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Sample records for oligonucleotide array sequence analysis

  1. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

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    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum strain SS14 determined with oligonucleotide arrays

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    Sodergren Erica

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum remains the enigmatic pathogen, since no virulence factors have been identified and the pathogenesis of the disease is poorly understood. Increasing rates of new syphilis cases per year have been observed recently. Results The genome of the SS14 strain was sequenced to high accuracy by an oligonucleotide array strategy requiring hybridization to only three arrays (Comparative Genome Sequencing, CGS. Gaps in the resulting sequence were filled with targeted dideoxy-terminators (DDT sequencing and the sequence was confirmed by whole genome fingerprinting (WGF. When compared to the Nichols strain, 327 single nucleotide substitutions (224 transitions, 103 transversions, 14 deletions, and 18 insertions were found. On the proteome level, the highest frequency of amino acid-altering substitution polymorphisms was in novel genes, while the lowest was in housekeeping genes, as expected by their evolutionary conservation. Evidence was also found for hypervariable regions and multiple regions showing intrastrain heterogeneity in the T. pallidum chromosome. Conclusion The observed genetic changes do not have influence on the ability of Treponema pallidum to cause syphilitic infection, since both SS14 and Nichols are virulent in rabbit. However, this is the first assessment of the degree of variation between the two syphilis pathogens and paves the way for phylogenetic studies of this fascinating organism.

  3. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

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    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  4. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-12-30

    Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the alpha-level (alphanew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of alphanew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  5. Comparative analysis of copy number detection by whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide array CGH

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    Bejjani Bassem A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a powerful diagnostic tool for the detection of DNA copy number gains and losses associated with chromosome abnormalities, many of which are below the resolution of conventional chromosome analysis. It has been presumed that whole-genome oligonucleotide (oligo arrays identify more clinically significant copy-number abnormalities than whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays, yet this has not been systematically studied in a clinical diagnostic setting. Results To determine the difference in detection rate between similarly designed BAC and oligo arrays, we developed whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide microarrays and validated them in a side-by-side comparison of 466 consecutive clinical specimens submitted to our laboratory for aCGH. Of the 466 cases studied, 67 (14.3% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome BAC array, and 73 (15.6% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome oligo array. However, because both platforms identified copy number variants of unclear clinical significance, we designed a systematic method for the interpretation of copy number alterations and tested an additional 3,443 cases by BAC array and 3,096 cases by oligo array. Of those cases tested on the BAC array, 17.6% were found to have a copy-number abnormality of potential clinical significance, whereas the detection rate increased to 22.5% for the cases tested by oligo array. In addition, we validated the oligo array for detection of mosaicism and found that it could routinely detect mosaicism at levels of 30% and greater. Conclusions Although BAC arrays have faster turnaround times, the increased detection rate of oligo arrays makes them attractive for clinical cytogenetic testing.

  6. DNA sequence analysis by hybridization with oligonucleotide microchips : MALDI mass spectrometry identification of 5mers contiguously stacked to microchip oligonucleotides.

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    Stomakhin, A. A.; Vasiliskov, V. A.; Timofeev, E.; Schulga, D.; Cotter, R. J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology; Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab.; Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been applied to increase the informational output from DNA sequence analysis. It has been used to analyze DNA by hybridization with microarrays of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides extended with stacked 5mers. In model experiments, a 28 nt long DNA fragment was hybridized with 10 immobilized, overlapping 8mers. Then, in a second round of hybridization DNA-8mer duplexes were hybridized with a mixture of 10 5mers. The stability of the 5mer complex with DNA was increased to raise the melting temperature of the duplex by 10-15{sup o}C as a result of stacking interaction with 8mers. Contiguous 13 bp duplexes containing an internal break were formed. MALDI MS identified one or, in some cases, two 5mers contiguously stacked to each DNA-8mer duplex formed on the microchip. Incorporating a mass label into 5mers optimized MALDI MS monitoring. This procedure enabled us to reconstitute the sequence of a model DNA fragment and identify polymorphic nucleotides. The application of MALDI MS identification of contiguously stacked 5mers to increase the length of DNA for sequence analysis is discussed.

  7. Comparative linkage analysis and visualization of high-density oligonucleotide SNP array data

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    Smith Richard JH

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of disease-associated genes using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs has been increasingly reported. In particular, the Affymetrix Mapping 10 K SNP microarray platform uses one PCR primer to amplify the DNA samples and determine the genotype of more than 10,000 SNPs in the human genome. This provides the opportunity for large scale, rapid and cost-effective genotyping assays for linkage analysis. However, the analysis of such datasets is nontrivial because of the large number of markers, and visualizing the linkage scores in the context of genome maps remains less automated using the current linkage analysis software packages. For example, the haplotyping results are commonly represented in the text format. Results Here we report the development of a novel software tool called CompareLinkage for automated formatting of the Affymetrix Mapping 10 K genotype data into the "Linkage" format and the subsequent analysis with multi-point linkage software programs such as Merlin and Allegro. The new software has the ability to visualize the results for all these programs in dChip in the context of genome annotations and cytoband information. In addition we implemented a variant of the Lander-Green algorithm in the dChipLinkage module of dChip software (V1.3 to perform parametric linkage analysis and haplotyping of SNP array data. These functions are integrated with the existing modules of dChip to visualize SNP genotype data together with LOD score curves. We have analyzed three families with recessive and dominant diseases using the new software programs and the comparison results are presented and discussed. Conclusions The CompareLinkage and dChipLinkage software packages are freely available. They provide the visualization tools for high-density oligonucleotide SNP array data, as well as the automated functions for formatting SNP array data for the linkage analysis programs Merlin and Allegro and calling

  8. [Sequencing by hybridization methods to generate large arrays of oligonucleotides]. Final technical report

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    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The subject of this project is to address a pressing need for custom DNA microarrays (chips) which can be easily and at low cost formatted and revised for research. In this sense, the term custom means chips for which there is need for limited quantities (less than hundreds) of any particular chip design which contains a large number of different, users defined sequences. Of the three principal approaches to fabricate DNA microarrays, the two which have been commercialized (a and b below) are not particularly suited to research purposes because of the significant time and costs required, once a result is obtained, to utilize that result in the design of a new and better chip: (a) the photodeprotection scheme used by Affymetrix; and (b) the spotting of pre-synthesized oligos or c-DNA onto surfaces.

  9. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  10. Typing of enteroviruses by use of microwell oligonucleotide arrays.

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    Susi, P; Hattara, L; Waris, M; Luoma-Aho, T; Siitari, H; Hyypiä, T; Saviranta, P

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a straightforward assay for the rapid typing of enteroviruses using oligonucleotide arrays in microtiter wells. The viral nucleic acids are concomitantly amplified and labeled during reverse transcription-PCR, and unpurified PCR products are used for hybridization. DNA strands are separated by alkaline denaturation, and hybridization is started by neutralization. The microarray hybridization reactions and the subsequent washes are performed in standard 96-well microtiter plates, which makes the method easily adaptable to high-throughput analysis. We describe here the assay principle and its potential in clinical laboratory use by correctly identifying 10 different enterovirus reference strains. Furthermore, we explore the detection of unknown sequence variants using serotype consensus oligonucleotide probes. With just two consensus probes for the coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9) serotype, we detected 23 out of 25 highly diverse CVA9 isolates. Overall, the assay involves several features aiming at ease of performance, robustness, and applicability to large-scale studies.

  11. Genomic analysis by oligonucleotide array Comparative Genomic Hybridization utilizing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

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    Savage, Stephanie J; Hostetter, Galen

    2011-01-01

    Formalin fixation has been used to preserve tissues for more than a hundred years, and there are currently more than 300 million archival samples in the United States alone. The application of genomic protocols such as high-density oligonucleotide array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, therefore, opens an untapped resource of available tissues for research and facilitates utilization of existing clinical data in a research sample set. However, formalin fixation results in cross-linking of proteins and DNA, typically leading to such a significant degradation of DNA template that little is available for use in molecular applications. Here, we describe a protocol to circumvent formalin fixation artifact by utilizing enzymatic reactions to obtain quality DNA from a wide range of FFPE tissues for successful genome-wide discovery of gene dosage alterations in archival clinical samples.

  12. Combining gene expression data from different generations of oligonucleotide arrays

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    Kong Sek

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the important challenges in microarray analysis is to take full advantage of previously accumulated data, both from one's own laboratory and from public repositories. Through a comparative analysis on a variety of datasets, a more comprehensive view of the underlying mechanism or structure can be obtained. However, as we discover in this work, continual changes in genomic sequence annotations and probe design criteria make it difficult to compare gene expression data even from different generations of the same microarray platform. Results We first describe the extent of discordance between the results derived from two generations of Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, as revealed in cluster analysis and in identification of differentially expressed genes. We then propose a method for increasing comparability. The dataset we use consists of a set of 14 human muscle biopsy samples from patients with inflammatory myopathies that were hybridized on both HG-U95Av2 and HG-U133A human arrays. We find that the use of the probe set matching table for comparative analysis provided by Affymetrix produces better results than matching by UniGene or LocusLink identifiers but still remains inadequate. Rescaling of expression values for each gene across samples and data filtering by expression values enhance comparability but only for few specific analyses. As a generic method for improving comparability, we select a subset of probes with overlapping sequence segments in the two array types and recalculate expression values based only on the selected probes. We show that this filtering of probes significantly improves the comparability while retaining a sufficient number of probe sets for further analysis. Conclusions Compatibility between high-density oligonucleotide arrays is significantly affected by probe-level sequence information. With a careful filtering of the probes based on their sequence overlaps, data from different

  13. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

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    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  14. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-01-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C...

  15. Oligonucleotide array outperforms SNP array on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples.

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    Nasri, Soroush; Anjomshoaa, Ahmad; Song, Sarah; Guilford, Parry; McNoe, Les; Black, Michael; Phillips, Vicky; Reeve, Anthony; Humar, Bostjan

    2010-04-01

    Compromised quality of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE)-derived DNA has compounded the use of archival specimens for array-based genomic studies. Recent technological advances have led to first successes in this field; however, there is currently no general agreement on the most suitable platform for the array-based analysis of FFPE DNA. In this study, FFPE and matched fresh-frozen (FF) specimens were separately analyzed with Affymetrix single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 6.0 and Agilent 4x44K oligonucleotide arrays to compare the genomic profiles from the two tissue sources and to assess the relative performance of the two platforms on FFPE material. Genomic DNA was extracted from matched FFPE-FF pairs of normal intestinal epithelium from four patients and were applied to the SNP and oligonucleotide platforms according to the manufacturer-recommended protocols. On the Affymetrix platform, a substantial increase in apparent copy number alterations was observed in all FFPE tissues relative to their matched FF counterparts. In contrast, FFPE and matched FF genomic profiles obtained via the Agilent platform were very similar. Both the SNP and the oligonucleotide platform performed comparably on FF material. This study demonstrates that Agilent oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization generates reliable results from FFPE extracted DNA, whereas the Affymetrix SNP-based array seems less suitable for the analysis of FFPE material.

  16. Evolutionary insights from suffix array-based genome sequence analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindya Poddar; Nagasuma Chandra; Madhavi Ganapathiraju; K Sekar; Judith Klein-Seetharaman; Raj Reddy; N Balakrishnan

    2007-08-01

    Gene and protein sequence analyses, central components of studies in modern biology are easily amenable to string matching and pattern recognition algorithms. The growing need of analysing whole genome sequences more efficiently and thoroughly, has led to the emergence of new computational methods. Suffix trees and suffix arrays are data structures, well known in many other areas and are highly suited for sequence analysis too. Here we report an improvement to the design of construction of suffix arrays. Enhancement in versatility and scalability, enabled by this approach, is demonstrated through the use of real-life examples. The scalability of the algorithm to whole genomes renders it suitable to address many biologically interesting problems. One example is the evolutionary insight gained by analysing unigrams, bi-grams and higher n-grams, indicating that the genetic code has a direct influence on the overall composition of the genome. Further, different proteomes have been analysed for the coverage of the possible peptide space, which indicate that as much as a quarter of the total space at the tetra-peptide level is left un-sampled in prokaryotic organisms, although almost all tri-peptides can be seen in one protein or another in a proteome. Besides, distinct patterns begin to emerge for the counts of particular tetra and higher peptides, indicative of a ‘meaning’ for tetra and higher n-grams. The toolkit has also been used to demonstrate the usefulness of identifying repeats in whole proteomes efficiently. As an example, 16 members of one COG, coded by the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv have been found to contain a repeating sequence of 300 amino acids.

  17. Mapping genomic library clones using oligonucleotide arrays

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    Sapolsky, R.J.; Lipshutz, R.J. [Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a high-density DNA probe array and accompanying biochemical and informatic methods to order clones from genomic libraries. This approach involves a series of enzymatic steps for capturing a set of short dispersed sequence markers scattered throughout a high-molecular-weight DNA. By this process, all the ambiguous sequences lying adjacent to a given Type IIS restriction site are ligated between two DNA adaptors. These markers, once amplified and labeled by PCR, can be hybridized and detected on a high-density olligonucleotide array bearing probes complementary to all possible markers. The array is synthesized using light-directed combinatorial chemistry. For each clone in a genomic library, a characteristic set of sequence markers can be determined. On the basis of the similarity between the marker sets for each pair of clones, their relative overlap can be measured. The library can be sequentially ordered into a contig map using this overlap information. This new methodology does not require gel-based methods or prior sequence information and involves manipulations that should allow for easy adaptation to automated processing and data collection. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, J Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of th...

  19. A sensitive method to detect the hepatitis B virus mutations by using solid phase PCR on oligonucleotide array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN QIN LU; JIN XIANG HAN; ZHONG LIN SHEN; CHUAN XI WANG

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive method based on solid phase PCR on oligonucleotide array was established to detect two point mutations 1896G-A and 1901G-A in hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, in which 6 probes including these two point mutations were immobilized on modified glass slides through 5' terminal linker,while the 3' terminal was made to be free. The mutated loci were designed to locate on the last nucleotides of 3' terminal respectively, and the positive control probes lacked the last nucleotide of 3' terminal in comparison with the probes used for detection. Probes fixed on oligonucleotide array were also the solid phase amplification primers. One pair of liquid primers was used to amplify the short template product from whole HBV DNA. Using target DNA as template, the solid primers were extended under the action of Taq DNA polymerase and incorporated with Cy-3dCTP as marker. During the thermal cycling reaction,probes served as solid phase amplification primers and amplification products bound to the oligonucleotide array, which could be visualized by incorporation with fluorescent dyes. After amplification, the oligonucleotide array was washed, performed with laser scanning, and then used for quantitative analysis to obtain the information for mutations. The hybridization results were compared with DNA sequencing. It was demonstrated that in case of sample A, the ratios of fluorescence intensities in wide type and in the muin these two loci. These results correlated to those obtained from DNA sequencing analysis in which the fluorescence intensity ratios in wide type and in the mutated types of 1996G-A and 1901D-A mutations in using solid phase PCR based on oligonucleotide array appears to be a sensitive and promising way to detect mutations with low-density.

  20. Multilocus sequence typing of Staphylococcus aureus with DNA array technology

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA newly developed oligonucleotide array suited for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of Staphylococcus aureus strains was analyzed with two strain collections in a two-center study. MLST allele identification for the first strain collection fully agreed with conventional strain typing. Analysis of strains from the second collection revealed that chip-defined MLST was concordant with conventional MLST. Array-mediated MLST data were reproducible, exchangeable, and epidemiologically ...

  1. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    followed by click assembly and analysis of the read sequence by various techniques. As we demonstrate in this paper, using our new approach, a viral RNA sequence can be detected in less than 2 h without the need for cDNA synthesis or any other enzymatic reactions and with a sensitivity of ... opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  2. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-07-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C/G)TCA, whereas the other 3 contained sequences matching six of these seven bases. The extreme preference for this 7-base-pair sequence suggests that each position directly contacts GCN4. The three nucleotide positions on each side of this core heptanucleotide also showed sequence preferences, indicating their effect on GCN4 binding. Interestingly, deviations in the core and a stronger sequence preference in the flanking region were found on one side of the central C . G base pair. Although GCN4 binds as a dimer, this asymmetry supports a model in which interactions on each side of the binding site are not equivalent. The random selection method should prove generally useful for defining the specificities of other DNA-binding proteins and for identifying putative target sequences from genomic DNA.

  3. Hepatotoxic Potential of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Can Be Predicted from Their Sequence and Modification Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H.; Yakimov, Victor; Ottosen, Søren; Kammler, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels F.; Høg, Anja M.; Hedtjärn, Maj; Meldgaard, Michael; Møller, Marianne R.; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides that recruit RNase H and thereby cleave complementary messenger RNAs are being developed as therapeutics. Dose-dependent hepatic changes associated with hepatocyte necrosis and increases in serum alanine-aminotransferase levels have been observed after treatment with certain oligonucleotides. Although general mechanisms for drug-induced hepatic injury are known, the characteristics of oligonucleotides that determine their hepatotoxic potential are not well understood. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the hepatotoxic potential of locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides in mice. We developed a random forests classifier, in which oligonucleotides are regarded as being composed of dinucleotide units, which distinguished between 206 oligonucleotides with high and low hepatotoxic potential with 80% accuracy as estimated by out-of-bag validation. In a validation set, 17 out of 23 oligonucleotides were correctly predicted (74% accuracy). In isolation, some dinucleotide units increase, and others decrease, the hepatotoxic potential of the oligonucleotides within which they are found. However, a complex interplay between all parts of an oligonucleotide can influence the hepatotoxic potential. Using the classifier, we demonstrate how an oligonucleotide with otherwise high hepatotoxic potential can be efficiently redesigned to abate hepatotoxic potential. These insights establish analysis of sequence and modification patterns as a powerful tool in the preclinical discovery process for oligonucleotide-based medicines. PMID:23952551

  4. Strategies in the preparation of DNA oligonucleotide arrays for diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, S L

    2001-08-01

    This report emphasizes the interfacial chemistry that is required to ensure proper attachment of oligonucleotides onto the surface of microarrays. For example, strategies for the covalent attachment of pre-synthesized oligonucleotides to glass slides, gold films, polyacrylamide gel pads, polypyrrole films, and optical fibers are surveyed in an attempt to better define the parameters for optimal formation and detection of DNA hybrids. These parameters include among others, the nature and length of the linkers attaching oligonucleotides to the arrays, and the surface density of oligonucleotides required for unhindered hybridization with DNA targets. Sensitive detection methods such as the use of light-scattering techniques, molecular beacons, surface plasmon resonance, attenuated total internal reflection-FTIR, and the evanescent field excitation of fluorescence from surface-bound fluorophores have been developed to study the kinetics and specificity of hybridization events. Finally, the synthesis of oligonucleotides directly on glass surfaces and polypropylene sheets has been investigated to enable DNA sequencing by hybridization and achieve oligonucleotide densities of ca. 10(6) sequences per cm(2) on DNA chips.

  5. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  6. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  7. Tandem gene arrays in Trypanosoma brucei: Comparative phylogenomic analysis of duplicate sequence variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains many tandem gene arrays. Gene duplicates are created through tandem duplication and are expressed through polycistronic transcription, suggesting that the primary purpose of long, tandem arrays is to increase gene dosage in an environment where individual gene promoters are absent. This report presents the first account of the tandem gene arrays in the T. brucei genome, employing several related genome sequences to establish how variation is created and removed. Results A systematic survey of tandem gene arrays showed that substantial sequence variation existed across the genome; variation from different regions of an array often produced inconsistent phylogenetic affinities. Phylogenetic relationships of gene duplicates were consistent with concerted evolution being a widespread homogenising force. However, tandem duplicates were not usually identical; therefore, any homogenising effect was coincident with divergence among duplicates. Allelic gene conversion was detected using various criteria and was apparently able to both remove and introduce sequence variation. Tandem arrays containing structural heterogeneity demonstrated how sequence homogenisation and differentiation can occur within a single locus. Conclusion The use of multiple genome sequences in a comparative analysis of tandem gene arrays identified substantial sequence variation among gene duplicates. The distribution of sequence variation is determined by a dynamic balance of conservative and innovative evolutionary forces. Gene trees from various species showed that intraspecific duplicates evolve in concert, perhaps through frequent gene conversion, although this does not prevent sequence divergence, especially where structural heterogeneity physically separates a duplicate from its neighbours. In describing dynamics of sequence variation that have consequences beyond gene dosage, this

  8. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Djama, Zeinab Robleh; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Radmer, Lorien; Denton, Geoff; Lévesque, C André

    2013-01-01

    Most Phytophthora spp. are destructive plant pathogens; therefore, effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of diseases. In the current study, a membrane-based oligonucleotide array was developed that can detect Phytophthora spp. reliably using three DNA regions; namely, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 5' end of cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1), and the intergenic region between cytochrome c oxidase 2 gene (cox2) and cox1 (cox2-1 spacer). Each sequence data set contained ≈250 sequences representing 98 described and 15 undescribed species of Phytophthora. The array was validated with 143 pure cultures and 35 field samples. Together, nonrejected oligonucleotides from all three markers have the ability to reliably detect 82 described and 8 undescribed Phytophthora spp., including several quarantine or regulated pathogens such as Phytophthora ramorum. Our results showed that a DNA array containing signature oligonucleotides designed from multiple genomic regions provided robustness and redundancy for the detection and differentiation of closely related taxon groups. This array has the potential to be used as a routine diagnostic tool for Phytophthora spp. from complex environmental samples without the need for extensive growth of cultures.

  9. Aspects of oligonucleotide and peptide sequencing with MALDI and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, D R; Bothner, B; Phung, Q; Harris, K; Siuzdak, G

    1998-09-01

    Biopolymer sequencing with mass spectrometry has become increasingly important and accessible with the development of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). Here we examine the use of sequential digestion for the rapid identification of proteolytic fragments, in turn highlighting the general utility of enzymatic MALDI ladder sequencing and ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Analyses were performed on oligonucleotides ranging in size from 2 to 50 residues, on peptides ranging in size from 7 to 44 residues and on viral coat proteins. MALDI ladder sequencing using exonuclease digestion generated a uniform distribution of ions and provided complete sequence information on the oligonucleotides 2-30 nucleic acid residues long. Only partial sequence information was obtained on the longer oligonucleotides. C-terminal peptide ladder sequencing typically provided information from 4 to 7 amino acids into the peptide. Sequential digestion, or endoprotease followed by exoprotease exposure, was also successfully applied to a trypsin digest of viral proteins. Analysis of ladder sequenced peptides by LCMS generated less information than in the MALDI-MS analysis and ESI-MS2 normally provided partial sequence information on both the small oligonucleotides and peptides. In general, MALDI ladder sequencing offered information on a broader mass range of biopolymers than ESI-MS2 and was relatively straightforward to interpret, especially for oligonucleotides.

  10. Rapid identification of allergenic and pathogenic molds in environmental air by an oligonucleotide array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu Lin-Yi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airborne fungi play an important role in causing allergy and infections in susceptible people. Identification of these fungi, based on morphological characteristics, is time-consuming, expertise-demanding, and could be inaccurate. Methods We developed an oligonucleotide array that could accurately identify 21 important airborne fungi (13 genera that may cause adverse health problems. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions, hybridization of the PCR products to a panel of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a nylon membrane, and detection of the hybridization signals with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibodies. Results A collection of 72 target and 66 nontarget reference strains were analyzed by the array. Both the sensitivity and specificity of the array were 100%, and the detection limit was 10 pg of genomic DNA per assay. Furthermore, 70 fungal isolates recovered from air samples were identified by the array and the identification results were confirmed by sequencing of the ITS and D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit RNA gene. The sensitivity and specificity of the array for identification of the air isolates was 100% (26/26 and 97.7% (43/44, respectively. Conclusions Identification of airborne fungi by the array was cheap and accurate. The current array may contribute to decipher the relationship between airborne fungi and adverse health effect.

  11. chipD: a web tool to design oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Yann S.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Tritt, Andrew J.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.; Mitchell, Julie C.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    chipD is a web server that facilitates design of DNA oligonucleotide probes for high-density tiling arrays, which can be used in a number of genomic applications such as ChIP-chip or gene-expression profiling. The server implements a probe selection algorithm that takes as an input, in addition to the target sequences, a set of parameters that allow probe design to be tailored to specific applications, protocols or the array manufacturer’s requirements. The algorithm optimizes probes to meet three objectives: (i) probes should be specific; (ii) probes should have similar thermodynamic properties; and (iii) the target sequence coverage should be homogeneous and avoid significant gaps. The output provides in a text format, the list of probe sequences with their genomic locations, targeted strands and hybridization characteristics. chipD has been used successfully to design tiling arrays for bacteria and yeast. chipD is available at http://chipd.uwbacter.org/. PMID:20529880

  12. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  13. Utilization of a labeled tracking oligonucleotide for visualization and quality control of spotted 70-mer arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shehnaz

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spotted 70-mer oligonucleotide arrays offer potentially greater specificity and an alternative to expensive cDNA library maintenance and amplification. Since microarray fabrication is a considerable source of data variance, we previously directly tagged cDNA probes with a third fluorophore for prehybridization quality control. Fluorescently modifying oligonucleotide sets is cost prohibitive, therefore, a co-spotted Staphylococcus aureus-specific fluorescein-labeled "tracking" oligonucleotide is described to monitor fabrication variables of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis oligonucleotide microarray. Results Significantly (p M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. tuberculosis mprA. Linearity between the mean log Cy3/Cy5 ratios of genes differentially expressed from arrays either possessing or lacking the tracking oligonucleotide was observed (R2 = 0.90, p Conclusions This novel approach enables prehybridization array visualization for spotted oligonucleotide arrays and sets the stage for more sophisticated slide qualification and data filtering applications.

  14. Strong position-dependent effects of sequence mismatches on signal ratios measured using long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulme Helen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important and widely used tool. Applications include capturing genomic DNA for high-throughput sequencing in addition to the traditional monitoring of gene expression and identifying DNA copy number variations. Sequence mismatches between probe and target strands are known to affect the stability of the probe-target duplex, and hence the strength of the observed signals from microarrays. Results We describe a large-scale investigation of microarray hybridisations to murine probes with known sequence mismatches, demonstrating that the effect of mismatches is strongly position-dependent and for small numbers of sequence mismatches is correlated with the maximum length of perfectly matched probe-target duplex. Length of perfect match explained 43% of the variance in log2 signal ratios between probes with one and two mismatches. The correlation with maximum length of perfect match does not conform to expectations based on considering the effect of mismatches purely in terms of reducing the binding energy. However, it can be explained qualitatively by considering the entropic contribution to duplex stability from configurations of differing perfect match length. Conclusion The results of this study have implications in terms of array design and analysis. They highlight the significant effect that short sequence mismatches can have upon microarray hybridisation intensities even for long oligonucleotide probes. All microarray data presented in this study are available from the GEO database 1, under accession number [GEO: GSE9669

  15. Multilocus sequence typing of Staphylococcus aureus with DNA array technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); C. Jay (Corinne); S.V. Snijders (Susan); N. Durin (Nathalia); B. Lacroix (Bruno); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Enright (Mark); A. Troesch (Alain); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA newly developed oligonucleotide array suited for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of Staphylococcus aureus strains was analyzed with two strain collections in a two-center study. MLST allele identification for the first strain collection fully agreed with conventiona

  16. Tetramerization of an RNA oligonucleotide containing a GGGG sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Cheong, C; Moore, P B

    1991-05-23

    Poly rG can form four-stranded helices. The Hoogsteen-paired quartets of G residues on which such structures depend are so stable that they will form in 5'-GMP solutions, provided that Na+ or K+ are present (see for example, refs 2-4). Telomeric DNA sequences, which are G-rich, adopt four-stranded antiparallel G-quartet conformations in vitro, and parallel tetramerization of G-rich sequences may be involved in meiosis. Here we show that RNAs containing short runs of Gs can also tetramerize. A 19-base oligonucleotide derived from the 5S RNA of Escherichia coli (strand III), 5'GCCGAUGGUAGUGUGGGGU3', forms a K(+)-stabilized tetrameric aggregate that depends on the G residues at its 3' end. This complex is so stable that it would be surprising if similar structures do not occur in nature.

  17. Oligonucleotide array discovery of polymorphisms in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) reveals patterns of SNP variation associated with breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sung-Chur; Robbins, Matthew D; Chilcott, Charles; Zhu, Tong; Francis, David M

    2009-10-09

    Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) has narrow genetic diversity that makes it difficult to identify polymorphisms between elite germplasm. We explored array-based single feature polymorphism (SFP) discovery as a high-throughput approach for marker development in cultivated tomato. Three varieties, FL7600 (fresh-market), OH9242 (processing), and PI114490 (cherry) were used as a source of genomic DNA for hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. Identification of SFPs was based on outlier detection using regression analysis of normalized hybridization data within a probe set for each gene. A subset of 189 putative SFPs was sequenced for validation. The rate of validation depended on the desired level of significance (alpha) used to define the confidence interval (CI), and ranged from 76% for polymorphisms identified at alpha or= 2 SNPs per locus. We used a subset of validated SNPs for genetic diversity analysis of 92 tomato varieties and accessions. Pairwise estimation of theta (Fst) suggested significant differentiation between collections of fresh-market, processing, vintage, Latin American (landrace), and S. pimpinellifolium accessions. The fresh-market and processing groups displayed high genetic diversity relative to vintage and landrace groups. Furthermore, the patterns of SNP variation indicated that domestication and early breeding practices have led to progressive genetic bottlenecks while modern breeding practices have reintroduced genetic variation into the crop from wild species. Finally, we examined the ratio of non-synonymous (Ka) to synonymous substitutions (Ks) for 20 loci with multiple SNPs (>or= 4 per locus). Six of 20 loci showed ratios of Ka/Ks >or= 0.9. Array-based SFP discovery was an efficient method to identify a large number of molecular markers for genetics and breeding in elite tomato germplasm. Patterns of sequence variation across five major tomato groups provided insight into to the effect of human selection on genetic variation.

  18. Managing the sequence-specificity of antisense oligonucleotides in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Hansen, Bo R; Koch, Troels; Lindow, Morten

    2017-03-17

    All drugs perturb the expression of many genes in the cells that are exposed to them. These gene expression changes can be divided into effects resulting from engaging the intended target and effects resulting from engaging unintended targets. For antisense oligonucleotides, developments in bioinformatics algorithms, and the quality of sequence databases, allow oligonucleotide sequences to be analyzed computationally, in terms of the predictability of their interactions with intended and unintended RNA targets. Applying these tools enables selection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides where no- or only few unintended RNA targets are expected. To evaluate oligonucleotide sequence-specificity experimentally, we recommend a transcriptomics protocol where two or more oligonucleotides targeting the same RNA molecule, but with entirely different sequences, are evaluated together. This helps to clarify which changes in cellular RNA levels result from downstream processes of engaging the intended target, and which are likely to be related to engaging unintended targets. As required for all classes of drugs, the toxic potential of oligonucleotides must be evaluated in cell- and animal models before clinical testing. Since potential adverse effects related to unintended targeting are sequence-dependent and therefore species-specific, in vitro toxicology assays in human cells are especially relevant in oligonucleotide drug discovery. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Oligonucleotide array discovery of polymorphisms in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. reveals patterns of SNP variation associated with breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Tong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. has narrow genetic diversity that makes it difficult to identify polymorphisms between elite germplasm. We explored array-based single feature polymorphism (SFP discovery as a high-throughput approach for marker development in cultivated tomato. Results Three varieties, FL7600 (fresh-market, OH9242 (processing, and PI114490 (cherry were used as a source of genomic DNA for hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays. Identification of SFPs was based on outlier detection using regression analysis of normalized hybridization data within a probe set for each gene. A subset of 189 putative SFPs was sequenced for validation. The rate of validation depended on the desired level of significance (α used to define the confidence interval (CI, and ranged from 76% for polymorphisms identified at α ≤ 10-6 to 60% for those identified at α ≤ 10-2. Validation percentage reached a plateau between α ≤ 10-4 and α ≤ 10-7, but failure to identify known SFPs (Type II error increased dramatically at α ≤ 10-6. Trough sequence validation, we identified 279 SNPs and 27 InDels in 111 loci. Sixty loci contained ≥ 2 SNPs per locus. We used a subset of validated SNPs for genetic diversity analysis of 92 tomato varieties and accessions. Pairwise estimation of θ (Fst suggested significant differentiation between collections of fresh-market, processing, vintage, Latin American (landrace, and S. pimpinellifolium accessions. The fresh-market and processing groups displayed high genetic diversity relative to vintage and landrace groups. Furthermore, the patterns of SNP variation indicated that domestication and early breeding practices have led to progressive genetic bottlenecks while modern breeding practices have reintroduced genetic variation into the crop from wild species. Finally, we examined the ratio of non-synonymous (Ka to synonymous substitutions (Ks for 20 loci with multiple SNPs (≥ 4 per

  20. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Daryl E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. Results We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods

  1. Development of a human mitochondrial oligonucleotide microarray (h-MitoArray and gene expression analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 13 patients with isolated F1Fo ATP synthase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansíková Hana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To strengthen research and differential diagnostics of mitochondrial disorders, we constructed and validated an oligonucleotide microarray (h-MitoArray allowing expression analysis of 1632 human genes involved in mitochondrial biology, cell cycle regulation, signal transduction and apoptosis. Using h-MitoArray we analyzed gene expression profiles in 9 control and 13 fibroblast cell lines from patients with F1Fo ATP synthase deficiency consisting of 2 patients with mt9205ΔTA microdeletion and a genetically heterogeneous group of 11 patients with not yet characterized nuclear defects. Analysing gene expression profiles, we attempted to classify patients into expected defect specific subgroups, and subsequently reveal group specific compensatory changes, identify potential phenotype causing pathways and define candidate disease causing genes. Results Molecular studies, in combination with unsupervised clustering methods, defined three subgroups of patient cell lines – M group with mtDNA mutation and N1 and N2 groups with nuclear defect. Comparison of expression profiles and functional annotation, gene enrichment and pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes revealed in the M group a transcription profile suggestive of synchronized suppression of mitochondrial biogenesis and G1/S arrest. The N1 group showed elevated expression of complex I and reduced expression of complexes III, V, and V-type ATP synthase subunit genes, reduced expression of genes involved in phosphorylation dependent signaling along MAPK, Jak-STAT, JNK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways, signs of activated apoptosis and oxidative stress resembling phenotype of premature senescent fibroblasts. No specific functionally meaningful changes, except of signs of activated apoptosis, were detected in the N2 group. Evaluation of individual gene expression profiles confirmed already known ATP6/ATP8 defect in patients from the M group and indicated several candidate

  2. Rapid identification of allergenic and pathogenic molds in environmental air by an oligonucleotide array

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Airborne fungi play an important role in causing allergy and infections in susceptible people. Identification of these fungi, based on morphological characteristics, is time-consuming, expertise-demanding, and could be inaccurate. Methods We developed an oligonucleotide array that could accurately identify 21 important airborne fungi (13 genera) that may cause adverse health problems. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region...

  3. Oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Zhong Wang; Guo-Xiang Wu; Li-Bo Luo; Min Chen; Li-Hua Ruan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: Mixture of samples with different genotypes and clinical serum samples from 126 chronic hepatitis B patients was tested for hepatitis B virus genotypes by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing of PCR products, respectively. Clinical performances, time required and costs of the three assays were evaluated.RESULTS: Oligonucleotide chips and real-time PCR detected 1% and 0.1% genotypes, respectively, in mixed samples. Of the 126 clinical samples from patients with chronic hepatitis B, genotype B was detected in 41(33%), 41 (33%) and 45 (36%) samples, and genotype C in 76 (60%), 76 (60%) and 81 (64%) samples, by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing,respectively. Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR detected mixed genotypes B and C in 9 samples. Realtime PCR was the rapidest and cheapest among the three assays.CONCLUSION: Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR are able to detect mixed genotypes, while sequencing only detects the dominant genotype in clinical samples.

  4. Sequence selective naked-eye detection of DNA harnessing extension of oligonucleotide-modified nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Daniela; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    DNA polymerases can efficiently and sequence selectively incorporate oligonucleotide (ODN)-modified nucleotides and the incorporated oligonucleotide strand can be employed as primer in rolling circle amplification (RCA). The effective amplification of the DNA primer by Φ29 DNA polymerase allows the sequence-selective hybridisation of the amplified strand with a G-quadruplex DNA sequence that has horse radish peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings we develop a system that allows DNA detection with single-base resolution by naked eye.

  5. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yonghua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  6. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  7. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  8. Error, reproducibility and sensitivity: a pipeline for data processing of Agilent oligonucleotide expression arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posch Wilfried

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression microarrays are increasingly used to obtain large scale transcriptomic information on a wide range of biological samples. Nevertheless, there is still much debate on the best ways to process data, to design experiments and analyse the output. Furthermore, many of the more sophisticated mathematical approaches to data analysis in the literature remain inaccessible to much of the biological research community. In this study we examine ways of extracting and analysing a large data set obtained using the Agilent long oligonucleotide transcriptomics platform, applied to a set of human macrophage and dendritic cell samples. Results We describe and validate a series of data extraction, transformation and normalisation steps which are implemented via a new R function. Analysis of replicate normalised reference data demonstrate that intrarray variability is small (only around 2% of the mean log signal, while interarray variability from replicate array measurements has a standard deviation (SD of around 0.5 log2 units ( 6% of mean. The common practise of working with ratios of Cy5/Cy3 signal offers little further improvement in terms of reducing error. Comparison to expression data obtained using Arabidopsis samples demonstrates that the large number of genes in each sample showing a low level of transcription reflect the real complexity of the cellular transcriptome. Multidimensional scaling is used to show that the processed data identifies an underlying structure which reflect some of the key biological variables which define the data set. This structure is robust, allowing reliable comparison of samples collected over a number of years and collected by a variety of operators. Conclusions This study outlines a robust and easily implemented pipeline for extracting, transforming normalising and visualising transcriptomic array data from Agilent expression platform. The analysis is used to obtain quantitative estimates of

  9. Design of oligonucleotides for microarrays and perspectives for design of multi-transcriptome arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Wernersson, Rasmus; Knudsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer with an ......Optimal design of oligonucleotides for microarrays involves tedious and laborious work evaluating potential oligonucleotides relative to a series of parameters. The currently available tools for this purpose are limited in their flexibility and do not present the oligonucleotide designer...

  10. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid--modified antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Hollingshead, Brett D; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S; Reed, Lori A; Davis, John W; Whiteley, Laurence O

    2014-04-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure-toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure-toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing.

  11. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid—modified antisense oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D.; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R.; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A.; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S.; Reed, Lori A.; Davis, John W.; Whiteley, Laurence O.

    2014-01-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure–toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure–toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing. PMID:24550163

  12. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  13. Experimental analysis of oligonucleotide microarray design criteria to detect deletions by comparative genomic hybridization

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    Moerman Donald G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is currently one of the most powerful techniques to measure DNA copy number in large genomes. In humans, microarray CGH is widely used to assess copy number variants in healthy individuals and copy number aberrations associated with various diseases, syndromes and disease susceptibility. In model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans the technique has been applied to detect mutations, primarily deletions, in strains of interest. Although various constraints on oligonucleotide properties have been suggested to minimize non-specific hybridization and improve the data quality, there have been few experimental validations for CGH experiments. For genomic regions where strict design filters would limit the coverage it would also be useful to quantify the expected loss in data quality associated with relaxed design criteria. Results We have quantified the effects of filtering various oligonucleotide properties by measuring the resolving power for detecting deletions in the human and C. elegans genomes using NimbleGen microarrays. Approximately twice as many oligonucleotides are typically required to be affected by a deletion in human DNA samples in order to achieve the same statistical confidence as one would observe for a deletion in C. elegans. Surprisingly, the ability to detect deletions strongly depends on the oligonucleotide 15-mer count, which is defined as the sum of the genomic frequency of all the constituent 15-mers within the oligonucleotide. A similarity level above 80% to non-target sequences over the length of the probe produces significant cross-hybridization. We recommend the use of a fairly large melting temperature window of up to 10°C, the elimination of repeat sequences, the elimination of homopolymers longer than 5 nucleotides, and a threshold of -1 kcal/mol on the oligonucleotide self-folding energy. We observed very little difference in data

  14. Antibacterial Activity of DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters Tuned by Oligonucleotide Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javani, Siamak; Lorca, Romina; Latorre, Alfonso; Flors, Cristina; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Somoza, Álvaro

    2016-04-27

    Silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) stabilized by DNA are promising materials with tunable fluorescent properties, which have been employed in a plethora of sensing systems. In this report, we explore their antimicrobial properties in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. After testing 9 oligonucleotides with different sequence and length, we found that the antibacterial activity depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide employed. The sequences tested yielded fluorescent AgNCs, which can be grouped in blue, yellow, and red emitters. Interestingly, blue emitters yielded poor antibacterial activity, whereas yellow and red emitters afforded an activity similar to silver nitrate. Furthermore, structural studies using circular dichroism indicate the formation of complexes with different stability and structure, which might be one of the factors that modulate their activity. Finally, we prepared a trimeric structure containing the sequence that afforded the best antimicrobial activity, which inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and negative bacteria in the submicromolar range.

  15. Electrochemical Detection of a Dengue-related Oligonucleotide Sequence Using Ferrocenium as a Hybridization Indicator

    OpenAIRE

    José Luiz de Lima-Filho; Duarte Miguel França dos Prazeres; ernando Rodrigues Ribeiro Teles

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for electrochemical detection of a synthetic 20-bp oligonucleotide sequence related with dengue virus genome was developed. A complimentary DNA probe sequence was electrostatically immobilized onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with chitosan. Electrochemical detection of hybridization between probe and target was performed by cyclic voltammetry, using ferrocene (Fc+) as a hybridization label. After hybridization, the peak current response of Fc+ oxidation increased around...

  16. Genome dynamics of short oligonucleotides: the example of bacterial DNA uptake enhancing sequences.

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    Mohammed Bakkali

    Full Text Available Among the many bacteria naturally competent for transformation by DNA uptake-a phenomenon with significant clinical and financial implications- Pasteurellaceae and Neisseriaceae species preferentially take up DNA containing specific short sequences. The genomic overrepresentation of these DNA uptake enhancing sequences (DUES causes preferential uptake of conspecific DNA, but the function(s behind this overrepresentation and its evolution are still a matter for discovery. Here I analyze DUES genome dynamics and evolution and test the validity of the results to other selectively constrained oligonucleotides. I use statistical methods and computer simulations to examine DUESs accumulation in Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomes. I analyze DUESs sequence and nucleotide frequencies, as well as those of all their mismatched forms, and prove the dependence of DUESs genomic overrepresentation on their preferential uptake by quantifying and correlating both characteristics. I then argue that mutation, uptake bias, and weak selection against DUESs in less constrained parts of the genome combined are sufficient enough to cause DUESs accumulation in susceptible parts of the genome with no need for other DUES function. The distribution of overrepresentation values across sequences with different mismatch loads compared to the DUES suggests a gradual yet not linear molecular drive of DNA sequences depending on their similarity to the DUES. Other genomically overrepresented sequences, both pro- and eukaryotic, show similar distribution of frequencies suggesting that the molecular drive reported above applies to other frequent oligonucleotides. Rare oligonucleotides, however, seem to be gradually drawn to genomic underrepresentation, thus, suggesting a molecular drag. To my knowledge this work provides the first clear evidence of the gradual evolution of selectively constrained oligonucleotides, including repeated, palindromic and protein

  17. A statistical multiprobe model for analyzing cis and trans genes in genetical genomics experiments with short-oligonucleotide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Haan, Gerald de; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2005-01-01

    Short-oligonucleotide arrays typically contain multiple probes per gene. In genetical genomics applications a statistical model for the individual probe signals can help in separating ‘‘true’’ differential mRNA expression from ‘‘ghost’’ effects caused by polymorphisms, misdesigned probes, and batch

  18. Screening the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Patients with Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis by Oligonucleotide-Based Custom DNA Array

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    Kenji Nakai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early screening of individuals considered to be at risk for severe internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis is an important strategy for preventing ischemic cerebral stroke. The purpose of this study is to screening candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with severe ICA stenosis using a newly developed oligonucleotide-based custom DNA array. The subjects consisted of 47 controls and 46 patients with severe ICA stenosis (70% who underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Subjects gave informed consent and we obtained samples of blood and genomic DNA. We studied 8 candidate genes: renin-angiotensin system [angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1, nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3]; growth factor [hepatocyte growth factor (HGF]; transgelin (SM22; cytokine [chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2]; coagulation-fibrinolysis system [5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR]; and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1. Genotyping of candidate SNPs was done with a line probe assay (LiPA based on an oligonucleotide-based DNA array. Results: The allele frequency of PAI-1 –1965 delG (odds ratio (OR, 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.2–0.6 and MTHFR (OR 1.3, 95% CI, 1.0–1.5 were significantly different between controls and cases with ICA stenosis by Fisher’s exact test. Multiple logistic analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM, SNPs in PAI-1 –1965 delG and MTHFR were an independent risk for ICA stenosis. In conclusion, genetic factors of coagulation-fibrinolysis as well as diabetes mellitus (DM were relevant in ICA stenosis.

