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Sample records for oligomer covalent complexes

  1. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  2. Characterization of non-covalent oligomers of proteins treated with hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Anna L P; Winterbourn, Christine C; Brennan, Stephen O; Jordan, T William; Kettle, Anthony J

    2003-10-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase that causes aggregation of many proteins. Treatment of apohaemoglobin and apomyoglobin with HOCl produced a regular series of oligomer bands when the proteins were separated by SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. Aggregation was detectable at a HOCl/protein molar ratio of 0.5:1 and was maximal at ratios of 10:1-20:1. Dimers formed within 1 min of adding HOCl, and further aggregation occurred over the next 30 min. No convincing evidence for covalent cross-linking was obtained by amino acid analysis, peptide analysis or electrospray ionization-MS of HOCl-modified apomyoglobin. The latter showed an increase in mass consistent with conversion of the two methionine residues into sulphoxides. A 5-fold excess of HOCl generated approximately three chloramines on the apomyoglobin. These underwent slow decay. Protein carbonyls were formed and were almost entirely located only on the polymer bands. Conversion of positively into negatively charged groups on the protein by succinylation caused preformed aggregates to dissociate. Treatment of apomyoglobin with taurine chloramine generated methionine sulphoxides but few protein carbonyls, and did not result in aggregation. We conclude that aggregation was due to strong, non-covalent interactions between protein chains. We propose that formation of protein carbonyls and possibly chloramines, along with methionine oxidation, alters protein folding to expose hydrophobic areas on neighbouring molecules that associate to form dimers and higher-molecular-mass aggregates. This process could lead to the formation of aggregated proteins at sites of myeloperoxidase activity and contribute to inflammatory tissue injury.

  3. Induction of Covalently Crosslinked p62 Oligomers with Reduced Binding to Polyubiquitinated Proteins by the Autophagy Inhibitor Verteporfin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Donohue

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic constituents, including organelles and long-lived proteins, that helps maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against various cellular stresses. Verteporfin is a benzoporphyrin derivative used clinically in photodynamic therapy to treat macular degeneration. Verteporfin was recently found to inhibit autophagosome formation by an unknown mechanism that does not require exposure to light. We report that verteporfin directly targets and modifies p62, a scaffold and adaptor protein that binds both polyubiquitinated proteins destined for degradation and LC3 on autophagosomal membranes. Western blotting experiments revealed that exposure of cells or purified p62 to verteporfin causes the formation of covalently crosslinked p62 oligomers by a mechanism involving low-level singlet oxygen production. Rose bengal, a singlet oxygen producer structurally unrelated to verteporfin, also produced crosslinked p62 oligomers and inhibited autophagosome formation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that crosslinked p62 oligomers retain their ability to bind to LC3 but show defective binding to polyubiquitinated proteins. Mutations in the p62 PB1 domain that abolish self-oligomerization also abolished crosslinked oligomer formation. Interestingly, small amounts of crosslinked p62 oligomers were detected in untreated cells, and other groups noted the accumulation of p62 forms with reduced SDS-PAGE mobility in cellular and animal models of oxidative stress and aging. These data indicate that p62 is particularly susceptible to oxidative crosslinking and lead us to propose a model whereby oxidized crosslinked p62 oligomers generated rapidly by drugs like verteporfin or over time during the aging process interfere with autophagy.

  4. Induction of Covalently Crosslinked p62 Oligomers with Reduced Binding to Polyubiquitinated Proteins by the Autophagy Inhibitor Verteporfin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Elizabeth; Balgi, Aruna D; Komatsu, Masaaki; Roberge, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic constituents, including organelles and long-lived proteins, that helps maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against various cellular stresses. Verteporfin is a benzoporphyrin derivative used clinically in photodynamic therapy to treat macular degeneration. Verteporfin was recently found to inhibit autophagosome formation by an unknown mechanism that does not require exposure to light. We report that verteporfin directly targets and modifies p62, a scaffold and adaptor protein that binds both polyubiquitinated proteins destined for degradation and LC3 on autophagosomal membranes. Western blotting experiments revealed that exposure of cells or purified p62 to verteporfin causes the formation of covalently crosslinked p62 oligomers by a mechanism involving low-level singlet oxygen production. Rose bengal, a singlet oxygen producer structurally unrelated to verteporfin, also produced crosslinked p62 oligomers and inhibited autophagosome formation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that crosslinked p62 oligomers retain their ability to bind to LC3 but show defective binding to polyubiquitinated proteins. Mutations in the p62 PB1 domain that abolish self-oligomerization also abolished crosslinked oligomer formation. Interestingly, small amounts of crosslinked p62 oligomers were detected in untreated cells, and other groups noted the accumulation of p62 forms with reduced SDS-PAGE mobility in cellular and animal models of oxidative stress and aging. These data indicate that p62 is particularly susceptible to oxidative crosslinking and lead us to propose a model whereby oxidized crosslinked p62 oligomers generated rapidly by drugs like verteporfin or over time during the aging process interfere with autophagy.

  5. Dynamic Covalent Assembly of Peptoid-Based Ladder Oligomers by Vernier Templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Jung, Jae Hwan; Scott, Timothy F

    2015-12-30

    Dynamic covalent chemistry, in conjunction with template-directed assembly, enables the fabrication of extended nanostructures that are both precise and tough. Here we demonstrate the dynamic covalent assembly of peptoid-based molecular ladders with up to 12 rungs via scandium(III)-catalyzed imine metathesis by employing the principle of Vernier templating, where small precursor units with mismatched numbers of complementary functional groups are coreacted to yield larger structures with sizes determined by the respective precursor functionalities. Owing to their monomer diversity and synthetic accessibility, sequence-specific oligopeptoids bearing dynamic covalent pendant groups were employed as precursors for molecular ladder fabrication. The generated structures were characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and gel permeation chromatography, confirming successful molecular ladder fabrication.

  6. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  7. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  8. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PADINJARE VEETIL BIJINA; CHERUMUTTATHU H SURESH

    2016-10-01

    Ab initio MP4/Aug-cc-pvDZ//MP2/6-311++g(d,p) level interaction energy (Eint) and molecular electrostatic potential analysis (MESP) of a large variety of non-covalent intermolecular complexes, viz. tetrel, chalcogen, pnicogen, halogen, hydrogen, dihydrogen and lithium bonded complexes have been reported. The electronic changes associated with the non-covalent complex formation is monitored in terms of MESP minimum (Vmin) in the free and complexed states of the donor and acceptor molecules as well as in terms ofMESP at the donor and acceptor atoms (Vn) of the free monomers and complexes. The change in Vmin or Vn on the donor molecule (ΔVmin(D) or ΔVn(D)) during complex formation is proportional to its electron donating ability while such a change on the acceptor molecule (ΔVmin(A) or ΔVn(A)) is proportional to its electron accepting ability. Further, the quantities ΔΔVmin = ΔVmin(D) −ΔVmin(A) and ΔΔVn = ΔVn(D) −ΔVn(A) have shown strong linear correlations with Eint of the complex (Eint values fall in the range 0.7 to 46.2 kcal/mol for 54 complexes) and suggest that the intermolecular non-covalent interactions in a wide variety of systems can be monitored and assessed in terms of change in MESP due to complex formation in the gas phase. With the incorporation of solvent effect in the calculation, charged systems showed significant deviations from the linear correlation. The MESP based analysis proposes that the large variety of intermolecular non-covalent complexes considered in this study can be grouped under the general category of electron donor-acceptor (eDA) complexes

  9. Covalent container compound: Empty, endohedral, and exohedral C28 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Mark R.; Laouini, Nozha

    1993-07-01

    Results from quasidynamical local-density simulations on a small fullerene complex (C28), three endohedral complexes (C28BC, C28BZr, and C28BTi), a C atom bound to the corner of the C28 molecule, and C28H4 are presented. This molecule forms spontaneously from a 29-atom diamond crystallite and, under proper circumstances, is a covalent container compound. Upon encapsulation of a Zr atom, 12.6 eV of energy is liberated leading to an unreactive closed-shell C28Zr molecule. The open-shell structure of the empty molecule leads to a reactive yet relatively stable building block which might be useful for synthesis of new metastable forms of carbon-based materials. Electronic structures, ionization energies, electron affinities, equilibrium geometries, and bare Hubbard U parameters are presented.

  10. Stability of lead(II) complexes of alginate oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, T.A.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Grasdalen, H.; Smidsrod, O.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The current work reports on the Pb(II) complexes formed with oligomeric uronic acids (carboxylated saccharide residues) found polymerized in the cell walls and envelopes of algae and bacteria alike. The application of partial acid hydrolysis, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), 1H NMR, and scanned

  11. Two supramolecular complexes based on polyoxometalates and Co-EDTA units via covalent connection or non-covalent interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chunlin; Xiao, Hanxi; Cai, Qing; Tang, Jianting; Cai, Tiejun; Deng, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Two new 3D network organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes {[Na6(CoEDTA)2(H2O)13]·(H2SiW12O40)·xH2O}n (1) and [CoH4EDTA(H2O)]2(SiW12O40)·15H2O (2) (H4EDTA=Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) have been successfully synthesized by solution method, and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both of the complexes are the supramolecules, but with different liking mode, they are two representative models of supramolecule. complex (1) is a 3D infinite network supramolecular coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through coordinate-covalent bonds. While complex (2) is normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions, such as H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. Both of complex (1) and (2) exhibit good catalytic activities for catalytic oxidation of methanol, when the initial concentration of methanol is 3.0 g m-3, flow rate is 10 mL min-1, and the quality of catalyst is 0.2 g, for complex (1) and complex (2) the maximum elimination rates of methanol are 85% (150 °C) and 92% (120 °C), respectively.

  12. Capillary electrophoresis methods for the determination of covalent polyphenol-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombley, John D; Loegel, Thomas N; Danielson, Neil D; Hagerman, Ann E

    2011-09-01

    The bioactivities and bioavailability of plant polyphenols including proanthocyanidins and other catechin derivatives may be affected by covalent reaction between polyphenol and proteins. Both processing conditions and gastrointestinal conditions may promote formation of covalent complexes for polyphenol-rich foods and beverages such as wine. Little is known about covalent reactions between proteins and tannin, because suitable methods for quantitating covalent complexes have not been developed. We established capillary electrophoresis methods that can be used to distinguish free protein from covalently bound protein-polyphenol complexes and to monitor polyphenol oxidation products. The methods are developed using the model protein bovine serum albumin and the representative polyphenol (-)epigallocatechin gallate. By pairing capillaries with different diameters with appropriate alkaline borate buffers, we are able to optimize resolution of either the protein-polyphenol complexes or the polyphenol oxidation products. This analytical method, coupled with purification of the covalent complexes by diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography, should facilitate characterization of covalent complexes in polyphenol-rich foods and beverages such as wine.

  13. Nonmigrating Equivalent Substitutes for PVC/DOP Formulations as Shown by a TG Study of PVC with Covalently Bound PEO-PPO Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rodrigo; Gacal, Tülin; Ocakoglu, Melike; García, Carolina; Elvira, Carlos; Gallardo, Alberto; Reinecke, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Monoamino functionalized ethylenoxide (EO)/propylenoxide oligomers (Jeffamine) are linked chemically to poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) using trichlorotriazine chemistry in order to prepare nonmigrating internally plasticized materials. The dependence of the plasticizer efficiency on both the number of anchoring points to the chains and the PVC/plasticizer compatibility is investigated using oligomers of different molecular weight and hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance. Hydrophilic oligomers (containing predominantly EO) of molecular weights between 2000 and 5000 g mol(-1) exhibit excellent plasticizer efficiency, nearly identical to di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DOP) in conventional PVC/DOP mixtures and may therefore be used as nonmigrating equivalents for DOP.

  14. Molecular characterization of covalent complexes between tissue transglutaminase and gliadin peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2004-01-01

    recognized by intestinal T cells from patients. Incubation of TG2 with gliadin peptides also results in the formation of covalent TG2-peptide complexes. Here we report the characterization of complexes between TG2 and two immunodominant gliadin peptides. Two types of covalent complexes were found......; the peptides are either linked via a thioester bond to the active site cysteine of TG2 or via isopeptide bonds to particular lysine residues of the enzyme. We quantified the number of gliadin peptides bound to TG2 under different conditions. After 30 min of incubation of TG2 at 1 microm with an equimolar ratio...

  15. Insight into Signal Response of Protein Ions in Native ESI-MS from the Analysis of Model Mixtures of Covalently Linked Protein Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Katharina; Wittwer, Yves; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Anders, Ulrike; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Native ESI-MS is increasingly used for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. In such analyses, peak intensity ratios measured in mass spectra are treated as abundance ratios of the respective molecules in solution. While signal intensities of similar-size analytes, such as a protein and its complex with a small molecule, can be directly compared, significant distortions of the peak ratio due to unequal signal response of analytes impede the application of this approach for large oligomeric biomolecular complexes. We use a model system based on concatenated maltose binding protein units (MBPn, n = 1, 2, 3) to systematically study the behavior of protein mixtures in ESI-MS. The MBP concatamers differ from each other only by their mass while the chemical composition and other properties remain identical. We used native ESI-MS to analyze model mixtures of MBP oligomers, including equimolar mixtures of two proteins, as well as binary mixtures containing different fractions of the individual components. Pronounced deviation from a linear dependence of the signal intensity with concentration was observed for all binary mixtures investigated. While equimolar mixtures showed linear signal dependence at low concentrations, distinct ion suppression was observed above 20 μM. We systematically studied factors that are most often used in the literature to explain the origin of suppression effects. Implications of this effect for quantifying protein-protein binding affinity by native ESI-MS are discussed in general and demonstrated for an example of an anti-MBP antibody with its ligand, MBP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  17. Direct Observation of Non-covalent Complexes for Phosphorylated Flavonoid-protein Interaction by ESI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Lan CHEN; Ting ZHANG; Hong Xia LIU; Ling Bo QU; You Zhu YU; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    Diethyl flavon-7-yl phosphate was synthesized by modified Atheron-Todd reaction. The result of ESI shows that the phosphated flavonoids possess stronger binding affinities toward proteins such as myoglobin, insulin and lysozyme and are easier to form the non-covalent complexes with them.

  18. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, THERMAL DEGRADATION AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF OLIGO[2-(2-HYDROXYPHENYLIMINOMETHYLBENZYLIDENE)AMINOPHENOL]AND OLIGOMER-METAL COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (I)smet Kaya; S(u)leyman Culhao(g)lu

    2008-01-01

    The oxidative polycondensation reaction conditions of 2-[(2-hydroxyphenyliminomethylbenzylidene)amino-phenol] (2-HPIMBAP) has been accomplished by using air O2 and NaOCl oxidants in an aqueous alkaline medium between50-90℃. The optimum reaction conditions of the oxidative polycondensation and the main parameters of the process wereestablished. At the optimum reaction conditions, yield of the products were found to be 67.72% and 61.49% for air O2 andNaOCl oxidants respectively. The structures of the monomer and oligomer were confirmed by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and13C-NMR and elemental analysis. Also, TGA-DTA, SEC techniques and solubility tests were applied for characterization.1H-NMR and 13C-NMR data show that the polymerization proceeded by the C-C and C-O-C coupling systems of orthoand para positions and oxyphenylene according to-OH group of 2-HPIMBAP. The number-average molecular weight(Mn), weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (PDI) values of oligo[2-(2-hydroxyphenyliminomethylbenzylidene)aminophenol] (oligo(2-HPIMBAP)) were determined. Thermal analyses of oligomer-metal complexeswere investigated in N2 atmosphere between 15-1000℃. Electrical conductivities of oligo(2-HPIMBAP) and oligomer-metalcomplexes measured with four point technique. Electrical conductivity of the oligo(2-HPIMBAP) was measured, showingthat the oligomer is a typical semiconductor. Optical band gaps (Eg) of 2-HPIMBAP, oligo(2-HPIMBAP) and oligomer-metal complex compounds were determined by UV-Vis measurements. The monomer and oligomer were screened forantibacterial activities.

  19. Covalent and Non-covalent Chemical Modification of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Tetra-(4-hydroxylphenyl)porphyrin and Its Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Wang, Hongke; Chang, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Deng, Biyun; Liao, Junxu

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were covalently and non-covalently functionalized with tetra- (4-hydroxylphenyl) porphyrin (THPPH2) and its complexes (ZnTHPP) forming dispersible nanohybrids in organic solution. The morphology of the nanohybrids was observed with transmission electron microscopy. The structure of the product was characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermogravim- etric analysis. The photo-induced electron-transfer process of the nanohybrids in organic solution was also revealed.

  20. Noncovalent Interaction Energies in Covalent Complexes: TEM-1 beta-Lactamase and beta-Lactams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The class A {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 is a key bacterial resistance enzyme against {beta}-lactam antibiotics, but little is known about the energetic bases for complementarity between TEM-1 and its inhibitors. Most inhibitors form a covalent adduct with the catalytic Ser70, making the measurement of equilibriumconstants, and hence interaction energies, technically difficult. This study evaluates noncovalent interactions withincovalent complexes by examining the differential stability of TEM-1 and its inhibitor adducts. The thermal denaturation of TEM-1 follows a two-state, reversible model with a melting temperature (T{sub m}) of 51.6 C and a van't Hoff enthalpy of unfolding ({Delta}H{sub VH}) of 146.2 kcal/mol at pH 7.0. The stability of the enzyme changes on forming an inhibitor adduct. As expected, some inhibitors stabilize TEM-1; transition-state analogues increase the T{sub m} by up to 3.7 C(1.7 kcal/mol). Surprisingly, all {beta}-lactam covalent acyl-enzyme complexes tested destabilize TEM-1 significantly relative to the apoenzyme. For instance, the clinically used inhibitor clavulanic acid and the {beta}-lactamase-resistant {beta}-lactams moxalactam and imipenem destabilize TEM-1 by over 2.6 C (1.2 kcal/mol) in their covalent adducts. Based on the structure of the TEM-1/imipenem complex (Maveyraud et al., J Am Chem Soc 1998;120:9748-52), destabilization by moxalactam and imipenem is thought to be caused by a steric clash between the side-chain of Asn132 and the 6(7)-{alpha} group of these {beta}-lactams. To test this hypothesis, the mutant enzyme N132A was made. In contrast with wild-type, the covalent complexes between N132A and both imipenem and moxalactam stabilize the enzyme, consistent with the hypothesis. To investigate the structural bases of this dramatic change instability, the structure of N132A/imipenem was determined by X-ray crystallography. In the complex with N132A, imipenemadopts a very different conformation from that observed in the wild

  1. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adam M; Mann, Thomas H; Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2017-02-28

    Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment.IMPORTANCE Lacking internal membrane-bound compartments, bacteria achieve subcellular organization by establishing self-assembling protein-based microdomains. The asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses one such microdomain to link cell cycle progression to morphogenesis, but the mechanism for the generation of this

  2. Synthesis of Novel Phosphorylated Daidzein Derivatives and ESI Investigation on Their Non-Covalent Complexes with Lysozyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN, Xiao-Lan; SHI, Xiao-Na; QU, Ling-Bo; YUAN, Jin-Wei; LU, Jian-Sha; ZHAO, Yu-Fen

    2007-01-01

    Daidzein (7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone) was phosphorylated by a modified Atherton-Todd reaction. The structures of the five target product, were determined by X-ray, IR, NMR and ESI-MS. Electrospray ionization results show that in the gas phase all the phosphorylated daidzein derivatives could form non-covalent complexes with the protein lysozyme, while non-covalent complexes were not detected in the mixed solution of daidzein with lysozyme.Relative affinity of every non-covalent complex was obtained according to its different decomposition orifice voltage.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  5. Detection and Characterization of Non-covalent Complex between Lappaconitine and β-Cyclodextrin by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xuan XU; Li LI; Hao YUE; Zhi Qiang LIU; Ming Quan GUO; Shu Ying LIU

    2006-01-01

    The non-covalent complexes between lappaconitine (LA) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been detected and characterized by electrospray ionization combined with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The experimental results showed that only 1:1 non-covalent complex can be formed in different starting molar ratios of LA to β-CD. Furthermore, the diagnostic fragmentation of the β-CD-LA complex, with a significant contribution of covalent fragmentation of LA leaving the N-acetyl anthranoyl (AN) moiety inserted to β-CD, provided the convincing evidence for the formation of non-covalent complex between LA and β-CD and the cite of LA molecule included to cavity of β-CD assigned to AN residue.

  6. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a π-Conjugated Oligomer/Porphyrin Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2014-10-02

    Controlling charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) at the donor-acceptor interface is extremely important to optimize the conversion efficiency in solar cell devices. In general, ultrafast CT and slow CR are desirable for optimal device performance. In this Letter, the ultrafast excited-state CT between platinum oligomer (DPP-Pt(acac)) as a new electron donor and porphyrin as an electron acceptor is monitored for the first time using femtosecond (fs) transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy with broad-band capability and 120 fs temporal resolution. Turning the CT on/off has been shown to be possible either by switching from an organometallic oligomer to a metal-free oligomer or by controlling the charge density on the nitrogen atom of the porphyrin meso unit. Our time-resolved data show that the CT and CS between DPP-Pt(acac) and cationic porphyrin are ultrafast (approximately 1.5 ps), and the CR is slow (ns time scale), as inferred from the formation and the decay of the cationic and anionic species. We also found that the metallic center in the DPP-Pt(acac) oligomer and the positive charge on the porphyrin are the keys to switching on/off the ultrafast CT process.

  7. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    radiotherapy rather than imaging, the delivery problem may be obviated by attaching the antisense oligomer to an antitumor antibody to improve delivery following intravenous administration. Since many antibodies are trapped in endosomes following internalization, a cell penetrating peptide such as tat will also be included to ensure transport of the complex without entrapment. Rather than covalent conjugation of the three entities, we are using streptavidin as linker after biotinylated each component. Our recent efforts have concentrated on establishing the influence of the streptavidin linker on the properties of each component within the delivery nanoparticle. Thus, we have shown that the Herceptin antibody, when linked to a labeled oligomer via streptavidin, remains capable of directing the label oligomer to Her2+ tumor cells in vitro and Her2+ tumor xenografts in mice. In addition, we have demonstrated that a labeled antisense oligomer within the nanoparticle remains capable of migrating to the nucleus and binding to its target mRNA in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that the tat peptide also preserves its properties of cell transport when incubated as one component of the nanoparticle. Most recently, we have addressed another of our concerns, namely whether the streptavidin would adversely effect the biodistribution of the antisense oligomer. We were pleased to find that the 99mTc-labeled antisense MORF within the Herceptin three component and two component nanoparticles accumulated and was retained in tumor in a manner suggestive of radiolabeled Herceptin itself. Thus the preserved properties within the streptavidin delivery nanoparticle of the Herceptin antibody, the tat peptide and the 111In labeled antisense MORF oligomer will explain why we have successfully demonstrated an Auger electron-mediated, antisense-mediated radiotherapy in cells in culture. One remaining concern is that the delivery nanoparticle may deliver the Auger electron emitting radionuclide to the

  8. Dynamic Covalent Synthesis of Aryleneethynylene Cages through Alkyne Metathesis: Dimer, Tetramer, or Interlocked Complex?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chenxi; Long, Hai; Azarnoush, Setareh; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    A dynamic covalent approach towards rigid aryleneethynylene covalent organic polyhedrons (COPs) was explored. Our study on the relationship of the COP structures and the geometry of their building blocks reveals that the topology of aryleneethynylene COPs strongly depends on the size of the building blocks. A tetramer (D2h symmetric), dimer, or interlocked complex can be formed from monomers with the same face-to-edge angle but in different sizes. As alkyne metathesis is a self-exchange reaction and non-directional, the cyclooligomerization of multi-alkyne monomers involves both intramolecular cyclization and intermolecular metathesis reaction, resulting in complicated thermodynamic process disturbed by kinetic competition. Although a tetrahedron-shaped tetramer (Td symmetric) has comparable thermodynamic stability to a D2h symmetric tetramer, its formation is kinetically disfavored and was not observed experimentally. Aryleneethynylene COPs consist of purely unsaturated carbon backbones and exhibit large internal cavities, which would have interesting applications in host-guest chemistry and development of porous materials.

  9. Heat-stable enterotoxin receptor/guanylyl cyclase C is an oligomer consisting of functionally distinct subunits, which are non-covalently linked in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); E. van der Wiel; M.L. Hom; L.H. Luthjens; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractGuanylyl cyclase (GC) C is a heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) receptor with a monomeric M(r) of approximately 140,000. We calculated from its hydrodynamic parameters that an active GC-C complex has a M(r) of 393,000, suggesting that GC-C is a trimer under nativ

  10. ESI-MS study on non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 and new neurogrowth promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红霞; 张学敏; 杨松成; 肖军海; 聂爱华; 赵丽琴; 李松

    2003-01-01

    An ESI-MS method for studying the non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 with its nonimmunosuppressive ligands was developed. The method was used to screen out three compounds capable of binding to rhFKBP12 non-covalently from 52 compounds. By competing binding experiment, the binding site and the relative binding strength of these three compounds 000107, 000308 and A2B12 with rhFKBP12 were measured. All of them have the same binding site as FK506 does. X-ray crystalline diffraction experiment of non-covalent bond complex of 000107, 000308 with rhFKBP12 by Tsinghua University showed the same results. Among them 000308 has good effect on stimulating neurite to grow in chicken sensory neuronal cultures.

  11. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  12. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  13. Raman study of the photopolymer formation in the {Pt(dbdtc)2}·C60 fullerene complex and the decomposition kinetics of the photo-oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletov, K. P.; Velkos, G.; Arvanitidis, J.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.

    2017-08-01

    The photopolymer formation in the fullerene layers of the C60 complex with platinum dibenzyldithiocarbamate is reported for the first time. The photo-oligomer peaks appear in the Raman spectra near the Ag(2) mode of the C60 molecule upon sample illumination with various laser wavelengths. The photo-oligomers are unstable upon heating and revert back to the C60 monomeric state. The activation energy of the thermal decomposition, obtained from the Arrhenius dependence of the decay time constant on temperature, is (1.12 ± 0.11) eV and the photo-oligomers decompose at ∼130 °C, being more fragile than the crystalline polymers of C60.

  14. Study of fungicidal and antibacterial effect of the Cu(II)-complexes of thiophene oligomers synthesized in ZSM-5 zeolite channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cík, G; Bujdáková, H; Sersen, F

    2001-07-01

    The influence of the Cu(II)-complexes of thiophene oligomers synthesized by oxidative polymerization of thiophene with Cu2+ ions in ZSM-5 zeolite channels on fungicidal and antimicrobial properties was studied. It has been found that the heterogeneous system culture medium-modified zeolite increases sporulation of the tested fungus (Aspergillus niger) and concurrently kills yeast (Candida albicans). These effects are attributed to a slow release of Cu2+ ions and thiophene oligomers into the culture medium. As for the tested bacteria (G+ Staphylococcus aureus, G- Escherichia coli), the percentage of the killed cells increases due to light activation of the system. The light effect is assigned to photogeneration of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), mainly *OH radicals, which were registered in the water solution by EPR spectroscopy. It has been confirmed that the thiophene oligomers present in the Cu-ZSM-5 microstructure slow down the release of copper into the medium.

  15. The azaphosphiridine to terminal phosphinidene complex rearrangement--looking for non-covalent interactions of a highly reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba Franco, José Manuel; Espinosa Ferao, Arturo; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Streubel, Rainer

    2013-10-25

    Azaphosphiridine complexes 4a,a', intermediates in the reaction of P-C5Me5 substituted Li–Cl phosphinidenoid complex 2 and C-furyl carbaldimine 3, rearranged selectively to give the novel N,P,C-cage complex 5a. Transient terminal phosphinidene complex 7a was trapped with phenyl acetylene (8) forming the new N,P,C-cage complex 9. DFT calculations provide evidence for a thermally allowed aza-phospha-Cope rearrangement that led to the P-amino substituted phosphinidene complex 7a, which is stabilized by non-covalent interactions in addition to typical through-bond electronic effects.

  16. Quantifying covalent interactions with resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering: Case study of Ni2+ aqua complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Miedema, P. S.; Techert, S.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Föhlisch, A.; Odelius, M.; Wernet, Ph.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the effects of covalent interactions in Ni 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra from aqueous Ni2+ ions and find that the relative RIXS intensities of ligand-to-metal charge-transfer final states with respect to the ligand-field final states reflect the covalent mixing between Ni 3d and water orbitals. Specifically, the experimental intensity ratio at the Ni L3-edge allows to determine that the Ni 3d orbitals have on average 5.5% of water character. We propose that 2p3d RIXS at the Ni L3-edge can be utilized to quantify covalency in Ni complexes without the use of external references or simulations.

  17. From N-vinylpyrrolidone anions to modified paraffin-like oligomers via double alkylation with 1,8-dibromooctane: access to covalent networks and oligomeric amines for dye attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obels, Daniela; Lievenbrück, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Summary The double alkylation of N-vinylpyrrolidone (N-VP) with 1,8-dibromooctane yields paraffin-like oligomeric chains bearing polymerizable vinyl moieties. These oligomers were radically crosslinked in bulk with N-VP as co-monomer yielding swellable polymer disks. The vinylic side groups of the N-VP oligomers allow thiol–ene click reactions with 2-aminoethanethiol hydrochloride to obtain reactive amino-functionalized oligomers. Further modification of the free amino groups with 1,4-difluoro-9,10-anthraquinone (DFA) yields red-colored oligomeric anthraquinone dyes. The final reaction of DFA-substituted N-VP oligomers with Jeffamine® M 600 leads to blue-colored and branched oligomers with poly(ethylene glycol) side chains. PMID:27559389

  18. Covalent Organic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra

    chemistry of silicon, InAs and GaAs materials, covalentsurface functionalization using organosilanes, liquid-phase, and vapor-phasefunctionalizations, diazo-transfer reaction, CuAAC click chemistry, different types ofbiorthogonal chemistries, SPAAC chemistry, and cellular interactions of chemically...... modifiednanostructures.The second chapter provides an overview of stable primary metal-surface functionalizationand its significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules. Inprinciple, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either in vapor-phase or in liquidphase.We compared...... immobilization of D-amino acid adhesion peptideson azide functionalized silicon, GaAs and InAs materials by using CuAAC-click chemistry.The covalent immobilization of penetration peptide (TAT) on gold nanotips of InAs NWs isalso demonstrated.In chapter four, the covalent immobilization of GFP on silicon wafers...

  19. A platinum complex that binds non-covalently to DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Mendoza, Oscar; Duarte, Alexandra A; Mann, David J; Vilar, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin and some of its derivatives have been shown to be very successful anticancer agents. Their main mode of action has been proposed to be via covalent binding to DNA. However, one of the limitations of these drugs is their poor activity against some tumours due to intrinsic or acquired resistance. Therefore, there is interest in developing complexes with different binding modes and mode of action. Herein we present a novel platinum(ii)-terpyridine complex (1) which interacts non-covalently with DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin. The interaction of this complex with DNA was studied by UV/Vis spectroscopic titrations, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assays and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. In addition, computational docking studies were carried out with the aim of establishing the complex's binding mode. These experimental and computational studies showed the complex to have an affinity constant for DNA of ∼10(4) M(-1), a theoretical free energy of binding of -10.83 kcal mol(-1) and selectivity for the minor groove of DNA. Long-term studies indicated that 1 did not covalently bind (or nick) DNA. The cancer cell antiproliferative properties of this platinum(ii) complex were probed in vitro against human and murine cell lines. Encouragingly the platinum(ii) complex displayed selective toxicity for the cancerous (U2OS and SH-SY5Y) and proliferating NIH 3T3 cell lines. Further cell based studies were carried out to establish the mode of action. Cellular uptake studies demonstrated that the complex is able to penetrate the cell membrane and localize to the nucleus, implying that genomic DNA could be a cellular target. Detailed immunoblotting studies in combination with DNA-flow cytometry showed that the platinum(ii) complex induced cell death in a manner consistent with necrosis.

  20. Bio-inspired multinuclear copper complexes covalently immobilized on reduced graphene oxide as efficient electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yue-Ting; Wei, Ping-Jie; Wang, Ru-Chun; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2015-05-01

    Inspired by the multicopper active site of laccase, which efficiently catalyzes the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), herein we report a novel bio-inspired ORR catalyst composed of a multinuclear copper complex that was immobilized on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via the covalently grafted triazole-dipyridine (TADPy) dinucleating ligand. This rGO-TADPyCu catalyst exhibited high ORR activity and superior long-term stability compared to Pt/C in alkaline media.

  1. Structural analyses of covalent enzyme-substrate analog complexes reveal strengths and limitations of de novo enzyme design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Althoff, Eric A; Bolduc, Jill; Jiang, Lin; Moody, James; Lassila, Jonathan K; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald; Stoddard, Barry; Baker, David

    2012-01-20

    We report the cocrystal structures of a computationally designed and experimentally optimized retro-aldol enzyme with covalently bound substrate analogs. The structure with a covalently bound mechanism-based inhibitor is similar to, but not identical with, the design model, with an RMSD of 1.4 Å over active-site residues and equivalent substrate atoms. As in the design model, the binding pocket orients the substrate through hydrophobic interactions with the naphthyl moiety such that the oxygen atoms analogous to the carbinolamine and β-hydroxyl oxygens are positioned near a network of bound waters. However, there are differences between the design model and the structure: the orientation of the naphthyl group and the conformation of the catalytic lysine are slightly different; the bound water network appears to be more extensive; and the bound substrate analog exhibits more conformational heterogeneity than typical native enzyme-inhibitor complexes. Alanine scanning of the active-site residues shows that both the catalytic lysine and the residues around the binding pocket for the substrate naphthyl group make critical contributions to catalysis. Mutating the set of water-coordinating residues also significantly reduces catalytic activity. The crystal structure of the enzyme with a smaller substrate analog that lacks naphthyl ring shows the catalytic lysine to be more flexible than in the naphthyl-substrate complex; increased preorganization of the active site would likely improve catalysis. The covalently bound complex structures and mutagenesis data highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the de novo enzyme design strategy.

  2. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-04-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the /sup 32/P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50/sup 0/C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the /sup 32/P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond.

  3. SYNTHESIS,CHARACTERIZATION,THERMAL DEGRADATION AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF OLIGO[2-(THIEN-2-YL- METHYLENE)AMINOPHENOL] AND OLIGOMER-METAL COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismet Kaya; Aysel Aydln

    2009-01-01

    The optimum reaction conditions of the oxidative polycondensation of 2-(thien-2-yl-methylene)aminophenol (2-TMAP) has been accomplished by using air O2, H2O2 and NaOCl oxidants in an aqueous alkaline medium between 20℃ and 90℃. The structures of the monomer and oligomer were confirmed by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR and elemental analysis. TGA-DTA, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) techniques and solubility tests were applied for characterization. The 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR data show that the polymerization proceeded with C-C and C-O-C coupling system from ortho and para positions and oxyphenylene. The number-average molecular weight (Mn), weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (PDI) values of oligo[2-(thien-2-yl-methylene)aminophenol] (O-2-TMAP) were determined with SEC measurements. Thermal analyses of oligomer-metal complex compounds of O-2-TMAP with Cd+2, Co+2, Cu+2, Zn+2, Fe+4, Zr+1, Ni+4 and Pb+4 ions were investigated in N2 atmosphere in the temperature range of 15-1000℃. The highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of monomer and oligomer were determined from the onset potentials for n-doping and p-doping, respectively. Optical band gaps (Eg) of 2-TMAP and O-2-TMAP and oligomer-metal complex compounds determined according to UV-Vis measurements. Also, electrical conductivities of O-2-TMAP and its metal complexes measured with four-point probe technique.

  4. 1D and 2D ~1H NMR studies on bisantrene complexes with short DNA oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚世杰; WILSON.W.David

    1995-01-01

    The binding of bisantrene to four DNA tetramers,d(CGCG)2,d(GCGC)2,d(CATG)2,and d(GTAC)2,was investigated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.Bisantrene is.a well knownanticancer drug and has been used clinically for years.DNA is believed to be one of its cellular targets.Re-suits from both ID and 2D 1H NMR are in agreement with an intercalation binding mode of bisantrene withthe four DNA tetramers in this study.The results further indicate that a threading intercalation birdingmode,in which one bisantrene side chain is in the minor groove and the other in the major groove of DNA,is preferred.The NMR results also suggest that bisantrene prefers binding at pyrimidine-(3’,5’)-purineintercalation sequences rather than at purine-(3’,5’)-pyrimidine sequences.The intramolecular andintermolecular NOE contacts of bisantrene-DNA tetramer complexes indicate that a C2’-endo uniform sugarpucker,rather than a mixed sugar conformation,is preferred by the intercalation site of both the 5’-(TA)-3’and the 5’-(CG)-3’ binding steps.

  5. Hybrid Luminescent Films Obtained by Covalent Anchoring Terbium Complex to Silica-based Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    New monomer N-(4-carboxyphenyl)-NL-(propyltriethoxysilyl)urea (1) which acts as both a ligand for Tb3+ ion and a sol-gel precursor has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, and MS. Hybrid luminescent thin films consisting of organoterbium covalently bonded to a silica-based network have been obtained in situ via a sol-gel approach. Strong line emission of Tb3+ ion was observed from the hybrid luminescent films under UV excitation.

  6. Building complex hybrid carbon architectures by covalent interconnections: graphene-nanotube hybrids and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ruitao; Cruz-Silva, Eduardo; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-05-27

    Graphene is theoretically a robust two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-hybridized carbon material with high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. However, due to the existence of grain boundaries and defects, experimentally synthesized large-area polycrystalline graphene sheets are easily broken and can exhibit high sheet resistances; thus, they are not suitable as flexible transparent conductors. As described in this issue of ACS Nano, Tour et al. circumvented this problem by proposing and synthesizing a novel hybrid structure that they have named "rebar graphene", which is composed of covalently interconnected carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with graphene sheets. In this particular configuration, CNTs act as "reinforcing bars" that not only improve the mechanical strength of polycrystalline graphene sheets but also bridge different crystalline domains so as to enhance the electrical conductivity. This report seems to be only the tip of the iceberg since it is also possible to construct novel and unprecedented hybrid carbon architectures by establishing covalent interconnections between CNTs with graphene, thus yielding graphene-CNT hybrids, three-dimensional (3D) covalent CNT networks, 3D graphene networks, etc. In this Perspective, we review the progress of these carbon hybrid systems and describe the challenges that need to be overcome in the near future.

  7. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  8. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  9. Synthesis of Novel Porphyrin and its Complexes Covalently Linked to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Study of their Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel covalent porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+ functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs have been successfully synthesized by the reaction of the carboxyl on the surface of MWNTs which was synthesized to use carbon radicals generated by the thermal decomposition of azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN with 5-p-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-triphenyl-porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+. Three resulting nanohybrids were characterized by spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman, and UV-vis, TGA, and TEM. The quality of porphyrin attached to the MWNTs was determined from thermogravimeric analysis (TGA of the MWNTs, which showed a weight loss of about 60%. The Raman and absorption spectroscopy data showed that the electronic properties of modified MWNTs were mostly retained, without damaging their one-dimensional electronic properties. From fluorescence measurements, it was observed that the porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+ were nearly quenched by MWNTs, indicating that this covalently modified mode facilitated the effective energy or electron transfer between the excited porphyrin moiety and the extended π-system of MWNTs.

  10. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  11. Investigation of non-covalent complexes of glutathione with common amino acids by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-yun DAI; Yan-qiu CHU; Bo WU; Liang WU; Chuan-fan DING

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the non-covalent interaction between glutathione and common amino acids. Methods: A stoichiometry of glutathione and common amino acids were mixed to reach the equilibrium, and then the mixed solution was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The binding of the com-plexes was further examined by collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a tandem mass spectrometer as well as UV spectroscopy. To avoid distinct ionization effi-ciency discrepancy and signal suppression in the ESI-MS measurements, the interaction between glutathione (GSH) and glutamate (Glu) was quantitatively evaluated. The total concentrations and series of m/z of peak intensities for glu-tathione and amino acids could be achieved, respectively. Due to the existence of some oligomeric species arising from glutathione or amino acids, an improved calculation formula was proposed to calculate the dissociation constants of glu-tathione binding to amino acids. Results: The ESI mass spectra revealed that glutathione could interact easily with Met, Phe, Tyr, Ser, or lie to form non-cova-lent complexes. The binding of the complexes was further confirmed by CID experiments in a tandem mass spectrometer as well as UV spectroscopy. Moreover, an improved calculation formula was successfully applied to determine the disso-ciation constants of glutathione binding to Glu, His, or Gln. Finally, a possible formation mechanism for the complexes of glutathione with amino acids was proposed. Conclusion: The reduced polypeptide y-glutathione can interact with each of 8 common amino acids, including Glu, His, and Gin to form non-covalent complexes with different affinity.

  12. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal insights into covalent flavinylation of the Escherichia coli Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbird, C.A.; Maklashina, Elena; Sharma, Pankaj; Qualls-Histed, Susan; Cecchini, Gary; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCSF); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-06-14

    The Escherichia coli Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR, FrdABCD) catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and succinate at a covalently attached FAD within the FrdA subunit. The SdhE assembly factor enhances covalent flavinylation of Complex II homologs, but the mechanisms underlying the covalent attachment of FAD remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we explored the mechanisms of covalent flavinylation of the E. coli QFR FrdA subunit. Using a ΔsdhE E. coli strain, we show that the requirement for the assembly factor depends on the cellular redox environment. We next identified residues important for the covalent attachment and selected the FrdAE245 residue, which contributes to proton shuttling during fumarate reduction, for detailed biophysical and structural characterization. We found that QFR complexes containing FrdAE245Q have a structure similar to that of the WT flavoprotein, but lack detectable substrate binding and turnover. In the context of the isolated FrdA subunit, the anticipated assembly intermediate during covalent flavinylation, FrdAE245 variants had stability similar to that of WT FrdA, contained noncovalent FAD, and displayed a reduced capacity to interact with SdhE. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis of WT FrdA cross-linked to SdhE suggested that the FrdAE245 residue is unlikely to contribute directly to the FrdA-SdhE protein-protein interface. We also found that no auxiliary factor is absolutely required for flavinylation, indicating that the covalent flavinylation is autocatalytic. We propose that multiple factors, including the SdhE assembly factor and bound dicarboxylates, stimulate covalent flavinylation by preorganizing the active site to stabilize the quinone-methide intermediate.

  13. Photo-reduction of CO2 Using a Rhenium Complex Covalently Supported on a Graphene/TiO2 Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shi-Cong; Sun, Xue-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2016-07-07

    One of the promising solutions for decreasing atmospheric CO2 is artificial photosynthesis, in which CO2 can be photoconverted into solar fuels. In this study, a rhenium complex Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl (PyBn=1-(2-picolyl)-4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole) was covalently grafted onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This was further combined with TiO2 to fabricate a novel catalyst composite TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl for CO2 photo-reduction. This hybrid composite demonstrated high selectivity conversion of CO2 into CO under xenon-lamp irradiation. Compared with the unsupported homogeneous catalyst Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl, the covalent immobilized catalyst composite TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl enhanced the turnover number six times and significantly improved catalyst stability. During the process of CO2 photo-reduction, intermediate species with lifetimes longer than hundreds of microseconds were observed and the formation of CO products was revealed using timeresolved infrared spectroscopy. A plausible mechanism for CO2 photo-reduction by the TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl catalyst composite has been suggested. The obtained results have implications for the future design of efficient catalyst composites for CO2 photo-conversion.

  14. Characterisation of covalent copper and manganese organometallic complexes with Schiff bases by ionspray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raffaelli, A.; Minutolo, F.; Feringa, B.L.; Salvadori, P.

    1998-01-01

    Copper and manganese complexes containing Schiff bases as ligands, having potential interest in homogeneous catalysis, have been characterised by mass spectrometry using ionspray ionisation. Single stage mass spectrometry allowed us to confirm the molecular weight of complexes in all cases, providin

  15. Metalloprotein complexes for the study of electron-transfer reactions. Characterization of diprotein complexes obtained by covalent cross-linking of cytochrome c and plastocyanin with a carbodiimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J S; Brothers, H M; Neddersen, J P; Peerey, L M; Cotton, T M; Kostić, N M

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt) and zinc cytochrome c (Zncyt) are separately cross-linked to plastocyanin (pc) by the carbodiimide EDC according to a published method. The changes in the protein reduction potentials indicate the presence of approximately two amide cross-links. Chromatography of the diprotein complexes cyt/pc and Zncyt/pc on CM-52 resin yields multiple fractions, whose numbers depend on the eluent. UV-vis, EPR, CD, MCD, resonance Raman, and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra show that cross-linking does not significantly perturb the heme and blue copper active sites. Degrees of heme exposure show that plastocyanin covers most of the accessible heme edge in cytochrome c. Impossibility of cross-linking cytochrome c to a plastocyanin derivative whose acidic patch had been blocked by chemical modification shows that it is the acidic patch that abuts the heme edge in the covalent complex. The chromatographic fractions of the covalent diprotein complex are structurally similar to one another and to the electrostatic diprotein complex. Isoelectric points show that the fractions differ from one another in the number and distribution of N-acylurea groups, byproducts of the reaction with the carbodiimide. Cytochrome c and plastocyanin are also tethered to each other via lysine residues by N-hydroxysuccinimide diesters. Tethers, unlike direct amide bonds, allow mobility of the cross-linked molecules. Laser-flash-photolysis experiments show that, nonetheless, the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction cyt(II)/pc(II)----cyt(III)/pc(I) is undetectable in complexes of either type. Only the electrostatic diprotein complex, in which protein rearrangement from the docking configuration to the reactive configuration is unrestricted, undergoes this intracomplex reaction at a measurable rate.

  16. A Brief Review of Chelators for Radiolabeling Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxia Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical modification of oligomers such as DNA, PNA, MORF, LNA to attach radionuclides for nuclear imaging and radiotherapy applications has become a field rich in innovation as older methods are improved and new methods are introduced. This review intends to provide a brief overview of several chelators currently in use for the labeling of oligomers with metallic radionuclides such as 99mTc, 111In and 188Re. While DNA and its analogs have been radiolabeled with important radionuclides of nonmetals such as 32P, 35S, 14C, 18F and 125I, the labeling methods for these isotopes involve covalent chemistry that is quite distinct from the coordinate-covalent chelation chemistry described herein. In this review, we provide a summary of the several chelators that have been covalently conjugated to oligomers for the purpose of radiolabeling with metallic radionuclides by chelation and including details on the conjugation, the choice of radionuclides and labeling methods.

  17. Reversible Covalent and Supramolecular Functionalization of Water-Soluble Gold(I) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Benedict; von Gröning, Maximilian; Lewe, Vanessa; Spitzer, Daniel; Otremba, Tobias; Stergiou, Natascha; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Schmitt, Edgar; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Besenius, Pol

    2017-02-09

    The ligation of gold(I) metalloamphiphiles with biomolecules is reported, using water-soluble Au(I) -N-alkynyl substituted maleimide complexes. For this purpose, two different polar ligands were applied: 1) a neutral, dendritic tetraethylene glycol-functionalized phosphane and 2) a charged, sulfonated N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC). The retro Diels-Alder reaction of a furan-protected maleimide gold(I) complex, followed by cycloaddition with a diene-functionalized biotin under mild conditions leads to a novel gold(I) metalloamphiphile. The strong streptavidin-biotin binding affinity in buffered aqueous solution of the resulting biotin alkynyl gold(I) phosphane conjugate remains intact. The cytotoxicity of the biotinylated gold(I) complex against a T47D human breast cancer cell line is higher than for cisplatin.

