and subsequent hybridization of the amplicons with an array of species-specific oligonucleotide capture probes immobilized on a polyester cloth support, followed by an immunoenzymatic assay of the bound PCR products. The CHAS permitted sensitive and specific detection of meat meals from different animal species blended in a grain-based feed and should provide a useful adjunct to microscopic examination for the identification of prohibited materials in animal feeds.

  18. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  19. Programmable cellular arrays. Faults testing and correcting in cellular arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercel, L.

    1978-03-01

    A review of some recent researches about programmable cellular arrays in computing and digital processing of information systems is presented, and includes both combinational and sequential arrays, with full arbitrary behaviour, or which can realize better implementations of specialized blocks as: arithmetic units, counters, comparators, control systems, memory blocks, etc. Also, the paper presents applications of cellular arrays in microprogramming, in implementing of a specialized computer for matrix operations, in modeling of universal computing systems. The last section deals with problems of fault testing and correcting in cellular arrays. (author)

  20. Membrane-Assisted Growth of DNA Origami Nanostructure Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes fulfill many important tasks within living organisms. In addition to separating cellular volumes, membranes confine the space available to membrane-associated proteins to two dimensions (2D), which greatly increases their probability to interact with each other and assemble into multiprotein complexes. We here employed two DNA origami structures functionalized with cholesterol moieties as membrane anchors—a three-layered rectangular block and a Y-shaped DNA structure—to mimic membrane-assisted assembly into hierarchical superstructures on supported lipid bilayers and small unilamellar vesicles. As designed, the DNA constructs adhered to the lipid bilayers mediated by the cholesterol anchors and diffused freely in 2D with diffusion coefficients depending on their size and number of cholesterol modifications. Different sets of multimerization oligonucleotides added to bilayer-bound origami block structures induced the growth of either linear polymers or two-dimensional lattices on the membrane. Y-shaped DNA origami structures associated into triskelion homotrimers and further assembled into weakly ordered arrays of hexagons and pentagons, which resembled the geometry of clathrin-coated pits. Our results demonstrate the potential to realize artificial self-assembling systems that mimic the hierarchical formation of polyhedral lattices on cytoplasmic membranes. PMID:25734977

  1. Membrane-assisted growth of DNA origami nanostructure arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabey, Samet; Kempter, Susanne; List, Jonathan; Xing, Yongzheng; Bae, Wooli; Schiffels, Daniel; Shih, William M; Simmel, Friedrich C; Liedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes fulfill many important tasks within living organisms. In addition to separating cellular volumes, membranes confine the space available to membrane-associated proteins to two dimensions (2D), which greatly increases their probability to interact with each other and assemble into multiprotein complexes. We here employed two DNA origami structures functionalized with cholesterol moieties as membrane anchors--a three-layered rectangular block and a Y-shaped DNA structure--to mimic membrane-assisted assembly into hierarchical superstructures on supported lipid bilayers and small unilamellar vesicles. As designed, the DNA constructs adhered to the lipid bilayers mediated by the cholesterol anchors and diffused freely in 2D with diffusion coefficients depending on their size and number of cholesterol modifications. Different sets of multimerization oligonucleotides added to bilayer-bound origami block structures induced the growth of either linear polymers or two-dimensional lattices on the membrane. Y-shaped DNA origami structures associated into triskelion homotrimers and further assembled into weakly ordered arrays of hexagons and pentagons, which resembled the geometry of clathrin-coated pits. Our results demonstrate the potential to realize artificial self-assembling systems that mimic the hierarchical formation of polyhedral lattices on cytoplasmic membranes.

  2. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  3. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  4. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  5. Inhibition effects of 125I-triplex forming oligonucleotide to hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Zhongwei; Hou Min; Cai Haidong; Yuan Xueyu; Yang Yuehua; Yuan Shidong; He Junmin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) has been reported as a new antigene strategy. The purpose of this study was to observe the inhibition effects of 125 I-TFO on hepatoma cells and to investigate the possibility of using 125 I-TFO as an antigene radiotherapy technique for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to HBV. Methods: TFO complementary to the initiator of S gene of HBV was synthesized and labeled with 125 I. HepG2.2.15 cells, in which HBV genome was integrated, were incubated with 125 I-TFO, TFO and 125 I respectively. After incubation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of each group were assayed with ELISA and the survival rate of cells in each group was determined with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Results: 125 I-TFO showed a high stability with a radiolabeling rate of >93%. The radiochemical purity of labeled compound was 90.8%, 81.1% and 73.2% respectively after 12, 48 and 72 h at 37 degree C. The peak inhibition effect of 125 I-TFO on synthesizing HBsAg and HBeAg by HepG2.2.15 cells were found at 48 h after transfection, with significantly the highest inhibition rate of 45.2% for HBsAg and 74.5% for HBeAg expression among the three groups(P 125 I-TFO may inhibit the antigen expression of HBV and the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells, thus it may provide a new approach to develop gene-based radiotherapeutic pharmaceuticals for anti-HBV and HCC. (authors)

  6. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby S Shemesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3 is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of 3H-radiolabeled (3H placed in THA or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5′-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs.