  19. Application of heteronuclear couplings to conformational analysis of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Live, D. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bax, A. [NIDDK National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The value of vicinal coupling constants extracted from NMR spectra in deducing torsion angles for conformational analysis is well recognized. Due to the abundance of protons, their couplings have been mostly widely used. In many instances, couplings between protons and other nuclei may be a valuable complement to proton-proton couplings or, in some instances, may be the only coupling available to characterize the torsion angle about a bond. Recently, heteronuclear couplings have been used to great benefit in studies of isotopically enriched proteins, and this general approach has been extended to peptides at natural abundance. The possibility of using this approach to study oligonucleotides is also attractive but has not as yet been widely exploited. With the development of strategies for labeling such molecules, particularly RNAs, this may become an important component in conformational analysis. For DNA, labeling is less accessible, but sufficient quantities of unlabeled material are readily available for measuring these couplings at natural abundance. We chose several DNA systems to explore the usefulness of heteronuclear couplings in addressing the sugar conformation and the glycosidic torsion angle. Intensities of cross peaks in long-range HMQC experiments can be related to the couplings. Crosspeaks involving H1{prime} and C1{prime} atoms have been emphasized because of the superior shift dispersion at these positions between sugar protons and carbon atoms. Results will be shown for the self-complementary Dickerson duplex dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and for d(GGTCGG), which dimerizes to form a G-tetrad structure incorporating both syn and anti base orientations. The couplings provide a clear discrimination between presence of C3{prime}-endo and C2{prime}-endo conformations of the sugars and syn and anti bases arrangements.

  20. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

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    Ki-Hong Jung

    Full Text Available Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa. We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org. The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics.

  1. Molecular phylogenetics before sequences: oligonucleotide catalogs as k-mer spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Mark A; Bernard, Guillaume; Chan, Cheong Xin

    2014-01-01

    From 1971 to 1985, Carl Woese and colleagues generated oligonucleotide catalogs of 16S/18S rRNAs from more than 400 organisms. Using these incomplete and imperfect data, Carl and his colleagues developed unprecedented insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the large RNA components of the translational apparatus. They recognized a third domain of life, revealed the phylogenetic backbone of bacteria (and its limitations), delineated taxa, and explored the tempo and mode of microbial evolution. For these discoveries to have stood the test of time, oligonucleotide catalogs must carry significant phylogenetic signal; they thus bear re-examination in view of the current interest in alignment-free phylogenetics based on k-mers. Here we consider the aims, successes, and limitations of this early phase of molecular phylogenetics. We computationally generate oligonucleotide sets (e-catalogs) from 16S/18S rRNA sequences, calculate pairwise distances between them based on D 2 statistics, compute distance trees, and compare their performance against alignment-based and k-mer trees. Although the catalogs themselves were superseded by full-length sequences, this stage in the development of computational molecular biology remains instructive for us today.

  2. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

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    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  3. Sequence-specific targeting of RNA with an oligonucleotide-neomycin conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Irudayasamy; Xi, Hongjuan; Arya, Dev P

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of neomycin covalently attached at the C5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine is reported. The synthesis outlined allows for incorporation of an aminoglycoside (neomycin) at any given site in an oligonucleotide (ODN) where a thymidine (or uridine) is present. Incorporation of this modified base into an oligonucleotide, which is complementary to a seven-bases-long alpha-sarcin loop RNA sequence, leads to enhanced duplex hybridization. The increase in Tm for this duplex (DeltaTm = 6 degrees C) suggests a favorable interaction of neomycin within the duplex groove. CD spectroscopy shows that the modified duplex adopts an A-type confirmation. ITC measurements indicate the additive effects of ODN and neomycin binding to the RNA target (Ka = 4.5 x 107 M-1). The enhanced stability of the hybrid duplex from this neomycin-ODN conjugate originates primarily from the enthalpic contribution of neomycin {DeltaDeltaHobs = -7.21 kcal/mol (DeltaHneomycin conjugated - DeltaH nonconjugated)} binding to the hybrid duplex. The short linker length allows for selective stabilization of the hybrid duplex over the hybrid triplex. The results described here open up new avenues in the design and synthesis of nucleo-aminoglycoside-conjugates (N-Ag-C) where the inclusion of any number of aminoglycoside (neomycin) molecules per oligonucleotide can be accomplished.

  4. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  5. Sequence diversity within the HA-1 gene as detected by melting temperature assay without oligonucleotide probes

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    Mattiuz Pier

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags are self-peptides derived from common cellular proteins and presented by MHC class I and II molecules. Disparities in mHags are a potential risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD in the recipients of bone marrow from HLA-identical donors. Two alleles have been identified in the mHag HA-1. The correlation between mismatches of the mHag HA-1 and GvHD has been suggested and methods to facilitate large-scale testing were afterwards developed. Methods We used sequence specific primer (SSP PCR and direct sequencing to detect HA-1 gene polymorphisms in a sample of 131 unrelated Italian subjects. We then set up a novel melting temperature (Tm assay that may help identification of HA-1 alleles without oligonucleotide probes. Results We report the frequencies of HA-1 alleles in the Italian population and the presence of an intronic 5 base-pair deletion associated with the immunogeneic allele HA-1H. We also detected novel variable sites with respect to the consensus sequence of HA-1 locus. Even though recombination/gene conversion events are documented, there is considerable linkage disequilibrium in the data. The gametic associations between HA-1R/H alleles and the intronic 5-bp ins/del polymorphism prompted us to try the Tm analysis with SYBR® Green I. We show that the addition of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO during the assay yields distinct patterns when amplicons from HA-1H homozygotes, HA-1R homozygotes, and heterozygotes are analysed. Conclusion The possibility to use SYBR® Green I to detect Tm differences between allelic variants is attractive but requires great caution. We succeeded in allele discrimination of the HA-1 locus using a relatively short (101 bp amplicon, only in the presence of DMSO. We believe that, at least in certain assets, Tm assays may benefit by the addition of DMSO or other agents affecting DNA strand conformation and stability.

  6. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Maerkle, Frieder; Hahn, Lothar; Foertsch, Tobias; Schillo, Sebastian; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Weber, Laura K; Ridder, Barbara; Soehindrijo, Miriam; Muenster, Bastian; Striffler, Jakob; Bischoff, F Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F

    2014-10-28

    In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches.

  7. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides

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    Alexander Nesterov-Mueller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches.

  8. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

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    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  9. How to decide? Different methods of calculating gene expression from short oligonucleotide array data will give different results

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    Voesenek Laurentius ACJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short oligonucleotide arrays for transcript profiling have been available for several years. Generally, raw data from these arrays are analysed with the aid of the Microarray Analysis Suite or GeneChip Operating Software (MAS or GCOS from Affymetrix. Recently, more methods to analyse the raw data have become available. Ideally all these methods should come up with more or less the same results. We set out to evaluate the different methods and include work on our own data set, in order to test which method gives the most reliable results. Results Calculating gene expression with 6 different algorithms (MAS5, dChip PMMM, dChip PM, RMA, GC-RMA and PDNN using the same (Arabidopsis data, results in different calculated gene expression levels. Consequently, depending on the method used, different genes will be identified as differentially regulated. Surprisingly, there was only 27 to 36% overlap between the different methods. Furthermore, 47.5% of the genes/probe sets showed good correlation between the mismatch and perfect match intensities. Conclusion After comparing six algorithms, RMA gave the most reproducible results and showed the highest correlation coefficients with Real Time RT-PCR data on genes identified as differentially expressed by all methods. However, we were not able to verify, by Real Time RT-PCR, the microarray results for most genes that were solely calculated by RMA. Furthermore, we conclude that subtraction of the mismatch intensity from the perfect match intensity results most likely in a significant underestimation for at least 47.5% of the expression values. Not one algorithm produced significant expression values for genes present in quantities below 1 pmol. If the only purpose of the microarray experiment is to find new candidate genes, and too many genes are found, then mutual exclusion of the genes predicted by contrasting methods can be used to narrow down the list of new candidate genes by 64 to 73%.

  10. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

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    Gbaj A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5’-bispyrene and 3’-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5’-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  11. Synthetic oligonucleotides with particular base sequences from the cDNA encoding proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG induce interferons and activate natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, T; Yano, O; Kuramoto, E; Kimura, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Yamamoto, S

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of 45-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide, having sequence randomly selected from the known cDNA encoding BCG proteins, were tested for their capability to augment natural killer (NK) cell activity of mouse spleen cells in vitro. Six out of the 13 oligonucleotides showed the activity, while the others did not. In order to know the minimal and essential sequence(s) responsible for the biological activity, 2 kinds of 30-mer and 5 kinds of 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments of an active 45-mer nucleotide were tested for their activity. One of the 30-mer oligonucleotides, designated BCG-A4a, was active, but the other 30-mer was inactive. All of the 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments were inactive. The BCG-A4a also stimulated the spleen cells to produce interferon (IFN)-alpha and -gamma. An experiment using anti-IFN antisera showed that the NK cell activation by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to the IFN-alpha produced. It was noticed that all of the biologically active oligonucleotides possessed one or more palindrome sequence(s), and the inactive ones did not, with an exception of a 45-mer inactive oligonucleotide containing overlapping palindrome sequences (GGGCCCGGG). These findings strongly suggest that certain palindrome sequences, like GACGTC, GGCGCC and TGCGCA, are essential for 30-mer oligonucleotides, like BCG-A4a, to induce IFNs.

  12. Using genomic DNA-based probe-selection to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species

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    Townsend Henrik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-density oligonucleotide (oligo arrays are a powerful tool for transcript profiling. Arrays based on GeneChip® technology are amongst the most widely used, although GeneChip® arrays are currently available for only a small number of plant and animal species. Thus, we have developed a method to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species and tested the method by analysing the transcriptome of Brassica oleracea L., a species for which no GeneChip® array is available, using a GeneChip® array designed for Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Genomic DNA from B. oleracea was labelled and hybridised to the ATH1-121501 GeneChip® array. Arabidopsis thaliana probe-pairs that hybridised to the B. oleracea genomic DNA on the basis of the perfect-match (PM probe signal were then selected for subsequent B. oleracea transcriptome analysis using a .cel file parser script to generate probe mask files. The transcriptional response of B. oleracea to a mineral nutrient (phosphorus; P stress was quantified using probe mask files generated for a wide range of gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds. An example probe mask file generated with a gDNA hybridisation intensity threshold of 400 removed > 68 % of the available PM probes from the analysis but retained >96 % of available A. thaliana probe-sets. Ninety-nine of these genes were then identified as significantly regulated under P stress in B. oleracea, including the homologues of P stress responsive genes in A. thaliana. Increasing the gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds up to 500 for probe-selection increased the sensitivity of the GeneChip® array to detect regulation of gene expression in B. oleracea under P stress by up to 13-fold. Our open-source software to create probe mask files is freely available http://affymetrix.arabidopsis.info/xspecies/ and may be used to facilitate transcriptomic analyses of a wide range of plant and animal

  13. A web-based search engine for triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Sara S; Wu, Qi; Thames, Howard D; DiGiovanni, John; Walborg, Earl F; MacLeod, Michael C; Vasquez, Karen M

    2006-01-01

    Triplex technology offers a useful approach for site-specific modification of gene structure and function both in vitro and in vivo. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) bind to their target sites in duplex DNA, thereby forming triple-helical DNA structures via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding. TFO binding has been demonstrated to site-specifically inhibit gene expression, enhance homologous recombination, induce mutation, inhibit protein binding, and direct DNA damage, thus providing a tool for gene-specific manipulation of DNA. We have developed a flexible web-based search engine to find and annotate TFO target sequences within the human and mouse genomes. Descriptive information about each site, including sequence context and gene region (intron, exon, or promoter), is provided. The engine assists the user in finding highly specific TFO target sequences by eliminating or flagging known repeat sequences and flagging overlapping genes. A convenient way to check for the uniqueness of a potential TFO binding site is provided via NCBI BLAST. The search engine may be accessed at spi.mdanderson.org/tfo.

  14. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  15. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  16. Leveraging human genomic information to identify nonhuman primate sequences for expression array development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Nicholas F

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonhuman primates (NHPs are essential for biomedical research due to their similarities to humans. The utility of NHPs will be greatly increased by the application of genomics-based approaches such as gene expression profiling. Sequence information from the 3' end of genes is the key resource needed to create oligonucleotide expression arrays. Results We have developed the algorithms and procedures necessary to quickly acquire sequence information from the 3' end of nonhuman primate orthologs of human genes. To accomplish this, we identified terminal exons of over 15,000 human genes by aligning mRNA sequences with genomic sequence. We found the mean length of complete last exons to be approximately 1,400 bp, significantly longer than previous estimates. We designed primers to amplify genomic DNA, which included at least 300 bp of the terminal exon. We cloned and sequenced the PCR products representing over 5,500 Macaca mulatta (rhesus monkey orthologs of human genes. This sequence information has been used to select probes for rhesus gene expression profiling. We have also tested 10 sets of primers with genomic DNA from Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus monkey, Papio hamadryas (Baboon, and Chlorocebus aethiops (African green monkey, vervet. The results indicate that the primers developed for this study will be useful for acquiring sequence from the 3' end of genes for other nonhuman primate species. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human genomic DNA sequence can be leveraged to obtain sequence from the 3' end of NHP orthologs and that this sequence can then be used to generate NHP oligonucleotide microarrays. Affymetrix and Agilent used sequences obtained with this approach in the design of their rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarrays.

  17. Sequence conversion by single strand oligonucleotide donors via non-homologous end joining in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Jilan; Thompson, Lawrence H; Seidman, Michael M

    2010-07-23

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology independent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways involving proteins such as Ku70/80, DNAPKcs, Xrcc4/Ligase 4, and the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex. DSBs can also be repaired by homology-dependent pathways (HDR), in which the MRN and CtIP nucleases produce single strand ends that engage homologous sequences either by strand invasion or strand annealing. The entry of ends into HDR pathways underlies protocols for genomic manipulation that combine site-specific DSBs with appropriate informational donors. Most strategies utilize long duplex donors that participate by strand invasion. Work in yeast indicates that single strand oligonucleotide (SSO) donors are also active, over considerable distance, via a single strand annealing pathway. We examined the activity of SSO donors in mammalian cells at DSBs induced either by a restriction nuclease or by a targeted interstrand cross-link. SSO donors were effective immediately adjacent to the break, but activity declined sharply beyond approximately 100 nucleotides. Overexpression of the resection nuclease CtIP increased the frequency of SSO-mediated sequence modulation distal to the break site, but had no effect on the activity of an SSO donor adjacent to the break. Genetic and in vivo competition experiments showed that sequence conversion by SSOs in the immediate vicinity of the break was not by strand invasion or strand annealing pathways. Instead these donors competed for ends that would have otherwise entered NHEJ pathways.

  18. Differentiation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic regions, and development of a species specific oligonucleotide for in situ detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, Vivian; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.;

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize and determine intraspecies and interspecies relatedness of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to Actinobacillus lignieresii and Actinobacillus suis by sequence analysis of the ribosomal operon and to find a species-specific area for in situ detection of A...

  19. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  20. Advantages of ion-exchange chromatography for oligonucleotide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ken; Thayer, Jim

    2011-05-01

    The rapid development of therapeutic oligonucleotides (ONs) has created a need for in-depth characterization of ONs, beyond previous requirements. The natural migration to LC-MS requires the use of chromatography with MS-compatible eluents to introduce the large, highly charged biopolymers into the mass spectrometer. Most frequently this employs ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography, which may leave gaps in the characterization, but these can be filled with the use of high-resolution ion-exchange chromatography. Several classes of isobaric isomers are among the impurities that will require further separation prior to MS analysis. This review shows how the use of ion exchange as an additional orthogonal analytical method can be used as standalone or interfaced with MS to achieve the highest possible analytical coverage in the characterization and quantification of impurities present in single- and double-stranded ON formulations. Some of these techniques have been in use for some time and the importance of others is just being recognized.

  1. Unique palindromic sequences in synthetic oligonucleotides are required to induce IFN [correction of INF] and augment IFN-mediated [correction of INF] natural killer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Kuramoto, E; Yano, O; Tokunaga, T

    1992-06-15

    Thirty-mer single-stranded oligonucleotides, with a sequence chosen from the known cDNA encoding the 64-kDa protein named Ag A or the MPB-70 protein of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the human cellular proteins such as complement component 1 inhibitor and Ig rearranged lambda-chain, were used to dissect the capability to induce IFN and to augment NK cell activity of mouse spleen cells by coincubation in vitro. Three with the hexamer palindromic sequence as GACGTC were active, whereas two kinds of oligonucleotides with no palindrome were inactive. The oligonucleotides containing at least one of the different palindromic sequences showed no activity. When a portion of the sequence of the inactive oligonucleotides was substituted with either palindromic sequence of GACGTC, AGCGCT, or AACGTT, the oligonucleotide acquired the ability to augment NK activity. In contrast, the oligonucleotides substituted with another palindromic sequence such as ACCGGT was without effect. Furthermore, exchange of two neighboring mononucleotides within, but not outside, the active palindromic sequence destroyed the ability of the oligonucleotides to augment NK cell activity. Stimulation of spleen cells with the substituted oligonucleotide, A4a-AAC, induced production of significant amounts of IFN-alpha/beta and small amounts of IFN-gamma. Augmentation of NK activity of the cells by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to IFN-alpha/beta production. These results strongly suggest that the presence of the unique palindromic sequences, such as GACGTC, AGCGCT, and AACGTT, but not ACCGGT, is essential for the immunostimulatory activity of oligonucleotides.

  2. Detection of copy number variation from array intensity and sequencing read depth using a stepwise Bayesian model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerstein Mark B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variants (CNVs have been demonstrated to occur at a high frequency and are now widely believed to make a significant contribution to the phenotypic variation in human populations. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH and newly developed read-depth approach through ultrahigh throughput genomic sequencing both provide rapid, robust, and comprehensive methods to identify CNVs on a whole-genome scale. Results We developed a Bayesian statistical analysis algorithm for the detection of CNVs from both types of genomic data. The algorithm can analyze such data obtained from PCR-based bacterial artificial chromosome arrays, high-density oligonucleotide arrays, and more recently developed high-throughput DNA sequencing. Treating parameters--e.g., the number of CNVs, the position of each CNV, and the data noise level--that define the underlying data generating process as random variables, our approach derives the posterior distribution of the genomic CNV structure given the observed data. Sampling from the posterior distribution using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we get not only best estimates for these unknown parameters but also Bayesian credible intervals for the estimates. We illustrate the characteristics of our algorithm by applying it to both synthetic and experimental data sets in comparison to other segmentation algorithms. Conclusions In particular, the synthetic data comparison shows that our method is more sensitive than other approaches at low false positive rates. Furthermore, given its Bayesian origin, our method can also be seen as a technique to refine CNVs identified by fast point-estimate methods and also as a framework to integrate array-CGH and sequencing data with other CNV-related biological knowledge, all through informative priors.

  3. Sequencing by ligation variation with endonuclease V digestion and deoxyinosine-containing query oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Antoine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing-by-ligation (SBL is one of several next-generation sequencing methods that has been developed for massive sequencing of DNA immobilized on arrayed beads (or other clonal amplicons. SBL has the advantage of being easy to implement and accessible to all because it can be performed with off-the-shelf reagents. However, SBL has the limitation of very short read lengths. Results To overcome the read length limitation, research groups have developed complex library preparation processes, which can be time-consuming, difficult, and result in low complexity libraries. Herein we describe a variation on traditional SBL protocols that extends the number of sequential bases that can be sequenced by using Endonuclease V to nick a query primer, thus leaving a ligatable end extended into the unknown sequence for further SBL cycles. To demonstrate the protocol, we constructed a known DNA sequence and utilized our SBL variation, cyclic SBL (cSBL, to resequence this region. Using our method, we were able to read thirteen contiguous bases in the 3' - 5' direction. Conclusions Combining this read length with sequencing in the 5' - 3' direction would allow a read length of over twenty bases on a single tage. Implementing mate-paired tags and this SBL variation could enable > 95% coverage of the genome.

  4. Sequence-specific binding and cleavage of duplex DNA by a radioiodinated, intercalator-linked, triplex-forming oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orson, Frank M.; McShan, W. Michael; Kinsey, Berma M

    1996-05-01

    Applications of oligodeoxynucleotides to modulate gene expression have been the subject of much recent research. We have sought to develop a method to permanently inactivate a gene, or potentially kill cells containing abnormal genes. In this report, we show that a DNA intercalator conjugated to a triplex-forming oligonucleotide can be labeled with an Auger electron emitting radioisotope, can cleave its duplex DNA target, and can specifically bind the target sequence contained in a total of 10 kilobases of irrelevant DNA.

  5. Tilted pillar array fabrication by the combination of proton beam writing and soft lithography for microfluidic cell capture Part 2: Image sequence analysis based evaluation and biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Járvás, Gábor; Varga, Tamás; Szigeti, Márton; Hajba, László; Fürjes, Péter; Rajta, István; Guttman, András

    2017-07-17

    As a continuation of our previously published work, this paper presents a detailed evaluation of a microfabricated cell capture device utilizing a doubly tilted micropillar array. The device was fabricated using a novel hybrid technology based on the combination of proton beam writing and conventional lithography techniques. Tilted pillars offer unique flow characteristics and support enhanced fluidic interaction for improved immunoaffinity based cell capture. The performance of the microdevice was evaluated by an image sequence analysis based in-house developed single-cell tracking system. Individual cell tracking allowed in-depth analysis of the cell-chip surface interaction mechanism from hydrodynamic point of view. Simulation results were validated by using the hybrid device and the optimized surface functionalization procedure. Finally, the cell capture capability of this new generation microdevice was demonstrated by efficiently arresting cells from a HT29 cell-line suspension. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Identification of cryptic microaberrations in osteosarcoma by high-definition oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Shamini; Yoshimoto, Maisa; Maire, Georges; Paderova, Jana; Bayani, Jane; Squire, Jeremy A; Zielenska, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone tumor characterized by complex abnormal karyotypes and a high level of genomic instability. Using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), a novel class of localized copy number variations called microaberrations has been detected. These genomic anomalies typically involve DNA imbalances affecting 700 kb to 1 Mb DNA, and are often associated with some type of genetic syndromes. Because the origin of instability in OS is poorly understood, we used aCGH to determine whether microaberrations were a characteristic of four OS cell lines: U-2 OS, HOS, MG-63, and SAOS-2. TP53 is mutated in SAOS-2, a line in which 17 microaberrations were found. In contrast, U-2 OS, which has a wild-type TP53, had only six such anomalies, the lowest incidence. A 500-kb microaberration within a region of gain at 5p15.33 in SAOS-2 was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Significantly, this genomic location is close to the TERT gene, a region of gain in all four cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the incidence of microaberrations in OS. The high levels of these anomalies detected suggest that the instability processes in OS that lead to a highly abnormal karyotypes may also be associated with acquisition of genomic microaberrations.

  7. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  8. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Gang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10-11 M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  9. Sequence-specific intercalating agents: intercalation at specific sequences on duplex DNA via major groove recognition by oligonucleotide-intercalator conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J S; François, J C; Montenay-Garestier, T; Saison-Behmoaras, T; Roig, V; Thuong, N T; Hélène, C

    1989-01-01

    An acridine derivative was covalently linked to the 5' end of a homopyrimidine oligonucleotide. Specific binding to a homopurine-homopyrimidine sequence of duplex DNA was demonstrated by spectroscopic studies (absorption and fluorescence) and by "footprinting" experiments with a copper phenanthroline chelate used as an artificial nuclease. A hypochromism and a red shift of the acridine absorption were observed. Triple-helix formation was also accompanied by a hypochromism in the ultraviolet range. The fluorescence of the acridine ring was quenched by a stacking interaction with a G.C base pair adjacent to the homopurine-homopyrimidine target sequence. The intercalating agent strongly stabilized the complex formed by the oligopyrimidine with its target duplex sequence. Cytosine methylation further increased the stability of the complexes. Footprinting studies revealed that the oligopyrimidine binds in a parallel orientation with respect to the homopurine-containing strand of the duplex. The intercalated acridine extended by 2 base pairs the region of the duplex protected by the oligopyrimidine against degradation by the nuclease activity of the copper phenanthroline chelate. Random intercalation of the acridine ring was lost due to the repulsive effect of the negatively charged oligonucleotide tail. Intercalation occurred only at those double-stranded sequences where the homopyrimidine oligonucleotide recognized the major groove of duplex DNA. Images PMID:2594761

  10. Sequence determination of rRNA genes of pathogenic Vibrio species and whole-cell identification of Vibrio vulnificus with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, R; Ludwig, W; Amann, R I; Schleifer, K H

    1994-04-01

    A comparative analysis of seven new 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic Vibrio species with previously published vibrio sequences confirmed that Vibrio vulnificus represents a group that is not closely related to the core organisms of the genus Vibrio. In addition, we found that V. vulnificus, Listonella (Vibrio) anguillarum and Vibrio diazotrophicus branch off separately from the core group. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of V. vulnificus strains belonging to biotypes 1 and 2 revealed that the sequences of all but four biotype 1 strains were identical to each other but slightly different (17 bases) from the sequences of the rest of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. In addition, the sequences of variable regions of the 23S rRNA genes of Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio furnissii, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio cholerae, and V. vulnificus C7184 and TW1 were determined, aligned, and compared with all available bacterial 23S rRNA sequences in order to search for specific target sites. As a result, four oligonucleotide probes specific for V. vulnificus were synthesized, and the specificities of these probes were evaluated by dot blot hybridization to membrane-bound RNAs from 21 V. vulnificus strains, 13 strains belonging to other Vibrio species, 61 strains belonging to species that are members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria, and 3 eucaryotic microorganisms. Two probes hybridized with all of the V. vulnificus strains tested, and the other two probes distinguished V. vulnificus biotype 1 strains from all other organisms. In situ identification of V. vulnificus by using tetramethylrhodamine- or fluorescein-labelled oligonucleotides is now possible.

  11. Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of the Specific Oligonucleotide Sequence of Dengue Virus Type 1 on Pencil Graphite Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine; Nascimento, Gustavo; Santana, Nataly; Ferreira, Danielly; Lima, Manoel; Natividade, Edna; Martins, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor that relies on the adsorption immobilization of the 18-mer single-stranded nucleic acid related to dengue virus gene 1 on activated pencil graphite was developed. Hybridization between the probe and its complementary oligonucleotides (the target) was investigated by monitoring guanine oxidation by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The pencil graphite electrode was made of ordinary pencil lead (type 4B). The polished surface of the working electrode was activated by applying a potential of 1.8 V for 5 min. Afterward, the dengue oligonucleotides probe was immobilized on the activated electrode by applying 0.5 V to the electrode in 0.5 M acetate buffer (pH 5.0) for 5 min. The hybridization process was carried out by incubating at the annealing temperature of the oligonucleotides. A time of five minutes and concentration of 1 μM were found to be the optimal conditions for probe immobilization. The electrochemical detection of annealing between the DNA probe (TS-1P) immobilized on the modified electrode, and the target (TS-1T) was achieved. The target could be quantified in a range from 1 to 40 nM with good linearity and a detection limit of 0.92 nM. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was tested using non-complementary sequences of dengue virus 2 and 3. PMID:22163916

  12. Assessing the Interplay between the Physicochemical Parameters of Ion-Pairing Reagents and the Analyte Sequence on the Electrospray Desorption Process for Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, Babak; Murph, Mandi M.; Bartlett, Michael G.

    2017-08-01

    Alkylamines are widely used as ion-pairing agents during LC-MS of oligonucleotides. In addition to a better chromatographic separation, they also assist with the desorption of oligonucleotide ions into the gas phase, cause charge state reduction, and decrease cation adduction. However, the choice of such ion-pairing agents has considerable influence on the MS signal intensity of oligonucleotides as they can also cause significant ion suppression. Interestingly, optimal ion-pairing agents should be selected on a case by case basis as their choice is strongly influenced by the sequence of the oligonucleotide under investigation. Despite imposing major practical difficulties to analytical method development, such a highly variable system that responds very strongly to the nuances of the electrospray composition provides an excellent opportunity for a fundamental study of the electrospray ionization process. Our investigations using this system quantitatively revealed the major factors that influenced the ESI ionization efficiency of oligonucleotides. Parameters such as boiling point, proton affinity, partition coefficient, water solubility, and Henry's law constants for the ion-pairing reagents and the hydrophobic thymine content of the oligonucleotides were found to be the most significant contributors. Identification of these parameters also allowed for the development of a statistical predictive algorithm that can assist with the choice of an optimum IP agent for each particular oligonucleotide sequence. We believe that research in the field of oligonucleotide bioanalysis will significantly benefit from this algorithm (included in Supplementary Material) as it advocates for the use of lesser-known but more suitable ion-pair alternatives to TEA for many oligonucleotide sequences.

  13. CGHPRO – A comprehensive data analysis tool for array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenzner Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridisation is a molecular cytogenetic technique for the genome wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. It is based on the co-hybridisation of differentially labelled test and reference DNA onto arrays of genomic BAC clones, cDNAs or oligonucleotides, and after correction for various intervening variables, loss or gain in the test DNA can be indicated from spots showing aberrant signal intensity ratios. Now that this technique is no longer confined to highly specialized laboratories and is entering the realm of clinical application, there is a need for a user-friendly software package that facilitates estimates of DNA dosage from raw signal intensities obtained by array CGH experiments, and which does not depend on a sophisticated computational environment. Results We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection and comparative analysis of array-CGH data. CGHPRO is a stand-alone JAVA application that guides the user through the whole process of data analysis. The import option for image analysis data covers several data formats, but users can also customize their own data formats. Several graphical representation tools assist in the selection of the appropriate normalization method. Intensity ratios of each clone can be plotted in a size-dependent manner along the chromosome ideograms. The interactive graphical interface offers the chance to explore the characteristics of each clone, such as the involvement of the clones sequence in segmental duplications. Circular Binary Segmentation and unsupervised Hidden Markov Model algorithms facilitate objective detection of chromosomal breakpoints. The storage of all essential data in a back-end database allows the simultaneously comparative analysis of different cases. The various display options facilitate also the definition of shortest regions of overlap and simplify the

  14. Major copy proportion analysis of tumor samples using SNP arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common genetic variations in the human genome and are useful as genomic markers. Oligonucleotide SNP microarrays have been developed for high-throughput genotyping of up to 900,000 human SNPs and have been used widely in linkage and cancer genomics studies. We have previously used Hidden Markov Models (HMM to analyze SNP array data for inferring copy numbers and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH from paired normal and tumor samples and unpaired tumor samples. Results We proposed and implemented major copy proportion (MCP analysis of oligonucleotide SNP array data. A HMM was constructed to infer unobserved MCP states from observed allele-specific signals through emission and transition distributions. We used 10 K, 100 K and 250 K SNP array datasets to compare MCP analysis with LOH and copy number analysis, and showed that MCP performs better than LOH analysis for allelic-imbalanced chromosome regions and normal contaminated samples. The major and minor copy alleles can also be inferred from allelic-imbalanced regions by MCP analysis. Conclusion MCP extends tumor LOH analysis to allelic imbalance analysis and supplies complementary information to total copy numbers. MCP analysis of mixing normal and tumor samples suggests the utility of MCP analysis of normal-contaminated tumor samples. The described analysis and visualization methods are readily available in the user-friendly dChip software.

  15. High resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis using spotted oligonucleotides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, B; Ouwerkerk, E; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, comparative genomic hybridisation array (array CGH) is the method of choice for studying genome wide DNA copy number changes. To date, either amplified representations of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)/phage artificial chromosomes (PACs) or cDNAs have been spotted as

  16. Molecular testing for familial hypercholesterolaemia-associated mutations in a UK-based cohort: development of an NGS-based method and comparison with multiplex polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Anne; Pandey, Sarojini; Lloyd, Kate L; Dyer, Nigel; Khan, Mike; Crockard, Martin; Latten, Mark J; Watson, Tracey L; Cree, Ian A; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2016-11-01

    Background Detection of disease-associated mutations in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia is crucial for early interventions to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. Screening for these mutations represents a methodological challenge since more than 1200 different causal mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor has been identified. A number of methodological approaches have been developed for screening by clinical diagnostic laboratories. Methods Using primers targeting, the low-density lipoprotein receptor, apolipoprotein B, and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, we developed a novel Ion Torrent-based targeted re-sequencing method. We validated this in a West Midlands-UK small cohort of 58 patients screened in parallel with other mutation-targeting methods, such as multiplex polymerase chain reaction (Elucigene FH20), oligonucleotide arrays (Randox familial hypercholesterolaemia array) or the Illumina next-generation sequencing platform. Results In this small cohort, the next-generation sequencing method achieved excellent analytical performance characteristics and showed 100% and 89% concordance with the Randox array and the Elucigene FH20 assay. Investigation of the discrepant results identified two cases of mutation misclassification of the Elucigene FH20 multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay. A number of novel mutations not previously reported were also identified by the next-generation sequencing method. Conclusions Ion Torrent-based next-generation sequencing can deliver a suitable alternative for the molecular investigation of familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, especially when comprehensive mutation screening for rare or unknown mutations is required.

  17. G-stack modulated probe intensities on expression arrays - sequence corrections and signal calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasold Mario

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The brightness of the probe spots on expression microarrays intends to measure the abundance of specific mRNA targets. Probes with runs of at least three guanines (G in their sequence show abnormal high intensities which reflect rather probe effects than target concentrations. This G-bias requires correction prior to downstream expression analysis. Results Longer runs of three or more consecutive G along the probe sequence and in particular triple degenerated G at its solution end ((GGG1-effect are associated with exceptionally large probe intensities on GeneChip expression arrays. This intensity bias is related to non-specific hybridization and affects both perfect match and mismatch probes. The (GGG1-effect tends to increase gradually for microarrays of later GeneChip generations. It was found for DNA/RNA as well as for DNA/DNA probe/target-hybridization chemistries. Amplification of sample RNA using T7-primers is associated with strong positive amplitudes of the G-bias whereas alternative amplification protocols using random primers give rise to much smaller and partly even negative amplitudes. We applied positional dependent sensitivity models to analyze the specifics of probe intensities in the context of all possible short sequence motifs of one to four adjacent nucleotides along the 25meric probe sequence. Most of the longer motifs are adequately described using a nearest-neighbor (NN model. In contrast, runs of degenerated guanines require explicit consideration of next nearest neighbors (GGG terms. Preprocessing methods such as vsn, RMA, dChip, MAS5 and gcRMA only insufficiently remove the G-bias from data. Conclusions Positional and motif dependent sensitivity models accounts for sequence effects of oligonucleotide probe intensities. We propose a positional dependent NN+GGG hybrid model to correct the intensity bias associated with probes containing poly-G motifs. It is implemented as a single-chip based calibration

  18. Introduction on Using the FastPCR Software and the Related Java Web Tools for PCR and Oligonucleotide Assembly and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Tselykh, Timofey V; Khassenov, Bekbolat; Ramanculov, Erlan M

    2017-01-01

    This chapter introduces the FastPCR software as an integrated tool environment for PCR primer and probe design, which predicts properties of oligonucleotides based on experimental studies of the PCR efficiency. The software provides comprehensive facilities for designing primers for most PCR applications and their combinations. These include the standard PCR as well as the multiplex, long-distance, inverse, real-time, group-specific, unique, overlap extension PCR for multi-fragments assembling cloning and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). It also contains a built-in program to design oligonucleotide sets both for long sequence assembly by ligase chain reaction and for design of amplicons that tile across a region(s) of interest. The software calculates the melting temperature for the standard and degenerate oligonucleotides including locked nucleic acid (LNA) and other modifications. It also provides analyses for a set of primers with the prediction of oligonucleotide properties, dimer and G/C-quadruplex detection, linguistic complexity as well as a primer dilution and resuspension calculator. The program consists of various bioinformatical tools for analysis of sequences with the GC or AT skew, CG% and GA% content, and the purine-pyrimidine skew. It also analyzes the linguistic sequence complexity and performs generation of random DNA sequence as well as restriction endonucleases analysis. The program allows to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites for coding sequences and supports the clustering of sequences. It performs efficient and complete detection of various repeat types with visual display. The FastPCR software allows the sequence file batch processing that is essential for automation. The program is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html , and its online version is located at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  19. High-frequency Oligonucleotides in Watermelon Expressed Sequenced Tag-unigenes Are Useful in Producing Polymorphic Polymerase Chain Reaction Markers among Watermelon Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we report a simple procedure for developing gene targeted primers, named high-frequency gene sequence (HFGS) primers, based on oligonucleotides that exist in high frequency in watermelon expressed sequence tag (EST)-unigenes. These HFGS primers were constructed by first screening for...

  20. Evaluation of sequence alignments and oligonucleotide probes with respect to three-dimensional structure of ribosomal RNA using ARB software package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Harald

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of high-resolution RNA crystal structures for the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits and the subsequent validation of comparative secondary structure models have prompted the biologists to use three-dimensional structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA for evaluating sequence alignments of rRNA genes. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structural features of rRNA are highly useful and successfully employed in designing rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes intended for in situ hybridization experiments. RNA3D, a program to combine sequence alignment information with three-dimensional structure of rRNA was developed. Integration into ARB software package, which is used extensively by the scientific community for phylogenetic analysis and molecular probe designing, has substantially extended the functionality of ARB software suite with 3D environment. Results Three-dimensional structure of rRNA is visualized in OpenGL 3D environment with the abilities to change the display and overlay information onto the molecule, dynamically. Phylogenetic information derived from the multiple sequence alignments can be overlaid onto the molecule structure in a real time. Superimposition of both statistical and non-statistical sequence associated information onto the rRNA 3D structure can be done using customizable color scheme, which is also applied to a textual sequence alignment for reference. Oligonucleotide probes designed by ARB probe design tools can be mapped onto the 3D structure along with the probe accessibility models for evaluation with respect to secondary and tertiary structural conformations of rRNA. Conclusion Visualization of three-dimensional structure of rRNA in an intuitive display provides the biologists with the greater possibilities to carry out structure based phylogenetic analysis. Coupled with secondary structure models of rRNA, RNA3D program aids in validating the sequence alignments of rRNA genes and evaluating

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  2. Energetic wave-package after first P-wave arrival during 2016 Central Italy seismic sequence: results from F-k array analysis in Amatrice area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiani, Daniela; Bordoni, Paola; Cara, Fabrizio; Cultrera, Giovanna; Mercuri, Alessia; Milana, Giuliano; Vassallo, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    Following the M 6.0 of August 24 2016 Amatrice earthquake, a temporary seismic network was installed in the village of Amatrice, under the umbrella of the Italian Center for Seismic Microzonation (http://www.centromicrozonazionesismica.it), who conducted a preparatory survey to seismic microzonation with other Italian Institutions. This work focuses on data analysis of 7 stations installed in the Amatrice terrace which is representative of the geological condition of the town, with the aim of studying the possible presence of secondary effects during the seismic sequence caused by site conditions. Stiff bedrock outcroppings were also sampled with 2 reference stations. Preliminary analyses carried out on several earthquakes with Ml > 4 highlight the presence of a low frequency phase with a high energy content at 6 -7 seconds after the first P-wave arrival in almost all the recordings. This wave package was observed for the Mw 6.5 of October 30 earthquake and it has the highest amplitude of the entire recordings, having PGA values of 0.5 g and frequency between 2 and 3 Hz. Frequency-wavenumber analysis performed for the 7 stations array gives an important contribution for the interpretation of this phenomenon, showing that the low frequency wave-package for the examined events does not always show back-azimuth and slowness values compatible with the very first portion of the seismic record. It could be associated to the presence of reflected or refracted waves generated by secondary effects as geological or morphological heterogeneities at local or larger scale.

  3. Sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos by oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Zhong, Fagang; Yang, Yonglin; Wang, Xinhua; Liu, Shouren; Zhu, Bin

    2013-06-01

    The aim has been to set up a rapid and accurate microarray assay using sandwich mode for sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos. Twelve sequence-specific oligonucleotide capture probes used to discriminate 12 samples were spotted onto the aldehyde-modified glass slides by Arrayer. The 2 recognition probes used to identify coding regions of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome gene (SRY) and β-casein (CSN2) reference gene were coupled with biotin. The assay was optimized by using genomic DNA extracted from blood samples of known sex individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the fragments in the HMG box region of SRY gene and CSN2 gene with sequence-specific primers. The sex of samples was identified by detecting both the SRY and CSN2 genes simultaneously in 2 reaction cells of microarrays, with the male having SRY and CSN2 signals and the female only CSN2. The sex of 20 bovine preimplantation embryos was determined by oligonucleotide microarray. The protocol was run with a blind test that showed a 100% (82/82) specificity and accuracy in sexing of leukocytes. The bovine embryos were transferred into 20 bovine recipients, with a pregnant rate of 40% (8/20). Three calves were born at term, and 5 fetuses were miscarried. Their sexes were fully in accordance with the embryonic sex predetermination predicted by oligonucleotide microarray. This suggests that the oligonucleotide microarray method of SRY gene analysis can be used in early sex prediction of bovine embryos in breeding programs.

  4. The Role of Fluorinated Alcohols as Mobile Phase Modifiers for LC-MS Analysis of Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, Babak; van Hattum, Hilde; van Dongen, William D.; Murph, Mandi M.; Bartlett, Michael G.

    2016-09-01

    Hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) has been widely used as an acidic modifier for mobile phases for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of oligonucleotides ever since the first report of its use for this purpose. This is not surprising, considering the exceptional performance of HFIP compared with carboxylic acids, which cause significant MS signal suppression in electrospray ionization. However, we have found that other fluorinated alcohols can also be utilized for mobile phase preparation and the choice of optimal fluorinated alcohol is determined by the ion-pairing (IP) agent. Although HFIP is a very good choice to be used alongside less hydrophobic IP agents, other fluorinated alcohols such as 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-methyl-2-propanol (HFMIP) can significantly outperform HFIP when used with more hydrophobic IP agents. We also found that more acidic fluorinated alcohols assist with the transfer of oligonucleotides with secondary structure (e.g., folded strands and hairpins) into the gas phase.

  5. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  6. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene......This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis...

  7. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Sequence Conversion by Single Strand Oligonucleotide Donors via Non-homologous End Joining in Mammalian Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Jilan; Thompson, Lawrence H.; Seidman, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology independent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways involving proteins such as Ku70/80, DNAPKcs, Xrcc4/Ligase 4, and the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex. DSBs can also be repaired by homology-dependent pathways (HDR), in which the MRN and CtIP nucleases produce single strand ends that engage homologous sequences either by strand invasion or strand annealing. The entry of ends into HDR pathways underlies protocols for genomic manipulatio...

  10. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene...

  11. Rapid and accurate synthesis of TALE genes from synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Hefei; Gao, Jingxia; Chen, Fengjiao; Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Cuizhen; Peng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Custom synthesis of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) genes has relied upon plasmid libraries of pre-fabricated TALE-repeat monomers or oligomers. Here we describe a novel synthesis method that directly incorporates annealed synthetic oligonucleotides into the TALE-repeat units. Our approach utilizes iterative sets of oligonucleotides and a translational frame check strategy to ensure the high efficiency and accuracy of TALE-gene synthesis. TALE arrays of more than 20 repeats can be constructed, and the majority of the synthesized constructs have perfect sequences. In addition, this novel oligonucleotide-based method can readily accommodate design changes to the TALE repeats. We demonstrated an increased gene targeting efficiency against a genomic site containing a potentially methylated cytosine by incorporating non-conventional repeat variable di-residue (RVD) sequences.

  12. A factorial analysis of silanization conditions for the immobilization of oligonucleotides on glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, C M; Cass, A E

    2001-06-01

    The modification of glass surfaces with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane and the application of this to DNA chip technology are described. A range of factors influencing the silanization method, and hence the number of surface-bound, chemically active thiol groups, were investigated using a design of experiment approach based on analysis of variance. The number of thiol groups introduced on glass substrates were measured directly using a specific radiolabel, [14C]cysteamine hydrochloride. For liquid-phase silanization, the number of surface-bound thiol groups was found to be dependent on both postsilanization thermal curing and silanization time and relatively independent of silane concentration, reaction temperature, and sample pretreatment. Depending on the conditions used in liquid-phase silanization, (1.3-9.0) x 10(12) thiol groups/cm2 on the glass samples were bound. The reliability and repeatability of liquid- and vacuum-phase silanization were also investigated. Eighteen-base oligonucleotide probes were covalently attached to the modified surfaces via a 3'-amino modification on the DNA and subsequent reaction with the cross-linking reagent N-(gamma-maleimidobutyryloxy) succinimide ester (GMBS). The resulting probe levels were determined and found to be stoichiometric with that of the introduced thiol groups. These results demonstrate that silanization of glass surfaces under specific conditions, prior to probe attachment, is of great importance in the development of DNA chips that use the simple concept of the covalent attachment of presynthesized oligonucleotides to silicon oxide surfaces.