  18. Electronic Excitations in Push-Pull Oligomers and Their Complexes with Fullerene from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory with Polarizable Embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeier, Björn; Rohlfing, Michael; Andrienko, Denis

    2014-08-12

    We present a comparative study of excited states in push-pull oligomers of PCPDTBT and PSBTBT and prototypical complexes with a C60 acceptor using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We analyze excitations in oligomers up to a length of 5 nm and find that for both materials the absorption energy practically saturates for structures larger than two repeat units due to the localized nature of the excitation. In the bimolecular complexes with C60, the transition from Frenkel to charge transfer excitons is generally exothermic and strongly influenced by the acceptor's position and orientation. The high CT binding energy of the order of 2 eV results from the lack of an explicit molecular environment. External polarization effects are then modeled in a GW-BSE based QM/MM approach by embedding the donor-acceptor complex into a polarizable lattice. The lowest charge transfer exciton is energetically stabilized by about 0.5 eV, while its binding energy is reduced to about 0.3 eV. We also identify a globally unbound charge transfer state with a more delocalized hole at higher energy while still within the absorption spectrum, which opens another potential pathway for charge separation. For both PCPDTBT and PSBTBT, the energetics are largely similar with respect to absorption and the driving force to form intermediate charge transfer excitations for free charge generation. These results support that the higher power conversion efficiency observed for solar cells using PSBTBT as donor material is a result of molecular packing rather than of the electronic structure of the polymer.

  19. Resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, and density functional theory calculations of a phenolate-bound iron porphyrin complex: electrostatic versus covalent contribution to bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pradip Kumar; Dey, Abhishek

    2014-07-21

    Resonance Raman (rR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of a phenolate-bound iron porphyrin complex are reported. The complex is found to exist in a five-coordinate high-spin state in a noncoordinating solvent and in a six-coordinate low-spin state in a coordinating solvent. The vibrations originating from the iron phenolate-bound chromophores reproduced those reported for heme tyrosine active sites in nature. The EPR parameters and iron-pyrrole (Fe-Npyr) vibrations of phenolate, thiolate, and imidazole ligated iron porphyrin complexes indicate that the phenolate axial ligand acts as a π anisotropic ligand, which is more covalent than a neutral imidazole ligand but less covalent than a thiolate axial ligand. While the Fe(III/II) potential of the phenolate compound in a noncoordinating solvent is 500 mV more negative than that of the imidazole-bound complex, it is also 110 mV more negative than that of the thiolate-bound complex. DFT calculations reproduce the geometry and vibrational frequencies and show that while both phenolate and thiolate axial ligands bear π and σ interaction with the ferric center, the former is significantly less covalent than the thiolate. The higher covalency of the thiolate ligand is responsible for the lower Fe-Npyr vibration and higher V/λ (from EPR) of the thiolate-bound complexes relative to those of the phenolate-bound complex, whereas the greater electrostatic stabilization of the Fe(III)-OPh bond is responsible for lowering the Fe(III/II) E° of the phenolate-bound complex relative to that of the thiolate-bound complex in a medium having a reasonable dielectric constant.

  20. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the subunit stoichiometry study of high-mass non-covalent complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniatte, M.; Lesieur, C.; Vecsey-Semjen, B.; Buckley, J. T.; Pattus, F.; van der Goot, F. G.; van Dorsselaer, A.

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the potential of MALDI-TOF MS for the mass measurement of large non-covalent protein complexes. The following non-covalent complexes have been investigated: aerolysin from Aeromonas hydrophila (335 kDa) and [alpha]-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus (233 kDa) which are both cytolytic toxins, three enzymes known to be homotetramers in solution: bovine liver catalase (235 kDa), rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase (232 kDa), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (147 kDa) and finally a lectin, concanavalin A (102 kDa). Three different matrix preparations were systematically tested under various conditions: ferulic acid dissolved in THF, 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone in 20 mM aqueous ammonium citrate and a two-step sample preparation with sinapinic acid. It was possible to find a suitable combination of matrix and preparation type which allowed the molecularity of all complexes tested to be deduced from the MALDI mass spectrum. Trimeric and tetrameric intermediates accumulating during the formation of the active heptameric aerolysin complex were also identified, this allowing a formation mechanism to be proposed. The observation of large specific non-covalent complexes has been found to be dependent on the choice of matrix, the type of sample preparation used, the solvent evaporation speed, the pH of the resulting matrix-sample mixture and the number of shots acquired on a given area. From this set of experiments, some useful guidelines for the observation of large complexes by MALDI could therefore be deduced. Fast evaporation of the solvent is particularly necessary in the case of pH sensitive complexes. An ESMS study on the same non-covalent complexes indicated that, rather surprisingly, reliable results could be obtained by MALDI-TOF MS on several very large complexes (above 200 kDa) for which ESMS yielded no clear spectra.

  1. Investigation by mass spectrometry of metal complexes of new molecular hosts: cyclic oligomer of sugar amino acid and sugar-aza-crown ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Françoise; Afonso, Carlos; Ménand, Mickaël; Hamon, Louis; Xie, Juan; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    The affinity of cyclic oligomers of sugar amino acid and sugar-aza-crown ether compounds towards various transition metal cations (Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Fe(II) and Zn(II)) was investigated with positive-ion electrospray mass spectrometry. The binding between the receptors (M) and the different metals (Met) is evidenced mainly by the presence of the [M + Met(II)Cl](+) ion. The experimental results showed that all studied receptors present specificity to Cu(II). An attempt has been made with CuI but no complexation was obtained. The formation of these complexes can be rationalized by considering the presence of two oxygens and two nitrogens on the receptor rim. The lone electron pair can serve as the electron donor to Cu(II). Theoretical calculations were carried out in order to show the structure of the complex and, in particular, to determine if Cu(2+) is situated either on the outer surface, on the rim of the receptor or inside the cavity. Comparison of complex formation was carried out by mixing the four receptors with various amounts of Cu(II) (one equivalent and five equivalents). It appears that the best complexation was obtained with the sugar-aza-crown ethers (amine linker) for both benzylated and methylated compounds. In addition, the stereochemical effects have been investigated.

  2. Transduction of proteins into leishmania tarentolae by formation of non-covalent complexes with cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Andrea-Anneliese; Breitling, Reinhard; Hemmerich, Peter; Kappe, Katarina; Braun, Maria; Wittig, Berith; Schaefer, Buerk; Lorkowski, Stefan; Reissmann, Siegmund

    2014-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are used to transport peptides, proteins, different types of ribonucleic acids (or mimics of these molecules), and DNA into live cells, both plant and mammalian. Leishmania belongs to the class of protozoa having, in comparison to mammalian cells, a different lipid composition of the membrane, proteoglycans on the surface, and signal pathways. We investigated the uptake of two different and easily detectable proteins into the non-pathogenic strain Leishmania tarentolae. From the large number of CPPs available, six and a histone were chosen specifically for their ability to form non-covalent complexes. For Leishmania we used the enzyme β-galactosidase and fluorescent labeled bovine serum albumin as cargoes. The results are compared to similar internalization studies using mammalian cells [Mussbach et al., ]. Leishmania cells can degrade CPPs by a secreted and membrane-bound chymotrypsin-like protease. Both cargo proteins were internalized with sufficient efficiency and achieved intramolecular concentrations similar to mammalian cells. The transport efficiencies of the CPPs differed from each other, and showed a different rank order for both cargoes. The intracellular distribution of fluorescent-labeled bovine serum albumin showed highest concentrations in the nucleus and kinetoplast. Leishmania are susceptible to high concentrations of some CPPs, although comparably dissimilar to mammalian cells. MPG-peptides are more cytotoxic in Leishmania than in mammalian cells, acting as antimicrobial peptides. Our results contribute to a better understanding of molecular interactions in Leishmania cells and possibly to new treatments of leishmaniasis.

  3. Oligomer-fullerene dyads and triads as model compounds for bulk-heterojunction PV cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.A.J.; Peeters, E.; Langeveld-Voss, B.M.W.; Hal, P.A. van; Knol, J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Covalent oligomer-fullerene donor-acceptor structures can serve as important model systems for plastic PV cells, based on interpenetrating networks of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives. Several series of [60]fullerene-oligomer dyads and triads were prepared. Photoinduced electron

  4. Multifunctional Pt(II) Reagents: Covalent Modifications of Pt Complexes Enable Diverse Structural Variation and In-Cell Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan D; Haley, Michael M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2016-01-19

    To enhance the functionality of Pt-based reagents, several strategies have been developed that utilize Pt compounds modified with small, reactive handles. This Account encapsulates work done by us and other groups regarding the use of Pt(II) compounds with reactive handles for subsequent elaboration with fluorophores or other functional moieties. Described strategies include the incorporation of substituents for well-known condensation or nucleophilic displacement-type reactions and their use, for example, to tether spectroscopic handles to Pt reagents for in vivo investigation. Other chief uses of displacement-type reactions have included tethering various small molecules exhibiting pharmacological activity directly to Pt, thus adding synergistic effects. Click chemistry-based ligation techniques have also been applied, primarily with azide- and alkyne-appended Pt complexes. Orthogonally reactive click chemistry reactions have proven invaluable when more traditional nucleophilic displacement reactions induce side-reactivity with the Pt center or when systematic functionalization of a larger number of Pt complexes is desired. Additionally, a diverse assortment of Pt-fluorophore conjugates have been tethered via click chemistry conjugation. In addition to providing a convenient synthetic path for diversifying Pt compounds, the use of click-capable Pt complexes has proved a powerful strategy for postbinding covalent modification and detection with fluorescent probes. This strategy bypasses undesirable influences of the fluorophore camouflaged as reactivity due to Pt that may be present when detecting preattached Pt-fluorophore conjugates. Using postbinding strategies, Pt reagent distributions in HeLa and lung carcinoma (NCI-H460) cell cultures were observed with two different azide-modified Pt compounds, a monofunctional Pt(II)-acridine type and a difunctional Pt(II)-neutral complex. In addition, cellular distribution was observed with an alkyne-appended difunctional

  5. Mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline with tridentate phenolate/pyridyl/(benz)imidazolyl Schiff base ligands: covalent vs non-covalent DNA binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Chandrasekaran; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2014-11-01

    A series of copper(II) complexes of the types [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4) 1-2, where HL is a tridentate ligand with two nitrogen and one oxygen donor atoms (2NO) such as 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyliminomethyl)phenol (HL1) and 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl-imino)methyl)-4-methylphenol (HL2), phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4)23-6, where L is a tridentate ligand with three nitrogen donor atoms (3N) such as (2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)pyridin-2-ylmethyleneamine (L3), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyleneamine (L4), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylene)-amine (L5) and 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(4,4a-dihydroquinolin-2-ylmethylene)amine (L6), has been isolated and characterized by different spectral techniques. In single crystal X-ray structures, 1 possesses square pyramidal distorted trigonal bipyramidal (SPDTBP), geometry whereas 3 and 4 possess trigonal bipyramidal distorted square pyramidal (TBDSP) geometry. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectral studies reveal that the complexes 1-6 bind non-covalently to calf thymus DNA more strongly than the corresponding covalently bound chlorido complexes [Cu(2NO)Cl] 1a-2a and [Cu(3N)Cl2] 3a-6a. On prolonged incubation, all the complexes 1-6 exhibit double strand cleavage of supercoiled (SC) plasmid DNA in the absence of an activator. Also, they exhibit cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (HBL-100) more potent than their corresponding chlorido complexes 1a-6a, and have the potential to act as efficient cytotoxic drugs.

  6. Covalent Organic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra

    chemistry of silicon, InAs and GaAs materials, covalentsurface functionalization using organosilanes, liquid-phase, and vapor-phasefunctionalizations, diazo-transfer reaction, CuAAC click chemistry, different types ofbiorthogonal chemistries, SPAAC chemistry, and cellular interactions of chemically...... immobilization of D-amino acid adhesion peptideson azide functionalized silicon, GaAs and InAs materials by using CuAAC-click chemistry.The covalent immobilization of penetration peptide (TAT) on gold nanotips of InAs NWs isalso demonstrated.In chapter four, the covalent immobilization of GFP on silicon wafers......, GaAs wafers andGaAs NWs is demonstrated. Series of Fmoc-Pra-OH, NHS-PEG5-NHS and BCN-NHSfunctionalized silicon surfaces has been prepared, whereby GFP-N3 and GFP-bicyclononyneare immobilized by using CuAAC and SPAAC chemistry. The specific and covalentimmobilization of GFP-N3 on bicyclononyne...

  7. Efficient Cleavage of Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes and Ultrafast Extraction of Lignin Oligomers from Wood Biomass by Microwave-Assisted Treatment with Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongzhuang; Chen, Wenshuai; Xia, Qinqin; Guo, Bingtuo; Wang, Qingwen; Liu, Shouxin; Liu, Yixing; Li, Jian; Yu, Haipeng

    2017-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant and renewable resource for the production of biobased value-added fuels, chemicals, and materials, but its effective exploitation by an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly strategy remains a challenge. Herein, a facile approach for efficiently cleaving lignin-carbohydrate complexes and ultrafast fractionation of components from wood by microwave-assisted treatment with deep eutectic solvent is reported. The solvent was composed of sustainable choline chloride and oxalic acid dihydrate, and showed a hydrogen-bond acidity of 1.31. Efficient fractionation of lignocellulose with the solvent was realized by heating at 80 °C under 800 W microwave irradiation for 3 min. The extracted lignin showed a low molecular weight of 913, a low polydispersity of 1.25, and consisted of lignin oligomers with high purity (ca. 96 %), and thus shows potential in downstream production of aromatic chemicals. The other dissolved matter mainly comprised glucose, xylose, and hydroxymethylfurfural. The undissolved material was cellulose with crystal I structure and a crystallinity of approximately 75 %, which can be used for fabricating nanocellulose. Therefore, this work promotes an ultrafast lignin-first biorefinery approach while simultaneously keeping the undissolved cellulose available for further utilization. This work is expected to contribute to improving the economics of overall biorefining of lignocellulosic biomass. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (fC) at the CpG site forms a covalent complex with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferases (DNMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kousuke; Kawamoto, Kyoji; Shimamura, Shintaro; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akira

    2016-11-15

    5-Methylcytosine (mC) is known to induce epigenetic changes. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes produce the further oxidized 5-substituted cytosine derivatives, 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC). However, their roles are unclear thus far. Here, we synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine and examined their interactions with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase (DNMT). We found that the ODN sequence containing fCpG formed a covalent complex with both bacterial and mouse recombinant DNMTs in the absence of any cofactors. The covalent bonding with DNMT suggests that the fCpG sequence in DNA may play a role in epigenetic regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Covalently grafted, silica gel supported C-protected cysteine or cystine copper complexes - syntheses, structure and possible surface reactions studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyi, A.; Csendes, Z.; Kiss, J. T.; Pálinkó, I.

    2009-04-01

    In this work the covalent anchoring of C-protected Cu(II)- L-cysteine and Cu(II)- L-cystine complexes onto a surface-modified silica gel is described. Conditions of the syntheses were varied and the obtained structures were studied by classical analytical (titration) as well as spectroscopic (infrared, atomic absorption) methods. It was found that the sulphur atoms in the molecules acted as primary coordination sites, while the other coordinating groups varied depending on whether the complexes were formed under ligand-poor or ligand-excess conditions.

  10. Non-covalent interactions of nitrous oxide with aromatic compounds: Spectroscopic and computational evidence for the formation of 1:1 complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qian [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Gor, Gennady Y., E-mail: ggor@princeton.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Khriachtchev, Leonid [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland)

    2014-04-14

    We present the first study of intermolecular interactions between nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and three representative aromatic compounds (ACs): phenol, cresol, and toluene. The infrared spectroscopic experiments were performed in a Ne matrix and were supported by high-level quantum chemical calculations. Comparisons of the calculated and experimental vibrational spectra provide direct identification and characterization of the 1:1 N{sub 2}O-AC complexes. Our results show that N{sub 2}O is capable of forming non-covalently bonded complexes with ACs. Complex formation is dominated by dispersion forces, and the interaction energies are relatively low (about −3 kcal mol{sup −1}); however, the complexes are clearly detected by frequency shifts of the characteristic bands. These results suggest that N{sub 2}O can be bound to the amino-acid residues tyrosine or phenylalanine in the form of π complexes.

  11. Non-covalent interactions of nitrous oxide with aromatic compounds: Spectroscopic and computational evidence for the formation of 1:1 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Gor, Gennady Y.; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2014-04-01

    We present the first study of intermolecular interactions between nitrous oxide (N2O) and three representative aromatic compounds (ACs): phenol, cresol, and toluene. The infrared spectroscopic experiments were performed in a Ne matrix and were supported by high-level quantum chemical calculations. Comparisons of the calculated and experimental vibrational spectra provide direct identification and characterization of the 1:1 N2O-AC complexes. Our results show that N2O is capable of forming non-covalently bonded complexes with ACs. Complex formation is dominated by dispersion forces, and the interaction energies are relatively low (about -3 kcal mol-1); however, the complexes are clearly detected by frequency shifts of the characteristic bands. These results suggest that N2O can be bound to the amino-acid residues tyrosine or phenylalanine in the form of π complexes.

  12. Crystal Structures of Covalent Complexes of [beta]-Lactam Antibiotics with Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5: Toward an Understanding of Antibiotic Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicola, George; Tomberg, Joshua; Pratt, R.F.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher (SC); (UNC); (Wesleyan)

    2010-12-07

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the molecular targets for the widely used {beta}-lactam class of antibiotics, but how these compounds act at the molecular level is not fully understood. We have determined crystal structures of Escherichia coli PBP 5 as covalent complexes with imipenem, cloxacillin, and cefoxitin. These antibiotics exhibit very different second-order rates of acylation for the enzyme. In all three structures, there is excellent electron density for the central portion of the {beta}-lactam, but weak or absent density for the R1 or R2 side chains. Areas of contact between the antibiotics and PBP 5 do not correlate with the rates of acylation. The same is true for conformational changes, because although a shift of a loop leading to an electrostatic interaction between Arg248 and the {beta}-lactam carboxylate, which occurs completely with cefoxitin and partially with imipenem and is absent with cloxacillin, is consistent with the different rates of acylation, mutagenesis of Arg248 decreased the level of cefoxitin acylation only 2-fold. Together, these data suggest that structures of postcovalent complexes of PBP 5 are unlikely to be useful vehicles for the design of new covalent inhibitors of PBPs. Finally, superimposition of the imipenem-acylated complex with PBP 5 in complex with a boronic acid peptidomimetic shows that the position corresponding to the hydrolytic water molecule is occluded by the ring nitrogen of the {beta}-lactam. Because the ring nitrogen occupies a similar position in all three complexes, this supports the hypothesis that deacylation is blocked by the continued presence of the leaving group after opening of the {beta}-lactam ring.

  13. Non-covalent pomegranate (Punica granatum) hydrolyzable tannin-protein complexes modulate antigen uptake, processing and presentation by a T-cell hybridoma line co-cultured with murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Haas, Linda; Vestling, Martha; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we characterize the interaction of pomegranate hydrolyzable tannins (HT) with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of non-covalent tannin-protein complexes on macrophage endocytosis, processing and presentation of antigen. We isolated HT from pomegranate and complex to HEL, the resulting non-covalent tannin-protein complex was characterized by gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Finally, cell culture studies and confocal microscopy imaging were conducted on the non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes to evaluate its effect on macrophage antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cell hybridomas. Our results indicate that non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes modulate uptake, processing and antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Pomegranate HT may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas.

  14. The mechanism of pseudouridine synthases from a covalent complex with RNA, and alternate specificity for U2605 versus U2604 between close homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czudnochowski, Nadine; Ashley, Gary W; Santi, Daniel V; Alian, Akram; Finer-Moore, Janet; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-02-01

    RluB catalyses the modification of U2605 to pseudouridine (Ψ) in a stem-loop at the peptidyl transferase center of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. The homolog RluF is specific to the adjacent nucleotide in the stem, U2604. The 1.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the complex between the catalytic domain of RluB and the isolated substrate stem-loop, in which the target uridine is substituted by 5-fluorouridine (5-FU), reveals a covalent bond between the isomerized target base and tyrosine 140. The structure is compared with the catalytic domain alone determined at 2.5 Å resolution. The RluB-bound stem-loop has essentially the same secondary structure as in the ribosome, with a bulge at A2602, but with 5-FU2605 flipped into the active site. We showed earlier that RluF induced a frame-shift of the RNA, moving A2602 into the stem and translating its target, U2604, into the active site. A hydrogen-bonding network stabilizes the bulge in the RluB-RNA but is not conserved in RluF and so RluF cannot stabilize the bulge. On the basis of the covalent bond between enzyme and isomerized 5-FU we propose a Michael addition mechanism for pseudouridine formation that is consistent with all experimental data.

  15. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  16. Covalent lanthanide(III) macrocyclic complexes: the bonding nature and optical properties of a promising single antenna molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2014-12-21

    The present work is focused on the elucidation of the electronic structure, bonding nature and optical properties of a series of low symmetry (C2) coordination compounds of type [Ln(III)HAM](3+), where "Ln(III)" are the trivalent lanthanide ions: La(3+), Ce(3+), Eu(3+) and Lu(3+), while "HAM" is the neutral six-nitrogen donor macrocyclic ligand [C22N6H26]. This systematic study has been performed in the framework of the Relativistic Density Functional Theory (R-DFT) and also using a multi-reference approach via the Complete Active Space (CAS) wavefunction treatment with the aim of analyzing their ground state and excited state electronic structures as well as electronic correlation. Furthermore, the use of the energy decomposition scheme proposed by Morokuma-Ziegler and the electron localization function (ELF) allows us to characterize the bonding between the lanthanide ions and the macrocyclic ligand, obtaining as a result a dative-covalent interaction. Due to a great deal of lanthanide optical properties and their technological applications, the absorption spectra of this set of coordination compounds were calculated using the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), where the presence of the intense Ligand to Metal Charge Transfer (LMCT) bands in the ultraviolet and visible region and the inherent f-f electronic transitions in the Near-Infra Red (NIR) region for some lanthanide ions allow us to propose these systems as "single antenna molecules" with potential applications in NIR technologies.

  17. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  18. Quantifying Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin non-covalent complexes by ESI-MS method and calculation of their equilibrium constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülfen, Mustafa; Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the dissociation and formation equilibrium constants of Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin complexes have been calculated after the quantifying them on ESI mass spectrometer. The ESI-MS spectra of the complexes were measured by using the solvents as 50% MeOH in water and 100% water. The effect of pH on the Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin complex formation were examined. Serial binding of Na(I) and K(I) ions to the insulin molecule were observed in the ESI-MS measurements. The first formation equilibrium constants were calculated as Kf1: 5.48×10(3) 1/M for Na(I)-insulin complex and Kf1: 4.87×10(3) 1/M for K(I)-insulin in water. The binding capability of Na(I) ions to insulin molecule is higher than the capability of K(I) ions. In case of a comparison together with Ca(II)-insulin and Mg(II)-insulin, the formation equilibrium constants (Kf1) are in order of Ca(II)-insulin>Mg(II)-insulin>Na(I)-insulin>K(I)-insulin in water. The results showed that Na(I) and K(I) ions are involved in the formation of the non-covalent complexes with insulin molecule, since high extracellular and intracellular concentrations of them in the body. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and electrochemical and photoelectrochemical properties of a covalently self-assembled monolayer film based on a bis-terpyridyl ruthenium(II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hao; Dai, Yong-Cheng; Chen, Xi; Huang, Qiu-Ying; Wang, Ke-Zhi, E-mail: kzwang@bnu.edu.cn

    2013-09-02

    A bis-terpyridyl Ru(II) complex of Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} (in which IPTP = 4′-(4-(imidazol-1-yl)phenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) has been synthesized using a microwave irradiation method, and characterized by elementary analysis, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy. A Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} based covalently self-assembled monolayer film was prepared and characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The cyclic voltammograms demonstrated that Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} assembled in the film was redox active with surface-confined characteristics. The photoelectrochemical properties and electron-transfer mechanism of the film were studied. It was found that the Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}/ITO electrode film exhibited a large cathodic photocurrent density of 2.72 μA/cm{sup 2} while irradiated with polychromatic light (325 nm < λ < 730 nm) at an applied potential of − 0.4 V versus saturated calomel electrode. The photocurrent action spectrum was in agreement with the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption band of Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, indicating that the photocurrent was generated based on MLCT excitation of the Ru{sup II}(IPTP){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} in the film. An incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency of this monolayer film was calculated to be 1.8% at 500 nm. - Highlights: • Ru complex covalently self-assembled monolayer film. • Reversible electrochemical activity. • Large cathodic photocurrent density of 2.72 μA/cm{sup 2}. • Photoelectric conversion efficiency of 1.8%.

  20. Covalent Hydration” Reactions in Model Monomeric Ru 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes: Thermodynamic Favorability as a Function of Metal Oxidation and Overall Spin States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Cape, Jonathan L.; Hurst, James K.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2011-09-05

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the plausibility of water addition to the simple mononuclear ruthenium complexes, [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 2+}/{sup 3+} and [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)RuOH]{sup 3+}, in which the OH fragment adds to the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. Activation of bpy toward water addition has frequently been postulated within the literature, although there exists little definitive experimental evidence for this type of 'covalent hydration'. In this study, we examine the energetic dependence of the reaction upon metal oxidation state, overall spin state of the complex, as well as selectivity for various positions on the bipyridine ring. The thermodynamic favorability is found to be highly dependent upon all three parameters, with free energies of reaction that span favorable and unfavorable regimes. Aqueous addition to [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 3+} was found to be highly favorable for the S = 1/2 state, while reduction of the formal oxidation state on the metal center makes the reaction highly unfavorable. Examination of both facial and meridional isomers reveals that when bipyridine occupies the position trans to the ruthenyl oxo atom, reactivity toward OH addition decreases and the site preferences are altered. The electronic structure and spectroscopic signatures (EPR parameters and simulated spectra) have been determined to aid in recognition of 'covalent hydration' in experimental systems. EPR parameters are found to uniquely characterize the position of the OH addition to the bpy as well as the overall spin state of the system.

  1. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  2. Posttranslational folding of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein in the ER: involvement of noncovalent and covalent complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, L.J.; Silva, A. de; Helenius, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we show that posttranslational folding of Vesicular Stomatitis virus G protein subunits can involve noncovalent, multimeric complexes as transient intermediates. The complexes are heterogeneous in size (4-21S20,W), contain several G glycopolypeptides, and are associated with BiP/GRP78

  3. Photofunctional hybrids of rare earth complexes covalently bonded to ZnO core-shell nanoparticle substrate through polymer linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yan-Fei; Yan, Bing

    2012-06-28

    A novel series of multi-component hybrids are assembled based on rare earth coordinated to rare earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+)) complex systems and ZnO nanocomposites through three different ester units (ethyl methacrylate (EMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl methacrylate (HFMA)) as functional polymer linkages. Methacrylic-group-modified ZnO nanoparticles (designated ZnO-MAA) are synthesized based on the reaction between zinc methacrylate and LiOH with the molar ratio 1 : 3.5 via sol-gel process. The final hybrid materials are prepared by introducing rare earth complexes into ZnO-MAA matrix via addition polymerization reaction in the presence of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as the initiator. The detailed characterization and luminescence of these hybrid materials are discussed. It is found that ZnO-MAA-HEMA/EMA/HFBMA-RE-phen hybrid systems have effective intramolecular energy transfer process and exhibit longer lifetime and higher quantum efficiency.

  4. Extension of Light-Harvesting Ability of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) through Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Covalently Attached Artificial Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yusuke; Noji, Tomoyasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Mizutani, Naoto; Komori, Daisuke; Nango, Mamoru; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Dewa, Takehisa

    2015-10-14

    Introducing appropriate artificial components into natural biological systems could enrich the original functionality. To expand the available wavelength range of photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050), artificial fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 647: A647) was covalently attached to N- and C-terminal Lys residues in LH2 α-polypeptides with a molar ratio of A647/LH2 ≃ 9/1. Fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopies revealed that intracomplex energy transfer from A647 to intrinsic chromophores of LH2 (B850) occurs in a multiexponential manner, with time constants varying from 440 fs to 23 ps through direct and B800-mediated indirect pathways. Kinetic analyses suggested that B800 chromophores mediate faster energy transfer, and the mechanism was interpretable in terms of Förster theory. This study demonstrates that a simple attachment of external chromophores with a flexible linkage can enhance the light harvesting activity of LH2 without affecting inherent functions of energy transfer, and can achieve energy transfer in the subpicosecond range. Addition of external chromophores, thus, represents a useful methodology for construction of advanced hybrid light-harvesting systems that afford solar energy in the broad spectrum.

  5. Theoretical investigation of paramagnetic NMR shifts in transition metal acetylacetonato complexes: analysis of signs, magnitudes, and the role of the covalency of ligand-metal bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-08-06

    Ligand chemical shifts are calculated and analyzed for three paramagnetic transition metal tris-acetylacetonato (acac) complexes, namely high-spin Fe(III) and Cr(III), and low-spin Ru(III), using scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT). The signs and magnitudes of the paramagnetic NMR ligand chemical shifts are directly related to the extent of covalent acac oxygen-to-metal σ donation involving unoccupied metal valence d(σ) acceptor orbitals. The role of delocalization of metal-centered spin density over the ligand atoms plays a minor secondary role. Of particular interest is the origin of the sign and magnitude of the methyl carbon chemical shift in the acac ligands, and the role played by the DFT delocalization error when calculating such shifts. It is found that the α versus β spin balance of oxygen σ donation to metal valence d acceptor orbitals is responsible for the sign and the magnitude of the ligand methyl carbon chemical shift. A problematic case is the methyl carbon shift of Fe(acac)(3). Most functionals produce shifts in excess of 1400 ppm, whereas the experimental shift is approximately 279 ppm. Range-separated hybrid functionals that are optimally tuned for Fe(acac)(3) based on DFT energetic criteria predict a lower limit of about 2000 ppm for the methyl carbon shift of the high-spin electronic configuration. Since the experimental value is based on a very strongly broadened signal it is possibly unreliable.

  6. Defusing Complexity in Intermetallics: How Covalently Shared Electron Pairs Stabilize the FCC Variant Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) (x ≈ 0.9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, Brandon J; Yannello, Vincent J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2015-08-17

    Simple sphere packings of metallic atoms are generally assumed to exhibit highly delocalized bonding, often visualized in terms of a lattice of metal cations immersed in an electron gas. In this Article, we present a compound that demonstrates how covalently shared electron pairs can, in fact, play a key role in the stability of such structures: Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) (x ≈ 0.9). Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) adopts a variant of the common TiAl3 structure type, which itself is a binary coloring of the fcc lattice. Electronic structure calculations trace the formation of this compound to a magic electron count of 14 electrons/T atom (T = transition metal) for the TiAl3 type, for which the Fermi energy coincides with an electronic pseudogap. This count is one electron/T atom lower than the electron concentration for a hypothetical MoGa3 phase, making this structure less competitive relative to more complex alternatives. The favorable 14 electron count can be reached, however, through the partial substitution of Ga with Cu. Using DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations and the reversed approximation Molecular Orbital (raMO) method, we show that the favorability of the 14 electron count has a simple structural origin in terms of the 18 - n rule of T-E intermetallics (E = main group element): the T atoms of the TiAl3 type are arranged into square nets whose edges are bridged by E atoms. The presence of shared electron pairs along these T-T contacts allows for 18 electron configurations to be achieved on the T atoms despite possessing only 18 - 4 = 14 electrons/T atom. This bonding scheme provides a rationale for the observed stability range of TiAl3 type TE3 phases of ca. 13-14 electrons/T atom, and demonstrates how the concept of the covalent bond can extend even to the most metallic of structure types.

  7. Nickel-phendione complex covalently attached onto carbon nanotube/cross linked glucose dehydrogenase as bioanode for glucose/oxygen compartment-less biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korani, Aazam; Salimi, Abdollah; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    Here, [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex, (phendion and phen are 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and 5-amino-1, 10-phenanthrolin) covalently attached onto carboxyl functionalized multi walls carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/MWCNTs-COOH) using solid phase interactions and combinatorial approaches.The attached [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex displays a surface controlled electrode process and it acts as an effective redox mediator for electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at reduced overpotentials. With co-immobilization of glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) by crosslinking an effective biocatalyst for glucose oxidation designed. The onset potential and current density are -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode and 0.550 mA cm-2, which indicate the applicability of the proposed system as an efficient bioanode for biofuel cell (BFC) design. A GCE/MWCNTs modified with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a platform for immobilization of bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and the prepared GCE/MWCNTs/AuNPs/BOD biocathode exhibits an onset potential of 0.56 V versus Ag/AgCl. The performance of the fabricated bioanode and biocathode in a membraneless enzyme based glucose/O2 biofuel cell is evaluated. The open circuit voltage of the cell and maximum current density are 520 mV and 0.233 mA cm-2, respectively, while maximum power density of 40 μWcm-2 achieves at voltage of 280 mV with stable output power after 24 h continues operation.

  8. PIPERIDINE OLIGOMERS AND COMBINATORIAL LIBRARIES THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to piperidine oligomers, methods for the preparation of piperidine oligomers and compound libraries thereof, and the use of piperidine oligomers as drug substances. The present invention also relates to the use of combinatorial libraries of piperidine oligomers...... in libraries (arrays) of compounds especially suitable for screening purposes....

  9. Covalent co-immobilization of heparin/laminin complex that with different concentration ratio on titanium surface for selectively direction of platelets and vascular cells behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Junying, E-mail: chenjy@263.net; Huang, Nan

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Extracellular matrix inspired surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF to construct a favorable microenvironment for selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • Take the advantage of specific intermolecular interaction, the bioactivity of above biomolecules was more efficiently maintained in compared with the common used covalent immobilization method. • Poly-l-lysine was used as a novel interlayer for surface amination, and in comparison, PLL coating was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: Surface biofunctional modification of coronary artery stent to improve the hemocompatibility and selectively accelerate endothelium regeneration but prevent restenosis have been become a new hotspot. For this, a novel method was developed in this work by co-immobilization of Ln and heparin complex on poly-L-lysine modified Ti surface. Take the advantage of the specific interaction between Ln and heparin, Ln and heparin complexes with different concentration ratios were set up for creating different exposure density of these two types of biomolecules. According to biocompatibility evaluation results, the Hep/Ln complexes modified surface displayed less platelet adhesion and activation. Especially, on L(150)H and L(200)H surface, the AT III binding quantity, APTT value and anti-coagulation property of modified surface were significantly promoted. Furthermore, the adherent density and proliferation activity of ECs and EPCs were positively correlated with Ln concentration. Notably, the proliferation of both ECs and EPCs on L(100)H, L(150)H and L(200)H surface were greatly promoted. Another hand, the proliferation activity of SMCs was significantly inhibited on Hep/Ln modified surfaces, which was considered mainly due to the inhibitory effect of heparin to SMCs. According to the existing results, this study demonstrated that in a certain range of heparin and laminin concentration ratio

  10. Dynamic covalent polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Melo, Fatima; Smulders, Maarten M.J.

    2016-01-01

    This Highlight presents an overview of the rapidly growing field of dynamic covalent polymers. This class of polymers combines intrinsic reversibility with the robustness of covalent bonds, thus enabling formation of mechanically stable, polymer-based materials that are responsive to external

  11. Raman Model Predicting Hardness of Covalent Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Qian, Quang-Rui; Sun, Jian; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the fact that both hardness and vibrational Raman spectrum depend on the intrinsic property of chemical bonds, we propose a new theoretical model for predicting hardness of a covalent crystal. The quantitative relationship between hardness and vibrational Raman frequencies deduced from the typical zincblende covalent crystals is validated to be also applicable for the complex multicomponent crystals. This model enables us to nondestructively and indirectly characterize the hardness o...

  12. Photoinduced electron-transfer processes involving covalently linked ruthenium and cobalt polypyridyl complexes. Comparison of electronic coupling in bridged and nonbridged ruthenium and cobalt complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaoqing; Lei, Yabin; Endicott, J.F. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)); Van Wallendal, S.; Jackman, D.C.; Rillema, D.P. (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte (United States)); Perkovic, M.W. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States) Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Photoinduced electron-transfer processes have been examined in a heterobimetallic coordination complex with polypyridyl ligands. Three relaxation processes were observed to follow light absorption by (bpy)[sub 2]Ru(bb)Co(bpy)[sub 2][sup 5+] (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and bb 1,2-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4'-yl)ethane) with lifetimes in water at 25[degrees]C of 0.18, 1, and 6 ns determined using picosecond flash photolysis techniques. These nearly solvent independent relaxation rates are ascribed to forward electron transfer from ([sup 3]MLCT)Ru(bpy)[sub 2][sup 2+] to Co(bpy)[sub 2][sup 3+], spin relaxation at the Co(II) center and back electron transfer from ([sup 4]T[sub 1])Co(bpy)[sub 2][sub 2+] to Ru(bpy)[sub 2][sup 3+]. Luminescence decay of ([sup 3]MLCT)Ru(bpy)[sub 2][sup 2+] has also been used to monitor the electron-transfer quenching step from 77-150 K, and the quenching rate extrapolated to 25[degrees]C (activation energy of 2.2 [times] 10[sup 3] cm[sup [minus]1]) was compatible with the 180-ps lifetime. It is inferred that the back electron transfer rate is retarded by poor donor-acceptor electronic coupling (k[sub el] [congruent] 10[sup [minus]3]). A Mulliken type of perturbational model is proposed to describe the weak electronic coupling in this complex. Spectroscopic parameters are combined with the perturbational expressions to give a plausible account of the electronic coupling in the back-electron-transfer process. 84 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Atomic covalent functionalization of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-01-15

    Although graphene's physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp(2) bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene's electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (∼1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Toward this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  14. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  15. Vanadate oligomer interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M

    2000-05-30

    'Monovanadate' containing a mixture of at least four different vanadate species and 'decavanadate' containing apparently only two vanadate species, mainly decameric species, inhibit myosin and actomyosin ATPase activities. The addition of myosin to 'monovanadate' and 'decavanadate' solutions promotes differential increases on the 51V NMR spectral linewidths of vanadate oligomers. The relative order of line broadening upon myosin addition, reflecting the interaction of the vanadate oligomers with the protein, was V10 > V4 > V1 = 1, whereas no changes were observed for monomeric vanadate species. It is concluded that decameric and tetrameric vanadate species interact quite potently with the protein and affect myosin as well actomyosin ATPase activities.

  16. Over-expression and purification strategies for recombinant multi-protein oligomers: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis σ/anti-σ factor protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Krishan Gopal; Jaiswal, Ravi Kumar; Shukla, Jinal K; Praveena, T; Gopal, B

    2010-12-01

    The function of a protein in a cell often involves coordinated interactions with one or several regulatory partners. It is thus imperative to characterize a protein both in isolation as well as in the context of its complex with an interacting partner. High resolution structural information determined by X-ray crystallography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance offer the best route to characterize protein complexes. These techniques, however, require highly purified and homogenous protein samples at high concentration. This requirement often presents a major hurdle for structural studies. Here we present a strategy based on co-expression and co-purification to obtain recombinant multi-protein complexes in the quantity and concentration range that can enable hitherto intractable structural projects. The feasibility of this strategy was examined using the σ factor/anti-σ factor protein complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach was successful across a wide range of σ factors and their cognate interacting partners. It thus appears likely that the analysis of these complexes based on variations in expression constructs and procedures for the purification and characterization of these recombinant protein samples would be widely applicable for other multi-protein systems.

  17. Non covalent assembly of coordination superstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Khlobystov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The main topic of this work is the design of discrete and polymeric multi-component coordination structures using non-covalent interactions between organic and inorganic molecular components. All of the structures described herein are based on transition metal cations and N-donor heterocyclic bis-exodentate ligands with different geometries and various spacer functionalities. The predominant method used for the structural characterisation of the complexes was single crystal X-ray crystallography. X-ray powder diffraction, IR and NMR spectroscopies and TEM and AFM imaging were used to characterise the bulk products from the reactions. Chapter 1 is a comparative review of non-covalent interactions relevant to coordination superstructures and covers the latest developments in the area of crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry. The nature, geometry and relative energy of the non-covalent interactions are considered in detail in order to reveal their influence on the structure and properties of complexes...

  18. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I), and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers. PMID:21645391

  19. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  20. Metabolism of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Synthesis and use of photosensitive insulin analogs to study insulin receptor metabolism in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B C

    1983-04-10

    To facilitate labeling cell surface insulin receptors and analyzing their metabolism by 3T3-L1 adipocytes, a characterization of both the interaction of photosensitive insulin analogs with 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the conditions for photocross-linking these derivatives to the insulin receptor are described. The synthesis and purification of two photoaffinity analogs of insulin are presented. Both B29-lysine- and A1-glycine-substituted N-(2-nitro-4-azidophenyl)glycyl insulin compete with 125I-insulin for binding to 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and the B29-derivative retains a biological activity similar to that for native insulin. An apparatus developed for these studies permits photolysis of cells in monolayer culture using the visible region of the lamp emission spectrum. Activation of the photoderivative by this apparatus occurs with a half-life of approximately 15 s and permits rapid photolabeling of a single species of receptor of 300,000 Da. The conditions for photolabeling permit a measurement of the turnover of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes in monolayer culture. Degradation of this complex occurs as an apparent first order process with a half-life of 7 h. A comparison with previous studies (Reed, B. C., Ronnett, G. V., Clements, P. R., and Lane, M. D. (1981) J. Biol. Chem 256, 3917-3925; Ronnett, G. V., Knutson, V. P., and Lane, M. D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4285-4291) indicates that in a "down-regulated" state, 3T3-L1 adipocytes degrade covalent receptor-hormone complexes with kinetics similar to those for the degradation of dissociable receptor-hormone complexes.

  1. Triply interlocked covalent organic cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasell, Tom; Wu, Xiaofeng; Jones, James T A; Bacsa, John; Steiner, Alexander; Mitra, Tamoghna; Trewin, Abbie; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2010-09-01

    Interlocked molecules comprise two or more separate components that are joined by 'mechanical' rather than covalent bonds. In other words, these molecular assemblies cannot be dissociated without the cleavage of one or more chemical bonds. Although recent progress has enabled the preparation of such topologies through coordination or templating interactions, three-dimensional interlocked covalent architectures remain difficult to prepare. Here, we present a template-free one-pot synthesis of triply interlocked organic cages. These 20-component dimers consist of two tetrahedral monomeric cages each built from four nodes and six linkers. The monomers exhibit axial chirality, which is recognized by their partner cage during the template-free interlocking assembly process. The dimeric cages also include two well-defined cavities per assembly, which for one of the systems studied led to the formation of a supramolecular host-guest chain. These interlocked organic molecules may prove useful as part of a toolkit for the modular construction of complex porous solids and other supramolecular assemblies.

  2. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-07-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  3. Structural Analysis of a Viral Ovarian Tumor Domain Protease from the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Complex with Covalently Bonded Ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Baker, Erica A.; Masters, Emily M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Pegan, Scott D. (Denver); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(-)] nairovirus that produces fever, prostration, and severe hemorrhages in humans. With fatality rates for CCHF ranging up to 70% based on several factors, CCHF is considered a dangerous emerging disease. Originally identified in the former Soviet Union and the Congo, CCHF has rapidly spread across large sections of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Recent reports have identified a viral homologue of the ovarian tumor protease superfamily (vOTU) within its L protein. This protease has subsequently been implicated in downregulation of the type I interferon immune response through cleavage of posttranslational modifying proteins ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like interferon-simulated gene 15 (ISG15). Additionally, homologues of vOTU have been suggested to perform similar roles in the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(+)] arteriviruses. By utilizing X-ray crystallographic techniques, the structure of vOTU covalently bound to ubiquitin propylamine, a suicide substrate of the enzyme, was elucidated to 1.7 {angstrom}, revealing unique structural elements that define this new subclass of the OTU superfamily. In addition, kinetic studies were carried out with aminomethylcoumarin (AMC) conjugates of monomeric Ub, ISG15, and NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8) substrates in order to provide quantitative insights into vOTU's preference for Ub and Ub-like substrates.

  4. Hyperphosphorylation-induced tau oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid eIqbal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein tau contains 2–3 phosphates per mole of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD brain tau is three to four fold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000 x g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also microtubule associated protein (MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike ABeta and prion protein (PrP oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1 : 1 ratio of the 3-repeat : 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

  5. Hyperphosphorylation-induced tau oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein (MAP) tau contains 2-3 phosphates per mol of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tau is three to fourfold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000 × g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike Aβ and prion protein (PrP) oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1:1 ratio of the 3-repeat: 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

  6. Targeting α-synuclein oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Diggelen, Femke

    2017-01-01

    . Although there is currently no cure for PD, αSn oligomers (αSOs) are a potential therapeutic target, but a major drawback it that little is known about the nature of PD-associated αSOs. The scientific literature describes a wide variety of protocols to generate αSOs in vitro, with a subsequent......+/K+ ATPase, V-type ATPase, VDAC, CaMKII and Rab-3A. The identification of these targets is a first step towards unravelling the toxic pathways which are activated upon synaptic binding of extracellularly added αSOs, and hopefully will contribute to the discovery of new disease modifying compounds, which can...

  7. Prion protein oligomer and its neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Huang; Fulin Lian; Yi Wen; Chenyun Guo; Donghai Lin

    2013-01-01

    The prion diseases,also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,are fatal neurodegenerative disorders.According to the 'protein only' hypothesis,the key molecular event in the pathogenesis of prion disease is the conformational conversion of the host-derived cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a misfolded form (scrapie PrP,prpSc).Increasing evidence has shown that the most infectious factor is the smaller subfibrillar oligomers formed by prion proteins.Both the prion oligomer and PrPSc are rich in β-sheet structure and resistant to the proteolysis of proteinase K.The prion oligomer is soluble in physiologic environments whereas PrPSc is insoluble.Various prion oligomers are formed in different conditions.Prion oligomers exhibited more neurotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo than the fibrillar forms of PrPSc,implying that prion oligomers could be potential drug targets for attacking prion diseases.In this article,we describe recent experimental evidence regarding prion oligomers,with a special focus on prion oligomer formation and its neurotoxicity.

  8. Synthesis of hybrid transition-metalloproteins via thiol-selective covalent anchoring of Rh-phosphine and Ru-phenanthroline complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heeten, R.; Muñoz, B.K.; Popa, G.; Laan, W.; Kamer, P.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of hybrid transition metalloproteins by thiol-selective incorporation of organometallic rhodium- and ruthenium complexes is described. Phosphine ligands and two rhodium-diphosphine complexes bearing a carboxylic acid group were coupled to the cysteine of PYP R52G, yielding a metalloe

  9. SYNTHESIS OF OLIGOMERS CONTAINING 5-FLUOROURACIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PIAO Aichih; SUN Shumen

    1983-01-01

    The condensation oligomers of 5-fluorouracil were prepared by reaction of 2,4-bis-(trimethyl-silyloxy)-5-fluoropyrimidine) with various dicarboxylic chlorides, e.g.R=(-CH2-)2, (-CH2-)4, (-CH2-)6, p-C6H4-, m-C6H4-, o-C6H4- The structures of obtained oligomers were characterized by IR and the oligomers were then hydrolyzed in acid, alkaline and neutral media at room temperature respectively. The amount of 5-fluorouracil released was quantitated by measuring its UV absorbance at 265.5nm. However in the case of oligomers containing phenylene moiety, 5-fluorouracil was not detected when the hydrolysis was conducted in acid or neutral medium, while in the case of oligomers containing methylene moiety, hydrolysis proceeded easily in acid, alkaline and neutral media.

  10. Synthesis of hybrid transition-metalloproteins via thiol-selective covalent anchoring of Rh-phosphine and Ru-phenanthroline complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Heeten, René; Muñoz, Bianca K; Popa, Gina; Laan, Wouter; Kamer, Paul C J

    2010-09-28

    The preparation of hybrid transition metalloproteins by thiol-selective incorporation of organometallic rhodium- and ruthenium complexes is described. Phosphine ligands and two rhodium-diphosphine complexes bearing a carboxylic acid group were coupled to the cysteine of PYP R52G, yielding a metalloenzyme active in the rhodium catalyzed hydrogenation of dimethyl itaconate. The successful coupling was shown by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectroscopy. In addition wild-type PYP (PYP WT), PYP R52G and ALBP were successfully modified with a (eta(6)-arene) ruthenium(II) phenanthroline complex via a maleimide linker.