  7. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  8. Customized oligonucleotide microarray gene expression-based classification of neuroblastoma patients outperforms current clinical risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberthuer, André; Berthold, Frank; Warnat, Patrick; Hero, Barbara; Kahlert, Yvonne; Spitz, Rüdiger; Ernestus, Karen; König, Rainer; Haas, Stefan; Eils, Roland; Schwab, Manfred; Brors, Benedikt; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    To develop a gene expression-based classifier for neuroblastoma patients that reliably predicts courses of the disease. Two hundred fifty-one neuroblastoma specimens were analyzed using a customized oligonucleotide microarray comprising 10,163 probes for transcripts with differential expression in clinical subgroups of the disease. Subsequently, the prediction analysis for microarrays (PAM) was applied to a first set of patients with maximally divergent clinical courses (n = 77). The classification accuracy was estimated by a complete 10-times-repeated 10-fold cross validation, and a 144-gene predictor was constructed from this set. This classifier's predictive power was evaluated in an independent second set (n = 174) by comparing results of the gene expression-based classification with those of risk stratification systems of current trials from Germany, Japan, and the United States. The first set of patients was accurately predicted by PAM (cross-validated accuracy, 99%). Within the second set, the PAM classifier significantly separated cohorts with distinct courses (3-year event-free survival [EFS] 0.86 +/- 0.03 [favorable; n = 115] v 0.52 +/- 0.07 [unfavorable; n = 59] and 3-year overall survival 0.99 +/- 0.01 v 0.84 +/- 0.05; both P model, the PAM predictor classified patients of the second set more accurately than risk stratification of current trials from Germany, Japan, and the United States (P < .001; hazard ratio, 4.756 [95% CI, 2.544 to 8.893]). Integration of gene expression-based class prediction of neuroblastoma patients may improve risk estimation of current neuroblastoma trials.

  9. Rescue of peripheral vestibular function in Usher syndrome mice using a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Depreux, Frederic F; Jodelka, Francine M; Lentz, Jennifer J; Rigo, Frank; Jones, Timothy A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2017-09-15

    Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C/harmonin) is associated with profound retinal, auditory and vestibular dysfunction. We have previously reported on an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-29) that dramatically improves auditory function and balance behavior in mice homozygous for the harmonin mutation Ush1c c.216G > A following a single systemic administration. The findings were suggestive of improved vestibular function; however, no direct vestibular assessment was made. Here, we measured vestibular sensory evoked potentials (VsEPs) to directly assess vestibular function in Usher mice. We report that VsEPs are absent or abnormal in Usher mice, indicating profound loss of vestibular function. Strikingly, Usher mice receiving ASO-29 treatment have normal or elevated vestibular response thresholds when treated during a critical period between postnatal day 1 and 5, respectively. In contrast, treatment of mice with ASO-29 treatment at P15 was minimally effective at rescuing vestibular function. Interestingly, ASO-29 treatment at P1, P5 or P15 resulted in sufficient vestibular recovery to support normal balance behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit to balance with ASO-29 treatment at P15 despite the profound vestibular functional deficits that persist with treatment at this later time. These findings provide the first direct evidence of an effective treatment of peripheral vestibular function in a mouse model of USH1C and reveal the potential for using antisense technology to treat vestibular dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Inhibition effects of {sup 125}I-triplex forming oligonucleotide to hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongwei, Lv; Min, Hou; Haidong, Cai; Xueyu, Yuan; Yuehua, Yang; Shidong, Yuan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China); Junmin, He

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) has been reported as a new antigene strategy. The purpose of this study was to observe the inhibition effects of {sup 125}I-TFO on hepatoma cells and to investigate the possibility of using {sup 125}I-TFO as an antigene radiotherapy technique for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to HBV. Methods: TFO complementary to the initiator of S gene of HBV was synthesized and labeled with {sup 125}I. HepG2.2.15 cells, in which HBV genome was integrated, were incubated with {sup 125}I-TFO, TFO and {sup 125}I respectively. After incubation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of each group were assayed with ELISA and the survival rate of cells in each group was determined with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Results: {sup 125}I-TFO showed a high stability with a radiolabeling rate of >93%. The radiochemical purity of labeled compound was 90.8%, 81.1% and 73.2% respectively after 12, 48 and 72 h at 37 degree C. The peak inhibition effect of {sup 125}I-TFO on synthesizing HBsAg and HBeAg by HepG2.2.15 cells were found at 48 h after transfection, with significantly the highest inhibition rate of 45.2% for HBsAg and 74.5% for HBeAg expression among the three groups(P<0.01 ). As the transfection time prolonged its inhibition effects were stronger. Conclusion: {sup 125}I-TFO may inhibit the antigen expression of HBV and the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells, thus it may provide a new approach to develop gene-based radiotherapeutic pharmaceuticals for anti-HBV and HCC. (authors)