  13. A comparison of alternative 60-mer probe designs in an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Benjamin D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays have proven powerful for functional genomics studies. Several technologies exist for the generation of whole-genome arrays. It is well documented that 25mer probes directed against different regions of the same gene produce variable signal intensity values. However, the extent to which this is true for probes of greater length (60mers is not well characterized. Moreover, this information has not previously been reported for whole-genome arrays designed against bacteria, whose genomes may differ substantially in characteristics directly affecting microarray performance. Results We report here an analysis of alternative 60mer probe designs for an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide array for the GC rich, β-proteobacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. Probes were designed using the ArrayOligoSel3.5 software package and whole-genome microarrays synthesized by Agilent, Inc. using their in-situ, ink-jet technology platform. We first validated the quality of the microarrays as demonstrated by an average signal to noise ratio of >1000. Next, we determined that the variance of replicate probes (1178 total probes examined of identical sequence was 3.8% whereas the variance of alternative probes (558 total alternative probes examined designs was 9.5%. We determined that depending upon the definition, about 2.4% of replicate and 7.8% of alternative probes produced outlier conclusions. Finally, we determined none of the probe design subscores (GC content, internal repeat, binding energy and self annealment produced by ArrayOligoSel3.5 were predictive or probes that produced outlier signals. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrated that the use of multiple probes per target sequence is not essential for in-situ synthesized 60mer oligonucleotide arrays designed against bacteria. Although probes producing outlier signals were identified, the use of ratios results in less than 10% of such outlier conclusions. We also determined that

  14. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  15. Genome-wide mapping of ORC and Mcm2p binding sites on tiling arrays and identification of essential ARS consensus sequences in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparicio Oscar M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic replication origins exhibit different initiation efficiencies and activation times within S-phase. Although local chromatin structure and function influences origin activity, the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. A key to understanding the exact features of chromatin that impinge on replication origin function is to define the precise locations of the DNA sequences that control origin function. In S. cerevisiae, Autonomously Replicating Sequences (ARSs contain a consensus sequence (ACS that binds the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC and is essential for origin function. However, an ACS is not sufficient for origin function and the majority of ACS matches do not function as ORC binding sites, complicating the specific identification of these sites. Results To identify essential origin sequences genome-wide, we utilized a tiled oligonucleotide array (NimbleGen to map the ORC and Mcm2p binding sites at high resolution. These binding sites define a set of potential Autonomously Replicating Sequences (ARSs, which we term nimARSs. The nimARS set comprises 529 ORC and/or Mcm2p binding sites, which includes 95% of known ARSs, and experimental verification demonstrates that 94% are functional. The resolution of the analysis facilitated identification of potential ACSs (nimACSs within 370 nimARSs. Cross-validation shows that the nimACS predictions include 58% of known ACSs, and experimental verification indicates that 82% are essential for ARS activity. Conclusion These findings provide the most comprehensive, accurate, and detailed mapping of ORC binding sites to date, adding to the emerging picture of the chromatin organization of the budding yeast genome.

  16. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zubaidah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21 translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%, 12p (12% and 9p (8%, and duplication 4q (6% and Xq (4%. Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL.

  17. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Akhras

    Full Text Available Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS, to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  18. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhras, Michael S; Pettersson, Erik; Diamond, Lisa; Unemo, Magnus; Okamoto, Jennifer; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  19. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  20. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  1. [mRNA expression analysis and classification of colonic biopsy samples using oligonucleotide and cDNA microarray techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamb, Orsolya

    2008-07-20

    Despite tremendous progress in the past few decades, certain important aspects regarding the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of colorectal cancer still remain unsolved. In our work we searched for biomarkers of the development of colorectal carcinoma, and performed gene expression analysis for colorectal disease classification. We have established that the oligonucleotide microarray analyses of biopsy samples wholly fulfil the Affymetrix quality requirements, are highly standard and reproducible and the Taqman microfluidic card system is suitable for high-throughput, quick and cost efficient real-time-PCR validation of gene expression changes. We have shown that the sequential overexpression of osteopontin and osteonectin mRNAs and proteins significantly correlates with the progression of the colorectal adenoma-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We have identified and validated ten novel markers with continuously increasing mRNA expression in line with the adenoma-dysplasia-carcinoma transition. We have identified the top 27, 13 and 10 genes associated with adenoma, colorectal cancer, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  2. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Safiye [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush, E-mail: faridbodf@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajloo, Davood [School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10{sup −15} to 1 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL{sup −1} with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.

  3. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  4. Synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides by solid phase phosphotriester method on a reduced scale; preparation of oligonucleotides for improved promoter sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, M

    1982-01-01

    A small reaction vessel, composed of a balled sintered glass filter and a test tube with a stopcock, was designed for the solid phase phosphotriester synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Operation of small scale synthesis (nucleoside on resin: 3-6 mumol, activated diester of dimer: 20-30 mumol) was performed under the atmosphere of argon. The yield of each coupling reaction was 60-100%. Twelve short oligonucleotides (6-16mer) were obtained in 19-78% overall yield by this method. These oligomers were prepared as a part of the control region of gene to increase the translation efficiency.

  5. [Tabular excel editor for analysis of aligned nucleotide sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, V V

    2010-01-01

    Excel platform was used for transition of results of multiple aligned nucleotide sequences obtained using the BLAST network service to the form appropriate for visual analysis and editing. Two macros operators for MS Excel 2007 were constructed. The array of aligned sequences transformed into Excel table and processed using macros operators is more appropriate for analysis than initial html data.

  6. Synthesis of triazole-linked oligonucleotides with high affinity to DNA complements and an analysis of their compatibility with biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varizhuk, Anna M; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Novikov, Roman A; Chizhov, Alexandr O; Smirnov, Igor P; Chuvilin, Andrey N; Tatarinova, Olga N; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Pozmogova, Galina E; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2013-06-21

    New oligonucleotide analogues with triazole internucleotide linkages were synthesized, and their hybridization properties were studied. The analogues demonstrated DNA binding affinities similar to those of unmodified oligonucleotides. The modification was shown to protect the oligonucleotides from nuclease hydrolysis. The modified oligonucleotides were tested as PCR primers. Modifications remote from the 3'-terminus were tolerated by polymerases. Our results suggest that these new oligonucleotide analogues are among the most promising triazole DNA mimics characterized to date.

  7. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hen-Wai; Tsao; Shyh-Lin; Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from -32.057 dBm to -0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  8. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Cheng; Hen-Wai Tsao; Shyh-Lin Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from-32.057 dBm to-0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of US1 gene in duck enteritis virus%Cloning and sequence analysis of US1gene in duck enteritis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; WANG Jun-wei; MA Bo; ZHAO Xiao-yan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a 1,860 bp sequence in IRs region of duck enteritis virus(DEV)was amplified by single oligonucleotide nested PCR with a single primer designed according to partial sequence of USI and then a pair of primers designed according to the 3' UTR of US8 gene and 5'end of the new getting sequence were used to amplify a 2,426 bp sequence toward the TRs region.Sequence analysis revealed that the both sequences contained an identical 990 bp open reading frame of DEV US1 gene.The two ORFs were in opposite transcription orientation.Sequence comparison of the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of US1 gene showed relatively high identity to Mardivirus.Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the eleven herpesviruses viruses were classified into three groups, and the duck enteritis virus was most closely related to Mardivirus.

  10. Improving signal intensities for genes with low-expression on oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Limei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays using long oligonucleotide probes are widely used to evaluate gene expression in biological samples. These oligonucleotides are pre-synthesized and sequence-optimized to represent specific genes with minimal cross-hybridization to homologous genes. Probe length and concentration are critical factors for signal sensitivity, particularly when genes with various expression levels are being tested. We evaluated the effects of oligonucleotide probe length and concentration on signal intensity measurements of the expression levels of genes in a target sample. Results Selected genes of various expression levels in a single cell line were hybridized to oligonucleotide arrays of four lengths and four concentrations of probes to determine how these critical parameters affected the intensity of the signal representing their expression. We found that oligonucleotides of longer length significantly increased the signals of genes with low-expression in the target. High-expressing gene signals were also boosted but to a lesser degree. Increasing the probe concentration, however, did not linearly increase the signal intensity for either low- or high-expressing genes. Conclusions We conclude that the longer the oligonuclotide probe the better the signal intensities of low expressing genes on oligonucleotide arrays.

  11. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  12. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  13. A strategy for detection of known and unknown SNP using a minimum number of oligonucleotides applicable in the clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Harvey

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Detection of unknown single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP relies on large scale sequencing expeditions of genomic fragments or complex high-throughput chip technology. We describe a simplified strategy for fluorimetric detection of known and unknown SNP by proportional hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays based on optimization of the established principle of signal loss or gain that requires a drastically reduced number of matched or mismatched probes. The array consists of two sets of 18-mer oligonucleotide probes. One set includes overlapping oligos with 4-nucleotide tiling representing an arbitrarily selected "consensus" sequence (consensus-oligos, the other includes oligos specific for known SNP within the same genomic region (variant-oligos. Fluorescence-labeled DNA amplified from a homozygous source identical to the consensus represents the reference target and is co-hybridized with a differentially-labeled test sample. Lack of hybridization of the test sample to consensus- with simultaneous hybridization to variant-oligos designates a known allele. Lack of hybridization to consensus- and variant-oligos indicates a new allele. Detection of unknown variants in heterozygous samples depends upon fluorimetric analysis of signal intensity based on the principle that homozygous samples generate twice the amount of signal. This method can identify unknown SNP in heterozygous conditions with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 90%. This strategy should dramatically increase the efficiency of SNP detection throughout the human genome and will decrease the cost and complexity of applying genomic wide analysis in the context of clinical trials.

  14. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Carl W; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J; Kasianowicz, John J; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-05-10

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5'-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods.

  15. ProbeMaker: an extensible framework for design of sets of oligonucleotide probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Nilsson, Mats; Landegren, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    Background Procedures for genetic analyses based on oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools that can allow highly parallel investigations of genetic material. Such procedures require the design of large sets of probes using application-specific design constraints. Results ProbeMaker is a software framework for computer-assisted design and analysis of sets of oligonucleotide probe sequences. The tool assists in the design of probes for sets of target sequences, incorporating sequence motifs for purposes such as amplification, visualization, or identification. An extension system allows the framework to be equipped with application-specific components for evaluation of probe sequences, and provides the possibility to include support for importing sequence data from a variety of file formats. Conclusion ProbeMaker is a suitable tool for many different oligonucleotide design and analysis tasks, including the design of probe sets for various types of parallel genetic analyses, experimental validation of design parameters, and in silico testing of probe sequence evaluation algorithms. PMID:16171527

  16. Design and evaluation of 16S rRNA sequence based oligonucleotide probes for the detection and quantification of Comamonas testosteroni in mixed microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathe Stephan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-proteobacterial species Comamonas testosteroni is capable of biotransformation and also biodegradation of a range of chemical compounds and thus potentially useful in chemical manufacturing and bioremediation. The ability to detect and quantify members of this species in mixed microbial communities thus may be desirable. Results We have designed an oligonucleotide probe for use in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and two pairs of PCR primers targeting a C. testosteroni subgroup. The FISH probe and one of the PCR primer pairs are suitable for quantification of C. testosteroni in mixed microbial communities using FISH followed by quantitative image analysis or real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. This has been shown by analysis of samples from an enrichment of activated sludge on testosterone resulting in an increase in abundance and finally isolation of C. testosteroni. Additionally, we have successfully used quantitative PCR to follow the C. testosteroni abundance during a laboratory scale wastewater bioaugmentation experiment. Conclusion The oligonucleotides presented here provide a useful tool to study C. testosteroni population dynamics in mixed microbial communities.

  17. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  18. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per...... period of the input frequency. Detailed simulations compare the results for a 32-loudspeaker array with a similar configuration with analog excitation of the drivers. Ideally, drivers in digital arrays should be very small and span a small area, but that sets limits on the low-frequency response...

  19. Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides using artificial neural network and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiun-Ching

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides (oligos is a computationally-intensive task and is a requirement for designing microarray probes, primers, and siRNAs. An artificial neural network (ANN is a machine learning technique that can effectively process complex and high noise data. Here, ANNs are applied to process the unique subsequence distribution for prediction of specific oligos. Results We present a novel and efficient algorithm, named the integration of ANN and BLAST (IAB algorithm, to identify specific oligos. We establish the unique marker database for human and rat gene index databases using the hash table algorithm. We then create the input vectors, via the unique marker database, to train and test the ANN. The trained ANN predicted the specific oligos with high efficiency, and these oligos were subsequently verified by BLAST. To improve the prediction performance, the ANN over-fitting issue was avoided by early stopping with the best observed error and a k-fold validation was also applied. The performance of the IAB algorithm was about 5.2, 7.1, and 6.7 times faster than the BLAST search without ANN for experimental results of 70-mer, 50-mer, and 25-mer specific oligos, respectively. In addition, the results of polymerase chain reactions showed that the primers predicted by the IAB algorithm could specifically amplify the corresponding genes. The IAB algorithm has been integrated into a previously published comprehensive web server to support microarray analysis and genome-wide iterative enrichment analysis, through which users can identify a group of desired genes and then discover the specific oligos of these genes. Conclusion The IAB algorithm has been developed to construct SpecificDB, a web server that provides a specific and valid oligo database of the probe, siRNA, and primer design for the human genome. We also demonstrate the ability of the IAB algorithm to predict specific oligos through

  20. Fingerprinting the Asterid species using subtracted diversity array reveals novel species-specific sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Mantri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asterids is one of the major plant clades comprising of many commercially important medicinal species. One of the major concerns in medicinal plant industry is adulteration/contamination resulting from misidentification of herbal plants. This study reports the construction and validation of a microarray capable of fingerprinting medicinally important species from the Asterids clade. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled genomic DNA of 104 non-asterid angiosperm and non-angiosperm species was subtracted from pooled genomic DNA of 67 asterid species. Subsequently, 283 subtracted DNA fragments were used to construct an Asterid-specific array. The validation of Asterid-specific array revealed a high (99.5% subtraction efficiency. Twenty-five Asterid species (mostly medicinal representing 20 families and 9 orders within the clade were hybridized onto the array to reveal its level of species discrimination. All these species could be successfully differentiated using their hybridization patterns. A number of species-specific probes were identified for commercially important species like tea, coffee, dandelion, yarrow, motherwort, Japanese honeysuckle, valerian, wild celery, and yerba mate. Thirty-seven polymorphic probes were characterized by sequencing. A large number of probes were novel species-specific probes whilst some of them were from chloroplast region including genes like atpB, rpoB, and ndh that have extensively been used for fingerprinting and phylogenetic analysis of plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subtracted Diversity Array technique is highly efficient in fingerprinting species with little or no genomic information. The Asterid-specific array could fingerprint all 25 species assessed including three species that were not used in constructing the array. This study validates the use of chloroplast genes for bar-coding (fingerprinting plant species. In addition, this method allowed detection of several new loci that can be

  1. Solid-phase synthesis of 2{sup '}-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides using dimeric phosphoramidate blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Gi Weon; Kang, Yong Han [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This research focused on the method of using dimeric phosphoramidite blocks to synthesize oligonucleotides for development as oligonucleotide drugs. A 16-mer oligonucleotide with the randomly selected sequence of C*C*T*C*G*C *T*C*T*C*G*C*C* C*G*C was synthesized using CC, GC, and TC dimers, a combination of monomers and dimers, or only monomers as building blocks. Using dimer blocks in this synthetic method provided a significant decrease in critical impurities that had similar properties to the main product, which was confirmed by LC-MS and HPLC analysis.

  2. Analysis of gene expression profiles in human systemic lupus erythematosus using oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, G-M; Chen, S-L; Shen, N; Ye, S; Bao, C-D; Gu, Y-Y

    2003-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest a strong genetic component for susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To investigate the genetic mechanism of pathogenesis of SLE, we studied the difference in gene expression of peripheral blood cells between 10 SLE patients and 18 healthy controls using oligonucleotide microarray. When gene expression for patients was compared to the mean of normal controls, among the 3002 target genes, 61 genes were identified with greater than a two-fold change difference in expression level. Of these genes, 24 were upregulated and 37 downregulated in at least half of the patients. By the Welch's ANOVA/Welch's t-test, all these 61 genes were significantly different (PTSA-1/Sca-2) may play an important role in the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. TSA-1 antigens may represent an important alternative pathway for T-cell activation that may be involved in IFN-mediated immunomodulation. Hierarchical clustering showed that patient samples were clearly separated from controls based on their gene expression profile. These results demonstrate that high-density oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to explore the mechanism of pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Analysis of Circular Arrays on Cylindrical Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Guglielmi, M.; Rozzi, T.; Zappelli, L.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of conformal arrays has been deeply developed and many authors have proposed either simplified models, based on single mode theory [1]-[4] or more accurate models but at the cost of a long computation time[5]. In this contribution we use the Multimode Equivalent Network (MEN) formulatio

  4. Analysis of Circular Arrays on Cylindrical Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Guglielmi, M.; Rozzi, T.; Zappelli, L.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of conformal arrays has been deeply developed and many authors have proposed either simplified models, based on single mode theory [1]-[4] or more accurate models but at the cost of a long computation time[5]. In this contribution we use the Multimode Equivalent Network (MEN)

  5. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per p...

  6. Analysis of Circular Arrays on Cylindrical Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Guglielmi, M.; Rozzi, T.; Zappelli, L.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of conformal arrays has been deeply developed and many authors have proposed either simplified models, based on single mode theory [1]-[4] or more accurate models but at the cost of a long computation time[5]. In this contribution we use the Multimode Equivalent Network (MEN) formulatio

  7. On the Statics for Micro-Array Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Tomoko; Akasaka, Shizu; Ito, Makiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Recently after human genome sequence has been determined almost perfectly, more and more researchers have been studying genes in detail. Therefore, we are sure that accumulated gene information for human will be getting more important in the near future to develop customized medicine and to make gene interactions clear. Among plenty of information, micro array might be one of the most important analysis method for genes because it is the technique that can get big amount of the gene expressions data from one time experiment and also can be used for DNA isolation. To get the novel knowledge from micro array data, we need to enrich statistical tools for its data analysis. So far, many mathematical theories and definition have been proposing. However, many of those proposals are tested with strict conditions or customized to data for specific species. In this paper, we reviewed existing typical statistical methods for micro array analysis and discussed the repeatability of the analysis, construction the guideline with more general procedure. First we analyzed the micro array data for TG rats, with statistical methods of family-wise error rate (FWER) control approach and False Discovery Rate (FDR) control approach. As existing report, no significantly different gene could be detected with FWER control approach. On the other hand, we could find several genes significantly with FDR control approach even q=0.5. To find out the reliability of FDR control approach with micro array conditions, we have analyzed 2 more pieces of data from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public database on the web site with SAM in addition to FWER and FDR control approaches. We could find a certain number of significantly different genes with BH method and SAM in the case of q=0.05. However, we have to note that the number and kinds of detected genes are different when we compare our result with the one from the published paper. Even if the same approach is used to analyze the same micro array

  8. HNA and ANA high-affinity arrays for detections of DNA and RNA single-base mismatches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Mikhail; Schepers, Guy; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Van Hummelen, Paul; Herdewijn, Piet

    2008-06-15

    DNA microarrays and sensors have become essential tools in the functional analysis of sequence information. Recently we reported that chimeric hexitol (HNA) and altritol (ANA) nucleotide monomers with an anhydrohexitol sugar moiety are easily available and proved their chemistry to be compatible with DNA and RNA synthesis. In this communication we describe a novel analytical platform based on HNA and ANA units to be used as synthetic oligonucleotide arrays on a glass solid support for match/mismatch detection of DNA and RNA targets. Arrays were fabricated by immobilization of diene-modified oligonucleotides on maleimido-activated glass slides. To demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the HNA/ANA arrays and to compare their properties with regular DNA arrays, sequences in the reverse transcriptase gene (codon 74) and the protease gene of HIV-1 (codon 10) were selected. Both, the relative intensity of the signal and match/mismatch discrimination increased up to fivefold for DNA targets and up to 3-3.5-fold for RNA targets applying HNA or ANA arrays (ANA>HNA>DNA). Certainly in the new field of miRNA detection, ANA arrays could prove very beneficial and their properties should be investigated in more detail.

  9. Identification of osteopontin as the most consistently over-expressed gene in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma:Detection by oligonucleotide microarray and real-time PCR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holger G Hass; Oliver Nehls; Juergen Jobst; Andrea Frilling; Ulrich Vogel; Stephan Kaiser

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular pathways involved in human cholangiocarcinogenesis by gene expression profiling.METHODS: Oligonucleotide arrays (Affymetr/x U133A)were used to establish a specific gene expression profile of intrahepatic CCC in comparison to corresponding nonmalignant liver tissue.To validate the expression values of the most overexpressed genes, RT-PCR experiments were performed.RESULTS: Five hundred and fifty-two statistically differentially expressed genes/ESTs (221 probes significantly up-regulated, 331 probes down-regulated;P2;≥70%) were identified.Using these data and two-dimensional cluster analysis,a specific gene expression profile was obtained allowing fast and reproducible differentiation of CCC, which was confirmed by supervised neuronal network modelling.The most consistently overexpressed gene (median fold change 33.5, significantly overexpressed in 100%)encoded osteopontin.Furthermore, an association of various genes with the histopathological grading could be demonstrated.CONCLUSION: A highly specific gone expression profile for intrahepatic CCC was identified, allowing for its fast and reproducible discrimination against nonmalignant liver tissue and other liver masses.The most overexpressed gene in intrahepatic CCC was the gene encoding osteopontin.These data may lead to a better understanding of human cholangiocarcinogenesis.

  10. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Matos

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in “Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II” Matos et al. (2015 [1].

  11. OligoHeatMap (OHM): an online tool to estimate and display hybridizations of oligonucleotides onto DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Olivier; Chevenet, François; Christen, Richard

    2008-07-01

    The efficiency of molecular methods involving DNA/DNA hybridizations depends on the accurate prediction of the melting temperature (T(m)) of the duplex. Many softwares are available for T(m) calculations, but difficulties arise when one wishes to check if a given oligomer (PCR primer or probe) hybridizes well or not on more than a single sequence. Moreover, the presence of mismatches within the duplex is not sufficient to estimate specificity as it does not always significantly decrease the T(m). OHM (OligoHeatMap) is an online tool able to provide estimates of T(m) for a set of oligomers and a set of aligned sequences, not only as text files of complete results but also in a graphical way: T(m) values are translated into colors and displayed as a heat map image, either stand alone or to be used by softwares such as TreeDyn to be included in a phylogenetic tree. OHM is freely available at http://bioinfo.unice.fr/ohm/, with links to the full source code and online help.

  12. Discrimination of bacillus anthracis and closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microarray.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavykin, S. G.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Zakharyev, V. M.; Lysov, Y. P.; Kelly, J. J.; Alferov, O. S.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Gavin, I. M.; Kukhtin, A. V.; Chandler, D. (Biochip Technology Center); (Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology); (Northwestern Univ.); (Georgetown Univ.)

    2008-01-30

    Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences is a commonly used method for the identification and discrimination of microorganisms. However, the high similarity of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences of Bacillus cereus group organisms (up to 99-100%) and repeatedly failed attempts to develop molecular typing systems that would use DNA sequences to discriminate between species within this group have resulted in several suggestions to consider B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, or these two species together with B. anthracis, as one species. Recently, we divided the B. cereus group into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, based on 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and identified subgroup-specific makers in each of these three genes. Here we for the first time demonstrated discrimination of these seven subgroups, including subgroup Anthracis, with a 3D gel element microarray of oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S and 23S rRNA markers. This is the first microarray enabled identification of B. anthracis and discrimination of these seven subgroups in pure cell cultures and in environmental samples using rRNA sequences. The microarray bearing perfect match/mismatch (p/mm) probe pairs was specific enough to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and was able to identify targeted organisms in 5 min. We also demonstrated the ability of the microarray to determine subgroup affiliations for B. cereus group isolates without rRNA sequencing. Correlation of these seven subgroups with groupings based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MME) analysis of a wide spectrum of different genes, and the demonstration of subgroup-specific differences in toxin profiles, psychrotolerance, and the ability to harbor some plasmids, suggest that these seven subgroups are not based solely on neutral genomic polymorphisms, but instead reflect

  13. Hybridization kinetics analysis of an oligonucleotide microarray for microRNA detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Botao Zhao; Shuo Ding; Wei Li; Youxin Jin

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) microarrays have been successfully used for profiling miRNA expression in many physiological processes such as development, differentiation, oncogenesis,and other disease processes. Detecting miRNA by miRNA microarray is actually based on nucleic acid hybridization between target molecules and their corresponding complementary probes. Due to the small size and high degree of similarity among miRNA sequences, the hybridization condition must be carefully optimized to get specific and reliable signals. Previously, we reported a microarray platform to detect miRNA expression. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of our microarray platform. After systematic analysis, we determined an optimized hybridization condition with high sensitivity and specificity for miRNA detection. Our results would be helpful for other hybridization-based miRNA detection methods, such as northern blot and nuclease protection assay.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  15. Patterns of oligonucleotide sequences in viral and host cell RNA identify mediators of the host innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Greenbaum

    Full Text Available The innate immune response provides a first line of defense against pathogens by targeting generic differential features that are present in foreign organisms but not in the host. These innate responses generate selection forces acting both in pathogens and hosts that further determine their co-evolution. Here we analyze the nucleic acid sequence fingerprints of these selection forces acting in parallel on both host innate immune genes and ssRNA viral genomes. We do this by identifying dinucleotide biases in the coding regions of innate immune response genes in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and then use this signal to identify other significant host innate immune genes. The persistence of these biases in the orthologous groups of genes in humans and chickens is also examined. We then compare the significant motifs in highly expressed genes of the innate immune system to those in ssRNA viruses and study the evolution of these motifs in the H1N1 influenza genome. We argue that the significant under-represented motif pattern of CpG in an AU context--which is found in both the ssRNA viruses and innate genes, and has decreased throughout the history of H1N1 influenza replication in humans--is immunostimulatory and has been selected against during the co-evolution of viruses and host innate immune genes. This shows how differences in host immune biology can drive the evolution of viruses that jump into species with different immune priorities than the original host.

  16. Fractals in DNA sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zu-Guo(喻祖国); Vo Anh; Gong Zhi-Min(龚志民); Long Shun-Chao(龙顺潮)

    2002-01-01

    Fractal methods have been successfully used to study many problems in physics, mathematics, engineering, finance,and even in biology. There has been an increasing interest in unravelling the mysteries of DNA; for example, how can we distinguish coding and noncoding sequences, and the problems of classification and evolution relationship of organisms are key problems in bioinformatics. Although much research has been carried out by taking into consideration the long-range correlations in DNA sequences, and the global fractal dimension has been used in these works by other people, the models and methods are somewhat rough and the results are not satisfactory. In recent years, our group has introduced a time series model (statistical point of view) and a visual representation (geometrical point of view)to DNA sequence analysis. We have also used fractal dimension, correlation dimension, the Hurst exponent and the dimension spectrum (multifractal analysis) to discuss problems in this field. In this paper, we introduce these fractal models and methods and the results of DNA sequence analysis.

  17. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2007-10-30

    The present invention is directed to a novel method of discriminating a highly infectious bacterium Bacillus anthracis from a group of closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations. The identification and analysis of these sequence variations enables positive discrimination of isolates of the B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed probes, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  18. Mechanism of antisense oligonucleotide interaction with natural RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, R; Petyuk, V; Vorobijev, Y; Koval, V; Fedorova, O; Vlassov, V; Zenkova, M

    2011-08-01

    Oligonucleotides find several numbers of applications: as diagnostic probes, RT and PCR primers and antisense agents due to their ability of forming specific interactions with complementary nucleotide sequences within nucleic acids. These interactions are strongly affected by accessibility of the target sequence in the RNA structure. In the present work the mechanism of invasion of RNA structure by oligonucleotide was investigated using a model system: yeast tRNA(Phe) and oligonucleotides complementary to the 3'-part of this molecule. Kinetics of interaction of oligonucleotides with in vitro transcript of yeast tRNAPhe was studied using stopped-flow technique with fluorescence quenching detection, 5'-DABCYL labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized with 3'-fluorescein labeled tRNA(Phe). The results evidence for a four-step invasion process of the oligonucleotide-RNA complex formation. The process is initiated by formation of transition complexes with nucleotides in the T-loop and ACCA sequence. This complex formation is followed by RNA unfolding and formation of an extended heteroduplex with the oligonucleotide via strand displacement process. Computer modeling of oligonucleotide-tRNA(Phe) interaction revealed potential factors that could favor transition complexes formation and confirmed the proposed mechanism, showing the oligonucleotide to be a molecular "wedge". Our data evidence that oligonucleotide invasion into structured RNA is initiated by loop-single strand interactions, similar to the initial step of the antisense RNA-RNA interactions. The obtained results can be used for choosing efficient oligonucleotide probes.

  19. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  20. Analysis of Structural Flexibility of Damaged DNA Using Thiol-Tethered Oligonucleotide Duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Fujita

    Full Text Available Bent structures are formed in DNA by the binding of small molecules or proteins. We developed a chemical method to detect bent DNA structures. Oligonucleotide duplexes in which two mercaptoalkyl groups were attached to the positions facing each other across the major groove were prepared. When the duplex contained the cisplatin adduct, which was proved to induce static helix bending, interstrand disulfide bond formation under an oxygen atmosphere was detected by HPLC analyses, but not in the non-adducted duplex, when the two thiol-tethered nucleosides were separated by six base pairs. When the insert was five and seven base pairs, the disulfide bond was formed and was not formed, respectively, regardless of the cisplatin adduct formation. The same reaction was observed in the duplexes containing an abasic site analog and the (6–4 photoproduct. Compared with the cisplatin case, the disulfide bond formation was slower in these duplexes, but the reaction rate was nearly independent of the linker length. These results indicate that dynamic structural changes of the abasic site- and (6–4 photoproduct-containing duplexes could be detected by our method. It is strongly suggested that the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, which specifically binds these duplexes and functions at the first step of global-genome nucleotide excision repair, recognizes the easily bendable nature of damaged DNA.

  1. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 `integrated sequence analysis` (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term `methodology` denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  2. A practical algorithm for finding maximal exact matches in large sequence datasets using sparse suffix arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Zia; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Singh, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput sequencing technologies place ever increasing demands on existing algorithms for sequence analysis. Algorithms for computing maximal exact matches (MEMs) between sequences appear in two contexts where high-throughput sequencing will vastly increase the volume of sequence data: (i) seeding alignments of high-throughput reads for genome assembly and (ii) designating anchor points for genome–genome comparisons.

  3. Novel design of multicapillary arrays for high-throughput DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsupryk, Andriy; Gorbovitski, Michael; Kabotyanski, Evgeni A; Gorfinkel, Vera

    2006-07-01

    A novel approach to design and optimize linear multicapillary arrays (LMCAs) for high-throughput DNA sequencing is proposed. A significant increase in the number of capillary lanes is obtained due to the use of composite insertions alternately placed between working capillaries of the array and a specific combination of refractive indices of the DNA separation matrix, capillary glass, the insertions and a medium which surrounds the capillary array. Theoretical and experimental studies showed that in conjunction with a dual-side laser illumination scheme, the proposed LMCA design allows a simultaneous uniform irradiation of as many as 550 working capillaries.

  4. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) transcriptome analysis in response to infection by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides using an oligonucleotide-DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Maho; Kurotani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Mochida, Keiichi; Matsui, Akihiro; Ishitani, Manabu; Sraphet, Supajit; Whankaew, Sukhuman; Asvarak, Thipa; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-07-01

    Cassava anthracnose disease (CAD), caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Manihotis, is a serious disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) worldwide. In this study, we established a cassava oligonucleotide-DNA microarray representing 59,079 probes corresponding to approximately 30,000 genes based on original expressed sequence tags and RNA-seq information from cassava, and applied it to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resistance to fungal infection using two cassava cultivars, Huay Bong 60 (HB60, resistant to CAD) and Hanatee (HN, sensitive to CAD). Based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and expression profiling by the microarray, we showed that the expressions of various plant defense-related genes, such as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, cell wall-related genes, detoxification enzyme, genes related to the response to bacterium, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), genes related to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were higher in HB60 compared with HN. Our results indicated that the induction of PR genes in HB60 by fungal infection and the higher expressions of defense response-related genes in HB60 compared with HN are likely responsible for the fungal resistance in HB60. We also showed that the use of our cassava oligo microarray could improve our understanding of cassava molecular mechanisms related to environmental responses and development, and advance the molecular breeding of useful cassava plants.

  5. HIV-1 and HIV-2 LTR nucleotide sequences: assessment of the alignment by N-block presentation, "retroviral signatures" of overrepeated oligonucleotides, and a probable important role of scrambled stepwise duplications/deletions in molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprevotte, I; Pupin, M; Coward, E; Didier, G; Terzian, C; Devauchelle, C; Hénaut, A

    2001-07-01

    Previous analyses of retroviral nucleotide sequences, suggest a so-called "scrambled duplicative stepwise molecular evolution" (many sectors with successive duplications/deletions of short and longer motifs) that could have stemmed from one or several starter tandemly repeated short sequence(s). In the present report, we tested this hypothesis by focusing on the long terminal repeats (LTRs) (and flanking sequences) of 24 human and 3 simian immunodeficiency viruses. By using a calculation strategy applicable to short sequences, we found consensus overrepresented motifs (often containing CTG or CAG) that were congruent with the previously defined "retroviral signature." We also show many local repetition patterns that are significant when compared with simply shuffled sequences. First- and second-order Markov chain analyses demonstrate that a major portion of the overrepresented oligonucleotides can be predicted from the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences, but by no means can biological mechanisms be deduced from these results: some of the listed local repetitions remain significant against dinucleotide-conserving shuffled sequences; together with previous results, this suggests that interspersed and/or local mononucleotide and oligonucleotide repetitions could have biased the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences. We searched for suggestive evolutionary patterns by scrutinizing a reliable multiple alignment of the 27 sequences. A manually constructed alignment based on homology blocks was in good agreement with the polypeptide alignment in the coding sectors and has been exhaustively assessed by using a multiplied alphabet obtained by the promising mathematical strategy called the N-block presentation (taking into account the environment of each nucleotide in a sequence). Sector by sector, we hypothesize many successive duplication/deletion scenarios that fit our previous evolutionary hypotheses. This suggests an important duplication/deletion role for

  6. In situ synthesis of DNA micro-arrays using typography technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel typography technique was developed to in situ synthesize oligonucleotide arrays on glass slide,which has the celerity,high spatial resolution,lower cost,reliable operation,and high synthetic efficiency.The principle and process of the typography technique for fabricating gene-chips have been described in detail.A suit of poly(terafluoroethylene)devices for synthesizing oligonucleotide arrays were designed and prepared,and the fiber tubes with a number of nano-or micron-channels were em- ployed.The oligonucleotide arrays of 16 and 160 features with four different probes were synthesized using the typography technique.The four specific oligonucleotide probes including the matched and the mismatched by the fluorescent target sequence gave obviously different hybridization fluorescent signals.It was indicated that the gene-chip fabricated by the typography method could be used to rapidly screen single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP)and to detect mutations.

  7. In situ synthesis of DNA micro-arrays using typography technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG JianXin; HE NongYue; LI Song

    2007-01-01

    A novel typography technique was developed to in situ synthesize oligonucleotide arrays on glass slide, which has the celerity, high spatial resolution, lower cost, reliable operation, and high synthetic efficiency. The principle and process of the typography technique for fabricating gene-chips have been described in detail. A suit of poly(terafluoroethylene) devices for synthesizing oligonucleotide arrays were designed and prepared, and the fiber tubes with a number of nano- or micron-channels were employed. The oligonucleotide arrays of 16 and 160 features with four different probes were synthesized using the typography technique. The four specific oligonucleotide probes including the matched and the mismatched by the fluorescent target sequence gave obviously different hybridization fluorescent signals. It was indicated that the gene-chip fabricated by the typography method could be used to rapidly screen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and to detect mutations.

  8. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria, we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at

  9. Exome sequencing and arrayCGH detection of gene sequence and copy number variation between ILS and ISS mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Laura; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Davis, Jonathan; Bennett, Beth; Radcliffe, Richard A; Sikela, James M

    2014-06-01

    It has been well documented that genetic factors can influence predisposition to develop alcoholism. While the underlying genomic changes may be of several types, two of the most common and disease associated are copy number variations (CNVs) and sequence alterations of protein coding regions. The goal of this study was to identify CNVs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in gene coding regions that may play a role in influencing the risk of an individual developing alcoholism. Toward this end, two mouse strains were used that have been selectively bred based on their differential sensitivity to alcohol: the Inbred long sleep (ILS) and Inbred short sleep (ISS) mouse strains. Differences in initial response to alcohol have been linked to risk for alcoholism, and the ILS/ISS strains are used to investigate the genetics of initial sensitivity to alcohol. Array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and exome sequencing were conducted to identify CNVs and gene coding sequence differences, respectively, between ILS and ISS mice. Mouse arrayCGH was performed using catalog Agilent 1 × 244 k mouse arrays. Subsequently, exome sequencing was carried out using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. ArrayCGH detected 74 CNVs that were strain-specific (38 ILS/36 ISS), including several ISS-specific deletions that contained genes implicated in brain function and neurotransmitter release. Among several interesting coding variations detected by exome sequencing was the gain of a premature stop codon in the alpha-amylase 2B (AMY2B) gene specifically in the ILS strain. In total, exome sequencing detected 2,597 and 1,768 strain-specific exonic gene variants in the ILS and ISS mice, respectively. This study represents the most comprehensive and detailed genomic comparison of ILS and ISS mouse strains to date. The two complementary genome-wide approaches identified strain-specific CNVs and gene coding sequence variations that should provide strong candidates to

  10. Ultrathin oligonucleotide layers for fluorescence-based DNA sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furch, M.; Ueberfeld, J.; Hartmann, Andreas; Bock, Daniel; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-11-01

    Preliminary investigations into the design of an affinity sensor using evanescent wave technology concentrate upon the means of immobilization of the receptor molecules. In this work DNA served as the selective recognition element. The molecular principle of a sequence-selective biosensor for DNA is based on a sandwich-hybridization assay wherein the analyte, a single-stranded (ss)DNA, bound specifically to both an immobilized capture probe and a dye-labeled oligonucleotide in free solution. The efficiency of the capture array depends on the density of highly organized oligonucleotides on the waveguide surface and correlates therefore directly with the specificity and the sensitivity of the sensor. In the present approach using the Langmuir- Blodgett technique cinnamoylbutylether-cellulose monolayers were transferred onto optical fibers or planar waveguides. These films served as matrices for the immobilization of biotinylated oligonucleotides via streptavidin. For the first time streptavidin was immobilized by that manner. The specificity of the streptavidin layer or the following bounded nucleic acid molecules were controlled by an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, this application has also shown to be suitable for the detection of Salmonella, which is an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritidis and food borne diseases.

  11. Differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva Oleg N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete sequencing of bacterial genomes has become a common technique of present day microbiology. Thereafter, data mining in the complete sequence is an essential step. New in silico methods are needed that rapidly identify the major features of genome organization and facilitate the prediction of the functional class of ORFs. We tested the usefulness of local oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns to recognize and differentiate types of atypical oligonucleotide composition in DNA sequences of bacterial genomes. Results A total of 163 bacterial genomes of eubacteria and archaea published in the NCBI database were analyzed. Local OU patterns exhibit substantial intrachromosomal variation in bacteria. Loci with alternative OU patterns were parts of horizontally acquired gene islands or ancient regions such as genes for ribosomal proteins and RNAs. OU statistical parameters, such as local pattern deviation (D, pattern skew (PS and OU variance (OUV enabled the detection and visualization of gene islands of different functional classes. Conclusion A set of approaches has been designed for the statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of bacterial genomes. These methods are useful for the visualization and differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition prior to or accompanying gene annotation.

  12. Isolation and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding the fifth complement component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundwall, Åke B; Wetsel, Rick A; Kristensen, Torsten

    1985-01-01

    obtained further predicted an arginine-rich sequence (RPRR) immediately upstream of the N-terminal threonine of C5a, indicating that the promolecule form of C5 is synthesized with a beta alpha-chain orientation as previously shown for pro-C3 and pro-C4. The C5 cDNA clone was sheared randomly by sonication......We have used available protein sequence data for the anaphylatoxin (C5a) portion of the fifth component of human complement (residues 19-25) to synthesize a mixed-sequence oligonucleotide probe. The labeled oligonucleotide was then used to screen a human liver cDNA library, and a single candidate cDNA...... clone of 1.85 kilobase pairs was isolated. Hybridization of the mixed-sequence probe to the complementary strand of the plasmid insert and sequence analysis by the dideoxy method predicted the expected protein sequence of C5a (positions 1-12), amino-terminal to the anticipated priming site. The sequence...

  13. Sequence Handling by Sequence Analysis Toolbox v1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, Christian Ravnsborg; Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    The fact that mass spectrometry have become a high-throughput method calls for bioinformatic tools for automated sequence handling and prediction. For efficient use of bioinformatic tools, it is important that these tools are integrated or interfaced with each other. The purpose of sequence...... analysis toolbox v1.0 was to have a general purpose sequence analyzing tool that can import sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing methods. The program includes algorithms for calculation or prediction of isoelectric point, hydropathicity index, transmembrane segments, and glycosylphosphatidyl...

  14. An integrated multiple capillary array electrophoresis system for high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.

    1998-03-27

    A capillary array electrophoresis system was chosen to perform DNA sequencing because of several advantages such as rapid heat dissipation, multiplexing capabilities, gel matrix filling simplicity, and the mature nature of the associated manufacturing technologies. There are two major concerns for the multiple capillary systems. One concern is inter-capillary cross-talk, and the other concern is excitation and detection efficiency. Cross-talk is eliminated through proper optical coupling, good focusing and immersing capillary array into index matching fluid. A side-entry excitation scheme with orthogonal detection was established for large capillary array. Two 100 capillary array formats were used for DNA sequencing. One format is cylindrical capillary with 150 {micro}m o.d., 75 {micro}m i.d and the other format is square capillary with 300 {micro}m out edge and 75 {micro}m inner edge. This project is focused on the development of excitation and detection of DNA as well as performing DNA sequencing. The DNA injection schemes are discussed for the cases of single and bundled capillaries. An individual sampling device was designed. The base-calling was performed for a capillary from the capillary array with the accuracy of 98%.

  15. The tetramethylammonium chloride method for screening of cDNA libraries using highly degenerate oligonucleotides obtained by backtranslation of amino-acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Leffers, H

    1993-01-01

    We describe a method for screening of cDNA libraries with highly degenerate oligonucleotides using tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC). This method is a convenient alternative to using probes generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), especially when these cannot easily be made. Nylon filt...