  11. Ballistic Energy Transport in Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, Natalia I; Qasim, Layla N; Kurnosov, Arkady A; Burin, Alexander L; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2015-09-15

    The development of nanocomposite materials with desired heat management properties, including nanowires, layered semiconductor structures, and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions, attracts broad interest. Such materials often involve polymeric/oligomeric components and can feature high or low thermal conductivity, depending on their design. For example, in SAM junctions made of alkane chains sandwiched between metal layers, the thermal conductivity can be very low, whereas the fibers of ordered polyethylene chains feature high thermal conductivity, exceeding that of many pure metals. The thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials is determined by the energy transport between and within each component of the material, which all need to be understood for optimizing the properties. For example, in the SAM junctions, the energy transport across the metal-chain interface as well as the transport through the chains both determine the overall heat conductivity, however, to separate these contributions is difficult. Recently developed relaxation-assisted two-dimensional infrared (RA 2DIR) spectroscopy is capable of studying energy transport in individual molecules in the time domain. The transport in a molecule is initiated by exciting an IR-active group (a tag); the method records the influence of the excess energy on another mode in the molecule (a reporter). The energy transport time can be measured for different reporters, and the transport speed through the molecule is evaluated. Various molecules were interrogated by RA 2DIR: in molecules without repeating units (disordered), the transport mechanism was expected and found to be diffusive. The transport via an oligomer backbone can potentially be ballistic, as the chain offers delocalized vibrational states. Indeed, the transport regime via three tested types of oligomers, alkanes, polyethyleneglycols, and perfluoroalkanes was found to be ballistic, whereas the transport within the end groups was diffusive

  12. Non-covalent conjugation of CdTe QDs with lysozyme binding DNA for fluorescent sensing of lysozyme in complex biological sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujia; Gao, Zhidan; Shao, Na

    2014-11-01

    Water-soluble cysteamine (CA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with lysozyme binding DNA (LBD) was constructed for luminescent sensing of lysozyme by forming a ternary self-assembly complex. Addition of negatively charged lysozyme binding DNA to the positively charged CA capped CdTe QDs buffer solution (Tris-HCl pH 7.4) could lead to the formation of QDs-LBD complex through electrostatic interactions. Once lysozyme was introduced into the CdTe QDs-LBD system, it could bind specifically with the QDs-LBD complex, resulting in fluorescence emission enhancement of the QDs due to the surface inert of QDs. At a given amount of LBD and CdTe QDs (LBD: QDs=2: 1), the fluorescence intensity enhancement of QDs was linear with lysozyme concentration over the range of 8.9-71.2 nM, with a detection limit of 4.3 nM. Due to the specific binding of LBD with lysozyme, this approach displayed high selectivity for lysozyme recognition. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by DLS and zeta potential measurement, and agarose gel electrophoresis experiment. Furthermore, the proposed CA-capped CdTe QDs-LBD sensor was applied to lysozyme detection in mouse serum and human morning urine samples, which showed high sensitivity and selectivity in the complex biological sample.

  13. Syntheses and characterization of three diphenyl phosphate based Cu(II) complexes and the effect of non-covalent interactions on their supramolecular framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DILIP KUMAR MAITY; FAZLE HAQUE; BASUDEB DUTTA; BISWAJIT BHATTACHARYA; DEBAJYOTI GHOSHAL

    2016-12-01

    Assembly of diphenylphosphate (dpp) with Cu(II) salts in combination with the different Ndonor linkers, e.g., pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdeta), bis-(3-aminopropyl)amine (bapa) and 4-Picolene (4-pic), yielded three new metal-organic coordination complexes, namely {[Cu(dpp)(pmdeta)]·ClO₄.H₂O}₂ (1), {[{[Cu(dpp)(bapa)H₂O]·ClO₄} (2) and [Cu(dpp)2(4-pic)₂]₂ (3) by stirring the constituent reactants at room temperature. Complexes 1–3 were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and were further characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) studies. Compound 1 exhibits a dimeric Cu(II) complex which forms a 1D supramolecular chain along the crystallographic c-axis by means of intermolecular π .. .π interactions. Compounds 2 and 3 form a monomeric and dimeric complex of Cu(II) respectively, which are further extended into a supramolecular 2D structure viaC-H..π interactions for 2 and a 3D structure for 3 with the help of both intermolecular C-H..π and π . . . π interactions for 3. In addition, the solid state UV-Vis spectra of compounds 1-3 and free dpp ligand have beeninvestigated at room temperature.

  14. Covalent co-immobilization of heparin/laminin complex that with different concentration ratio on titanium surface for selectively direction of platelets and vascular cells behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2014-10-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of coronary artery stent to improve the hemocompatibility and selectively accelerate endothelium regeneration but prevent restenosis have been become a new hotspot. For this, a novel method was developed in this work by co-immobilization of Ln and heparin complex on poly-L-lysine modified Ti surface. Take the advantage of the specific interaction between Ln and heparin, Ln and heparin complexes with different concentration ratios were set up for creating different exposure density of these two types of biomolecules. According to biocompatibility evaluation results, the Hep/Ln complexes modified surface displayed less platelet adhesion and activation. Especially, on L(150)H and L(200)H surface, the AT III binding quantity, APTT value and anti-coagulation property of modified surface were significantly promoted. Furthermore, the adherent density and proliferation activity of ECs and EPCs were positively correlated with Ln concentration. Notably, the proliferation of both ECs and EPCs on L(100)H, L(150)H and L(200)H surface were greatly promoted. Another hand, the proliferation activity of SMCs was significantly inhibited on Hep/Ln modified surfaces, which was considered mainly due to the inhibitory effect of heparin to SMCs. According to the existing results, this study demonstrated that in a certain range of heparin and laminin concentration ratio, the biological behavior of platelets, ECs, EPCs and SMCs could be selectively directed. We suggested that this article provided a potential method to construct an adequate platform on a stent surface for accelerate endothelialization with low side effects.

  15. Filling the "green gap" of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex by covalent attachment of Rhodamine Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Kristina; Werwie, Mara; Wiegand, Sabine; Paulsen, Harald

    2009-12-01

    The major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) greatly enhances the efficiency of photosynthesis in green plants. Recombinant LHCII can be assembled in vitro from its denatured, bacterially expressed apoprotein and plant pigments. This makes it an interesting candidate for biomimetic light-harvesting in photovoltaic applications. Due to its almost 20 pigments bound per apoprotein, LHCII absorbs efficiently in the blue and red spectral domains of visible light but less efficiently in the green domain, the so-called "green gap" in its absorption spectrum. Here we present a hybrid complex of recombinant LHCII with organic dyes that add to LHCII absorption in the green spectral region. One or three Rhodamine Red dye molecules were site-specifically attached to cysteine side chains in the apoprotein and did not interfere with LHCII assembly, function and stability. The dyes transferred their excitation energy virtually completely to the chlorophylls in LHCII, partially filling in the green gap. Thus, organic dyes can be used to increase the absorption cross section and, thus, the light-harvesting efficiency of recombinant LHCII.

  16. Adding Effects of Reactive Oligomers for Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 英介; 稲垣, 慎二; 岡本, 弘

    1991-01-01

    Reactive oligomers with both functional end groups were prepared by the radical telomerization and the effect of oligomers added to bisphenol-A-glycidylehter type epoxy resin was investigated by measuring mechanical properties, adhesive properties and dynamic viscoelasticities. These oligomers were high viscous liquid except the one prepared from methyl methacrylate, therefore the blend of oligomers with epoxy resin is easy. Adding oligomers, the cured epoxy resins showed the lower glass-tran...

  17. Taming fluorescence yield of dye insensitive to temperature by non-covalent complex with the host CB[7] for aqueous dye lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monika Gupta; Krishna K Jagtap; V Sudarsan; Alok K Ray

    2014-02-01

    Quantum yield of fluorescence (QYF) of widely used Rhodamine (RhB) dye in ethanol and water was observed to decrease rapidly with increase in temperature of the dye solutions, which was correlated to enhanced torsional motion of its flexible diethylamino groups. This is harmful for its use in high-average power dye lasers, pumped by copper vapour laser (CVL) or diodepumped solid-state green laser (DPSSGL), in which bulk temperature of the dye solution was found to increase due to the heat generated by circulation pumps and non-radiative decay processes of excited dye molecules. The QYF of RhB dye in water was found to be not sensitive to temperature in the practical operating region 16–25°C of dye laser by adopting supramolecular route to form an inclusion complex of RhB with the container molecule cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]).

  18. Subdiffusion of proteins and oligomers on membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepzelter, David; Zaman, Muhammad

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion of proteins on lipid membranes plays a central role in cell signaling processes. From a mathematical perspective, most membrane diffusion processes are explained by the Saffman-Delbrück theory. However, recent studies have suggested a major limitation in the theoretical framework, the lack of complexity in the modeled lipid membrane. Lipid domains (sometimes termed membrane rafts) are known to slow protein diffusion, but there have been no quantitative theoretical examinations of how much diffusion is slowed in a general case. We provide an overall theoretical framework for confined-domain ("corralled") diffusion. Further, there have been multiple apparent contradictions of the basic conclusions of Saffman and Delbrück, each involving cases in which a single protein or an oligomer has multiple transmembrane regions passing through a lipid phase barrier. We present a set of corrections to the Saffman-Delbrück theory to account for these experimental observations. Our corrections are able to provide a quantitative explanation of numerous cellular signaling processes that have been considered beyond the scope of the Saffman-Delbrück theory, and may be extendable to other forms of subdiffusion.

  19. Photophysical properties of a novel organic-inorganic hybrid material: Eu(III)-β-diketone complex covalently bonded to SiO(2) /ZnO composite matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Juan; Yan, Bing

    2010-01-01

    In this article, dibenzoylmethane (DBM) was first grafted with the coupling reagent 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl isocyanate (TESPIC) to form precursor DBM-Si, and ZnO quantum dot was modified with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) to form SiO(2) /ZnO nanocomposite particle. Then the precursor DBM-Si and the terminal ligand 1,10-phenthroline (phen) were coordinated to Eu(3+) ion to obtain ternary hybrid material phen-Eu-DBM-SiO(2) /ZnO after hydrolysis and copolycondensation between the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), water molecules and the SiO(2) /ZnO network via the sol-gel process. In addition, for comparison, the binary hybrid material with SiO(2) /ZnO network and ternary hybrid material with pure Si-O network were also synthesized, denoted as Eu-DBM-SiO(2) /ZnO and phen-Eu-DBM-Si, respectively. The results reveal that hybrid material with SiO(2) /ZnO network phen-Eu-DBM-SiO(2) /ZnO exhibits the stronger red light, the longer lifetimes and higher quantum efficiency than hybrid material with pure Si-O network phen-Eu-DBM-Si, suggesting that SiO(2) /ZnO is a favorable host matrix for the luminescence of rare earth complexes.

  20. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  1. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian J; Parent, Lucas R; Overholts, Anna C; Beaucage, Peter A; Bisbey, Ryan P; Chavez, Anton D; Hwang, Nicky; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, Austin M; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Dichtel, William R

    2017-01-25

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material's morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications.

  2. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  3. Covalent heterogenization of discrete bis(8-quinolinolato)dioxomolybdenum(VI) and dioxotungsten(VI) complexes by a metal-template/metal-exchange method: Cyclooctene epoxidation catalysts with enhanced performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Ren, Yang; Lee, Sungsik; Kan, Qiubin

    2014-10-01

    A metal-template/metal-exchange method was used to imprint covalently attached bis(8- quinolinolato)dioxomolybdenum(VI) and dioxotungsten(VI) complexes onto large surface-area, mesoporous SBA-15 silica to obtain discrete MoO2 VIT and WO2 VIT catalysts bearing different metal loadings, respectively. Homogeneous counterparts, MoO2 VIN and WO2 VIN, as well as randomly ligandgrafted heterogeneous analogues, MoO2 VIG and WO2 VIG, were also prepared for comparison. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), pair distribution function (PDF) and UV–vis data demonstrate that MoO2 VIT and WO2 VIT adopt a more solution-like bis(8-quinolinol) coordination environment than MoO2 VIG and WO2 VIG, respectively. Correspondingly, the templated MoVI and WVI catalysts show superior performances to their randomly grafted counterparts and neat analogues in the epoxidation of cyclooctene. It is found that the representative MoO2 VIT-10% catalyst can be recycled up to five times without significant loss of reactivity, and heterogeneity test confirms the high stability of MoO2 VIT-10% catalyst against leaching of active species into solution. The homogeneity of the discrete bis(8-quinolinol) metal spheres templated on SBA-15 should be responsible for the superior performances.

  4. Targeted non-covalent self-assembled nanoparticles based on human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Buckle, Tessa; Kuil, Joeri; Luker, Gary D.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Nieweg, Omgo; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a biological nanocarrier that forms non-covalent complexes with a number of synthetic and biomolecules. Previously we demonstrated radiolabeled HSA-based nanoparticles can form non-covalent complexes with fluorescent cyanine dyes yielding imaging agents for surgical guid

  5. Dynamic covalent chemistry approaches toward macrocycles, molecular cages, and polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinghua; Wang, Qi; Taynton, Philip; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-20

    polymerization. We prepared imine- or ethynylene-linked porous polymer networks, which exhibit permanent porosity with high specific surface areas. Our most recent contribution is the discovery of a recyclable polyimine material whose self-healing can be activated simply by heating or water treatment. The facile access to complex functional organic molecules through dynamic covalent chemistry has allowed us to explore their exciting applications in gas adsorption/separation, host-guest chemistry, and nanocomposite fabrication. It is clear that there are significant opportunities for improved dynamic covalent systems and their more widespread applications in materials science.

  6. Lactic acid oligomers (OLAs) as prodrug moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, J; Lachmann, B; Lauer, R; Eppacher, S; Noe, C R

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we propose the use of lactic acid oligomers (OLAs) as prodrug moieties. Two synthetic approaches are presented, on the one hand a non selective oligomerisation of lactic acid and on the other hand a block synthesis to tetramers of lactic acid. Dimers of lactic acid were investigated with respect to their plasma stability and their adsorption to albumine. Ibuprofen was chosen as the first drug for OLAylation. The ester 19 of LA(1)-ibuprofen was evaluated with respect to the degradation to human plasma and the adsorption to albumine. All results indicate that lactic acid oligomers are promising prodrug moieties.

  7. Extractant Design by Covalency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olson, Angela Christine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kozimor, Stosh Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cross, Justin Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Batista, Enrique Ricardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Macor, Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-21

    This project aims to provide an electronic structure-to-function understanding of extractants for actinide selective separation processes. The research entails a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates chemical syntheses, structural determination, K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In FY15, the project reached the final stage of testing the extraction performance of a new ligand design and preparing an americium-extractant complex for analysis.

  8. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urmimala Maitra; M Pandeeswar; T Govindaraju

    2012-05-01

    Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures of different dimensionalities such as nanodiamond, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene can yield useful homo- and hetero-binary conjugates. Binary conjugation of the nanocarbons has been achieved by introducing symmetrical amide-linkages between acid (-COOH) functionalized nanocarbons and a diamine-linker. The binary conjugates have been characterized by using transmission electron microscopy as well as infrared, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Dispersions of covalently crosslinked binary conjugates of nanocarbons could be obtained in dimethyl formamide (DMF). Composites of the binary conjugates with polymer can be readily prepared by using the DMF suspensions.

  9. Near- and far-field properties of plasmonic oligomers under radially and azimuthally polarized light excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Avner; Grajower, Meir; Lerman, Gilad M; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald; Levy, Uriel

    2014-05-27

    We present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study on the near- and far-field properties of plasmonic oligomers using radially and azimuthally polarized excitation. These unconventional polarization states are perfectly matched to the high spatial symmetry of the oligomers and thus allow for the excitation of some of the highly symmetric eigenmodes of the structures, which cannot be excited by linearly polarized light. In particular, we study hexamer and heptamer structures and strikingly find very similar optical responses, as well as the absence of a Fano resonance. Furthermore, we investigate the near-field distributions of the oligomers using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). We observe significantly enhanced near-fields, which arise from efficient excitation of the highly symmetric eigenmodes by the radially and azimuthally polarized light fields. Our study opens up possibilities for tailored light-matter interaction, combining the design freedom of complex plasmonic structures with the remarkable properties of radially and azimuthally polarized light fields.

  10. The Toxicity of Amyloid ß Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lock Yue Chew

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms of Aβ oligomer toxicity which may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In particular, we discuss on the interaction of Aβ oligomers with the membrane through the process of adsorption and insertion. Such interaction gives rises to phase transitions  in the sub-structures of the Aβ peptide from α-helical to β-sheet  structure. By means of a coarse-grained model, we exhibit the tendency of β-sheet structures to aggregate, thus providing further insights to the process of membrane induced aggregation. We show that the aggregated oligomer causes membrane invagination, which is a precursor to the formation of pore structures and ion channels. Other pathological progressions to AD due to Aβ oligomers  are also covered,  such as their interaction with the membrane receptors, and their direct versus indirect effects on oxidative  stress and intraneuronal accumulation.  We further illustrate that the molecule curcumin is a potential Aβ toxicity inhibitor as a β-sheet breaker by having  a high propensity to interact with certain Aβ residues without  binding to them. The comprehensive understanding gained from these current  researches on the various toxicity mechanisms show promises in the provision of better therapeutics and treatment strategies in the near future.

  11. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    Linking organic molecules by covalent bonds into extended solids typically generates amorphous, disordered materials. The ability to develop strategies for obtaining crystals of such solids is of interest because it opens the way for precise control of the geometry and functionality of the extended structure, and the stereochemical orientation of its constituents. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a new class of porous covalent organic structures whose backbone is composed entirely of light elements (B, C, N, O, Si) that represent a successful demonstration of how crystalline materials of covalent solids can be achieved. COFs are made by combination of organic building units covalently linked into extended structures to make crystalline materials. The attainment of crystals is done by several techniques in which a balance is struck between the thermodynamic reversibility of the linking reactions and their kinetics. This success has led to the expansion of COF materials to include organic units linked by these strong covalent bonds: B-O, C-N, B-N, and B-O-Si. Since the organic constituents of COFs, when linked, do not undergo significant change in their overall geometry, it has been possible to predict the structures of the resulting COFs, and this advantage has facilitated their characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. It has also allowed for the synthesis of COF structures by design and for their formation with the desired composition, pore size, and aperture. In practice, the modeled PXRD pattern for a given expected COF is compared with the experimental one, and depending on the quality of the match, this is used as a starting point for solving and then refining the crystal structure of the target COF. These characteristics make COFs an attractive class of new porous materials. Accordingly, they have been used as gas storage materials for energy applications, solid supports for catalysis, and optoelectronic devices. A large and

  12. Constructing covalent organic frameworks in water via dynamic covalent bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thote, Jayshri; Barike Aiyappa, Harshitha; Rahul Kumar, Raya; Kandambeth, Sharath; Biswal, Bishnu P.; Balaji Shinde, Digambar; Chaki Roy, Neha; Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    The formation of keto-enamine based crystalline, porous polymers in water is investigated for the first time. Facile access to the Schiff base reaction in water has been exploited to synthesize stable porous structures using the principles of Dynamic Covalent Chemistry (DCC). Most credibly, the water-based Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs) possess chemical as well as physical properties such as crystallinity, surface area and porosity, which is comparable to their solvothermal counterparts. The formation of COFs in water is further investigated by understanding the nature of the monomers formed using hydroxy and non-hydroxy analogues of the aldehyde. This synthetic route paves a new way to synthesize COFs using a viable, greener route by utilization of the DCC principles in conjunction with the keto–enol tautomerism to synthesize useful, stable and porous COFs in water. PMID:27840679

  13. Molecular Biodynamers : Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-01-01

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and

  14. Molecular Biodynamers : Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-01-01

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and

  15. Multiple Ionic-Covalent Couplings in Molecules and Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GwangHi Jeung

    2009-01-01

    The electronic states of molecules made of electropositive and electronegative components result from the interfcrence between the covalent configurations and the ionic configurations.This work shows complex aspects of these ionic-covalent couplings in small molecules such as Li2H, Li2F, and Li4F. The extension of this type of analysis to the adsorption of the electrophilic molecules on the metal clusters or on the metal surfaces is supposed to lead to a radically new interpretation of the observed physical and chemical properties.

  16. Stochastic sensing through covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Hagan; Shin, Seong-Ho; Luchian, Tudor; Cheley, Stephen

    2013-03-26

    A system and method for stochastic sensing in which the analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element or an adaptor element. If such bonding is irreversible, the bond may be broken by a chemical reagent. The sensor element may be a protein, such as the engineered P.sub.SH type or .alpha.HL protein pore. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current, change in force, and change in fluorescence. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may be detected.

  17. On the fluorescence of pyrrole derivative oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Jeconias Rocha; Amazonas, Jarlesson Gama; Alberto Brito Silva Junior, Carlos [Pos-Graduacao em Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil); Melo, Celso P. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-020 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Laks, Bernardo [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nero, Jordan del [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil)], E-mail: jordan@ufpa.br

    2008-08-01

    In this work we have investigated the ground state and others eletronic properties of the biosensor 3-methyl pyrrole-4-carboxilic acid (MPC) oligomers and related compounds. We considered the systems described by a DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* type Hamiltonian and explored the effects due to the presence of conformational defects. Furthermore the excited states have been determined by a post Hartree-Fock CI methodology. The results revealed the existence of different electronic patterns for the MPC if compared to the ones existing for the oligopyrrole derivative systems. The response of one of investigated polymers (MPC) was found to be critically dependent on the radicals linked to the studied oligomer chain structure so that the electronic structure analyses should be easily improved by choosing a proper set of preparation parameters to design conducting polymers with desirable properties.

  18. Replication of proto-RNAs sustained by ligase-helicase cycle in oligomer world

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Daisuke; Narikiyo, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism of the replication of proto-RNAs in oligomer world is proposed. The replication is carried out by a minimum cycle which is sustained by a ligase and a helicase. We expect that such a cycle actually worked in the primordial soup and can be constructed in vitro. By computer simulation the products of the replication acquires diversity and complexity. Such diversity and complexity are the bases of the evolution.

  19. Ethynyl terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); hesives and composite matrices. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A new class of ethynyl-terminated oligomers and the process for preparing same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These improved polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  20. An update on the physiological and therapeutic relevance of GPCR oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Batoul

    2017-03-01

    The traditional view on GPCRs held that they function as single monomeric units composed of identical subunits. This notion was overturned by the discovery that GPCRs can form homo- and hetero-oligomers, some of which are obligatory, and can further assemble into receptor mosaics consisting of three or more protomers. Oligomerisation exerts significant impacts on receptor function and physiology, offering a platform for the diversification of receptor signalling, pharmacology, regulation, crosstalk, internalization and trafficking. Given their involvement in the modulation of crucial physiological processes, heteromers could constitute important therapeutic targets for a wide range of diseases, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, substance abuse or obesity. This review aims at depicting the current developments in GPCR oligomerisation research, documenting various class A, B and C GPCR heteromers detected in vitro and in vivo using biochemical and biophysical approaches, as well as recently identified higher-order oligomeric complexes. It explores the current understanding of dimerization dynamics and the possible interaction interfaces that drive oligomerisation. Most importantly, it provides an inventory of the wide range of physiological processes and pathophysiological conditions to which GPCR oligomers contribute, surveying some of the oligomers that constitute potential drug targets. Finally, it delineates the efforts to develop novel classes of ligands that specifically target and tether to receptor oligomers instead of a single monomeric entity, thus ameliorating their ability to modulate GPCR function.

  1. Diverse metastable structures formed by small oligomers of α-synuclein probed by force spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Neupane

    Full Text Available Oligomeric aggregates are widely suspected as toxic agents in diseases caused by protein aggregation, yet they remain poorly characterized, partly because they are challenging to isolate from a heterogeneous mixture of species. We developed an assay for characterizing structure, stability, and kinetics of individual oligomers at high resolution and sensitivity using single-molecule force spectroscopy, and applied it to observe the formation of transient structured aggregates within single oligomers of α-synuclein, an intrinsically-disordered protein linked to Parkinson's disease. Measurements of the molecular extension as the proteins unfolded under tension in optical tweezers revealed that even small oligomers could form numerous metastable structures, with a surprisingly broad range of sizes. Comparing the structures formed in monomers, dimers and tetramers, we found that the average mechanical stability increased with oligomer size. Most structures formed within a minute, with size-dependent rates. These results provide a new window onto the complex α-synuclein aggregation landscape, characterizing the microscopic structural heterogeneity and kinetics of different pathways.

  2. Thermodynamics of oligomer formation: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Joseph W; Horan, Andrew J; Hall, Wiley A; Johnston, Murray V

    2013-05-14

    Dimers and higher order oligomers, whether in the gas or particle phase, can affect important atmospheric processes such as new particle formation, and gas-particle partitioning. In this study, the thermodynamics of dimer formation from various oxidation products of α-pinene ozonolysis are investigated using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanics, and continuum solvent modeling. Favorable dimer formation pathways are found to exist in both gas and condensed phases. The free energies of dimer formation are used to calculate equilibrium constants and expected dimer concentrations under a variety of conditions. In the gas phase, favorable pathways studied include formation of non-covalent dimers of terpenylic acid and/or cis-pinic acid and a covalently-bound peroxyhemiacetal. Under atmospherically relevant conditions, only terpenylic acid forms a dimer in sufficient quantities to contribute to new particle formation. Under conditions typically used in laboratory experiments, several dimer formation pathways may contribute to particle formation. In the condensed phase, non-covalent dimers of terpenylic acid and/or cis-pinic acid and covalently-bound dimers representing a peroxyhemiacetal and a hydrated aldol are favorably formed. Dimer formation is both solution and temperature dependent. A water-like solution appears to promote dimer formation over methanol- or acetonitrile-like solutions. Heating from 298 K to 373 K causes extensive decomposition back to monomers. Dimers that are not favorably formed in either the gas or condensed phase include hemi-acetal, ester, anhydride, and the di(α-hydroxy) ether.

  3. Structural Properties of HIV Integrase. Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.; Diamond, T; Hwang, Y; Bushman, F; Van Duyne, G

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the catalytic component of the preintegration complex, a large nucleoprotein assembly critical for the integration of the retroviral genome into a host chromosome. Although partial crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus IN alone and its complex with the integrase binding domain of the host factor PSIP1/lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are available, many questions remain regarding the properties and structures of LEDGF-bound IN oligomers. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, multiangle light scattering, and small angle x-ray scattering, we have established the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and molecular shapes of IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes in solution. Analyses of intact IN tetramers bound to two different LEDGF truncations allow for placement of the integrase binding domain by difference analysis. Modeling of the small angle x-ray scattering envelopes using existing structural data suggests domain arrangements in the IN oligomers that support and extend existing biochemical data for IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes and lend new insights into the quaternary structure of LEDGF-bound IN tetramers. These IN oligomers may be involved in stages of the viral life cycle other than integration, including assembly, budding, and early replication.

  4. Simultaneous covalent and noncovalent hybrid polymerizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Yu, Tao; Palmer, Liam C.; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I. (NWU)

    2016-01-28

    Covalent and supramolecular polymers are two distinct forms of soft matter, composed of long chains of covalently and noncovalently linked structural units, respectively. We report a hybrid system formed by simultaneous covalent and supramolecular polymerizations of monomers. The process yields cylindrical fibers of uniform diameter that contain covalent and supramolecular compartments, a morphology not observed when the two polymers are formed independently. The covalent polymer has a rigid aromatic imine backbone with helicoidal conformation, and its alkylated peptide side chains are structurally identical to the monomer molecules of supramolecular polymers. In the hybrid system, covalent chains grow to higher average molar mass relative to chains formed via the same polymerization in the absence of a supramolecular compartment. The supramolecular compartments can be reversibly removed and re-formed to reconstitute the hybrid structure, suggesting soft materials with novel delivery or repair functions.

  5. Peptide oligomers for holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    SEVERAL classes of organic materials (such as photoanisotropic liquid-crystalline polymers(1-4) and photorefractive polymers(5-7)) are being investigated for the development of media for optical data storage. Here we describe a new family of organic materials-peptide oligomers containing azobenzene...... chromophores-which appear particularly promising for erasable holographic data storage applications. The rationale for our approach is to use the structural properties of peptide-like molecules to impose orientational order on the chromophores, and thereby optimize the optical properties of the resulting...

  6. Macrocyclic 2,7-Anthrylene Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Wakamatsu, Kan; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Sato, Hiroyasu; Toyota, Shinji

    2016-05-06

    A macrocyclic compound consisting of six 2,7-anthrylene units was successfully synthesized by Ni-mediated coupling of the corresponding dibromo precursor as a novel π-conjugated compound. This compound was sufficiently stable and soluble in organic solvents due to the presence of mesityl groups. X-ray analysis showed that the molecule had a nonplanar and hexagonal wheel-shaped framework of approximately S6 symmetry. The dynamic process between two S6 structures was observed by using the dynamic NMR technique, the barrier being 58 kJ mol(-1) . The spectroscopic properties of the hexamer were compared with those of analogous linear oligomers.

  7. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  8. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing.

  9. Highly Stable Foams from Block Oligomers Synthesized by Enzymatic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Boeriu, C.G.; Frissen, A.E.; Schols, H.A.; Wierenga, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized a new amphiphilic block oligomer by the enzymatic linking of a fatty acid (lauric acid) to a fructan oligomer (inulin) and tested the functionality of this carbohydrate derivative in foam stabilization. The structure of the modified oligosaccharide was found to be (Fruc)n(Glc)1CO

  10. The Challenge of Synthesizing Oligomers for Molecular Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the size of the oligomer and introducing functional groups at the ends of the oligomer that allow it to react with separate electrodes are critical issues when preparing materials for molecular wires. We demonstrate a general synthetic approach to oligophenylenevinylene (OPV) derivative...

  11. [Application and development of spectroscopy methodologies in the study on non-covalent interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Dai, Ben-Cai; Zhao, Yong-De; Lu, Kui

    2009-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method is widely used in the structure determination of biologic macromolecules and non-covalent interactions study for its convenience and speed. In the present paper, spectroscopy methodologies in the study of non-covalent interactions between small-molecule and biomacromolecule is comprehensively reviewed with 25 references. This review article focuses on the applications and development of common spectroscopy methodologies in the study of non-covalent interactions between small molecule and biomacromolecule,including the UV, fluorescence, CD, IR, Raman, resonance light scattering technique and SPR. The advantages and disadvantages of spectroscopy methodologies are also described. UV-Vis absorption spectrum (UV) method is widely used in the study of non-covalent interactions for its convenience and speed. The binding site number, the apparent binding constant and the interaction mode of non-covalent interactions can be obtained by fluorescence spectrum method. Circular dichroism (CD) method is effective way in the study of non-covalent interactions measure. Spectroscopy information about protein secondary structure and conformation can be acquired by infrared spectrometry (IR) method. Raman spectroscopy method is a better way to investigate the conformation change in macromolecules in solution. Non-covalent interactions can be measured by surface plasma resonance (SPR) method under the natural active condition. X-ray diffraction analysis method is better for non-covalent interactions research, but it is difficult to cultivate crystalline complex.

  12. Statistical mechanics of thermal denaturation of DNA oligomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navin Singh; Yashwant Singh

    2003-08-01

    Double stranded DNA chain is known to have non-trivial elasticity. We study the effect of this elasticity on the denaturation profile of DNA oligomer by constraining one base pair at one end of the oligomer to remain in unstretched (or intact) state. The effect of this constraint on the denaturation profile of the oligomer has been calculated using the Peyrard–Bishop Hamiltonian. The denaturation profile is found to be very different from the free (i.e. without the constraint) oligomer. We have also examined how this constraint affects the denaturation profile of the oligomer having a segment of defect sites located at different parts of the chain.

  13. Origin and diversification of a metabolic cycle in oligomer world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Tomoaki; Narikiyo, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Based on the oligomer-world hypothesis we propose an abstract model where the molecular recognition among oligomers is described in the shape space. The origin of life in the oligomer world is regarded as the establishment of a metabolic cycle in a primitive cell. The cycle is sustained by the molecular recognition. If an original cell acquires the ability of the replication of oligomers, the relationship among oligomers changes due to the poor fidelity of the replication. This change leads to the diversification of metabolic cycles. The selection among diverse cycles is the basis of the evolution. The evolvability is one of the essential characters of life. We demonstrate the origin and diversification of the metabolic cycle by the computer simulation of our model. Such a simulation is expected to be the simplified demonstration of what actually occurred in the primordial soup. Our model describes an analog era preceding the digital era based on the genetic code.

  14. Properties of Surface Cyclic Oligomers Present on Polyester Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑敏; 宋心远

    2003-01-01

    The effects of different treatments, such as dry heat,wet heat, solvent vapor and ultrasonic, on properties of the cyclic oligomers on the surface of polyester fiber are studied. The components of surface oligomers are analyzed through Thin-Layer Chromatograph. The result shows that: all of the treatments, especially solvent vapor treatment, can significantly increase the content of surface cyclic oligomers. The content of cyclic trimer is increased more considerably than other oligomers. Moreover, the morphology and the distribution of surface cyclic oligomers are also different from different treatments: Dry heat and wet heat cause larger polygonal solids distributed evenly on the surface of fiber; solvent vapor makes fiber surface exhibit irregular rodlike crystal shapes randomly; ultrasonic treatment induces some obscure and smaller deposits on the surface of fiber.

  15. Hydrogels with covalent and noncovalent crosslinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilck, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin. The hydrogel may contain covalent and non-covalent crosslinks.

  16. Design, synthesis, and characterization of biomimetic oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jonas Striegler

    . Using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we found evidence for the presence of thioamide–aromatic interactions through Csp2-H···Samide hydrogen bonding. Based on these studies we designed a ß-peptoid oligomer from residues prone to fit......Peptides and proteins made from the 20 canonical amino acids are responsible for many processes necessary for organisms to function. Beside their composition, proteins obtain their activity and unique selectivity through an ability to display functionalities accurately in the three......, for their ability to mimic the structural elements seen in proteins. Two prominent peptidomimetics are ß-peptides and a-peptoids (N-alkylglycines), which have been shown to fold into helical and sheet-like arrangements. To expand the chemical space available for mimicking protein structure their features have been...

  17. Aβ1-42 monomers or oligomers have different effects on autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmotto, Michela; Monteleone, Debora; Piras, Antonio; Valsecchi, Valeria; Tropiano, Marta; Ariano, Stefania; Fornaro, Michele; Vercelli, Alessandro; Puyal, Julien; Arancio, Ottavio; Tabaton, Massimo; Tamagno, Elena

    2014-10-01

    The role of autophagy and its relationship with apoptosis in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis is poorly understood. Disruption of autophagy leads to buildup of incompletely digested substrates, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation in vacuoles and cell death. Aβ, in turn, has been found to affect autophagy. Thus, Aβ might be part of a loop in which it is both the substrate of altered autophagy and its cause. Given the relevance of different soluble forms of Aβ1-42 in AD, we have investigated whether monomers and oligomers of the peptide have a differential role in causing altered autophagy and cell death. Using differentiated SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells, we found that monomers hamper the formation of the autophagic BCL2-BECN1/Beclin 1 complex and activate the MAPK8/JNK1-MAPK9/JNK2 pathway phosphorylating BCL2. Monomers also inhibit apoptosis and allow autophagy with intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and elevation of levels of BECN1 and LC3-II, resulting in an inhibition of substrate degradation due to an inhibitory action on lysosomal activity. Oligomers, in turn, favor the formation of the BCL2-BECN1 complex favoring apoptosis. In addition, they cause a less profound increase in BECN1 and LC3-II levels than monomers without affecting the autophagic flux. Thus, data presented in this work show a link for autophagy and apoptosis with monomers and oligomers, respectively. These studies are likely to help the design of novel disease modifying therapies.

  18. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) < Cd(II) < Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  19. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  20. Applications of reversible covalent chemistry in analytical sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David

    2012-12-07

    Reversible covalent chemistry (RCC) adds another dimension to commonly used sample preparation techniques like solid-phase extraction (SPE), solid-phase microextraction (SPME), molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) or immuno-affinity cleanup (IAC): chemical selectivity. By selecting analytes according to their covalent reactivity, sample complexity can be reduced significantly, resulting in enhanced analytical performance for low-abundance target analytes. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the applications of RCC in analytical sample preparation. The major reactions covered include reversible boronic ester formation, thiol-disulfide exchange and reversible hydrazone formation, targeting analyte groups like diols (sugars, glycoproteins and glycopeptides, catechols), thiols (cysteinyl-proteins and cysteinyl-peptides) and carbonyls (carbonylated proteins, mycotoxins). Their applications range from low abundance proteomics to reversible protein/peptide labelling to antibody chromatography to quantitative and qualitative food analysis. In discussing the potential of RCC, a special focus is on the conditions and restrictions of the utilized reaction chemistry.

  1. Structure-Induced Covalent Bonding in Al-Li Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kazuki; Ishii, Yasushi

    2010-06-01

    Formation mechanism of a deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states of the Al-Li Bergman and Zintl compounds is discussed with an emphasis on the differences among isostructural Al-Mg compounds. Since Li scatters electrons very weakly in comparison with Al and Mg, the potential landscape for electrons in Al-Li compounds is not that of the entire close-packed structure but that of the Al sublattice, which is a rather porous network like the diamond lattice. The porous network structure realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures enhances the covalent nature of electronic structures, hence the deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states. A concept of structure-induced covalent bonding in a network realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures may provide a novel picture in the electronic structures of complex intermetallic compounds.

  2. Flavins as Covalent Catalysts: New Mechanisms Emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Valentina; Palfey, Bruce A; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    With approximately 1% of proteins being flavoproteins, flavins are at the heart of a plethora of redox reactions in all areas of biology. Thanks to a series of fascinating recent discoveries, in addition to redox chemistry, covalent catalysis is now being recognized more frequently as a common strategy in flavoenzymes, with unprecedented mechanisms becoming apparent. Thus, noncanonical covalent reactions by flavins are emerging as a new pervasive concept in basic enzymology and biochemistry. These diverse enzymes are engaged in most biological processes, positioning the knowledge being gained from these new mechanisms to be translated into drugs that function through covalent mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Covalently linked tandem lesions in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrzyc, Helen B; Dawidzik, Jean B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Freund, Harold G; Wilton, John H; Box, Harold C

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution.

  4. The Challenge of Synthesizing Oligomers for Molecular Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik C. Krebs

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the size of the oligomer and introducing functional groups at the ends of the oligomer that allow it to react with separate electrodes are critical issues when preparing materials for molecular wires. We demonstrate a general synthetic approach to oligophenylenevinylene (OPV derivative molecules with a molecular length up to 9–10 nm which allow for the introduction of aromatic thioacetate functionality in fully conjugated oligomer systems. Oligomers containing 3–15 phenyl units were synthesized by step wise Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE reactions of a bifunctional OPV-monomer, which demonstrated good control of the size of the OPVs. Workup after each reaction step ensures a high purity of the final products. End group functionalization was introduced as a last step.

  5. New strategy for stable-isotope-aided, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of DNA oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Okira; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most efficient method for determining the solution structures of biomolecules. By applying multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques to {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins, we can determine the solution structures of proteins with molecular mass of 20 to 30kDa at an accuracy similar to that of x-ray crystallography. Improvements in NMR instrumentation and techniques as well as the development of protein engineering methods for labeling proteins have rapidly advanced multidimensional heteronuclear NMR of proteins. In contrast, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR studies of nucleic acids is less advanced because there were no efficient methods for preparing large amounts of labeled DNA/RNA oligomers. In this report, we focused on the chemical synthesis of DNA oligomers labeled at specific residue(s). RNA oligomers with specific labels, which are difficult to synthesize by the enzyme method, can be synthesized by the chemical method. The specific labels are useful for conformational analysis of larger molecules such as protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  6. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  7. Covalent Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavia Sanders, Adriana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A report meant to document the chemistries investigated by the author for covalent surface modification of CNTs. Oxidation, cycloaddition, and radical reactions were explored to determine their success at covalently altering the CNT surface. Characterization through infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis was performed in order to determine the success of the chemistries employed. This report is not exhaustive and was performed for CNT surface modification exploration as it pertains to the "Next Gen" project.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermosetting Polyimide Oligomers for Microelectronics Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    A series of reactive phenylethynyl endcapped imide oligomers has been prepared in either fully cyclized or amic acid precursor form. Soluble oligomers have been synthesized with controlled molecular weights ranging from 2- to 12 Kg/mol. Molecular weight characterization was performed using SEC (size exclusion chromatography) and 13C-NMR, revealing good agreement between the theoretical and experimental (Mn) values. Crosslinked polyimides were obtained by solution or melt processing the oli...

  9. Self-association of TPR domains: Lessons learned from a designed, consensus-based TPR oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Sharma, Amit; Kleanthous, Colin

    2010-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is a protein-protein interaction module that acts as an organizing centre for complexes regulating a multitude of biological processes. Despite accumulating evidence for the formation of TPR oligomers as an additional level of regulation there is a lack of structural and solution data explaining TPR self-association. In the present work we characterize the trimeric TPR-containing protein YbgF, which is linked to the Tol system in Gram-negative bacteria. By subtracting previously identified TPR consensus residues required for stability of the fold from residues conserved across YbgF homologs, we identified residues involved in oligomerization of the C-terminal YbgF TPR domain. Crafting these residues, which are located in loop regions between TPR motifs, onto the monomeric consensus TPR protein CTPR3 induced the formation of oligomers. The crystal structure of this engineered oligomer shows an asymmetric trimer where stacking interactions between the introduced tyrosines and displacement of the C-terminal hydrophilic capping helix, present in most TPR domains, are key to oligomerization. Asymmetric trimerization of the YbgF TPR domain and CTPR3Y3 leads to the formation of higher order oligomers both in the crystal and in solution. However, such open-ended self-association does not occur in full-length YbgF suggesting that the protein's N-terminal coiled-coil domain restricts further oligomerization. This interpretation is borne out in experiments where the coiled-coil domain of YbgF was engineered onto the N-terminus of CTPR3Y3 and shown to block self-association beyond trimerization. Our study lays the foundations for understanding the structural basis for TPR domain self-association and how such self-association can be regulated in TPR domain-containing proteins.

  10. Association thermodynamics and conformational stability of beta-sheet amyloid beta(17-42) oligomers: effects of E22Q (Dutch) mutation and charge neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, Nikolay; Dorosh, Lyudmyla; Wishart, David; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-20

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. It was found that amyloidogenic oligomers, not mature fibrils, are neurotoxic agents related to these diseases. Molecular mechanisms of infectivity, pathways of aggregation, and molecular structure of these oligomers remain elusive. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics, molecular mechanics combined with solvation analysis by statistical-mechanical, three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM-KH) in a new MM-3D-RISM-KH method to study conformational stability, and association thermodynamics of small wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers with different protonation states of Glu(22), as well the E22Q (Dutch) mutants. The association free energy of small beta-sheet oligomers shows near-linear trend with the dimers being thermodynamically more stable relative to the larger constructs. The linear (within statistical uncertainty) dependence of the association free energy on complex size is a consequence of the unilateral stacking of monomers in the beta-sheet oligomers. The charge reduction of the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers upon protonation of the solvent-exposed Glu(22) at acidic conditions results in lowering the association free energy compared to the wild-type oligomers at neutral pH and the E22Q mutants. The neutralization of the peptides because of the E22Q mutation only marginally affects the association free energy, with the reduction of the direct electrostatic interactions mostly compensated by the unfavorable electrostatic solvation effects. For the wild-type oligomers at acidic conditions such compensation is not complete, and the electrostatic interactions, along with the gas-phase nonpolar energetic and the overall entropic effects, contribute to the lowering of the association free energy. The differences in the association thermodynamics between the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers at neutral pH and the Dutch mutants, on the one hand, and the Abeta(17

  11. Inactivation of lipoprotein lipase occurs on the surface of THP-1 macrophages where oligomers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 are formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Thulin, Petra; Ehrenborg, Ewa [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Olivecrona, Thomas [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Olivecrona, Gunilla, E-mail: Gunilla.Olivecrona@medbio.umu.se [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is controlled by ANGPTL4 in THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both LPL and ANGPTL4 bind to THP-1 macrophages in a heparin-releasable fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only monomers of ANGPTL4 are present within THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covalent oligomers of ANGPTL4 appear on cell surface and in medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of LPL coincide with ANGPTL4 oligomer formation on cell surfaces. -- Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins causing release of fatty acids for metabolic purposes in muscles and adipose tissue. LPL in macrophages in the artery wall may, however, promote foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 4 inactivates LPL and ANGPTL4 expression is controlled by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). The mechanisms for inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 was studied in THP-1 macrophages where active LPL is associated with cell surfaces in a heparin-releasable form, while LPL in the culture medium is mostly inactive. The PPAR{delta} agonist GW501516 had no effect on LPL mRNA, but increased ANGPTL4 mRNA and caused a marked reduction of the heparin-releasable LPL activity concomitantly with accumulation of inactive, monomeric LPL in the medium. Intracellular ANGPTL4 was monomeric, while dimers and tetramers of ANGPTL4 were present in the heparin-releasable fraction and medium. GW501516 caused an increase in the amount of ANGPTL4 oligomers on the cell surface that paralleled the decrease in LPL activity. Actinomycin D blocked the effects of GW501516 on ANGPTL4 oligomer formation and prevented the inactivation of LPL. Antibodies against ANGPTL4 interfered with the inactivation of LPL. We conclude that inactivation of LPL in THP-1 macrophages primarily occurs on the cell surface where oligomers of ANGPTL4 are formed.

  12. Covalent bonding: the fundamental role of the kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacskay, George B; Nordholm, Sture

    2013-08-22

    This work addresses the continuing disagreement between two prevalent schools of thought concerning the mechanism of covalent bonding. According to Hellmann, Ruedenberg, and Kutzelnigg, a lowering of the kinetic energy associated with electron delocalization is the key stabilization mechanism. The opposing view of Slater, Feynman, and Bader has maintained that the source of stabilization is electrostatic potential energy lowering due to electron density redistribution to binding regions between nuclei. Despite the large body of accurate quantum chemical work on a range of molecules, the debate concerning the origin of bonding continues unabated, even for H2(+), the simplest of covalently bound molecules. We therefore present here a detailed study of H2(+), including its formation, that uses a sequence of computational methods designed to reveal the relevant contributing mechanisms as well as the spatial density distributions of the kinetic and potential energy contributions. We find that the electrostatic mechanism fails to provide real insight or explanation of bonding, while the kinetic energy mechanism is sound and accurate but complex or even paradoxical to those preferring the apparent simplicity of the electrostatic model. We further argue that the underlying mechanism of bonding is in fact of dynamical character, and analyses that focus on energy do not reveal the origin of covalent bonding in full clarity.