  11. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  12. Array architectures for iterative algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Hosagrahar V.; Rao, Sailesh K.; Kailath, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Regular mesh-connected arrays are shown to be isomorphic to a class of so-called regular iterative algorithms. For a wide variety of problems it is shown how to obtain appropriate iterative algorithms and then how to translate these algorithms into arrays in a systematic fashion. Several 'systolic' arrays presented in the literature are shown to be specific cases of the variety of architectures that can be derived by the techniques presented here. These include arrays for Fourier Transform, Matrix Multiplication, and Sorting.

  13. Josephson junctions array resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargiulo, Oscar; Muppalla, Phani; Mirzaei, Iman; Kirchmair, Gerhard [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the self- and cross-Kerr effect of extended plasma resonances in Josephson junction chains. The chain consists of 1600 individual junctions and we can measure quality factors in excess of 10000. The Kerr effect manifests itself as a frequency shift that depends linearly on the number of photons in a resonant mode. By changing the input power we are able to measure this frequency shift on a single mode (self-kerr). By changing the input power on another mode while measuring the same one, we are able to evaluate the cross-kerr effect. We can measure the cross-Kerr effect by probing the resonance frequency of one mode while exciting another mode of the array with a microwave drive.

  14. Diagnosable structured logic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  15. Low Frequency Space Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, B.; Weiler, K.W.; Johnston, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA) is a conceptual mission to survey the entire sky and to image individual sources at frequencies between 1.5 and 26 MHz, a frequency range over which the earth's ionosphere transmits poorly or not at all. With high resolution, high sensitivity observations, a new window will be opened in the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomical investigation. Also, extending observations down to such low frequencies will bring astronomy to the fundamental limit below which the galaxy becomes optically thick due to free-free absorption. A number of major scientific goals can be pursued with such a mission, including mapping galactic emission and absorption, studies of individual source spectra in a frequency range where a number of important processes may play a role, high resolution imaging of extended sources, localization of the impulsive emission from Jupiter, and a search for coherent emission processes. 19 references

  16. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  17. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  18. Classification of Dukes' B and C colorectal cancers using expression arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.M.; Knudsen, Steen; Laurberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies. Substaging of the cancer is of importance not only to prognosis but also to treatment. Classification of substages based on DNA microarray technology is currently the most promising approach. We therefore investigated if gene...... expression microarrays could be used to classify colorectal tumors. Methods. We used the Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the expression of more than 5,000 genes in samples from the sigmoid and upper rectum of the left colon. Five samples were from normal mucosa and five samples from each...... expression of one of the most common malignancies, colorectal cancer, now seems to be within reach. The data indicates that it is possible at least to classify Dukes' B and C colorectal tumors with microarrays....

  19. Networked Sensor Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical

  20. Unsupervised Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Data from Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Reveals Equivalence with Molecular Classification and Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Arriba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate whether chromosomal instability (CIN is associated with tumor phenotypes and/or with global genomic status based on MSI (microsatellite instability and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype in early-onset colorectal cancer (EOCRC. METHODS: Taking as a starting point our previous work in which tumors from 60 EOCRC cases (≤45 years at the time of diagnosis were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, in the present study we performed an unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of those aCGH data in order to unveil possible associations between the CIN profile and the clinical features of the tumors. In addition, we evaluated the MSI and the CIMP statuses of the samples with the aim of investigating a possible relationship between copy number alterations (CNAs and the MSI/CIMP condition in EOCRC. RESULTS: Based on the similarity of the CNAs detected, the unsupervised analysis stratified samples into two main clusters (A, B and four secondary clusters (A1, A2, B3, B4. The different subgroups showed a certain correspondence with the molecular classification of colorectal cancer (CRC, which enabled us to outline an algorithm to categorize tumors according to their CIMP status. Interestingly, each subcluster showed some distinctive clinicopathological features. But more interestingly, the CIN of each subcluster mainly affected particular chromosomes, allowing us to define chromosomal regions more specifically affected depending on the CIMP/MSI status of the samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings may provide a basis for a new form of classifying EOCRC according to the genomic status of the tumors.