  16. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. RIKEN Integrated Sequence Analysis (RISA) System—384-Format Sequencing Pipeline with 384 Multicapillary Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Sasaki, Nobuya; Carninci, Piero; Konno, Hideaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nishi, Katsuo; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Tashiro, Hideo; Itoh, Mari; Sumi, Noriko; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Shin; Hazama, Makoto; Nishine, Tsutomu; Harada, Akira; Yamamoto, Rintaro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Sumito; Ikegami, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Katsuya; Fujiwake, Syuji; Inoue, Kouji; Togawa, Yoshiyuki; Izawa, Masaki; Ohara, Eiji; Watahiki, Masanori; Yoneda, Yuko; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Ozawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Takumi; Matsuura, Shuji; Kawai, Jun; Okazaki, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Masami; Inoue, Yorinao; Kira, Akira; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2000-01-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto sequencer (RISA sequencer), a 384-multicapillary array assembler (CAS), and a 384-multicapillary casting device. The RISA sequencer can simultaneously analyze 384 independent sequencing products. The optical system is a scanning system chosen after careful comparison with an image detection system for the simultaneous detection of the 384-capillary array. This scanning system can be used with any fluorescent-labeled sequencing reaction (chain termination reaction), including transcriptional sequencing based on RNA polymerase, which was originally developed by us, and cycle sequencing based on thermostable DNA polymerase. For long-read sequencing, 380 out of 384 sequences (99.2%) were successfully analyzed and the average read length, with more than 99% accuracy, was 654.4 bp. A single RISA sequencer can analyze 216 kb with >99% accuracy in 2.7 h (90 kb/h). For short-read sequencing to cluster the 3′ end and 5′ end sequencing by reading 350 bp, 384 samples can be analyzed in 1.5 h. We have also developed a RISA inoculator, RISA filtrator and densitometer, RISA plasmid preparator which can handle throughput of 40,000 samples in 17.5 h, and a high-throughput RISA thermal cycler which has four 384-well sites. The combination of these technologies allowed us to construct the RISA system consisting of 16 RISA sequencers, which can process 50,000 DNA samples per day. One haploid genome shotgun sequence of a higher organism, such as human, mouse, rat, domestic animals, and plants, can

  18. RIKEN integrated sequence analysis (RISA) system--384-format sequencing pipeline with 384 multicapillary sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Itoh, M; Aizawa, K; Nagaoka, S; Sasaki, N; Carninci, P; Konno, H; Akiyama, J; Nishi, K; Kitsunai, T; Tashiro, H; Itoh, M; Sumi, N; Ishii, Y; Nakamura, S; Hazama, M; Nishine, T; Harada, A; Yamamoto, R; Matsumoto, H; Sakaguchi, S; Ikegami, T; Kashiwagi, K; Fujiwake, S; Inoue, K; Togawa, Y

    2000-11-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto sequencer (RISA sequencer), a 384-multicapillary array assembler (CAS), and a 384-multicapillary casting device. The RISA sequencer can simultaneously analyze 384 independent sequencing products. The optical system is a scanning system chosen after careful comparison with an image detection system for the simultaneous detection of the 384-capillary array. This scanning system can be used with any fluorescent-labeled sequencing reaction (chain termination reaction), including transcriptional sequencing based on RNA polymerase, which was originally developed by us, and cycle sequencing based on thermostable DNA polymerase. For long-read sequencing, 380 out of 384 sequences (99.2%) were successfully analyzed and the average read length, with more than 99% accuracy, was 654.4 bp. A single RISA sequencer can analyze 216 kb with >99% accuracy in 2.7 h (90 kb/h). For short-read sequencing to cluster the 3' end and 5' end sequencing by reading 350 bp, 384 samples can be analyzed in 1.5 h. We have also developed a RISA inoculator, RISA filtrator and densitometer, RISA plasmid preparator which can handle throughput of 40,000 samples in 17.5 h, and a high-throughput RISA thermal cycler which has four 384-well sites. The combination of these technologies allowed us to construct the RISA system consisting of 16 RISA sequencers, which can process 50,000 DNA samples per day. One haploid genome shotgun sequence of a higher organism, such as human, mouse, rat, domestic animals, and plants, can be

  19. Application of DNA fingerprinting with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5 to analysis of the genetic variation within Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, M; Ueda, H; Hayashi, M; Oku, Y; Kurosawa, T; Kamiya, M

    1995-04-01

    DNA from T. taeniaeformis digested with the restriction endonuclease was hybridized with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5. Metacestode and adult showed same clear multibanding patterns, which were characteristic of multilocus DNA fingerprinting. The fingerprinting patterns were quite different from those of the rodent hosts. Genetic variations in 4 laboratory-reared isolates of T. taeniaeformis, including 3 isolates which have been reported to be indistinguishable by infectivity, morphology and protein composition of metacestode, were investigated using this technique. Each of the 4 isolates exhibited isolate-specific fingerprinting patterns and were easily distinguished from one another, thus it was considered that (CAC)5 was a highly resolvable and informative probe for cestodes. However, it was also indicated that (CAC)5 was so sensitive that applying fingerprinting with (CAC)5 to taxonomical or phylogenetic analysis was limited where habitat of the host was restricted to the small area. In comparison to fingerprinting with 32P-labeled (CAC)5, fingerprinting with digoxigenated (CAC)5 represented more and sharper bands. It was considered that a digoxigenated probe was more useful for genetic analysis of cestodes.

  20. Nylon Filter Arrays Reveal Differential Expression of Expressed Sequence Tags in Wheat Roots Under Aluminum Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai XIAO; Gui-Hua BAI; Brett F CARVER

    2005-01-01

    To enrich differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for aluminum (Al) tolerance, cDNA subtraction libraries were generated from Al-stressed roots of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) nearisogenic lines (NILs) contrasting in Al-tolerance gene(s) from the Al-tolerant cultivar Atlas 66, using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Expression patterns of the ESTs were investigated with nylon filter arrays containing 614 cDNA clones from the subtraction library. Gene expression profiles from macroarray analysis indicated that 25 ESTs were upregulated in the tolerant NIL in response to Al stress. The result from Northern analysis of selected upregulated ESTs was similar to that from macroarray analysis. These highly expressed ESTs showed high homology with genes involved in signal transduction, oxidative stress alleviation, membrane structure, Mg2+ transportation, and other functions. Under Al stress, the Al-tolerant NIL may possess altered structure or function of the cell wall, plasma membrane, and mitochondrion. The wheat response to Al stress may involve complicated defense-related signaling and metabolic pathways.The present experiment did not detect any induced or activated genes involved in the synthesis of malate and other organic acids in wheat under Al-stress.

  1. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  2. Optimization of RNA Isolation from the Archaebacterium Methanosarcina Barkeri and Validation for Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culley, David E.; Kovacik, William P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT-The recent completion of a draft genome sequence for Methanosarcina barkeri has allowed the application of various high throughput post-genomics technologies, such as nucleic acid microarrays and mass spectrometry of proteins to detect global changes in transcription and translation that occur in response to experimental treatments...

  3. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  4. Sequence Analysis in Demographic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billari, Francesco C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThis paper examines the salient features of sequence analysis in demogrpahicresearch. The new approach allows a holistic perspective on life course analysis and is based on arepresentation of lives as sequences of states. Some of the methods for analyzing such data aresketched, from complex description to optimal matching ot monoethetic divisive algorithms. Afer ashort ilustration of a demographically-relevant example, the needs in terms of data collection and theopportunities of applying the same aproach to synthetic data are discussed.FrenchOn examine ici les principaux éléments de l’analyse par séquence endémographie. Cette nouvelle technique permet une perspective unifiée del’analyse du cours de la vie, en représentant la vie comme une série d’états.Certaines des méthodes pour de telles analyses sont décrites, en commençant parla description complexe, pour considérer ensuite les alignements optimales, etles algorithmes de division. Après un court exemple en démographie, onconsidère les besoins en données et les possibilités d’application aux donnéessynthétique.

  5. An eigencurrent approach for the analysis of finite antenna arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekers, D.J.; Eijndhoven, S.J.L. van; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate description of typical finite-array behavior such as edge effects and array resonances is essential in the design of various types of antennas. The analysis approach proposed in this paper is essentially based on the concept of eigencurrents and is capable of describing finite-array beha

  6. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  7. Design, validation and annotation of transcriptome-wide oligonucleotide probes for the oligochaete annelid Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Gong

    Full Text Available High density oligonucleotide probe arrays have increasingly become an important tool in genomics studies. In organisms with incomplete genome sequence, one strategy for oligo probe design is to reduce the number of unique probes that target every non-redundant transcript through bioinformatic analysis and experimental testing. Here we adopted this strategy in making oligo probes for the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a species for which we have sequenced transcriptome-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Our objectives were to identify unique transcripts as targets, to select an optimal and non-redundant oligo probe for each of these target ESTs, and to annotate the selected target sequences. We developed a streamlined and easy-to-follow approach to the design, validation and annotation of species-specific array probes. Four 244K-formatted oligo arrays were designed using eArray and were hybridized to a pooled E. fetida cRNA sample. We identified 63,541 probes with unsaturated signal intensities consistently above the background level. Target transcripts of these probes were annotated using several sequence alignment algorithms. Significant hits were obtained for 37,439 (59% probed targets. We validated and made publicly available 63.5K oligo probes so the earthworm research community can use them to pursue ecological, toxicological, and other functional genomics questions. Our approach is efficient, cost-effective and robust because it (1 does not require a major genomics core facility; (2 allows new probes to be easily added and old probes modified or eliminated when new sequence information becomes available, (3 is not bioinformatics-intensive upfront but does provide opportunities for more in-depth annotation of biological functions for target genes; and (4 if desired, EST orthologs to the UniGene clusters of a reference genome can be identified and selected in order to improve the target gene specificity of designed probes. This approach is

  8. BASE Flexible Array Preliminary Lithospheric Structure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeck, W. L.; Sheehan, A. F.; Anderson, M. L.; Siddoway, C. S.; Erslev, E.; Harder, S. H.; Miller, K. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) is a Flexible Array experiment integrated with EarthScope. The goal of BASE is to develop a better understanding of how basement-involved foreland arches form and what their link is to plate tectonic processes. To achieve this goal, the crustal structure under the Bighorn Mountain range, Bighorn Basin, and Powder River Basin of northern Wyoming and southern Montana are investigated through the deployment of 35 broadband seismometers, 200 short period seismometers, 1600 “Texan” instruments using active sources and 800 “Texan” instruments monitoring passive sources, together with field structural analysis of brittle structures. The novel combination of these approaches and anticipated simultaneous data inversion will give a detailed structural crustal image of the Bighorn region at all levels of the crust. Four models have been proposed for the formation of the Bighorn foreland arch: subhorizontal detachment within the crust, lithospheric buckling, pure shear lithospheric thickening, and fault blocks defined by lithosphere-penetrating thrust faults. During the summer of 2009, we deployed 35 broadband instruments, which have already recorded several magnitude 7+ teleseismic events. Through P wave receiver function analysis of these 35 stations folded in with many EarthScope Transportable Array stations in the region, we present a preliminary map of the Mohorovicic discontinuity. This crustal map is our first test of how the unique Moho geometries predicted by the four hypothesized models of basement involved arches fit seismic observations for the Bighorn Mountains. In addition, shear-wave splitting analysis for our first few recorded teleseisms helps us determine if strong lithospheric deformation is preserved under the range. These analyses help lead us to our final goal, a complete 4D (3D spatial plus temporal) lithospheric-scale model of arch formation which will advance our understanding of the mechanisms

  9. Dry-reagent disposable biosensor for visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by oligonucleotide ligation reaction: application to pharmacogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Gravanis, Achille

    2008-08-01

    Most genotyping methods for known single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are based on hybridization with allele-specific probes, oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR), primer extension or invasive cleavage. OLR offers superior specificity because it involves two recognition events; namely, the hybridization of an allele-specific probe and a common probe to adjacent positions on target DNA. OLR products can be detected by microtiter well-based colorimetric, time-resolved fluorimetric or chemiluminometric assays, electrophoresis, microarrays, microspheres, and homogeneous fluorimetric or colorimetric assays. We have developed a simple, robust, and low-cost disposable biosensor in dry-reagent format, which allows visual genotyping with no need for instrumentation. The OLR mixture contains a biotinylated common probe and an allele-specific probe with a (dA)(20) segment at the 3'-end. OLR products are denatured and applied to the biosensor next to gold nanoparticles that are decorated with oligo(dT) strands. The sensor is immersed in the appropriate buffer and all components migrate by capillary action. The OLR product is captured by immobilized streptavidin at the test zone (TZ) of the sensor and hybridizes with the oligo(dT) strands of the nanoparticles. A characteristic red line is generated due to the accumulation of nanoparticles. The excess nanoparticles are captured by immobilized oligo(dA) at the control zone of the strip, giving a second red line. We have applied successfully the proposed OLR-dipstick assay to the genotyping of four SNPs in the drug-metabolizing enzyme genes CYP2D6 ((*)3 and (*)4) and CYP2C19 ((*)2 and (*)3). The results were in agreement with direct sequencing.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains using the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hailang; Shen, Li; Yin, Huaqun; Li, Qian; Chen, Qijiong; Luo, Yanjie; Liao, Liqin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xueduan

    2009-05-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an important microorganism used in biomining operations for metal recovery. Whole-genomic diversity analysis based on the oligonucleotide microarray was used to analyze the gene content of 12 strains of A. ferrooxidans purified from various mining areas in China. Among the 3100 open reading frames (ORFs) on the slides, 1235 ORFs were absent in at least 1 strain of bacteria and 1385 ORFs were conserved in all strains. The hybridization results showed that these strains were highly diverse from a genomic perspective. The hybridization results of 4 major functional gene categories, namely electron transport, carbon metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides, and detoxification, were analyzed. Based on the hybridization signals obtained, a phylogenetic tree was built to analyze the evolution of the 12 tested strains, which indicated that the geographic distribution was the main factor influencing the strain diversity of these strains. Based on the hybridization signals of genes associated with bioleaching, another phylogenetic tree showed an evolutionary relationship from which the co-relation between the clustering of specific genes and geochemistry could be observed. The results revealed that the main factor was geochemistry, among which the following 6 factors were the most important: pH, Mg, Cu, S, Fe, and Al.

  11. Information Analysis of DNA Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, Riyazuddin

    2010-01-01

    The problem of differentiating the informational content of coding (exons) and non-coding (introns) regions of a DNA sequence is one of the central problems of genomics. The introns are estimated to be nearly 95% of the DNA and since they do not seem to participate in the process of transcription of amino-acids, they have been termed "junk DNA." Although it is believed that the non-coding regions in genomes have no role in cell growth and evolution, demonstration that these regions carry useful information would tend to falsify this belief. In this paper, we consider entropy as a measure of information by modifying the entropy expression to take into account the varying length of these sequences. Exons are usually much shorter in length than introns; therefore the comparison of the entropy values needs to be normalized. A length correction strategy was employed using randomly generated nucleonic base strings built out of the alphabet of the same size as the exons under question. Our analysis shows that intron...

  12. Arrays in biological and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Bo Vöge

    2002-01-01

    Recently a dramatic change has happened for biological and biochemical analysis. Originally developed as an academic massive parallel screening tool, industry has caught the idea as well of performing all kinds of assays in the new format of microarrays. From food manufacturers over water supply...... plants to the omnipresent pharmaceutical industry, the buzz-word is bioarrays, attracting scientific funding and investor capital. Although only few commercial products are currently out in the research laboratorium, hospital clinic or at the local doctor, there are high expectations for arrays screening...... predispositions and following therapy, monitoring the amount of bacteria in food stuff, measuring the small signs from cardiac arrest before it happens, analysing the toxin level in a water sample (preferentially on-line) or deciphering the identity of an infecting bug. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  13. Analysis of baseline and cisplatin-inducible gene expression in Fanconi anemia cells using oligonucleotide-based microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Johnson M

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Fanconi anemia (FA suffer from multiple defects, most notably of the hematological compartment (bone marrow failure, and susceptibility to cancer. Cells from FA patients show increased spontaneous chromosomal damage, which is aggravated by exposure to low concentrations of DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C or cisplatin. Five of the identified FA proteins form a nuclear core complex. However, the molecular function of these proteins remains obscure. Methods Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare the expression of approximately 12,000 genes from FA cells with matched controls. Expression profiles were studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from three different FA patients, one from the FA-A and two from the FA-C complementation groups. The isogenic control cell lines were obtained by either transfecting the cells with vectors expressing the complementing cDNAs or by using a spontaneous revertant cell line derived from the same patient. In addition, we analyzed expression profiles from two cell line couples at several time points after a 1-hour pulse treatment with a discriminating dose of cisplatin. Results Analysis of the expression profiles showed differences in expression of a number of genes, many of which have unknown function or are difficult to relate to the FA defect. However, from a selected number of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and chromatin structure, Western blot analysis showed that p21waf1/Cip1 was significantly upregulated after low dose cisplatin treatment in FA cells specifically (as well as being expressed at elevated levels in untreated FA cells. Conclusions The observed increase in expression of p21waf1/Cip1 after treatment of FA cells with crosslinkers suggests that the sustained elevated levels of p21waf1/Cip1 in untreated FA cells detected by Western blot analysis likely reflect increased spontaneous damage in these cells.

  14. Investigation of a new core-shell particle column for ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis of oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biba, Mirlinda; Welch, Christopher J; Foley, Joe P

    2014-08-01

    A new core-shell particle column showed excellent performance and durability for separation of short (∼21-mer) ribonucleic acid (RNA) oligonucleotides by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (IP-RPLC). Previously investigated core-shell C18 columns showed excellent peak shapes and separations of closely eluting impurities by IP-RPLC. However, these columns showed only modest long-term stability at the neutral pH and elevated column temperatures of ≥60°C, typically used for IP-RPLC analysis of oligonucleotides. The newly introduced SunShell C18 column provided separations comparable to the previously evaluated core-shell columns, but with significantly improved long-term column stability when operated at neutral pH and elevated column temperature.

  15. Array Analysis of North Atlantic Microseisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Möllhoff, Martin; Donne, Sarah; Lokmer, Ivan; Le Pape, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Oceans generate persistent low frequency background seismic signals known as microseisms through a mechanical coupling with the Earth's crust. Microseism energy originates as regions of low barometric pressure (depressions) over the oceans where it is transmitted to the sea-floor and propagates as elastic energy in the Earths crust. Consequently microseisms carry important meteorological information relating to both the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. The significance of microseisms as climate indicators has previously been investigated in several studies (Essen et al., 1999; Aster et al., 2010) and to estimate ocean wave parameters using onshore seismometer data (Bromirski et al., 1999). Also many modern seismological methods make use of microseism signals, for example "noise tomography" (Shapiro et al., 2005); spectral ratio techniques ; and cross-correlation techniques (Wapenaar et al., 2011; Brenguier et al., 2014). The continental shelf near Ireland is a known generation are for microseisms and an important region for European weather forecasting and climate studies. There has also been seismometers in the region since the 1960s. There is a single station in Valentia observatory in south-west Ireland and a small scale seismic array in Scotland which offer potential climate records for the region. To make use of this information it is first necessary to understand how microseisms recorded in Ireland relate to the local ocean wavefield. The WAVEOBS project was set established with three primary goals; to get a better fundamental understanding of microseism sources; to investigate the use of ocean generated microseisms as real time ocean wave height data; and to investigate their use as a climate proxy. Using spectral analysis and array methods the microseism wavefield in the North-East Atlantic near Ireland is described with reference to the ocean wavefield.

  16. Application of affymetrix array and massively parallel signature sequencing for identification of genes involved in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichner Lillian J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affymetrix GeneChip Array and Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS are two high throughput methodologies used to profile transcriptomes. Each method has certain strengths and weaknesses; however, no comparison has been made between the data derived from Affymetrix arrays and MPSS. In this study, two lineage-related prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and C4-2, were used for transcriptome analysis with the aim of identifying genes associated with prostate cancer progression. Methods Affymetrix GeneChip array and MPSS analyses were performed. Data was analyzed with GeneSpring 6.2 and in-house perl scripts. Expression array results were verified with RT-PCR. Results Comparison of the data revealed that both technologies detected genes the other did not. In LNCaP, 3,180 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,169 genes were only detected by MPSS. Similarly, in C4-2, 4,121 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,014 genes were only detected by MPSS. Analysis of the combined transcriptomes identified 66 genes unique to LNCaP cells and 33 genes unique to C4-2 cells. Expression analysis of these genes in prostate cancer specimens showed CA1 to be highly expressed in bone metastasis but not expressed in primary tumor and EPHA7 to be expressed in normal prostate and primary tumor but not bone metastasis. Conclusion Our data indicates that transcriptome profiling with a single methodology will not fully assess the expression of all genes in a cell line. A combination of transcription profiling technologies such as DNA array and MPSS provides a more robust means to assess the expression profile of an RNA sample. Finally, genes that were differentially expressed in cell lines were also differentially expressed in primary prostate cancer and its metastases.

  17. A fully automated 384 capillary array for DNA sequencer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, T

    2003-03-20

    Phase I SpectruMedix has successfully developed an automatic 96-capillary array DNA prototype based on the multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system originated from Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University. With computer control of all steps involved in a 96-capillary array running cycle, the prototype instrument (the SCE9600) is now capable of sequencing 450 base pairs (bp) per capillary, or 48,000 bp per instrument run within 2 hrs. Phase II of this grant involved the advancement of the core 96 capillary technologies, as well as designing a high density 384 capillary prototype. True commercialization of the 96 capillary instrument involved finalization of the gel matrix, streamlining the instrument hardware, creating a more reliable capillary cartridge, and further advancement of the data processing software. Together these silos of technology create a truly commercializable product (the SCE9610) capable of meeting the operation needs of the sequencing centers.

  18. A novel setup for the determination of absolute cross sections for low-energy electron induced strand breaks in oligonucleotides - The effect of the radiosensitizer 5-fluorouracil*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackwitz, Jenny; Ranković, Miloš Lj.; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Bald, Ilko

    2017-02-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in DNA radiation damage. Here we present a method to quantify LEE induced strand breakage in well-defined oligonucleotide single strands in terms of absolute cross sections. An LEE irradiation setup covering electron energies Measurements are presented for 10.0 and 5.5 eV for different oligonucleotide targets. The determination of absolute strand break cross sections is performed by atomic force microscopy analysis. An accurate fluence determination ensures small margins of error of the determined absolute single strand break cross sections σ SSB . In this way, the influence of sequence modification with the radiosensitive 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) is studied using an absolute and relative data analysis. We demonstrate an increase in the strand break yields of 5FU containing oligonucleotides by a factor of 1.5 to 1.6 compared with non-modified oligonucleotide sequences when irradiated with 10 eV electrons.

  19. An Optimal Sorting of Pulse Amplitude Sequence Based on the Phased Array Radar Beam Tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan Sheng∗,Yongshun Zhang; Wenlong Lu

    2016-01-01

    The study of phased array radar ( PAR) pulse amplitude sequence characteristics is the key to understand the radar’s working state and its beam’s scanning manner. According to the principle of antenna pattern formation and the searching and tracking modes of beams, this paper analyzes the characteristics and differences of pulse amplitude sequence when the radar beams work in searching and tracking modes respectively. Then an optimal sorting model of pulse amplitude sequence is established based on least⁃squares and curve⁃fitting methods. This method is helpful for acquiring the current working state of the radar and recognizing its instantaneous beam pointing by sorting the pulse amplitude sequence without the necessity to estimate the antenna pattern.

  20. Development of a Method for Profiling Protein Interactions with LNA-Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides Using Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2016-04-01

    Development of locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by nontarget-mediated hepatotoxicity. Increased binding of hepatocellular proteins to toxic LNA gapmers may be one of the mechanisms contributing to LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the protein binding propensity of nontoxic sequence-1 (NTS-1), toxic sequence-2 (TS-2), and severely highly toxic sequence-3 (HTS-3) LNA gapmers using human protein microarrays. We previously demonstrated by the transcription profiling analysis of liver RNA isolated from mice that TS-2 and HTS-3 gapmers modulate different transcriptional pathways in mice leading to hepatotoxicity. Our protein array profiling demonstrated that a greater number of proteins, including ones associated with hepatotoxicity, hepatic system disorder, and cell functions, were bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 compared with NTS-1. However, the profiles of proteins bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 were similar and did not distinguish proteins contributing to severe in vivo toxicity. These results, together with the previous transcription profiling analysis, indicate that the combination of sequence-dependent transcription modulation and increased protein binding of toxic LNA gapmers contributes to hepatotoxicity.

  1. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of biological sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torney, D.C.; Bruno, W.; Detours, V. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objectives of this project involved deriving new capabilities for analyzing biological sequences. The authors focused on tabulating the statistical properties exhibited by Human coding DNA sequences and on techniques of inferring the phylogenetic relationships among protein sequences related by descent.

  3. Application of a cholesterol stationary phase in the analysis of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides by means of ion pair chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studzińska, Sylwia; Krzemińska, Katarzyna; Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-07-01

    The main aim of this study was the investigation of the influence of several ion pair reagents towards both the retention and the mass spectrometry sensitivity of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. A cholesterol stationary phase was applied for the first time in the analysis of this group of compounds. The mobile phase composition was modified by changing the concentration and the type of amines and acetates or 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol. It has been shown that the increase of amines concentration results in the retention factor increase for each oligonucleotide, on each adsorbent. The only exception was the mobile phase composed of triethylamine and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol. This is a consequence of interactions taking place between a cholesterol molecule and an alcohol. This effect was convenient when the mass spectrometry detection was applied, since it allowed an increase in the sensitivity. Moreover, optimization of the mobile phase composition and its impact on the efficiency of ionization process and on the sensitivity in mass spectrometry were also presented. The optimization of this new method, based on cholesterol stationary phase coupled with mass spectrometry detection, was finally applied for the determination of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides impurity in a real sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gait Analysis by Multi Video Sequence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten; Juhl, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The project presented in this article aims to develop software so that close-range photogrammetry with sufficient accuracy can be used to point out the most frequent foot mal positions and monitor the effect of the traditional treatment. The project is carried out as a cooperation between the Ort...... Sequence Analysis (MVSA). Results show that the developed MVSA system, in the following called Fodex, can measure the navicula height with a precision of 0.5-0.8 mm. The calcaneus angle can be measured with a precision of 0.8-1.5 degrees....

  5. Guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides as synthetic riboregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by short oligonucleotides (antisense oligonucleotides), which can modulate RNA structures and inhibit subsequent associations with the translation machinery, is a potential approach for gene therapy. This chapter describes an alternative antisense strategy using guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides (G-ASs) to introduce a DNA-RNA heteroquadruplex structure at a designated sequence on RNA targets. The feasibility of using G-ASs to modulate RNA conformation may allow control of RNA function by inducing biologically important quadruplex structures. This approach to manipulate quadruplex structures using G-ASs may expand the strategies for regulating RNA structures and the functions of short oligonucleotide riboregulators.

  6. A study of oligonucleotide occurrence distributions in DNA coding segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, T; Colosimo, A; Morante, S; Parisi, V; Rossi, G C

    1997-02-21

    In this paper we present a general strategy designed to study the occurrence frequency distributions of oligonucleotides in DNA coding segments and to deal with the problem of detecting possible patterns of genomic compositional inhomogeneities and disuniformities. Identifying specific tendencies or peculiar deviations in the distributions of the effective occurrence frequencies of oligonucleotides, with respect to what can be a priori expected, is of the greatest importance in biology. Differences between expected and actual distributions may in fact suggest or confirm the existence of specific biological mechanisms related to them. Similarly, a marked deviation in the occurrence frequency of an oligonucleotide may suggest that it belongs to the class of so-called "DNA signal (target) sequences". The approach we have elaborated is innovative in various aspects. Firstly, the analysis of the genomic data is carried out in the light of the observation that the distribution of the four nucleotides along the coding regions of the genoma is biased by the existence of a well-defined "reading frame". Secondly, the "experimental" numbers found by counting the occurrences of the various oligonucleotide sequences are appropriately corrected for the many kinds of mistakes and redundancies present in the available genetic Data Bases. A methodologically significant further improvement of our approach over the existing searching strategies is represented by the fact that, in order to decide whether or not the (corrected) "experimental" value of the occurrence frequency of a given oligonucleotide is within statistical expectations, a measure of the strength of the selective pressure, having acted on it in the course of the evolution, is assigned to the sequence, in a way that takes into account both the value of the "experimental" occurrence frequency of the sequence and the magnitude of the probability that this number might be the result of statistical fluctuations. If the

  7. Bayesian analysis of binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney, David C.

    2005-03-01

    This manuscript details Bayesian methodology for "learning by example", with binary n-sequences encoding the objects under consideration. Priors prove influential; conformable priors are described. Laplace approximation of Bayes integrals yields posterior likelihoods for all n-sequences. This involves the optimization of a definite function over a convex domain--efficiently effectuated by the sequential application of the quadratic program.

  8. Oligonucleotides Containing Aminated 2′-Amino-LNA Nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Samuelsen, Simone V.; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2017-01-01

    Mono- and diaminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. Each modification imparts significant stabilization of nucleic acid duplexes and triplexes, excellent sequence selectivity, and significant nuclease resistance. Molecular modeling suggested...... that structural stabilization occurs via intrastrand electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of the aminated 2′-amino-LNA monomers and the host oligonucleotide backbone....

  9. Enhanced fluorescence of silver nanoclusters stabilized with branched oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Lorca, Romina; Zamora, Félix; Somoza, Álvaro

    2013-05-28

    DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are promising optical materials, whose fluorescence properties can be tuned by the selection of the DNA sequence employed. In this work we have used modified oligonucleotides in the preparation of AgNCs. The fluorescent intensity obtained was 60 times higher than that achieved with standard oligonucleotides.

  10. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with acupoint herbal plaster: an oligonucleotide chip analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Lee, Yun-Shien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-11-04

    Allergic rhinitis is regarded as an imbalanced Th1/Th2 cell-mediated response. The present study used microarray analysis to compare gene expression levels between allergic rhinitis patients before and after a series of acupoint herbal plaster applications. In this experimental pilot study, volunteers experiencing sneezing, runny nose, and congestion for more than 9 months in the year following initial diagnoses were included after diagnostic confirmation by otolaryngologists to exclude patients with sinusitis and nasal polyps. Patients with persistent allergic rhinitis each received four acupoint herbal plaster treatments applied using the moxibustion technique. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ). Peripheral blood samples were analyzed using an ImmunoCAP Phadiatop test, and patients were classified as phadiatop (Ph)-positive or -negative. Microarray results were analyzed for genes that were differentially expressed between (1) Ph-positive and -negative patients treated with herbal plaster; and (2) before and after herbal plaster treatment in the Ph-positive patient group. Unsupervised and supervised methods were used for gene-expression data analysis. Nineteen Ph-positive and four Ph-negative participants with persistent allergic rhinitis were included in the study. RQLQ results indicated that the 19 Ph-positive volunteers experienced improvement in six of seven categories following acupoint herbal plaster treatments, whereas the four Ph-negative participants reported improvement in only two categories. Hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of the gene expression profiles of Ph-positive and -negative participants indicated the groups exhibited distinct physiological responses to acupoint herbal treatment. Evaluation of gene networks using MetaCore identified that the "Immune response_IL-13 signaling via JAK-STAT" and the "Inflammation_Interferon signaling" were down- and up

  11. Joint Sequence Analysis: Association and Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccarreta, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    In its standard formulation, sequence analysis aims at finding typical patterns in a set of life courses represented as sequences. Recently, some proposals have been introduced to jointly analyze sequences defined on different domains (e.g., work career, partnership, and parental histories). We introduce measures to evaluate whether a set of…

  12. High-resolution SNP array analysis of patients with developmental disorder and normal array CGH results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siggberg Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic analysis of patients with developmental disorders has improved over recent years largely due to the use of microarray technology. Array methods that facilitate copy number analysis have enabled the diagnosis of up to 20% more patients with previously normal karyotyping results. A substantial number of patients remain undiagnosed, however. Methods and Results Using the Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0, we analyzed 35 patients with a developmental disorder of unknown cause and normal array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH results, in order to characterize previously undefined genomic aberrations. We detected no seemingly pathogenic copy number aberrations. Most of the vast amount of data produced by the array was polymorphic and non-informative. Filtering of this data, based on copy number variant (CNV population frequencies as well as phenotypically relevant genes, enabled pinpointing regions of allelic homozygosity that included candidate genes correlating to the phenotypic features in four patients, but results could not be confirmed. Conclusions In this study, the use of an ultra high-resolution SNP array did not contribute to further diagnose patients with developmental disorders of unknown cause. The statistical power of these results is limited by the small size of the patient cohort, and interpretation of these negative results can only be applied to the patients studied here. We present the results of our study and the recurrence of clustered allelic homozygosity present in this material, as detected by the SNP 6.0 array.

  13. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells ...... mismatches may be detected in the PCR and typing for HLA-DP gene variants, which differ for only one base, may be performed.......The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...

  14. Mulibrey nanism: Two novel mutations in a child identified by Array CGH and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzillo, Enza; Cozzolino, Carla; Genesio, Rita; Melis, Daniela; Frisso, Giulia; Orrico, Ada; Lombardo, Barbara; Fattorusso, Valentina; Discepolo, Valentina; Della Casa, Roberto; Simonelli, Francesca; Nitsch, Lucio; Salvatore, Francesco; Franzese, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    In childhood, several rare genetic diseases have overlapping symptoms and signs, including those regarding growth alterations, thus the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The proband, aged 3 years, was suspected to have Silver-Russel syndrome because of intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, typical facial dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, body asymmetry, and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. Other features were left atrial and ventricular enlargement and patent foramen ovale. Total X-ray skeleton showed hypoplasia of the twelfth rib bilaterally and of the coccyx, slender long bones with thick cortex, and narrow medullary channels. The genetic investigation did not confirm Silver-Russel syndrome. At the age of 5 the patient developed an additional sign: hepatomegaly. Array CGH revealed a 147 kb deletion (involving TRIM 37 and SKA2 genes) on one allele of chromosome 17, inherited from his mother. These results suggested Mulibrey nanism. The clinical features were found to fit this hypothesis. Sequencing of the TRIM 37 gene showed a single base change at a splicing locus, inherited from his father that provoked a truncated protein. The combined use of Array CGH and DNA sequencing confirmed diagnosis of Mulibrey nanism. The large deletion involving the SKA2 gene, along with the increased frequency of malignant tumours in mulibrey patients, suggests closed monitoring for cancer of our patient and his mother. Array CGH should be performed as first tier test in all infants with multiple anomalies. The clinician should reconsider the clinical features when the genetics suggests this. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer G Mulle

    Full Text Available DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  17. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulle, Jennifer G; Patel, Viren C; Warren, Stephen T; Hegde, Madhuri R; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-03-29

    DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  18. Update-in-Place Analysis for True Multidimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Fitzgerald

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Applicative languages have been proposed for defining algorithms for parallel architectures because they are implicitly parallel and lack side effects. However, straightforward implementations of applicative-language compilers may induce large amounts of copying to preserve program semantics. The unnecessary copying of data can increase both the execution time and the memory requirements of an application. To eliminate the unnecessary copying of data, the Sisal compiler uses both build-in-place and update-in-place analyses. These optimizations remove unnecessary array copy operations through compile-time analysis. Both build-in-place and update-in-place are based on hierarchical ragged arrays, i.e., the vector-of-vectors array model. Although this array model is convenient for certain applications, many optimizations are precluded, e.g., vectorization. To compensate for this deficiency, new languages, such as Sisal 2.0, have extended array models that allow for both high-level array operations to be performed and efficient implementations to be devised. In this article, we introduce a new method to perform update-in-place analysis that is applicable to arrays stored either in hierarchical or in contiguous storage. Consequently, the array model that is appropriate for an application can be selected without the loss of performance. Moreover, our analysis is more amenable for distributed memory and large software systems.

  19. ProbeMaker: an extensible framework for design of sets of oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Mats

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procedures for genetic analyses based on oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools that can allow highly parallel investigations of genetic material. Such procedures require the design of large sets of probes using application-specific design constraints. Results ProbeMaker is a software framework for computer-assisted design and analysis of sets of oligonucleotide probe sequences. The tool assists in the design of probes for sets of target sequences, incorporating sequence motifs for purposes such as amplification, visualization, or identification. An extension system allows the framework to be equipped with application-specific components for evaluation of probe sequences, and provides the possibility to include support for importing sequence data from a variety of file formats. Conclusion ProbeMaker is a suitable tool for many different oligonucleotide design and analysis tasks, including the design of probe sets for various types of parallel genetic analyses, experimental validation of design parameters, and in silico testing of probe sequence evaluation algorithms.

  20. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  1. Random DNA fragmentation allows detection of single-copy, single-exon alterations of copy number by oligonucleotide array CGH in clinical FFPE samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, Galen; Kim, Su Young; Savage, Stephanie; Gooden, Gerald C; Barrett, Michael; Zhang, Jian; Alla, Lalitamba; Watanabe, April; Einspahr, Janine; Prasad, Anil; Nickoloff, Brian J; Carpten, John; Trent, Jeffrey; Alberts, David; Bittner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Genomic technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), increasingly offer definitive gene dosage profiles in clinical samples. Historically, copy number profiling was limited to large fresh-frozen tumors where intact DNA could be readily extracted. Genomic analyses of pre-neoplastic tumors and diagnostic biopsies are often limited to DNA processed by formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedding (FFPE). We present specialized protocols for DNA extraction and processing from FFPE tissues utilizing DNase processing to generate randomly fragmented DNA. The protocols are applied to FFPE clinical samples of varied tumor types, from multiple institutions and of varied block age. Direct comparative analyses with regression coefficient were calculated on split-sample (portion fresh/portion FFPE) of colorectal tumor samples. We show equal detection of a homozygous loss of SMAD4 at the exon-level in the SW480 cell line and gene-specific alterations in the split tumor samples. aCGH application to a set of archival FFPE samples of skin squamous cell carcinomas detected a novel hemizygous deletion in INPP5A on 10q26.3. Finally we present data on derivative of log ratio, a particular sensitive detector of measurement variance, for 216 sequential hybridizations to assess protocol reliability over a wide range of FFPE samples.

  2. Factors to be considered for robust high-throughput automated DNA sequencing using a multiple-capillary array instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Miller, Arthur W.; Ruiz-Martinez, Marie C.; Kotler, Lev; Kesilman, Jeffrey; Karger, Barry L.

    1997-05-01

    The overall goal of our program is to develop a robust, high throughput, fully automated DNA sequencing instrument based on replaceable polymer solutions using a multicapillary array. Significant effort has already been devoted to column and polymer chemistry in order to obtain long read lengths per run in fast analysis time. In this paper we report on progress in instrument considerations and data processing software. A simple instrument design, based on no moving parts for continuous illumination of the capillaries and detection of the fluorescent light was used for this study. Our polymer solution replacement system with the permanent connection between the buffer/chamber manifold and capillary columns on the detector side is designed to prevent the trapping of air bubbles during matrix solution replacement. A special construction of a column-electrode couple on the injection side precludes air trapping during sample injection from small sample volumes. Our in-house software now features the significant reduction of the crosstalk signal from neighbor columns, which may be a potential problem in densely packed large capillary array sequencers.

  3. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  4. De Novo Identification of Single Nucleotide Mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydan, Jason S.; Okada, H. Mark; Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been used primarily to detect copy-number variants between two genomes. Here we report using aCGH to detect single nucleotide mutations on oligonucleotide microarrays with overlapping 50-mer probes. This technique represents a powerful method for rapidly detecting novel homozygous single nucleotide mutations in any organism with a sequenced reference genome. PMID:19189945

  5. Analysis of Flat-Plate Solar Array and Solar Lantern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. N. V. Aashrith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A very detailed theortical analysis of a solar array has been carried out based on established values of solar radiation data to predict the performance of solar lamp . The analysis is based on established theory about flat-plate collectors. Top heat loss coefficient (Ut, Bottom heat loss coefficient (Ub, Overall heat loss coefficient (Ul, Useful energy (Qu, efficiency (hp of the flat-plate solar array and efficiency (hl of the solar lantern has been calculated.

  6. Development and application of functional gene arrays for microbial community analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.L.HE; J.D.VAN NOSTRAND; L.Y.WU; J.Z.ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    Functional gene markers can provide important information about functional gene diversity and potential activity of microbial communities.Although microarray technology has been successfully applied to study gene expression for pure cultures,simple,and artificial microbial communities,adapting such a technology to analyze complex microbial communities still presents a lot of challenges in terms of design,sample preparation,and data analysis.This work is focused on the development and application of functional gene arrays (FGAs) to target key functional gene markers for microbial community studies.A few key issues specifically related to FGAs,such as oligonucleotide probe design,nucleic acid extraction and purification,data analysis,specificity,sensitivity,and quantitative capability are discussed in detail.Recent studies have demonstrated that FGAs can provide specific,sensitive,and potentially quantitative information about microbial communities from a variety of natural environments and controlled ecosystems.This technology is expected to revolutionize the analysis of microbial communities,and link microbial structure to ecosystem functioning.

  7. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation.

  8. i-Genome: A database to summarize oligonucleotide data in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yu-Chung

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of sequence features in genomes is crucial to comparative genomics, evolutionary analysis, the analyses of regulatory sequences and the quantitative evaluation of sequences. Computing the frequencies and the occurrences of a pattern in complete genomes is time-consuming. Results The proposed database provides information about sequence features generated by exhaustively computing the sequences of the complete genome. The repetitive elements in the eukaryotic genomes, such as LINEs, SINEs, Alu and LTR, are obtained from Repbase. The database supports various complete genomes including human, yeast, worm, and 128 microbial genomes. Conclusions This investigation presents and implements an efficiently computational approach to accumulate the occurrences of the oligonucleotides or patterns in complete genomes. A database is established to maintain the information of the sequence features, including the distributions of oligonucleotide, the gene distribution, the distribution of repetitive elements in genomes and the occurrences of the oligonucleotides. The database can provide more effective and efficient way to access the repetitive features in genomes.

  9. Genome Microscale Heterogeneity among Wild Potatoes Revealed by Diversity Arrays Technology Marker Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Traini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuber-bearing potato species possess several genes that can be exploited to improve the genetic background of the cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum. Among them, S. bulbocastanum and S. commersonii are well known for their strong resistance to environmental stresses. However, scant information is available for these species in terms of genome organization, gene function, and regulatory networks. Consequently, genomic tools to assist breeding are meager, and efficient exploitation of these species has been limited so far. In this paper, we employed the reference genome sequences from cultivated potato and tomato and a collection of sequences of 1,423 potato Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT markers that show polymorphic representation across the genomes of S. bulbocastanum and/or S. commersonii genotypes. Our results highlighted microscale genome sequence heterogeneity that may play a significant role in functional and structural divergence between related species. Our analytical approach provides knowledge of genome structural and sequence variability that could not be detected by transcriptome and proteome approaches.

  10. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Rudolph L

    2016-08-19

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Sequence Matching Analysis for Curriculum Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liem Yenny Bendatu; Bernardo Nugroho Yahya

    2015-01-01

    .... This study attempts to develop a sequence matching analysis. Considering conformance checking as the basis of this approach, this proposed approach utilizes the current control flow technique in process mining domain...

  12. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  13. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Stein, Cy A

    2014-11-01

    Over the past several dozen years, regardless of the substantial effort directed toward developing rational oligonucleotide strategies to silence gene expression, antisense oligonucleotide-based cancer therapy has not been successful. This review focuses on the most likely reasons for this lack of success, and on the barriers that still need to be overcome to make a clinical cancer treatment reality out of the promise of antisense therapy. Considerable progress has been made in the design and delivery of nucleic acid fragments. Chemical modifications have considerably improved oligonucleotide absorption, distribution and metabolism while at the same time reducing toxicity. Nevertheless, the delivery and the cellular uptake of these molecules are still not adequate to provide the desired therapeutic outcome. Recent therapeutic interventional phase III trials of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides for a cancer indication will be discussed, in addition to those studies that markedly improve the scientific understanding of the properties of these molecules. We still do not have a marketed antisense oligonucleotide for a cancer indication. This is because critical aspects of the cellular, tumor pharmacology and delivery properties of these agents are still not well understood.

  15. Development of a cDNA array for chicken gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of microarray technology to functional genomic analysis in the chicken has been limited by the lack of arrays containing large numbers of genes. Results We have produced cDNA arrays using chicken EST collections generated by BBSRC, University of Delaware and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. From a total of 363,838 chicken ESTs representing 24 different adult or embryonic tissues, a set of 11,447 non-redundant ESTs were selected and added to an existing collection of clones (4,162 from immune tissues and a chicken bursal cell line (DT40. Quality control analysis indicates there are 13,007 useable features on the array, including 160 control spots. The array provides broad coverage of mRNAs expressed in many tissues; in addition, clones with expression unique to various tissues can be detected. Conclusions A chicken multi-tissue cDNA microarray with 13,007 features is now available to academic researchers from genomics@fhcrc.org. Sequence information for all features on the array is in GenBank, and clones can be readily obtained. Targeted users include researchers in comparative and developmental biology, immunology, vaccine and agricultural technology. These arrays will be an important resource for the entire research community using the chicken as a model.

  16. Stochastic segmentation models for array-based comparative genomic hybridization data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tze Leung; Xing, Haipeng; Zhang, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a high throughput, high resolution technique for studying the genetics of cancer. Analysis of array-CGH data typically involves estimation of the underlying chromosome copy numbers from the log fluorescence ratios and segmenting the chromosome into regions with the same copy number at each location. We propose for the analysis of array-CGH data, a new stochastic segmentation model and an associated estimation procedure that has attractive statistical and computational properties. An important benefit of this Bayesian segmentation model is that it yields explicit formulas for posterior means, which can be used to estimate the signal directly without performing segmentation. Other quantities relating to the posterior distribution that are useful for providing confidence assessments of any given segmentation can also be estimated by using our method. We propose an approximation method whose computation time is linear in sequence length which makes our method practically applicable to the new higher density arrays. Simulation studies and applications to real array-CGH data illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  17. Analysis of Array-CGH Data Using the R and Bioconductor Software Suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried A. Hofmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations. DNA copy number alterations (CNAs are a hallmark of somatic mutations in tumor genomes and congenital abnormalities that lead to diseases such as mental retardation. However, accurate identification of amplified or deleted regions requires a sequence of different computational analysis steps of the microarray data. Results. We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection, and comparative analysis of array-CGH data which allows the accurate and sensitive detection of CNAs. Conclusion. The implemented option for the determination of minimal altered regions (MARs from a series of tumor samples is a step forward in the identification of new tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes.

  18. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  19. Microfluidic gene arrays for rapid genomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jay A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-12-01

    Genomic analysis tools have recently become an indispensable tool for the evaluation of gene expression in a variety of experiment protocols. Two of the main drawbacks to this technology are the labor and time intensive process for sample preparation and the relatively long times required for target/probe hybridization. In order to overcome these two technological barriers we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform on chip sample purification and labeling, integrated with a high density genearray. Sample purification was performed using a porous polymer monolithic material functionalized with an oligo dT nucleotide sequence for the isolation of high purity mRNA. These purified mRNA"s can then rapidly labeled using a covalent fluorescent molecule which forms a selective covalent bond at the N7 position of guanine residues. These labeled mRNA"s can then released from the polymer monolith to allow for direct hybridization with oligonucletide probes deposited in microfluidic channel. To allow for rapid target/probe hybridization high density microarray were printed in microchannels. The channels can accommodate array densities as high as 4000 probes. When oligonucleotide deposition is complete, these channels are sealed using a polymer film which forms a pressure tight seal to allow sample reagent flow to the arrayed probes. This process will allow for real time target to probe hybridization monitoring using a top mounted CCD fiber bundle combination. Using this process we have been able to perform a multi-step sample preparation to labeled target/probe hybridization in less than 30 minutes. These results demonstrate the capability to perform rapid genomic screening on a high density microfluidic microarray of oligonucleotides.