  13. Density functional theory study of neutral and oxidized thiophene oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yafei; Wei, Chengwei [School of Physics Science and Technology and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for NSLSCS, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Blaisten-Barojas, Estela, E-mail: blaisten@gmu.edu [Computational Materials Science Center and School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2013-11-14

    The effect of oxidation on the energetics and structure of thiophene (Th) oligomers is studied with density functional theory at the B3PW91/6-311++G(d,p) level. Neutral n-Th oligomers (2 < n < 13) are gently curved planar chains. Ionization potential and electron affinity results show that n-Th oligomers are easier to be oxidized as their chain length increases. Oxidation states +2, +4, +6, and +8 are energetically stable in 12-Th. Upon oxidation the conjugated backbone of 12-Th switches from extended benzenoid phase to quinoid phase localized on groups of monomers regularly spaced along the chain. Oxidized states +2, +4, +6, and +8 of 12-Th display two +1e localized at the ends of their chains only because of the finite size of the chains. In 12-Th this end-effect extends over the two terminal monomers forming a positive-negative charge duet. This peculiar charge localization makes n-Th oligomers different from other conducting polymers with similar structure, such as polypyrrole. The spectrum of single-electron molecular states of oxidized 12-Th displays two localized single-electron states in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap per +2 oxidation state. Oligothiophene 12-Th doped with F atoms at 1:2 concentration presents a charge transfer of 3.4 e from oligomer to dopants that increases to 4.8 e in the presence of solvent. The charge distribution in these F-doped oligomers is similar to the +4 oxidation state of 12-Th. It is predicted that dopants produce an enhanced charge transfer localized in the proximity of their locations enhancing the formation of bipolarons in the central part of the oligomer chain.

  14. Sequence-specific purification of DNA oligomers in hydrophobic interaction chromatography using peptide nucleic acid amphiphiles: extended dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Jeffrey M; Schneider, James W

    2007-06-01

    We present improvements on a previously reported method (Vernille JP, Schneider JW. 2004. Biotechnol Prog 20(6):1776-1782) to purify DNA oligomers by attachment of peptide nucleic acid amphiphiles (PNAA) to particular sequences on the oligomers, followed by their separation from unbound oligomers using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). Use of alkyl-modified HIC media (butyl and octyl sepharose) over phenyl-modified media (phenyl sepharose) reduced the elution time of unbound DNA while not affecting the elution time of the PNAA/DNA complex. Modifying the alkane tail length for PNAA from C(12) to C(18) increased slightly the retention of PNAA/DNA duplexes. By combining these two refinements, we show that sequence-specific purifications of DNA oligomers 60 bases in length or more can be achieved with high resolution, even when the PNAA alkane is attached to the center of the target strand. The insensitivity of the PNAA/DNA duplex binding to choice of HIC media appears to be due to a surface-induced aggregation phenomenon that does not occur in the case of untagged DNA. We also report on the use of batch HIC as an adequate predictor of elution profiles in linear gradient HIC, and its potential to considerably reduce purification times by applying step gradients. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. What's in a covalent bond? On the role and formation of covalently bound flavin cofactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; McIntire, William S.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2009-01-01

    Many enzymes use one or more cofactors, such as biotin, heme, or flavin. These cofactors may be bound to the enzyme in a noncovalent or covalent manner. Although most flavoproteins contain a noncovalently bound flavin cofactor (FMN or FAD), a large number have these cofactors covalently linked to th

  16. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  17. Non-covalent interactions in 2-methylimidazolium copper(II) complex (MeImH)2[Cu(pfbz)4]: Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray structure and packing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Saini, Anju; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Jitendra; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Venugopalan, Paloth

    2017-01-01

    A new anionic copper(II) complex, (MeImH)2 [Cu(pfbz)4] (1) where, MeImH = 2-methylimidazolium and pfbz = pentafluorobenzoate has been isolated by reacting copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, pentafluorobenzoic acid and 2-methylimidazole in ethanol: water mixture in 1:2:2 molar ratio. This complex 1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, FT-IR) and conductance measurements. The complex salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. Single crystal X-ray structure determination revealed the presence of discrete ions: [Cu(pfbz)4]2- anion and two 2-methylimidazolium cation (C4H7N2)+. The crystal lattice is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions between cationic-anionic and the anionic-anionic moieties respectively, besides π-π interactions.

  18. Molecular dipole static polarisabilities and hyperpolarisabilities of conjugated oligomer chains calculated with the local π-electron coupled cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Zakharov, Anton B.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-12-01

    A new semi-empirical π-electron local coupled cluster theory has been developed to calculate static dipole polarisabilities and hyperpolarisabilities of extended π-conjugated systems. The key idea of the approach is the use of the ethylene molecular orbitals as the orbital basis set for π-conjugated compounds (the method is termed the Covalent Unbonded Molecules of Ethylene method, cue). Test calculations of some small model organic conjugated compounds demonstrate high accuracy of the version of the cue local coupled cluster theory developed in this work in comparison with the π-electron full configuration interaction (FCI) method. Calculations of different conjugated carbon-based oligomer chains (polyenes, polyynes, polyacenes, polybenzocyclobutadiene, etc.) demonstrate fast convergence (per π-electron) of the polarisability and hyperpolarisability values in the calculations when more classes of orbital excitations are included in the coupled cluster single and double (CCSD) excitation operator. The results show qualitatively correct dependence on the system size.

  19. Voltammetry and in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of osmium, iron, and ruthenium complexes of 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine covalently linked to Au(111)-electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    prepared in situ by first linking the terpy ligand to the surface via the S-atom, followed by addition of suitable metal compounds. The metal-terpy SAMs were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy with full electrochemical potential control of substrate and tip (in...... of the metal coordination spheres induced voltammetric sharpening. In situ STM images of single molecular scale strong structural features were observed for the osmium and iron complexes. As expected from the voltammetric patterns, the surface coverage was by far the highest for the Ru-complex which...

  20. Onset of the Electronic Absorption Spectra of Isolated and π-Stacked Oligomers of 5,6-Dihydroxyindole: An Ab Initio Study of the Building Blocks of Eumelanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Deniz; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang; Domratcheva, Tatiana

    2016-04-14

    Eumelanin is a naturally occurring skin pigment which is responsible for developing a suntan. The complex structure of eumelanin consists of π-stacked oligomers of various indole derivatives, such as the monomeric building block 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI). In this work, we present an ab initio wave-function study of the absorption behavior of DHI oligomers and of doubly and triply π-stacked species of these oligomers. We have simulated the onset of the electronic absorption spectra by employing the MP2 and the linear-response CC2 methods. Our results demonstrate the effect of an increasing degree of oligomerization of DHI and of an increasing degree of π-stacking of DHI oligomers on the onset of the absorption spectra and on the degree of red-shift toward the visible region of the spectrum. We find that π-stacking of DHI and its oligomers substantially red-shifts the onset of the absorption spectra. Our results also suggest that the optical properties of biological eumelanin cannot be simulated by considering the DHI building blocks alone, but instead the building blocks indole-semiquinone and indole-quinone have to be considered as well. This study contributes to advancing the understanding of the complex photophysics of the eumelanin biopolymer.

  1. Amyloid oligomer conformation in a group of natively folded proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yoshiike

    Full Text Available Recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that destabilized proteins with defective folding induce aggregation and toxicity in protein-misfolding diseases. One such unstable protein state is called amyloid oligomer, a precursor of fully aggregated forms of amyloid. Detection of various amyloid oligomers with A11, an anti-amyloid oligomer conformation-specific antibody, revealed that the amyloid oligomer represents a generic conformation and suggested that toxic beta-aggregation processes possess a common mechanism. By using A11 antibody as a probe in combination with mass spectrometric analysis, we identified GroEL in bacterial lysates as a protein that may potentially have an amyloid oligomer conformation. Surprisingly, A11 reacted not only with purified GroEL but also with several purified heat shock proteins, including human Hsp27, 40, 70, 90; yeast Hsp104; and bovine Hsc70. The native folds of A11-reactive proteins in purified samples were characterized by their anti-beta-aggregation activity in terms of both functionality and in contrast to the beta-aggregation promoting activity of misfolded pathogenic amyloid oligomers. The conformation-dependent binding of A11 with natively folded Hsp27 was supported by the concurrent loss of A11 reactivity and anti-beta-aggregation activity of heat-treated Hsp27 samples. Moreover, we observed consistent anti-beta-aggregation activity not only by chaperones containing an amyloid oligomer conformation but also by several A11-immunoreactive non-chaperone proteins. From these results, we suggest that the amyloid oligomer conformation is present in a group of natively folded proteins. The inhibitory effects of A11 antibody on both GroEL/ES-assisted luciferase refolding and Hsp70-mediated decelerated nucleation of Abeta aggregation suggested that the A11-binding sites on these chaperones might be functionally important. Finally, we employed a computational approach to uncover possible A11-binding sites on

  2. The Familial British Dementia Mutation Promotes Formation of Neurotoxic Cystine Cross-linked Amyloid Bri (ABri) Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Adam; Frigerio, Carlo Sala; Freir, Darragh B; Boland, Barry; Jin, Ming; Walsh, Dominic M

    2015-07-03

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease believed to result from a mutation in the BRI2 gene. Post-translational processing of wild type BRI2 and FBD-BRI2 result in the production of a 23-residue long Bri peptide and a 34-amino acid long ABri peptide, respectively, and ABri is found deposited in the brains of individuals with FBD. Similarities in the neuropathology and clinical presentation shared by FBD and Alzheimer disease (AD) have led some to suggest that ABri and the AD-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are molecular equivalents that trigger analogous pathogenic cascades. But the sequences and innate properties of ABri and Aβ are quite different, notably ABri contains two cysteine residues that can form disulfide bonds. Thus we sought to determine whether ABri was neurotoxic and if this activity was regulated by oxidation and/or aggregation. Crucially, the type of oxidative cross-linking dramatically influenced both ABri aggregation and toxicity. Cyclization of Bri and ABri resulted in production of biologically inert monomers that showed no propensity to assemble, whereas reduced ABri and reduced Bri aggregated forming thioflavin T-positive amyloid fibrils that lacked significant toxic activity. ABri was more prone to form inter-molecular disulfide bonds than Bri and the formation of covalently stabilized ABri oligomers was associated with toxicity. These results suggest that extension of the C-terminal of Bri causes a shift in the type of disulfide bonds formed and that structures built from covalently cross-linked oligomers can interact with neurons and compromise their function and viability.

  3. Effect of procyandin oligomers on oxidative hair damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Moo

    2011-02-01

    Procyanidins are a subclass of flavonoids and consist of oligomers of catechin that naturally occur in plants and are known to exert many physiological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and enzyme inhibitory effects. These possible inhibitory effects of the procyanidins were known to involve metal chelation, radical trapping, or direct enzyme binding. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of procyandin oligomers on hair damage induced by oxidative stress. In this study, several methods for evaluating oxidative damage in bleached hair are utilized to analyze the protective effect of procyandin oligomers against oxidative hair damage. It was observed that procyanidin oligomers strongly bind to keratin in hair and inhibit the breakdown of hair caused by oxidative damage in an analysis of hair using electrophoresis, transmission electron microscope, and fluorescence dye. These results confirm that procyanidin oligomers can be applicable as a potential candidate to the development of hair care with protective effect on hair damage. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Covalent functionalization of MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Presolski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 nanosheets have been used extensively in catalytic, electronic, optoelectronic and electrochemical research due to their diverse properties that are often determined by the method of fabrication. Fine tuning of the colloidal behaviour, specific interactions and further reactivity of the materials is typically achieved by subsequent surface modifications. Arguably the most permanent of these involve covalent attachment of molecules to either the molybdenum or the sulphur atoms in the lattice. Here we review of the nascent field of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD covalent functionalization and explore the prospective avenues for hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials.

  5. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Nandita [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Kar, Rekha [Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Singha, Prajjal K. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Venkatachalam, Manjeri A. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); McEwen, Donald G. [Greehey Children' s Cancer Research Institute, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Saikumar, Pothana, E-mail: saikumar@uthscsa.edu [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 {mu}M concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTP{gamma}S or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  6. Preparation and applications of a variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/hydroxyapatite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroki; Iwaki, Ken-Ichi; Furukuwa, Rika; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2008-04-15

    A variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers were applied to the preparation of fluorinated oligomer/hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites (particle size: 38-356 nm), which exhibit a good dispersibility in water and traditional organic solvents. These fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/HAp composites were easily prepared by the reactions of disodium hydrogen phosphate and calcium chloride in the presence of self-assembled molecular aggregates formed by fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers in aqueous solutions. In these fluorinated HAp composites thus obtained, fluoroalkyl end-capped acrylic acid oligomers and 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomer/HAp nanocomposites afforded transparent colorless solutions toward water; however, fluoroalkyl end-capped N,N-dimethylacrylamide oligomer and acryloylmorpholine oligomer were found to afford transparent colorless solutions with trace amounts of white-colored HAp precipitants under similar conditions. HAp could be encapsulated more effectively into fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomeric aggregate cores to afford colloidal stable fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites, compared to that of fluorinated acrylic acid oligomers. These fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites were applied to the surface modification of glass and PVA to exhibit a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine. HAp formation was newly observed on the modified polyethylene terephthalate film surface treated with fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomers and acrylic acid oligomer/HAp composites by soaking these films into the simulated body fluid.

  7. Postsynaptic Receptors for Amyloid-β Oligomers as Mediators of Neuronal Damage in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarca, Margarita C.; Ríos, Juvenal A.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    The neurotoxic effect of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) over the central synapses has been described and is reflected in the decrease of some postsynaptic excitatory proteins, the alteration in the number and morphology of the dendritic spines, and a decrease in long-term potentiation. Many studies has been carried out to identify the putative Aβ receptors in neurons, and is still no clear why the Aβ oligomers only affect the excitatory synapses. Aβ oligomers bind to neurite and preferentially to the postsynaptic region, where the postsynaptic protein-95 (PSD-95) is present in the glutamatergic synapse, and interacts directly with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and neuroligin (NL). NL is a postsynaptic protein which binds to the presynaptic protein, neurexin to form a heterophilic adhesion complex, the disruption of this interaction affects the integrity of the synaptic contact. Structurally, NL has an extracellular domain homolog to acetylcholinesterase, the first synaptic protein that was found to interact with Aβ. In the present review we will document the interaction between Aβ and the extracellular domain of NL-1 at the excitatory synapse, as well as the interaction with other postsynaptic components, including the glutamatergic receptors (NMDA and mGluR5), the prion protein, the neurotrophin receptor, and the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We conclude that several Aβ oligomers receptors exist at the excitatory synapse, which could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effect described for the Aβ oligomers. The characterization of the interaction between Aβ receptors and Aβ oligomers could help to understand the source of the neurologic damage observed in the brain of the Alzheimer’s disease patients. PMID:23267328

  8. Electronic coherence dynamics in trans-polyacetylene oligomers

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Electronic decoherence processes in trans-polyacetylene oligomers are considered by explicitly computing the time dependent molecular polarization from the coupled dynamics of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in a mean-field mixed quantum-classical approximation. The oligomers are described by the SSH Hamiltonian and the effect of decoherence is incorporated by propagating an ensemble of quantum-classical trajectories with initial conditions obtained by sampling the Wigner distribution of the nuclear degrees of freedom. The decoherence for superpositions between the ground and excited and between pairs of excited states is considered for chains of different length, and the dynamics is discussed in terms of the nuclear overlap function that appears in the off-diagonal elements of the electronic reduced density matrix. For long oligomers the loss of coherence occurs in tens of femtoseconds. This timescale is determined by the initial decay of the nuclear overlap and by the decay of population into ...

  9. Oligomer formation within secondary organic aerosol: equilibrium and dynamic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Trump

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model based on the volatility basis set to consider the potential influence of oligomer content on volatility-driven SOA yields. The implications for aerosol evaporation studies, including dilution, chamber thermo-equilibration, and thermodenuder studies are also considered. A simplified description of oligomer formation reproduces essentially all of the broad classes of equilibrium and dynamical observations related to SOA formation and evaporation: significant oligomer content may be consistent with mass yields that increase with organic aerosol mass concentration; reversible oligomerization can explain the hysteresis between the rate of SOA formation and its evaporation rate upon dilution; and the model is consistent with both chamber thermo-equilibration studies and thermodenuder studies of SOA evaporation.

  10. Resveratrol Oligomers for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Qiu Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene is a naturally derived phytoalexin stilbene isolated from grapes and other plants, playing an important role in human health and is well known for its extensive bioactivities, such as antioxidation, anti-inflammatory, anticancer. In addition to resveratrol, scientists also pay attention to resveratrol oligomers, derivatives of resveratrol, which are characterized by the polymerization of two to eight, or even more resveratrol units, and are the largest group of oligomeric stilbenes. Resveratrol oligomers have multiple beneficial properties, of which some are superior in activity, stability, and selectivity compared with resveratrol. The complicated structures and diverse biological activities are of significant interest for drug research and development and may provide promising prospects as cancer preventive and therapeutical agents. This review presents an overview on preventive or anticancer properties of resveratrol oligomers.

  11. Assessment of density functionals and paucity of non-covalent interactions in aminoylyne complexes of molybdenum and tungsten [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M≡EN(SiMe3)(R)] (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb): a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Krishna K; Patidar, Pankaj; Bariya, Pankaj K; Patidar, Sunil K; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-07-14

    Electronic, molecular structure and bonding energy analyses of the metal-aminosilylyne, -aminogermylyne, -aminostannylyne and -aminoplumbylyne complexes [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(Ph)] (M = Mo, W) and [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2Mo[triple bond, length as m-dash]GeN(SiMe3)(Mes)] have been investigated at DFT, DFT-D3 and DFT-D3(BJ) levels using BP86, PBE, PW91, RPBE, TPSS and M06-L functionals. The performance of metaGGA functionals for the geometries of aminoylyne complexes is better than GGA functionals. Significant dispersion interactions between OH, EC(O) and EH pairs appeared in the dispersion-corrected geometries. The non-covalent distances of these interactions follow the order DFT > DFT-D3(BJ) > DFT-D3. The values of Nalewajski-Mrozek bond order (1.22-1.52) and Pauling bond order (2.23-2.59) of the optimized structures at BP86/TZ2P indicate the presence of multiple bonds between metal and E atoms. The overall electronic charges transfer from transition-metal fragments to ligands. The topological analysis based on QTAIM has been performed to determine the analogy of non-covalent interactions. The strength of M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(R) bonds has been evaluated by energy decomposition analysis. The electrostatic interactions are almost equal to orbital interactions. The M ← E σ-donation is smaller than the M → E π-back donation. Upon going from E = Si to E = Pb, the M-E bond orders decrease as Si > Ge > Sn > Pb, consistent with the observed geometry trends. The M-E uncorrected bond dissociation energies vary with the density functionals as RPBE DFT-D3 dispersion corrections to the BDEs correspond to the BP86 functional, ranging between 5.6-8.1 kcal mol(-1), which are smaller than the DFT-D3(BJ) dispersion corrections (10.1-12.0 kcal mol(-1)). The aryl substituents on nitrogen have an insignificant effect on M-E-N bending. The bending of the M-E-N bond angle has been discussed in terms of Jahn-Teller distortion. The

  12. Surface modification of cellulose fiber via supramolecular assembly of biodegradable polyesters by the aid of host-guest inclusion complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Shufang; Cheng, Xinjian; Yam, Richard C M; Kong, Deling; Li, Robert K Y

    2010-05-10

    In this article, we report a novel surface modification method for cellulose fiber that is based on supramolecular assembly. Beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) was first covalently grafted onto the fiber surface. Then poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) oligomers having both ends capped with adamantane motifs (i.e., PCL-AD) were immobilized to the cellulose fiber surface through the host-guest inclusion complexation between beta-CD and AD motif. FTIR-ATR and XPS analyses confirmed the successful assembly of PCL-ADs, which was further supported by the increasing trend of weight gain with the concentration of CDs on the fiber surface. Contact angle and TGA measurements reflect the enhanced hydrophobicity and thermal stability of the cellulose fiber as a consequence of this modification. The morphologies of the cellulose fiber before and after the assembly process have also been compared by SEM.

  13. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of β-amyloid oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-01-01

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Aβ1-42 resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by the dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Aβ1-42 with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to the phos...

  14. Gas chromatographic retention characteristics of different polysiloxane oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lenten, F. J.; Conaway, J. E.; Rogers, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on the Kovats and McReynolds indices for a modified set of Rohrschneider solutes have been examined using two different batches of a commercial polysiloxane stationary phase, Dow-Corning DC-710, and five pure oligomers isolated from the mixture. The significant differences that were found between batches appear to be due primarily to changes in the percentage of one oligomer, the cyclic pentamer. This finding emphasizes the desirability of using a pure stationary phase as well as carefully specifying the column temperature in order to improve intra- and inter- laboratory comparisons of retention indices.

  15. Isolation and identification of oligomers from partial degradation of lime fruit cutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shiying; Fang, Xiuhua; Wang, Weimin; Yu, Bingwu; Cheng, Xiaofang; Qiu, Feng; Mort, Andrew J; Stark, Ruth E

    2008-11-12

    Complementary degradative treatments with low-temperature hydrofluoric acid and methanolic potassium hydroxide have been used to investigate the protective biopolymer cutin from Citrus aurantifolia (lime) fruits, augmenting prior enzymatic and chemical strategies to yield a more comprehensive view of its molecular architecture. Analysis of the resulting soluble oligomeric fragments with one- and two-dimensional NMR and MS methods identified a new dimer and three trimeric esters of primary alcohols based on 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid and 10-oxo-16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid units. Whereas only 10-oxo-16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid units were found in the oligomers from hydrofluoric acid treatments, the dimer and trimer products isolated to date using diverse degradative methods included six of the seven possible stoichiometric ratios of monomer units. A novel glucoside-linked hydroxyfatty acid tetramer was also identified provisionally, suggesting that the cutin biopolymer can be bound covalently to the plant cell wall. Although the current findings suggest that the predominant molecular architecture of this protective polymer in lime fruits involves esters of primary and secondary alcohols based on long-chain hydroxyfatty acids, the possibility of additional cross-linking to enhance structural integrity is underscored by these and related findings of nonstandard cutin molecular architectures.

  16. Evaluation of structural and functional properties of chitosan-chlorogenic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zihao; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to first synthesize chitosan-chlorogenic acid (CA) covalent complex and then compare structural and functional properties between chitosan-CA covalent complex and physical complex. First, chitosan-CA covalent complex was synthesized and its total phenolic content was as high as 276.5 ± 6.2 mg/g. Then structural and functional properties of chitosan-CA covalent and physical complexes were analyzed. The covalent reaction induced formation of both amide and ester bonds in chitosan. Data of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the complexations of CA changed crystallinity and morphology of chitosan, and covalent complexation induced a larger change of physical structure than physical complexation. In terms of functional properties, chitosan-CA covalent complex exhibited better thermal stability than physical complex in terms of antioxidant activity, and the viscosity of chitosan was significantly increased by covalent modification.

  17. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  18. Covalent functionalization of graphene with reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyeung; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-01-15

    Graphene, a material made exclusively of sp(2) carbon atoms with its π electrons delocalized over the entire 2D network, is somewhat chemically inert. Covalent functionalization can enhance graphene's properties including opening its band gap, tuning conductivity, and improving solubility and stability. Covalent functionalization of pristine graphene typically requires reactive species that can form covalent adducts with the sp(2) carbon structures in graphene. In this Account, we describe graphene functionalization reactions using reactive intermediates of radicals, nitrenes, carbenes, and arynes. These reactive species covalently modify graphene through free radical addition, CH insertion, or cycloaddition reactions. Free radical additions are among the most common reaction, and these radicals can be generated from diazonium salts and benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer from graphene to aryl diazonium ion or photoactivation of benzoyl peroxide yields aryl radicals that subsequently add to graphene to form covalent adducts. Nitrenes, electron-deficient species generated by thermal or photochemical activation of organic azides, can functionalize graphene very efficiently. Because perfluorophenyl nitrenes show enhanced bimolecular reactions compared with alkyl or phenyl nitrenes, perfluorophenyl azides are especially effective. Carbenes are used less frequently than nitrenes, but they undergo CH insertion and C═C cycloaddition reactions with graphene. In addition, arynes can serve as a dienophile in a Diels-Alder type reaction with graphene. Further study is needed to understand and exploit the chemistry of graphene. The generation of highly reactive intermediates in these reactions leads to side products that complicate the product composition and analysis. Fundamental questions remain about the reactivity and regioselectivity of graphene. The differences in the basal plane and the undercoordinated edges of graphene and the zigzag versus arm-chair configurations

  19. Oligomer Molecules for Efficient Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-02-16

    Solar cells, a renewable, clean energy technology that efficiently converts sunlight into electricity, are a promising long-term solution for energy and environmental problems caused by a mass of production and the use of fossil fuels. Solution-processed organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted much attention in the past few years because of several advantages, including easy fabrication, low cost, lightweight, and flexibility. Now, OSCs exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 10%. In the early stage of OSCs, vapor-deposited organic dye materials were first used in bilayer heterojunction devices in the 1980s, and then, solution-processed polymers were introduced in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices. Relative to polymers, vapor-deposited small molecules offer potential advantages, such as a defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, and good batch-to-batch reproducibility. However, the limited solubility and high crystallinity of vapor-deposited small molecules are unfavorable for use in solution-processed BHJ OSCs. Conversely, polymers have good solution-processing and film-forming properties and are easily processed into flexible devices, whereas their polydispersity of molecular weights and difficulty in purification results in batch to batch variation, which may hamper performance reproducibility and commercialization. Oligomer molecules (OMs) are monodisperse big molecules with intermediate molecular weights (generally in the thousands), and their sizes are between those of small molecules (generally with molecular weights 10000). OMs not only overcome shortcomings of both vapor-deposited small molecules and solution-processed polymers, but also combine their advantages, such as defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, good batch-to-batch reproducibility, good solution processability, and film-forming properties. Therefore, OMs are a

  20. Gas-Phase Covalent And Non-Covalent Ion/ion Chemistry Of Biological Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Stutzman, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion chemistry involves the interaction of oppositely charged ions inside of the mass spectrometer. During this gas-phase chemistry, particle transfer (i.e., proton and electron) or synthesis can occur at rapid reaction rates. Particle transfer represents a mature area of ion/ion chemistry, while selective covalent modification represents a fairly new area of gas-phase chemistry. Gas-phase covalent chemistry is based on traditional solution phase organic chemistry. The work de...

  1. Orthogonal non-covalent binding forces in solid state supramolecular herringbone-shaped "interlocked dimers". Pseudopolymorphism in [(ppy)Pd(mu-pz)](2) (ppy = 2-(2-pyridyl)phenyl, pz = pyrazol-1-yl) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, José; Espinosa, Arturo; Galiana, J Miguel; Pérez, Eduardo; Serrano, J Luis; Aranda, Miguel A G; Insausti, Maite

    2009-11-21

    The crystal structures of [(ppy)Pd(mu-pz)](2) (ppy = 2-(2-pyridyl)phenyl, pz = pyrazol-1-yl) (1) and two different solvatomorphs of it, [(ppy)Pd(mu-pz)](2) x 1/2 CH(2)Cl(2) (2) and [(ppy)Pd(mu-pz)](2) x 1/2 CHCl(3) (3) have been elucidated by powder (1 and 2) and single crystal (3) X-ray diffraction. In all of them two molecules fit together following a very similar pattern forming a "dimer". All neutral dinuclear square-planar complexes having mu-pz or related bridges and planar aromatic ligands completing the coordination spheres found in the CSD show a similar arrangement to those observed in compounds 1-3, consisting of "interlocked dimers" following a herringbone-like pattern. A DFT study reveals the simultaneous action of pi,pi- and T-stacking interactions occurring as two sets of orthogonally oriented binding forces, as well as anagostic bonds overlapped with the latter.

  2. Covalently-bonded grafting of [Ln3(Benzimidazole)4]-arrayed (Ln = Tb, Nd, Yb or Er) complex monomers into PNBE (poly(norbornene)) with highly luminous color-purity green-light or efficient NIR luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Fu, Guorui; Feng, Heini; Guan, Jiaqing; Li, Fengping; Lü, Xingqiang; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jones, Richard A.

    2017-07-01

    Within series of Ln3-grafted polymers Poly({[Ln3(L)4(NO3)6]·(NO3)·(H3O)2}-co-NBE) (Ln = La, 1; Ln = Eu, 2; Ln = Tb, 3; Ln = Nd, 4; Ln = Yb, 5; Ln = Er, 6 or Ln = Gd, 7) obtained from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of norbornene (NBE) with each of allyl-functionalized complex monomers {[Ln3(L)4(NO3)6]·(NO3)·(H3O)2} (HL = 4-allyl-2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-6-methoxyphenol), PNBE-assisted effective energy transfer renders Poly(3-co-NBE) Tb3+-centered highly luminous color-purity green-light with an attractive quantum yield of 87% and efficient near-infrared (NIR) luminescence (ΦNdL = 0.61%; ΦYbL = 1.47% and ΦErL = 0.03%) for Nd3+-, Yb3+- or Er3+-grafted polymers.

  3. metal complexes of copper(ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Thermally stable metal complexes based on oligomers were prepared by the reaction ... Besides, coordination compounds of salicylaldehyde Schiff base have proven to be an excellent .... They were insoluble in common organic.

  4. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  5. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  6. Covalent docking using autodock: Two-point attractor and flexible side chain methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Giulia; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    We describe two methods of automated covalent docking using Autodock4: the two-point attractor method and the flexible side chain method. Both methods were applied to a training set of 20 diverse protein-ligand covalent complexes, evaluating their reliability in predicting the crystallographic pose of the ligands. The flexible side chain method performed best, recovering the pose in 75% of cases, with failures for the largest inhibitors tested. Both methods are freely available at the AutoDock website (http://autodock.scripps.edu). © 2015 The Protein Society.

  7. Non-Covalent Derivatives: Cocrystals and Eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Stoler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent derivatives (NCDs are formed by incorporating one (or more coformer molecule(s into the matrix of a parent molecule via non-covalent forces. These forces can include ionic forces, Van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding, lipophilic-lipophilic interactions and pi-pi interactions. NCDs, in both cocrystal and eutectic forms, possess properties that are unique to their supramolecular matrix. These properties include critical product performance factors such as solubility, stability and bioavailability. NCDs have been used to tailor materials for a variety of applications and have the potential to be used in an even broader range of materials and processes. NCDs can be prepared using little or no solvent and none of the reagents typical to synthetic modifications. Thus, NCDs represent a powerfully versatile, environmentally-friendly and cost-effective opportunity.

  8. Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers: an Amyloid Pore? Insights into Mechanisms of alpha-Synuclein Oligomer-Lipid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockl, Martin T.; Zijlstra, Niels; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In many human diseases, oligomeric species of amyloid proteins may play a pivotal role in cytotoxicity. Many lines of evidence indicate that permeabilization of cellular membranes by amyloid oligomers may be the key factor in disrupting cellular homeostasis. However, the exact mechanisms by which th

  9. alpha-Synuclein Oligomers: an Amyloid Pore? : Insights into Mechanisms of alpha-Synuclein Oligomer-Lipid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockl, M.T.; Zijlstra, N.; Subramaniam, V.

    2013-01-01

    In many human diseases, oligomeric species of amyloid proteins may play a pivotal role in cytotoxicity. Many lines of evidence indicate that permeabilization of cellular membranes by amyloid oligomers may be the key factor in disrupting cellular homeostasis. However, the exact mechanisms by which th

  10. Development of Selective Covalent Janus Kinase 3 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Akahane, Koshi; McNally, Randall; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ficarro, Scott B; Liu, Suhu; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Koyama, Shohei; Pattison, Michael J; Labella, Katherine; Johannessen, Liv; Akbay, Esra A; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Frank, David A; Marto, Jarrod A; Look, Thomas A; Arthur, J Simon C; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S

    2015-08-27

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) and their downstream effectors, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STATs), form a critical immune cell signaling circuit, which is of fundamental importance in innate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis, and dysregulation is frequently observed in immune disease and cancer. The high degree of structural conservation of the JAK ATP binding pockets has posed a considerable challenge to medicinal chemists seeking to develop highly selective inhibitors as pharmacological probes and as clinical drugs. Here we report the discovery and optimization of 2,4-substituted pyrimidines as covalent JAK3 inhibitors that exploit a unique cysteine (Cys909) residue in JAK3. Investigation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) utilizing biochemical and transformed Ba/F3 cellular assays resulted in identification of potent and selective inhibitors such as compounds 9 and 45. A 2.9 Å cocrystal structure of JAK3 in complex with 9 confirms the covalent interaction. Compound 9 exhibited decent pharmacokinetic properties and is suitable for use in vivo. These inhibitors provide a set of useful tools to pharmacologically interrogate JAK3-dependent biology.

  11. GPCR oligomers in pharmacology and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Maeso Javier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represent one of the largest families of cell surface receptors, and are the target of more than half of the current therapeutic drugs on the market. When activated by an agonist, the GPCR undergoes conformational changes that facilitate its interaction with heterotrimeric G proteins, which then relay signals to downstream intracellular effectors. Although GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, many studies support the hypothesis that G protein coupling involves the formation of GPCR homo- and/or hetero-complexes. These complex systems have been suggested to exhibit specific signaling cascades, pharmacological, internalization, and recycling properties. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function and dynamics of GPCR complexes, as well as the findings obtained in animal models.

  12. Construct Polyoxometalate Frameworks through Covalent Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Huishuang; Yu, Zheng-Bao; Wang, Lei; Sun, Licheng; Sun, Junliang

    2015-09-08

    An emerging strategy for exploring the application of polyoxometalates (POMs) is to assemble POM clusters into open-framework materials, especially inorganic-organic hybrid three-dimensional (3D) open-framework materials, via the introduction of different organic linkers between the POM clusters. This strategy has yielded a few 3D crystalline POMs of which a typical class is the group of polyoxometalate metal-organic frameworks (POMMOFs). However, for reported POMMOFs, only coordination bonds are involved between the linkers and POM clusters, and it has not yet produced any covalently bonded polyoxometalate frameworks. Here, the concept of "covalently bonded POMs (CPOMs)" is developed. By using vanadoborates as an example, we showed that the 3D CPOMs can be obtained by a condensation reaction through the oxolation mechanism of polymer chemistry. In particular, suitable single crystals were harvested and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This work forges a link among polymer science, POM chemistry, and open-framework materials by demonstrating that it is possible to use covalent bonds according to polymer chemistry principles to construct crystalline 3D open-framework POM materials.

  13. Exploiting the dynamic properties of covalent modification cycle for the design of synthetic analog biomolecular circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Sawlekar, Rucha; Bates, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    Cycles of covalent modification are ubiquitous motifs in cellular signalling. Although such signalling cycles are implemented via a highly concise set of chemical reactions, they have been shown to be capable of producing multiple distinct input-output mapping behaviours - ultrasensitive, hyperbolic, signal-transducing and threshold-hyperbolic. In this paper, we show how the set of chemical reactions underlying covalent modification cycles can be exploited for the design of synthetic analog biomolecular circuitry. We show that biomolecular circuits based on the dynamics of covalent modification cycles allow (a) the computation of nonlinear operators using far fewer chemical reactions than purely abstract designs based on chemical reaction network theory, and (b) the design of nonlinear feedback controllers with strong performance and robustness properties. Our designs provide a more efficient route for translation of complex circuits and systems from chemical reactions to DNA strand displacement-based chemistry, thus facilitating their experimental implementation in future Synthetic Biology applications.

  14. The significant role of covalency in determining the ground state of cobalt phthalocyanines molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To shed some light on the metal 3d ground state configuration of cobalt phthalocyanines system, so far in debate, we present an investigation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS at Co L2,3 edge and theoretical calculation. The density functional theory calculations reveal highly anisotropic covalent bond between central cobalt ion and nitrogen ligands, with the dominant σ donor accompanied by weak π-back acceptor interaction. Our combined experimental and theoretical study on the Co-L2,3 XAS spectra demonstrate a robust ground state of 2A1g symmetry that is built from 73% 3d7 character and 27% 3 d 8 L ¯ ( L ¯ denotes a ligand hole components, as the first excited-state with 2Eg symmetry lies about 158 meV higher in energy. The effect of anisotropic and isotropic covalency on the ground state was also calculated and the results indicate that the ground state with 2A1g symmetry is robust in a large range of anisotropic covalent strength while a transition of ground state from 2A1g to 2Eg configuration when isotropic covalent strength increases to a certain extent. Here, we address a significant anisotropic covalent effect of short Co(II-N bond on the ground state and suggest that it should be taken into account in determining the ground state of analogous cobalt complexes.

  15. Induction of volatile organic compound in the leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum by chitosan oligomer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Peiqing; Lin Xuezheng; Shen Jihong; Huang Xiaohang; Chen Kaoshan; Li Guangyou

    2005-01-01

    Induction of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in the leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum by chitosan oligomer elictor was studied. The results demonstrated that VOCs in chitosan oligomer-treated leaves showed stronger inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea than that in water-treated leaves, and the spore germination was reduced by 22.1% in 144h after elicitor treatment at a concentration of 1.0%. A total of 16 constituents were detected in water-treated leaves, and chitosan oligomer treatment increased the amount of VOCs production. Chitosan oligomer at different concentration and different time courses of induction treatment could induce different amount of VOCs. Chitosan oligomer resulted in an optimal production of VOCs in 144h after elicitation at concentration of 0.6%. Chitosan oligomer also enhanced activtity of PAL and LOX. The results showed that the enhancement of VOCs production after chitosan oligomer treatment might be an important agent for L.esculentum acquiring resistance against pathogen.

  16. Intracellular Aβ-oligomers and early inflammation in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Martin A; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Klein, William L; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Lifelong use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to diminish the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting a key role of inflammation in early stages of the pathology. While amyloid plaque-associated inflammation has been extensively studied in human and animal models, little is known about the inflammatory process prior to plaque deposition, i.e., in preclinical stages of AD. In this study we investigated microglial and neuronal inflammatory markers in preplaque transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice. We found evidence that prior to plaque deposition classical markers of microglial activation such as major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS), and CD40 are already upregulated in the hippocampus of transgenic mice. Microglial cells from transgenic mice in the preplaque stage displayed intermediately activated morphology and appeared to be recruited toward intracellular amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-oligomer burdened neurons. The inducible, neuron-specific cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme was found to be upregulated and specifically expressed by neurons in close relationship with Aβ-bearing cells, at this early stage of the AD-like pathology. Our study suggests that neuroinflammation might be one of the earliest pathological responses to intracellular accumulation of Aβ-oligomers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  18. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  19. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of double-walled carbon nanotubes in nonpolar and aqueous media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L S Panchakarla; A Govindaraj

    2008-11-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been functionalized by both covalent and non-covalent means. Covalent functionalization has been carried out by attaching an aliphatic amide function to DWNTs which enable solubilization in non-polar solvents. Solubilization in non-polar solvents has also been accomplished by non-covalent functionalization by using 1-pyrenebutanoicacid succinimidyl ester (PYBS). Non-covalent functionalization of DWNTs has been carried out by using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyoxyethylene(40)nonylphenyl ether (IGPAL), both of which enable solubilization in aqueous media. These functionalized DWNTs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, IR and Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Molecular Simulation Studies of Covalently and Ionically Grafted Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bingbing

    Solvent-free covalently- or ionically-grafted nanoparticles (CGNs and IGNs) are a new class of organic-inorganic hybrid composite materials exhibiting fluid-like behaviors around room temperature. With similar structures to prior systems, e.g. nanocomposites, neutral or charged colloids, ionic liquids, etc, CGNs and IGNs inherit the functionality of inorganic nanopariticles, the facile processibility of polymers, as well as conductivity and nonvolatility from their constituent materials. In spite of the extensive prior experimental research having covered synthesis and measurements of thermal and dynamic properties, little progress in understanding of these new materials at the molecular level has been achieved, because of the lack of simulation work in this new area. Atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in this thesis to investigate the thermodynamics, structure, and dynamics of these systems and to seek predictive methods predictable for their properties. Starting from poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers (PEO) melts, we established atomistic models based on united-atom representations of methylene. The Green-Kubo and Einstein-Helfand formulas were used to calculate the transport properties. The simulations generate densities, viscosities, diffusivities, in good agreement with experimental data. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. Coupled with thermodynamic integration methods, the models give good predictions of pressure-composition-density relations for CO 2 + PEO oligomers. Water effects on the Henry's constant of CO 2 in PEO have also been investigated. The dependence of the calculated Henry's constants on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length. CGNs are modeled by the inclusion of solid-sphere nanoparticles into the atomistic

  1. 气相中环糊精与甘氨酰-苯丙氨酰-苯丙氨酸和甘氨酸三肽非共价复合物的质谱研究%Investigation on Non-Covalent Complexes of Cyclodextrins with GGG and GFF Tripeptides in Gas Phase by Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小丹; 许崇晟; 储艳秋; 丁传凡

    2013-01-01

    为了探索环糊精和寡肽的非共价相互作用,一定化学计量比的a-,β-,γ-环糊精(CD)分别和甘氨酸三肽(GGG)、甘氨酰-苯丙氨酰-苯丙氨酸三肽(GFF)在室温下反应达到平衡并用正离子模式质谱检测.实验结果显示GGG,GFF均可以和α-,β-,γ-CD生成1∶1配合比的非共价复合物.碰撞诱导解离实验进一步验证了α-,β-,γ-CD与GGG,GFF非共价复合物的形成.质谱滴定法测得的结合常数结果表明环糊精和两种三肽形成非共价复合物的结合强度均按照γ-,β-,α-CD的次序逐渐增大.GGG和α-,β-,γ-CD复合物的结合常数分别为2799.96,2528.73,1697.11L·mol-1,GFF和α-,β-,γ-CD复合物的结合常数分别为2773.94,2134.03,1330.68 L·mol-1对于α-,β-或γ-CD,含有苯基的GFF+ CD复合物的结合强度要小于相应的脂肪族的GGG+ CD复合物,表明虽然在气相GFF+CD复合物的构象与溶液中的构象有所变化,但是苯基仍然参与和环糊精疏水腔体的键合作用.%To investigate the non-covalent interaction between α-, β-, y-cyclodextrins and peptides, a stoichiometry of α-, β-, y-cyclodextrins (CD) with GGG (Gly-Gly-Gly) or GFF (Gly-Phe-Phe) was mixed respectively, and then incubated at room temperature for 12 h to reach the equilibrium. In positive mode, the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results indicated that α-, β-, γ-CD with GGG or GFF could form non-covalent complexes, respectively. The binding of cyclodextrins with GGG or GFF was further confirmed by collision induced dissociation (CID) in a tandem mass spectrometer. The formation constants of six complexes (GGG+CD and GFF+CD) were determined by mass spectrometric titration. The results showed the formation constants for both GGG's and GFF's complexes increased according to the order γ-CD, β-CD, α-CD. The formation constants Kst values for GGG complexes with α-CD, β-CD or γ-CD are 2799.96, 2528.73, 1697.11 L·mol-1, respectively. While the

  2. Chromatin remodeling and cancer, Part I: Covalent histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang G; Allis, C David; Chi, Ping

    2007-09-01

    Dynamic chromatin remodeling underlies many, if not all, DNA-templated biological processes, including gene transcription; DNA replication and repair; chromosome condensation; and segregation and apoptosis. Disruption of these processes has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. The mechanisms of dynamic chromatin remodeling include the use of covalent histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent complexes and DNA methylation. Together, these mechanisms impart variation into the chromatin fiber, and this variation gives rise to an 'epigenetic landscape' that extends the biological output of DNA alone. Here, we review recent advances in chromatin remodeling, and pay particular attention to mechanisms that appear to be linked to human cancer. Where possible, we discuss the implications of these advances for disease-management strategies.

  3. Charge transfer in conjugated oligomers encapsulated into carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almadori, Y.; Alvarez, L.; Michel, T.; Le Parc, R.; Bantignies, J.L.; Hermet, P.; Sauvajol, J.L. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5521, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5521, CNRS, 34095 Montpellier (France); Arenal, R. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, CNRS-ONERA, 92322 Chatillon (France); Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, U. Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Babaa, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Technology PETRONAS, UTP, Ipoh-Perak (Malaysia); Jouselme, B.; Palacin, S. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    This study deals with a hybrid system consisting in quaterthiophene derivative encapsulated inside single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Investigations of the encapsulation step are performed by transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy data point out different behaviors depending on the laser excitation energy with respect to the optical absorption of quaterthiophene. At low excitation energy (far from the oligomer resonance window) there is no significant modification of the Raman spectra before and after encapsulation. By contrast, at high excitation energy (close to the oligomer resonance window), Raman spectra exhibit a G-band shift together with an important RBM intensity loss, suggesting a significant charge transfer between the inserted molecule and the host nanotubes. Those results suggest a photo induced process leading to a significant charge transfer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Ethynyl-terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A class of ethynyl terminated oligomers and the process for preparing the same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  5. Electroactive Reactive Oligomers and Polymers as Device Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-03

    development of conjugated. conducting and electroactive oligomers, polymers and multi-component materials is proposed for application to photovoltaic...characteristics. Intense research has focused on oligo- and polythiophenes , as such materials early showed high hole mobilities. While vapor deposited a...to atmospheric oxygen, air stability now becomes an issue. The research conducted in this project focuses on the study of a soluble polymer consisting

  6. Changes of adiponectin oligomer composition by moderate weight reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Thomas; Rochlitz, Helmut; Wegewitz, Uta; Akpulat, Suzan; Mai, Knut; Weickert, Martin O; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2005-09-01

    Adiponectin affects lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. However, adiponectin circulates in three different oligomers that may also have distinct biological functions. We aimed to analyze the role of these oligomers in obesity and lipid metabolism after weight reduction. A total of 17 obese volunteers (15 women and 2 men) participated in a weight reduction program. Individuals were characterized before and after 6 months of a balanced diet. Adiponectin was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and oligomers were detected by nondenaturating Western blot. BMI decreased (35.1 +/- 1.2 to 32.8 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2), P < 0.001), which was associated with an improved metabolite profile. Total adiponectin increased from 5.3 +/- 0.5 to 6.1 +/- 0.6 microg/ml (P = 0.076). High (HMW) and medium molecular weight (MMW) adiponectin oligomers significantly increased during weight reduction (HMW: 0.37 +/- 0.07 to 0.4 +/- 0.08 microg/ml, P = 0.042; MMW: 2.3 +/- 0.2 to 2.9 +/- 0.3 microg/ml, P = 0.007), while low molecular weight (LMW) did not significantly change. Body weight inversely correlated with HMW (r = -0.695, P = 0.002) and positively with LMW (r = 0.579, P = 0.015). Interestingly, HDL cholesterol and HMW were strongly correlated (r = 0.665, P = 0.007). Indeed, HMW and free fatty acids before weight reduction predicted approximately 60% of HDL changes during intervention. In conclusion, weight reduction results in a relative increase of HMW/MMW adiponectin and a reduction of LMW adiponectin. Total adiponectin and especially HMW adiponectin are related to circulating HDL cholesterol.

  7. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of β-amyloid oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-01-01

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Aβ1-42 resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by the dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Aβ1-42 with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to the phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. Similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Aβ1–42 oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Aβ1-42 induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures. PMID:20153288

  8. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-04-15

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Abeta(1-42) with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. A similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Abeta(1-42) oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Abeta(1-42) induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures.

  9. Oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates identified in rainwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Turpin, B. J.; Seitzinger, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric organic matter, and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems, yet less than 50 percent of rainwater organic matter is considered chemically characterized. Precipitation samples collected in New Jersey, USA, were analyzed by negative ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). We document the presence of 552 unique compounds in the rainwater over a mass range of 50-500 Da, in four compound classes (i.e., CHO, CHOS, CHON, and CHONS). The presence of oligomers, organosulfates, nitroxy organosulfates, organic acids, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates is reported. Some compounds detected have distinct primary sources; however, the composition of the bulk of this material suggests it is formed in the atmosphere and composed of known contributors to secondary organic aerosol. For example, eight oligomer series known to form through aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal and organosulfate compounds known to form from 4 precursors in smog chamber experiments were identified in the rainwater samples. The oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates detected in the rainwater could all contribute to the HULIS fraction of atmospheric organic matter.

  10. Molecular simulation of oligomer inhibitors for calcite scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyu Zhang; Hua Ren; Wenwen Wang; Junping Zhang; Hepeng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Molecular simulation was performed to study the interaction between CaCO3 crystal and several oligomer inhibitors,by using the equilibrium morphology method to calculate the growth morphology of CaCO3 without inhibitors.The calculated morphology agreed well with SEM photographs.Then,a double-layer model was built to investigate the interaction between calcite crystal and oligomer inhibitors containing maleic anhydride (MA) and acrylic acid (AA).Interaction energy per gram of an oligomer inhibitor was introduced as a scale of inhibition efficiency of different monomers.The results indicated that,for calcite scale inhibition,acrylamide (AM) and vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) were the most efficient monomers,while allylsulfonic acid (AS) was the poorest.Increasing proportion of AM in dimer inhibitor molecule would improve the inhibition efficiency of MA,though,for a trimer,such as MA-AA-AM,certain sequence of monomers in the inhibitor molecule was necessary besides higher proportion of AM.

  11. α-Synuclein oligomers and clinical implications for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Kalia, Suneil K; McLean, Pamela J; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E

    2013-02-01

    Protein aggregation within the central nervous system has been recognized as a defining feature of neurodegenerative diseases since the early 20th century. Since that time, there has been a growing list of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease, which are characterized by inclusions of specific pathogenic proteins. This has led to the long-held dogma that these characteristic protein inclusions, which are composed of large insoluble fibrillar protein aggregates and visible by light microscopy, are responsible for cell death in these diseases. However, the correlation between protein inclusion formation and cytotoxicity is inconsistent, suggesting that another form of the pathogenic proteins may be contributing to neurodegeneration. There is emerging evidence implicating soluble oligomers, smaller protein aggregates not detectable by conventional microscopy, as potential culprits in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The protein α-synuclein is well recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and is the major component of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. However, α-synuclein also forms oligomeric species, with certain conformations being toxic to cells. The mechanisms by which these α-synuclein oligomers cause cell death are being actively investigated, as they may provide new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson disease and related disorders. Here we review the possible role of α-synuclein oligomers in cell death in Parkinson disease and discuss the potential clinical implications.

  12. Electrical properties of covalently functionalized graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Plachinda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We have employed first-principle calculations to study transformation of graphene’s electronic structure under functionalization by covalent bonds with di erent atomic and molecular groups - epoxies, amines, PFPA. It is shown that this functionalization leads to an opening in the graphene’s band gap on order of tens meV, but also leads to reduction of electrical conductivity. We also discuss the influence of charge exchange between the functionalizing molecule and graphene’s conjugated electrons on electron transport properties.

  13. Supramolecular chemistry of pyrazolyl complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the progress in the supramolecular chemistry of the pyrazolyl-based metal complexes. The text is written under the structural point of view, emphasizing the role of the covalent and non-covalent interactions in the rational construction of super and supramolecules.

  14. Covalent Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongfei; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-20

    As an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are excellent candidates for various applications. In particular, they can serve as ideal platforms for capturing CO2 to mitigate the dilemma caused by the greenhouse effect. Recent research achievements using COFs for CO2 capture are highlighted. A background overview is provided, consisting of a brief statement on the current CO2 issue, a summary of representative materials utilized for CO2 capture, and an introduction to COFs. Research progresses on: i) experimental CO2 capture using different COFs synthesized based on different covalent bond formations, and ii) computational simulation results of such porous materials on CO2 capture are summarized. Based on these experimental and theoretical studies, careful analyses and discussions in terms of the COF stability, low- and high-pressure CO2 uptake, CO2 selectivity, breakthrough performance, and CO2 capture conditions are provided. Finally, a perspective and conclusion section of COFs for CO2 capture is presented. Recent advancements in the field are highlighted and the strategies and principals involved are discussed.

  15. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  16. Influence of thermalization on thermal conduction through molecular junctions: Computational study of PEG oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Hari Datt; Leitner, David M.

    2017-08-01

    Thermalization in molecular junctions and the extent to which it mediates thermal transport through the junction are explored and illustrated with computational modeling of polyethylene glycol (PEG) oligomer junctions. We calculate rates of thermalization in the PEG oligomers from 100 K to 600 K and thermal conduction through PEG oligomer interfaces between gold and other materials, including water, motivated in part by photothermal applications of gold nanoparticles capped by PEG oligomers in aqueous and cellular environments. Variation of thermalization rates over a range of oligomer lengths and temperatures reveals striking effects of thermalization on thermal conduction through the junction. The calculated thermalization rates help clarify the scope of applicability of approaches that can be used to predict thermal conduction, e.g., where Fourier's law breaks down and where a Landauer approach is suitable. The rates and nature of vibrational energy transport computed for PEG oligomers are compared with available experimental results.

  17. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  18. Chitosan polymer sizes effective in inducing phytoalexin accumulation and fungal suppression are verified with synthesized oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwiger, L A; Ogawa, T; Kuyama, H

    1994-01-01

    Biologically derived chitosan has been reported to induce pisatin and disease resistance response proteins in pea tissue and also to inhibit the germination and growth of some fungal pathogens. Stereo-controlled synthesis of chitosan tetramer, hexamer, and octamer allowed the precise verification of oligomer size required for biological activity. The octameric oligomer optimally induced pisatin accumulation and inhibited fungal growth, verifying previous results obtained with column-purified oligomers derived from crab shells.

  19. Prediction of substrates for glutathione transferases by covalent docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang Qiang; Calhoun, Sara; Fan, Hao; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Branch, Megan C; Mashiyama, Susan T; London, Nir; Jacobson, Matthew P; Babbitt, Patricia C; Shoichet, Brian K; Armstrong, Richard N; Sali, Andrej

    2014-06-23

    Enzymes in the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily catalyze the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to electrophilic substrates. As a consequence they are involved in a number of key biological processes, including protection of cells against chemical damage, steroid and prostaglandin biosynthesis, tyrosine catabolism, and cell apoptosis. Although virtual screening has been used widely to discover substrates by docking potential noncovalent ligands into active site clefts of enzymes, docking has been rarely constrained by a covalent bond between the enzyme and ligand. In this study, we investigate the accuracy of docking poses and substrate discovery in the GST superfamily, by docking 6738 potential ligands from the KEGG and MetaCyc compound libraries into 14 representative GST enzymes with known structures and substrates using the PLOP program [ Jacobson Proteins 2004 , 55 , 351 ]. For X-ray structures as receptors, one of the top 3 ranked models is within 3 Å all-atom root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the native complex in 11 of the 14 cases; the enrichment LogAUC value is better than random in all cases, and better than 25 in 7 of 11 cases. For comparative models as receptors, near-native ligand-enzyme configurations are often sampled but difficult to rank highly. For models based on templates with the highest sequence identity, the enrichment LogAUC is better than 25 in 5 of 11 cases, not significantly different from the crystal structures. In conclusion, we show that covalent docking can be a useful tool for substrate discovery and point out specific challenges for future method improvement.

  20. Adsorption behavior of conjugated {C}3-oligomers on Si(100) and HOPG surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, G; Stiévenard, Didier; Krzeminski, Christophe; Delerue, Christophe; Roncali, Jean; Martineau, C; 10.1021/la026907n

    2012-01-01

    A pi-conjugated {C}3h-oligomer involving three dithienylethylene branches bridged at the meta positions of a central benzenic core has been synthesized and deposited either on the Si(100) surface or on the HOPG surface. On the silicon surface, scanning tunneling microscopy allows the observation of isolated molecules. Conversely, by substituting the thiophene rings of the oligomers with alkyl chains, a spontaneous ordered film is observed on the HOPG surface. As the interaction of the oligomers is different with both surfaces, the utility of the Si(100) surface to characterize individual oligomers prior to their use into a 2D layer is discussed.

  1. Smart macrocyclic molecules: induced fit and ultrafast self-sorting inclusion behavior through dynamic covalent chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Min; Pan, Jin-Long; Lei, Ting; Liu, Chenjiang; Pei, Jian

    2010-12-10

    A family of macrocycles with oligo(ethylene glycol) chains, 4O, 5O, and 6O, was developed to construct a series of new incorporated macrocycles through dynamic covalent chemistry. These flexible macrocycles exhibited excellent "self-sorting" abilities with diamine compounds, which depended on the "induced-fit" rule. For instance, the host macrocycles underwent conformational modulation to accommodate the diamine guests, affording [1+1] intramolecular addition compounds regardless of the flexibility of the diamine. These macrocycles folded themselves to fit various diamines with different chain length through modulation of the flexible polyether chain, and afforded intramolecular condensation products. However, if the chain of the diamine was too long and rigid, oligomers or polymers were obtained from the mixture of the macromolecule and the diamine. All results demonstrated that inclusion compounds involving conformationally suitable aromatic diamines were thermodynamically favorable candidates in the mixture due to the restriction of the macrocycle size. Furthermore, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of self-sorting behaviors of both mixed 4O-5O and 4O-6O systems were investigated in detail. Finally, theoretical calculations were also employed to further understand such self-sorting behavior, and indicated that the large enthalpy change of H(2)NArArNH(2)@4O is the driving force for the sorting behavior. Our system may provide a model to further understand the principle of biomolecules with high specificity due only to their conformational self-adjusting ability.

  2. Dynamic covalent chemistry of bisimines at the solid/liquid interface monitored by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Artur; El Garah, Mohamed; Haar, Sébastien; Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic covalent chemistry relies on the formation of reversible covalent bonds under thermodynamic control to generate dynamic combinatorial libraries. It provides access to numerous types of complex functional architectures, and thereby targets several technologically relevant applications, such as in drug discovery, (bio)sensing and dynamic materials. In liquid media it was proved that by taking advantage of the reversible nature of the bond formation it is possible to combine the error-correction capacity of supramolecular chemistry with the robustness of covalent bonding to generate adaptive systems. Here we show that double imine formation between 4-(hexadecyloxy)benzaldehyde and different α,ω-diamines as well as reversible bistransimination reactions can be achieved at the solid/liquid interface, as monitored on the submolecular scale by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging. Our modular approach enables the structurally controlled reversible incorporation of various molecular components to form sophisticated covalent architectures, which opens up perspectives towards responsive multicomponent two-dimensional materials and devices.

  3. At low concentrations, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) binds non-covalently to alpha-synuclein and prevents its fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenbo; Gallagher, Amy; Hong, Dong-Pyo; Long, Chunmei; Fink, Anthony L; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2009-05-01

    Several studies have shown that catecholamines can inhibit the fibrillation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-Syn), a small presynaptic protein whose aggregation is believed to be a critical step in the etiology of Parkinson's disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders. However, the mechanism of this inhibition is uncertain. We show here that substoichiometric concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), a normal product of the metabolism of dopamine, can inhibit the fibrillation of alpha-Syn, due to non-covalent binding of DOPAC to alpha-Syn monomer. Intriguingly, the presence of alpha-Syn accelerates the spontaneous oxidation of DOPAC, and the oxidized form of DOPAC (the quinone) is responsible for the fibrillation inhibition. In addition, the presence of DOPAC leads to the oxidation of the methionine residues of alpha-Syn, probably due to the H(2)O(2) production as a by-product of DOPAC oxidation. The lack of fibrillation results from the formation of stable oligomers, which are very similar to those observed transiently at early stages of the alpha-Syn fibrillation. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that DOPAC stabilizes the normally transient oligomers and prevents them from subsequent fibril formation. The analysis of the alpha-Syn Y39W variant suggests that DOPAC binds non-covalently to the same N-terminal region of alpha-Syn as lipid vesicles, probably in the vicinity of residue 39. In contrast to the compounds with 1,2-dihydroxyphenyl groups (DOPAC and catechol), their 1,4-dihydroxyphenyl isomers (hydroquinone and homogentisic acid) are able to modify alpha-Syn covalently, probably due to the less steric hindrance in the Michael addition.

  4. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures.

  5. Non-covalent associative structure of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI Heng-fu(水恒福)

    2004-01-01

    The recent progress of non-covalent associative structure of coal, and the mechanisms of the CS2/NMP (1:1 by volume) mixed solvent and the additive addition enhancing the extraction yield of coals were reviewed, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states were presented, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states were introduced in this paper. Coal extraction and swelling in organic solvents at room temperature were the most useful methods to understand the associative structure of coal. CS2/NMP (1:1 by volume) is a unique solvent to give high extraction yields for some bituminous coals. Some additives can dissociate the stronger interactions among coal molecules and enhance the extraction yields of coal in the mixed solvent.

  6. Design of a covalently bonded glycosphingolipid microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigi, Emma; Blixt, Ola; Buschard, Karsten; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are well known ubiquitous constituents of all eukaryotic cell membranes, yet their normal biological functions are not fully understood. As with other glycoconjugates and saccharides, solid phase display on microarrays potentially provides an effective platform for in vitro study of their functional interactions. However, with few exceptions, the most widely used microarray platforms display only the glycan moiety of GSLs, which not only ignores potential modulating effects of the lipid aglycone, but inherently limits the scope of application, excluding, for example, the major classes of plant and fungal GSLs. In this work, a prototype "universal" GSL-based covalent microarray has been designed, and preliminary evaluation of its potential utility in assaying protein-GSL binding interactions investigated. An essential step in development involved the enzymatic release of the fatty acyl moiety of the ceramide aglycone of selected mammalian GSLs with sphingolipid N-deacylase (SCDase). Derivatization of the free amino group of a typical lyso-GSL, lyso-G(M1), with a prototype linker assembled from succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-diethyleneglycol] ester and 2-mercaptoethylamine, was also tested. Underivatized or linker-derivatized lyso-GSL were then immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide- or epoxide-activated glass microarray slides and probed with carbohydrate binding proteins of known or partially known specificities (i.e., cholera toxin B-chain; peanut agglutinin, a monoclonal antibody to sulfatide, Sulph 1; and a polyclonal antiserum reactive to asialo-G(M2)). Preliminary evaluation of the method indicated successful immobilization of the GSLs, and selective binding of test probes. The potential utility of this methodology for designing covalent microarrays that incorporate GSLs for serodiagnosis is discussed.

  7. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  8. Molecular determinants of S100B oligomer formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Thulin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S100B is a dimeric protein that can form tetramers, hexamers and higher order oligomers. These forms have been suggested to play a role in RAGE activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oligomerization was found to require a low molecular weight trigger/cofactor and could not be detected for highly pure dimer, irrespective of handling. Imidazol was identified as a substance that can serve this role. Oligomerization is dependent on both the imidazol concentration and pH, with optima around 90 mM imidazol and pH 7, respectively. No oligomerization was observed above pH 8, thus the protonated form of imidazol is the active species in promoting assembly of dimers to higher species. However, disulfide bonds are not involved and the process is independent of redox potential. The process was also found to be independent of whether Ca(2+ is bound to the protein or not. Tetramers that are purified from dimers and imidazol by gel filtration are kinetically stable, but dissociate into dimers upon heating. Dimers do not revert to tetramer and higher oligomer unless imidazol is again added. Both tetramers and hexamers bind the target peptide from p53 with retained stoichiometry of one peptide per S100B monomer, and with high affinity (lgK = 7.3±0.2 and 7.2±0.2, respectively in 10 mM BisTris, 5 mM CaCl(2, pH 7.0, which is less than one order of magnitude reduced compared to dimer under the same buffer conditions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: S100B oligomerization requires protonated imidazol as a trigger/cofactor. Oligomers are kinetically stable after imidazol is removed but revert back to dimer if heated. The results underscore the importance of kinetic versus thermodynamic control of S100B protein aggregation.

  9. Acute hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlipidaemia modify circulating adiponectin and its oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Thomas; Weicht, Jessica; Mai, Knut; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2009-10-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with low adiponectin levels, although adiponectin is exclusively expressed in white adipose tissue. The mechanism beyond that paradox is not entirely clear, although insulin itself may reduce circulating adiponectin levels. However, obesity is also associated with hyperlipidaemia and the effects of free fatty acids (FFAs) and triglycerides (TG) on circulating adiponectin levels have not yet been investigated. We analysed the effect of an acute and euglycaemic elevation of insulin on adiponectin oligomers in 23 healthy individuals. In a subgroup including 11 healthy men, FFAs and TG were acutely elevated by infusion of heparin/lipids over 120 min. Again the effect on circulating adiponectin and its oligomers was investigated. Adiponectin was determined by ELISA, oligomers were detected by nondenaturating Western blot. Acute hyperinsulinaemia resulted in a significant reduction of total adiponectin to 7.74 +/- 0.98 microg/ml (P = 0.004). High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin did not change (0.80 +/- 0.12 to 0.81 +/- 0.14 microg/ml; P = 0.887), whereas MMW adiponectin decreased from 4.30 +/- 0.51 to 3.78 +/- 0.48 microg/ml (P = 0.005) and LMW adiponectin from 3.63 +/- 0.42 to 3.15 +/- 0.46 microg/ml (P = 0.048). Interestingly, heparin/lipid infusion also reduced circulating adiponectin levels (P = 0.001), which was primarily the result of reduced MMW adiponectin (P = 0.004), whereas LMW and HMW were not significantly affected. The presented data suggest that both, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlipidaemia, may contribute to low adiponectin levels in states of obesity.

  10. Mechanisms of hybrid oligomer formation in the pathogenesis of combined Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor F Tsigelny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and pathological aggregation of neuronal proteins has been proposed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD are frequent neurodegenerative diseases of the aging population. While progressive accumulation of amyloid beta protein (Abeta oligomers has been identified as one of the central toxic events in AD, accumulation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn resulting in the formation of oligomers and protofibrils has been linked to PD and Lewy body Disease (LBD. We have recently shown that Abeta promotes alpha-syn aggregation and toxic conversion in vivo, suggesting that abnormal interactions between misfolded proteins might contribute to disease pathogenesis. However the molecular characteristics and consequences of these interactions are not completely clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in potential Abeta/alpha-syn interactions, immunoblot, molecular modeling, and in vitro studies with alpha-syn and Abeta were performed. We showed in vivo in the brains of patients with AD/PD and in transgenic mice, Abeta and alpha-synuclein co-immunoprecipitate and form complexes. Molecular modeling and simulations showed that Abeta binds alpha-syn monomers, homodimers, and trimers, forming hybrid ring-like pentamers. Interactions occurred between the N-terminus of Abeta and the N-terminus and C-terminus of alpha-syn. Interacting alpha-syn and Abeta dimers that dock on the membrane incorporated additional alpha-syn molecules, leading to the formation of more stable pentamers and hexamers that adopt a ring-like structure. Consistent with the simulations, under in vitro cell-free conditions, Abeta interacted with alpha-syn, forming hybrid pore-like oligomers. Moreover, cells expressing alpha-syn and treated with Abeta displayed increased current amplitudes and calcium influx consistent with the

  11. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  12. Expression of enzymes in yeast for lignocellulose derived oligomer CBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, John E.; Wiswall, Erin; Shikhare, Indraneel; Xu, Haowen; Thorngren, Naomi; Hau, Heidi H.; Stonehouse, Emily

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides a multi-component enzyme system that hydrolyzes hemicellulose oligomers from hardwood which can be expressed, for example, in yeast such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In some embodiments, this invention provides for the engineering of a series of biocatalysts combining the expression and secretion of components of this enzymatic system with robust, rapid xylose utilization, and ethanol fermentation under industrially relevant process conditions for consolidated bioprocessing. In some embodiments, the invention utilizes co-cultures of strains that can achieve significantly improved performance due to the incorporation of additional enzymes in the fermentation system.

  13. Structural Transitions of Solvent-Free Oligomer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2011-09-01

    Novel structural transitions of solvent-free oligomer-grafted nanoparticles are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring model. Variations in core size and grafting density lead to self-assembly of the nanoparticles into a variety of distinct structures. At the boundaries between different structures, the nanoparticle systems undergo thermoreversible transitions. This structural behavior, which has not been previously reported, deviates significantly from that of simple liquids. The reversible nature of these transitions in solvent-free conditions offers new ways to control self-assembly of nanoparticles at experimentally accessible conditions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  14. Synthesis and properties of a covalently linked angular perylene imide dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Karl J; Würthner, Frank

    2012-12-21

    Utilizing the unexplored chemistry of a monocarbon analog to perylene bisimide, a covalently linked angular perylene dimer was synthesized. On the basis of measured optical properties and molecular modeling, the spectral changes relative to a monomeric reference perylene can be explained by an angle-dependent oblique exciton coupling model. With a roughly trigonal interchromophore arrangement, the dimer building block is promising for larger, cyclic assemblies to mimic naturally occurring light harvesting complexes.

  15. Selective Covalent Chemistry via Gas-Phase Ion/ion Reactions: An Exploration of the Energy Surfaces Associated with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Ester Reagents and Primary Amines and Guanidine Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Jiexun; Fisher, Christine M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Selective covalent bond forming reactions (referred to as covalent reactions) can occur in gas-phase ion/ion reactions and take place via the formation of a long-lived chemical complex. The gas-phase ion/ion reactivity between sulfo- N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) ester reagent anions and peptide cations containing a primary amine or guanidine group has been examined via DFT calculations and complex dissociation rate measurements. The results reveal insights regarding the roles of the barriers of competing processes within the complex. When the covalent reaction is exothermic, two prototypical cases, determined by the nature of the energy surface, are apparent. The product partitioning between covalent reaction and simple proton transfer upon dissociation of the long-lived complex is sensitive to activation conditions when the transition state barrier for covalent reaction is relatively high ( case 1) but is insensitive to activation conditions when the transition state barrier is relatively low ( case 2). Covalent reaction efficiencies are very high in case 2 scenarios, such as when the reactive site is a guanidine and the anion attachment site is a guanidinium ion. Covalent reaction efficiencies are variable, and generally low, in case 1 scenarios, such as when an amine is the reactive site and an ammonium ion is the site of anion attachment. A relatively long slow-heating step prior to the complex dissociation step, however, can dramatically increase covalent reaction yield in case 1 scenarios.

  16. Lipid raft disruption protects mature neurons against amyloid oligomer toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Contrusciere, Valentina; Raggi, Carla; Fecchi, Katia; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Santini, Maria Teresa; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Frank, Claudio; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2010-04-01

    A specific neuronal vulnerability to amyloid protein toxicity may account for brain susceptibility to protein misfolding diseases. To investigate this issue, we compared the effects induced by oligomers from salmon calcitonin (sCTOs), a neurotoxic amyloid protein, on cells of different histogenesis: mature and immature primary hippocampal neurons, primary astrocytes, MG63 osteoblasts and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In mature neurons, sCTOs increased apoptosis and induced neuritic and synaptic damages similar to those caused by amyloid beta oligomers. Immature neurons and the other cell types showed no cytotoxicity. sCTOs caused cytosolic Ca(2+) rise in mature, but not in immature neurons and the other cell types. Comparison of plasma membrane lipid composition showed that mature neurons had the highest content in lipid rafts, suggesting a key role for them in neuronal vulnerability to sCTOs. Consistently, depletion in gangliosides protected against sCTO toxicity. We hypothesize that the high content in lipid rafts makes mature neurons especially vulnerable to amyloid proteins, as compared to other cell types; this may help explain why the brain is a target organ for amyloid-related diseases.

  17. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  18. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: a general method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Li, Mai Suan; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ9-40, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  19. Broadband terahertz dynamics of propylene glycol monomer and oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Shota; Mori, Tatsuya; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the broadband terahertz spectra (0.1-5.0 THz) of glass-forming liquids, propylene glycol (PG), its oligomers poly (propylene glycol)s (PPGs), and poly (propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PPG-de) using broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman scattering. The numerical value of the dielectric loss at around 1.5 THz, which is the peak position of broad peaks in all samples, decreased as the molecular weight increased. Furthermore, the peak at around 1.5 THz is insensitive to the molecular weight. For PPGs, the side chain effect of the oligomer was observed in the terahertz region. Based on the experimental and calculation results for the PPGs and PPG-de, whose end groups are epoxy groups, the beginnings of the increases in the observed dielectric loss above 3.5 THz of the PPGs are assigned to the OH bending vibration. The higher value of the dielectric loss in the terahertz region for the PPG-de can be the tail of a broad peak located in the MHz region. The difference between the Raman susceptibility and dielectric loss reflects the difference in the observable molecular dynamics between the infrared and Raman spectroscopies.

  20. Charge Separation and Recombination in Small Band Gap Oligomer-Fullerene Triads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, Bram P.; Bouwer, Ricardo K. M.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Williams, Rene M.; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis and photophysics of a series of thiophene-thienopyrazine small band gap oligomers end-capped at both ends with C(60) are presented In these triads a photoinduced electron transfer reaction occurs between the oligomer as a donor and the fullerene as an acceptor Femtosecond photoinduced

  1. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid-beta (Abeta)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Abeta and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVES: 1) Analyze the potential of Abeta-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large c

  2. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid-beta (Abeta)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Abeta and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVES: 1) Analyze the potential of Abeta-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large

  3. Photo-Electron Spectroscopy Study of Energy Levels in Conjugated Oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Sjoerd; Heeres, A.; Stalmach, U.; Wildeman, J.; Hadziioannou, G.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Jonkman, H.T.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the valence orbital structure of poly(para-phenylenevinylene) (PPV)-like oligomers. We studied these molecules as isolated oligomers in the gas phase, as well as in thin films deposited on metal substrates. We use a simple model based on a previously reported Hamiltonian that accurately

  4. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  5. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  6. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  7. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2017-02-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions.

  8. Single chain folding of synthetic polymers by covalent and non-covalent interactions: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ozcan; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2012-06-14

    The present feature article highlights the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles and initial attempts towards mimicking the structure of natural biomacromolecules by single chain folding of well-defined linear polymers through covalent and non-covalent interactions. Initially, the discussion focuses on the synthesis and characterization of single chain self-folded structures by non-covalent interactions. The second part of the article summarizes the folding of single chain polymers by means of covalent interactions into nanoparticle systems. The current state of the art in the field of single chain folding indicates that covalent-bond-driven nanoparticle preparation is well advanced, while the first encouraging steps towards building reversible single chain folding systems by the use of mutually orthogonal hydrogen-bonding motifs have been made. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Preparation of Chito-Oligomers by Hydrolysis of Chitosan in the Presence of Zeolite as Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing interest has recently been shown to use chitin/chitosan oligomers (chito-oligomers in medicine and food fields because they are not only water-soluble, nontoxic, and biocompatible materials, but they also exhibit numerous biological properties, including antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities, as well as immuno-enhancing effects on animals. Conventional depolymerization methods of chitosan to chito-oligomers are either chemical by acid-hydrolysis under harsh conditions or by enzymatic degradation. In this work, hydrolysis of chitosan to chito-oligomers has been achieved by applying adsorption-separation technique using diluted HCl in the presence of different types of zeolite as adsorbents. The chito-oligomers were retrieved from adsorbents and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS, and ninhydrin test.

  10. Star-shaped tetrathiafulvalene oligomers towards the construction of conducting supramolecular assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The construction of redox-active supramolecular assemblies based on star-shaped and radially expanded tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) oligomers with divergent and extended conjugation is summarized. Star-shaped TTF oligomers easily self-aggregate with a nanophase separation to produce supramolecular structures, and their TTF units stack face-to-face to form columnar structures using the fastener effect. Based on redox-active self-organizing supramolecular structures, conducting nanoobjects are constructed by doping of TTF oligomers with oxidants after the formation of such nanostructures. Although radical cations derived from TTF oligomers strongly interact in solution to produce a mixed-valence dimer and π-dimer, it seems to be difficult to produce nanoobjects of radical cations different from those of neutral TTF oligomers. In some cases, however, radical cations form nanostructured fibers and rods by controlling the supramolecular assembly, oxidation states, and counter anions employed. PMID:26664579

  11. Antimicrobial surfaces using covalently bound polyallylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Kargar, Mehdi; Sahari, Ali; Russel, Lauren; Gause, Katelyn T; Behkam, Bahareh; Ducker, William A

    2014-01-13

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of the cationic polymer polyallylamine (PA) when covalently bonded to glass. The objective was to obtain a robust attachment, yet still allow extension of the polymer chain into solution to enable interaction with the bacteria. The PA film displayed strong antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis , Staphylococcus aureus , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa , which includes both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Glass surfaces were prepared by a straightforward two-step procedure of first functionalizing with epoxide groups using 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GOPTS) and then exposing to PA so that the PA could bind via reaction of a fraction of its amine groups. The surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to verify the presence of the polymer on the surface, zeta potential measurements to estimate the surface charge of the films, and atomic force microscopy to determine the extension of the polymer chains into solution. Antimicrobial properties of these coatings were evaluated by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacteria on the functionalized glass slides, incubating them under agar, and counting the number of surviving cell colonies.

  12. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Christopher (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Adzima, Brian J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  13. One-Step Synthesis of Precursor Oligomers for Organic Photovoltaics: A Comparative Study between Polymers and Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Daojuan; Wang, Suhao; Ma, Wei; Hedström, Svante; James, David Ian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Persson, Petter; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Inganäs, Olle; Huang, Fei; Wang, Ergang

    2015-12-16

    Two series of oligomers TQ and rhodanine end-capped TQ-DR were synthesized using a facile one-step method. Their optical, electrical, and thermal properties and photovoltaic performances were systematically investigated and compared. The TQ series of oligomers were found to be amorphous, whereas the TQ-DR series are semicrystalline. For the TQ oligomers, the results obtained in solar cells show that as the chain length of the oligomers increases, an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) is obtained. However, when introducing 3-ethylrhodanine into the TQ oligomers as end groups, the PCE of the TQ-DR series of oligomers decreases as the chain length increases. Moreover, the TQ-DR series of oligomers give much higher performances compared to the original amorphous TQ series of oligomers owing to the improved extinction coefficient (ε) and crystallinity afforded by the rhodanine. In particular, the highly crystalline oligomer TQ5-DR, which has the shortest conjugation length shows a high hole mobility of 0.034 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a high PCE of 3.14%, which is the highest efficiency out of all of the six oligomers. The structure-property correlations for all of the oligomers and the TQ1 polymer demonstrate that structural control of enhanced intermolecular interactions and crystallinity is a key for small molecules/oligomers to achieve high mobilities, which is an essential requirement for use in OPVs.

  14. Perspective: Found in translation: Quantum chemical tools for grasping non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorczak, Ewa; Corminboeuf, Clémence

    2017-03-01

    Today's quantum chemistry methods are extremely powerful but rely upon complex quantities such as the massively multidimensional wavefunction or even the simpler electron density. Consequently, chemical insight and a chemist's intuition are often lost in this complexity leaving the results obtained difficult to rationalize. To handle this overabundance of information, computational chemists have developed tools and methodologies that assist in composing a more intuitive picture that permits better understanding of the intricacies of chemical behavior. In particular, the fundamental comprehension of phenomena governed by non-covalent interactions is not easily achieved in terms of either the total wavefunction or the total electron density, but can be accomplished using more informative quantities. This perspective provides an overview of these tools and methods that have been specifically developed or used to analyze, identify, quantify, and visualize non-covalent interactions. These include the quantitative energy decomposition analysis schemes and the more qualitative class of approaches such as the Non-covalent Interaction index, the Density Overlap Region Indicator, or quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Aside from the enhanced knowledge gained from these schemes, their strengths, limitations, as well as a roadmap for expanding their capabilities are emphasized.

  15. Amyloid β oligomers in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, treatment, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2015-02-01

    Protein aggregation is common to dozens of diseases including prionoses, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Over the past 15 years, there has been a paradigm shift in understanding the structural basis for these proteinopathies. Precedent for this shift has come from investigation of soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins now widely regarded as instigating neuron damage leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Toxic AβOs accumulate in AD brain and constitute long-lived alternatives to the disease-defining Aβ fibrils deposited in amyloid plaques. Key experiments using fibril-free AβO solutions demonstrated that while Aβ is essential for memory loss, the fibrillar Aβ in amyloid deposits is not the agent. The AD-like cellular pathologies induced by AβOs suggest their impact provides a unifying mechanism for AD pathogenesis, explaining why early stage disease is specific for memory and accounting for major facets of AD neuropathology. Alternative ideas for triggering mechanisms are being actively investigated. Some research favors insertion of AβOs into membrane, while other evidence supports ligand-like accumulation at particular synapses. Over a dozen candidate toxin receptors have been proposed. AβO binding triggers a redistribution of critical synaptic proteins and induces hyperactivity in metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors. This leads to Ca(2+) overload and instigates major facets of AD neuropathology, including tau hyperphosphorylation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and synapse loss. Because different species of AβOs have been identified, a remaining question is which oligomer is the major pathogenic culprit. The possibility has been raised that more than one species plays a role. Despite some key unknowns, the clinical relevance of AβOs has been established, and new studies are beginning to point to co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypercholesterolemia as etiological factors. Because pathogenic AβOs appear early in the disease, they

  16. Quantum Chemical-Based Protocol for the Rational Design of Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmeister, Tanja; Kesselring, Jochen; Jung, Sascha; Schneider, Thomas H; Weickert, Anastasia; Becker, Johannes; Lee, Wook; Bamberger, Denise; Wich, Peter R; Distler, Ute; Tenzer, Stefan; Johé, Patrick; Hellmich, Ute A; Engels, Bernd

    2016-07-13

    We propose a structure-based protocol for the development of customized covalent inhibitors. Starting from a known inhibitor, in the first and second steps appropriate substituents of the warhead are selected on the basis of quantum mechanical (QM) computations and hybrid approaches combining QM with molecular mechanics (QM/MM). In the third step the recognition unit is optimized using docking approaches for the noncovalent complex. These predictions are finally verified by QM/MM or molecular dynamic simulations. The applicability of our approach is successfully demonstrated by the design of reversible covalent vinylsulfone-based inhibitors for rhodesain. The examples show that our approach is sufficiently accurate to identify compounds with the desired properties but also to exclude nonpromising ones.

  17. Fusing tetrapyrroles to graphene edges by surface-assisted covalent coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanqin; Garnica, Manuela; Bischoff, Felix; Ducke, Jacob; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Batzill, Matthias; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V.

    2017-01-01

    Surface-assisted covalent linking of precursor molecules enables the fabrication of low-dimensional nanostructures, which include graphene nanoribbons. One approach to building functional multicomponent systems involves the lateral anchoring of organic heteromolecules to graphene. Here we demonstrate the dehydrogenative coupling of single porphines to graphene edges on the same metal substrate as used for graphene synthesis. The covalent linkages are visualized by scanning probe techniques with submolecular resolution, which directly reveals bonding motifs and electronic features. Distinct configurations are identified that can be steered towards entities predominantly fused to graphene edges through two pyrrole rings by thermal annealing. Furthermore, we succeeded in the concomitant metallation of the macrocycle with substrate atoms and the axial ligation of adducts. Such processes combined with graphene-nanostructure synthesis has the potential to create complex materials systems with tunable functionalities.

  18. Conditional repair by locally switching the thermal healing capability of dynamic covalent polymers with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Anne; Göstl, Robert; Wendt, Robert; Kötteritzsch, Julia; Hager, Martin D.; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Brademann-Jock, Kerstin; Thünemann, Andreas F.; Nöchel, Ulrich; Behl, Marc; Hecht, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Healable materials could play an important role in reducing the environmental footprint of our modern technological society through extending the life cycles of consumer products and constructions. However, as most healing processes are carried out by heat alone, the ability to heal damage generally kills the parent material's thermal and mechanical properties. Here we present a dynamic covalent polymer network whose thermal healing ability can be switched `on' and `off' on demand by light, thereby providing local control over repair while retaining the advantageous macroscopic properties of static polymer networks. We employ a photoswitchable furan-based crosslinker, which reacts with short and mobile maleimide-substituted poly(lauryl methacrylate) chains forming strong covalent bonds while simultaneously allowing the reversible, spatiotemporally resolved control over thermally induced de- and re-crosslinking. We reason that our system can be adapted to more complex materials and has the potential to impact applications in responsive coatings, photolithography and microfabrication.

  19. N@a and N@d: Oligomer and Partner Specification by Asparagine in Coiled-Coil Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jordan M; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Danon, Jonathan J; Rush, Laura E; Lupas, Andrei N; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-02-17

    The α-helical coiled coil is one of the best-studied protein-protein interaction motifs. As a result, sequence-to-structure relationships are available for the prediction of natural coiled-coil sequences and the de novo design of new ones. However, coiled coils adopt a wide range of oligomeric states and topologies, and our understanding of the specification of these and the discrimination between them remains incomplete. Gaps in our knowledge assume more importance as coiled coils are used increasingly to construct biomimetic systems of higher complexity; for this, coiled-coil components need to be robust, orthogonal, and transferable between contexts. Here, we explore how the polar side chain asparagine (Asn, N) is tolerated within otherwise hydrophobic helix-helix interfaces of coiled coils. The long-held view is that Asn placed at certain sites of the coiled-coil sequence repeat selects one oligomer state over others, which is rationalized by the ability of the side chain to make hydrogen bonds, or interactions with chelated ions within the coiled-coil interior of the favored state. We test this with experiments on de novo peptide sequences traditionally considered as directing parallel dimers and trimers, and more widely through bioinformatics analysis of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures. We find that when located centrally, rather than near the termini of such coiled-coil sequences, Asn does exert the anticipated oligomer-specifying influence. However, outside of these bounds, Asn is observed less frequently in the natural sequences, and the synthetic peptides are hyperthermostable and lose oligomer-state specificity. These findings highlight that not all regions of coiled-coil repeat sequences are equivalent, and that care is needed when designing coiled-coil interfaces.

  20. Formation of RNA oligomers on montmorillonite: site of catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Certain montmorillonites catalyze the self condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of nucleosides in pH 8 aqueous electrolyte solutions at ambient temperatures leading to formation of RNA oligomers. In order to establish the nature of the sites on montmorillonite responsible for this catalytic activity, oligomerization reactions were run with montmorillonites which had been selectively modified (I) at the edges by (a) fluoride treatment, (b) silylation, (c) metaphosphate treatment of the anion exchange sites (II) in the interlayer by (a) saturation with quaternary alkylammonium ions of increasing size, (b) aluminum polyoxo cations. High pressure liquid chromatography, HPLC, analysis of condensation products for their chain lengths and yields indicated that modification at the edges did not affect the catalytic activity to a significant extent, while blocking the interlayer strongly inhibited product formation.

  1. Tau oligomers and fibrils induce activation of microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Inelia; Jiménez, José M; Mancilla, Marcela; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a process related to the onset of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing sets of evidence support the major role of deregulation of the interaction patterns between glial cells and neurons in the pathway toward neuronal degeneration, a process we are calling neuroimmunomodulation in AD. On the basis of the hypothesis that pathological tau aggregates induce microglial activation with the subsequent events of the neuroinflammatory cascade, we have studied the effects of tau oligomeric species and filamentous structures over microglial cells in vitro. Tau oligomers and fibrils were induced by arachidonic acid and then their actions assayed upon addition to microglial cells. We showed activation of the microglia, with significant morphological alterations as analyzed by immunofluorescence. The augmentation of nitrites and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 was evaluated in ELISA assays. Furthermore, conditioned media of stimulated microglia cells were exposed to hippocampal neurons generating altered patterns in these cells, including shortening of neuritic processes and cytoskeleton reorganization.

  2. Diffusivities and Viscosities of Poly(ethylene oxide) Oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2010-10-14

    Diffusivities and viscosities of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomer melts with 1 to 12 repeat units have been obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the TraPPE-UA force field. The simulations generated diffusion coefficients with high accuracy for all of the molar masses studied, but the statistical uncertainties in the viscosity calculations were significantly larger for longer chains. There is good agreement of the calculated viscosities and densities with available experimental data, and thus, the simulations can be used to bridge gaps in the data and for extrapolations with respect to chain length, temperature, and pressure. We explored the convergence characteristics of the Green-Kubo formulas for different chain lengths and propose minimal production times required for convergence of the transport properties. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Supported Intrinsically Porous Oligomers as Hybrid Materials for Separations, Storage, and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anthony Boone

    Adsorption-desorption phenomena are often difficult to study at the molecular level because the surfaces on which they occur can be heterogeneous, giving a wide distribution of adsorption sites and associated energies. Considering that these phenomena underlie an incredibly wide variety of industrially important processes, a better understanding could aid in the development of more efficient methods. In this work, we describe an approach to designing materials with well-defined adsorption sites by covalently attaching intrinsically porous molecules to solid surfaces by a rigid multidentate linker. These cup-shaped molecules are intended to act as adsorption sites on the material, whereas the rigid attachment to the solid support serves to prevent movement and conformational changes of the sites, leading to better understanding of adsorption phenomena. As a proof-of-concept application, materials were used for adsorption of n-butanol biofuel and related compounds from dilute aqueous solution. The materials were thermally and hydrolytically stable, and adsorption phenomena were reversible. Adsorption sites containing more hydrophobic molecular area led to stronger adsorption, suggesting that it is driven by weak van der Waals forces. Likewise, adsorption sites that were strongly polarized performed poorly, possibly reflecting a greater energy penalty of removing water molecules from the cavity. Upon placing a Lewis acidic metal at the bottom of the cavity, an enhancement was seen only with the most acidic metal, which may indicate weak guest coordination. Observing that hydrophobic interactions dominate adsorption on these materials, efforts were made to develop hybrid materials with large hydrophobic area for adsorption. Glaser coupling of diethynylbenzene was used to grow oligo(phenylene butadiynylene)s from the surface of silica, resulting in materials that were more than 25% organic by weight. In addition to their potential use as adsorbents, these materials may

  4. Fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers as low threshold and high gain amplifying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazlauskas, Karolis, E-mail: karolis.kazlauskas@ff.vu.lt; Kreiza, Gediminas; Bobrovas, Olegas; Adomėnienė, Ona; Adomėnas, Povilas; Juršėnas, Saulius [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jankauskas, Vygintas [Department of Solid State Electronics, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-07-27

    Deliberate control of intermolecular interactions in fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers was attempted via introduction of different-length alkyl moieties to attain high emission amplification and low amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold at high oligomer concentrations. Containing fluorenyl peripheral groups decorated with different-length alkyl moieties, the oligomers were found to express weak concentration quenching of emission, yet excellent carrier drift mobilities (close to 10{sup −2} cm{sup 2}/V/s) in the amorphous films. Owing to the larger radiative decay rates (>1.0 × 10{sup 9 }s{sup −1}) and smaller concentration quenching, fluorene-cored oligomers exhibited down to one order of magnitude lower ASE thresholds at higher concentrations as compared to those of benzofluorene counterparts. The lowest threshold (300 W/cm{sup 2}) obtained for the fluorene-cored oligomers at the concentration of 50 wt % in polymer matrix is among the lowest reported for solution-processed amorphous films in ambient conditions, what makes the oligomers promising for lasing application. Great potential in emission amplification was confirmed by high maximum net gain (77 cm{sup −1}) revealed for these compounds. Although the photostability of the oligomers was affected by photo-oxidation, it was found to be comparable to that of various organic lasing materials including some commercial laser dyes evaluated under similar excitation conditions.

  5. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND RING-OPENING POLYMERIZATION OF CYCLIC (ARYLENE PHOSPHONATE) OLIGOMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ming Zhang; Qing-zhong Guo; Tian-lu Chen

    2004-01-01

    A series of cyclic (arylene phosphonate) oligomers were prepared by reaction of phenylphosphonic dichloride (PPD) with various bisphenols under pseudo-high dilution conditions via interfacial polycondensation. The yield of cyclic (arylenc phosphonate) oligomers is over 85% by using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) at 0 ℃. The structures of the cyclic oligomers were confirmed by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and IR analysis. These cyclic oligomers undergo facile ring-opening polymerization in the melt by using potassium 4,4'-biphenoxide as the initiator to give linear polyphosphonate. Free-radical ring-opening polymerization of cyclic(arylene phosphonate) oligomers containing sulfur linkages was also performed in the melt using 2,2'-dithiobis(benzothiazole) (DTB) as the initiator at 270℃ and the resulting polymer had a Mw of 8 × 103 with a molecular weight distribution of 4. Ring-opening copolymerization of these cyclic oligomers with cyclic carbonate oligomers was also achieved. The average molecular weight of the resulting copolymer is higher than the corresponding homopolymer and the thermal stability of the copolymer is better than the corresponding homopolymer.

  6. Supramolecular motifs in dynamic covalent PEG-hemiaminal organogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Courtney H.; ter Hurrne, Gijs M.; Wojtecki, Rudy J.; Jones, Gavin O.; Horn, Hans W.; Meijer, E. W.; Frank, Curtis W.; Hedrick, James L.; García, Jeannette M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic covalent materials are stable materials that possess reversible behaviour triggered by stimuli such as light, redox conditions or temperature; whereas supramolecular crosslinks depend on the equilibrium constant and relative concentrations of crosslinks as a function of temperature. The combination of these two reversible chemistries can allow access to materials with unique properties. Here, we show that this combination of dynamic covalent and supramolecular chemistry can be used to prepare organogels comprising distinct networks. Two materials containing hemiaminal crosslink junctions were synthesized; one material is comprised of dynamic covalent junctions and the other contains hydrogen-bonding bis-hemiaminal moieties. Under specific network synthesis conditions, these materials exhibited self-healing behaviour. This work reports on both the molecular-level detail of hemiaminal crosslink junction formation as well as the macroscopic behaviour of hemiaminal dynamic covalent network (HDCN) elastomeric organogels. These materials have potential applications as elastomeric components in printable materials, cargo carriers and adhesives. PMID:26174864

  7. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  8. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  9. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  10. The cell factory approach toward biotechnological production of high-value chitosan oligomers and their derivatives: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Shoa; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-02-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant renewable resources, and chitosans, the partially deacetylated derivatives of chitin, are among the most promising functional biopolymers, with superior material properties and versatile biological functionalities. Elucidating molecular structure-function relationships and cellular modes of action of chitosans, however, it is challenging due to the micro-heterogeneity and structural complexity of polysaccharides. Lately, it has become apparent that many of the biological activities of chitosan polymers, such as in agricultural plant disease protection or in mediating scar-free wound healing, may be attributed to oligomeric break-down products generated by the action of chitosanolytic hydrolases present in the target tissues, such as human chitotriosidase. Consequently, the focus of current research is shifting toward chitosan oligomers so that the availability of well-defined chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) becomes a bottleneck. Well-known ways of producing COS use physical and/or chemical means for the partial depolymerization of chitosan polymers, typically leading to broad mixtures of COS varying in their degrees of polymerization (DP) and acetylation (DA), and with more or less random patterns of acetylation (PAs). Even after chromatographic separation according to DP and DA, such mixtures are of limited value to elucidate structure-function relationships and modes of action. More recently, enzymatic means using chitinases and/or chitosanases, and sometimes chitin deacetylases, have been proposed as these can be more tightly controlled and yield slightly better defined mixtures of COS. An alternative would be chemical synthesis of COS which in principle would allow for full structural control, but protocols for it are lengthy, costly, and not yet well developed, and yields are low. Synthetic biology now allows to develop today's in vitro bio-refinery approaches into in vivo cell factory approaches for the biotechnological

  11. Non-covalent interactions between carbon nanotubes and conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Dönüs

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are interest to many different disciplines including chemistry, physics, biology, material science and engineering because of their unique properties and potential applications in various areas spanning from optoelectronics to biotechnology. However, one of the drawbacks associated with these materials is their insolubility which limits their wide accessibility for many applications. Various approaches have been adopted to circumvent this problem including modification of carbon nanotube surfaces by non-covalent and covalent attachments of solubilizing groups. Covalent approach modification may alter the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and, in turn make them undesirable for many applications. On the other hand, a non-covalent approach helps to improve the solubility of CNTs while preserving their intrinsic properties. Among many non-covalent modifiers of CNTs, conjugated polymers are receiving increasing attention and highly appealing because of a number of reasons. To this end, the aim of this feature article is to review the recent results on the conjugated polymer-based non-covalent functionalization of CNTs with an emphasis on the effect of conjugated polymers in the dispersibility/solubility, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes as well as their usage in the purification and isolation of a specific single-walled nanotube from the mixture of the various tubes.