  20. Detection of hepatitis B virus genotypes using oligonucleotide chip among hepatitis B virus carriers in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Rong Tang; Ji-Shen Zhang; Hui Zhao; Yu-Hua Gong; Yong-Zhong Wang; Jian-Long Zhao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with a newly oligonucleotide chip assay among the HBV carriers in Eastern China.METHODS: An assay using oligonucleotide chip was developed for detection of HBV genotypes in serum samples from HBV DNA-positive patients in Eastern China. This method is based on the principle of reverse hybridization with Cy5-labeled amplicons hybridizing to type-specific oligonucleotide probes that are immobilized on slides. The results of 80 randomly chosen sera were confirmed by direct sequencing.RESULTS: HBV genotype B, C and mixed genotype were detected in 400 serum samples, accounting for8.3% (n = 33), 83.2% (n = 333), and 8.5% (n = 34),respectively. The evaluation of the oligonucleotide assay showed 100% concordance with the amplicon phylogenetic analysis except 9 mixed genotype infections undetected by sequencing.CONCLUSION: The study indicates that HBV genotype C and B prevail in the Eastern China. It is suggested that the oligonucleotide chip is a reliable and convenient tool for the detection of HBV genotyping.

  1. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and cell uptake of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Norris, Daniel; Yu, Rosie; Bennett, C Frank

    2015-06-29

    Pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides are largely driven by chemistry of the backbone and thus are sequence independent within a chemical class. Tissue bioavailability (% of administered dose) is assisted by plasma protein binding that limits glomerular filtration and ultimate urinary excretion of oligonucleotides. The substitution of one non-bridging oxygen with the more hydrophobic sulfur atom (phosphorothioate) increases both plasma stability and plasma protein binding and thus, ultimately, tissue bioavailability. Additional modifications of the sugar at the 2' position, increase RNA binding affinity and significantly increase potency, tissue half-life and prolong RNA inhibitory activity. Oligonucleotides modified in this manner consistently exhibit the highest tissue bioavailability (>90%). Systemic biodistribution is broad, and organs typically with highest concentrations are liver and kidney followed by bone marrow, adipocytes, and lymph nodes. Cell uptake is predominantly mediated by endocytosis. Both size and charge for most oligonucleotides prevents distribution across the blood brain barrier. However, modified single-strand oligonucleotides administered by intrathecal injection into the CSF distribute broadly in the CNS. The majority of intracellular oligonucleotide distribution following systemic or local administration occurs rapidly in just a few hours following administration and is facilitated by rapid endocytotic uptake mechanisms. Further understanding of the intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides may provide further enhancements in design and ultimate potency of antisense oligonucleotides in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Performance Analysis of a NASA Integrated Network Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program is planning to integrate its individual networks into a unified network which will function as a single entity to provide services to user missions. This integrated network architecture is expected to provide SCaN customers with the capabilities to seamlessly use any of the available SCaN assets to support their missions to efficiently meet the collective needs of Agency missions. One potential optimal application of these assets, based on this envisioned architecture, is that of arraying across existing networks to significantly enhance data rates and/or link availabilities. As such, this document provides an analysis of the transmit and receive performance of a proposed SCaN inter-network antenna array. From the study, it is determined that a fully integrated internetwork array does not provide any significant advantage over an intra-network array, one in which the assets of an individual network are arrayed for enhanced performance. Therefore, it is the recommendation of this study that NASA proceed with an arraying concept, with a fundamental focus on a network-centric arraying.

  3. Development of self-compressing BLSOM for comprehensive analysis of big sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Akihito; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Abe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    With the remarkable increase in genomic sequence data from various organisms, novel tools are needed for comprehensive analyses of available big sequence data. We previously developed a Batch-Learning Self-Organizing Map (BLSOM), which can cluster genomic fragment sequences according to phylotype solely dependent on oligonucleotide composition and applied to genome and metagenomic studies. BLSOM is suitable for high-performance parallel-computing and can analyze big data simultaneously, but a large-scale BLSOM needs a large computational resource. We have developed Self-Compressing BLSOM (SC-BLSOM) for reduction of computation time, which allows us to carry out comprehensive analysis of big sequence data without the use of high-performance supercomputers. The strategy of SC-BLSOM is to hierarchically construct BLSOMs according to data class, such as phylotype. The first-layer BLSOM was constructed with each of the divided input data pieces that represents the data subclass, such as phylotype division, resulting in compression of the number of data pieces. The second BLSOM was constructed with a total of weight vectors obtained in the first-layer BLSOMs. We compared SC-BLSOM with the conventional BLSOM by analyzing bacterial genome sequences. SC-BLSOM could be constructed faster than BLSOM and cluster the sequences according to phylotype with high accuracy, showing the method's suitability for efficient knowledge discovery from big sequence data.

  4. Development of Self-Compressing BLSOM for Comprehensive Analysis of Big Sequence Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Kikuchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the remarkable increase in genomic sequence data from various organisms, novel tools are needed for comprehensive analyses of available big sequence data. We previously developed a Batch-Learning Self-Organizing Map (BLSOM, which can cluster genomic fragment sequences according to phylotype solely dependent on oligonucleotide composition and applied to genome and metagenomic studies. BLSOM is suitable for high-performance parallel-computing and can analyze big data simultaneously, but a large-scale BLSOM needs a large computational resource. We have developed Self-Compressing BLSOM (SC-BLSOM for reduction of computation time, which allows us to carry out comprehensive analysis of big sequence data without the use of high-performance supercomputers. The strategy of SC-BLSOM is to hierarchically construct BLSOMs according to data class, such as phylotype. The first-layer BLSOM was constructed with each of the divided input data pieces that represents the data subclass, such as phylotype division, resulting in compression of the number of data pieces. The second BLSOM was constructed with a total of weight vectors obtained in the first-layer BLSOMs. We compared SC-BLSOM with the conventional BLSOM by analyzing bacterial genome sequences. SC-BLSOM could be constructed faster than BLSOM and cluster the sequences according to phylotype with high accuracy, showing the method’s suitability for efficient knowledge discovery from big sequence data.

  5. Development of a 690 K SNP array in catfish and its application for genetic mapping and validation of the reference genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yun; Waldbieser, Geoff; Bosworth, Brian; Liu, Shikai; Yang, Yujia; Bao, Lisui; Yuan, Zihao; Li, Ning; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are capable of providing the highest level of genome coverage for genomic and genetic analysis because of their abundance and relatively even distribution in the genome. Such a capacity, however, cannot be achieved without an efficient genotyping platform such as SNP arrays. In this work, we developed a high-density SNP array with 690,662 unique SNPs (herein 690 K array) that were relatively evenly distributed across the entire genome, and covered 98.6% of the reference genome sequence. Here we also report linkage mapping using the 690 K array, which allowed mapping of over 250,000 SNPs on the linkage map, the highest marker density among all the constructed linkage maps. These markers were mapped to 29 linkage groups (LGs) with 30,591 unique marker positions. This linkage map anchored 1,602 scaffolds of the reference genome sequence to LGs, accounting for over 97% of the total genome assembly. A total of 1,007 previously unmapped scaffolds were placed to LGs, allowing validation and in few instances correction of the reference genome sequence assembly. This linkage map should serve as a valuable resource for various genetic and genomic analyses, especially for GWAS and QTL mapping for genes associated with economically important traits. PMID:28079141

  6. Genetic analysis of presbycusis by arrayed primer extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Ballay, Charles; Inserra, Michelle; Stidham, Katrina; Colen, Tahl; Roberson, Joseph; Gardner, Phyllis; Schrijver, Iris

    2008-01-01

    Using the Hereditary Hearing Loss arrayed primer extension (APEX) array, which contains 198 mutations across 8 hearing loss-associated genes (GJB2, GJB6, GJB3, GJA1, SLC26A4, SLC26A5, 12S-rRNA, and tRNA Ser), we compared the frequency of sequence variants in 94 individuals with early presbycusis to 50 unaffected controls and aimed to identify possible genetic contributors. This cross-sectional study was performed at Stanford University with presbycusis samples from the California Ear Institute. The patients were between ages 20 and 65 yr, with adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, and carried a clinical diagnosis of early presbycusis. Exclusion criteria comprised known causes of hearing loss such as significant noise exposure, trauma, ototoxic medication, neoplasm, and congenital infection or syndrome, as well as congenital or pediatric onset. Sequence changes were identified in 11.7% and 10% of presbycusis and control alleles, respectively. Among the presbycusis group, these solely occurred within the GJB2 and SLC26A4 genes. Homozygous and compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations were exclusively seen in affected individuals. We were unable to detect a statistically significant difference between our control and affected populations regarding the frequency of sequence variants detected with the APEX array. Individuals who carry two mild mutations in the GJB2 gene possibly have an increased risk of developing early presbycusis.

  7. Advanced spectral analysis of ionospheric waves observed with sparse arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Helmboldt, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from a single, six-hour observing period to illustrate the application of techniques developed for interferometric radio telescopes to the spectral analysis of observations of ionospheric fluctuations with sparse arrays. We have adapted the deconvolution methods used for making high dynamic range images of cosmic sources with radio arrays to making comparably high dynamic range maps of spectral power of wavelike ionospheric phenomena. In the example presented here, we have used observations of the total electron content (TEC) gradient derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of synchrotron emission from two galaxy clusters at 330 MHz as well as GPS-based TEC measurements from a sparse array of 33 receivers located within New Mexico near the VLA. We show that these techniques provide a significant improvement in signal to noise (S/N) of detected wavelike structures by correcting for both measurement inaccuracies and wavefront distortions. This is especially true for the...

  8. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library a...

  9. The use of oligonucleotide probes for meningococcal serotype characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SACCHI Claudio Tavares

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examine the potential use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize Neisseria meningitidis serotypes without the use of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Antigenic diversity on PorB protein forms the bases of serotyping method. However, the current panel of MAbs underestimated, by at least 50% the PorB variability, presumably because reagents for several PorB variable regions (VRs are lacking, or because a number of VR variants are not recognized by serotype-defining MAbs12. We analyzed the use of oligonucleotide probes to characterize serotype 10 and serotype 19 of N. meningitidis. The porB gene sequence for the prototype strain of serotype 10 was determined, aligned with 7 other porB sequences from different serotypes, and analysis of individual VRs were performed. The results of DNA probes 21U (VR1-A and 615U (VR3-B used against 72 N. meningitidis strains confirm that VR1 type A and VR3 type B encode epitopes for serotype-defined MAbs 19 and 10, respectively. The use of probes for characterizing serotypes possible can type 100% of the PorB VR diversity. It is a simple and rapid method specially useful for analysis of large number of samples.

  10. EzArray: A web-based highly automated Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuelin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though microarray experiments are very popular in life science research, managing and analyzing microarray data are still challenging tasks for many biologists. Most microarray programs require users to have sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer skills for usage. With accumulating microarray data deposited in public databases, easy-to-use programs to re-analyze previously published microarray data are in high demand. Results EzArray is a web-based Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system for researchers who need to organize microarray data efficiently and get data analyzed instantly. EzArray organizes microarray data into projects that can be analyzed online with predefined or custom procedures. EzArray performs data preprocessing and detection of differentially expressed genes with statistical methods. All analysis procedures are optimized and highly automated so that even novice users with limited pre-knowledge of microarray data analysis can complete initial analysis quickly. Since all input files, analysis parameters, and executed scripts can be downloaded, EzArray provides maximum reproducibility for each analysis. In addition, EzArray integrates with Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO and allows instantaneous re-analysis of published array data. Conclusion EzArray is a novel Affymetrix expression array data analysis and sharing system. EzArray provides easy-to-use tools for re-analyzing published microarray data and will help both novice and experienced users perform initial analysis of their microarray data from the location of data storage. We believe EzArray will be a useful system for facilities with microarray services and laboratories with multiple members involved in microarray data analysis. EzArray is freely available from http://www.ezarray.com/.

  11. RSAT 2015: Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Herrmann, Carl; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A; Delerce, Jeremy; Jaeger, Sébastien; Blanchet, Christophe; Vincens, Pierre; Caron, Christophe; Staines, Daniel M; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Artufel, Marie; Charbonnier-Khamvongsa, Lucie; Hernandez, Céline; Thieffry, Denis; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; van Helden, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    RSAT (Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools) is a modular software suite for the analysis of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. Its main applications are (i) motif discovery, appropriate to genome-wide data sets like ChIP-seq, (ii) transcription factor binding motif analysis (quality assessment, comparisons and clustering), (iii) comparative genomics and (iv) analysis of regulatory variations. Nine new programs have been added to the 43 described in the 2011 NAR Web Software Issue, including a tool to extract sequences from a list of coordinates (fetch-sequences from UCSC), novel programs dedicated to the analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS or population genomics (retrieve-variation-seq and variation-scan), a program to cluster motifs and visualize the similarities as trees (matrix-clustering). To deal with the drastic increase of sequenced genomes, RSAT public sites have been reorganized into taxon-specific servers. The suite is well-documented with tutorials and published protocols. The software suite is available through Web sites, SOAP/WSDL Web services, virtual machines and stand-alone programs at http://www.rsat.eu/.

  12. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results.

  13. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fernandez

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de. The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons. The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0 was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01 allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  14. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  15. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and pharmacological properties of the porcine 5-HT(1D) receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L. Bhalla (Pankaj); H.S. Sharma (Hari); T. Wurch (Thierry); P.J. Pauwels (Petrus); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA cDNA encoding the full-length 5-HT(1D) receptor derived from porcine cerebral cortex was amplified, cloned and sequenced, using guinea-pig 5-HT(1D) receptor coding sequence oligonucleotide primers in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT - PC

  16. Improving oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes by implementation of polony microarray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Bent, Elizabeth; Li, Wei; Jeske, Daniel R.; Cui, Xinping; Braun, Jonathan; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) were obtained by implementing polony microarray technology. OFRG is an array-based method for analyzing microbial community composition. Polonies are discrete clusters of DNA, produced by solid-phase PCR in hydrogels, and derived from individual, spatially isolated DNA molecules. The advantages of a polony-based OFRG method include higher throughput and reductions in the PCR-induced errors and compositional skew inherent in all other PCR-based community composition methods, including high throughput sequencing of rRNA genes. Given the similarities between polony microarrays and certain aspects of sequencing methods such as the Illumina platform, we suggest that if concepts presented in this study were implemented in high throughput sequencing protocols, a reduction of PCR-induced errors and compositional skew may be realized. PMID:22640891

  17. Synthesis and hybridization properties of inverse oligonucleotides.

    OpenAIRE

    Marangoni, M.; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Augustijns, Patrick; Rozenski, Jef; Herdewijn , Piet

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of adenine and thymine cyclopentylethyl nucleosides is presented. This novel constrained monomeric building block is very difficult to incorporate into oligonucleotides. It was introduced in 13mer oligodeoxynucleotide sequences at a single position using H-phosphonate chemistry. Phosphoramidite chemistry completely failed in this particular case. The H-phosphonate building blocks were obtained starting from the corresponding phosphoramidites. Stability of duplexes with RNA and D...

  18. Cladistic analysis of anuran POMC sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrubaian, Jasem; Danielson, Phillip; Walker, David; Dores, Robert M

    2002-03-01

    Procedures for performing cladistic analyses can provide powerful tools for understanding the evolution of neuropeptide and polypeptide hormone coding genes. These analyses can be done on either amino acid data sets or nucleotide data sets and can utilize several different algorithms that are dependent on distinct sets of operating assumptions and constraints. In some cases, the results of these analyses can be used to gauge phylogenetic relationships between taxa. Selecting the proper cladistic analysis strategy is dependent on the taxonomic level of analysis and the rate of evolution within the orthologous genes being evaluated. For example, previous studies have shown that the amino acid sequence of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the common precursor for the melanocortins and beta-endorphin, can be used to resolve phylogenetic relationships at the class and order level. This study tested the hypothesis that POMC sequences could be used to resolve phylogenetic relationships at the family taxonomic level. Cladistic analyses were performed on amphibian POMC sequences characterized from the marine toad, Bufo marinus (family Bufonidae; this study), the spadefoot toad, Spea multiplicatus (family Pelobatidae), the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis (family Pipidae) and the laughing frog, Rana ridibunda (family Ranidae). In these analyses the sequence of Australian lungfish POMC was used as the outgroup. The analyses were done at the amino acid level using the maximum parsimony algorithm and at the nucleotide level using the maximum likelihood algorithm. For the anuran POMC genes, analysis at the nucleotide level using the maximum likelihood algorithm generated a cladogram with higher bootstrap values than the maximum parsimony analysis of the POMC amino acid data set. For anuran POMC sequences, analysis of nucleotide sequences using the maximum likelihood algorithm would appear to be the preferred strategy for resolving phylogenetic relationships at the family taxonomic

  19. A review of statistical methods for preprocessing oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijin

    2009-12-01

    Microarrays have become an indispensable tool in biomedical research. This powerful technology not only makes it possible to quantify a large number of nucleic acid molecules simultaneously, but also produces data with many sources of noise. A number of preprocessing steps are therefore necessary to convert the raw data, usually in the form of hybridisation images, to measures of biological meaning that can be used in further statistical analysis. Preprocessing of oligonucleotide arrays includes image processing, background adjustment, data normalisation/transformation and sometimes summarisation when multiple probes are used to target one genomic unit. In this article, we review the issues encountered in each preprocessing step and introduce the statistical models and methods in preprocessing.

  20. Hybrid Information Flow Analysis for Programs with Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergö Barany

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Information flow analysis checks whether certain pieces of (confidential data may affect the results of computations in unwanted ways and thus leak information. Dynamic information flow analysis adds instrumentation code to the target software to track flows at run time and raise alarms if a flow policy is violated; hybrid analyses combine this with preliminary static analysis. Using a subset of C as the target language, we extend previous work on hybrid information flow analysis that handled pointers to scalars. Our extended formulation handles arrays, pointers to array elements, and pointer arithmetic. Information flow through arrays of pointers is tracked precisely while arrays of non-pointer types are summarized efficiently. A prototype of our approach is implemented using the Frama-C program analysis and transformation framework. Work on a full machine-checked proof of the correctness of our approach using Isabelle/HOL is well underway; we present the existing parts and sketch the rest of the correctness argument.

  1. A Tandem Oligonucleotide Approach for SNP-Selective RNA Degradation Using Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been studied for many years as a tool for gene silencing. One of the most difficult cases of selective RNA silencing involves the alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, in which the allele sequence is differentiated by a single nucleotide. A new approach to improve the performance of allele selectivity for antisense oligonucleotides is proposed. It is based on the simultaneous application of two oligonucleotides. One is complementary to the mutated form of the targeted RNA and is able to activate RNase H to cleave the RNA. The other oligonucleotide, which is complementary to the wild type allele of the targeted RNA, is able to inhibit RNase H cleavage. Five types of SNPs, C/G, G/C, G/A, A/G, and C/U, were analyzed within the sequence context of genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and Machado-Joseph disease. For most analyzed cases, the application of the tandem approach increased allele-selective RNA degradation 1.5-15 fold relative to the use of a single antisense oligonucleotide. The presented study proves that differentiation between single substitution is highly dependent on the nature of the SNP and surrounding nucleotides. These variables are crucial for determining the proper length of the inhibitor antisense oligonucleotide. In the tandem approach, the comparison of thermodynamic stability of the favorable duplexes WT RNA-inhibitor and Mut RNA-gapmer with the other possible duplexes allows for the evaluation of chances for the allele-selective degradation of RNA. A larger difference in thermodynamic stability between favorable duplexes and those that could possibly form, usually results in the better allele selectivity of RNA degradation.

  2. High copy arrays containing a sequence upstream of mec-3 alter cell migration and axonal morphology in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchen Brandi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caenorhabditis elegans gene mec-3 encodes a LIM-homeodomain protein that is a master regulator of touch receptor neuron genes. Two of the touch neurons, the ALM neurons, are generated in the anterior of the animal and then migrate to near the middle of the animal. In animals transformed with a sequence upstream of mec-3, the ALM touch receptor neurons failed to migrate to their normal positions and sometimes migrated in the wrong direction, and the PLM touch receptor neurons showed axonal defects. Here we characterize this effect and identify the sequence causing the cell migration and axonal defects. Results The ALM migration defect did not result from RNA interference (RNAi, nonspecific effects of carrying a transgenic array, expression of GFP, or the marker gene used to make the transformants. Instead, the ALM migration defect resulted from transgenic arrays containing many copies of a specific 104 bp DNA sequence. Transgenic arrays containing this sequence did not affect all cell migrations. Conclusions The mec-3 upstream sequence appeared to be sequestering (titrating out a specific DNA-binding factor that is required for the ALMs to migrate correctly. Because titration of this factor could reverse the direction of ALM migrations, it may be part of a program that specifies both the direction and extent of ALM migrations. mec-3 is a master regulator of touch receptor neuron genes, so the factor or factors that bind this sequence may also be involved in specifying the fate of touch receptor neurons.

  3. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis reveals dysregulation of energy-related metabolism in insulin-sensitive tissues of type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Wang, X C; Zhao, L; Zhang, Y; Yao, L L; Lin, Y; Peng, Y D; Hu, R M

    2014-06-17

    Impaired insulin action within skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the liver is an important characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In order to identify common underlying defects in insulin-sensitive tissues that may be involved in the pathogenesis of T2D, the gene expression profiles of skeletal muscle, visceral adipose tissue, and liver from autopsy donors with or without T2D were examined using oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Compared with controls, 691 genes were commonly dysregulated in these three insulin-sensitive tissues of humans with T2D. These co-expressed genes were enriched within the mitochondrion, with suggested involvement in energy metabolic processes such as glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, fatty acid beta oxidative, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and electron transport. Genes related to energy metabolism were mostly downregulated in diabetic skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue, while they were upregulated in the diabetic liver. This observed dysregulation in energy-related metabolism may be the underlying factor leading to the molecular mechanisms responsible for the insulin resistance of patients with T2D.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Survivin Protein Expression and Its Therapeutic Depletion by an Antisense Oligonucleotide in Human Lung Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Olsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed antisense and interference therapeutics are a promising treatment option for cancer. The demonstration of depletion of target proteins within human tumors in vivo using validated methodology will be a key to the application of this technology. Here, we present a flow cytometric-based approach to quantitatively determine protein levels in solid tumor material derived by fiber optic brushing (FOB of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Focusing upon the survivin protein, and its depletion by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO (LY2181308, we show that we can robustly identify a subpopulation of survivin positive tumor cells in FOB samples, and, moreover, detect survivin depletion in tumor samples from a patient treated with LY2181308. Survivin depletion appears to be a result of treatment with this ASO, because a tumor treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy did not exhibit a decreased percentage of survivin positive cells. Our approach is likely to be broadly applicable to, and useful for, the quantification of protein levels in tumor samples obtained as part of clinical trials and studies, facilitating the proof-of-principle testing of novel targeted therapies.

  5. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational w

  6. DETECTING LOW-LEVEL SYNTHESIS IMPURITIES IN MODIFIED PHOSPHOROTHIOATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Wyrzykiewicz, Tadeusz K; Limbach, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    An LC-MS method based on the use of high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS) for profiling oligonucleotides synthesis impurities is described.Oligonucleotide phosphorothioatediesters (phosphorothioate oligonucleotides), in which one of the non-bridging oxygen atoms at each phosphorus center is replaced by a sulfur atom, are now one of the most popular oligonucleotide modifications due to their ease of chemical synthesis and advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Despite significant progress in the solid-phase oligomerization chemistry used in the manufacturing of these oligonucleotides, multiple classes of low-level impurities always accompany synthetic oligonucleotides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for the identification of these synthesis impurities. However, impurity profiling, where the entire complement of low-level synthetic impurities is identified in a single analysis, is more challenging. Here we present an LC-MS method based the use of high resolution-mass spectrometry, specifically Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS or FTMS). The optimal LC-FTMS conditions, including the stationary phase and mobile phases for the separation and identification of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were found. The characteristics of FTMS enable charge state determination from single m/z values of low-level impurities. Charge state information then enables more accurate modeling of the detected isotopic distribution for identification of the chemical composition of the detected impurity. Using this approach, a number of phosphorothioate impurities can be detected by LC-FTMS including failure sequences carrying 3'-terminal phosphate monoester and 3'-terminal phosphorothioate monoester, incomplete backbone sulfurization and desulfurization products, high molecular weight impurities, and chloral, isobutyryl, and N(3) (2-cyanoethyl) adducts of the full

  7. probeBase--an online resource for rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers: new features 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Daniel; Loy, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-04

    probeBase http://www.probebase.net is a manually maintained and curated database of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers. Contextual information and multiple options for evaluating in silico hybridization performance against the most recent rRNA sequence databases are provided for each oligonucleotide entry, which makes probeBase an important and frequently used resource for microbiology research and diagnostics. Here we present a major update of probeBase, which was last featured in the NAR Database Issue 2007. This update describes a complete remodeling of the database architecture and environment to accommodate computationally efficient access. Improved search functions, sequence match tools and data output now extend the opportunities for finding suitable hierarchical probe sets that target an organism or taxon at different taxonomic levels. To facilitate the identification of complementary probe sets for organisms represented by short rRNA sequence reads generated by amplicon sequencing or metagenomic analysis with next generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina and IonTorrent, we introduce a novel tool that recovers surrogate near full-length rRNA sequences for short query sequences and finds matching oligonucleotides in probeBase.

  8. Information theory applications for biological sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinga, Susana

    2014-05-01

    Information theory (IT) addresses the analysis of communication systems and has been widely applied in molecular biology. In particular, alignment-free sequence analysis and comparison greatly benefited from concepts derived from IT, such as entropy and mutual information. This review covers several aspects of IT applications, ranging from genome global analysis and comparison, including block-entropy estimation and resolution-free metrics based on iterative maps, to local analysis, comprising the classification of motifs, prediction of transcription factor binding sites and sequence characterization based on linguistic complexity and entropic profiles. IT has also been applied to high-level correlations that combine DNA, RNA or protein features with sequence-independent properties, such as gene mapping and phenotype analysis, and has also provided models based on communication systems theory to describe information transmission channels at the cell level and also during evolutionary processes. While not exhaustive, this review attempts to categorize existing methods and to indicate their relation with broader transversal topics such as genomic signatures, data compression and complexity, time series analysis and phylogenetic classification, providing a resource for future developments in this promising area.

  9. Wrinkle analysis of a space planar film reflect-array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-wei XIAO; Wu-jun CHEN; Gong-yi FU

    2011-01-01

    The presence of wrinkles in a membrane is the main factor that induces surface errors on space planar film reflect arrays. Based on the commercial finite element (FE) package ABAQUS, a numerical procedure for membrane wrinkle analysis was set up, and used to analyze a square planar film reflect-array under pure shear force to evaluate its induced wrinkle characteristics. First, the effect of shear force on the wrinkle pattern of the array was studied and validated by experiment. Second, the effect of prestress was studied. When the prestress increases, the quantity of the wrinkles increases, and the amplitude of the wrinkles decreases. Third, the influence of the boundary conditions was investigated. A frame side edge structure has a relatively smooth surface, but also relatively high stress. Finally, the behavior of a joint seam was analyzed. The results indicate that a joint band has a significant influence on the wrinkle pattern of the membrane.

  10. Digital image sequence processing, compression, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Todd R

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionTodd R. ReedCONTENT-BASED IMAGE SEQUENCE REPRESENTATIONPedro M. Q. Aguiar, Radu S. Jasinschi, José M. F. Moura, andCharnchai PluempitiwiriyawejTHE COMPUTATION OF MOTIONChristoph Stiller, Sören Kammel, Jan Horn, and Thao DangMOTION ANALYSIS AND DISPLACEMENT ESTIMATION IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAINLuca Lucchese and Guido Maria CortelazzoQUALITY OF SERVICE ASSESSMENT IN NEW GENERATION WIRELESS VIDEO COMMUNICATIONSGaetano GiuntaERROR CONCEALMENT IN DIGITAL VIDEOFrancesco G.B. De NataleIMAGE SEQUENCE RESTORATION: A WIDER PERSPECTIVEAnil KokaramVIDEO SUMMARIZATIONCuneyt M. Taskiran and Edward

  11. Study on failure analysis of array chip components in IRFPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; He, Yingjie; Li, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Infrared focal plane array detector has advantages of strong anti-interference ability and high sensitivity. Its size, weight and power dissipation has been noticeably decreased compared to the conventional infrared imaging system. With the development of the detector manufacture technology and the cost reduction, IRFPA detector has been widely used in the military and commercial fields. Due to the restricting of array chip manufacturing process and material defects, the fault phenomenon such as cracking, bad pixel and abnormal output was showed during the test, which restricts the performance of the infrared detector imaging system, and these effects are gradually intensified with the expanding of the focal plane array size and the shrinking of the pixel size. Based on the analysis of the test results for the infrared detector array chip components, the fault phenomenon was classified. The main cause of the chip component failure is chip cracking, bad pixel and abnormal output. The reason of the failure has been analyzed deeply. According to analyze the mechanism of the failure, a series of measures which contain filtrating materials and optimizing the manufacturing process of array chip components were used to improve the performance of the chip components and the test pass rate, which is used to meet the needs of the detector performance.

  12. Resolving prokaryotic taxonomy without rRNA: longer oligonucleotide word lengths improve genome and metagenome taxonomic classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric B Alsop

    Full Text Available Oligonucleotide signatures, especially tetranucleotide signatures, have been used as method for homology binning by exploiting an organism's inherent biases towards the use of specific oligonucleotide words. Tetranucleotide signatures have been especially useful in environmental metagenomics samples as many of these samples contain organisms from poorly classified phyla which cannot be easily identified using traditional homology methods, including NCBI BLAST. This study examines oligonucleotide signatures across 1,424 completed genomes from across the tree of life, substantially expanding upon previous work. A comprehensive analysis of mononucleotide through nonanucleotide word lengths suggests that longer word lengths substantially improve the classification of DNA fragments across a range of sizes of relevance to high throughput sequencing. We find that, at present, heptanucleotide signatures represent an optimal balance between prediction accuracy and computational time for resolving taxonomy using both genomic and metagenomic fragments. We directly compare the ability of tetranucleotide and heptanucleotide world lengths (tetranucleotide signatures are the current standard for oligonucleotide word usage analyses for taxonomic binning of metagenome reads. We present evidence that heptanucleotide word lengths consistently provide more taxonomic resolving power, particularly in distinguishing between closely related organisms that are often present in metagenomic samples. This implies that longer oligonucleotide word lengths should replace tetranucleotide signatures for most analyses. Finally, we show that the application of longer word lengths to metagenomic datasets leads to more accurate taxonomic binning of DNA scaffolds and have the potential to substantially improve taxonomic assignment and assembly of metagenomic data.

  13. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-03-22

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold.

  14. Application of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Bacterial Source Tracking of Environmental Enterococcus sp. Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Furey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In an effort towards adapting new and defensible methods for assessing and managing the risk posed by microbial pollution, we evaluated the utility of oligonucleotide microarrays for bacterial source tracking (BST of environmental Enterococcus sp. isolates derived from various host sources. Current bacterial source tracking approaches rely on various phenotypic and genotypic methods to identify sources of bacterial contamination resulting from point or non-point pollution. For this study Enterococcus sp. isolates originating from deer, bovine, gull, and human sources were examined using microarrays. Isolates were subjected to Box PCR amplification and the resulting amplification products labeled with Cy5. Fluorescent-labeled templates were hybridized to in-house constructed nonamer oligonucleotide microarrays consisting of 198 probes. Microarray hybridization profiles were obtained using the ArrayPro image analysis software. Principal Components Analysis (PCA and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA were compared for their ability to visually cluster microarray hybridization profiles based on the environmental source from which the Enterococcus sp. isolates originated. The PCA was visually superior at separating origin-specific clusters, even for as few as 3 factors. A Soft Independent Modeling (SIM classification confirmed the PCA, resulting in zero misclassifications using 5 factors for each class. The implication of these results for the application of random oligonucleotide microarrays for BST is that, given the reproducibility issues, factor-based variable selection such as in PCA and SIM greatly outperforms dendrogram-based similarity measures such as in HCA and K-Nearest Neighbor KNN.

  15. Selection strategy and the design of hybrid oligonucleotide primers for RACE-PCR: cloning a family of toxin-like sequences from Agelena orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipkin Alexey

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background the use of specific but partially degenerate primers for nucleic acid hybridisations and PCRs amplification of known or unknown gene families was first reported well over a decade ago and the technique has been used widely since then. Results here we report a novel and successful selection strategy for the design of hybrid partially degenerate primers for use with RT-PCR and RACE-PCR for the identification of unknown gene families. The technique (named PaBaLiS has proven very effective as it allowed us to identify and clone a large group of mRNAs encoding neurotoxin-like polypeptide pools from the venom of Agelena orientalis species of spider. Our approach differs radically from the generally accepted CODEHOP principle first reported in 1998. Most importantly, our method has proven very efficient by performing better than an independently generated high throughput EST cloning programme. Our method yielded nearly 130 non-identical sequences from Agelena orientalis, whilst the EST cloning technique yielded only 48 non-identical sequences from 2100 clones obtained from the same Agelena material. In addition to the primer design approach reported here, which is almost universally applicable to any PCR cloning application, our results also indicate that venom of Agelena orientalis spider contains a much larger family of related toxin-like sequences than previously thought. Conclusion with upwards of 100,000 species of spider thought to exist, and a propensity for producing diverse peptide pools, many more peptides of pharmacological importance await discovery. We envisage that some of these peptides and their recombinant derivatives will provide a new range of tools for neuroscience research and could also facilitate the development of a new generation of analgesic drugs and insecticides.

  16. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  17. ANGSD: Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-11-25

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies are generating vast amounts of data. Fast, flexible and memory efficient implementations are needed in order to facilitate analyses of thousands of samples simultaneously. We present a multithreaded program suite called ANGSD. This program can calculate various summary statistics, and perform association mapping and population genetic analyses utilizing the full information in next generation sequencing data by working directly on the raw sequencing data or by using genotype likelihoods. The open source c/c++ program ANGSD is available at http://www.popgen.dk/angsd . The program is tested and validated on GNU/Linux systems. The program facilitates multiple input formats including BAM and imputed beagle genotype probability files. The program allow the user to choose between combinations of existing methods and can perform analysis that is not implemented elsewhere.

  18. Sample processing for DNA chip array-based analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfors Sven-Olof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exploitation of DNA-based analyses of microbial pathogens, and especially simultaneous typing of several virulence-related genes in bacteria is becoming an important objective of public health these days. Results A procedure for sample processing for a confirmative analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC on a single colony with DNA chip array was developed and is reported here. The protocol includes application of fragmented genomic DNA from ultrasonicated colonies. The sample processing comprises first 2.5 min of ultrasonic treatment, DNA extraction (2×, and afterwards additional 5 min ultrasonication. Thus, the total sample preparation time for a confirmative analysis of EHEC is nearly 10 min. Additionally, bioinformatic revisions were performed in order to design PCR primers and array probes specific to most conservative regions of the EHEC-associated genes. Six strains with distinct pathogenic properties were selected for this study. At last, the EHEC chip array for a parallel and simultaneous detection of genes etpC-stx1-stx2-eae was designed and examined. This should permit to sense all currently accessible variants of the selected sequences in EHEC types and subtypes. Conclusion In order to implement the DNA chip array-based analysis for direct EHEC detection the sample processing was established in course of this work. However, this sample preparation mode may also be applied to other types of EHEC DNA-based sensing systems.

  19. Identification of distinct antibody epitopes and mimotopes from a peptide array of 5520 randomly generated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Ulrich; Ivascu, Claudia; Schlief, Marén; Landgraf, Christiane; Gericke, Seike; Zahn, Grit; Herzel, Hanspeter; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Schneider-Mergener, Jens

    2002-09-01

    We used a relatively small library of 5520 randomly generated single 15-mer peptides prepared by SPOT synthesis as an array of 28.5x19.0 cm to identify epitopes for three distinct monoclonal antibodies, namely anti-p24 (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1) monoclonal anibody (mab) CB4-1, anti-interleukin-10 (IL-10) mab CB/RS/13, and anti-transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) mab Tab2. Initially identified peptide ligands mostly had very low affinities for the antibodies with dissociation constants around 10(-4) M. Subsequent identification of residues critical for the antibody interactions involved complete L-amino acid substitutional analyses. Several substitutions resulted in analogs with dissociation constants in the low micromolar and high nanomolar range. Specifically binding peptides with key residue patterns matching the wild-type epitopes were identified for all three antibodies. In addition, for antibody CB4-1 mimotopes that showed no homology to the known epitope were selected. Our results suggest that a very limited library diversity, although far from covering the entire sequence repertoire, can suffice to rapidly and economically select peptidic antibody epitopes and mimotopes.

  20. Preparation and application of triple helix forming oligonucleotides and single strand oligonucleotide donors for gene correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rowshon; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for site-specific modulation of genomic sequences in mammalian cells require two components. One must be capable of recognizing and activating a specific target sequence in vivo, driving that site into an exploitable repair pathway. Information is transferred to the site via participation in the pathway by the second component, a donor nucleic acid, resulting in a permanent change in the target sequence. We have developed biologically active triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as site-specific gene targeting reagents. These TFOs, linked to DNA reactive compounds (such as a cross-linking agent), activate pathways that can engage informational donors. We have used the combination of a psoralen-TFO and single strand oligonucleotide donors to generate novel cell lines with directed sequence changes at the target site. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of bioactive psoralen-linked TFOs, their co-introduction into mammalian cells with donor nucleic acids, and the identification of cells with sequence conversion of the target site. We have emphasized details in the synthesis and purification of the oligonucleotides that are essential for preparation of reagents with optimal activity.

  1. OTU analysis using metagenomic shotgun sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Hao

    Full Text Available Because of technological limitations, the primer and amplification biases in targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have veiled the true microbial diversity underlying environmental samples. However, the protocol of metagenomic shotgun sequencing provides 16S rRNA gene fragment data with natural immunity against the biases raised during priming and thus the potential of uncovering the true structure of microbial community by giving more accurate predictions of operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Nonetheless, the lack of statistically rigorous comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragments and other data types makes it difficult to interpret previously reported results using 16S rRNA gene fragments. Therefore, in the present work, we established a standard analysis pipeline that would help confirm if the differences in the data are true or are just due to potential technical bias. This pipeline is built by using simulated data to find optimal mapping and OTU prediction methods. The comparison between simulated datasets revealed a relationship between 16S rRNA gene fragments and full-length 16S rRNA sequences that a 16S rRNA gene fragment having a length >150 bp provides the same accuracy as a full-length 16S rRNA sequence using our proposed pipeline, which could serve as a good starting point for experimental design and making the comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragment-based and targeted 16S rRNA sequencing-based surveys possible.

  2. Genomic shotgun array: a procedure linking large-scale DNA sequencing with regional transcript mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Hui; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2004-02-11

    To facilitate transcript mapping and to investigate alterations in genomic structure and gene expression in a defined genomic target, we developed a novel microarray-based method to detect transcriptional activity of the human chromosome 4q22-24 region. Loss of heterozygosity of human 4q22-24 is frequently observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen well-characterized genes have been identified from this region. We took previously sequenced shotgun subclones as templates to amplify overlapping sequences for the genomic segment and constructed a chromosome-region-specific microarray. Using genomic DNA fragments as probes, we detected transcriptional activity from within this region among five different tissues. The hybridization results indicate that there are new transcripts that have not yet been identified by other methods. The existence of new transcripts encoded by genes in this region was confirmed by PCR cloning or cDNA library screening. The procedure reported here allows coupling of shotgun sequencing with transcript mapping and, potentially, detailed analysis of gene expression and chromosomal copy of the genomic sequence for the putative HCC tumor suppressor gene(s) in the 4q candidate region.

  3. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  4. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  5. HAT: Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays with application to promoter-GeneChip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters Bas J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tiling-arrays are applicable to multiple types of biological research questions. Due to its advantages (high sensitivity, resolution, unbiased, the technology is often employed in genome-wide investigations. A major challenge in the analysis of tiling-array data is to define regions-of-interest, i.e., contiguous probes with increased signal intensity (as a result of hybridization of labeled DNA in a region. Currently, no standard criteria are available to define these regions-of-interest as there is no single probe intensity cut-off level, different regions-of-interest can contain various numbers of probes, and can vary in genomic width. Furthermore, the chromosomal distance between neighboring probes can vary across the genome among different arrays. Results We have developed Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays (HAT, and first evaluated its performance for tiling-array datasets from a Chromatin Immunoprecipitation study on chip (ChIP-on-chip for the identification of genome-wide DNA binding profiles of transcription factor Cebpa (used for method comparison. Using this assay, we can refine the detection of regions-of-interest by illustrating that regions detected by HAT are more highly enriched for expected motifs in comparison with an alternative detection method (MAT. Subsequently, data from a retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen were used to examine the performance of HAT among different applications of tiling-array datasets. In both studies, detected regions-of-interest have been validated with (qPCR. Conclusions We demonstrate that HAT has increased specificity for analysis of tiling-array data in comparison with the alternative method, and that it accurately detects regions-of-interest in two different applications of tiling-arrays. HAT has several advantages over previous methods: i as there is no single cut-off level for probe-intensity, HAT can detect regions-of-interest at various thresholds, ii it can

  6. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  7. Sequence Matching Analysis for Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Yenny Bendatu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations apply information technologies to support their business processes. Using the information technologies, the actual events are recorded and utilized to conform with predefined model. Conformance checking is an approach to measure the fitness and appropriateness between process model and actual events. However, when there are multiple events with the same timestamp, the traditional approach unfit to result such measures. This study attempts to develop a sequence matching analysis. Considering conformance checking as the basis of this approach, this proposed approach utilizes the current control flow technique in process mining domain. A case study in the field of educational process has been conducted. This study also proposes a curriculum analysis framework to test the proposed approach. By considering the learning sequence of students, it results some measurements for curriculum development. Finally, the result of the proposed approach has been verified by relevant instructors for further development.

  8. Development and validation of an oligonucleotide microarray to characterise ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reich Marlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In forest ecosystems, communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM are influenced by several biotic and abiotic factors. To understand their underlying dynamics, ECM communities have been surveyed with ribosomal DNA-based sequencing methods. However, most identification methods are both time-consuming and limited by the number of samples that can be treated in a realistic time frame. As a result of ongoing implementation, the array technique has gained throughput capacity in terms of the number of samples and the capacity for parallel identification of several species. Thus far, although phylochips (microarrays that are used to detect species have been mostly developed to trace bacterial communities or groups of specific fungi, no phylochip has been developed to carry oligonucleotides for several ectomycorrhizal species that belong to different genera. Results We have constructed a custom ribosomal DNA phylochip to identify ECM fungi. Specific oligonucleotide probes were targeted to the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions from 95 fungal species belonging to 21 ECM fungal genera. The phylochip was first validated using PCR amplicons of reference species. Ninety-nine percent of the tested oligonucleotides generated positive hybridisation signals with their corresponding amplicons. Cross-hybridisation was mainly restricted at the genus level, particularly for Cortinarius and Lactarius species. The phylochip was subsequently tested with environmental samples that were composed of ECM fungal DNA from spruce and beech plantation fungal communities. The results were in concordance with the ITS sequencing of morphotypes and the ITS clone library sequencing results that were obtained using the same PCR products. Conclusion For the first time, we developed a custom phylochip that is specific for several ectomycorrhizal fungi. To overcome cross-hybridisation problems, specific filter and evaluation strategies that used spot

  9. RIKEN Integrated Sequence Analysis (RISA) System—384-Format Sequencing Pipeline with 384 Multicapillary Sequencer

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Sasaki, Nobuya; Carninci, Piero; Konno, Hideaki; AKIYAMA, Junichi; Nishi, Katsuo; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Tashiro, Hideo; Itoh, Mari; Sumi, Noriko; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Shin

    2000-01-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto seque...

  10. A New Achiral Linker Reagent for the Incorporation of Multiple Amino Groups Into Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new functionalized achiral linker reagent for incorporating multiple primary amino groups or reporter groups into oligonucleotides following the phosphoramidite methodology. It is possible to substitute any ribodeoxynucleotide, deoxynucleotide, or nucleotide wit......, to a method for preparing a labelled oligonucleotide, and to the use of the labelled oligonucleotide as hybridisation probe, in polymerase chain reactions (PCR), in nucleic acid sequencing, in cloning recombinant DNA and $i(in vitro) mutagenesis....

  11. Sequence specificity is obtained from the majority of modular C2H2 zinc-finger arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kathy N; van Bakel, Harm; Cote, Atina G; van der Ven, Anton; Hughes, Timothy R

    2011-06-01

    C2H2 zinc fingers (C2H2-ZFs) are the most prevalent type of vertebrate DNA-binding domain, and typically appear in tandem arrays (ZFAs), with sequential C2H2-ZFs each contacting three (or more) sequential bases. C2H2-ZFs can be assembled in a modular fashion, providing one explanation for their remarkable evolutionary success. Given a set of modules with defined three-base specificities, modular assembly also presents a way to construct artificial proteins with specific DNA-binding preferences. However, a recent survey of a large number of three-finger ZFAs engineered by modular assembly reported high failure rates (∼70%), casting doubt on the generality of modular assembly. Here, we used protein-binding microarrays to analyze 28 ZFAs that failed in the aforementioned study. Most (17) preferred specific sequences, which in all but one case resembled the intended target sequence. Like natural ZFAs, the engineered ZFAs typically yielded degenerate motifs, binding dozens to hundreds of related individual sequences. Thus, the failure of these proteins in previous assays is not due to lack of sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Our findings underscore the relevance of individual C2H2-ZF sequence specificities within tandem arrays, and support the general ability of modular assembly to produce ZFAs with sequence-specific DNA-binding activity.

  12. Data-flow Analysis of Programs with Associative Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hauzar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic programming languages, such as PHP, JavaScript, and Python, provide built-in data structures including associative arrays and objects with similar semantics—object properties can be created at run-time and accessed via arbitrary expressions. While a high level of security and safety of applications written in these languages can be of a particular importance (consider a web application storing sensitive data and providing its functionality worldwide, dynamic data structures pose significant challenges for data-flow analysis making traditional static verification methods both unsound and imprecise. In this paper, we propose a sound and precise approach for value and points-to analysis of programs with associative arrays-like data structures, upon which data-flow analyses can be built. We implemented our approach in a web-application domain—in an analyzer of PHP code.

  13. Dual-Polarized Planar Phased Array Analysis for Meteorological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis for the accuracy requirements of the planar polarimetric phased array radar (PPPAR in meteorological applications. Among many factors that contribute to the polarimetric biases, four factors are considered and analyzed in this study, namely, the polarization distortion due to the intrinsic limitation of a dual-polarized antenna element, the antenna pattern measurement error, the entire array patterns, and the imperfect horizontal and vertical channels. Two operation modes, the alternately transmitting and simultaneously receiving (ATSR mode and the simultaneously transmitting and simultaneously receiving (STSR mode, are discussed. For each mode, the polarimetric biases are formulated. As the STSR mode with orthogonal waveforms is similar to the ATSR mode, the analysis is mainly focused on the ATSR mode and the impacts of the bias sources on the measurement of polarimetric variables are investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. Some insights of the accuracy requirements are obtained and summarized.

  14. Advanced spectral analysis of ionospheric waves observed with sparse arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Intema, H. T.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a case study from a single, 6h observing period to illustrate the application of techniques developed for interferometric radio telescopes to the spectral analysis of observations of ionospheric fluctuations with sparse arrays. We have adapted the deconvolution methods used for making high dynamic range images of cosmic sources with radio arrays to making comparably high dynamic range maps of spectral power of wavelike ionospheric phenomena. In the example presented here, we have used observations of the total electron content (TEC) gradient derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of synchrotron emission from two galaxy clusters at 330MHz as well as GPS-based TEC measurements from a sparse array of 33 receivers located within New Mexico near the VLA. We show that these techniques provide a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of detected wavelike structures by correcting for both measurement inaccuracies and wavefront distortions. This is especially true for the GPS data when combining all available satellite/receiver pairs, which probe a larger physical area and likely have a wider variety of measurement errors than in the single-satellite case. In this instance, we found that the peak S/N of the detected waves was improved by more than an order of magnitude. The data products generated by the deconvolution procedure also allow for a reconstruction of the fluctuations as a two-dimensional waveform/phase screen that can be used to correct for their effects.

  15. Single cell array impedance analysis in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinagac, Emre; Taskin, Selen; Kizil, Huseyin

    2016-10-01

    Impedance analysis of single cells is presented in this paper. Following the separation of a target cell type by dielectrophoresis in our previous work, this paper focuses on capturing the cells as a single array and performing impedance analysis to point out the signature difference between each cell type. Lab-on-a-chip devices having a titanium interdigitated electrode layer on a glass substrate and a PDMS microchannel are fabricated to capture each cell in a single form and perform impedance analysis. HCT116 (homosapiens colon colorectal carcin) and HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells are used in our experiments.

  16. Recovery and evolutionary analysis of complete integron gene cassette arrays from Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillings Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrons are genetic elements capable of the acquisition, rearrangement and expression of genes contained in gene cassettes. Gene cassettes generally consist of a promoterless gene associated with a recombination site known as a 59-base element (59-be. Multiple insertion events can lead to the assembly of large integron-associated cassette arrays. The most striking examples are found in Vibrio, where such cassette arrays are widespread and can range from 30 kb to 150 kb. Besides those found in completely sequenced genomes, no such array has yet been recovered in its entirety. We describe an approach to systematically isolate, sequence and annotate large integron gene cassette arrays from bacterial strains. Results The complete Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron cassette array was determined through the streamlined approach described here. To place it in an evolutionary context, we compare the DAT722 array to known vibrio arrays and performed phylogenetic analyses for all of its components (integrase, 59-be sites, gene cassette encoded genes. It differs extensively in terms of genomic context as well as gene cassette content and organization. The phylogenetic tree of the 59-be sites collectively found in the Vibrio gene cassette pool suggests frequent transfer of cassettes within and between Vibrio species, with slower transfer rates between more phylogenetically distant relatives. We also identify multiple cases where non-integron chromosomal genes seem to have been assembled into gene cassettes and others where cassettes have been inserted into chromosomal locations outside integrons. Conclusion Our systematic approach greatly facilitates the isolation and annotation of large integrons gene cassette arrays. Comparative analysis of the Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron obtained through this approach to those found in other vibrios confirms the role of this genetic element in promoting lateral gene transfer and suggests a high rate of gene

  17. Improvements in analysis techniques for segmented mirror arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Gregory J.; Genberg, Victor L.; Bisson, Gary R.

    2016-08-01

    The employment of actively controlled segmented mirror architectures has become increasingly common in the development of current astronomical telescopes. Optomechanical analysis of such hardware presents unique issues compared to that of monolithic mirror designs. The work presented here is a review of current capabilities and improvements in the methodology of the analysis of mechanically induced surface deformation of such systems. The recent improvements include capability to differentiate surface deformation at the array and segment level. This differentiation allowing surface deformation analysis at each individual segment level offers useful insight into the mechanical behavior of the segments that is unavailable by analysis solely at the parent array level. In addition, capability to characterize the full displacement vector deformation of collections of points allows analysis of mechanical disturbance predictions of assembly interfaces relative to other assembly interfaces. This capability, called racking analysis, allows engineers to develop designs for segment-to-segment phasing performance in assembly integration, 0g release, and thermal stability of operation. The performance predicted by racking has the advantage of being comparable to the measurements used in assembly of hardware. Approaches to all of the above issues are presented and demonstrated by example with SigFit, a commercially available tool integrating mechanical analysis with optical analysis.

  18. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streelman J Todd

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may contribute to the adaptive evolution of gene expression, but functional alleles in these regions are difficult to identify without abundant genomic resources. Among African cichlid fishes, the differential expression of seven opsin genes has produced adaptive differences in visual sensitivity. Quantitative genetic analysis suggests that cis-regulatory alleles near the SWS2-LWS opsins may contribute to this variation. Here, we sequence BACs containing the opsin genes of two cichlids, Oreochromis niloticus and Metriaclima zebra. We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory sequences that influence cichlid opsin expression. Results We identified 20 conserved non-coding elements surrounding the opsins of cichlids and other teleosts, including one known enhancer and a retinal microRNA. Most conserved elements contained computationally-predicted binding sites that correspond to transcription factors that function in vertebrate opsin expression; O. niloticus and M. zebra were significantly divergent in two of these. Similarly, we found a large number of relevant transcription factor binding sites within each opsin's proximal promoter, and identified five opsins that were considerably divergent in both expression and the number of transcription factor binding sites shared between O. niloticus and M. zebra. We also found several microRNA target sites within the 3'-UTR of each opsin, including two 3'-UTRs that differ significantly between O. niloticus and M. zebra. Finally, we examined interspecific divergence among 18 phenotypically diverse cichlids from Lake Malawi for one conserved non-coding element, two 3'-UTRs, and five opsin proximal promoters. We found that all regions were highly conserved with some evidence of CRX transcription

  19. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  20. Determination of optimal sites of antisense oligonucleotide cleavage within TNFα mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. H.; Giles, R. V.; Spiller, D. G.; Grzybowski, J.; Tidd, D. M.; Sibson, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides provide a powerful tool in order to determine the consequences of the reduced expression of a selected target gene and may include target validation and therapeutic applications. Methods of predicting optimum antisense sites are not always effective. We have compared the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides, which were selected in vitro using random combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries of differing length and complexity, upon putative target sites within TNFα mRNA. The relationship of specific target site accessibility and oligonucleotide efficacy with respect to these parameters proved to be complex. Modification of the length of the recognition sequence of the oligonucleotide library illustrated that independent target sites demonstrated a preference for antisense oligonucleotides of a defined and independent optimal length. The efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide sequences selected in vitro paralleled that observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated U937 cells. The application of methylphosphonate:phosphodiester chimaeric oligonucleotides to U937 cells reduced mRNA levels to up to 19.8% that of the untreated cell population. This approach provides a predictive means to profile any mRNA of known sequence with respect to the identification and optimisation of sites accessible to antisense oligonucleotide activity. PMID:11522838

  1. Optimized in situ construction of oligomers on an array surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C.; Albeanu, Dinu F.; Corbett, Julia F.; Handley, Heather; Henson, Charlotte; Malik, Pratap

    2002-01-01

    Oligonucleotide arrays are powerful tools to study changes in gene expression for whole genomes. These arrays can be synthesized by adapting photolithographic techniques used in microelectronics. Using this method, oligonucleotides are built base by base directly on the array surface by numerous cycles of photodeprotection and nucleotide addition. In this paper we examine strategies to reduce the number of synthesis cycles required to construct oligonucleotide arrays. By computer modeling oligonucleotide synthesis, we found that the number of required synthesis cycles could be significantly reduced by focusing upon how oligonucleotides are chosen from within genes and upon the order in which nucleotides are deposited on the array. The methods described here could provide a more efficient strategy to produce oligonucleotide arrays. PMID:12384609

  2. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCremonesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of L. helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract.As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones.

  3. Optical Characterization of Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  4. Calculation and analysis of correlation curves between Lanzhou Seismic Array sites and assessment of primary array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝春月; 郑重; 周公威

    2003-01-01

    By using the waveform data recorded during the site survey of Lanzhou Seismic Array, the author calculated andanalyzed the correlation of the signal and noise between the site pairs and found that the ideal radii of the twoconcentric rings for Lanzhou Seismic Array were 380 m and 1500 m, respectively. According to the radius limitand other requirements, nine sites were chosen to make a seismic array, and then the detection and location abilityof the array were estimated.

  5. Analysis and design of low profile multiband multifunctional antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsicker, Walker F.

    Light-weight phased array antennas for aerospace and mobile applications require utilizing the same antenna aperture to provide multiple functions with dissimilar radiation pattern specifications (e.g., multiband operation for communications and tracking). Multi-functional antennas provide advantages over aggregate antenna clusters by reducing space requirements, and can aid in the optimal placement of all required apertures to provide adequate isolation between channels. Furthermore, the combination of antenna apertures into a common geometry mitigates co-site installation issues by addressing interference within the integrated radiator design itself as opposed to the extensive analysis which is required to configure multiple radiators in close proximity. The combination of multiple radiators into a single aperture can only be achieved with the proper selection of antenna topology and accompanying feed network design. This research proposes a new technique for the design of multiband arrays in which a common aperture is used. Highlighted by this method is the integration of a tri-band array comprised of an X-band (12 GHz) microstrip patch array on a superstrate above printed dual-band (1 and 2 GHz) slot loop antenna arrays in an octave-spaced lattice. The selection of a ground backing reflector is considered for improved gain and system packaging, but restricts the utility of the design principally due to the lambda/4 depth of the ground plane. Therefore, a novel multiband high impedance surfaces (HIS) is proposed to load the slot apertures for reduced height. The novel techniques proposed here will enable the design of a low profile and conformal single aperture supporting multi-band and multi-functional operations.

  6. ESTPiper – a web-based analysis pipeline for expressed sequence tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zuojian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EST sequencing projects are increasing in scale and scope as the genome sequencing technologies migrate from core sequencing centers to individual research laboratories. Effectively, generating EST data is no longer a bottleneck for investigators. However, processing large amounts of EST data remains a non-trivial challenge for many. Web-based EST analysis tools are proving to be the most convenient option for biologists when performing their analysis, so these tools must continuously improve on their utility to keep in step with the growing needs of research communities. We have developed a web-based EST analysis pipeline called ESTPiper, which streamlines typical large-scale EST analysis components. Results The intuitive web interface guides users through each step of base calling, data cleaning, assembly, genome alignment, annotation, analysis of gene ontology (GO, and microarray oligonucleotide probe design. Each step is modularized. Therefore, a user can execute them separately or together in batch mode. In addition, the user has control over the parameters used by the underlying programs. Extensive documentation of ESTPiper's functionality is embedded throughout the web site to facilitate understanding of the required input and interpretation of the computational results. The user can also download intermediate results and port files to separate programs for further analysis. In addition, our server provides a time-stamped description of the run history for reproducibility. The pipeline can also be installed locally, allowing researchers to modify ESTPiper to suit their own needs. Conclusion ESTPiper streamlines the typical process of EST analysis. The pipeline was initially designed in part to support the Daphnia pulex cDNA sequencing project. A web server hosting ESTPiper is provided at http://estpiper.cgb.indiana.edu/ to now support projects of all size. The software is also freely available from the authors for

  7. Spectral Analysis of Broadband Seismic Array Data, Tien Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshy, S.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    We used a spectral analysis method to examine amplitude variations of body waves recorded in the Tien Shan region of central Asia. We used broadband data from the Kyrgyz Network (KNET), Kazakhstan Network (KZNET), and from a set of temporary, PASSCAL stations operated from 1997-2000 we refer to as the Ghengis array. A spectral ratio method similar to that used by Wilson and Pavlis (2000) was employed, but with station AAK used as a reference instead of the array median. Spectral ratios were estimated for all teleseismic events and a larger, intermediate depth events from the Hindu-Kush region for all three-components of ground motion and total signal strength on all components. Results are visualized by maps of amplitude for various frequency bands and through the 4-D animation method introduced by Wilson and Pavlis (2000). Data from Hindu-Kush events showed amplitude variations as much as a factor of 100 across the study area with a strong frequency dependence. The largest variations were at the highest frequencies observed near 15 Hz. Stations in the northwestern part of the Tien Shan array show little variation in amplitude relative to the reference station, AAK. In the central and eastern part of the array, the amplitude estimates are significantly smaller at all frequencies. In contrast, for stations in the western Tien Shan near the Talas-Fergana Fault, and the southern Tien Shan near the Tarim Basin, the amplitude values become much larger than the reference site. The teleseismic data show a different pattern and show a somewhat smaller, overall amplitude variation at comparable frequencies. The northern part of the array again shows small variations relative to the reference stations. There are some amplifications in the southern stations of the array, especially in the Tarim Basin. The higher frequency observations that show large amplifications at stations in the Tarim Basin are readily explained by site effects due to the thick deposits of sediments

  8. Investigation of Proposed Process Sequence for the Array Automated Assembly Task, Phase 2. [low cost silicon solar array fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Bunyan, S.; Pepe, A.

    1979-01-01

    The technological readiness of the proposed process sequence was reviewed. Process steps evaluated include: (1) plasma etching to establish a standard surface; (2) forming junctions by diffusion from an N-type polymeric spray-on source; (3) forming a p+ back contact by firing a screen printed aluminum paste; (4) forming screen printed front contacts after cleaning the back aluminum and removing the diffusion oxide; (5) cleaning the junction by a laser scribe operation; (6) forming an antireflection coating by baking a polymeric spray-on film; (7) ultrasonically tin padding the cells; and (8) assembling cell strings into solar circuits using ethylene vinyl acetate as an encapsulant and laminating medium.

  9. Versatile functionalization of nanoelectrodes by oligonucleotides via pyrrole electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Emeline; Nguyen, Khoa; Bouchain-Gautier, Christelle; Filoramo, Arianna; Goux-Capes, Laurence; Goffman, Marcello; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2010-11-15

    Surface modification at the nanometer scale is a challenge for the future of molecular electronics. In particular, the precise anchoring and electrical addressing of biological scaffolds such as complex DNA nanonetworks is of importance for generating bio-directed assemblies of nano-objects for nanocircuit purposes. Herein, we consider the individual modification of nanoelectrodes with different oligonucleotide sequences by an electrochemically driven co-polymerization process of pyrrole and modified oligonucleotide sequences bearing pyrrole monomers. We demonstrate that this one-step technique presents the advantages of simplicity, localization of surface modification, mechanical, biological and chemical stability of the coatings, and high lateral resolution.

  10. Morphology Analysis of Si Island Arrays on Si(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, A.; Alonso, M.; Navarro, E.; Sacedón, J. L.; Ruiz, A.

    2010-12-01

    The formation of nanometer-scale islands is an important issue for bottom-up-based schemes in novel electronic, optoelectronic and magnetoelectronic devices technology. In this work, we present a detailed atomic force microscopy analysis of Si island arrays grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Recent reports have shown that self-assembled distributions of fourfold pyramid-like islands develop in 5-nm thick Si layers grown at substrate temperatures of 650 and 750°C on HF-prepared Si(001) substrates. Looking for wielding control and understanding the phenomena involved in this surface nanostructuring, we develop and apply a formalism that allows for processing large area AFM topographic images in a shot, obtaining surface orientation maps with specific information on facets population. The procedure reveals some noticeable features of these Si island arrays, e.g. a clear anisotropy of the in-plane local slope distributions. Total island volume analysis also indicates mass transport from the substrate surface to the 3D islands, a process presumably related to the presence of trenches around some of the pyramids. Results are discussed within the framework of similar island arrays in homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial semiconductor systems.

  11. The On-Site Analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; De Cesare, Giovanni; De Rosa, Adriano; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Borkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Colomé, Pep; Reyes, Raquel de los; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Gotz, Diego; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Inoue, Susumu; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Flour, Thierry Le; Lindemann, Rico; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Markoff, Sera; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Oya, Igor; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rosen, Simon; Ribo, Marc; Tacchini, Alessandro; Schüssler, Fabian; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Wegner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in part...

  12. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the B

  13. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) in prokaryotic taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Kämpfer, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To obtain a higher resolution of the phylogenetic relationships of species within a genus or genera within a family, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is currently a widely used method. In MLSA studies, partial sequences of genes coding for proteins with conserved functions ('housekeeping genes') are used to generate phylogenetic trees and subsequently deduce phylogenies. However, MLSA is not only suggested as a phylogenetic tool to support and clarify the resolution of bacterial species with a higher resolution, as in 16S rRNA gene-based studies, but has also been discussed as a replacement for DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) in species delineation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MLSA has become an accepted and widely used method in prokaryotic taxonomy, no common generally accepted recommendations have been devised to date for either the whole area of microbial taxonomy or for taxa-specific applications of individual MLSA schemes. The different ways MLSA is performed can vary greatly for the selection of genes, their number, and the calculation method used when comparing the sequences obtained. Here, we provide an overview of the historical development of MLSA and critically review its current application in prokaryotic taxonomy by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the method's numerous variations. This provides a perspective for its future use in forthcoming genome-based genotypic taxonomic analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative analysis of sequences from PT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer

    . All but one sequence mapped to the MCP gene while the last sequence mapped to the Neurofilament gene. Approx. half of the sequences contained no errors while the rest differed with 88-99 percent similarity with most having 99% similarity. One sequence, when BLASTed, showed most similarity to European...... Sheatfish and not EHNV. Generally, mistakes occurred at the ends of the sequences. This can be due to several factors. One is that the sequence has not been trimmed of the sequence primer sites. Another is the lack of quality control of the chromatogram. Finally, sequencing in just one direction can result...

  15. Development and production of an oligonucleotide MuscleChip: use for validation of ambiguous ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the development, validation, and use of a highly redundant 120,000 oligonucleotide microarray (MuscleChip containing 4,601 probe sets representing 1,150 known genes expressed in muscle and 2,075 EST clusters from a non-normalized subtracted muscle EST sequencing project (28,074 EST sequences. This set included 369 novel EST clusters showing no match to previously characterized proteins in any database. Each probe set was designed to contain 20–32 25 mer oligonucleotides (10–16 paired perfect match and mismatch probe pairs per gene, with each probe evaluated for hybridization kinetics (Tm and similarity to other sequences. The 120,000 oligonucleotides were synthesized by photolithography and light-activated chemistry on each microarray. Results Hybridization of human muscle cRNAs to this MuscleChip (33 samples showed a correlation of 0.6 between the number of ESTs sequenced in each cluster and hybridization intensity. Out of 369 novel EST clusters not showing any similarity to previously characterized proteins, we focused on 250 EST clusters that were represented by robust probe sets on the MuscleChip fulfilling all stringent rules. 102 (41% were found to be consistently "present" by analysis of hybridization to human muscle RNA, of which 40 ESTs (39% could be genome anchored to potential transcription units in the human genome sequence. 19 ESTs of the 40 ESTs were furthermore computer-predicted as exons by one or more than three gene identification algorithms. Conclusion Our analysis found 40 transcriptionally validated, genome-anchored novel EST clusters to be expressed in human muscle. As most of these ESTs were low copy clusters (duplex and triplex in the original 28,000 EST project, the identification of these as significantly expressed is a robust validation of the transcript units that permits subsequent focus on the novel proteins encoded by these genes.

  16. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  17. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Lawrence

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU’s Not Unix Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics makes FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format. Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  18. A basic analysis toolkit for biological sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siragusa Enrico

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a software library, nicknamed BATS, for some basic sequence analysis tasks. Namely, local alignments, via approximate string matching, and global alignments, via longest common subsequence and alignments with affine and concave gap cost functions. Moreover, it also supports filtering operations to select strings from a set and establish their statistical significance, via z-score computation. None of the algorithms is new, but although they are generally regarded as fundamental for sequence analysis, they have not been implemented in a single and consistent software package, as we do here. Therefore, our main contribution is to fill this gap between algorithmic theory and practice by providing an extensible and easy to use software library that includes algorithms for the mentioned string matching and alignment problems. The library consists of C/C++ library functions as well as Perl library functions. It can be interfaced with Bioperl and can also be used as a stand-alone system with a GUI. The software is available at http://www.math.unipa.it/~raffaele/BATS/ under the GNU GPL.

  19. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae

    KAUST Repository

    Dippenaar, Anzaan

    2015-10-21

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  20. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  1. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  2. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  3. Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides through metal-induced cyclization of short complementary strands : Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Freville, Fabrice; Richard, Tristan; Bathany, Katell; Moreau, Serge

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A new strategy to cyclize a short synthetic oligonucleotide on a DNA or a RNA target strand is described. This one relies on a metal-mediated cyclization of short synthetic oligonucleotides conjugated with two chelating 2,2':6',2”-terpyridine moieties at their 3' and 5' ends. Cyclization following metal addition (Zn2+, Fe2+) was demonstrated using UV monitored thermal denaturation experiments, mass spectrometry analysis and gel shift assays. NMR experiments were used t...

  4. DNA array analysis in a Microsoft Windows environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, T; Kraus, B; Tucker, D L; Smalley, D J; Dorman, A F; McKibben, L

    2002-01-01

    Microsoft Windows-based computers have evolved to the point that they provide sufficient computational and visualization power for robust analysis of DNA array data. In fact, smaller laboratories might prefer to carry out some or all of their analyses and visualization in a Windows environment, rather than alternative platforms such as UNIX. We have developed a series of manually executed macros written in Visual Basic for Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, that allows for rapid and comprehensive gene expression data analysis. The first macro assigns gene names to spots on the DNA array and normalizes individual hybridizations by expressing the signal intensity for each gene as a percentage of the sum of all gene intensities. The second macro streamlines statistical consideration of the confidence in individual gene measurements for sets of experimental replicates by calculating probability values with the Student's t test. The third macro introduces a threshold value, calculates expression ratios between experimental conditions, and calculates the standard deviation of the mean of the log ratio values. Selected columns of data are copied by a fourth macro to create a processed data set suitable for entry into a Microsoft Access database. An Access database structure is described that allows simple queries across multiple experiments and export of data into third-party data visualization software packages. These analysis tools can be used in their present form by others working with commercial E. coli membrane arrays, or they may be adapted for use with other systems. The Excel spreadsheets with embedded Visual Basic macros and detailed instructions for their use are available at http://www.ou.edu/microarray.

  5. Discovery of common Asian copy number variants using integrated high-resolution array CGH and massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hansoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Ju, Young Seok; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E; Kim, Sheehyun; Lee, Seungbok; Suh, Dongwhan; Hong, Dongwan; Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Yoo, Yun Joo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Yavartanoo, Maryam; Chang, Young Wha; Ha, Jung-Sook; Chong, Wilson; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Darvishi, Katayoon; Kim, Hyeran; Yang, Song Ju; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Hurles, Matthew E; Scherer, Stephen W; Carter, Nigel P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Lee, Charles; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for the majority of human genomic diversity in terms of base coverage. Here, we have developed and applied a new method to combine high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data with whole-genome DNA sequencing data to obtain a comprehensive catalog of common CNVs in Asian individuals. The genomes of 30 individuals from three Asian populations (Korean, Chinese and Japanese) were interrogated with an ultra-high-resolution array CGH platform containing 24 million probes. Whole-genome sequencing data from a reference genome (NA10851, with 28.3x coverage) and two Asian genomes (AK1, with 27.8x coverage and AK2, with 32.0x coverage) were used to transform the relative copy number information obtained from array CGH experiments into absolute copy number values. We discovered 5,177 CNVs, of which 3,547 were putative Asian-specific CNVs. These common CNVs in Asian populations will be a useful resource for subsequent genetic studies in these populations, and the new method of calling absolute CNVs will be essential for applying CNV data to personalized medicine.

  6. The origin of biased sequence depth in sequence-independent nucleic acid amplification and optimization for efficient massive parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toon Rosseel

    Full Text Available Sequence Independent Single Primer Amplification is one of the most widely used random amplification approaches in virology for sequencing template preparation. This technique relies on oligonucleotides consisting of a 3' random part used to prime complementary DNA synthesis and a 5' defined tag sequence for subsequent amplification. Recently, this amplification method was combined with next generation sequencing to obtain viral sequences. However, these studies showed a biased distribution of the resulting sequence reads over the analyzed genomes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms that lead to biased sequence depth when using random amplification. Avian paramyxovirus type 8 was used as a model RNA virus to investigate these mechanisms. We showed, based on in silico analysis of the sequence depth in relation to GC-content, predicted RNA secondary structure and sequence complementarity to the 3' part of the tag sequence, that the tag sequence has the main contribution to the observed bias in sequence depth. We confirmed this finding experimentally using both fragmented and non-fragmented viral RNAs as well as primers differing in random oligomer length (6 or 12 nucleotides and in the sequence of the amplification tag. The observed oligonucleotide annealing bias can be reduced by extending the random oligomer sequence and by in silico combining sequence data from SISPA experiments using different 5' defined tag sequences. These findings contribute to the optimization of random nucleic acid amplification protocols that are currently required for downstream applications such as viral metagenomics and microarray analysis.

  7. A liquid core waveguide fluorescence detector for multicapillary electrophoresis applied to DNA sequencing in a 91-capillary array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, A; Westberg, J; Roeraade, J

    2000-09-01

    A new laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector for multicapillary electrophoresis is presented. The detection principle is based on waveguiding of the emitted fluorescence from the point of illumination to the capillary ends by total internal reflection (TIR) and imaging of the capillary ends. The capillaries themselves thus act as liquid core waveguides (LCWs). At the illumination point, the capillaries are arranged in a planar array, which allows clean and efficient illumination with a line-focused laser beam. The capillary ends are rearranged into a small, densely packed two-dimensional array, which is imaged end-on with high light collection efficiency and excellent image quality. Wavelength dispersion is obtained with a single prism. Intercapillary optical crosstalk is less than 0.5%, and rejection of stray light is very efficient. The detector is applied to four-color DNA sequencing by gel electrophoresis in a 91-capillary array, with simple fluorescein and rhodamine dyes as fluorophores. Since the imaged two-dimensional array is so compact, the detector has a high potential for very large-scale multiplexing.

  8. The proximal chromosome 14q microdeletion syndrome: delineation of the phenotype using high resolution SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis (SOMA) and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgyekes, Edina; Shanske, Alan L; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Nahum, Odelia; Pirzadeh, Sara; Blumfield, Einat; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Warburton, Dorothy; Levy, Brynn

    2011-08-01

    We report on two patients with overlapping small interstitial deletions involving regions 14q12 to 14q13.1. Both children had severe developmental delay, failure to thrive, microcephaly, and distinctive facial features, including abnormal spacing of the eyes, epicanthal folds, sloping forehead, low-set ears, rounded eyebrows with triangular media aspect and outer tapering, depressed and broad nasal bridge, small mouth, a long philtrum, and a prominent Cupid's bow. Brain MRI of both children showed partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. Our first patient had bilateral hypoplastic optic nerves causing blindness, mild hearing impairment, sinus arrhythmia, abnormal temperature regulation, frequent apneic episodes, myoclonic jerks, and opisthotonus. Our second patient had a seizure disorder confirmed by EEG, sleep apnea, chronic interstitial lung disease, and several episodes of pneumonia and gastroenteritis. Cytogenetic analysis showed a normal karyotype in Patient 1 and a unique apparently balanced three-way translocation in Patient 2 involving chromosomes 4, 14, and 11. High resolution SNP Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis (SOMA) revealed a deletion in the proximal region of chromosome 14q overlapping with the deletion of our first patient, and no copy number changes in chromosomes 4 and 11. Here, we review and compare published cases with a deletion involving the 14q12-22.1 chromosomal region in an effort to correlate phenotype and genotype. We also examine the underlying genomic architecture to identify the possible mechanism of the chromosomal abnormality. Our review found a patient with a mirror duplication of our first patient's deletion, confirming the existence of an underlying genomic structural instability in the region. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Multilocus sequence analysis of the family Halomonadaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Márquez, M Carmen; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) protocols have been developed for species circumscription for many taxa. However, at present, no studies based on MLSA have been performed within any moderately halophilic bacterial group. To test the usefulness of MLSA with these kinds of micro-organisms, the family Halomonadaceae, which includes mainly halophilic bacteria, was chosen as a model. This family comprises ten genera with validly published names and 85 species of environmental, biotechnological and clinical interest. In some cases, the phylogenetic relationships between members of this family, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, are not clear and a deep phylogenetic analysis using several housekeeping genes seemed appropriate. Here, MLSA was applied using the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, atpA, gyrB, rpoD and secA genes for species of the family Halomonadaceae. Phylogenetic trees based on the individual and concatenated gene sequences revealed that the family Halomonadaceae formed a monophyletic group of micro-organisms within the order Oceanospirillales. With the exception of the genera Halomonas and Modicisalibacter, all other genera within this family were phylogenetically coherent. Five of the six studied genes (16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and secA) showed a consistent evolutionary history. However, the results obtained with the atpA gene were different; thus, this gene may not be considered useful as an individual gene phylogenetic marker within this family. The phylogenetic methods produced variable results, with those generated from the maximum-likelihood and neighbour-joining algorithms being more similar than those obtained by maximum-parsimony methods. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays an important evolutionary role in the family Halomonadaceae; however, the impact of recombination events in the phylogenetic analysis was minimized by concatenating the six loci, which agreed with the current taxonomic scheme for this family. Finally, the findings of

  10. Pulsar Timing Array Analysis for Black Hole Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil J

    2013-01-01

    An astrophysical population of supermassive black hole binaries is thought to be the strongest source of gravitational waves in the frequency range covered by Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs). A potential cause for concern is that the standard cross-correlation method used in PTA data analysis assumes that the signals are isotropically distributed and Gaussian random, while the signals from a black hole population are likely to be anisotropic and deterministic. Here we argue that while the conventional analysis is not optimal, it is not hopeless either, as the standard Hellings-Downs correlation curve turns out to hold for point sources, and the small effective number of signal samples blurs the distinction between Gaussian and deterministic signals. Possible improvements to the standard cross-correlation analysis that account for the anisotropy of the signal are discussed.

  11. Three microarray platforms: an analysis of their concordance in profiling gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen David

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays for the analysis of gene expression are of three different types: short oligonucleotide (25–30 base, long oligonucleotide (50–80 base, and cDNA (highly variable in length. The short oligonucleotide and cDNA arrays have been the mainstay of expression analysis to date, but long oligonucleotide platforms are gaining in popularity and will probably replace cDNA arrays. As part of a validation study for the long oligonucleotide arrays, we compared and contrasted expression profiles from the three formats, testing RNA from six different cell lines against a universal reference standard. Results The three platforms had 6430 genes in common. In general, correlation of gene expression levels across the platforms was good when defined by concordance in the direction of expression difference (upregulation or downregulation, scatter plot analysis, principal component analysis, cell line correlation or quantitative RT-PCR. The overall correlations (r values between platforms were in the range 0.7 to 0.8, as determined by analysis of scatter plots. When concordance was measured for expression ratios significant at p-values of Conclusion Our results indicate that the long oligonucleotide platform is highly suitable for expression analysis and compares favorably with the cDNA and short oligonucleotide varieties. All three platforms can give similar and reproducible results if the criterion is the direction of change in gene expression and minimal emphasis is placed on the magnitude of change.

  12. Heteroduplex analysis by capillary array electrophoresis for rapid mutation detection in large multiexon genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Eladio; Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Pérez-Cabornero, Lucía; Sanz, David J; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Miner, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Heteroduplex analysis (HA) has proven to be a robust tool for mutation detection. HA by capillary array electrophoresis (HA-CAE) was developed to increase throughput and allow the scanning of large multiexon genes in multicapillary DNA sequencers. HA-CAE is a straightforward and high-throughput technique to detect both known and novel DNA variants with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. It consists of only three steps: multiplex-PCR using fluorescently labeled primers, heteroduplex formation and electrophoresis in a multicapillary DNA sequencer. It allows, e.g., the complete coding and flanking intronic sequences of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes from two patients (approximately 25 kb each) to be scanned in a single run of a 16-capillary sequencer, and has enabled us to detect 150 different mutations to date (both single nucleotide substitutions, or SNSs, and small insertions/deletions). Here, we describe the protocol developed in our laboratory to scan BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes using an ABI3130XL sequencer. This protocol could be adapted to other instruments or to the study of other large multiexon genes and can be completed in 7-8 h.

  13. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  14. Photolithographic Synthesis of High-Density DNA and RNA Arrays on Flexible, Transparent, and Easily Subdivided Plastic Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Matthew T; Carter, Matthew C D; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Wolfer, Jamison; Codner, Eric; Sussman, Michael R; Lynn, David M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2015-11-17

    The photolithographic fabrication of high-density DNA and RNA arrays on flexible and transparent plastic substrates is reported. The substrates are thin sheets of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) coated with cross-linked polymer multilayers that present hydroxyl groups suitable for conventional phosphoramidite-based nucleic acid synthesis. We demonstrate that by modifying array synthesis procedures to accommodate the physical and chemical properties of these materials, it is possible to synthesize plastic-backed oligonucleotide arrays with feature sizes as small as 14 μm × 14 μm and feature densities in excess of 125 000/cm(2), similar to specifications attainable using rigid substrates such as glass or glassy carbon. These plastic-backed arrays are tolerant to a wide range of hybridization temperatures, and improved synthetic procedures are described that enable the fabrication of arrays with sequences up to 50 nucleotides in length. These arrays hybridize with S/N ratios comparable to those fabricated on otherwise identical arrays prepared on glass or glassy carbon. This platform supports the enzymatic synthesis of RNA arrays and proof-of-concept experiments are presented showing that the arrays can be readily subdivided into smaller arrays (or "millichips") using common laboratory-scale laser cutting tools. These results expand the utility of oligonucleotide arrays fabricated on plastic substrates and open the door to new applications for these important bioanalytical tools.

  15. Evaluation of a dedicated dual phased-array surface coil using a black-blood FSE sequence for high resolution MRI of the carotid vessel wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ouhlous (Mohamed); F. Lethimonnier; D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (Marc); L.C.J. van Heerebeek (Lambertus C.); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the carotid vessel wall using a phased-array coil and a black-blood (BB) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. Materials and Methods: The phased-array coil was compared with a three-inch coil. Images from volun

  16. SVAMP: Sequence variation analysis, maps and phylogeny

    KAUST Repository

    Naeem, Raeece

    2014-04-03

    Summary: SVAMP is a stand-alone desktop application to visualize genomic variants (in variant call format) in the context of geographical metadata. Users of SVAMP are able to generate phylogenetic trees and perform principal coordinate analysis in real time from variant call format (VCF) and associated metadata files. Allele frequency map, geographical map of isolates, Tajima\\'s D metric, single nucleotide polymorphism density, GC and variation density are also available for visualization in real time. We demonstrate the utility of SVAMP in tracking a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak from published next-generation sequencing data across 15 countries. We also demonstrate the scalability and accuracy of our software on 245 Plasmodium falciparum malaria isolates from three continents. Availability and implementation: The Qt/C++ software code, binaries, user manual and example datasets are available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/svamp. © The Author 2014.

  17. Statistical analysis of next generation sequencing data

    CERN Document Server

    Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the latest high throughput technology to revolutionize genomic research. NGS generates massive genomic datasets that play a key role in the big data phenomenon that surrounds us today. To extract signals from high-dimensional NGS data and make valid statistical inferences and predictions, novel data analytic and statistical techniques are needed. This book contains 20 chapters written by prominent statisticians working with NGS data. The topics range from basic preprocessing and analysis with NGS data to more complex genomic applications such as copy number variation and isoform expression detection. Research statisticians who want to learn about this growing and exciting area will find this book useful. In addition, many chapters from this book could be included in graduate-level classes in statistical bioinformatics for training future biostatisticians who will be expected to deal with genomic data in basic biomedical research, genomic clinical trials and personalized med...

  18. Time fluctuation analysis of forest fire sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Orozco, Carmen D.; Kanevski, Mikhaïl; Tonini, Marj; Golay, Jean; Pereira, Mário J. G.

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are complex events involving both space and time fluctuations. Understanding of their dynamics and pattern distribution is of great importance in order to improve the resource allocation and support fire management actions at local and global levels. This study aims at characterizing the temporal fluctuations of forest fire sequences observed in Portugal, which is the country that holds the largest wildfire land dataset in Europe. This research applies several exploratory data analysis measures to 302,000 forest fires occurred from 1980 to 2007. The applied clustering measures are: Morisita clustering index, fractal and multifractal dimensions (box-counting), Ripley's K-function, Allan Factor, and variography. These algorithms enable a global time structural analysis describing the degree of clustering of a point pattern and defining whether the observed events occur randomly, in clusters or in a regular pattern. The considered methods are of general importance and can be used for other spatio-temporal events (i.e. crime, epidemiology, biodiversity, geomarketing, etc.). An important contribution of this research deals with the analysis and estimation of local measures of clustering that helps understanding their temporal structure. Each measure is described and executed for the raw data (forest fires geo-database) and results are compared to reference patterns generated under the null hypothesis of randomness (Poisson processes) embedded in the same time period of the raw data. This comparison enables estimating the degree of the deviation of the real data from a Poisson process. Generalizations to functional measures of these clustering methods, taking into account the phenomena, were also applied and adapted to detect time dependences in a measured variable (i.e. burned area). The time clustering of the raw data is compared several times with the Poisson processes at different thresholds of the measured function. Then, the clustering measure value

  19. Comparison of fungi within the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex by analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, G T; Daniels, M J; Osbourn, A E

    1995-02-01

    Four ascomycete species of the genus Gaeumannomyces infect roots of monocotyledons. Gaeumannomyces graminis contains four varieties, var. tritici, var. avenae, var. graminis, and var. maydis. G. graminis varieties tritici, avenae, and graminis have Phialophora-like anamorphs and, together with the other Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora species found on cereal roots, constitute the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. Relatedness of a number of Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora isolates was assessed by comparison of DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene, the 5.8S rRNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS). G. graminis var. tritici, G. graminis var. avenae, and G. graminis var. graminis isolates can be distinguished from each other by nucleotide sequence differences in the ITS regions. The G. graminis var. tritici isolates can be further subdivided into R and N isolates (correlating with ability [R] or inability [N] to infect rye). Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS regions of several oat-infecting G. graminis var. tritici isolates suggests that these isolates are actually more closely related to G. graminis var. avenae. The isolates of Magnaporthe grisea included in the analysis showed a surprising degree of relatedness to members of the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. G. graminis variety-specific oligonucleotide primers were used in PCRs to amplify DNA from cereal seedlings infected with G. graminis var. tritici or G. graminis var. avenae, and these should be valuable for sensitive detection of pathogenic isolates and for diagnosis of take-all.

  20. Movement Pattern Analysis Based on Sequence Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Chavoshi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased affordability and deployment of advanced tracking technologies have led researchers from various domains to analyze the resulting spatio-temporal movement data sets for the purpose of knowledge discovery. Two different approaches can be considered in the analysis of moving objects: quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. This research focuses on the latter and uses the qualitative trajectory calculus (QTC, a type of calculus that represents qualitative data on moving point objects (MPOs, and establishes a framework to analyze the relative movement of multiple MPOs. A visualization technique called sequence signature (SESI is used, which enables to map QTC patterns in a 2D indexed rasterized space in order to evaluate the similarity of relative movement patterns of multiple MPOs. The applicability of the proposed methodology is illustrated by means of two practical examples of interacting MPOs: cars on a highway and body parts of a samba dancer. The results show that the proposed method can be effectively used to analyze interactions of multiple MPOs in different domains.

  1. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  2. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Love

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  3. Electrochemical genosensor array for the simultaneous detection of multiple high-risk human papillomavirus sequences in clinical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civit, Laia [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Fragoso, Alex, E-mail: alex.fragoso@urv.cat [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Hoelters, Sebastian; Duerst, Matthias [Department for Gynecology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); O' Sullivan, Ciara K., E-mail: ciara.osullivan@urv.cat [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-risk human papillomavirus is detected in virtually all-invasive cervical cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrochemical genosensor for simultaneous detection of multiple high-risk HPV applied to cervical scrape samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent correlation with HPV genotyping carried out within a hospital laboratory. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor array for the simultaneous detection of three high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences, HPV16, 18 and 45, exhibiting high sensitivity and selectivity is presented. The electrodes of a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 array were modified via co-immobilization of a 1:100 (mol/mol) mixture of a thiolated probe and an oligoethyleneglycol-terminated bipodal thiol. Detection of synthetic and PCR products was carried out in a sandwich type format, with the target hybridized between a surface immobilized probe and a horseradish peroxidase-labelled secondary reporter probe. The detection limits obtained in the detection of each individual target were in the pM range, allowing the application of this sensor for the detection of samples obtained from PCR amplification of cervical scrape samples. The results obtained exhibited an excellent correlation with the HPV genotyping carried out within a hospital laboratory. Multiplexing and cross-reactivity studies demonstrated high selectivity over potential interfering sequences, facilitating application of the developed platform for the high-throughput screening of multiple high-risk DNA sequences.

  4. Tracking of intercalary DNA sequences integrated into tandem repeat arrays in rye Secale vavilovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Achrem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of repetitive sequences of the JNK block present in the pericentromeric region of the 2RL chromosome was studied in Secale vavilovii. Amplification of sequences present between the JNK sequences led to the identification of seven abnormal DNA fragments. Two of these fragments showed high similarity to the glutamate 5-kinase gene and putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of trypanosomatid from the genus Leishmania, whose presence can be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Other fragments were similar to mitochondrial gene for ribosomal protein S4 in plants and to the glycoprotein (G gene of the IHNV virus. Presumably, they are pseudogenes inserted into the JNK heterochromatin region. Within this region, also fragments similar to the rye repetitive sequence and chromosome 3B in wheat were found. There is no known mechanism that would explain how foreign sequences were inserted into the block region of tandem repetitive sequences of the JNK family.

  5. Assessment of low-cost manufacturing process sequences. [photovoltaic solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    An extensive research and development activity to reduce the cost of manufacturing photovoltaic solar arrays by a factor of approximately one hundred is discussed. Proposed and actual manufacturing process descriptions were compared to manufacturing costs. An overview of this methodology is presented.

  6. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schweitzer, Anthony C; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D; Moldawer, Lyle L; Maier, Ronald V; Tompkins, Ronald G; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2011-03-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays.

  7. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  8. Prevention of hyperglycemia in Zucker diabetic fatty rats by exercise training: effects on gene expression in insulin-sensitive tissues determined by high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Michele; Gregersen, Soeren; Kruhoeffer, Mogens;

    2005-01-01

    , blood samples, soleus muscle, liver, visceral fat (epididymal fat pads), and islet tissue were collected. Gene expression was quantified with Affymetrix RG-U34A array (16 chips). Exercise training ameliorates the development of hyperglycemia and reduces plasma free fatty acid and the level of glucagon......, and pancreatic islets after ET in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Eighteen ZDF rats (7 weeks old) were divided in a control and ET group. Exercise was performed using a motorized treadmill (20 m/min 1 hour daily for 6 days a week). Blood glucose, weight, and food intake were measured weekly. After 5 weeks...... as genes with unknown functions (expressed sequence tags). In the liver, expression of 148 genes increased, whereas that of 199 genes decreased. These were primarily genes involved in lipogenesis and detoxification. Genes coding for transcription factors were changed in parallel in skeletal muscle...