  12. Oligomers Solidification Depending on the Nature, Molecular Mass, Type and Reactional Group Containing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliyp. Medvedev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to regularity defining of curing oligomers, and prepolymers with hydroxyl and isocyanate groups and double bonds reactive oligomers.The features of the spatial structure of elasticpolyurethane based oligomers and prepolymers with the definition of the physical and chemical bonds share, as well as the chain interval length between grid points were researched. The possibility of oligodiendiolecuring in the presence of a methacrylate component on the mechanism of radical polymerization was experimentally confirmed.To achieve the objectives rheokinetic method of analysis (rotational viscometer, thermometric and iodometric methods, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetrywere used.

  13. Electrochemical and optical properties of biphenyl bridged-dicarbazole oligomer films: Electropolymerization and electrochromism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyuncu, Sermet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey); Can Vocational School, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17400 Canakkale (Turkey)], E-mail: sermetkoyuncu@hotmail.com; Gultekin, Burak [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Zafer, Ceylan [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylan.zafer@ege.edu.tr; Bilgili, Hakan; Can, Mustafa; Demic, Serafettin [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Kaya, Ismet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey); Icli, Siddik [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-10-01

    4,4'-Di(N-carbazoyl)biphenyl monomer (CBP) was synthesized and coated onto ITO-glass surface by electrochemical oxidative polymerization. Its CV shows two distinct one-electron and stepwise oxidation processes occurred at 1.29 and 1.61 V. By using this property, the monomer was electrochemically polymerized separately at these oxidation states and thus, two different oligomer films were obtained afterwards. Their spectro-electrochemical and electrochromic properties were also investigated. Switching ability of the oligomers was evaluated by kinetic studies upon measuring the percent transmittance (%T) at their maximum contrast point, indicating that these oligomers were found to be suitable material for electrochromic devices.

  14. Coulombic free energy and salt ion association per phosphate of all-atom models of DNA oligomer: dependence on oligomer size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas

    2012-08-23

    We investigate how the coulombic Gibbs free energy and salt ion association per phosphate charge of DNA oligomers vary with oligomer size (i.e. number of charged residues ∣ZD∣) at 0.15 M univalent salt by non-linear Poisson Boltzmann (NLPB) analysis of all-atom DNA models. Calculations of these quantities ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) are performed for short and long double-stranded (ds) and single-stranded (ss) DNA oligomers, ranging from 4 to 118 phosphates (ds) and from 2 to 59 phosphates (ss). Behaviors of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as functions of ∣ZD∣ provide a measure of the range of the coulombic end effect and determine the size of an oligomer at which an interior region with the properties (per charge) of the infinite-length polyelectrolyte first appears. This size (10-11 phosphates at each end for ds DNA and 6-9 for ss DNA at 0.15 M salt) is in close agreement with values obtained previously by Monte Carlo and NLPB calculations for cylindrical models of polyions, and by analysis of binding of oligocations to DNA oligomers. Differences in [Formula: see text] and in [Formula: see text] between ss and ds DNA are used to predict effects of oligomeric size and salt concentration on duplex stability in the vicinity of 0.15 M salt. Results of all-atom calculations are compared with results of less structurally detailed models and with experimental data.

  15. Interaction with the 5D3 monoclonal antibody is regulated by intramolecular rearrangements but not by covalent dimer formation of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Laczkó, Rozália; Hegedűs, Csilla;

    2008-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein working as a homodimer or homo-oligomer. The protein plays an important role in the protection/detoxification of various tissues and may also be responsible for the multidrug-resistant phenotype of cancer cells. In our previous study we found that the 5......D3 monoclonal antibody shows a function-dependent reactivity to an extracellular epitope of the ABCG2 transporter. In the current experiments we have further characterized the 5D3-ABCG2 interaction. The effect of chemical cross-linking and the modulation of extracellular S-S bridges...... on the transporter function and 5D3 reactivity of ABCG2 were investigated in depth. We found that several protein cross-linkers greatly increased 5D3 labeling in ABCG2 expressing HEK cells; however, there was no correlation between covalent dimer formation, the inhibition of transport activity, and the increase in 5...

  16. Evidence for DAPI intercalation in CG sites of DNA oligomer [d(CGACGTCG)]2: a 1H NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, E; D'Ambrosio, E; Ravagnan, G; Paci, M

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and the DNA oligomer [d(CGACGTCG)]2 has been investigated by proton one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in solution. Compared with the minor groove binding of the drug to [d(GCGATCGC)]2, previously studied by NMR spectroscopy, the interaction of DAPI with [d(CGACGTCG)]2 appears markedly different and gives results typical of a binding mechanism by intercalation. C:G imino proton signals of the [d(CGACGTCG)]2 oligomer as well as DAPI resonances appear strongly upfield shifted and sequential dipolar connectivities between cytosine and guanine residues show a clear decrease upon binding. Moreover, protons lying in both the minor and major grooves of the DNA double helix appear involved in the interaction, as evidenced principally by intermolecular drug-DNA NOEs. In particular, the results indicate the existence of two stereochemically non-equivalent intercalation binding sites located in the central and terminal adjacent C:G base pairs of the palindromic DNA sequence. Different lifetimes of the complexes were also observed for the two sites of binding. Moreover, due to the fast exchange on the NMR timescale between free and bound species, different interactions in dynamic equilibrium with the observed intercalative bindings were not excluded. PMID:7753623

  17. On couplings and excimers: lessons from studies of singlet fission in covalently linked tetracene dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I

    2016-03-21

    Electronic factors controlling singlet fission (SF) rates are investigated in covalently linked dimers of tetracene. Using covalent linkers, relative orientation of the individual chromophores can be controlled, maximizing the rates of SF. Structures with coplanar and staggered arrangements of tetracene moieties are considered. The electronic structure calculations and three-state kinetic model for SF rates provide explanations for experimentally observed low SF yields in coplanar dimers and efficient SF in staggered dimers. The calculations illuminate the role of the excimer formation in SF process. The structural relaxation in the S1 state leads to the increased rate of the multi-exciton (ME) state formation, but impedes the second step, separation of the ME state into independent triplets. The slower second step reduces SF yield by allowing other processes, such as radiationless relaxation, to compete with triplet generation. The calculations of electronic couplings also suggest an increased rate of radiationless relaxation at the excimer geometries. Thus, the excimer serves as a trap of the ME state. The effect of covalent linkers on the electronic factors and SF rates is investigated. In all considered structures, the presence of the linker leads to larger couplings, however, the effect on the overall rate is less straightforward, since the linkers generally result in less favorable energetics. This complex behavior once again illustrates the importance of integrative approaches that evaluate the overall rate, rather than focusing on specific electronic factors such as energies or couplings.

  18. Effective scheme for partitioning covalent bonds in density-functional embedding theory: From molecules to extended covalent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Muñoz-García, Ana Belén; Pavone, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Density-functional embedding theory provides a general way to perform multi-physics quantum mechanics simulations of large-scale materials by dividing the total system's electron density into a cluster's density and its environment's density. It is then possible to compute the accurate local electronic structures and energetics of the embedded cluster with high-level methods, meanwhile retaining a low-level description of the environment. The prerequisite step in the density-functional embedding theory is the cluster definition. In covalent systems, cutting across the covalent bonds that connect the cluster and its environment leads to dangling bonds (unpaired electrons). These represent a major obstacle for the application of density-functional embedding theory to study extended covalent systems. In this work, we developed a simple scheme to define the cluster in covalent systems. Instead of cutting covalent bonds, we directly split the boundary atoms for maintaining the valency of the cluster. With this new covalent embedding scheme, we compute the dehydrogenation energies of several different molecules, as well as the binding energy of a cobalt atom on graphene. Well localized cluster densities are observed, which can facilitate the use of localized basis sets in high-level calculations. The results are found to converge faster with the embedding method than the other multi-physics approach ONIOM. This work paves the way to perform the density-functional embedding simulations of heterogeneous systems in which different types of chemical bonds are present.

  19. Dye label interference with RNA modification reveals 5-fluorouridine as non-covalent inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenkuch, Felix; Hinze, Gerald; Kellner, Stefanie; Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald; Basché, Thomas; Helm, Mark

    2014-11-10

    The interest in RNA modification enzymes surges due to their involvement in epigenetic phenomena. Here we present a particularly informative approach to investigate the interaction of dye-labeled RNA with modification enzymes. We investigated pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase TruB interacting with an alleged suicide substrate RNA containing 5-fluorouridine (5FU). A longstanding dogma, stipulating formation of a stable covalent complex was challenged by discrepancies between the time scale of complex formation and enzymatic turnover. Instead of classic mutagenesis, we used differentially positioned fluorescent labels to modulate substrate properties in a range of enzymatic conversion between 6% and 99%. Despite this variegation, formation of SDS-stable complexes occurred instantaneously for all 5FU-substrates. Protein binding was investigated by advanced fluorescence spectroscopy allowing unprecedented simultaneous detection of change in fluorescence lifetime, anisotropy decay, as well as emission and excitation maxima. Determination of Kd values showed that introduction of 5FU into the RNA substrate increased protein affinity by 14× at most. Finally, competition experiments demonstrated reversibility of complex formation for 5FU-RNA. Our results lead us to conclude that the hitherto postulated long-term covalent interaction of TruB with 5FU tRNA is based on the interpretation of artifacts. This is likely true for the entire class of pseudouridine synthases.

  20. Diffusion of oligomers in latex systems A route to low volatile organic compound (VOC) coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fasano, David M; Fitzwater, Susan J; Lau, Willie; Sheppard, Aurelia C

    2010-01-01

    We synthesize specially designed latex polymer systems by an in situ emulsion polymerization process that yields latex particles with both a high molecular weight polymer phase and a low molecular weight oligomer phase...

  1. Direct Correlation Between Ligand-Induced α-Synuclein Oligomers and Amyloid-like Fibril Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Nors; Foderà, Vito; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins into amyloid deposits is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The suggestion that intermediate oligomeric species may be cytotoxic has led to intensified investigations of pre-fibrillar oligomers, which...

  2. PHOTOPHYSICAL BEHAVIORS OF OLIGOMER BASED ON 1,1'-BINAPHTHOL WITH 3,3'-ACETYLENE SPACER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The photophysical behaviors of the oligomer based on 1,1'-binaphthol with 3,3'-acetylene spacer were investigated. The oligomer molecule has a naphthyl-acetylenenaphthyl effective conjugation segment. The atropic of the 1,1'-binaphthyl moiety led to twisted and rigid main chain in the oligomer. With the changes of the external environment such as solvents used, solvent viscosity and ambient temperature, the wavelengths of absorption and the intensities of fluorescence and absorption are changed slightly, but the fluorescent intensity and quantum yield can be influenced. The luminescent behaviors of the oligomer exhibit twisted intramolecular charge transfer characteristics, which could have a potential application in wavelength-stable light emitting material adaptable to ambient temperature and the solvents used in wide range.

  3. Salt anions promote the conversion of HypF-N into amyloid-like oligomers and modulate the structure of the oligomers and the monomeric precursor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Silvia; Mannini, Benedetta; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Shalova, Irina N; Penco, Amanda; Mulvihill, Estefania; Laurents, Douglas V; Relini, Annalisa; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-12-07

    An understanding of the solution factors contributing to the rate of aggregation of a protein into amyloid oligomers, to the modulation of the conformational state populated prior to aggregation and to the structure/morphology of the resulting oligomers is one of the goals of present research in this field. We have studied the influence of six different salts on the conversion of the N-terminal domain of Escherichiacoli HypF (HypF-N) into amyloid-like oligomers under conditions of acidic pH. Our results show that salts having different anions (NaCl, NaClO(4), NaI, Na(2)SO(4)) accelerate oligomerization with an efficacy that follows the electroselectivity series of the anions (SO(4)(2-)≥ ClO(4)(-)>I(-)>Cl(-)). By contrast, salts with different cations (NaCl, LiCl, KCl) have similar effects. We also investigated the effect of salts on the structure of the final and initial states of HypF-N aggregation. The electroselectivity series does not apply to the effect of anions on the structure of the oligomers. By contrast, it applies to their effect on the content of secondary structure and on the exposure of hydrophobic clusters of the monomeric precursor state. The results therefore indicate that the binding of anions to the positively charged residues of HypF-N at low pH is the mechanism by which salts modulate the rate of oligomerization and the structure of the monomeric precursor state but not the structure of the resulting oligomers. Overall, the data contribute to rationalize the effect of salts on amyloid-like oligomer formation and to explain the role of charged biological macromolecules in protein aggregation processes.

  4. Bacterial resistance to antisense peptide phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Susan E; Reese, Kaleb A; Mitev, Georgi M; Mullen, Valerie; Johnson, Rudd C; Pomraning, Kyle R; Mellbye, Brett L; Tilley, Lucas D; Iversen, Patrick L; Freitag, Michael; Geller, Bruce L

    2012-12-01

    Peptide phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) are synthetic DNA mimics that bind cRNA and inhibit bacterial gene expression. The PPMO (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP (where R is arginine, F, phenylalanine, X is 6-aminohexanoic acid, B is β-alanine, and AcpP is acyl carrier protein) is complementary to 11 bases of the essential gene acpP (which encodes acyl carrier protein). The MIC of (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 2.5 μM (14 μg/ml) in Escherichia coli W3110. The rate of spontaneous resistance of E. coli to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 4 × 10(-7) mutations/cell division. A spontaneous (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP-resistant mutant (PR200.1) was isolated. The MIC of (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 40 μM (224 μg/ml) for PR200.1. The MICs of standard antibiotics for PR200.1 and W3110 were identical. The sequence of acpP was identical in PR200.1 and W3110. PR200.1 was also resistant to other PPMOs conjugated to (RFF)(3)RXB or peptides with a similar composition or pattern of cationic and nonpolar residues. Genomic sequencing of PR200.1 identified a mutation in sbmA, which encodes an active transport protein. In separate experiments, a (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP-resistant isolate (RR3) was selected from a transposome library, and the insertion was mapped to sbmA. Genetic complementation of PR200.1 or RR3 with sbmA restored susceptibility to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP. Deletion of sbmA caused resistance to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP. We conclude that resistance to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was linked to the peptide and not the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer, dependent on the composition or repeating pattern of amino acids, and caused by mutations in sbmA. The data further suggest that (RFF)(3)R-XB PPMOs may be transported across the plasma membrane by SbmA.

  5. Functional consequence of covalent reaction of phosphoenolpyruvate with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase (MurA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin-Yi; Yang, Yan; Han, Huijong; Betzi, Stephane; Olesen, Sanne H; Marsilio, Frank; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2012-04-13

    The enzyme MurA has been an established antibiotic target since the discovery of fosfomycin, which specifically inhibits MurA by covalent modification of the active site residue Cys-115. Early biochemical studies established that Cys-115 also covalently reacts with substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield a phospholactoyl adduct, but the structural and functional consequences of this reaction remained obscure. We captured and depicted the Cys-115-PEP adduct of Enterobacter cloacae MurA in various reaction states by X-ray crystallography. The data suggest that cellular MurA predominantly exists in a tightly locked complex with UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UNAM), the product of the MurB reaction, with PEP covalently attached to Cys-115. The uniqueness and rigidity of this "dormant" complex was previously not recognized and presumably accounts for the failure of drug discovery efforts toward the identification of novel and effective MurA inhibitors. We demonstrate that recently published crystal structures of MurA from various organisms determined by different laboratories were indeed misinterpreted and actually contain UNAM and covalently bound PEP. The Cys-115-PEP adduct was also captured in vitro during the reaction of free MurA and substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or isomer UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine. The now available series of crystal structures allows a comprehensive view of the reaction cycle of MurA. It appears that the covalent reaction of MurA with PEP fulfills dual functions by tightening the complex with UNAM for the efficient feedback regulation of murein biosynthesis and by priming the PEP molecule for instantaneous reaction with substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine.

  6. Identification And Characterization Of Oligomers As Major Components Of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalberer, M. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Paulsen, D. [PSI and ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Sax, M. [ETH Zuerich and PSI (Switzerland); Steinbacher, M.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Fisseha, R.; Richter, R.; Weingartner, E.; Frankevich, V. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Zenobi, R. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition and volatility of organic aerosols formed during photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds were measured in the PSI smog chamber. With mass spectrometric and aerosol volatility methods, oligomers were identified for the first time as main constituents of these organic aerosols. Measurements showed that oligomers account for about 50% of the aerosol mass after more than 20 hours of aging. (author)

  7. KCTD Hetero-oligomers Confer Unique Kinetic Properties on Hippocampal GABAB Receptor-Induced K+ Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzius, Thorsten; Turecek, Rostislav; Seddik, Riad; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tiao, Jim; Rem, Pascal D; Metz, Michaela; Kralikova, Michaela; Bouvier, Michel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein coupled receptors for the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, GABA. GABAB receptors were shown to associate with homo-oligomers of auxiliary KCTD8, KCTD12, KCTD12b, and KCTD16 subunits (named after their T1 K(+)-channel tetramerization domain) that regulate G-protein signaling of the receptor. Here we provide evidence that GABAB receptors also associate with hetero-oligomers of KCTD subunits. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicate that two-thirds of the KCTD16 proteins in the hippocampus of adult mice associate with KCTD12. We show that the KCTD proteins hetero-oligomerize through self-interacting T1 and H1 homology domains. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements in live cells reveal that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers associate with both the receptor and the G-protein. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers impart unique kinetic properties on G-protein-activated Kir3 currents. During prolonged receptor activation (one min) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce moderately desensitizing fast deactivating K(+) currents, whereas KCTD12 and KCTD16 homo-oligomers produce strongly desensitizing fast deactivating currents and nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents, respectively. During short activation (2 s) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal neurons of KCTD knock-out mice are consistent with these findings and indicate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers increase the duration of slow IPSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that simultaneous assembly of distinct KCTDs at the receptor increases the molecular and functional repertoire of native GABAB receptors and modulates physiologically induced K(+) current responses in the hippocampus.

  8. Mitochondrial oligomers boost glycolysis in cancer stem cells to facilitate blebbishield-mediated transformation after apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jinesh, GG; Molina, JR; Huang, L.; Laing, NM; Mills, GB; Bar-Eli, M; Kamat, AM

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis culminates in secondary necrosis due to lack of ATP. Cancer stem cells form spheres after apoptosis by evoking the blebbishield emergency program. Hence, determining how blebbishields avoid secondary necrosis is crucial. Here we demonstrate that N-Myc and VEGFR2 control transformation from blebbishields, during which oligomers of K-Ras, p27, BAD, Bax, and Bak boost glycolysis to avoid secondary necrosis. Non-apoptotic cancer cells also utilize oligomers to boost glycolysis, which di...

  9. The complexity of condensed tannin binding to bovine serum albumin--An isothermal titration calorimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmister, Rachel L; Faulkner, Peta; Downey, Mark O; Darby, Samuel J; Falconer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was applied to study the binding of purified proanthocyanidin oligomers to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The molecular weight of the proanthocyanidin oligomer had a major impact on its binding to BSA. The calculated change in enthalpy (ΔH) and association constant (Ka) became greater as the oligomer size increased then plateaued at the heptameric oligomer. These results support a model for precipitation of proteins by proanthocyanidin where increased oligomer size enhanced the opportunity for cross linkages between proteins ultimately forming sediment-able complexes. The authors suggest tannin binding to proteins is opportunistic and involves multiple sites, each with a different Ka and ΔH of binding. The ΔH of binding comprises both an endothermic hydrophobic interaction and exothermic hydrogen bond component. This suggests the calculated entropy value (ΔS) for tannin-protein interactions is subject to a systematic error and should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinct annular oligomers captured along the assembly and disassembly pathways of transthyretin amyloid protofibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo H Pires

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Defects in protein folding may lead to severe degenerative diseases characterized by the appearance of amyloid fibril deposits. Cytotoxicity in amyloidoses has been linked to poration of the cell membrane that may involve interactions with amyloid intermediates of annular shape. Although annular oligomers have been detected in many amyloidogenic systems, their universality, function and molecular mechanisms of appearance are debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated with high-resolution in situ atomic force microscopy the assembly and disassembly of transthyretin (TTR amyloid protofibrils formed of the native protein by pH shift. Annular oligomers were the first morphologically distinct intermediates observed in the TTR aggregation pathway. Morphological analysis suggests that they can assemble into a double-stack of octameric rings with a 16 ± 2 nm diameter, and displaying the tendency to form linear structures. According to light scattering data coupled to AFM imaging, annular oligomers appeared to undergo a collapse type of structural transition into spheroid oligomers containing 8-16 monomers. Disassembly of TTR amyloid protofibrils also resulted in the rapid appearance of annular oligomers but with a morphology quite distinct from that observed in the assembly pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations indicate that annular oligomers are key dynamic intermediates not only in the assembly but also in the disassembly of TTR protofibrils. The balance between annular and more compact forms of aggregation could be relevant for cytotoxicity in amyloidogenic disorders.

  11. Genome-scale DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Savković, S; Crkvenjakov, R; Salbego, D; Serrato, H; Kreuzer, H; Gemmell, A; Batus, S; Grujić, D; Carnahan, S; Tepavcević, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed hybridization technology (Drmanac et al. 1994) enables economical large-scale detection of short oligomers within DNA fragments. The newly developed recognition method (Milosavljević 1995b) enables comparison of lists of oligomers detected within DNA fragments against known DNA sequences. We here describe an experiment involving a set of 4,513 distinct genomic E.coli clones of average length 2kb, each hybridized with 636 randomly selected short oligomer probes. High hybridization signal with a particular probe was used as an indication of the presence of a complementary oligomer in the particular clone. For each clone, a list of oligomers with highest hybridization signals was compiled. The database consisting of 4,513 oligomer lists was then searched using known E.coli sequences as queries in an attempt to identify the clones that match the query sequence. Out of a total of 11 clones that were recognized at highest significance level by our method, 8 were single-pass sequenced from both ends. The single-pass sequenced ends were then compared against the query sequences. The sequence comparisons confirmed 7 out of the total of 8 examined recognitions. This experiment represents the first successful example of genome-scale sequence recognition based on hybridization data.

  12. The mechanism by which influenza A virus nucleoprotein forms oligomers and binds RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Krug, Robert M.; Tao, Yizhi Jane

    2006-12-06

    Influenza A viruses pose a serious threat to world public health, particularly the currently circulating avian H5N1 viruses. The influenza viral nucleoprotein forms the protein scaffold of the helical genomic ribonucleoprotein complexes, and has a critical role in viral RNA replication. Here we report a 3.2 Angstrom crystal structure of this nucleoprotein, the overall shape of which resembles a crescent with a head and a body domain, with a protein fold different compared with that of the rhabdovirus nucleoprotein. Oligomerization of the influenza virus nucleoprotein is mediated by a flexible tail loop that is inserted inside a neighboring molecule. This flexibility in the tail loop enables the nucleoprotein to form loose polymers as well as rigid helices, both of which are important for nucleoprotein functions. Single residue mutations in the tail loop result in the complete loss of nucleoprotein oligomerization. An RNA-binding groove, which is found between the head and body domains at the exterior of the nucleoprotein oligomer, is lined with highly conserved basic residues widely distributed in the primary sequence. The nucleoprotein structure shows that only one of two proposed nuclear localization signals are accessible, and suggests that the body domain of nucleoprotein contains the binding site for the viral polymerase. Our results identify the tail loop binding pocket as a potential target for antiviral development.

  13. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  14. Joining cross-stacked carbon nanotube architecture with covalent bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Gong, Wenbin; He, Qiang; Li, Qingwen; Lu, Weibang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have superior mechanical properties that make them highly attractive for high performance bulk structures such as CNT fibers and films; however, the weak wan der Waals interaction between CNTs gives degraded strength and modulus, forming covalent bonding between CNTs which is considered to be highly promising but remains a considerable challenge due to the inert nature of the carbon surface. An appropriate electron-beam, as yet, has been used to introduce covalent bonding but limited to CNT bundles. Here, we used a spinnable CNT array to form a cross-stacked CNT architecture first, a bulk film, and proved that sp3 covalent bonding can be directly formed between cross-stacked CNTs under high pressure at appropriate temperatures via a laser heated diamond anvil cell method. The Raman spectrum and molecular dynamic simulations were used to probe and interpret the bonding formation process, respectively. It was found that under 30 GPa with the temperature of 765-1345 K, sp3 covalent bonding was mainly formed in the cross-stacked region. We anticipate that the formation of sp3 covalent bonding between CNTs under high pressure could offer a general pathway to enhance the performance of nano-carbon based materials.

  15. Carboxybetaine methacrylate oligomer modified nylon for circulating tumor cells capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chaoqun; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-10-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) capture is one of the most effective approaches in diagnosis and treatment of cancers in the field of personalized cancer medicine. In our study, zwitterionic carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) oligomers were grafted onto nylon via atomic transfer random polymerization (ATRP) which would serve as a novel material for the development of convenient CTC capture interventional medical devices. The chemical, physical and biological properties of pristine and modified nylon surfaces were assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectra, atomic force microscope, water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma recalcification time (PRT) determinations, etc. The results, including the significant decrease of proteins adsorption and platelets adhesion, as well as prolonged PRTs demonstrated the extraordinary biocompatibility and blood compatibility of the modified surface. Furthermore, we showed that upon immobilization of anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (anti-EpCAM) antibody onto the CBMA moiety, the modified nylon surface can selectively capture EpCAM positive tumor cells from blood with high efficiency, indicating the potential of the modified nylon in the manufacture of convenient interventional CTC capture medical devices.

  16. Oligomer formation of tau protein hyperphosphorylated in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-12-05

    Abnormal phosphorylation ("hyperphosphorylation") and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Oligomer Formation of Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylated in Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation (“hyperphosphorylation”) and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. PMID:25339173

  18. HAMLET forms annular oligomers when deposited with phospholipid monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Anne; Gjerde, Anja Underhaug; Ying, Ming; Svanborg, Catharina; Holmsen, Holm; Glomm, Wilhelm R; Martinez, Aurora; Halskau, Oyvind

    2012-04-20

    Recently, the anticancer activity of human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) has been linked to its increased membrane affinity in vitro, at neutral pH, and ability to cause leakage relative to the inactive native bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA) protein. In this study, atomic force microscopy resolved membrane distortions and annular oligomers (AOs) produced by HAMLET when deposited at neutral pH on mica together with a negatively charged lipid monolayer. BLA, BAMLET (HAMLET's bovine counterpart) and membrane-binding Peptide C, corresponding to BLA residues 75-100, also form AO-like structures under these conditions but at higher subphase concentrations than HAMLET. The N-terminal Peptide A, which binds to membranes at acidic but not at neutral pH, did not form AOs. This suggests a correlation between the capacity of the proteins/peptides to integrate into the membrane at neutral pH-as observed by liposome content leakage and circular dichroism experiments-and the formation of AOs, albeit at higher concentrations. Formation of AOs, which might be important to HAMLET's tumor toxic action, appears related to the increased tendency of the protein to populate intermediately folded states compared to the native protein, the formation of which is promoted by, but not uniquely dependent on, the oleic acid molecules associated with HAMLET. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  20. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  1. Unique copper-induced oligomers mediate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Josephine A; Wang, Xiaoyan; Brown, David R

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson's disease and a number of other neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to either genetic mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene or show evidence of aggregates of the alpha-synuclein protein, sometimes in the form of Lewy bodies. There currently is no clear evidence of a distinct neurotoxic species of alpha-synuclein to explain the death of neurons in these diseases. We undertook to assess the toxicity of alpha-synuclein via exogenous application in cell culture. Initially, we showed that only aggregated alpha-synuclein is neurotoxic and requires the presence copper but not iron. Other members of the synuclein family showed no toxicity in any form and inherited point mutations did not alter the effective toxic concentration of alpha-synuclein. Through protein fractionation techniques, we were able to isolate an oligomeric species responsible for the toxicity of alpha-synuclein. This oligomeric species has a unique stellate appearance under EM and again, requires association with copper to induce cell death. The results allow us to suggest that the toxic species of alpha-synuclein in vivo could possibly be these stellate oligomers and not fibrils. Our data provide a link between the recently noted association of copper and alpha-synuclein and a potential role for the combination in causing neurodegeneration.

  2. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, Nicolas; Spriet, Corentin; Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  3. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  4. Substituent effects on non-covalent interactions with aromatic rings: insights from computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Rajesh K; Bloom, Jacob W G; An, Yi; Wheeler, Steven E

    2011-12-09

    Non-covalent interactions with aromatic rings pervade modern chemical research. The strength and orientation of these interactions can be tuned and controlled through substituent effects. Computational studies of model complexes have provided a detailed understanding of the origin and nature of these substituent effects, and pinpointed flaws in entrenched models of these interactions in the literature. Here, we provide a brief review of efforts over the last decade to unravel the origin of substituent effects in π-stacking, XH/π, and ion/π interactions through detailed computational studies. We highlight recent progress that has been made, while also uncovering areas where future studies are warranted.

  5. Construction of a novel chimera consisting of a chelator-containing Tat peptide conjugated to a morpholino antisense oligomer for technetium-99m labeling and accelerating cellular kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yumin [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)]. E-mail: yumin.zhang@mpi.com; Tung, C.-H. [Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); He Jiang [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Liu Ning [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Yanachkov, Ivan [GlSynthesis, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Liu Guozheng [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Rusckowski, Mary [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The attempt to target the limited copies of messenger RNA (mRNA) in vivo with radiolabeled nucleobase oligomers as antisense probes is challenging. Selecting an antisense molecule with superior properties, enhancing the cellular kinetics, and improving the radiolabeling chemistry would be the reasonable approach to accomplish this goal. The present study reports a method to construct a chimera of phosphorodiamidate morpholino nucleobase oligomer (MORF) covalently conjugated to a peptide containing a cell membrane transduction Tat peptide and an N{sub 2}S{sub 2} chelator for technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) radiolabeling (N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF). The radiolabeling properties and cellular kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF were measured. As hypothesized, the preparation of {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF could be achieved by an instant one-step method with labeling efficiency greater than 95%, and the {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF showed distinct properties in cell culture from those of a control, the same MORF sequence without Tat but with mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG{sub 3}) as chelator for {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-MORF). {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF achieved maximum accumulation of about 35% within 2 h, while {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-MORF showed lower and steadily increasing accumulations but of less than 1% in 24 h. These preliminary results demonstrated that the proposed chimera has properties for easy labeling, and {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat-MORF prepared by this method possesses enhanced cellular kinetics and merits further investigation for in vivo mRNA targeting.

  6. Soluble Oligomers of the Pore-forming Toxin Cytolysin A from Escherichia coli Are Off-pathway Products of Pore Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderer, Daniel; Benke, Stephan; Schuler, Benjamin; Glockshuber, Rudi

    2016-03-11

    The α-pore-forming toxin Cytolysin A (ClyA) is responsible for the hemolytic activity of various Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains. Soluble ClyA monomers spontaneously assemble into annular dodecameric pore complexes upon contact with membranes or detergent. At ClyA monomer concentrations above ∼100 nm, the rate-limiting step in detergent- or membrane- induced pore assembly is the unimolecular reaction from the monomer to the assembly-competent protomer, which then oligomerizes rapidly to active pore complexes. In the absence of detergent, ClyA slowly forms soluble oligomers. Here we show that soluble ClyA oligomers cannot form dodecameric pore complexes after the addition of detergent and are hemolytically inactive. In addition, we demonstrate that the natural cysteine pair Cys-87/Cys-285 of ClyA forms a disulfide bond under oxidizing conditions and that both the oxidized and reduced ClyA monomers assemble to active pores via the same pathway in the presence of detergent, in which an unstructured, monomeric intermediate is transiently populated. The results show that the oxidized ClyA monomer assembles to pore complexes about one order of magnitude faster than the reduced monomer because the unstructured intermediate of oxidized ClyA is less stable and dissolves more rapidly than the reduced intermediate. Moreover, we show that oxidized ClyA forms soluble, inactive oligomers in the absence of detergent much faster than the reduced monomer, providing an explanation for several contradictory reports in which oxidized ClyA had been described as inactive.

  7. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer(TTF·+-TTF·+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π /π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π /π bonding has the bonding energy of about -21 kcal·mol-1 and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·+ subunit,i.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  8. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FangFang; WANG Yi; WANG BingQiang; WANG YinFeng; MA Fang; Li ZhiRu

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer (TTF·~+-TTF·~+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π/π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π/π bonding has the bonding energy of about-21 kcal·mol~(-1) and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·~+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·~+ subunit,I.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  9. A comparison of covalent and non-covalent imprinting strategies for the synthesis of stigmasterol imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Shima N N S; Boysen, Reinhard I; Schwarz, Lachlan J; Danylec, Basil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-09-12

    Non-covalent and covalent imprinting strategies have been investigated for the synthesis of stigmasterol imprinted polymers. The synthesized molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were then evaluated for their recognition and selectivity towards stigmasterol via static and dynamic batch-binding assays and their performance measured against control non-imprinted polymers (NIPs). MIPs prepared using the conventional non-covalent imprinting method displayed little to no binding affinity for stigmasterol under various conditions. In contrast, the application of a covalent imprinting approach using the novel post-synthetically cleavable monomer-template composite stigmasteryl-3-O-methacrylate resulted in the fabrication of a MIP that successfully recognized stigmasterol in both organic and partially aqueous environments. The affinity and selectivity of the covalently prepared MIP was enhanced when undertaken in a partially aqueous environment consisting of an acetonitrile/water (9:1, v/v) solvent mixture. These features have been exploited in a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) format, wherein the preferential retention of stigmasterol (with an imprint factor of 12) was demonstrated with 99% recovery in comparison to cholesterol (imprint factor of 6) and ergosterol (imprint factor of 4) while in the presence of several closely related steryl analogues.

  10. Perfluorinated poly(dimethylsiloxane) via the covalent attachment of perfluoroalkylsilanes on the oxidized surface: Effects on zeta-potential values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peiling; Horton, J. Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is a widely-used polymer in microfluidic devices due to its range of physical and chemical properties suitable for molding micron-sized features. However, its hydrophobicity also leads to some limitations: it poorly supports electro-osmotic flow, and can be incompatible with biomolecules and with many organic solvents. Surface modification is commonly used to vary PDMS surface properties to make it more suitable for specific microfluidic applications. Here, we report on the surface modification of PDMS using perfluoroalkane-triethoxysilanes, via the covalent attachment of triethoxysilane groups on plasma-oxidized PDMS. A device constructed from such fluorinated materials could be used for separating fluorous-tagged proteins or peptides. Modified PDMS were characterized using a range of surface analytical methods. In particular, zeta- (ζ-) potential values at the interfaces of both modified and unmodified PDMS and under varying pH conditions were measured, as ζ-potential is an essential parameter to support electroosmotic flow (EOF), a common pumping method in microfluidic devices. The results showed the length of fluorinated alkane chain has significant effect on the density of surface modifying species and topography following modification. In addition, the perfluorinated modification increases the magnitude of the ζ-potential at the PDMS interface when compared to that of native PDMS, increasing the electro-osmotic flow rate, over a wide pH range. The modified surface is resistant to the diffusion of PDMS oligomers that affects other PDMS surface modification processes.

  11. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengl, Stefan; Hoffmann, Eike; Grote, Michael; Wagner, Cornelia; Mundigl, Olaf; Georges, Guy; Thorey, Irmgard; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Bujotzek, Alexander; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Benz, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Humanized hapten-binding IgGs were designed with an accessible cysteine close to their binding pockets, for specific covalent payload attachment. Individual analyses of known structures of digoxigenin (Dig)- and fluorescein (Fluo) binding antibodies and a new structure of a biotin (Biot)-binder, revealed a “universal” coupling position (52+2) in proximity to binding pockets but without contributing to hapten interactions. Payloads that carry a free thiol are positioned on the antibody and covalently linked to it via disulfides. Covalent coupling is achieved and driven toward complete (95–100%) payload occupancy by spontaneous redox shuffling between antibody and payload. Attachment at the universal position works with different haptens, antibodies, and payloads. Examples are the haptens Fluo, Dig, and Biot combined with various fluorescent or peptidic payloads. Disulfide-bonded covalent antibody-payload complexes do not dissociate in vitro and in vivo. Coupling requires the designed cysteine and matching payload thiol because payload or antibody without the Cys/thiol are not linked (<5% nonspecific coupling). Hapten-mediated positioning is necessary as hapten-thiol-payload is only coupled to antibodies that bind matching haptens. Covalent complexes are more stable in vivo than noncovalent counterparts because digoxigeninylated or biotinylated fluorescent payloads without disulfide-linkage are cleared more rapidly in mice (approximately 50% reduced 48 hour serum levels) compared with their covalently linked counterparts. The coupling technology is applicable to many haptens and hapten binding antibodies (confirmed by automated analyses of the structures of 140 additional hapten binding antibodies) and can be applied to modulate the pharmacokinetics of small compounds or peptides. It is also suitable to link payloads in a reduction-releasable manner to tumor- or tissue-targeting delivery vehicles.—Dengl, S., Hoffmann, E., Grote, M., Wagner, C., Mundigl, O

  12. Self-propagative replication of Aβ oligomers suggests potential transmissibility in Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    Full Text Available The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptide and its deposition in parts of the brain form the central processes in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD. The low-molecular weight oligomers of Aβ aggregates (2 to 30 mers are known to be the primary neurotoxic agents whose mechanisms of cellular toxicity and synaptic dysfunction have received substantial attention in the recent years. However, how these toxic agents proliferate and induce widespread amyloid deposition throughout the brain, and what mechanism is involved in the amplification and propagation of toxic oligomer species, are far from clear. Emerging evidence based on transgenic mice models indicates a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates and implicates a prion-like mechanism of oligomer propagation, which manifests as the dissemination and proliferation of Aβ toxicity. Despite accumulating evidence in support of a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates, a clear, molecular-level understanding of this intriguing mechanism is lacking. Recently, we reported the characterization of unique replicating oligomers of Aβ42 (12-24 mers in vitro called Large Fatty Acid-derived Oligomers (LFAOs (Kumar et al., 2012, J. Biol. Chem. In the current report, we establish that LFAOs possess physiological activity by activating NF-κB in human neuroblastoma cells, and determine the experimental parameters that control the efficiency of LFAO replication by self-propagation. These findings constitute the first detailed report on monomer - oligomer lateral propagation reactions that may constitute potential mechanism governing transmissibility among Aβ oligomers. These data support the previous reports on transmissible mechanisms observed in transgenic animal models.

  13. Solvent free low-melt viscosity imide oligomers and thermosetting polymide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    .[.This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280.degree. C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371.degree. C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) equal to and above 310.degree. C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280.degree. C. (450-535.degree. F.) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343.degree. C. (550-650.degree. F.) high temperature performance capability..]. .Iadd.This invention relates to compositions and a solvent-free reaction process for preparing imide oligomers and polymers specifically derived from effective amounts of dianhydrides such as 2,3,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic polyamine and an end-cap such as 4-phenylethynyphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260.degree. C.-280.degree. C..Iaddend.

  14. Self-assembly of conjugated oligomers and polymers at the interface: structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lirong; Yang, Liu; Lei, Shengbin

    2012-08-01

    In this review, we give a brief account on the recent scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of interfacial structures and properties of π-conjugated semiconducting oligomers and polymers, either at the solid-air (including solid-vacuum) or at the solid-liquid interface. The structural aspects of the self-assembly of both oligomers and polymers are highlighted. Conjugated oligomers can form well ordered supramolecular assemblies either at the air-solid or liquid-solid interface, thanks to the relatively high mobility and structural uniformity in comparison with polymers. The backbone structure, substitution of side chains and functional groups can affect the assembling behavior significantly, which offers the opportunity to tune the supramolecular structure of these conjugated oligomers at the interface. For conjugated polymers, the large molecular weight limits the mobility on the surface and the distribution in size also prevents the formation of long range ordered supramolecular assembly. The submolecular resolution obtained on the assembling monolayers enables a detailed investigation of the chain folding at the interface, both the structural details and the effect on electronic properties. Besides the ability in studying the assembling structures at the interfaces, STM also provides a reasonable way to evaluate the distribution of the molecular weight of conjugated polymers by statistic of the contour length of the adsorbed polymer chains. Both conjugated oligomers and polymers can form composite assemblies with other materials. The ordered assembly of oligomers can act as a template to controllably disperse other molecules such as coronene or fullerene. These investigations open a new avenue to fine tune the assembling structure at the interface and in turn the properties of the composite materials. To summarize scanning tunneling microscopy has demonstrated its surprising ability in the investigation of the assembling structures and properties of

  15. Interactions of vanadate oligomers with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M; Mdeira, V M

    1994-04-28

    Upon addition of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the line width of tetrameric vanadate signal of 51V-NMR spectra narrowed in the presence of ATP and Ca2+, whereas monomeric vanadate line widths were broadened. Thus, ATP decreases the affinity of the enzyme for tetravanadate whereas it induces the interaction with monomeric vanadate. In the presence of Ca2+ it was observed that tetrameric and decameric vanadate bind to SR ATPase whereas monomeric vanadate only binds to SR when ATP is present. However, decameric vanadate clearly differs from vanadate oligomers present in monovanadate solutions in preventing the accumulation of Ca2+ by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Mg2+ increased the inhibitory effect promoted by decavanadate whereas a slight enhancement of Ca2+ uptake was observed in the presence of monovanadate. For 5 mM Mg2+, a nominal 2 mM vanadium 'decavanadate' solution containing about 190 to 200 microM decameric and less than 100 microM monomeric species depressed the rate of Ca2+ uptake by 50% whereas a nominal 2 mM monovanadate solution containing about 662 microM monomeric, 143 microM dimeric and 252 microM tetrameric species had no effect on the rate of Ca2+ accumulation. However, 2 mM 'decavanadate' inhibits by 75% the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity whereas the presence of 2 mM 'monovanadate' produces an inhibitory effect below 50%. Therefore, the Ca:ATP stoichiometry of Ca2+ transport is enhanced by monovanadate. In the presence of oxalate, inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by these solutions is enhanced to 97% and 86% whereas in the presence of the ionophore lasalocid, the inhibitory values were 87% and 19% for 2 mM decavanadate and 2 mM monovanadate solutions, respectively. Apparently, the increase of vesicular Ca2+ concentration counteracts monovanadate inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity but it does not significantly affect decavanadate inhibition.

  16. CHIRAL CONJUGATED OLIGOMER BASED ON 1,1'-BINOL WITH 3,3'-ACETYLENE-PHENYLENE-ACETYLENE SPACER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-jun Liu; Ke-shen Zhang; Yong-jun Chen; Dong Wang; Chao-jun Li

    2001-01-01

    The 1,1'-binaphthol based oligomers 3 and 7 with 3,3'-acetylene-phenylene-acetylene spacer were prepared from BINOL 1. The high optical rotation value and CD spectra demonstrated the main chain chirality of the oligomer molecule. The UV-VIS and fluorescent spectra evidence the characteristics of conjugated structure. In comparison with oligomer 2 bearing 3,3'-acetylene spacer, the oligomers 3 and 7 have longer efficient conjugation segment, and their fluorescent quantum yields (φ) increased (0.60-0.65 versus 0.14). Extending the effective conjugation segment would improve the photophysical properties of chiral conjugated polymers.``

  17. Repeatable mechanochemical activation of dynamic covalent bonds in thermoplastic elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imato, Keiichi; Kanehara, Takeshi; Nojima, Shiki; Ohishi, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Yuji; Takahara, Atsushi; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-18

    Repeated mechanical scission and recombination of dynamic covalent bonds incorporated in segmented polyurethane elastomers are demonstrated by utilizing a diarylbibenzofuranone-based mechanophore and by the design of the segmented polymer structures. The repeated mechanochemical reactions can accompany clear colouration and simultaneous fading.

  18. From covalent glycosidase inhibitors to activity-based glycosidase probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Lianne I.; Jiang, Jianbing; Li, Kah-Yee; Witte, Martin D.; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Beenakker, Thomas J. N.; Schroeder, Sybrin P.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Codee, Jeroen D. C.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.

    2014-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling has emerged as a powerful discovery tool in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research. Success of activity-based protein profiling hinges on the presence of compounds that can covalently and irreversibly bind to enzymes, do so selectively in the context of co

  19. Covalent Attachment of 1-Alkenes to Oxidized Platinum Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso Carnicero, J.M.; Fabre, B.; Trilling, A.K.; Scheres, L.M.W.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray

  20. Hybridization characteristics of biomolecular adaptors, covalent DNA streptavidin conjugates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeyer, CM; Burger, W; Hoedemakers, RMJ

    1998-01-01

    Semisynthetic, covalent streptavidin-DNA adducts are versatile molecular connectors for the fabrication of both nano-and microstructured protein arrays by use of DNA hybridization. In this study, the hybridization characteristics of six adduct species, each containing a different DNA sequence of 21

  1. Covalent binding of the flavonoid quercetin to human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaldas, M.I.; Walle, U.K.; Woude, van der H.; McMillan, J.M.; Walle, T.

    2005-01-01

    Quercetin is an abundant flavonoid in the human diet with numerous biological activities, which may contribute to the prevention of human disease but also may be potentially harmful. Quercetin is oxidized in cells to products capable of covalently binding to cellular proteins, a process that may be

  2. Construction of covalently coupled, concatameric dimers of 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager, Marie; Scholl, D Jason; Kubale, Valentina;

    2009-01-01

    -Ala repeats flanked by flexible spacers and positively charged residues to ensure correct inside-out orientation plus an extracellular HA-tag to construct covalently coupled dimers of 7TM receptors. Such 15 TM concatameric homo- and heterodimers of the beta(2)-adrenergic and the NK(1) receptors, which...

  3. Differences in the mannose oligomer specificities of the closely related lectins from Galanthus nivalis and Zea mays strongly determine their eventual anti-HIV activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouquaert Elke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent report, the carbohydrate-binding specificities of the plant lectins Galanthus nivalis (GNA and the closely related lectin from Zea mays (GNAmaize were determined by glycan array analysis and indicated that GNAmaize recognizes complex-type N-glycans whereas GNA has specificity towards high-mannose-type glycans. Both lectins are tetrameric proteins sharing 64% sequence similarity. Results GNAmaize appeared to be ~20- to 100-fold less inhibitory than GNA against HIV infection, syncytia formation between persistently HIV-1-infected HuT-78 cells and uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte SupT1 cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and subsequent transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virions to uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte cells. In contrast to GNA, which preferentially selects for virus strains with deleted high-mannose-type glycans on gp120, prolonged exposure of HIV-1 to dose-escalating concentrations of GNAmaize selected for mutant virus strains in which one complex-type glycan of gp120 was deleted. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR analysis revealed that GNA and GNAmaize interact with HIV IIIB gp120 with affinity constants (KD of 0.33 nM and 34 nM, respectively. Whereas immobilized GNA specifically binds mannose oligomers, GNAmaize selectively binds complex-type GlcNAcβ1,2Man oligomers. Also, epitope mapping experiments revealed that GNA and the mannose-specific mAb 2G12 can independently bind from GNAmaize to gp120, whereas GNAmaize cannot efficiently bind to gp120 that contained prebound PHA-E (GlcNAcβ1,2man specific or SNA (NeuAcα2,6X specific. Conclusion The markedly reduced anti-HIV activity of GNAmaize compared to GNA can be explained by the profound shift in glycan recognition and the disappearance of carbohydrate-binding sites in GNAmaize that have high affinity for mannose oligomers. These findings underscore the need for mannose oligomer recognition of therapeutics to be endowed with anti-HIV activity and that mannose, but

  4. Chemoselective small molecules that covalently modify one lysine in a non-enzyme protein in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Connelly, Stephen; Reixach, Natàlia; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-02-19

    A small molecule that could bind selectively to and then react chemoselectively with a non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid, such as blood, could have numerous practical applications. Herein, we report a family of designed stilbenes that selectively and covalently modify the prominent plasma protein transthyretin in preference to more than 4,000 other human plasma proteins. They react chemoselectively with only one of eight lysine {epsilon}-amino groups within transthyretin. The crystal structure confirms the expected binding orientation of the stilbene substructure and the anticipated conjugating amide bond. These covalent transthyretin kinetic stabilizers exhibit superior amyloid inhibition potency compared to their noncovalent counterparts, and they prevent cytotoxicity associated with amyloidogenesis. Though there are a few prodrugs that, upon metabolic activation, react with a cysteine residue inactivating a specific non-enzyme, we are unaware of designed small molecules that react with one lysine {epsilon}-amine within a specific non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid.