  9. Efficient assembly of very short oligonucleotides using T4 DNA Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Robert A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In principle, a pre-constructed library of all possible short oligonucleotides could be used to construct many distinct gene sequences. In order to assess the feasibility of such an approach, we characterized T4 DNA Ligase activity on short oligonucleotide substrates and defined conditions suitable for assembly of a plurality of oligonucleotides. Findings Ligation by T4 DNA Ligase was found to be dependent on the formation of a double stranded DNA duplex of at least five base pairs surrounding the site of ligation. However, ligations could be performed effectively with overhangs smaller than five base pairs and oligonucleotides as small as octamers, in the presence of a second, complementary oligonucleotide. We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous oligonucleotide phosphorylation and ligation and, as a proof of principle for DNA synthesis through the assembly of short oligonucleotides, we performed a hierarchical ligation procedure whereby octamers were combined to construct a target 128-bp segment of the beta-actin gene. Conclusions Oligonucleotides as short as 8 nucleotides can be efficiently assembled using T4 DNA Ligase. Thus, the construction of synthetic genes, without the need for custom oligonucleotide synthesis, appears feasible.

  10. Analysis of the modal behavior of an antiguide diode laser array with Talbot filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van Pieter D.; Reglat, Muriel; Vassilief, Georges; Krijnen, Gijs J.M.; Driessen, Alfred; Mouthaan, Anton J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the filtering of the array modes in a resonant optical waveguide (ROW) array of antiguides by a diffractive spatial filter (a Talbot filter) is presented. A dispersion relation is derived for the array modes, allowing the calculation of the field distribution. The filtering is analyze

  11. Schlieren sequence analysis using computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathanial Timothy

    Computer vision-based methods are proposed for extraction and measurement of flow structures of interest in schlieren video. As schlieren data has increased with faster frame rates, we are faced with thousands of images to analyze. This presents an opportunity to study global flow structures over time that may not be evident from surface measurements. A degree of automation is desirable to extract flow structures and features to give information on their behavior through the sequence. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the analysis of large schlieren data is recast as a computer vision problem. The double-cone schlieren sequence is used as a testbed for the methodology; it is unique in that it contains 5,000 images, complex phenomena, and is feature rich. Oblique structures such as shock waves and shear layers are common in schlieren images. A vision-based methodology is used to provide an estimate of oblique structure angles through the unsteady sequence. The methodology has been applied to a complex flowfield with multiple shocks. A converged detection success rate between 94% and 97% for these structures is obtained. The modified curvature scale space is used to define features at salient points on shock contours. A challenge in developing methods for feature extraction in schlieren images is the reconciliation of existing techniques with features of interest to an aerodynamicist. Domain-specific knowledge of physics must therefore be incorporated into the definition and detection phases. Known location and physically possible structure representations form a knowledge base that provides a unique feature definition and extraction. Model tip location and the motion of a shock intersection across several thousand frames are identified, localized, and tracked. Images are parsed into physically meaningful labels using segmentation. Using this representation, it is shown that in the double-cone flowfield, the dominant unsteady motion is associated with large scale

  12. De novo Transcriptome Sequencing and Development of Abscission Zone-Specific Microarray as a New Molecular Tool for Analysis of Tomato Organ Abscission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Riov, Joseph; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Kuravadi, Nagesh A.; Kochanek, Bettina; Salim, Shoshana; Tucker, Mark L.; Meir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Abscission of flower pedicels and leaf petioles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can be induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, respectively, which leads to auxin depletion, resulting in increased sensitivity of the abscission zone (AZ) to ethylene. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the acquisition of abscission competence and its modulation by auxin gradients are not yet known. We used RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome of tomato flower AZ (FAZ) and leaf AZ (LAZ) during abscission. RNA-Seq was performed on a pool of total RNA extracted from tomato FAZ and LAZ, at different abscission stages, followed by de novo assembly. The assembled clusters contained transcripts that are already known in the Solanaceae (SOL) genomics and NCBI databases, and over 8823 identified novel tomato transcripts of varying sizes. An AZ-specific microarray, encompassing the novel transcripts identified in this study and all known transcripts from the SOL genomics and NCBI databases, was constructed to study the abscission process. Multiple probes for longer genes and key AZ-specific genes, including antisense probes for all transcripts, make this array a unique tool for studying abscission with a comprehensive set of transcripts, and for mining for naturally occurring antisense transcripts. We focused on comparing the global transcriptomes generated from the FAZ and the LAZ to establish the divergences and similarities in their transcriptional networks, and particularly to characterize the processes and transcriptional regulators enriched in gene clusters that are differentially regulated in these two AZs. This study is the first attempt to analyze the global gene expression in different AZs in tomato by combining the RNA-Seq technique with oligonucleotide microarrays. Our AZ-specific microarray chip provides a cost-effective approach for expression profiling and robust analysis of multiple samples in a rapid succession. PMID:26834766

  13. De novo transcriptome sequencing and development of abscission zone-specific microarray as a new molecular tool for analysis of tomato organ abscission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivignesh eSundaresan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscission of flower pedicels and leaf petioles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum can be induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, respectively, leading to auxin depletion, which results in increased sensitivity of the abscission zone (AZ to ethylene. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the acquisition of abscission competence and its modulation by auxin gradients are not yet known. We used RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq to obtain the comprehensive transcriptome of tomato flower AZ (FAZ and leaf AZ (LAZ during abscission. RNA-Seq was performed on a pool of total RNA extracted from different abscission stages of tomato FAZ and LAZ, followed by de novo assembly. The assembled clusters contained transcripts that are already known in Solanaceae (SOL genomics database and NCBI databases, and over 8,823 identified novel tomato transcripts of varying sizes. An AZ-specific microarray, encompassing these novel transcripts identified in this study and all known transcripts from the SOL genomics and NCBI databases, was constructed to study the abscission process. Multiple probes for longer genes and key AZ-specific genes, including antisense probes for all transcripts, make this array a unique tool for studying abscission with a comprehensive set of transcripts, and for mining for naturally occurring antisense transcripts. We focused on comparing the global transcriptomes generated from the FAZ and the LAZ to establish the divergences and similarities in their transcriptional networks, and particularly to characterize the processes and transcriptional regulators enriched in gene clusters that are differentially regulated in these two AZs. This study is the first attempt to analyze the global gene expression in different AZs in tomato by combining the RNA-Seq technique with oligonucleotide microarrays. Our AZ-specific microarray chip provides a cost-effective approach for expression profiling and robust analysis of multiple samples in a rapid succession.

  14. Genomic relationships computed from either next- generation sequence or array SNP data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez Enciso, M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of sequence data in genomic prediction models is a topic of high interest, given the decreasing prices of current next'-generation sequencing technologies (NGS) and the theoretical possibility of directly interrogating the genomes for all causal mutations. Here, we compare by simulation how

  15. Expression profiling of gastric cancer samples by oligonucleotide microarray analysis reveals low degree of intra-tumor variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Christine Steudel; Dana Grossmann; Daniela Aust; Gerhard Ehninger; Stephan Miehlke; Christian Thiede

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Gene expression profiling provides an unique opportunity to gain insight into the development of different types of gastric cancer. Tumor sample heterogeneity is thought to decrease the sensitivity and tumor specificity of microarray analysis. Thus, microdissection and preamplification of RNA is frequently performed. However, this technique may also induce considerable changes to the expression profile. To assess the effect of gastric tumor heterogeneity on expression profiling results, we measured the variation in gene expression within the same gastric cancer sample by performing a gene chip analysis with two RNA preparations extracted from the same tumor specimen.METHODS: Tumor samples from six intestinal T2 gastric tumors were dissected under liquid nitrogen and RNA was prepared from two separate tumor fragments. Each extraction was individually processed and hybridized to an Affymetrix U133A gene chip covering approximately 18 000 human gene transcripts. Expression profiles were analyzed using Microarray Suite 5.0 (Affymetrix) and GeneSpring 6.0 (Silicon Genetics).RESULTS: All gastric cancers showed little variance in expression profiles between different regions of the same tumor sample. In this case, gene chips displayed mean pair wise correlation coefficients of 0.94±0.02 (mean±SD),compared to values of 0.61±0.1 for different tumor samples. Expression of the variance between the two expression profiles as a percentage of "total change"(Affymetrix) revealed a remarkably low average value of 1.18±0.78 for comparing fragments of the same tumor sample.In contrast, comparison of fragments from different tumors revealed a percentage of 24.4±4.5.CONCLUSION: Our study indicates a low degree of expression profile variability within gastric tumor samples isolated from one patient. These data suggest that tumor tissue heterogeneity is not a dominant source of error for microarray analysis of larger tumor samples, making total RNA extraction an appropriate

  16. Airborne electronically steerable phased array. [steerable antennas - systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, R.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study directed to the design of a lightweight high-gain, spaceborne communications array are presented. The array includes simultaneous transmission and receiving, automatic acquisition and tracking of a signal within a 60-degree cone from the array normal, and provides for independent forming of the transmit and receive beams. Application for this array is the space shuttle, space station, or any of the advanced manned (or unmanned) orbital vehicles. Performance specifications are also given.

  17. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of open lactic acid fermentation of kitchen refuse using rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Mori, Masatsugu; Fujii, Akira; Iwami, Yuko; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2004-01-01

    Reproducible amounts of lactic acid accumulate in minced kitchen refuse under open conditions with intermittent pH neutralization [Sakai et al., Food Sci. Technol. Res., 6, 140 (2000)]. Here, we showed that such pH-controlled open fermentation of kitchen refuse reproducibly resulted a selective proliferation of a major lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species. In one experiment, the predominant microorganisms isolated during the early phase (6 h) were Gammaproteobacteria. In contrast, those that predominated during the late phase (48 h) were always Lactobacillus plantarum in three independent experiments. To further quantify the microbial community within open lactic acid fermentation, we performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis targeting 16S (23S) rRNA. We designed two new group-specific DNA probes: LAC722(L) was active for most LAB including the genera Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Weisella, whereas Lplan477 was specific for L. plantarum and its related species. We then optimized sample preparation using lysozyme and hybridization conditions including temperature, as well as the formamide concentration and the salt concentration in the washing buffer. We succeeded in quantification of microorganisms in semi-solid, complex biological materials such as minced kitchen refuse by taking color microphotographs in modified RGB balance on pre-coated slides. FISH analysis of the fermentation of kitchen refuse indicated that control of the pH swing leads to domination by the LAB population in minced kitchen refuse under open conditions. We also confirmed that L. plantarum, which generates lactic acid in high quantities but with low optical activity, became the dominant microorganism in kitchen refuse during the late phase of open fermentation.

  18. Analysis of Wide-Band Signals Using Wavelet Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisii, V.; Saccorotti, G.

    2005-12-01

    Wavelets transforms allow for precise time-frequency localization in the analysis of non-stationary signals. In wavelet analysis the trade-off between frequency bandwidth and time duration, also known as Heisenberg inequality, is by-passed using a fully scalable modulated window which solves the signal-cutting problem of Windowed Fourier Transform. We propose a new seismic array data processing procedure capable of displaying the localized spatial coherence of the signal in both the time- and frequency-domain, in turn deriving the propagation parameters of the most coherent signals crossing the array. The procedure consists in: a) Wavelet coherence analysis for each station pair of the instruments array, aimed at retrieving the frequency- and time-localisation of coherent signals. To this purpose, we use the normalised wavelet cross- power spectrum, smoothed along the time and scale domains. We calculate different coherence spectra adopting smoothing windows of increasing lengths; a final, robust estimate of the time-frequency localisation of spatially-coherent signals is eventually retrieved from the stack of the individual coherence distribution. This step allows for a quick and reliable signal discrimination: wave groups propagating across the network will manifest as high-coherence patches spanning the corresponding time-scale region. b) Once the signals have been localised in the time and frequency domain,their propagation parameters are estimated using a modified MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Characterization) algorithm. We select the MUSIC approach as it demonstrated superior performances in the case of low SNR signals, more plane waves contemporaneously impinging at the array and closely separated sources. The narrow-band Coherent Signal Subspace technique is applied to the complex Continuous Wavelet Transform of multichannel data for improving the singularity of the estimated cross-covariance matrix and the accuracy of the estimated signal eigenvectors. Using

  19. Analysis of electrical performances of planar active phased array antennas with distorted array plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Congsi; Bao Hong; Zhang Fushun; Feng Xingang

    2009-01-01

    a planar phased array antenna with different distortions grades prove the validity of the model.Therefore,by the method,the antenna designers may set the reasonable requirement on the structural tolerance in manufacturing antenna.

  20. SAVANT: Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chock, Ricaurte

    2000-01-01

    The photovoltaics (PV) industry is now being held to strict specifications, such as end-oflife power requirements, that force them to overengineer their products to avoid contractual penalties. Such overengineering has been the only reliable way to meet such specifications. Unfortunately, it also results in a more costly process than is probably necessary. In our conversations with the PV industry, the issue of cost has been raised again and again. Consequently, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Effects branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has been developing a software tool to address this problem. SAVANT, Glenn's tool for solar array verification and analysis is in the technology demonstration phase. Ongoing work has proven that more efficient and less costly PV designs should be possible by using SAVANT to predict the on-orbit life-cycle performance. The ultimate goal of the SAVANT project is to provide a user-friendly computer tool to predict PV on-orbit life-cycle performance. This should greatly simplify the tasks of scaling and designing the PV power component of any given flight or mission. By being able to predict how a particular PV article will perform, designers will be able to balance mission power requirements (both beginning-of-life and end-of-life) with survivability concerns such as power degradation due to radiation and/or contamination. Recent comparisons with actual flight data from the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) mission validate this approach.

  1. Gene expression changes in initiation and progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas revealed by laser microdissection and oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumino, Jun; Uzawa, Narikazu; Okada, Norihiko; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mogushi, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ken-Ichiro; Sato, Hiroaki; Michikawa, Chieko; Nakata, Yoshimi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2013-02-01

    Oral carcinogenesis is a complex process involving multiple genes. However, the genetic changes involved in this process are not apparent in identical oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). According to pathological characteristics, samples of normal tissue, oral dysplastic lesions (ODLs), and invasive cancers were obtained from identical OSCCs using laser microdissection (LMD). Large-scale gene expression profiling was carried out on 33 samples derived from 11 OSCCs. We analyzed genes differentially expressed in normal tissues vs. ODLs and in ODLs vs. invasive tumors and identified 15 candidate genes with continuously increasing or decreasing expression during oral carcinogenesis. One of these genes, ISG15, was chosen for further characterization. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that ISG15 expression consistently increased during oral tumorigenesis. An ISG15 high-expression level was significantly associated with poor prognosis (p = 0.027). In addition, patients with high-expression tumors had a poorer 5-year survival rate than patients with low expression levels (p = 0.019). In conclusion, we identified 15 genes with continuously increasing or decreasing expression during oral carcinogenesis. One of these, ISG15, is likely to be associated with both dysgenesis and tumorigenesis and may be a potential prognostic marker for oral cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. Joint analysis of BICEP2/keck array and Planck Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barkats, D; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Benton, S J; Bernard, J-P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Brevik, J A; Bucher, M; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Buza, V; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J-F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chary, R-R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Connors, J; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J-M; Désert, F-X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Dvorkin, C; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Filippini, J P; Finelli, F; Fliescher, S; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; Golwala, S R; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hasselfield, M; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hristov, V V; Huffenberger, K M; Hui, H; Hurier, G; Irwin, K D; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Keihänen, E; Kernasovskiy, S A; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kovac, J M; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kuo, C L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J-M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leitch, E M; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Lueker, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Matarrese, S; Megerian, K G; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M-A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Pryke, C; Puget, J-L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Richter, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schwarz, R; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sheehy, C D; Spencer, L D; Staniszewski, Z K; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A-S; Sygnet, J-F; Tauber, J A; Teply, G P; Terenzi, L; Thompson, K L; Toffolatti, L; Tolan, J E; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Turner, A D; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Vieregg, A G; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Weber, A C; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-03-13

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400  deg^{2} patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5°. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2  μK deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150  GHz to a lensed-ΛCDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0σ significance.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of WEC Array Layout Parameters Effect on the Power Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the effect that the array layout choice has on the power performance. To this end, a sensitivity analysis is carried out with six array layout parameters, as the simulation inputs, the array power performance (q-factor), as the simulation output, and a simulation model specially...... developed in cooperation with the DTOcean research project, which aims to provide design tools for the deployment of the first generation of ocean energy converter arrays. The sensitivity analysis is performed for the particular case of an array of floating cylinders moving in the usual six rigid body...

  4. Rapid mutation detection in complex genes by heteroduplex analysis with capillary array electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Eladio; Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Lastra, Enrique; García-Girón, Carlos; Miner, Cristina

    2005-06-01

    Mutational analysis of large multiexon genes without prevalent mutations is a laborious undertaking that requires the use of a high-throughput scanning technique. The Human Genome Project has enabled the development of powerful techniques for mutation detection in large multiexon genes. We have transferred heteroduplex analysis (HA) by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis of the two major breast cancer (BC) predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, to a multicapillary DNA sequencer in order to increase the throughput of this technique. This new method that we have called heteroduplex analysis by capillary array electrophoresis (HA-CAE) is based on the use of multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), different fluorescent labels and HA in a 16-capillary DNA sequencer. To date, a total of 114 different DNA sequence variants (19 insertions/deletions and 95 single-nucleotide substitutions - SNS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 from 431 unrelated BC families have been successfully detected by HA-CAE. In addition, we have optimized the multiplex-PCR conditions for the colorectal cancer genes MLH1 and MSH2 in order to analyze them by HA-CAE. Both genes have been amplified in 13 multiplex groups, which contain the 35 exons, and their corresponding flanking intronic sequences. MLH1 and MSH2 have been analyzed in nine hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients, and we have found six different DNA changes: one complex deletion/insertion mutation in MLH1 exon 19 and another five SNS. Only the complex mutation and one SNS may be classified as cancer-prone mutations. Our experience has revealed that HA-CAE is a simple, fast, reproducible and sensitive method to scan the sequences of complex genes.

  5. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  6. Copy Number Variation Analysis by Array Analysis of Single Cells Following Whole Genome Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is required to ensure the availability of sufficient material for copy number variation analysis of a genome deriving from an individual cell. Here, we describe the protocols we use for copy number variation analysis of non-fixed single cells by array-based approaches following single-cell isolation and whole genome amplification. We are focusing on two alternative protocols, an isothermal and a PCR-based whole genome amplification method, followed by either comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) or SNP array analysis, respectively.

  7. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Quin, Kelly E; Smith, Daniel; Naseer, Zan; Schulte, Jane; Engel, Samuel D; Loh, Yong-Hwee E; Streelman, J Todd; Boore, Jeffrey L; Carleton, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    .... We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory...

  8. ArrayExplorer, a program in Visual Basic for robust and accurate filter cDNA array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriotis, P C; Querec, T D; Gruver, B N; Brown, T R; Patriotis, C

    2001-10-01

    Determining the dynamics in the global regulation of gene expression holds the promise of bringing a better understanding of the processes that govern physiological cell growth regulation and its disruption during the development of disease. The advent for cDNA arrays has created the possibility for the parallel analysis of expression of thousands of genes in a given cell population, simultaneously. The level of expression of a given set of genes within the studied tissue corresponds to the intensity of a labeled cDNA probe synthesized from the studied tissue RNA and bound specifically to the cDNAs of the genes spotted on the array. The accurate extraction of gene expression intensity values is essential for further data analysis and the interpretation of the obtained results. Here, we describe a new array image-processing software developed in Microsoft Visual Basic, the ArrayExplorer, which provides a user-friendly, multiple-window interface and a number of automatic and manual features that facilitate a reliable, robust, and accurate extraction of gene intensity values from filter-array images.

  9. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis using capillary array electrophoresis for large-scale mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lars Allan; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes capillary array electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP), a screening method for detection of unknown and previously identified mutations. The method detects 98% of mutations in a sample material and can be applied to any organism where the goal is to determine genetic variation. This protocol describes how to screen for mutations in 192 singleplex or up to 768 multiplex samples over 3 days. The protocol is based on the principle of sequence-specific mobility of single-stranded DNA in a native polymer, and covers all stages in the procedure, from initial DNA purification to final CAE-SSCP data analysis, as follows: DNA is purified, followed by PCR amplification using fluorescent primers. After PCR amplification, double-stranded DNA is heat-denatured to separate the strands and subsequently cooled on ice to avoid reannealing. Finally, samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis and appropriate analysis software.

  10. Electrochemical measurement for analysis of DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.B.; Hong, J.S.; Pak, J.H. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Y.M. [National Institute of Health, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    One of the important roles of a DNA chip is the capability of detecting genetic diseases and mutations by analyzing DNA sequence. For a successful electrochemical genotyping, several aspects should be considered including the chemical treatment of electrode surface, DNA immobilization on electrode, hybridization, choice of an intercalator to be selectively bound to double standed DNA, and an equipment for detecting and analyzing the output singal. Au was used as the electrode material, 2-mercaptoethanol was used for linking DNA to Au electrode, and methylene blue was used as an indicator that can be bound to a double stranded DNA selectively. From the analysis of reductive current of this indicator that was bound to a double stranded DNA on an electrode, a normal double stranded DNA was able to be distinguished from a single stranded DNA in just a few seconds. Also, it was found that the peak reduction current of indicator is proportional to the concentration of target DNA to be hybridized with probe DNA. Therefore, it is possible to realize a simple and cheap DNA sensor using the electrochemical measurement for genotyping. (author). 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mapping deeply-buried geothermal faults using microtremor array analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peifen; Ling, Suqun; Li, Chuanjin; Du, Jianguo; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Xueqiu; Dai, Kangming; Zhang, Zuohong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the spatial autocorrelation microtremor array analysis is utilized to map deeply-buried subtle faults that have primary controls on geothermal reservoirs. We identified a low-velocity anomaly which is approximately 50 m wide at about 550-1400 m deep. A well drilled based on this anomaly later successfully produced hot water and further proved that the low-velocity anomaly was caused by a highly fractured zone at depths from 700 to 1500 m. Our results clearly demonstrate that the microtremor survey method can be effectively utilized to map deeply-buried faults and structures for geothermal energy exploration. The most effective way to increase the drilling success rate and, hence reduce the geothermal exploration risk, seems to be the development of new exploration methods and the integration of various geophysical technologies.

  12. The Murchison Widefield Array 21 cm Power Spectrum Analysis Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Trott, C. M.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Pindor, B.; Sullivan, I. S.; Pober, J. C.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Thyagarajan, N.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple independent data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction, and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregrounds.

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array 21 cm Power Spectrum Analysis Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Daniel C; Trott, C M; Dillon, Joshua S; Pindor, B; Sullivan, I S; Pober, J C; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bernardi, G; Bowman, Judd D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hewitt, J N; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, H S; Kratzenberg, E; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Thyagarajan, N; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, Shiv K; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tegmark, M; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B

    2016-01-01

    We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple, independent, data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregr...

  14. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors.

  15. Novel algorithms for protein sequence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Kai

    2008-01-01

    Each protein is characterized by its unique sequential order of amino acids, the so-called protein sequence. Biology”s paradigm is that this order of amino acids determines the protein”s architecture and function. In this thesis, we introduce novel algorithms to analyze protein sequences. Chapter 1

  16. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol

    2010-01-01

    preferentially selected for sequencing. In accordance with the Bermuda and Fort Lauderdale agreements and the more recent Toronto Statement the data have been released into public sequence repositories (Genbank/EMBL, NCBI/Ensembl trace repositories) in a timely manner and in advance of publication. CONCLUSIONS...

  17. Genome-wide SNPs and re-sequencing of growth habit and inflorescence genes in barley: implications for association mapping in germplasm arrays varying in size and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muehlbauer Gary J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerations in applying association mapping (AM to plant breeding are population structure and size: not accounting for structure and/or using small populations can lead to elevated false-positive rates. The principal determinants of population structure in cultivated barley are growth habit and inflorescence type. Both are under complex genetic control: growth habit is controlled by the epistatic interactions of several genes. For inflorescence type, multiple loss-of-function alleles in one gene lead to the same phenotype. We used these two traits as models for assessing the effectiveness of AM. This research was initiated using the CAP Core germplasm array (n = 102 assembled at the start of the Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP. This array was genotyped with 4,608 SNPs and we re-sequenced genes involved in morphology, growth and development. Larger arrays of breeding germplasm were subsequently genotyped and phenotyped under the auspices of the CAP project. This provided sets of 247 accessions phenotyped for growth habit and 2,473 accessions phenotyped for inflorescence type. Each of the larger populations was genotyped with 3,072 SNPs derived from the original set of 4,608. Results Significant associations with SNPs located in the vicinity of the loci involved in growth habit and inflorescence type were found in the CAP Core. Differentiation of true and spurious associations was not possible without a priori knowledge of the candidate genes, based on re-sequencing. The re-sequencing data were used to define allele types of the determinant genes based on functional polymorphisms. In a second round of association mapping, these synthetic markers based on allele types gave the most significant associations. When the synthetic markers were used as anchor points for analysis of interactions, we detected other known-function genes and candidate loci involved in the control of growth habit and inflorescence type. We

  18. Analysis of common k-mers for whole genome sequences using SSB-tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Cho, Hwan-Gue

    2002-01-01

    As sequenced genomes become larger and sequencing process becomes faster, there is a need to develop a tool to analyze sequences in the whole genomic scale. However, on-memory algorithms such as suffix tree and suffix array are not applicable to the analysis of whole genome sequence set, since the size of individual whole genome ranges from several million base pairs to hundreds billion base pairs. In order to effectively manipulate the huge sequence data, it is necessary to use the indexed data structure for external memory. In this paper, we introduce a workbench called SequeX for the analysis and visualization of whole genome sequences using SSB-tree (Static SB-tree). It consists of two parts: the analysis query subsystem and the visualization subsystem. The query subsystem supports various transactions such as pattern matching, k-occurrence, and k-mer analysis. The visualization subsystem helps biologists to easily understand whole genome structure and feature by sequence viewer, annotation viewer, CGR (Chaos Game Representation) viewer, and k-mer viewer. The system also supports a user-friendly programming interface based on Java script for batch processing and the extension for a specific purpose of a user. SequeX can be used to identify conserved genes or sequences by the analysis of the common k-mers and annotation. We analyze the common k-mer for 72 microbial genomes announced by Entrez, and find an interesting biological fact that the longest common k-mer for 72 sequences is 11-mer, and only 11 such sequences exist. Finally we note that many common k-mers occur in conserved region such as CDS, rRNA, and tRNA.

  19. Cloning and sequencing analysis of three amylase cDNAs in the shrimp Penaeus vannamei (Crustacea decapoda): evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wormhoudt, A; Sellos, D

    1996-05-01

    In Penaeus vannamei, alpha-amylase is the most important glucosidase and is present as at least two major isoenzymes which have been purified. In order to obtain information on their structure, a hepatopancreas cDNA library constructed in phage lambda-Zap II (Strategene) was screened using a synthetic oligonucleotide based on the amino acid sequence of a V8 staphylococcal protease peptide of P. vannamei alpha-amylase. Three clones were selected: AMY SK 37 (EMBL sequence accession number: X 77318) is the most complete of the analyzed clones and was completely sequenced. It contains the complete cDNA sequence coding for one of the major isoenzymes of shrimp amylase. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the existence of a 511-residue-long pre-enzyme containing a highly hydrophobic signal peptide of 16 amino acids. Northern hybridization of total RNA with the amylase cDNA confirms the size of the messenger at around 1,600 bases. AMY SK 28, which contains the complete mature sequence of amylase, belonged to the same family characterized by a common 3' terminus and presented four amino acid changes. Some other variants of this family were also partially sequenced. AMY SK 20 was found to encode a minor variant of the protein with a different 3' terminus and 57 amino acid changes. Phylogenetic analysis established with the conserved amino acid regions of the (beta/alpha) eight-barrel domain and with the total sequence of P. vannamei showed close evolutionary relationships with mammals (59-63% identity) and with insect alpha-amylase (52-62% identity). The use of conserved sequences increased the level of similarity but it did not alter the ordering of the groupings. Location of the secondary structure elements confirmed the high level of sequence similarity of shrimp alpha-amylase with pig alpha-amylase.

  20. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  1. Sequencing and Analysis of a Genomic Fragment Provide an Insight into the Dunaliella viridis Genomic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming SUN; Yuan-Ping TANG; Xiang-Zong MENG; Wen-Wen ZHANG; Shan LI; Zhi-Rui DENG; Zheng-Kai XU; Ren-Tao SONG

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)n type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features.

  2. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos [Reston, VA; Chen, Yong [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  3. Genetic definition and sequence analysis of Arabidopsis centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, G P; Nickel, K; Kuromori, T; Benito, M I; Kaul, S; Lin, X; Bevan, M; Murphy, G; Harris, B; Parnell, L D; McCombie, W R; Martienssen, R A; Marra, M; Preuss, D

    1999-12-24

    High-precision genetic mapping was used to define the regions that contain centromere functions on each natural chromosome in Arabidopsis thaliana. These regions exhibited dramatic recombinational repression and contained complex DNA surrounding large arrays of 180-base pair repeats. Unexpectedly, the DNA within the centromeres was not merely structural but also encoded several expressed genes. The regions flanking the centromeres were densely populated by repetitive elements yet experienced normal levels of recombination. The genetically defined centromeres were well conserved among Arabidopsis ecotypes but displayed limited sequence homology between different chromosomes, excluding repetitive DNA. This investigation provides a platform for dissecting the role of individual sequences in centromeres in higher eukaryotes.

  4. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  5. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: hybridization assays on polymer particles obtained by direct solid phase assembly of the oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, H; Heinonen, P; Iitiä, A; Lönnberg, H

    1997-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides were assembled by conventional phosphoramidite chemistry on uniformly sized (50 microns) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate (SINTEF) and compact polystyrene (Dynosphere) particles, the aminoalkyl side chains of which were further derivatized with DMTrO-acetyl groups. The linker was completely resistant toward ammonolytic deprotection of the base moieties. The quality of oligonucleotides was assessed by repeating the synthesis on the same particles derivatized with a cleavable ester linker. The ability of the oligonucleotide-coated particles to bind complementary sequences via hybridization was examined by following the attachment of oligonucleotides bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate to the particles. The fluorescence emission was measured directly on a single particle. The effects of the following factors on the kinetics and efficiency of hybridization were studied: number of particles in a given volume of the assay solution, loading of oligonucleotide on the particle, concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution, length of the hybridizing sequence, presence of noncomplementary sequences, and ionic strength. The fluorescence signal measured on a single particle after hybridization was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution over a concentration range of 5 orders of magnitude.

  6. Sequence Analysis of Trimer Isomers Formed by Montmorillonite Catalysis in the Reaction of Binary Monomer Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Gözen; Hazen, Robert M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2007-10-01

    Oligonucleotides are structurally similar to short RNA strands. Therefore, their formation via non-enzymatic reactions is highly relevant to Gilbert's RNA world scenario (1986) and the origin of life. In laboratory synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers, it is necessary to remove the water molecules from the reaction medium to shift the equilibrium in favor of oligonucleotide formation, which would have been impossible for reactions that took place in dilute solutions on the early Earth. Model studies designed to address this problem demonstrate that montmorillonite, a phyllosilicate common on Earth and identified on Mars, efficiently catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between activated mononucleotides in dilute solutions and produces RNA-like oligomers. The purpose of this study was to examine the sequences and regiospecificity of trimer isomers formed in the reaction of 5'-phosphorimidazolides of adenosine and uridine. Results demonstrated that regiospecificity and sequence specificity observed in the dimer fractions are conserved in their elongation products. With regard to regiospecificity, 61% of the linkages were found to be RNA-like 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds. With regard to sequence specificity, we found that 88% of the linear trimers were hetero-isomers with 61% A-monomer and 39% U-monomer incorporation. These results lend support to Bernal's hypothesis that minerals may have played a significant role in the chemical processes that led to the origin of life by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds in RNA-like oligomers.

  7. GATA: a graphic alignment tool for comparative sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix David A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several problems exist with current methods used to align DNA sequences for comparative sequence analysis. Most dynamic programming algorithms assume that conserved sequence elements are collinear. This assumption appears valid when comparing orthologous protein coding sequences. Functional constraints on proteins provide strong selective pressure against sequence inversions, and minimize sequence duplications and feature shuffling. For non-coding sequences this collinearity assumption is often invalid. For example, enhancers contain clusters of transcription factor binding sites that change in number, orientation, and spacing during evolution yet the enhancer retains its activity. Dot plot analysis is often used to estimate non-coding sequence relatedness. Yet dot plots do not actually align sequences and thus cannot account well for base insertions or deletions. Moreover, they lack an adequate statistical framework for comparing sequence relatedness and are limited to pairwise comparisons. Lastly, dot plots and dynamic programming text outputs fail to provide an intuitive means for visualizing DNA alignments. Results To address some of these issues, we created a stand alone, platform independent, graphic alignment tool for comparative sequence analysis (GATA http://gata.sourceforge.net/. GATA uses the NCBI-BLASTN program and extensive post-processing to identify all small sub-alignments above a low cut-off score. These are graphed as two shaded boxes, one for each sequence, connected by a line using the coordinate system of their parent sequence. Shading and colour are used to indicate score and orientation. A variety of options exist for querying, modifying and retrieving conserved sequence elements. Extensive gene annotation can be added to both sequences using a standardized General Feature Format (GFF file. Conclusions GATA uses the NCBI-BLASTN program in conjunction with post-processing to exhaustively align two DNA

  8. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a

  9. Full sequence analysis of the original Sapporo virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kaori; Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Kinoshita-Numata, Kazuko; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Nakata, Shuji; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the full-length genome sequence of the prototype of sapovirus, namely Sapporo virus (SV82), was identified. Sapporo virus RNA was extracted from a fecal sample, amplified by RT-PCR and the PCR products sequenced directly and analyzed. Sequence analysis showed that Sapporo virus consists of 7433 nucleotides and has three open reading frames. The Sapporo strain shows 91.7% nucleotide sequence identity to the Manchester virus. Phylogenic analysis has also revealed the closeness of Sapporo virus to other sapovirus/genogroup I strains. Basic information on the evolutionary history of sapovirus analysis is provided here.

  10. Parsimonious higher-order hidden Markov models for improved array-CGH analysis with applications to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seifert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH is an important technology in molecular biology for the detection of DNA copy number polymorphisms between closely related genomes. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are popular tools for the analysis of Array-CGH data, but current methods are only based on first-order HMMs having constrained abilities to model spatial dependencies between measurements of closely adjacent chromosomal regions. Here, we develop parsimonious higher-order HMMs enabling the interpolation between a mixture model ignoring spatial dependencies and a higher-order HMM exhaustively modeling spatial dependencies. We apply parsimonious higher-order HMMs to the analysis of Array-CGH data of the accessions C24 and Col-0 of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare these models against first-order HMMs and other existing methods using a reference of known deletions and sequence deviations. We find that parsimonious higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of these polymorphisms. Moreover, we perform a functional analysis of identified polymorphisms revealing novel details of genomic differences between C24 and Col-0. Additional model evaluations are done on widely considered Array-CGH data of human cell lines indicating that parsimonious HMMs are also well-suited for the analysis of non-plant specific data. All these results indicate that parsimonious higher-order HMMs are useful for Array-CGH analyses. An implementation of parsimonious higher-order HMMs is available as part of the open source Java library Jstacs (www.jstacs.de/index.php/PHHMM.

  11. Parsimonious higher-order hidden Markov models for improved array-CGH analysis with applications to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael; Gohr, André; Strickert, Marc; Grosse, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) is an important technology in molecular biology for the detection of DNA copy number polymorphisms between closely related genomes. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are popular tools for the analysis of Array-CGH data, but current methods are only based on first-order HMMs having constrained abilities to model spatial dependencies between measurements of closely adjacent chromosomal regions. Here, we develop parsimonious higher-order HMMs enabling the interpolation between a mixture model ignoring spatial dependencies and a higher-order HMM exhaustively modeling spatial dependencies. We apply parsimonious higher-order HMMs to the analysis of Array-CGH data of the accessions C24 and Col-0 of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare these models against first-order HMMs and other existing methods using a reference of known deletions and sequence deviations. We find that parsimonious higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of these polymorphisms. Moreover, we perform a functional analysis of identified polymorphisms revealing novel details of genomic differences between C24 and Col-0. Additional model evaluations are done on widely considered Array-CGH data of human cell lines indicating that parsimonious HMMs are also well-suited for the analysis of non-plant specific data. All these results indicate that parsimonious higher-order HMMs are useful for Array-CGH analyses. An implementation of parsimonious higher-order HMMs is available as part of the open source Java library Jstacs (www.jstacs.de/index.php/PHHMM).

  12. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) oligonucleotide-PCR clamping technique to selectively PCR amplify the SSU rRNA genes of bacteria in investigating the plant-associated community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Sakai, Masao

    2014-09-17

    The simultaneous extraction of plant organelle (mitochondria and plastid) genes during the DNA extraction step is a major limitation in investigating the community structures of bacteria associated with plants because organelle SSU rRNA genes are easily amplified by PCR using primer sets that are specific to bacteria. To inhibit the amplification of organelle genes, the locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide-PCR clamping technique was applied to selectively amplify bacterial SSU rRNA genes by PCR. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which were complementary to mitochondria and plastid genes, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the bacterial primer and converting DNA bases into LNA bases specific to mitochondria and plastids at the shifted region from the 3' end of the primer-binding position. PCR with LNA oligonucleotides selectively amplified the bacterial genes while inhibited that of organelle genes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that conventional amplification without LNA oligonucleotides predominantly generated DGGE bands from mitochondria and plastid genes with few bacterial bands. In contrast, additional bacterial bands were detected in DGGE patterns, the amplicons of which were prepared using LNA oligonucleotides. These results indicated that the detection of bacterial genes had been screened by the excessive amplification of the organelle genes. Sequencing of the bands newly detected by using LNA oligonucleotides revealed that their similarity to the known isolated bacteria was low, suggesting the potential to detect novel bacteria. Thus, application of the LNA oligonucleotide-PCR clamping technique was considered effective for the selective amplification of bacterial genes from extracted DNA containing plant organelle genes.

  13. Approximate Methods in the Analysis of Conformal Array Antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Gerini, G.

    2000-01-01

    Conformal array antennas are required whenever an antenna must be located on a vehicle, e.g. the skin of an aircraft, missile or superstructure of a ship. Conforming the array antenna to the existing structure avoids compromising aerodynamic or stealth characteristics, but at the cost of an increase

  14. Analysis of finite phased arrays of circular microstrip patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Bailey, Marion C.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing a finite planar array of circular microstrip patches fed by coaxial probes. The self- and mutual impedances between array elements are calculated using the method of moments with the dyadic Green's function for a dielectric layer on a ground plane. The patch circuits are determined by using the reaction integral equation. The active input impedance as well as the active element pattern of the array are computed from a knowledge of the resultant patch currents. The calculated results for two-element and eight-element linear arrays are in good agreement with experimental data. The active reflection coefficient and element pattern for the center and edge elements of a two-dimensional array as a function of scan angle are also presented.

  15. Analysis of Cylindrical Dipole Arrays for Smart Antenna Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAOXiangyu; GAOJun; K.M.Luk; LIANGChanghong

    2005-01-01

    A locally Conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) algorithm is studied and applied to model the radiation pattern of a linear dipole arrays mounted on a finite solid conducting cylinder. The numerical result shows that is in good agreement with the moment methods. Finally, the algorithm is applied to study smart antenna used in base station antenna. Several linear arrays mounted with uniform distribution on the cylinder are analyzed. The effects of the number of linear arrays on producing reasonably omnidirectional radiation pattern in the horizontal plane are investigated. It is shown that eight column dipole arrays may be a good choice for economical and practical considerations, and the omnidirection radiation characteristic can be better if the distance from the array axis to the cylinder surface is reduced.

  16. Scalable Kernel Methods and Algorithms for General Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksa, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of large-scale sequential data has become an important task in machine learning and pattern recognition, inspired in part by numerous scientific and technological applications such as the document and text classification or the analysis of biological sequences. However, current computational methods for sequence comparison still lack…

  17. Rare variant detection using family-based sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Fan, Yu; Palculict, Timothy B; Shen, Peidong; Ruteshouser, E Cristy; Chi, Aung-Kyaw; Davis, Ronald W; Huff, Vicki; Scharfe, Curt; Wang, Wenyi

    2013-03-05

    Next-generation sequencing is revolutionizing genomic analysis, but this analysis can be compromised by high rates of missing true variants. To develop a robust statistical method capable of identifying variants that would otherwise not be called, we conducted sequence data simulations and both whole-genome and targeted sequencing data analysis of 28 families. Our method (Family-Based Sequencing Program, FamSeq) integrates Mendelian transmission information and raw sequencing reads. Sequence analysis using FamSeq reduced the number of false negative variants by 14-33% as assessed by HapMap sample genotype confirmation. In a large family affected with Wilms tumor, 84% of variants uniquely identified by FamSeq were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In children with early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders from 26 families, de novo variant calls in disease candidate genes were corrected by FamSeq as mendelian variants, and the number of uniquely identified variants in affected individuals increased proportionally as additional family members were included in the analysis. To gain insight into maximizing variant detection, we studied factors impacting actual improvements of family-based calling, including pedigree structure, allele frequency (common vs. rare variants), prior settings of minor allele frequency, sequence signal-to-noise ratio, and coverage depth (∼20× to >200×). These data will help guide the design, analysis, and interpretation of family-based sequencing studies to improve the ability to identify new disease-associated genes.

  18. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  19. Mathematical methods of analysis of biopolymer sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Gindikin, S G

    1992-01-01

    This collection contains papers by participants in the seminar on mathematical methods in molecular biology who worked for several years at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Bioorganic Chemistry (now the Institute of Physical and Chemical Problems in Biology) at Moscow State University. The seminar united mathematicians and biologists around the problems of biological sequences. The collection includes original results as well as expository material and spans a range of perspectives, from purely mathematical problems to algorithms and their computer realizations. For this reason, the book is of interest to mathematicians, statisticians, biologists, and computational scientists who work with biopolymer sequences.

  20. An introduction to DNA chips: principles, technology, applications and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the recently developed GeneChip technology that provides efficient access to genetic information using miniaturised, high-density arrays of DNA or oligonucleotide probes. Such microarrays are powerful tools to study the molecular basis of interactions on a scale that would be impossible using conventional analysis. The recent development of the microarray technology has greatly accelerated the investigation of gene regulation. Arrays are mostly used to identify which genes are turned on or off in a cell or tissue, and also to evaluate the extent of a gene's expression under various conditions. Indeed, this technology has been successfully applied to investigate simultaneous expression of many thousands of genes and to the detection of mutations or polymorphisms, as well as for their mapping and sequencing.

  1. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Disease Resistance Gene Analogues from Three Wild Rice Species in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-mei; CHENG Zai-quan; YANG Ming-zhi; WU Cheng-jun; WANG Ling-xian; SUN Yi-ding; HUANG Xing-qi

    2003-01-01

    Two sets of degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed according to amino acid conservedregions of reported plant disease resistance genes which encode proteins that contain nucleotide-binding site andleucine-rich repeats(NBS-LRR), and the plant disease resistance genes which encode serine/threonine proteinkinase(STK). By polymerase chain reaction(PCR), disease resistance gene analogues have been amplified fromthree wild rice species in Yunnan Province, China. The DNA fragments from amplification have been clonedinto the pGEM-T vector respectively. Sequencing of the DNA fragments indicated that 7 classes, 2 classes and6 classes NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogues from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , Oryza officinalis Wall. ,and Oryza meyeriana Baill. were obtained respectively. The two representative fragments of TO12 from Ory-za officinalis Wall. and TR19 from Oryza rufipogon Griff. belong to the same class and homology of theirsequences are 100%. The result shows that the sequences of the same class disease resistance gene analogueshave no difference among different species of wild rice. 5 classes STK disease resistance gene analogues werealso obtained among which 4 classes from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , 1 class from Oryza officinalis Wall. Bycomparison analysis of amino acid sequences, we found that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues havevery iow identity(low to 25%) with the reported disease resistance gene L6, N, Bs2, Prf, Pto, Lr10 and Xa21etc. The finding suggests that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues are analogues of putative diseaseresistance genes that have not been isolated so far.

  2. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  3. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  4. Oligonucleotides Containing Aminated 2'-Amino-LNA Nucleotides: Synthesis and Strong Binding to Complementary DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chenguang; Samuelsen, Simone V; Christensen, Niels Johan; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-04-05

    Mono- and diaminated 2'-amino-LNA monomers were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides. Each modification imparts significant stabilization of nucleic acid duplexes and triplexes, excellent sequence selectivity, and significant nuclease resistance. Molecular modeling suggested that structural stabilization occurs via intrastrand electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of the aminated 2'-amino-LNA monomers and the host oligonucleotide backbone.