  5. Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

    2011-07-06

    Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

  6. Synthesis of poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer using 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate for UV curable coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M N; Oh, S W; Ahn, B H; Moon, M J; Kang, Y S

    2009-02-01

    The poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer was obtained by the reaction of methyl acrylate oligomer and 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate. Synthesis of poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer was done with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-MEOH), methyl acrylate, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, initiator) and dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst. Then 2-MEOH was used for functional chain transfer agent. The structure and property of the synthesized oligomers were characterized by FT-IR, FT-NMR, rheometer, and DSC. In this study, by synthetic method including the addition of 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate, thermal behavior of synthesized material was improved more than that reported in the previous study. Poly(methyl urethane) oligomer can be used for UV curable coatings, inks and adhesives. UV curable coating have high resistance against weather, ozone, aging, frictional wear, and heat. Besides they can absorb the shock and resist rust according to the thickness of film. It is used as an adhesive, paint, optical fiber coating agent, and waterproof agent because of these advantages at the present time.

  7. Mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies Abeta oligomers neurotoxicity providing an unexpected mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sanz-Blasco

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid beta peptide (Abeta toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Abeta(1-42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Abeta fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca(2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Abeta oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Abeta oligomers. Our results indicate that i mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers and ii inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Abeta oligomers and AD.

  8. Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric; Breckenridge, Leigham; McMahon, Lloyd; Som, Sreemoyee; McConnell, Ian; Bloom, George S

    2017-01-01

    Aggregates composed of the microtubule associated protein, tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's tauopathies. Extracellular tau can induce the accumulation and aggregation of intracellular tau, and tau pathology can be transmitted along neural networks over time. There are six splice variants of central nervous system tau, and various oligomeric and fibrillar forms are associated with neurodegeneration in vivo. The particular extracellular forms of tau capable of transferring tau pathology from neuron to neuron remain ill defined, however, as do the consequences of intracellular tau aggregation on neuronal physiology. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of extracellular tau monomers, oligomers, and filaments comprising various tau isoforms on the behavior of cultured neurons. We found that 2N4R or 2N3R tau oligomers provoked aggregation of endogenous intracellular tau much more effectively than monomers or fibrils, or of oligomers made from other tau isoforms, and that a mixture of all six isoforms most potently provoked intracellular tau accumulation. These effects were associated with invasion of tau into the somatodendritic compartment. Finally, we observed that 2N4R oligomers perturbed fast axonal transport of membranous organelles along microtubules. Intracellular tau accumulation was often accompanied by increases in the run length, run time and instantaneous velocity of membranous cargo. This work indicates that extracellular tau oligomers can disrupt normal neuronal homeostasis by triggering axonal tau accumulation and loss of the polarized distribution of tau, and by impairing fast axonal transport.

  9. Effect of pathogenic mutations on the structure and dynamics of Alzheimer's A beta 42-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassler, Kristin; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that soluble A beta-amyloid oligomers play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and present direct effectors of synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Three pathological E22-A beta-amyloid point mutants (E22G, E22K, E22Q) and the deletion mutant E22 Delta exhibit an enhanced tendency to form prefibrillar aggregates. The present study assessed the effect of these four mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent structural and energetic analyses. Our data shows that E22 plays a unique role in wild type A beta, since it has a destabilising effect on the oligomer structure due to electrostatic repulsion between adjacent E22 side chains. Mutations in which E22 is replaced by an uncharged residue result in higher oligomer stability. This effect is also observed to a lesser extent for the E22K mutation and is consistent with its lower pathogenicity compared to other mutants. Interestingly, deletion of E22 does not destroy the amyloid fold but is compensated by local changes in the backbone geometry that allow the preservation of a structurally important salt bridge. The finding that all mutant oligomers investigated exhibit higher internal stability than the wild type offers an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced oligomer formation and stability.

  10. Migration of oligomers from PET: determination of diffusion coefficients and comparison of experimental versus modelled migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Maria; Fornari, Roberta; de Voogt, Pim; Franz, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is increasingly used as food-contact material in, for example, containers for beverage such as bottles for soft drinks, mineral water, juices and beer. Mass transport of substances present in packaging materials into the packed food and beverages is monitored to verify the food law compliance of the materials. PET is known to contain or give rise to migrants that are oligomers derived from the polymeric material. Until now their actual migration potential has been investigated only poorly. A convenient way to determine their migration would be by using models. To verify existing models with experimental data, a migration kinetic study of PET oligomers was conducted. PET bottle material was submerged in 50% ethanol at 80°C for 15 h. The oligomer content in the migration solutions was determined every hour using LC-MS with the first-series cyclic PET trimer as standard. Diffusion coefficients of five PET oligomers (first-series dimer and trimer, second-series dimer and trimer, and third-series dimer) were calculated from the obtained data and compared with the calculated diffusion coefficients using the models of Welle and Piringer. This is the first study to provide diffusion characteristics of oligomers in PET other than the first-series cyclic trimer.

  11. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Overload Underlies Aβ Oligomers Neurotoxicity Providing an Unexpected Mechanism of Neuroprotection by NSAIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Valero, Ruth A.; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Aβ1–42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Aβ fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Aβ oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Aβ oligomers. Our results indicate that i) mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Aβ oligomers and ii) inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Aβ oligomers and AD. PMID:18648507

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Hispidin Oligomers from Medicinal Fungi: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hassane Anouar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hispidin oligomers are styrylpyrone pigments isolated from the medicinal fungi Inonotus xeranticus and Phellinus linteus. They exhibit diverse biological activities and strong free radical scavenging activity. To rationalize the antioxidant activity of a series of four hispidin oligomers and determine the favored mechanism involved in free radical scavenging, DFT calculations were carried out at the B3P86/6-31+G (d, p level of theory in gas and solvent. The results showed that bond dissociation enthalpies of OH groups of hispidin oligomers (ArOH and spin density delocalization of related radicals (ArO• are the appropriate parameters to clarify the differences between the observed antioxidant activities for the four oligomers. The effect of the number of hydroxyl groups and presence of a catechol moiety conjugated to a double bond on the antioxidant activity were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies showed that the PC-ET mechanism is the main mechanism involved in free radical scavenging. The spin density distribution over phenoxyl radicals allows a better understanding of the hispidin oligomers formation.

  13. Solvent Free Low-Melt Viscosity Imide Oligomers And Thermosetting Polyimide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, CHun-Hua (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine' and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280" C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371 C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T(sub g)) equal to and above 310 C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280 C. (450-535 F) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343C (550-650 F) high temperature performance capability.

  14. Thin films of arylenevinylene oligomers prepared by MAPLE for applications in non-linear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanculescu, A., E-mail: sanca@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Vacareanu, L.; Grigoras, M. [P. Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Socol, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Socol, G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Str. Atomistilor, Nr. 409, P.O. Box MG-36, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Stanculescu, F. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Str. Atomistilor nr.405, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Preda, N.; Matei, E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Ionita, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Str. Atomistilor nr.405, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Girtan, M. [Laboratoire de Photonique d' Angers, Universite d' Angers, 2, Bd. Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Str. Atomistilor, Nr. 409, P.O. Box MG-36, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses two arylenevinylene oligomers with optical nonlinear properties. Their trans molecular structure was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Second Harmonic Generation and two-photon fluorescence have been observed on Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation-deposited thin films. We have seen two local maxima in UV-Vis spectra and a red shift of the photoluminescence peak for carbazole-based oligomer, which can be correlated with a higher conformational flexibility and with strong polarization interactions in the solid state. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy images have revealed a grainy morphology of the film deposited on titanium and a higher roughness for carbazole-based oligomer. Second harmonic measurements have shown nearly equal values of the second-order nonlinear optical coefficient for the triphenylamine and carbazole-based oligomers for P{sub laser} < 100 mW. z-Scan and x-scan representations of the carbazole-based oligomer film have shown strong two-photon fluorescence intensity inside the sample confirming a volume process, and a strong second harmonic at the surface of the sample determined by the surface morphology.

  15. Determination of the critical molar mass of ovalbumin oligomers degraded by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRATOLJUB H. MILOSAVLJEVIC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental method has been developed which enables the determination of the critical molar mass (Mmc of ovalbumin oligomers degraded by ultrasound of known frequency. To test the validity of the Mmc postulate, a series of ovalbumin oligomers was prepared by the radiolytic cross-linking of 1% solutions of ovalbumin monomer dissolved in 50 mM Na/K-phosphate buffer pH 7.0 saturated with N2O. Under these conditions, irradiation with 5 kGy from a 60Co source, yielded ovalbumin dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher order oligomers. On the basis of the results obtained with the ovalbumin oligomers, it was concluded that for ultrasound of 23 kHz frequency and 5mm amplitude, the Mmc was 274000 + 14000 g/mol. Our results confirmed that the two postulates in the chemistry of polymer degradation by ultrasound are valid when ovalbumin oligomers are used as substrates, i.e., (1 that the higher the molar mass of the original macromolecule, the faster is its degradation rate, and (2 that a lower molar mass limit (LMmL exists below which the macromolecules are resistent to further degradation.

  16. DNA visualization in single molecule studies carried out with optical tweezers: Covalent versus non-covalent attachment of fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suei, Sandy; Raudsepp, Allan; Kent, Lisa M; Keen, Stephen A J; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Williams, Martin A K

    2015-10-16

    In this study, we investigated the use of the covalent attachment of fluorescent dyes to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) stretched between particles using optical tweezers (OT) and compared the mechanical properties of the covalently-functionalized chain to that of unmodified DNA and to DNA bound to a previously uncharacterized groove-binder, SYBR-gold. Modified DNA species were obtained by covalently linking azide-functionalized organic fluorophores onto the backbone of DNA chains via the alkyne moieties of modified bases that were incorporated during PCR. These DNA molecules were then constructed into dumbbells by attaching polystyrene particles to the respective chain ends via biotin or digoxigenin handles that had been pre-attached to the PCR primers which formed the ends of the synthesized molecule. Using the optical tweezers, the DNA was stretched by separating the two optically trapped polystyrene particles. Displacements of the particles were measured in 3D using an interpolation-based normalized cross-correlation method and force-extension curves were calculated and fitted to the worm-like chain model to parameterize the mechanical properties of the DNA. Results showed that both the contour and persistence length of the covalently-modified dsDNAs were indistinguishable from that of the unmodified dsDNA, whereas SYBR-gold binding perturbed the contour length of the chain in a force-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A new source of oxygenated organic aerosol and oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large oxygenated organic uptake to aerosols was observed when exposing ambient urban air to inorganic acidic and non-acidic sulfate seed aerosol. For non-acidic seed aerosol the uptake was attributed to the direct dissolution of primary vehicle exhaust gases into the aqueous aerosol fraction, and was correlated to the initial seed sulphate mass. The uptake of primary oxygenated organic gases to aerosols in this study represents a significant amount of organic aerosol (OA that may be considered primary when compared to that reported for primary organic aerosol (POA, but is considerably more oxygenated (O : C ~ 0.3 than traditional POA. Consequently, a fraction of measured ambient oxygenated OA, which correlates with secondary sulphate, may in fact be of a primary, rather than secondary source. These results represent a new source of oxygenated OA on neutral aerosol and imply that the uptake of primary organic gases will occur in the ambient atmosphere, under dilute conditions, and in the presence of pre-existing SO4 aerosols which contain water. Conversely, under acidic seed aerosol conditions, oligomer formation was observed with the uptake of organics being enhanced by a factor of three or more compared to neutral aerosols, and in less than 2 min, representing an additional source of SOA to the atmosphere. This resulted in a trajectory in Van Krevelen space towards higher O : C (slope ~ −1.5, despite a lack of continual gas-phase oxidation in this closed system. The results demonstrate that high molecular weight species will form on acidic aerosols at the ambient level and mixture of organic gases, but are otherwise unaffected by subsequent aerosol neutralization, and that aerosol acidity will affect the organic O : C via aerosol-phase reactions. These two processes, forming oxygenated POA under neutral conditions and SOA under acidic conditions can contribute to the total ambient OA mass and the evolution of ambient aerosol O : C ratios

  18. Differential transendothelial transport of adiponectin complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Adiponectin’s effects on systemic physiology and cell-specific responses are well-defined, but little is known about how this insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory adipokine reaches its target cells. All molecules face active and passive transport limitations, but adiponectin is particularly noteworthy due to the diverse size range and high molecular weights of its oligomers. Additionally, its metabolic target organs possess a range of endothelial permeability. Methods Full-length recombinant murine adiponectin was produced and oligomer fractions isolated by gel filtration. Adiponectin complex sizes were measured by dynamic light scattering to determine Stokes radii. Transendothelial transport of purified oligomers was quantitatively assessed under a number of different conditions in vitro using murine endothelial cells and in vivo using several mouse models of altered endothelial function. Results Adiponectin oligomers exhibit large transport radii that limit transendothelial transport. Oligomerization is a significant determinant of flux across endothelial monolayers in vitro; low molecular weight adiponectin is preferentially transported. In vivo sampled sera from the heart, liver, and tail vein demonstrated significantly different complex distribution of lower molecular weight oligomers. Pharmacological interventions, such as PPARγ agonist treatment, differentially affect adiponectin plasma clearance and tissue uptake. Exercise induces enhanced adiponectin uptake to oxidative skeletal muscles, wherein adiponectin potently lowers ceramide levels. In total, endothelial barriers control adiponectin transport in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. Conclusions Adiponectin oligomer efficacy in a given tissue may therefore be endothelial transport mediated. Targeting endothelial dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome through exercise and pharmaceuticals may afford an effective approach to increasing adiponectin’s beneficial effects. PMID:24552349

  19. Stress relaxation following uniaxial extension of polystyrene melt and oligomer dilutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2016-01-01

    The filament stretching rheometer has been used to measure the stress relaxation following the startup of uniaxial extensional flow, on anarrow molar mass distribution (NMMD) polystyrene melt and styrene oligomer dilutions thereof. All samples used here were characterizedin molecular weight......, mechanical spectroscopy, and constant strain rate uniaxial extension in the work of Huang et al. [Macromolecules 46,5026–5035 (2013); ACS Macro Lett. 2, 741–744 (2013)]. The stress relaxation following the steady extensional stress was measured on a285 kg/mole NMMD polystyrene and two 1.92 kg/mole styrene...... oligomer dilutions thereof {PS-285k, PS-285k/2k-72, and PS-285k/2k-44 inthe work of Huang et al. [Macromolecules 46, 5026–5035 (2013)]}. The two dilutions contained 28 and 56 wt. % oligomer, respectively.Further, the stress relaxation on a 545 kg/mole NMMD polystyrene diluted with 48 wt. % 0.972 kg...

  20. Detection of Misfolded Aβ Oligomers for Sensitive Biochemical Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Salvadores

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD diagnosis is hampered by the lack of early, sensitive, and objective laboratory tests. We describe a sensitive method for biochemical diagnosis of AD based on specific detection of misfolded Aβ oligomers, which play a central role in AD pathogenesis. The protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay (Aβ-PMCA, exploits the functional property of Aβ oligomers to seed the polymerization of monomeric Aβ. Aβ-PMCA allowed detection of as little as 3 fmol of Aβ oligomers. Most importantly, using cerebrospinal fluid, we were able to distinguish AD patients from control individuals affected by a variety of other neurodegenerative disorders or nondegenerative neurological diseases with overall sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 92%. These findings provide the proof-of-principle basis for developing a highly sensitive and specific biochemical test for AD diagnosis.

  1. A mechanistic model of tau amyloid aggregation based on direct observation of oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Sarah L.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Kumar, Satish; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Shivji, Nadia; Mandelkow, Eva; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Klenerman, David

    2015-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a key role in neurodegenerative disease, giving rise to small oligomers that may become cytotoxic to cells. The fundamental microscopic reactions taking place during aggregation, and their rate constants, have been difficult to determine due to lack of suitable methods to identify and follow the low concentration of oligomers over time. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence to study the aggregation of the repeat domain of tau (K18), and two mutant forms linked with familial frontotemporal dementia, the deletion mutant ΔK280 and the point mutant P301L. Our kinetic analysis reveals that aggregation proceeds via monomeric assembly into small oligomers, and a subsequent slow structural conversion step before fibril formation. Using this approach, we have been able to quantitatively determine how these mutations alter the aggregation energy landscape.

  2. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Novel Multi-branched Oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jing Gong; Ying-hui Wang; Zhi-hui Kang; Tian-hao Huang; Ran Lu; Han-zhuang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fluorene-vinylene unit dependent photo-physical properties of multibranched truxene based oligomers (Tr-OFVn,n=1-4) employing steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopy,transient absorption spectroscopy,two-photon fluorescence,and z-scan technique.The results show that the increasing of fluorene-vinylene unit leads to a red-shift in the spectra of absorption and fluorescence,and shortens the excited state lifetime.Meanwhile,two-photon fluorescence efficiency and two-photon absorption cross section of truxene based oligomers gradually enhance in company with the extension of π-conjugated length.In addition,the values of two-photon absorption cross section modeled on the sum-over-state approach agree well with the experimental ones.The results indicate multi-branched truxene based oligomers bearing oligo(fluorene-vinylene) arms are promising organic materials for two-photon applications.

  3. Exploring the assembly mechanism of tetrapeptide oligomers using the Activation-Relaxation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are associated with formation of amyloid fibrils. All amyloid fibrils seem to share a common cross β-sheet structure. Experimental studies have shown that peptides as short as 4 amino acids can form amyloid fibrils. It has also been shown that the oligomers that form early in the aggregation process of even non-disease-related proteins may be cytotoxic. We report a detailed study of the assembly mechanisms of the tetrapeptides into different size oligomers: trimers, hexamers and more. The assembly of the oligomers, in which the peptides form β-sheets through interpeptide interactions, are studied using the activation-relaxation technique (ART) in combination with a reduced off-lattice energy model (OPEP). We also describe the multiple pathways of oligomerization as well as categorize the various oligomeric intermediates, providing information of the early events of β-sheet formation.

  4. Oligomers of heat-shock proteins: Structures that don't imply function

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Most proteins must remain soluble in the cytosol in order to perform their biological functions. To protect against undesired protein aggregation, living cells maintain a population of molecular chaperones that ensure the solubility of the proteome. Here we report simulations of a lattice model of interacting proteins to understand how low concentrations of passive molecular chaperones, such as small heat-shock proteins, suppress thermodynamic instabilities in protein solutions. Given fixed concentrations of chaperones and client proteins, the solubility of the proteome can be increased by tuning the chaperone--client binding strength. Surprisingly, we find that the binding strength that optimizes solubility while preventing irreversible chaperone binding also promotes the formation of weakly bound chaperone oligomers, although the presence of these oligomers does not significantly affect the thermodynamic stability of the solution. Such oligomers are commonly observed in experiments on small heat-shock prote...

  5. Biodegradable polyester-based eco-composites containing hemp fibers modified with macrocyclic oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzatti, Lucia; Utzeri, Roberto; Hodge, Philip; Stagnaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    An original compatibilizing pathway for hemp fibers/poly(1,4-butylene adipate-co-terephtalate) (PBAT) eco-composites was explored exploiting the capability of macrocyclic oligomers (MCOs), obtained by cyclodepolymerization (CDP) of PBAT at high dilution, of being re-converted into linear chains by entropically-driven ring-opening polymerization (ED-ROP) that occurs simply heating the MCOS in the bulk. CDP reaction of PBAT was carried out varying solvent, catalyst and reaction time. Selected MCOs were used to adjust the conditions of the ED-ROP reaction. The best experimental conditions were then adopted to modify hemp fibers. Eco-composites based on PBAT and hemp fibers as obtained or modified with PBAT macrocyclics or oligomers were prepared by different process strategies. The best fiber-PBAT compatibility was observed when the fibers were modified with PBAT oligomers before incorporation in the polyester matrix.

  6. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  7. Exploiting the reversible covalent bonding of boronic acids: recognition, sensing, and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Steven D; Davidson, Matthew G; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Fossey, John S; Jenkins, A Toby A; Jiang, Yun-Bao; Kubo, Yuji; Marken, Frank; Sakurai, Kazuo; Zhao, Jianzhang; James, Tony D

    2013-02-19

    Boronic acids can interact with Lewis bases to generate boronate anions, and they can also bind with diol units to form cyclic boronate esters. Boronic acid based receptor designs originated when Lorand and Edwards used the pH drop observed upon the addition of saccharides to boronic acids to determine their association constants. The inherent acidity of the boronic acid is enhanced when 1,2-, 1,3-, or 1,4-diols react with boronic acids to form cyclic boronic esters (5, 6, or 7 membered rings) in aqueous media, and these interactions form the cornerstone of diol-based receptors used in the construction of sensors and separation systems. In addition, the recognition of saccharides through boronic acid complex (or boronic ester) formation often relies on an interaction between a Lewis acidic boronic acid and a Lewis base (proximal tertiary amine or anion). These properties of boronic acids have led to them being exploited in sensing and separation systems for anions (Lewis bases) and saccharides (diols). The fast and stable bond formation between boronic acids and diols to form boronate esters can serve as the basis for forming reversible molecular assemblies. In spite of the stability of the boronate esters' covalent B-O bonds, their formation is reversible under certain conditions or under the action of certain external stimuli. The reversibility of boronate ester formation and Lewis acid-base interactions has also resulted in the development and use of boronic acids within multicomponent systems. The dynamic covalent functionality of boronic acids with structure-directing potential has led researchers to develop a variety of self-organizing systems including macrocycles, cages, capsules, and polymers. This Account gives an overview of research published about boronic acids over the last 5 years. We hope that this Account will inspire others to continue the work on boronic acids and reversible covalent chemistry.

  8. The MitCHAP-60 disease is due to entropic destabilization of the human mitochondrial Hsp60 oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nadler, Michal; Nisemblat, Shahar; Horovitz, Amnon; Mandel, Hanna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-10-01

    The 60-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp60) is a vital cellular complex that mediates the folding of many of the mitochondrial proteins. Its function is executed in cooperation with the co-chaperonin, mHsp10, and requires ATP. Recently, the discovery of a new mHsp60-associated neurodegenerative disorder, MitCHAP-60 disease, has been reported. The disease is caused by a point mutation at position 3 (D3G) of the mature mitochondrial Hsp60 protein, which renders it unable to complement the deletion of the homologous bacterial protein in Escherichia coli (Magen, D., Georgopoulos, C., Bross, P., Ang, D., Segev, Y., Goldsher, D., Nemirovski, A., Shahar, E., Ravid, S., Luder, A., Heno, B., Gershoni-Baruch, R., Skorecki, K., and Mandel, H. (2008) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 83, 30-42). The molecular basis of the MitCHAP-60 disease is still unknown. In this study, we present an in vitro structural and functional analysis of the purified wild-type human mHsp60 and the MitCHAP-60 mutant. We show that the D3G mutation leads to destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer and causes its disassembly at low protein concentrations. We also show that the mutant protein has impaired protein folding and ATPase activities. An additional mutant that lacks the first three amino acids (N-del), including Asp-3, is similarly impaired in refolding activity. Surprisingly, however, this mutant exhibits profound stabilization of its oligomeric structure. These results suggest that the D3G mutation leads to entropic destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer, which severely impairs its chaperone function, thereby causing the disease.

  9. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L; Martim, Gedalias C; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2015-05-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10-30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10-20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by two-fold in the experimental groups (from 1.17 ± 0.36 MPam(1/2) to around 3.23 ± 0.22 MPam(1/2)). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased.

  10. Electrospun complexes - functionalised nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T.; Wolf, M.; Dreyer, B.; Unruh, D.; Krüger, C.; Menze, M.; Sindelar, R.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Renz, F.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present a new approach of using iron-complexes in electro-spun fibres. We modify poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by replacing the methoxy group with Diaminopropane or Ethylenediamine. The complex is bound covalently via an imine-bridge or an amide. The resulting polymer can be used in the electrospinning process without any further modifications in method either as pure reagent or mixed with small amounts of not functionalised polymer resulting in fibres of different qualities (Fig. 1).

  11. Electrospun complexes - functionalised nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.; Wolf, M.; Dreyer, B.; Unruh, D.; Krüger, C.; Menze, M. [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany); Sindelar, R. [University of Applied Science Hannover, Faculty II (Germany); Klingelhöfer, G. [Gutenberg-University, Institute of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry (Germany); Renz, F., E-mail: renz@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Here we present a new approach of using iron-complexes in electro-spun fibres. We modify poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by replacing the methoxy group with Diaminopropane or Ethylenediamine. The complex is bound covalently via an imine-bridge or an amide. The resulting polymer can be used in the electrospinning process without any further modifications in method either as pure reagent or mixed with small amounts of not functionalised polymer resulting in fibres of different qualities (Fig. 1).

  12. Crystal structure of human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical to β-sheet rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide bond linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into an β-sheet rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates, and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23808589

  13. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  14. Asymmetric synthesis of vinylogous β-amino acids and their incorporation into mixed backbone oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; An, Hongchan; Mo, Shuting Cynthia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Chiral vinylogous β-amino acids (VBAA) were synthesized using enantioselective Mannich reactions of aldehydes with in situ generated N-carbamoyl imines followed by a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction. The efficiency with which these units could be incorporated into oligomers with different moieties on the C- and N-terminal sides was established, as was the feasibility of sequencing oligomers containing VBAAs by tandem mass spectrometry. The data show that VBAAs will be useful building blocks for the construction of combinatorial libraries of peptidomimetic compounds.

  15. Synthesis and G-Quadruplex-Binding Properties of Defined Acridine Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of oligomers containing two or three acridine units linked through 2-aminoethylglycine using solid-phase methodology is described. Subsequent studies on cell viability showed that these compounds are not cytotoxic. Binding to several DNA structures was studied by competitive dialysis, which showed a clear affinity for DNA sequences that form G-quadruplexes and parallel triplexes. The fluorescence spectra of acridine oligomers were affected strongly upon binding to DNA. These spectral changes were used to calculate the binding constants (K. Log K were found to be in the order of 4–6.

  16. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  17. Cyclic oligomers in polyamide for food contact material: quantification by HPLC-CLND and single-substance calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimrich, M; Bönsch, M; Nickl, H; Simat, T J

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic oligomers are the major substances migrating from polyamide (PA) food contact materials. However, no commercial standards are available for the quantification of these substances. For the first time the quantification of cyclic oligomers was carried out by HPLC coupled with a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) and single-substance calibration. Cyclic monomer (MW = 226 Da) and dimer (MW = 452 Da) of PA66 were synthesised and equimolar N detection of CLND to synthesised oligomers, caprolactam, 6-aminohexanoic acid (monomers of PA6) and caffeine (a typical nitrogen calibrant) was proven. Relative response factors (UVD at 210 nm) referring to caprolactam were determined for cyclic PA6 oligomers from dimer to nonamer, using HPLC-CLND in combination with a UVD. A method for quantification of cyclic oligomer content in PA materials was introduced using HPLC-CLND analysis and caffeine as a single nitrogen calibrant. The method was applied to the quantification of cyclic PA oligomers in several PA granulates. For two PA6 granulates from different manufacturers markedly different oligomer contents were analysed (19.5 versus 13.4 g kg⁻¹). The elution pattern of cyclic oligomers offers the possibility of identifying the PA type and differentiating between PA copolymers and blends.

  18. Considerable Enhancement of Emission Yields of [Au(CN)2(-)] Oligomers in Aqueous Solutions by Coexisting Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ryo; Maeba, Junichi; Nozaki, Koichi; Iwamura, Munetaka

    2016-08-01

    The photophysical properties of [Au(CN)2(-)] oligomers in aqueous solutions were investigated as functions of coexisting cations as well as the viscosity and temperature of solutions. A solution of [Au(CN)2(-)] in the concentration range of 0.03-0.2 mol/dm(3) exhibited emission peaks at 460-480 nm because of the presence of oligomers larger than trimers. Although the emission yields (ϕem) of K[Au(CN)2] solutions were glycerol mixture indicated that the lifetimes were almost directly proportional to the inverse of the viscosity of the solution. On the other hand, the intrinsic lifetimes of dimers and trimers with weak emission in shorter wavelength regions were very short and independent of the viscosity of the solutions and coexisting cations (dimer, ∼25 ps; trimer, ∼2 ns). These results indicated that the deactivation of the excited-state [Au(CN)2(-)]n oligomers (n ≥ 4) was dominated by the dissociation of the oligomers to a shorter species (dimer or trimer). The hydrophobic interactions between tetraalkylammonium cations and CN ligands remarkably stabilized the larger oligomers and suppressed the dissociation of the excited-state oligomers, which enhanced the emission yield of the oligomers. This work provides a new method of "exciplex tuning" by changing the environment of excited-state [Au(CN)2(-)]n oligomers.

  19. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture.

  20. Absorption enhancing effects of chitosan oligomers on the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight heparin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailong; Mi, Jie; Huo, Yayu; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Jianfeng; Yamamoto, Akira; Gao, Yang

    2014-05-15

    Absorption enhancing effects of chitosan oligomers with different type and varying concentration on the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) were examined by an in situ closed loop method in different intestinal sections of rats. Chitosan hexamer with the optimal concentration of 0.5% (w/v) showed the highest absorption enhancing ability both in the small intestine and large intestine. The membrane toxicities of chitosan oligomers were evaluated by morphological observation and determining the biological markers including amount of protein and activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from intestinal epithelium cells. There was no obvious change both in levels of protein and LDH and morphology in the intestinal membrane between control and various chitosan oligomers groups, suggesting that chitosan oligomers did not induce any significant membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. In addition, zeta potentials became less negative and amount of free LMWH gradually decreased when various chitosan oligomers were added to LMWH solution, revealing that electrostatic interaction between positively charged chitosan oligomers and negative LMWH was included in the absorption enhancing mechanism of chitosan oligomers. In conclusion, chitosan oligomers, especially chitosan hexamer, are safe and efficient absorption enhancers and can be used promisingly to improve oral absorption of LMWH.

  1. Covalent flavinylation of vanillyl-alcohol oxidase is an autocatalytic process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Jianfeng; Mazon, Hortense; van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.; Heck, Albert J.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO; EC 1.1.3.38) contains a covalently 8 alpha-histidyl bound FAD, which represents the most frequently encountered covalent flavin-protein linkage. To elucidate the mechanism by which VAO covalently incorporates the FAD cofactor, apo VAO was produced by using a riboflavin

  2. Improving photocurrent generation: supramolecularly and covalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes-polymer/porphyrin donor-acceptor nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, G M Aminur; Troeger, Anna; Sgobba, Vito; Guldi, Dirk M; Jux, Norbert; Tchoul, Maxim N; Ford, Warren T; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Novel nanohybrids based on covalently and noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been prepared and assembled for the construction of photoactive electrodes. Polymer-grafted SWNTs were synthesized by free-radical polymerization of (vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride. Poly[(vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride] (PVBTAn+) was also noncovalently wrapped around SWNTs to form stable, positively charged SWNT/PVBTAn+ suspensions in water. Versatile donor-acceptor nanohybrids were prepared by using the electrostatic/van der Waals interactions between covalent SWNT-PVBTAn+ and/or noncovalent SWNT/PVBTAn+ and porphyrins (H2P8- and/or ZnP8-). Several spectroscopic, microscopic, transient, and photoelectrochemical measurements were taken to characterize the resulting supramolecular complexes. Photoexcitation of the nanohybrids afforded long-lived radical ion pairs with lifetimes as long as 2.2 micros. In the final part, photoactive electrodes were constructed by using a layer-by-layer technique on an indium tin oxide covered glass support. Photocurrent measurements gave remarkable internal photon-to-current efficiencies of 3.81 and 9.90 % for the covalent ZnP8-/SWNT-PVBTAn+ and noncovalent ZnP8-/SWNT/PVBTAn+ complex, respectively, when a potential of 0.5 V was applied.

  3. Construction of human Fab library and screening of a single-domain antibody of amyloid-beta 42 oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuanning Yuan; Minge Du; Yiwen Chen; Fei Dou

    2013-01-01

    Screening humanized antibodies from a human Fab phage display library is an effective and quick method to obtain beta-amyloid oligomers. Thus, the present study prepared amyloid-beta 42 oli-gomers and constructed a naïve human Fab phage display library based on blood samples from six healthy people. After three rounds of biopanning in vitro, a human single-domain antibody that spe-cifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers was identified. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated this antibody bound specifical y to human amyloid-beta 42 te-tramer and nonamer, but not the monomer or high molecular weight oligomers. This study suc-cessful y constructed a human phage display library and screened a single-domain antibody that specifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers.

  4. Pro-Inflammatory S100A8 and S100A9 Proteins: Self-Assembly into Multifunctional Native and Amyloid Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla A. Morozova-Roche

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available S100A8 and S100A9 are EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins belonging to the S100 family. They are abundant in cytosol of phagocytes and play critical roles in numerous cellular processes such as motility and danger signaling by interacting and modulating the activity of target proteins. S100A8 and S100A9 expression levels increased in many types of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and they are implicated in the numerous disease pathologies. The Ca2+ and Zn2+-binding properties of S100A8/A9 have a pivotal influence on their conformation and oligomerization state, including self-assembly into homo- and heterodimers, tetramers and larger oligomers. Here we review how the unique chemical and conformational properties of individual proteins and their structural plasticity at the quaternary level account for S100A8/A9 functional diversity. Additional functional diversification occurs via non-covalent assembly into oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid complexes discovered in the aging prostate and reproduced in vitro. This process is also regulated by Ca2+and Zn2+-binding and effectively competes with the formation of the native complexes. High intrinsic amyloid-forming capacity of S100A8/A9 proteins may lead to their amyloid depositions in numerous ailments characterized by their elevated expression patterns and have additional pathological significance requiring further thorough investigation.

  5. Structure-based design of covalent Siah inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, John L; Santelli, Eugenio; Feng, Yongmei; De, Surya K; Purves, Angela; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Wu, Bainan; Ronai, Ze'ev A; Liddington, Robert C; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2013-08-22

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah regulates key cellular events that are central to cancer development and progression. A promising route to Siah inhibition is disrupting its interactions with adaptor proteins. However, typical of protein-protein interactions, traditional unbiased approaches to ligand discovery did not produce viable hits against this target, despite considerable effort and a multitude of approaches. Ultimately, a rational structure-based design strategy was successful for the identification of Siah inhibitors in which peptide binding drives specific covalent bond formation with the target. X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry, and functional data demonstrate that these peptide mimetics are efficient covalent inhibitors of Siah and antagonize Siah-dependent regulation of Erk and Hif signaling in the cell. The proposed strategy may result useful as a general approach to the design of peptide-based inhibitors of other protein-protein interactions.

  6. Covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules. [Acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorgeirsson, S.S.; Wirth, P.J.

    1977-03-01

    In vivo and in vitro covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules via metabolic activation is described, using the analgesic acetaminophen as an example. Acetaminophen is metabolized through a variety of pathways. The arylating metabolite is formed by a cytochrome P-450 dependent N-hydroxylation process. The resulting hydroxamic acid is then conjugated with glutathione, and the resulting conjugate is subsequently excreted as the mercapturic acid in the urine. It is not until the glutathione concentration is reduced to about 20% of the initial concentration that covalent binding of acetaminophen to amino acids of proteins occurs and subsequent liver necrosis is seen. The extent of in vitro binding correlates with treatments that alter hepatic necrosis and in vivo binding, indicating that in vitro binding is a valid index of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. A simple bacterial test system for detecting chemical carcinogens as mutagens is described.

  7. Semisynthetic Nanoreactor for Reversible Single-Molecule Covalent Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Protein engineering has been used to remodel pores for applications in biotechnology. For example, the heptameric α-hemolysin pore (αHL) has been engineered to form a nanoreactor to study covalent chemistry at the single-molecule level. Previous work has been confined largely to the chemistry of cysteine side chains or, in one instance, to an irreversible reaction of an unnatural amino acid side chain bearing a terminal alkyne. Here, we present four different αHL pores obtained by coupling either two or three fragments by native chemical ligation (NCL). The synthetic αHL monomers were folded and incorporated into heptameric pores. The functionality of the pores was validated by hemolysis assays and by single-channel current recording. By using NCL to introduce a ketone amino acid, the nanoreactor approach was extended to an investigation of reversible covalent chemistry on an unnatural side chain at the single-molecule level. PMID:27537396

  8. Covalently Bound Nitroxyl Radicals in an Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Barbara K.; Braunecker, Wade A.; Bobela, David C.; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Johnson, Justin C.

    2016-09-15

    A series of covalent organic framework (COF) structures is synthesized that possesses a tunable density of covalently bound nitroxyl radicals within the COF pores. The highest density of organic radicals produces an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal that suggests the majority of radicals strongly interact with other radicals, whereas for smaller loadings the EPR signals indicate the radicals are primarily isolated but with restricted motion. The dielectric loss as determined from microwave absorption of the framework structures compared with an amorphous control suggests that free motion of the radicals is inhibited when more than 25% of available sites are occupied. The ability to tune the mode of radical interactions and the subsequent effect on redox, electrical, and optical characteristics in a porous framework may lead to a class of structures with properties ideal for photoelectrochemistry or energy storage.

  9. Antibodies covalently immobilized on actin filaments for fast myosin driven analyte transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm(-1. The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments.

  10. Enzyme directed formation of un-natural side-chains for covalent surface attachment of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwayoung; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    The covalent immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is an essential aspect of several fields of research, including proteomics, sensing, heterogeneous biocatalysis, and more broadly biotechnology. Site-specific, covalent attachment of proteins has been achieved in recent years by the use of expanded genetic codes to produce proteins with controlled placement of un-natural amino acids bearing bio-orthogonal functional groups. Unfortunately, the complexity of developing such systems is impractical for most laboratories; hence, a less complicated approach to generating un-natural amino acid side-chains has been employed. Utilizing a straightforward reaction with formylglycine generating enzyme, we use the site-specific modification of engineered proteins to yield un-natural amino acid side-chains for protein immobilization. Using this approach, we demonstrate the controlled immobilization of various enzymes onto a variety of amine coated surfaces. Our results reveal reusability of the immobilized enzymes via this strategy, and furthermore, we find the activity of the immobilized enzymes to remain even after a month of use indicating significant stability of the linkage.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of non-covalent single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization with surfactant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Mansouri, Alireza; Azamat, Jafar

    2016-03-01

    Non-covalent functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with improved solubility and biocompatibility can successfully transfer drugs, DNA, RNA, and proteins into the target cells. Theoretical studies such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations in fully atomistic scale were used to investigate the hydrophobic and aromatic π-π-stacking interaction of designing four novel surfactant peptides for non-covalent functionalization of SWCNTs. The results indicated that the designed peptides have binding affinity towards SWCNT with constant interactions during MD simulation times, and it can even be improved by increasing the number of tryptophan residues. The aromatic content of the peptides plays a significant role in their adsorption in SWCNT wall. The data suggest that π-π stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of tryptophan and π electrons of SWCNTs is more important than hydrophobic effects for dispersing carbon nanotubes; nevertheless SWCNTs are strongly hydrophobic in front of smooth surfaces. The usage of aromatic content of peptides for forming SWCNT/peptide complex was proved successfully, providing new insight into peptide design strategies for future nano-biomedical applications.

  12. Studies on Escherichia coli sex factors: evidence that covalent circles exist within cells and the general problem of isolation of covalent circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D; Folkmanis, A; Kirschner, I

    1971-03-01

    We examined in detail conditions necessary for making reproducible and for maximizing the amount of deoxyribonucleic acid obtained from a sex factor-containing cell as covalent circles. The results argue that under optimal conditions covalent circles are neither created nor lost during the isolation procedure. The causes of the culture-to-culture variation in recovery of covalent circular deoxyribonucleic acid were investigated but an understanding of this is not yet at hand. Some commonly used conditions which drastically reduce the recovery of covalent circles are described.

  13. Effect of covalent and non-covalent linking of zinc(II) phthalocyanine functionalised carbon nanomaterials on the sensor response to ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakov, Maxim S.; Basova, Tamara V.; Göksel, Meltem; Şenocak, Ahmet; Demirbaş, Erhan; Durmus,Mahmut; Kadem, Burak; Hassan, Aseel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a comparative study of the sensor response of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) covalently and non-covalently functionalised with1-[N-(2-ethoxyethyl)-4-pentynamide]-8(11),15(18),22(25)-tris-{2-[2-(2-ethoxyethoxy) ethoxy]-1-[2-((2-ethoxy ethoxy)-ethoxy)methyl]ethyloxy}zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to ammonia is carried out. It was shown that in the case of SWCNT-based materials both covalent and non-covalent functionalisation with zinc(II) ...

  14. Covalent assembly of gold nanoparticles for nonvolatile memory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, P S; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-12-01

    This work reports a versatile approach for enhancing the stability of nonvolatile memory devices through covalent assembly of functionalized gold nanoparticles. 11-mercapto-1-undecanol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a narrow size distribution and particle size of about 5 nm were synthesized. Then, the AuNPs were immobilized on a SiO(2) substrate using a functionalized polymer as a surface modifier. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize the AuNPs and their morphology before and after immobilization. Finally, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) type memory device with such covalently anchored AuNPs as a charge trapping layer was fabricated. The MIS structure showed well-defined counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. The flat band voltage shift was 1.64 V at a swapping voltage between ±7 V. Furthermore, the MIS structure showed a good retention characteristic up to 20,000 s. The present synthetic route to covalently immobilize gold nanoparticles system will be a step towards realization for the nanoparticle-based electronic devices and related applications.

  15. Covalently Cross-Linked Arabinoxylans Films for Debaryomyces hansenii Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsés González-Estrada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, wheat water extractable arabinoxylans (WEAX were isolated and characterized, and their capability to form covalently cross-linked films in presence of Debaryomyces hansenii was evaluated. WEAX presented an arabinose to xylose ratio of 0.60, a ferulic acid and diferulic acid content of 2.1 and 0.04 µg∙mg−1 WEAX, respectively and a Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR spectrum typical of WEAX. The intrinsic viscosity and viscosimetric molecular weight values for WEAX were 3.6 dL∙g−1 and 440 kDa, respectively. The gelation of WEAX (1% w/v with and without D. hansenii (1 × 107 CFU∙cm−2 was rheologically investigated by small amplitude oscillatory shear. The entrapment of D. hansenii decreased gel elasticity from 1.4 to 0.3 Pa, probably by affecting the physical interactions between WEAX chains. Covalently cross-linked WEAX films containing D. hansenii were prepared by casting. Scanning electron microscopy images show that WEAX films containing D. hansenii were porous and consisted of granular-like and fibre microstructures. Average tensile strength, elongation at break and Young’s modulus values dropped when D. hansenii was present in the film. Covalently cross-lined WEAX containing D. hansenii could be a suitable as a functional entrapping film.

  16. Supramolecular catalysis. Part 1: non-covalent interactions as a tool for building and modifying homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Ballester, Pablo; Vidal-Ferran, Anton; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-03-01

    Supramolecular catalysis is a rapidly expanding discipline which has benefited from the development of both homogeneous catalysis and supramolecular chemistry. The properties of classical metal and organic catalysts can now be carefully tailored by means of several suitable approaches and the choice of reversible interactions such as hydrogen bond, metal-ligand, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The first part of these two subsequent reviews will be dedicated to catalytic systems for which non-covalent interactions between the partners of the reaction have been designed although mimicking enzyme properties has not been intended. Ligand, metal, organocatalyst, substrate, additive, and metal counterion are reaction partners that can be held together by non-covalent interactions. The resulting catalysts possess unique properties compared to analogues lacking the assembling properties. Depending on the nature of the reaction partners involved in the interactions, distinct applications have been accomplished, mainly (i) the building of bidentate ligand libraries (intra ligand-ligand), (ii) the building of di- or oligonuclear complexes (inter ligand-ligand), (iii) the alteration of the coordination spheres of a metal catalyst (ligand-ligand additive), and (iv) the control of the substrate reactivity (catalyst-substrate). More complex systems that involve the cooperative action of three reaction partners have also been disclosed. In this review, special attention will be given to supramolecular catalysts for which the observed catalytic activity and/or selectivity have been imputed to non-covalent interaction between the reaction partners. Additional features of these catalysts are the easy modulation of the catalytic performance by modifying one of their building blocks and the development of new catalytic pathways/reactions not achievable with classical covalent catalysts.

  17. Stabilizing Off-pathway Oligomers by Polyphenol Nanoassemblies for IAPP Aggregation Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Pilkington, Emily H.; Davis, Thomas P.; Chun Ke, Pu; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that many naturally occurring polyphenols have inhibitory effect on the aggregation of several proteins. Here, we use discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations and high-throughput dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments to study the anti-aggregation effects of two polyphenols, curcumin and resveratrol, on the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin). Our DMD simulations suggest that the aggregation inhibition is caused by stabilization of small molecular weight IAPP off-pathway oligomers by the polyphenols. Our analysis indicates that IAPP-polyphenol hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking combined with hydrophobic interactions are responsible for the stabilization of oligomers. The presence of small oligomers is confirmed with DLS measurements in which nanometer-sized oligomers are found to be stable for up to 7.5 hours, the time frame within which IAPP aggregates in the absence of polyphenols. Our study offers a general anti-aggregation mechanism for polyphenols, and further provides a computational framework for the future design of anti-amyloid aggregation therapeutics.

  18. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  19. Stress relaxation following uniaxial extension of polystyrene melt and oligomer dilutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2016-01-01

    The filament stretching rheometer has been used to measure the stress relaxation following the startup of uniaxial extensional flow, on anarrow molar mass distribution (NMMD) polystyrene melt and styrene oligomer dilutions thereof. All samples used here were characterizedin molecular weight, mech...... ofconstitutive representation was observed for all measured relaxations.VC 2016 The Society of Rheology....

  20. Interchain tube pressure effect in extensional flows of oligomer diluted nearly monodisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Huang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    We have derived a constitutive equation to explain the extensional dynamics of oligomer-diluted monodisperse polymers, if the length of the diluent has at least two Kuhn steps. These polymer systems have a flow dynamics which distinguish from pure monodisperse melts and solutions thereof, if the ...

  1. Manipulating Fano resonance via fs-laser melting of hybrid oligomers at nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshov, S. I.; Zuev, D. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, the novel concept of asymmetric metal-dielectric (hybrid) nanoparticles is proposed. The experimental data and the results of numerical simulation of the optical properties of hybrid nanostructures are presented. The change of their optical response after fs- laser modification is shown. The possibility of manipulating Fano resonance in hybrid oligomers by the gold nanoparticles reshaping is demonstrated.

  2. High-capacity conductive nanocellulose paper sheets for electrochemically controlled extraction of DNA oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Razaq

    Full Text Available Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg(-1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30-50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m(2 g(-1 of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT(6, (dT(20, and (dT(40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules.