  5. Application of wavelet transform in runoff sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A wavelet transform is applied to runoff analysis to obtain the composition of the runoff sequence and to forecast future runoff. An observed runoff sequence is firstly decomposed and reconstructed by wavelet transform and its expanding tendency is derived. Then, the runoff sequence is forecasted by the back propagation artificial neural networks (BPANN) and by a wavelet transform combined with BPANN. The earlier researches seldom involve the problem of how to choose wavelet function, which is important and cannot be ignored when the wavelet transform is used. With application of the developed approach to the analysis of runoff sequence, several kinds of wavelet functions have been tested.

  6. EM design and analysis of dipole arrays on non-planar dielectric substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a simple and systematic description of EM design of antenna arrays. Printed dipole antennas are known to be simple yet more efficient than wire antennas. The dielectric substrate and the presence of ground plane affect the antenna performance and the resonant frequency is shifted. This book includes the EM design and performance analysis of printed dipole arrays on planar and cylindrical substrates. The antenna element is taken as half-wave centre-fed dipole. The substrate is taken as low-loss dielectric. The effect of substrate material, ground plane, and the curvature effect is discussed. Results are presented for both the linear and planar dipole arrays. The performance of dipole array is analyzed in terms of input impedance, return loss, and radiation pattern for different configurations. The effect of curved platform (substrate and ground plane) on the radiation behaviour of dipole array is analyzed. The book explains fundamentals of EM design and analysis of dipole antenna array throu...

  7. 'Specific' oligonucleotides often recognize more than one gene: the limits of in situ hybridization applied to GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladinic, M; Didelon, F; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-05-15

    As exquisite probes for gene sequences, oligonucleotides are one of the most powerful tools of recombinant molecular biology. In studying the GABA receptor subunits in the neonatal hippocampus we have used oligonucleotide probes in in situ hybridization and cloning techniques. The oligonucleotides used and assumed to be specific for the target gene, actually recognized more than one gene, leading to surprising and contradictory results. In particular, we found that a GABA(A)-rho specific oligonucleotide recognized an abundant, previously unknown, transcription factor in both in situ and library screening, while oligos 'specific' for GABA(A) subunits were able to recognize 30 additional unrelated genes in library screening. This suggests that positive results obtained with oligonucleotides should be interpreted with caution unless confirmed by identical results with oligonucleotides from different parts of the same gene, or cDNA library screening excludes the presence of other hybridizing species.

  8. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-06-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been idedntified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  9. FASTERp: A Feature Array Search Tool for Estimating Resemblance of Protein Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macklin, Derek; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2014-03-14

    Metagenome sequencing efforts have provided a large pool of billions of genes for identifying enzymes with desirable biochemical traits. However, homology search with billions of genes in a rapidly growing database has become increasingly computationally impractical. Here we present our pilot efforts to develop a novel alignment-free algorithm for homology search. Specifically, we represent individual proteins as feature vectors that denote the presence or absence of short kmers in the protein sequence. Similarity between feature vectors is then computed using the Tanimoto score, a distance metric that can be rapidly computed on bit string representations of feature vectors. Preliminary results indicate good correlation with optimal alignment algorithms (Spearman r of 0.87, ~;;1,000,000 proteins from Pfam), as well as with heuristic algorithms such as BLAST (Spearman r of 0.86, ~;;1,000,000 proteins). Furthermore, a prototype of FASTERp implemented in Python runs approximately four times faster than BLAST on a small scale dataset (~;;1000 proteins). We are optimizing and scaling to improve FASTERp to enable rapid homology searches against billion-protein databases, thereby enabling more comprehensive gene annotation efforts.

  10. Identification of FVIII gene mutations in patients with hemophilia A using new combinatorial sequencing by hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetta M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard methods of mutation detection are time consuming in Hemophilia A (HA rendering their application unavailable in some analysis such as prenatal diagnosis. Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of combinatorial sequencing-by-hybridization (cSBH as an alternative and reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene. Patients/Methods: We have applied a new method of cSBH that uses two different colors for detection of multiple point mutations in the FVIII gene. The 26 exons encompassing the HA gene were analyzed in 7 newly diagnosed Italian patients and in 19 previously characterized individuals with FVIII deficiency. Results: Data show that, when solution-phase TAMRA and QUASAR labeled 5-mer oligonucleotide sets mixed with unlabeled target PCR templates are co-hybridized in the presence of DNA ligase to universal 6-mer oligonucleotide probe-based arrays, a number of mutations can be successfully detected. The technique was reliable also in identifying a mutant FVIII allele in an obligate heterozygote. A novel missense mutation (Leu1843Thr in exon 16 and three novel neutral polymorphisms are presented with an updated protocol for 2-color cSBH. Conclusions: cSBH is a reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene and may represent a complementary method for the genetic screening of HA patients.

  11. Multiple platform assessment of the EGF dependent transcriptome by microarray and deep tag sequencing analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraola Susana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF is a key regulatory growth factor activating many processes relevant to normal development and disease, affecting cell proliferation and survival. Here we use a combined approach to study the EGF dependent transcriptome of HeLa cells by using multiple long oligonucleotide based microarray platforms (from Agilent, Operon, and Illumina in combination with digital gene expression profiling (DGE with the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Results By applying a procedure for cross-platform data meta-analysis based on RankProd and GlobalAncova tests, we establish a well validated gene set with transcript levels altered after EGF treatment. We use this robust gene list to build higher order networks of gene interaction by interconnecting associated networks, supporting and extending the important role of the EGF signaling pathway in cancer. In addition, we find an entirely new set of genes previously unrelated to the currently accepted EGF associated cellular functions. Conclusions We propose that the use of global genomic cross-validation derived from high content technologies (microarrays or deep sequencing can be used to generate more reliable datasets. This approach should help to improve the confidence of downstream in silico functional inference analyses based on high content data.

  12. Removing the bottleneck in whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for rapid drug resistance analysis: a call to action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth McNerney

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing (WGS can provide a comprehensive analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations that cause resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. With the deployment of bench-top sequencers and rapid analytical software, WGS is poised to become a useful tool to guide treatment. However, direct sequencing from clinical specimens to provide a full drug resistance profile remains a serious challenge. This article reviews current practices for extracting M. tuberculosis DNA and possible solutions for sampling sputum. Techniques under consideration include enzymatic digestion, physical disruption, chemical degradation, detergent solubilization, solvent extraction, ligand-coated magnetic beads, silica columns, and oligonucleotide pull-down baits. Selective amplification of genomic bacterial DNA in sputum prior to WGS may provide a solution, and differential lysis to reduce the levels of contaminating human DNA is also being explored. To remove this bottleneck and accelerate access to WGS for patients with suspected drug-resistant tuberculosis, it is suggested that a coordinated and collaborative approach be taken to more rapidly optimize, compare, and validate methodologies for sequencing from patient samples.

  13. Elastic sequence correlation for human action analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cheng, Li; Wang, Liang

    2011-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatically analyzing and understanding human actions from video footage. An "action correlation" framework, elastic sequence correlation (ESC), is proposed to identify action subsequences from a database of (possibly long) video sequences that are similar to a given query video action clip. In particular, we show that two well-known algorithms, namely approximate pattern matching in computer and information sciences and dynamic time warping (DTW) method in signal processing, are special cases of our ESC framework. The proposed framework is applied to two important real-world applications: action pattern retrieval, as well as action segmentation and recognition, where, on average, its run time speed (in matlab) is about 3.3 frames per second. In addition, comparing with the state-of-the-art algorithms on a number of challenging data sets, our approach is demonstrated to perform competitively.

  14. Cardiac nonrigid motion analysis from image sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huafeng

    2006-01-01

    Noninvasive estimation of the soft tissue kinematics properties from medical image sequences has many important clinical and physiological implications, such as the diagnosis of heart diseases and the understanding of cardiac mechanics. In this paper, we present a biomechanics based strategy, framed as a priori constraints for the ill-posed motion recovery problema, to realize estimation of the cardiac motion and deformation parameters. By constructing the heart dynamics system equations from biomechanics principles, we use the finite element method to generate smooth estimates.of heart kinematics throughout the cardiac cycle. We present the application of the strategy to the estimation of displacements and strains from in vivo left ventricular magnetic resonance image sequence.

  15. Analysis of Neuronal Sequences Using Pairwise Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Structure of the Nervous System of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans”. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences...oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR...data, and (2) it has no simple, realistic biological interpretation. In this chapter, we describe a new representation of sequences that addresses

  16. Conjugation with receptor-targeted histidine-rich peptides enhances the pharmacological effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Juliano, Rudy

    2014-01-15

    Ineffective delivery to intracellular sites of action is one of the key limitations to the use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Here, we describe molecular scale antisense oligonucleotide conjugates that bind selectively to a cell surface receptor, are internalized, and then partially escape from nonproductive endosomal locations to reach their sites of action in the nucleus. Peptides that include bombesin sequences for receptor targeting and a run of histidine residues for endosomal disruption were covalently linked to a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide. The conjugates were tested for their ability to correct splicing and up-regulate expression of a luciferase reporter in prostate cancer cells that express the bombesin receptor. We found that trivalent conjugates that included both the targeting sequence and several histidine residues were substantially more effective than conjugates containing only the bombesin or histidine moieties. This demonstrates the potential of creating molecular scale oligonucleotide conjugates with both targeting and endosome escape capabilities.

  17. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of the partial sequence of the rbcL from Bryopsis hypnoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The partial sequence of the rbcL from Bryopsis hypnoides, including the sequences of the upstream, extron and partial intron, was amplified by PCR and their sequences were determined. With Spinacia oleracea as the outgroup, neighbor-joining method and maximum parsimony method were used respectively to build phylogenetic trees according to the rbcL exon sequence among 13species that were the typical species of six phyla. Two kinds of trees showed clearly that there were two groups among those species,the green lineage and the non-green lineage. And the relationships of algae in the green lineage were similar in the two trees but those in the non-green lineage were not consistent. Analysis of codon preference indicated that the codon preference of the rbcL exon of Bryopsis hypnoides distinctly differed from that of the relevant sequence of photosynthetic bacteria.

  19. Molecular Subtyping of Salmonella Typhimurium with Multiplex Oligonucleotide Ligation-PCR (MOL-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Véronique; Mattheus, Wesley; Roosens, Nancy H C; Marchal, Kathleen; Bertrand, Sophie; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2017-01-01

    A multiplex oligonucleotide ligation-PCR (MOL-PCR) assay is a valuable high-throughput technique for the detection of bacteria and viruses, for characterization of pathogens and for diagnosis of genetic diseases, as it allows one to combine different types of molecular markers in a high-throughput multiplex assay. A MOL-PCR assay starts with a multiplex oligonucleotide ligation reaction for detection of the molecular marker, followed by a singleplex PCR for signal amplification and analysis of the MOL-PCR products on a Luminex platform. This last step occurs through a liquid bead suspension array in which the MOL-PCR products are hybridized to MagPlex-TAG beads.In this chapter, we describe the complete procedure for a MOL-PCR assay for subtyping of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and its monophasic variant S. 1,4[5],12:i:- from DNA isolation through heat lysis up to data interpretation through a Gödel Prime Product. The subtyping assay consists of 50 discriminative molecular markers and two internal positive control markers divided over three MOL-PCR assays.

  20. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  1. Protein comparative sequence analysis and computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Brett D; Oakley, Cecily E; Fajer, Piotr G

    2008-01-01

    A problem frequently encountered by the biological scientist is the identification of a previously unknown gene or protein sequence, where there are few or no clues as to the biochemical function, ligand specificity, gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, tissue specificity, cellular localization, developmental phase of activity, or biological role. Through the process of bioinformatics there are now many approaches for predicting answers to at least some of these questions, often then allowing the design of more insightful experiments to characterize more definitively the new protein.

  2. Error Analysis of Deep Sequencing of Phage Libraries: Peptides Censored in Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadim L. Matochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N×1 frequency vector n=ni, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N×N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa. The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq. Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq=Sa IN, where IN is a N×N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN, which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process.

  3. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, John A; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. T...

  4. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  5. Theoretical analysis of ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna array for HT-7U

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin-Jun; Qin Cheng-Ming; Zhao Yan-Ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the coupling analysis of phased antenna array designed to excite fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency. The coupling of the antenna is calculated in slab geometry. The coupling code based on the variational principle gives the self-consistent current flowing in the antenna, this method has been extended so that it can be applied to a phased antenna array. As an example, this paper analyses the coupling prosperities of a 2×2phased antenna array. It gives the optimum geometry of antenna array. The fields excited at plasma surface are found to more or less correspond to the antenna current phasing.

  6. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  7. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. (Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)); Rocchi, M. (Istituto G. Gaslini, Genoa (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  8. Characterization of self-assembled DNA concatemers from synthetic oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies of DNA–ligand interaction on a single molecule level provide opportunities to understand individual behavior of molecules. Construction of DNA molecules with repetitive copies of the same segments of sequences linked in series could be helpful for enhancing the interaction possibility for sequence-specific binding ligand to DNA. Here we report on the use of synthetic oligonucleotides to self-assembly into duplex DNA concatemeric molecules. Two strands of synthetic oligonucleotides used here were designed with 50-mer in length and the sequences are semi-complimentary so to hybridize spontaneously into concatemers of double stranded DNA. In order to optimize the length of the concatemers the oligonucleotides were incubated at different oligomer concentrations, ionic strengths and temperatures for different durations. Increasing the salt concentration to 200 mM NaCl was found to be the major optimizing factor because at this enhanced ionic strength the concatemers formed most quickly and the other parameters had no detectable effect. The size and shape of formed DNA concatemers were studied by gel electrophoresis in agarose, polyacrylamide gels and by AFM. Our results show that linear DNA constructs up to several hundred base pairs were formed and could be separated from a substantial fraction of non-linear constructs.

  9. A new sieving matrix for DNA sequencing, genotyping and mutation detection and high-throughput genotyping with a 96-capillary array system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Capillary electrophoresis has been widely accepted as a fast separation technique in DNA analysis. In this dissertation, a new sieving matrix is described for DNA analysis, especially DNA sequencing, genetic typing and mutation detection. A high-throughput 96 capillary array electrophoresis system was also demonstrated for simultaneous multiple genotyping. The authors first evaluated the influence of different capillary coatings on the performance of DNA sequencing. A bare capillary was compared with a DB-wax, an FC-coated and a polyvinylpyrrolidone dynamically coated capillary with PEO as sieving matrix. It was found that covalently-coated capillaries had no better performance than bare capillaries while PVP coating provided excellent and reproducible results. The authors also developed a new sieving Matrix for DNA separation based on commercially available poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). This sieving matrix has a very low viscosity and an excellent self-coating effect. Successful separations were achieved in uncoated capillaries. Sequencing of M13mp18 showed good resolution up to 500 bases in treated PVP solution. Temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis and PVP solution was applied to mutation detection. A heteroduplex sample and a homoduplex reference were injected during a pair of continuous runs. A temperature gradient of 10 C with a ramp of 0.7 C/min was swept throughout the capillary. Detection was accomplished by laser induced fluorescence detection. Mutation detection was performed by comparing the pattern changes between the homoduplex and the heteroduplex samples. High throughput, high detection rate and easy operation were achieved in this system. They further demonstrated fast and reliable genotyping based on CTTv STR system by multiple-capillary array electrophoresis. The PCR products from individuals were mixed with pooled allelic ladder as an absolute standard and coinjected with a 96-vial tray. Simultaneous one-color laser-induced fluorescence

  10. Facility Layout Based on Sequence Analysis: Design of Flowshops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; WU Zhi-ming

    2009-01-01

    A computer-aided method to design a hybrid layout-tree-shape planar flowlines is presented. In new-type flowshop layout, the common machines shared by several flowlines could be located together in functional sections. The approach combines traditional cell formation techniques with sequence alignment algorithms. Firstly, a sequence analysis based cell formation procedure is adopted; then the operation sequences for parts are aligned to maximize machines adjacency in hyperedge representations; finally a tree-shape planar flowline will be obtained for each part family. With the help of a sample of operation sequences obtained from industry, this algorithm is illustrated.

  11. Mesoscopic Model for Free Energy Landscape Analysis of DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia-Rojo, R; Mazo, J J; Falo, F; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021908

    2012-01-01

    A mesoscopic model which allows us to identify and quantify the strength of binding sites in DNA sequences is proposed. The model is based on the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model for the DNA chain coupled to a Brownian particle which explores the sequence interacting more importantly with open base pairs of the DNA chain. We apply the model to promoter sequences of different organisms. The free energy landscape obtained for these promoters shows a complex structure that is strongly connected to their biological behavior. The analysis method used is able to quantify free energy differences of sites within genome sequences.

  12. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  13. Application of the Taguchi method to the analysis of the deposition step in microarray production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severgnini, Marco; Pattini, Linda; Consolandi, Clarissa; Rizzi, Ermanno; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Cerutti, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    Every microarray experiment is affected by many possible sources of variability that may even corrupt biological evidence on analyzed sequences. We applied a "Taguchi method" strategy, based on the use of orthogonal arrays to optimize the deposition step of oligonucleotide sequences on glass slides. We chose three critical deposition parameters (humidity, surface, and buffer) at two levels each, in order to establish optimum settings. A L8 orthogonal array was used in order to monitor both the main effects and interactions on the deposition of a 25 mer oligonucleotide hybridized to its fluorescent-labeled complementary. Signal-background ratio and deposition homogeneity in terms of mean intensity and spot diameter were considered as significant outputs. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to raw data and to mean results for each slide and experimental run. Finally we calculated an overall evaluation coefficient to group together important outputs in one number. Environmental humidity and surface-buffer interaction were recognized as the most critical factors, for which a 50% humidity, associated to a chitosan-covered slide and a sodium phosphate + 25% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) buffer gave best performances. Our results also suggested that Taguchi methods can be efficiently applied in optimization of microarray procedures.

  14. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a high

  15. Real analysis via sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Little, Charles H C; van Brunt, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This text gives a rigorous treatment of the foundations of calculus. In contrast to more traditional approaches, infinite sequences and series are placed at the forefront. The approach taken has not only the merit of simplicity, but students are well placed to understand and appreciate more sophisticated concepts in advanced mathematics. The authors mitigate potential difficulties in mastering the material by motivating  definitions, results, and proofs. Simple examples  are provided to  illustrate new material and exercises are included at the end of most sections. Noteworthy topics include: an extensive discussion of convergence tests for infinite series, Wallis’s formula and Stirling’s formula, proofs of the irrationality of π and e, and a treatment of Newton’s method as a special instance of finding fixed points of iterated functions.

  16. Editorial: Special Issue on Algorithms for Sequence Analysis and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Mäkinen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of Algorithms is dedicated to approaches to biological sequence analysis that have algorithmic novelty and potential for fundamental impact in methods used for genome research.

  17. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si_(0.9)Ge_(0.1) structures and investigate III-V on Si_(1-x)Ge_x device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si_(0.1)Ge_(0.9) wires coated with a GaA...

  18. [Automatic analysis pipeline of next-generation sequencing data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Li; Fengyu, Li; Siyao, Zhang; Bin, Cai; Na, Zheng; Yu, Nie; Dao, Zhou; Qian, Zhao

    2014-06-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing has generated high demand for data processing and analysis. Although there are a lot of software for analyzing next-generation sequencing data, most of them are designed for one specific function (e.g., alignment, variant calling or annotation). Therefore, it is necessary to combine them together for data analysis and to generate interpretable results for biologists. This study designed a pipeline to process Illumina sequencing data based on Perl programming language and SGE system. The pipeline takes original sequence data (fastq format) as input, calls the standard data processing software (e.g., BWA, Samtools, GATK, and Annovar), and finally outputs a list of annotated variants that researchers can further analyze. The pipeline simplifies the manual operation and improves the efficiency by automatization and parallel computation. Users can easily run the pipeline by editing the configuration file or clicking the graphical interface. Our work will facilitate the research projects using the sequencing technology.

  19. The Spectrum Sequences of Periodic Frame Multiresolution Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Zhang LI; Qiao Fang LIAN

    2009-01-01

    The periodic multiresolution analysis (PMRA) and the periodic frame multiresolution analysis (PFMRA) provide a general recipe for the construction of periodic wavelets and periodic wavelet frames,respectively. This paper addresses PFMRAs by the introduction of the notion of spec-trum sequence. In terms of spectrum sequences,the scaling function sequences generating a normalized PFMRA are characterized; a characterization of the spectrum sequences of PFMRAs is obtained,which provides a method to construct PFMRAs since its proof is constructive; a necessary and sufficient con-dition for a PFMRA to admit a single wavelet frame sequence is obtained; a necessary and sufficient condition for a PFMRA to be contained in a given PMRA is also obtained. What is more,it is proved that an arbitrary PFMRA must be contained in some PMRA. In the meanwhile,some examples are provided to illustrate the general theory.

  20. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  1. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith,Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo,Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-06-13

    Recovery and analysis of multiple Neanderthal autosomalsequences using a metagenomic approach reveals that modern humans andNeanderthals split ~;400,000 years ago, without significant evidence ofsubsequent admixture.

  2. Oligonucleotide primers for targeted amplification of single-copy nuclear genes in apocritan Hymenoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Hartig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published nucleotide sequence data from the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants are taxonomically scattered and still inadequate for reconstructing a well-supported phylogenetic tree for the order. The analysis of comprehensive multiple gene data sets obtained via targeted PCR could provide a cost-effective solution to this problem. However, oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of nuclear genes across a wide range of hymenopteran species are still scarce. FINDINGS: Here we present a suite of degenerate oligonucleotide primer pairs for PCR amplification of 154 single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from Hymenoptera. These primers were inferred from genome sequence data from nine Hymenoptera (seven species of ants, the honeybee, and the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We empirically tested a randomly chosen subset of these primer pairs for amplifying target genes from six Hymenoptera, representing the families Chrysididae, Crabronidae, Gasteruptiidae, Leucospidae, Pompilidae, and Stephanidae. Based on our results, we estimate that these primers are suitable for studying a large number of nuclear genes across a wide range of apocritan Hymenoptera (i.e., all hymenopterans with a wasp-waist and of aculeate Hymenoptera in particular (i.e., apocritan wasps with stingers. CONCLUSIONS: The amplified nucleotide sequences are (a with high probability from single-copy genes, (b easily generated at low financial costs, especially when compared to phylogenomic approaches, (c easily sequenced by means of an additionally provided set of sequencing primers, and (d suitable to address a wide range of phylogenetic questions and to aid rapid species identification via barcoding, as many amplicons contain both exonic and fast-evolving intronic nucleotides.

  3. Stability Analysis of the Buck-Boost Type Solar Array Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Hwan; Yoon, Seok-Teak; Park, Hee-Sung; Park, Sung-Woo; Koo, Ja-Chun; Jang, Jin-Baek; Lee, Sang-Kon

    2014-08-01

    The SAR (Solar Array Regulator) is different from a general DC-DC Converter. The input of the SAR is connected to the solar array and the output is connected to the battery. So, the output voltage of the SAR is constant and the input voltage of the SAR is variable. And the solar array current which is the SAR input current is variable according to the solar array voltage. Therefore, the SAR is influenced by the electrical characteristic of the solar array. For these reasons, a small signal model for a general DC-DC converter cannot be applied to the SAR for the stability analysis. In this paper, the small signal model of the BUCK-BOOST type SAR (BBSAR) is introduced and its transfer functions are induced. Using small signal transfer functions, the stability analysis is performed and its results are compared to the simulation result.

  4. Human papillomavirus genotyping by Linear Array and Next-Generation Sequencing in cervical samples from Western Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Miramontes, María Guadalupe; Torres-Reyes, Luis Alberto; Alvarado-Ruíz, Liliana; Romero-Martínez, Salvador Angel; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Verenice; Balderas-Peña, Luz María Adriana; Vallejo-Ruíz, Verónica; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva Irene; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-10-06

    The Linear Array® (LA) genotyping test is one of the most used methodologies for Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping, in that it is able to detect 37 HPV genotypes and co-infections in the same sample. However, the assay is limited to a restricted number of HPV, and sequence variations in the detection region of the HPV probes could give false negatives results. Recently, 454 Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) technology has been efficiently used also for HPV genotyping; this methodology is based on massive sequencing of HPV fragments and is expected to be highly specific and sensitive. In this work, we studied HPV prevalence in cervixes of women in Western Mexico by LA and confirmed the genotypes found by NGS. Two hundred thirty three cervical samples from women Without cervical lesions (WCL, n = 48), with Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN I, n = 98), or with Cervical cancer (CC, n = 87) were recruited, DNA was extracted, and HPV positivity was determined by PCR amplification using PGMY09/11 primers. All HPV- positive samples were genotyped individually by LA. Additionally, pools of amplicons from the PGMY-PCR products were sequenced using 454 NGS technology. Results obtained by NGS were compared with those of LA for each group of samples. We identified 35 HPV genotypes, among which 30 were identified by both technologies; in addition, the HPV genotypes 32, 44, 74, 102 and 114 were detected by NGS. These latter genotypes, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported in Mexican population. Furthermore, we found that LA did not detect, in some diagnosis groups, certain HPV genotypes included in the test, such as 6, 11, 16, 26, 35, 51, 58, 68, 73, and 89, which indicates possible variations at the species level. There are HPV genotypes in Mexican population that cannot be detected by LA, which is, at present, the most complete commercial genotyping test. More studies are necessary to determine the impact of HPV-44, 74, 102 and 114 on the risk of

  5. Inference of splicing regulatory activities by sequence neighborhood analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Stadler

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic-acid motifs is critical to many cellular processes. We have developed a new and general method called Neighborhood Inference (NI that predicts sequences with activity in regulating a biochemical process based on the local density of known sites in sequence space. Applied to the problem of RNA splicing regulation, NI was used to predict hundreds of new exonic splicing enhancer (ESE and silencer (ESS hexanucleotides from known human ESEs and ESSs. These predictions were supported by cross-validation analysis, by analysis of published splicing regulatory activity data, by sequence-conservation analysis, and by measurement of the splicing regulatory activity of 24 novel predicted ESEs, ESSs, and neutral sequences using an in vivo splicing reporter assay. These results demonstrate the ability of NI to accurately predict splicing regulatory activity and show that the scope of exonic splicing regulatory elements is substantially larger than previously anticipated. Analysis of orthologous exons in four mammals showed that the NI score of ESEs, a measure of function, is much more highly conserved above background than ESE primary sequence. This observation indicates a high degree of selection for ESE activity in mammalian exons, with surprisingly frequent interchangeability between ESE sequences.

  6. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  7. Tools for integrated sequence-structure analysis with UCSF Chimera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Conrad C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond mapping where a sequence region falls in the structure and vice versa; (b facilitate changing data of one type based on the other (for example, using only sequence-conserved residues to match structures, or adjusting a sequence alignment based on spatial fit; (c can be used with a researcher's own data, including arbitrary sequence alignments and annotations, closely or distantly related sets of proteins, etc.; and (d interoperate with each other and with a full complement of molecular graphics features. We describe enhancements to UCSF Chimera to achieve these goals. Results The molecular graphics program UCSF Chimera includes a suite of tools for interactive analyses of sequences and structures. Structures automatically associate with sequences in imported alignments, allowing many kinds of crosstalk. A novel method is provided to superimpose structures in the absence of a pre-existing sequence alignment. The method uses both sequence and secondary structure, and can match even structures with very low sequence identity. Another tool constructs structure-based sequence alignments from superpositions of two or more proteins. Chimera is designed to be extensible, and mechanisms for incorporating user-specific data without Chimera code development are also provided. Conclusion The tools described here apply to many problems involving comparison and analysis of protein structures and their sequences. Chimera includes complete documentation and is intended for use by a wide range of scientists, not just those in the computational disciplines. UCSF Chimera is free for non-commercial use and is

  8. Stereospecificity of oligonucleotide interactions revisited: no evidence for heterochiral hybridization and ribozyme/DNAzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hoehlig

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications.

  9. Polymerase-Endonuclease Amplification Reaction (PEAR) for Large-Scale Enzymatic Production of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gou, Deming; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR), for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI) cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. PMID:20062528

  10. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  11. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  12. Analysis of Eigenspace Dynamics with Applications to Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    be met in most practical situations,1-2 in which large-aperture arrays operate in the presence of fast maneuvering interferers, or with towed...the improvement of subspace beamforming processors , in which the data snapshots are projected into particular subspaces of interest such as mm xPy

  13. Optimization of capillary array electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for routine molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Larsen, Lars Allan; Baba, Shingo; Kukita, Yoji; Tahira, Tomoko; Christiansen, Michael; Vuust, Jens; Hayashi, Kenshi; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2006-10-01

    Mutation screening is widely used for molecular diagnostics of inherited disorders. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the present and future identification of genetic risk factors for complex disorders will increase the need for high-throughput mutation screening technologies. Capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) SSCP analysis is a low-cost, automated method with a high throughput and high reproducibility. Thus, the method fulfills many of the demands to be met for application in routine molecular diagnostics. However, the need for performing the electrophoresis at three temperatures between 18 degrees C and 35 degrees C for achievement of high sensitivity is a disadvantage of the method. Using a panel of 185 mutant samples, we have analyzed the effect of sample purification, sample medium and separation matrix on the sensitivity of CAE-SSCP analysis to optimize the method for molecular diagnostic use. We observed different effects from sample purification and sample medium at different electrophoresis temperatures, probably reflecting the complex interplay between sequence composition, electrophoresis conditions and sensitivity in SSCP analysis. The effect on assay sensitivity from three different polymers was tested using a single electrophoresis temperature of 27 degrees C. The data suggest that a sensitivity of 98-99% can be obtained using a 10% long chain poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide polymer.

  14. FastPCR: An in silico tool for fast primer and probe design and advanced sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Khassenov, Bekbolat; Ramankulov, Yerlan; Samuilova, Olga; Ivanov, Konstantin I

    2017-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important laboratory techniques used in molecular biology, genetics and molecular diagnostics. The success of a PCR-based method largely depends on the correct nucleic acid sequence analysis in silico prior to a wet-bench experiment. Here, we report the development of an online Java-based software for virtual PCR on linear or circular DNA templates and multiple primer or probe search from large or small databases. Primer or probe sensitivity and specificity are predicted by searching a database to find sequences with an optimal number of mismatches, similarity and stability. The software determines primer location, orientation, efficiency of binding and calculates primer melting temperatures for standard and degenerate oligonucleotides. The software is suitable for batch file processing, which is essential for automation when working with large amounts of data. The online Java software is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html. Accession numbers for the sequences resulting from this study: EU140956 EU177767 EU867815 EU882730 FJ975775-FJ975780 HM481419 HM481420 KC686837-KC686839 KM262797. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ArrayQuest: a web resource for the analysis of DNA microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Jeremy L

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous microarray analysis programs have been created through the efforts of Open Source software development projects. Providing browser-based interfaces that allow these programs to be executed over the Internet enhances the applicability and utility of these analytic software tools. Results Here we present ArrayQuest, a web-based DNA microarray analysis process controller. Key features of ArrayQuest are that (1 it is capable of executing numerous analysis programs such as those written in R, BioPerl and C++; (2 new analysis programs can be added to ArrayQuest Methods Library at the request of users or developers; (3 input DNA microarray data can be selected from public databases (i.e., the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC DNA Microarray Database or Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO or it can be uploaded to the ArrayQuest center-point web server into a password-protected area; and (4 analysis jobs are distributed across computers configured in a backend cluster. To demonstrate the utility of ArrayQuest we have populated the methods library with methods for analysis of Affymetrix DNA microarray data. Conclusion ArrayQuest enables browser-based implementation of DNA microarray data analysis programs that can be executed on a Linux-based platform. Importantly, ArrayQuest is a platform that will facilitate the distribution and implementation of new analysis algorithms and is therefore of use to both developers of analysis applications as well as users. ArrayQuest is freely available for use at http://proteogenomics.musc.edu/arrayquest.html.

  16. Analysis of the crosstalk in an underwater planar array transducer by the equivalent circuit method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Seonghun; Roh, Yongrae

    2017-07-01

    A planar array transducer consists of several transducers arranged on an acoustic window, which causes crosstalk. The crosstalk is a phenomenon in which the acoustic pressure generated by a projector is transferred to adjacent hydrophones through the acoustic window and the transferred pressure generates noise signals in the hydrophones. The performance of the planar array transducer is deteriorated due to this acoustic interaction, which should be minimized for maximum array performance. Analysis of the crosstalk has been carried out with sophisticated numerical methods, which motivated the need to develop a simpler and accurate analysis method. In this work, an equivalent circuit has been developed to analyze the crosstalk level of the planar array transducer, and the validity of the developed method has been verified by comparing the result from the equivalent circuit analysis with that from finite element analysis.

  17. DSAP: deep-sequencing small RNA analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Liu, Yi-Chung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lin, Wei-Chen; Gan, Richie Ruei-Chi; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2010-07-01

    DSAP is an automated multiple-task web service designed to provide a total solution to analyzing deep-sequencing small RNA datasets generated by next-generation sequencing technology. DSAP uses a tab-delimited file as an input format, which holds the unique sequence reads (tags) and their corresponding number of copies generated by the Solexa sequencing platform. The input data will go through four analysis steps in DSAP: (i) cleanup: removal of adaptors and poly-A/T/C/G/N nucleotides; (ii) clustering: grouping of cleaned sequence tags into unique sequence clusters; (iii) non-coding RNA (ncRNA) matching: sequence homology mapping against a transcribed sequence library from the ncRNA database Rfam (http://rfam.sanger.ac.uk/); and (iv) known miRNA matching: detection of known miRNAs in miRBase (http://www.mirbase.org/) based on sequence homology. The expression levels corresponding to matched ncRNAs and miRNAs are summarized in multi-color clickable bar charts linked to external databases. DSAP is also capable of displaying miRNA expression levels from different jobs using a log(2)-scaled color matrix. Furthermore, a cross-species comparative function is also provided to show the distribution of identified miRNAs in different species as deposited in miRBase. DSAP is available at http://dsap.cgu.edu.tw.

  18. Mutual Coupling Effects Analysis in a Cross-Rhombic Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sosa-Pedroza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of mutual coupling effects on radiation pattern and individual coupling in a conformal array of cross rhombic antennas. Analysis is made using both full-wave simulation and numerical approaches implemented in Matlab. The array consists of a truncated hexagonal pyramid, with a cross rhombic antenna in each pyramidal face, including the one on the top, having a 7-antennas-array. Results of radiation pattern and S11 parameters are presented, showing mutual coupling effects among the elements.

  19. Modified Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm for Analysis of Large Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaset Mhudtongon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper deals with the optimization of a large antenna array for maximum directivity using a modified fruit fly optimization algorithm (MFOA with random search of two groups of swarm and adaptive fruit fly swarm population size. The MFOA is utilized to determine three nonlinear mathematical test functions, analysis of the optimal number of elements and optimal element spacing of the large antenna array, and analysis of nonuniform amplitude of antenna array. The numerical results demonstrate that the MFOA is effective in solving all test function and electromagnetic problems. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are ease of implementation, large search range, less processing time, and reduced memory requirement.

  20. Phenotype MicroArrays as a complementary tool to next generation sequencing for characterization of tree endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Kathrin; Macaya-Sanz, David; Martín, Juan A; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Witzell, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to calibrate microbial community profiles obtained through next generation sequencing (NGS) with relevant taxonomic identities of the microbes, and to further associate these identities with phenotypic attributes. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) techniques provide a semi-high throughput assay for characterization and monitoring the microbial cellular phenotypes. Here, we present detailed descriptions of two different PM protocols used in our recent studies on fungal endophytes of forest trees, and highlight the benefits and limitations of this technique. We found that the PM approach enables effective screening of substrate utilization by endophytes. However, the technical limitations are multifaceted and the interpretation of the PM data challenging. For the best result, we recommend that the growth conditions for the fungi are carefully standardized. In addition, rigorous replication and control strategies should be employed whether using pre-configured, commercial microwell-plates or in-house designed PM plates for targeted substrate analyses. With these precautions, the PM technique is a valuable tool to characterize the metabolic capabilities of individual endophyte isolates, or successional endophyte communities identified by NGS, allowing a functional interpretation of the taxonomic data. Thus, PM approaches can provide valuable complementary information for NGS studies of fungal endophytes in forest trees.

  1. Synthesis of high-quality libraries of long (150mer) oligonucleotides by a novel depurination controlled process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeProust, Emily M; Peck, Bill J; Spirin, Konstantin; McCuen, Heather Brummel; Moore, Bridget; Namsaraev, Eugeni; Caruthers, Marvin H

    2010-01-01

    ...) in fmol amounts using parallel synthesis of DNA on microarrays. The sequence accuracy of the oligonucleotides in such large-scale syntheses has been limited by the yields and side reactions of the DNA synthesis process used...

  2. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-09-09

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9.

  3. ATM solar array in-flight performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J. P.; Crabtree, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The physical and electrical characteristics of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) solar array are described and in-flight performance data are analyzed and compared with predicted results. Two solar cell module configurations were used. Type I module consists of 228 2 x 6 cm solar cells with two cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. Type II modules contain 684 2 x 2 cm cells with six cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. A different interconnection scheme was used for each type. Panels using type II modules with mesh interconnect system performed marginally better than those using type I module with loop interconnect system. The average degradation rate for the ATM array was 8.2% for a 271-day mission.

  4. Harmonic space analysis of pulsar timing array redshift maps

    CERN Document Server

    Roebber, Elinore

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for treating the angular information in the pulsar timing array response to a gravitational wave background based on standard cosmic microwave background techniques. We calculate the angular power spectrum of the all-sky gravitational redshift pattern induced at the earth for both a single bright source of gravitational radiation and a statistically isotropic, unpolarized Gaussian random gravitational wave background. The angular power spectrum is the harmonic transform of the Hellings & Downs curve. We use the power spectrum to examine the expected variance in the Hellings & Downs curve in both cases. Finally, we discuss the extent to which pulsar timing arrays are sensitive to the angular power spectrum and find that the power spectrum sensitivity is dominated by the quadrupole anisotropy of the gravitational redshift map.

  5. Electromagnetic linear machines with dual Halbach array design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Liang; Peng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Zongxia

    2017-01-01

    This book extends the conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnet arrangement into 3D pattern for permanent magnet linear machines for the first time, and proposes a novel dual Halbach array. It can not only effectively increase the radial component of magnetic flux density and output force of tubular linear machines, but also significantly reduce the axial flux density, radial force and thus system vibrations and noises. The book is also the first to address the fundamentals and provide a summary of conventional arrays, as well as novel concepts for PM pole design in electric linear machines. It covers theoretical study, numerical simulation, design optimization and experimental works systematically. The design concept and analytical approaches can be implemented to other linear and rotary machines with similar structures. The book will be of interest to academics, researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in electronic engineering and mechanical engineering who wish to learn the core principles, met...

  6. Event Sequence Analysis using Self Organizing Map

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In today’s world we have abundance of data and scarcity of Knowledge data mining field emerged as the fit of thetool to the problem. With the advent of internet technology and the exponential growth in the technology behind theworld wide web, the concept of web mining and found a place for itself and emerged as a separate field of research.Web mining involves a wide range of applications that aim at discovering and extracting hidden information in datastored on the Web. Web log analysis is an...

  7. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  8. Performance Analysis for Lateral-Line-Inspired Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    frequency is encoded in the nerve fibers connected to the lateral line [10], indicating that at least some high level information about vortices is being...Mogdans. Responses to dipole stimuli of anterior lateral line nerve fibres in goldfish, carassius auratus, under still and running water conditions...M. Humphreys. Wall-pressure-array measure- ments beneath a separating/ reattaching flow region. Physics of Fluids, 15(3):706–717, March 2003. [37

  9. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Chen, Christopher T.; Emmer, Hal; McMahon, William E.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2013-07-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si0.9Ge0.1 structures and investigate III-V on Si1-xGex device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si0.1Ge0.9 wires coated with a GaAs0.9P0.1 shell in three different geometries: conformal, hemispherical, and spherical. The analytical model indicates that efficiencies approaching 34% are achievable with high quality materials. Full field electromagnetic simulations serve to elucidate the optical loss mechanisms and demonstrate light guiding into the wire core. Simulated current-voltage curves under solar illumination reveal the impact of a varying GaAs0.9P0.1 minority carrier lifetime. Finally, defective regions at the hetero-interface are shown to have a negligible effect on device performance if highly doped so as to serve as a back surface field. Overall, the growths and the model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed geometries and can be used to guide tandem wire array solar cell designs.

  10. Applications of array processors in the analysis of remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Strong, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The architectures, programming characteristics, and ranges of application of past, present, and planned array processors for the digital processing of remote-sensing images are compared. Such functions as radiometric and geometric corrections, principal-components analysis, cluster coding, histogram generation, grey-level mapping, convolution, classification, and mensuration and modeling operations are considered, and both pipeline-type and single-instruction/multiple-data-stream (SIMD) arrays are evaluated. Numerical results are presented in a table, and it is found that the pipeline-type arrays normally used with minicomputers increase their speed significantly at low cost, while even further gains are provided by the more expensive SIMD arrays. Most image-processing operations become I/O-limited when SIMD arrays are used with current I/O devices.

  11. Crosstalk analysis of silicon-on-insulator nanowire-arrayed waveguide grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Li; An, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Jia-Shun; Wang, Yue; Wang, Liang-Liang; Li, Jian-Guang; Wu, Yuan-Da; Yin, Xiao-Jie; Hu, Xiong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The factors influencing the crosstalk of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) are analyzed using the transfer function method. The analysis shows that wider and thicker arrayed waveguides, outsider fracture of arrayed waveguide, and larger channel space, could mitigate the deterioration of crosstalk. The SOI nanowire AWGs with different arrayed waveguide widths are fabricated by using deep ultraviolet lithography (DUV) and inductively coupled plasma etching (ICP) technology. The measurement results show that the crosstalk performance is improved by about 7 dB through adopting 800 nm arrayed waveguide width. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA016902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274047, 61435013, 61307034, and 61405188), and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0402504).

  12. Chemically robust fluoroalkyl phthalocyanine-oligonucleotide bioconjugates and their GRP78 oncogene photocleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pradeepkumar; Patel, Hemantbhai H; Borland, Emily; Gorun, Sergiu M; Sabatino, David

    2014-06-18

    The first representative of functionalized fluoroalkyl phthalocyanines, F48H7(COOH)PcZn, is reported. The complex generates (1)O2 affording long-lasting photooxidation of an external substrate without self-decomposition. The carboxylic group couples with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting GRP78 oncogenes, resulting in the F48H7PcZn-cancer targeting oligonucleotide (CTO). The bioconjugated fluorophthalocyanine effectively hybridizes complementary GRP78 DNA and mRNA sequences. Piperidine cleavage assays reveal desired photochemical oligonucleotide oxidative degradation for both F48H7PcZn-CTO:DNA and F48H7PcZn-CTO:mRNA hybrids. This new materials strategy could be extended to other functional fluorinated phthalocyanines-antisense oligonucleotide combinations for long-lasting oncogene-targeting photodynamic therapy.

  13. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  14. Inhibition of HTLV-III by exogenous oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodchild, J.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described of detecting the presence of HTLV-III virus in a sample by demonstrating inhibition of replication of the virus in cells which are normally killed by the HTLV-III virus after the cells have been (a) combined with the sample and an oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication and capable of hybridizing with at least the highly conserved region, the highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome being a nucleotide sequence present in the genomes of HTLV-III isolates and the oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication being complementary to a region of the HTLV-III genome.

  15. Proton NMR studies of (N-MeCys sup 3 ,N-MeCys sup 7 )TANDEM binding to DNA oligonucleotides: Sequence-specific binding at the TpA site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addess, K.J.; Gilbert, D.E.; Feigon, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Olsen, R.K. (Utah State Univ., Logan (United States))

    1992-01-21

    (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-MeCys{sup 7})TANDEM, an undermethylated analogue of Triostin A, contains two N-methyl groups on the cysteine residues only. Footprinting results showed that (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-Me-Cys{sup 7})TANDEM binds strongly to DNA rich in A{center dot}T residues. However, it was not known whether specific binding of (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-MeCys{sup 7})TANDEM requires a TpA step or an ApT step. In 1:1 saturated complexes with the octamers (d(GGATATCC)){sub 2} and (d(GGTTAACC)){sub 2}, (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-MeCys{sup 7})TANDEM binds to each octamer as a bis-intercalator bracketing the TpA step. The octadepsipeptide ring binds in the minor groove of the DNA. Analysis of sugar coupling constants from the phase-sensitive COSY data indicates that the sugar of the thymine in the TpA binding site adopts predominantly an N-type sugar conformation, while the remaining sugars on the DNA adopt an S-type conformation, as has been observed in other Triostin A and echinomycin complexes. The drug does not bind to the octamer (d(GGAATTCC)){sub 2} as a bis-intercalator. Only weak nonintercalative binding is observed to this DNA octamer. These results show unambiguously that (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-MeCys{sup 7})TANDEM binds sequence specifically at TpA sites in DNA. The factors underlying the sequence specificity of (N-MeCys{sup 3},N-MeCys{sup 7})TANDEM binding to DNA are discussed.

  16. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particl