  3. Molecular mechanisms used by chaperones to reduce the toxicity of aberrant protein oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannini, Benedetta; Cascella, Roberta; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Van Waarde-Verhagen, Maria; Meehan, Sarah; Roodveldt, Cintia; Campioni, Silvia; Boninsegna, Matilde; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Kampinga, Harm H.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wilson, Mark R.; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Chaperones are the primary regulators of the proteostasis network and are known to facilitate protein folding, inhibit protein aggregation, and promote disaggregation and clearance of misfolded aggregates inside cells. We have tested the effects of five chaperones on the toxicity of misfolded oligom

  4. Optimization of the All-D Peptide D3 for Aβ Oligomer Elimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Nicole Klein

    Full Text Available The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ is postulated to be the crucial event in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, small neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are considered to be responsible for the development and progression of AD. Therefore, elimination of thesis oligomers represents a potential causal therapy of AD. Starting from the well-characterized d-enantiomeric peptide D3, we identified D3 derivatives that bind monomeric Aβ. The underlying hypothesis is that ligands bind monomeric Aβ and stabilize these species within the various equilibria with Aβ assemblies, leading ultimately to the elimination of Aβ oligomers. One of the hereby identified d-peptides, DB3, and a head-to-tail tandem of DB3, DB3DB3, were studied in detail. Both peptides were found to: (i inhibit the formation of Thioflavin T-positive fibrils; (ii bind to Aβ monomers with micromolar affinities; (iii eliminate Aβ oligomers; (iv reduce Aβ-induced cytotoxicity; and (v disassemble preformed Aβ aggregates. The beneficial effects of DB3 were improved by DB3DB3, which showed highly enhanced efficacy. Our approach yielded Aβ monomer-stabilizing ligands that can be investigated as a suitable therapeutic strategy against AD.

  5. High-Capacity Conductive Nanocellulose Paper Sheets for Electrochemically Controlled Extraction of DNA Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaq, Aamir; Nyström, Gustav; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Nyholm, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy)-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg−1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30–50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m2 g−1) of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT)6, (dT)20, and (dT)40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules. PMID:22195031

  6. Facile Synthesis of Highly Crystalline and Large Areal Hexagonal Boron Nitride from Borazine Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungchan; Seo, Tae Hoon; Cho, Hyunjin; Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Dong Su; Won, Dong-Il; Kang, Sang Ook; Kim, Myung Jong

    2017-01-01

    A novel and facile synthetic method for h-BN films from borazine oligomer (B3N3H4)x precursors has been developed. This method only includes spin-coating of borazine oligomer onto nickel catalysts and a subsequent annealing step. Large areal and highly crystalline h-BN films were obtained. The stoichiometric B/N ratio of borazine oligomer precursor was preserved in the final h-BN product such that it was close to 1 as revealed by XPS. Catalytic effect of nickel for h-BN formation was clearly demonstrated by lowering crystallization temperature compared to the growth condition in the absence of catalyst. The graphene field effect transistor (GFET) characterization has proved the high quality synthesis of h-BN films, showing the shift of neutrality point and the increase of the mobility. This method can also provide functional h-BN coating on various surfaces by annealing Ni-coated borazine oligomer films and subsequent removal of Ni catalyst. PMID:28074854

  7. Force spectroscopy reveals the presence of structurally modified dimers in transthyretin amyloid annular oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ricardo H; Saraiva, Maria J; Damas, Ana M; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z

    2017-03-01

    Toxicity in amyloidogenic protein misfolding disorders is thought to involve intermediate states of aggregation associated with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Despite their relevance, the heterogeneity and transience of these oligomers have placed great barriers in our understanding of their structural properties. Among amyloid intermediates, annular oligomers or annular protofibrils have raised considerable interest because they may contribute to a mechanism of cellular toxicity via membrane permeation. Here we investigated, by using AFM force spectroscopy, the structural detail of amyloid annular oligomers from transthyretin (TTR), a protein involved in systemic and neurodegenerative amyloidogenic disorders. Manipulation was performed in situ, in the absence of molecular handles and using persistence length-fit values to select relevant curves. Force curves reveal the presence of dimers in TTR annular oligomers that unfold via a series of structural intermediates. This is in contrast with the manipulation of native TTR that was more often manipulated over length scales compatible with a TTR monomer and without unfolding intermediates. Imaging and force spectroscopy data suggest that dimers are formed by the assembly of monomers in a head-to-head orientation with a nonnative interface along their β-strands. Furthermore, these dimers stack through nonnative contacts that may enhance the stability of the misfolded structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β...

  9. A cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered and NIR- enhanced amyloidosis therapeutic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu[1,2; Peng Shi[1,2; Meng Li[1,2; Jinsong Ren[1; xiaogang Qu[1

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for improving the efficiency of non-specific amyloidosis therapeutic drugs by coating amyloid-responsive lipid bilayers. The approach had drawn inspiration from amyloid oligomer-mediated cell membrane disruption in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis. A graphene-mesoporous silica hybrid (GMS)-supported lipid bilayer (GMS-Lip) system was used as a drug carrier, Drugs were well confined inside the nanocarrier until encountering amyloid oligomers, which could pierce the lipid bilayer coat and cause drug release. To ensure release efficiency, use of a near-infrared (NIR) laser was also introduced to facilitate drug release, taking advantage of the photothermal effect of GMS and thermal sensitivity of lipid bilayers. To facilitate tracking, fluorescent dyes were co-loaded with drugs within GMS-Lip and the NIR laser was used once the oligomer-triggered release had been signaled. Because of the spatially and temporally controllable property of light, the NIR-assisted release could be easily and selectively activated locally by tracking the fluorescence signal. Our design is based on arnyloidosis pathogenesis, the cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered release via cell membrane disruption, for the controlled release of drug molecules. The results may shed light on the development of pathogenesis- inspired drug delivery systems,

  10. Secondary vapor phase reactions of lignin-derived oligomers obtained by fast pyrolysis of pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; McDonald, Armando G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Westerhof, Roel J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of secondary reactions in vapor phase on the yield and composition of pyrolytic lignin (PL) oligomers was investigated. The Pine wood material was pyrolyzed at 500 °C in a fluidized bed reactor, and the vapors were transferred to a downstream tubular reactor operated at res

  11. Cholesterol facilitates interactions between α-synuclein oligomers and charge-neutral membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    composed of anionic lipids, while the more physiologically relevant zwitterionic lipids remain intact. We present experimental evidence for significant morphological changes in zwitterionic membranes containing cholesterol, induced by α-synuclein oligomers. Depending on the lipid composition, model...... of cholesterol for mediating interactions between physiologically relevant membranes and α-synuclein....

  12. Student-Driven Design of Peptide Mimetics: Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Peptoid Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Nicola L. B.; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Yoo, Barney; Schulz, Nathan; Zea, Corbin J.; Streff, Jennifer M.; Schwarz, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate organic laboratory is described in which peptide mimetic oligomers called "peptoids" are built stepwise on a solid-phase resin. Students employ two modern strategies to facilitate rapid multistep syntheses: solid-phase techniques to obviate the need for intermediate purifications and microwave irradiation to…

  13. Optical Properties of Oligo(fluorene-vinylene) Functionalized Anthracene Linear Oligomers: Effect of π-extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-hao Huang; Li-li Qu; Zhi-hui Kang; Ying-hui Wang; Ran Lu; Er-long Miao; Fei Wang

    2013-01-01

    The photo-physical properties of oligo(fluorene-vinylene) functionalized anthracene linear oligomers (An-OFVn (n=1-4)) have been systemically investigated through experimental and theoretical methods.The steady-state spectral measurement shows that the increasing of fluorene-vinylene (FV) group could lead to the red shift of absorption spectra and restrain the excimer formation between oligomers.Quantum chemical calculations exhibit that the energy levels of HOMO,LUMO,and the band gap gradually converge to a constant in accompany with the increasing of FV unit.Meanwhile,the electronic cloud which distributes on the branch arms,also gradually enhances and makes the absorption spectral shape of oligomers become similar to that of branch arms step by step.The time-resolved fluorescence tests exhibits that the lifetime of excimer emission would be ahmost invariable after the number of FV group in oligomer is >2.In nonlinear optical test,the two-photon photoluminescence efficiency and two-photon absorption cross-section will both gradually enhance and be close to an extrenum after the number of FV unit is equal to 4.These results will provide a guideline for the design of novel photo-electronic materials.

  14. Annotation of Different Dehydrocatechin Oligomers by MS/MS and Their Occurrence in Black Tea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, Annewieke J.W.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrocatechins (DhC's), oligomeric oxidation products of (epi)catechins, were formed in model incubations of epicatechin with mushroom tyrosinase. DhC oligomers up to tetramers were detected by reversed-phase ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-MS) analysis.

  15. Rapid Multistep Synthesis of a Bioactive Peptidomimetic Oligomer for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utku, Yeliz; Rohatgi, Abhinav; Yoo, Barney; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Pohl, Nicola L.

    2010-01-01

    Peptidomimetic compounds are increasingly important in drug-discovery applications. We introduce the synthesis of an N-substituted glycine oligomer, a bioactive "peptoid" trimer. The six-step protocol is conducted on solid-phase resin, enabling the synthesis to be performed by undergraduate organic chemistry students. This synthesis lab was…

  16. Annotation of Different Dehydrocatechin Oligomers by MS/MS and Their Occurrence in Black Tea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, Annewieke J.W.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrocatechins (DhC's), oligomeric oxidation products of (epi)catechins, were formed in model incubations of epicatechin with mushroom tyrosinase. DhC oligomers up to tetramers were detected by reversed-phase ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-MS) analysis.

  17. Amyloid-beta oligomer detection by ELISA in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Jongbloed, W.; Biemans, E.A.L.M.; Veerhuis, R.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposits are important pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta aggregates into fibrils; however, the intermediate oligomers are believed to be the most neurotoxic species and, therefore, are of great interest as potential biomarkers. Here, we have developed an

  18. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serene W; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-04-21

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species.

  19. Structure–property relationships of synthetic organophosphorus flame retardant oligomers by thermal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Zhiman [State Key Lab of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, 166 Ren’ai Road Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Wang, Xin; Tang, Gang; Song, Lei [State Key Lab of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hu, Yuan, E-mail: yuanhu@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, 166 Ren’ai Road Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Yuen, Richard K.K., E-mail: Richard.Yuen@cityu.edu.hk [USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, 166 Ren’ai Road Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2013-08-10

    Highlights: • Oligomers with different chemical components in molecular chains were synthesized. • FP-3 containing three IFR components possessed high thermal stability. • FP-3 possessed lowest flammability. • FP-3 exhibited a synergistic interaction between gas and condensed phase. - Abstract: A series of flame retardant oligomers with different chemical components in molecular chains, designated as FP-1, FP-2 and FP-3, respectively, were successfully synthesized using solution polycondensation and well characterized. The thermal properties and flammability of these oligomers were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC). The results demonstrated that FP-3 had the lowest flammability in terms of the lowest maximum mass loss rate, and FP-1 possessed the highest thermal stability and char yield, due to its higher stable hexatomic ring structure of piperazine compared with the linear alkane chain structure of neopentyl glycol. The gases evolved during decomposition were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared coupled with the thermogravimetric analyzer (TG–IR) technique. The char residues of the flame retardant oligomers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that FP-3 exhibited a synergistic interaction between the gas phase and condensation phase, increasing its flame retardancy.

  20. Alpha-synuclein oligomers - neurotoxic molecules in Parkinson’s disease and other Lewy body disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ingelsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adverse intra- and extracellular effects of toxic α-synuclein are believed to be central to the pathogenesis in Parkinson’s disease and other disorders with Lewy body pathology in the nervous system. One of the physiological roles of α-synuclein relates to the regulation of neurotransmitter release at the presynapse, although it is still unclear whether this mechanism depends on the action of monomers or smaller oligomers. As for the pathogenicity, accumulating evidence suggest that prefibrillar species, rather than the deposits per se, are responsible for the toxicity in affected cells. In particular, larger oligomers or protofibrils of α-synuclein have been shown to impair protein degradation as well as the function of several organelles, such as the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Accumulating evidence further suggest that oligomers/protofibrils may have a toxic effect on the synapse, which may lead to disrupted electrophysiological properties. In addition, recent data indicate that oligomeric α-synuclein species can spread between cells, either as free-floating proteins or via extracellular vesicles, and thereby act as seeds to propagate disease between interconnected brain regions. Taken together, several lines of evidence suggest that α-synuclein have neurotoxic properties and therefore should be an appropriate molecular target for therapeutic intervention in Parkinson’s disease and other disorders with Lewy pathology. In this context, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies against α-synuclein oligomers/protofibrils should be a particularly attractive treatment option.

  1. Genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nakai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we conducted in vitro genotoxicity tests to evaluate the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food. Styrene oligomers were extracted with acetone and the extract was subjected to the Ames test (OECD test guideline No. 471 and the in vitro chromosomal aberration test (OECD test guideline No. 473 under good laboratory practice conditions. The concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers in the concentrated extract were 540 and 13,431 ppm, respectively. Extraction with acetone provided markedly higher concentrations of styrene oligomers compared with extraction with 50% ethanol aqueous solution, which is the food simulant currently recommended for use in safety assessments of polystyrene by both the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority. And these high concentrations of styrene dimers and trimers were utilized for the evaluation of genotoxicity in vitro. Ames tests using five bacterial tester strains were negative both in the presence or absence of metabolic activation. The in vitro chromosomal aberration test using Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU was also negative. Together, these results suggest that the risk of the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers that migrate from polystyrene food packaging into food is very low.

  2. Synthesis of a new π-conjugated redox oligomer: Electrochemical and optical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blili, Saber; Zaâboub, Zouhour; Maaref, Hassen; Haj Said, Ayoub

    2017-01-01

    A new π-conjugated redox oligomer was prepared according a two-Step Synthesis. Firstly, an oligophenylene (OMPA) was obtained from the anodic oxidation of the (4-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile. Then, the resulting material was chemically modified by the Knoevenagel condensation with the ferrocenecarboxaldehyde. This reaction led to a redox-conjugated oligomer the Fc-OMPA. The synthesized material was characterized using different spectroscopic techniques: NMR, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The Fc-OMPA was used to modify a platinum electrode surface and the electrochemical response of the ferrocene redox-center was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Moreover, the room temperature PL spectra of Fc-OMPA revealed that the ferrocene moiety, which acts as an electron donor, can effectively quench the oligomer luminescence. However, when ferrocene was oxidized to ferrocenium ion, the intramolecular charge transfer process was prevented which consequently enhanced the light emission. Thus, the oligomer light-emission can be, chemically or electrochemically tuned. The obtained results showed that the prepared material is a good candidate for the elaboration of electrochemical sensors and for the development of luminescent Redox-switchable devices.

  3. Oligomer formation during gas-phase ozonolysis of small alkenes and enol ethers: new evidence for the central role of the Criegee Intermediate as oligomer chain unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadezky, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Kanawati, B.; Römpp, A.; Spengler, B.; Mellouki, A.; Le Bras, G.; Chaimbault, P.; Moortgat, G. K.

    2008-05-01

    An important fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by atmospheric oxidation of diverse volatile organic compounds (VOC) has recently been shown to consist of high-molecular weight oligomeric species. In our previous study (Sadezky et al., 2006), we reported the identification and characterization of oligomers as main constituents of SOA from gas-phase ozonolysis of small enol ethers. These oligomers contained repeated chain units of the same chemical composition as the main Criegee Intermediates (CI) formed during the ozonolysis reaction, which were CH2O2 (mass 46) for alkyl vinyl ethers (AVE) and C2H4O2 (mass 60) for ethyl propenyl ether (EPE). In the present work, we extend our previous study to another enol ether (ethyl butenyl ether EBE) and a variety of structurally related small alkenes (trans-3-hexene, trans-4-octene and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene). Experiments have been carried out in a 570 l spherical glass reactor at atmospheric conditions in the absence of seed aerosol. SOA formation was measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). SOA filter samples were collected and chemically characterized off-line by ESI(+)/TOF MS and ESI(+)/TOF MS/MS, and elemental compositions were determined by ESI(+)/FTICR MS and ESI(+)/FTICR MS/MS. The results for all investigated unsaturated compounds are in excellent agreement with the observations of our previous study. Analysis of the collected SOA filter samples reveal the presence of oligomeric compounds in the mass range 200 to 800 u as major constituents. The repeated chain units of these oligomers are shown to systematically have the same chemical composition as the respective main Criegee Intermediate (CI) formed during ozonolysis of the unsaturated compounds, which is C3H6O2 (mass 74) for ethyl butenyl ether (EBE), trans-3-hexene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, and C4H8O2 (mass 88) for trans-4-octene. Analogous fragmentation pathways among the oligomers formed by gas-phase ozonolysis of the different

  4. Oligomer formation during gas-phase ozonolysis of small alkenes and enol ethers: new evidence for the central role of the Criegee Intermediate as oligomer chain unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sadezky

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An important fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed by atmospheric oxidation of diverse volatile organic compounds (VOC has recently been shown to consist of high-molecular weight oligomeric species. In our previous study (Sadezky et al., 2006, we reported the identification and characterization of oligomers as main constituents of SOA from gas-phase ozonolysis of small enol ethers. These oligomers contained repeated chain units of the same chemical composition as the main Criegee Intermediates (CI formed during the ozonolysis reaction, which were CH2O2 (mass 46 for alkyl vinyl ethers (AVE and C2H4O2 (mass 60 for ethyl propenyl ether (EPE. In the present work, we extend our previous study to another enol ether (ethyl butenyl ether EBE and a variety of structurally related small alkenes (trans-3-hexene, trans-4-octene and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene.

    Experiments have been carried out in a 570 l spherical glass reactor at atmospheric conditions in the absence of seed aerosol. SOA formation was measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS. SOA filter samples were collected and chemically characterized off-line by ESI(+/TOF MS and ESI(+/TOF MS/MS, and elemental compositions were determined by ESI(+/FTICR MS and ESI(+/FTICR MS/MS. The results for all investigated unsaturated compounds are in excellent agreement with the observations of our previous study. Analysis of the collected SOA filter samples reveal the presence of oligomeric compounds in the mass range 200 to 800 u as major constituents. The repeated chain units of these oligomers are shown to systematically have the same chemical composition as the respective main Criegee Intermediate (CI formed during ozonolysis of the unsaturated compounds, which is C3H6O2 (mass 74 for ethyl butenyl ether (EBE, trans-3-hexene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, and C4H8

  5. Ordered self-assembly mechanism of a spherical oncoprotein oligomer triggered by zinc removal and stabilized by an intrinsically disordered domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Smal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-assembly is a common theme in proteins of unrelated sequences or functions. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein is an extended dimer with an intrinsically disordered domain, that can form large spherical oligomers. These are the major species in the cytosol of HPV transformed and cancerous cells. E7 binds to a large number of targets, some of which lead to cell transformation. Thus, the assembly process not only is of biological relevance, but represents a model system to investigate a widely distributed mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using various techniques, we monitored changes in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure in a time course manner. By applying a robust kinetic model developed by Zlotnik, we determined the slow formation of a monomeric "Z-nucleus" after zinc removal, followed by an elongation phase consisting of sequential second-order events whereby one monomer is added at a time. This elongation process takes place at a strikingly slow overall average rate of one monomer added every 28 seconds at 20 µM protein concentration, strongly suggesting either a rearrangement of the growing complex after binding of each monomer or the existence of a "conformation editing" mechanism through which the monomer binds and releases until the appropriate conformation is adopted. The oligomerization determinant lies within its small 5 kDa C-terminal globular domain and, remarkably, the E7 N-terminal intrinsically disordered domain stabilizes the oligomer, preventing an insoluble amyloid route. CONCLUSION: We described a controlled ordered mechanism with features in common with soluble amyloid precursors, chaperones, and other spherical oligomers, thus sharing determining factors for symmetry, size and shape. In addition, such a controlled and discrete polymerization reaction provides a valuable tool for nanotechnological applications. Finally, its increased immunogenicity related to its supramolecular

  6. Alpha-synuclein oligomers and fibrils originate in two distinct conformer pools: a small angle X-ray scattering and ensemble optimisation modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, Cyril C; Kirby, Nigel M; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Barnham, Kevin J; Knott, Robert B; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; Rekas, Agata; Kenche, Vijaya B; Ryan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The 140 residue intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (α-syn) self-associates to form fibrils that are the major constituent of the Lewy body intracellular protein inclusions, and neurotoxic oligomers. Both of these macromolecular structures are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Using ensemble optimisation modelling (EOM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on a size-exclusion column equipped beamline, we studied how the distribution of structural conformers in α-syn may be influenced by the presence of the familial early-onset mutations A30P, E45K and A53T, by substituting the four methionine residues with alanines and by reaction with copper (Cu2+) or an anti-fibril organic platinum (Pt) complex. We found that the WT had two major conformer groups, representing ensembles of compact and extended structures. The population of the extended group was increased in the more rapidly fibril-forming E45K and A53T mutants, while the compact group was enlarged in the oligomer-forming A30P mutant. Addition of Cu2+ resulted in the formation of an ensemble of compact conformers, while the anti-fibril agent and alanine substitution substantially reduced the population of extended conformers. Since our observations with the mutants suggest that fibrils may be drawn from the extended conformer ensemble, we propose that the compact and extended ensembles represent the beginning of oligomer and fibril formation pathways respectively, both of which have been reported to lead to a toxic gain of function. Manipulating these pathways and monitoring the results by EOM and SAXS may be useful in the development of anti-Parkinson's disease therapies.

  7. Intracellular formation of α-synuclein oligomers and the effect of heat shock protein 70 characterized by confocal single particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Johannes; Hillmer, Andreas S; Högen, Tobias; McLean, Pamela J; Giese, Armin

    2016-08-12

    Synucleinopathies such as dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson's disease are characterized by intracellular deposition of pathologically aggregated α-synuclein. The details of the molecular pathogenesis of PD and especially the conditions that lead to intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein and the role of these aggregates in cell death remain unknown. In cell free in vitro systems considerable knowledge about the aggregation processes has been gathered. In comparison, the knowledge about these aggregation processes in cells is far behind. In cells α-synuclein aggregates can be toxic. However, the crucial particle species responsible for decisive steps in pathogenesis such as seeding a continuing aggregation process and triggering cell death remain to be identified. In order to understand the complex nature of intracellular α-synuclein aggregate formation, we analyzed fluorescent particles formed by venus and α-synuclein-venus fusion proteins and α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins derived from gently lyzed cells. With these techniques we were able to identify and characterize α-synuclein oligomers formed in cells. Especially the use of α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins enabled us to identify very small α-synuclein oligomers with high sensitivity. Furthermore, we were able to study the molecular effect of heat shock protein 70, which is known to inhibit α-synuclein aggregation in cells. Heat shock protein 70 does not only influence the size of α-synuclein oligomers, but also their quantity. In summary, this approach based on fluorescence single particle spectroscopy, that is suited for high throughput measurements, can be used to detect and characterize intracellularly formed α-synuclein aggregates and characterize the effect of molecules that interfere with α-synuclein aggregate formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Síntesis y caracterización de un complejo oligomérico de 1,1’-bis(octadecil)-2,2’-bibencimidazol y Cobalto(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Ninán, Oscar; Galli, Carla; Santiago, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Se reporta la preparación de un complejo oligomérico obtenido a partir de la reacción del 1,1’-bis(octadecil)-2,2’-bencimidazol y CoCl2. Este oligómero ha sido caracterizado por espectroscopía UV-visible, FT-IR y 1H-RMN. El análisis elemental no arroja una relación definida entre el cobalto y el ligando. El complejo oligomérico sufre descomposición frente al calentamiento según el análisis DSC. The preparation of an oligomeric complex obtained from the reaction of 1,1'-bis(octadecyl)-2,2'-...

  9. Thermodynamically stable amyloid-β monomers have much lower membrane affinity than the small oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bidyut; Das, Anand K; Maiti, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is an extracellular 39-43 residue long peptide present in the mammalian cerebrospinal fluid, whose aggregation is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Small oligomers of Aβ are currently thought to be the key to toxicity. However, it is not clear why the monomers of Aβ are non-toxic, and at what stage of aggregation toxicity emerges. Interactions of Aβ with cell membranes is thought to be the initiator of toxicity, but membrane binding studies with different preparations of monomers and oligomers have not settled this issue. We have earlier found that thermodynamically stable Aβ monomers emerge spontaneously from oligomeric mixtures upon long term incubation in physiological solutions (Nag et al., 2011). Here we show that the membrane-affinity of these stable Aβ monomers is much lower than that of a mixture of monomers and small oligomers (containing dimers to decamers), providing a clue to the emergence of toxicity. Fluorescently labeled Aβ40 monomers show negligible binding to cell membranes of a neuronal cell line (RN46A) at physiological concentrations (250 nM), while oligomers at the same concentrations show strong binding within 30 min of incubation. The increased affinity most likely does not require any specific neuronal receptor, since this difference in membrane-affinity was also observed in a somatic cell-line (HEK 293T). Similar results are also obtained for Aβ42 monomers and oligomers. Minimal amount of cell death is observed at these concentrations even after 36 h of incubation. It is likely that membrane binding precedes subsequent slower toxic events induced by Aβ. Our results (a) provide an explanation for the non-toxic nature of Aβ monomers, (b) suggest that Aβ toxicity emerges at the initial oligomeric phase, and (c) provide a quick assay for monitoring the benign-to-toxic transformation of Aβ.

  10. Natural amyloid-β oligomers acutely impair the formation of a contextual fear memory in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara A Kittelberger

    Full Text Available Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss.

  11. Major Reaction Coordinates Linking Transient Amyloid-β Oligomers to Fibrils Measured at Atomic Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Bappaditya; Bhowmik, Debanjan; Maity, Barun Kumar; Mote, Kaustubh R; Dhara, Debabrata; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Maiti, Sudipta; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2017-08-22

    The structural underpinnings for the higher toxicity of the oligomeric intermediates of amyloidogenic peptides, compared to the mature fibrils, remain unknown at present. The transient nature and heterogeneity of the oligomers make it difficult to follow their structure. Here, using vibrational and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that freely aggregating Aβ40 oligomers in physiological solutions have an intramolecular antiparallel configuration that is distinct from the intermolecular parallel β-sheet structure observed in mature fibrils. The intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network flips nearly 90°, and the two β-strands of each monomeric unit move apart, to give rise to the well-known intermolecular in-register parallel β-sheet structure in the mature fibrils. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance distance measurements capture the interstrand separation within monomer units during the transition from the oligomer to the fibril form. We further find that the D23-K28 salt-bridge, a major feature of the Aβ40 fibrils and a focal point of mutations linked to early onset Alzheimer's disease, is not detectable in the small oligomers. Molecular dynamics simulations capture the correlation between changes in the D23-K28 distance and the flipping of the monomer secondary structure between antiparallel and parallel β-sheet architectures. Overall, we propose interstrand separation and salt-bridge formation as key reaction coordinates describing the structural transition of the small Aβ40 oligomers to fibrils. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamically stable amyloid-β monomers have much lower membrane affinity than the small oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyut eSarkar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ is an extracellular 39-43 residue long peptide present in the mammalian cerebrospinal fluid, whose aggregation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Small oligomers of Aβ are currently thought to be the key to toxicity. However, it is not clear why the monomers of Aβ are non-toxic, and at what stage of aggregation toxicity emerges. Interactions of Aβ with cell membranes is thought to be the initiator of toxicity, but membrane-binding studies with different preparations of monomers and oligomers have not settled this issue. We have earlier found that thermodynamically stable Aβ monomers emerge spontaneously from oligomeric mixtures upon long term incubation in physiological solutions (Nag et al, JBC, 2011. Here we show that the membrane-affinity of these stable Aβ monomers is much lower than that of a mixture of small oligomers (containing dimers to decamers, providing a clue to the emergence of toxicity. Fluorescently labeled Aβ40 monomers show negligible binding to cell membranes of a neuronal cell line (RN46A at physiological concentrations (250 nM, while oligomers at the same concentrations show strong binding within 30 minutes of incubation. The increased affinity most likely does not require any specific neuronal receptor, since this difference in membrane-affinity was also observed in a somatic cell-line (HEK 293T. Similar results are also obtained for Aβ42 monomers and oligomers. Minimal amount of cell death is observed at these concentrations even after 36 hours of incubation. It is likely that membrane binding precedes subsequent slower toxic events induced by Aβ. Our results a provide an explanation for the non-toxic nature of Aβ monomers, b suggest that Aβ toxicity emerges at the initial oligomeric phase, and c provide a quick assay for monitoring the benign-to-toxic transformation of Aβ.

  13. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Robin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Ly, Sonny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Science Directorate; Hilt, Silvia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Petrlova, Jitka [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Maezawa, Izumi [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Kálai, Tamás [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Hideg, Kálmán [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Jin, Lee-Way [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Laurence, Ted A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Voss, John C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  14. Assessment of two hybrid van der Waals density functionals for covalent and non-covalent binding of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Jiao, Yang; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Rangel, Tonatiuh; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Hyldgaard, Per

    2017-06-01

    Two hybrid van der Waals density functionals (vdW-DFs) are developed using 25% Fock exchange with (i) the consistent-exchange vdW-DF-cx functional [K. Berland and P. Hyldgaard, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035412 (2014)] and (ii) with the vdW-DF2 functional [K. Lee et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 081101 (2010)]. The ability to describe covalent and non-covalent binding properties of molecules is assessed. For properties related to covalent binding, atomization energies (G2-1 set), molecular reaction energies (G2RC set), and ionization energies (G21IP set) are benchmarked against experimental reference values. We find that hybrid-vdW-DF-cx yields results that are rather similar to those of the standard non-empirical hybrid PBE0 [C. Adamo and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 6158 (1999)], with mean average deviations (MADs) of 4.9 and 5.0 kcal/mol for the G2-1 set, respectively. In this comparison, experimental reference values are used, back corrected by wavefunction-based quantum-chemistry calculations of zero-point energies. Hybrid vdW-DF2 follows somewhat different trends, showing on average significantly larger deviations from the reference energies, with a MAD of 14.5 kcal/mol for the G2-1 set. Non-covalent binding properties of molecules are assessed using the S22 benchmark set of non-covalently bonded dimers and the X40 set of dimers of small halogenated molecules, using wavefunction-based quantum chemistry results as references. For the S22 set, hybrid-vdW-DF-cx performs better than standard vdW-DF-cx for the mostly hydrogen-bonded systems, with MAD dropping from 0.6 to 0.3 kcal/mol, but worse for purely dispersion-bonded systems, with MAD increasing from 0.2 to 0.6 kcal/mol. Hybrid-vdW-DF2 offers a slight improvement over standard vdW-DF2. Similar trends are found for the X40 set, with hybrid-vdW-DF-cx performing particularly well for binding energies involving the strongly polar hydrogen halides, but poorly for systems with tiny binding energies. Our study of the X40 set

  15. Essential motions in a fungal lipase with bound substrate, covalently attached inhibitor and product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Bywater, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    of response along the pathway suggesting that binding, catalysis and product clearance occur along different energy surfaces. Motions in the enzyme with a covalently attached ligand are more complex and occur along several eigenvectors. The magnitudes of the fluctuations in these individual subspaces...... are significantly smaller than those observed for the substrate and product molecules, indicating that the energy surface is shallow and that a relatively large number of conformational substates are accessible. On the other hand, substrate binding and product release occur at distinct modes of the protein...... flexibility suggesting that these processes occur along rough energy surfaces with only a few minima. Detailed energetic analyses along the trajectories indicated that in all cases binding is dominated by van der Waals interactions. The carboxylate form of the product is stabilized by a tight hydrogen bond...

  16. Cucurbit[7]uril disrupts aggregate formation between rhodamine B dyes covalently attached to glass substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halterman, Ronald L; Moore, Jason L; Yip, Wai Tak

    2011-07-01

    Dye aggregation is detrimental to the performance of high optical density dye-doped photonic materials. To overcome this challenge, the ability of cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) as a molecular host to disrupt aggregate formation on glass substrates was examined. Rhodamine B was covalently attached to glass slides by initially coating the surface with azidohexylsiloxane followed by copper-catalyzed "click" triazole formation with rhodamine B propargyl ester. The absorption and emission spectra of rhodamine B coated slides in water indicated diverse heterogeneous properties as surface dye density varied. Fluorescence quenching due to dye aggregation was evident at high surface dye density. Addition of aqueous cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) to the surface-tethered dyes perturbed the spectra to reveal a considerable reduction in heterogeneity, which suggested that the presence of a surface in close proximity does not significantly impair CB7's ability to complex with tethered rhodamine B.

  17. Covalent Immobilization of β-Glucosidase on Magnetic Particles for Lignocellulose Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alftrén, Johan; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-01-01

    β-Glucosidase hydrolyzes cellobiose to glucose and is an important enzyme in the consortium used for hydrolysis of cellulosic and lignocellulosic feedstocks. In the present work, β-glucosidase was covalently immobilized on non-porous magnetic particles to enable re-use of the enzyme. It was found....... The performance and recyclability of immobilized β-glucosidase on more complex substrate (pretreated spruce) was also studied. It was shown that adding immobilized β-glucosidase (16 U/g dry matter) to free cellulases (8 FPU/g dry matter) increased the hydrolysis yield of pretreated spruce from ca. 44 % to ca. 65...... %. In addition, it was possible to re-use the immobilized β-glucosidase in the spruce and retain activity for at least four cycles. The immobilized enzyme thus shows promise for lignocellulose hydrolysis....

  18. Covalent organic frameworks comprising cobalt porphyrins for catalytic CO2 reduction in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.; Diercks, C. S.; Zhang, Y. -B.; Kornienko, N.; Nichols, E. M.; Zhao, Y.; Paris, A. R.; Kim, D.; Yang, P.; Yaghi, O. M.; Chang, C. J.

    2015-08-20

    Conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) and other value-added carbon products is an important challenge for clean energy research. Here we report modular optimization of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), in which the building units are cobalt porphyrin catalysts linked by organic struts through imine bonds, to prepare a catalytic material for aqueous electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO. The catalysts exhibit high Faradaic efficiency (90%) and turnover numbers (up to 290,000, with initial turnover frequency of 9400 hour-1) at pH 7 with an overpotential of –0.55 volts, equivalent to a 26-fold improvement in activity compared with the molecular cobalt complex, with no degradation over 24 hours. X-ray absorption data reveal the influence of the COF environment on the electronic structure of the catalytic cobalt centers.

  19. Studies of TAK1-centered polypharmacology with novel covalent TAK1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Gurbani, Deepak; Weisberg, Ellen L; Jones, Douglas S; Rao, Suman; Singer, William D; Bernard, Faviola M; Mowafy, Samar; Jenney, Annie; Du, Guangyan; Nonami, Atsushi; Griffin, James D; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Westover, Kenneth D; Sorger, Peter K; Gray, Nathanael S

    2017-02-15

    Targeted polypharmacology provides an efficient method of treating diseases such as cancer with complex, multigenic causes provided that compounds with advantageous activity profiles can be discovered. Novel covalent TAK1 inhibitors were validated in cellular contexts for their ability to inhibit the TAK1 kinase and for their polypharmacology. Several inhibitors phenocopied reported TAK1 inhibitor 5Z-7-oxozaenol with comparable efficacy and complementary kinase selectivity profiles. Compound 5 exhibited the greatest potency in RAS-mutated and wild-type RAS cell lines from various cancer types. A biotinylated derivative of 5, 27, was used to verify TAK1 binding in cells. The newly described inhibitors constitute useful tools for further development of multi-targeting TAK1-centered inhibitors for cancer and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Causative factors for formation of toxic islet amyloid polypeptide oligomer in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong HR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hye Rin Jeong, Seong Soo A AnDepartment of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP is a peptide hormone that is synthesized and cosecreted with insulin from insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells. Recently, h-IAPP was proposed to be the main component responsible for the cytotoxic pancreatic amyloid deposits in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Since the causative factors of IAPP (or amylin oligomer aggregation are not fully understood, this review will discuss the various forms of h-IAPP aggregation. Not all forms of IAPP aggregates trigger the destruction of β-cell function and loss of β-cell mass; however, toxic oligomers do trigger these events. Once these toxic oligomers form under abnormal metabolic conditions in T2DM, they can lead to cell disruption by inducing cell membrane destabilization. In this review, the various factors that have been shown to induce toxic IAPP oligomer formation will be presented, as well as the potential mechanism of oligomer and fibril formation from pro-IAPPs. Initially, pro-IAPPs undergo enzymatic reactions to produce the IAPP monomers, which can then develop into oligomers and fibrils. By this mechanism, toxic oligomers could be generated by diverse pathway components. Thus, the interconnections between factors that influence amyloid aggregation (eg, absence of PC2 enzyme, deamidation, reduction of disulfide bonds, environmental factors in the cell, genetic mutations, copper metal ions, and heparin will be presented. Hence, this review will aid in understanding the fundamental causative factors contributing to IAPP oligomer formation and support studies for investigating novel T2DM therapeutic approaches, such as the development of inhibitory agents for preventing oligomerization at the early stages of diabetic pathology.Keywords: amyloid aggregation, causative factor, IAPP, islet

  1. Intracellular formation of α-synuclein oligomers and the effect of heat shock protein 70 characterized by confocal single particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Johannes [Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases – DZNE, Site Munich, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 17, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hillmer, Andreas S. [Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 23, 81377 Munich (Germany); Högen, Tobias [Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); McLean, Pamela J. [Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Giese, Armin, E-mail: armin.giese@med.uni-muenchen.de [Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 23, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2016-08-12

    Synucleinopathies such as dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson’s disease are characterized by intracellular deposition of pathologically aggregated α-synuclein. The details of the molecular pathogenesis of PD and especially the conditions that lead to intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein and the role of these aggregates in cell death remain unknown. In cell free in vitro systems considerable knowledge about the aggregation processes has been gathered. In comparison, the knowledge about these aggregation processes in cells is far behind. In cells α-synuclein aggregates can be toxic. However, the crucial particle species responsible for decisive steps in pathogenesis such as seeding a continuing aggregation process and triggering cell death remain to be identified. In order to understand the complex nature of intracellular α-synuclein aggregate formation, we analyzed fluorescent particles formed by venus and α-synuclein-venus fusion proteins and α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins derived from gently lyzed cells. With these techniques we were able to identify and characterize α-synuclein oligomers formed in cells. Especially the use of α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins enabled us to identify very small α-synuclein oligomers with high sensitivity. Furthermore, we were able to study the molecular effect of heat shock protein 70, which is known to inhibit α-synuclein aggregation in cells. Heat shock protein 70 does not only influence the size of α-synuclein oligomers, but also their quantity. In summary, this approach based on fluorescence single particle spectroscopy, that is suited for high throughput measurements, can be used to detect and characterize intracellularly formed α-synuclein aggregates and characterize the effect of molecules that interfere with α-synuclein aggregate formation. - Highlights: • Single particle spectroscopy detects intracellular formed α-synuclein aggregates. • Fusion proteins allow detection of protein

  2. Microsolvation and the Effects of Non-Covalent Interactions on Intramolecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foguel, Lidor; Vealey, Zachary; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Physicochemical processes brought about by non-covalent interactions between neighboring molecules are undeniably of crucial importance in the world around us, being responsible for effects ranging from the subtle (yet precise) control of biomolecular recognition events to the very existence of condensed phases. Of particular interest is the differential ability of distinct non-covalent forces, such as those mediated by dispersion-dominated aryl (π-π) coupling and electrostatically-driven hydrogen bonding, to affect unimolecular transformations by altering potential surface topographies and the nature of reaction coordinates. A concerted experimental and computational investigation of "microsolvation" (solvation at the molecular level) has been undertaken to elucidate the site-specific coupling between solute and solvent degrees of freedom, as well as attendant consequences for the efficiency and pathway of intrinsic proton-transfer dynamics. Targeted species have been synthesized in situ under "cold" supersonic free-jet expansion conditions (T_{rot} ≈ 1-2K) by complexing an active (proton-transfer) substrate with various ligands (e.g., water isotopologs and benzene derivatives) for which competing interaction mechanisms can lead to unique binding motifs. A series of fluorescence-based spectroscopic measurements have been performed on binary adducts formed with the prototypical 6-hydroxy-2-formylfulvene (HFF) system, where a quasi-linear intramolecular O-H...O bond and a zero-point energy that straddles the proton-transfer barrier crest synergistically yield the largest tunneling-induced splitting ever reported for the ground electronic state of an isolated neutral molecule. Such characteristics afford a localized metric for unraveling incipient changes in unimolecular reactivity, with comparison of experimentally observed and quantum-chemical predicted rovibronic landscapes serving to discriminate complexes built upon electrostatic (hydrogen-bonding) and

  3. Synthesis of Cycloveratrylene Macrocycles and Benzyl Oligomers Catalysed by Bentonite under Microwave/Infrared and Solvent-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Salmón

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tonsil Actisil FF, which is a commercial bentonitic clay, promotes the formation of cycloveratrylene macrocycles and benzyl oligomers from the corresponding benzyl alcohols in good yields under microwave heating and infrared irradiation in the absence of solvent in both cases. The catalytic reaction is sensitive to the type of substituent on the aromatic ring. Thus, when benzyl alcohol was substituted with a methylenedioxy, two methoxy or three methoxy groups, a cyclooligomerisation process was induced. Unsubstituted, methyl and methoxy benzyl alcohols yielded linear oligomers. In addition, computational chemistry calculations were performed to establish a validated mechanistic pathway to explain the growth of the obtained linear oligomers.

  4. Thiophene-based donor–acceptor co-oligomers by copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Potratz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present a three-component one-pot procedure to synthesize co-oligomers of a donor–acceptor–donor type, in which thiophene moieties work as donor and 1,2,3-triazoles as acceptor units. In this respect, terminally ethynylated (oligothiophenes were coupled to halogenated (oligothiophenes in the presence of sodium azide and a copper catalyst. Optoelectronic properties of various thiophene-1,2,3-triazole co-oligomers were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Several co-oligomers were electropolymerized to the corresponding conjugated polymers.

  5. Programmable oligomers targeting 5'-GGGG-3' in the minor groove of DNA and NF-kappaB binding inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, David M; Poposki, Julie A; Marques, Michael A; Dervan, Peter B

    2007-01-15

    A series of hairpin oligomers containing benzimidazole (Bi) and imidazopyridine (Ip) rings were synthesized and screened to target 5'-WGGGGW-3', a core sequence in the DNA-binding site of NF-kappaB, a prolific transcription factor important in biology and disease. Five Bi and Ip containing oligomers bound to the 5'-WGGGGW-3' site with high affinity. One of the oligomers (Im-Im-Im-Im-gamma-Py-Bi-Py-Bi-beta-Dp) was able to inhibit DNA binding by the transcription factor NF-kappaB.

  6. Purified high molecular weight synthetic Aβ(1-42) and biological Aβ oligomers are equipotent in rapidly inducing MTT formazan exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Adam M; Housley, Molly; Murphy, M Paul; Levine, Harry

    2011-06-15

    Synthetic soluble Aβ oligomers are often used as a surrogate for biologic material in a number of model systems. We compared the activity of Aβ oligomers (synthetic and cell culture media derived) on the human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and C2C12 mouse myoblast cell lines in a novel, modified MTT assay. Separating oligomers from monomeric peptide by size exclusion chromatography produced effects at peptide concentrations approaching physiologic levels (10-100 nM). Purified oligomers, but not monomers or fibrils, elicited an increase of a detergent-insoluble form of MTT formazan within 2h as opposed to a control toxin (H(2)O(2)). This effect was comparable for biological and synthetic peptide in both cell types. Monomeric Aβ attenuated the effect of soluble oligomers. This study suggests that the activities of biological and synthetic oligomers are indistinguishable during early stages of Aβ oligomer-cell interaction.

  7. Effect of photocurrent enhancement in porphyrin-graphene covalent hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianguo; Niu, Lin; Liu, Jixian; Wang, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Xie, Shiqiang; Huang, Linjun; Xu, Qingsong; Wang, Yuan; Belfiore, Laurence A

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets were covalently functionalized with 5-p-aminophenyl-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin (NH2TPP) by an amidation reaction between the amino group in NH2TPP and carboxyl groups in GO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning and transmission electron microscopies reveal that NH2TPP covalent bonds form on the double surface of graphene oxide sheets, generating a unique nano-framework, i.e., NH2TPP-graphene-NH2TPP. Its UV-visible spectroscopy reveals that the absorption spectrum is not a linear superposition of the spectra of NH2TPP and graphene oxide, because a 59nm red shift of the strong graphene oxide absorption is observed from 238 to 297nm, with significant spectral broadening between 300 and 700nm. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy indicates efficient quenching of NH2TPP photoluminescence in this hybrid material, suggesting that photo-induced electron transfer occurs at the interface between NH2TPP and GO. A reversible on/off photo-current density of 47mA/cm(2) is observed when NH2TPP-graphene-NH2TPP hybrid sandwiches are subjected to pulsed white-light illumination. Covalently-bound porphyrins decrease the optical HOMO/LUMO band gap of graphene oxide by ≈1eV, according to UV-visible spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry predicts a small HOMO/LUMO band gap of 0.84eV for NH2TPP-graphene-NH2TPP hybrid sandwiches, which is consistent with efficient electron transfer and fluorescence quenching.

  8. Oligomer formation during gas-phase ozonolysis of small alkenes and enol ethers: new evidence for the central role of the Criegee Intermediate as oligomer chain unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sadezky

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available An important fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed by atmospheric oxidation of diverse volatile organic compounds (VOC has recently been shown to consist of high-molecular weight oligomeric species. In our previous study (Sadezky et al., 2006, we reported the identification and characterization of oligomers as main constituents of SOA from gas-phase ozonolysis of small enol ethers. These oligomers contained repeated chain units of the same chemical composition as the main Criegee Intermediates (CI formed during the ozonolysis reaction, which were CH2O2 (mass 46 for alkyl vinyl ethers (AVE and C2H4O2 (mass 60 for ethyl propenyl ether (EPE. In the present work, we extend our previous study (Sadezky et al., 2006 to another enol ether (ethyl butenyl ether EBE and a variety of structurally related small alkenes (trans-3-hexene, trans-4-octene and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene.

    Experiments have been carried out in a 570 l spherical glass reactor at atmospheric conditions in the absence of seed aerosol. SOA formation was measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS. SOA filter samples were collected and chemically characterized off-line by ESI(+/MS-TOF and ESI(+/MS/MS-TOF, and elemental compositions were confirmed by ESI(+/MS/MS-FTICR. The results for all investigated unsaturated compounds are in excellent agreement with the observations of our previous study (Sadezky et al., 2006. Analysis of the collected SOA filter samples reveal the presence of oligomeric compounds in the mass range 200 to 800 u as major constituents. The repeated chain units of these oligomers are shown to systematically have the same chemical composition as the respective main Criegee Intermediate (CI formed during ozonolysis of the unsaturated compounds, which is C3H6O2 (mass 74 for ethyl butenyl ether (EBE, trans-3-hexene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene

  9. Effect of photocurrent enhancement in porphyrin–graphene covalent hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jianguo, E-mail: jianguotangde@hotmail.com [Institute of Hybrid Materials―the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Niu, Lin; Liu, Jixian; Wang, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Xie, Shiqiang; Huang, Linjun; Xu, Qingsong; Wang, Yuan [Institute of Hybrid Materials―the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Belfiore, Laurence A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets were covalently functionalized with 5-p-aminophenyl-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin (NH{sub 2}TPP) by an amidation reaction between the amino group in NH{sub 2}TPP and carboxyl groups in GO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning and transmission electron microscopies reveal that NH{sub 2}TPP covalent bonds form on the double surface of graphene oxide sheets, generating a unique nano-framework, i.e., NH{sub 2}TPP-graphene-NH{sub 2}TPP. Its UV–visible spectroscopy reveals that the absorption spectrum is not a linear superposition of the spectra of NH{sub 2}TPP and graphene oxide, because a 59 nm red shift of the strong graphene oxide absorption is observed from 238 to 297 nm, with significant spectral broadening between 300 and 700 nm. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy indicates efficient quenching of NH{sub 2}TPP photoluminescence in this hybrid material, suggesting that photo-induced electron transfer occurs at the interface between NH{sub 2}TPP and GO. A reversible on/off photo-current density of 47 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed when NH{sub 2}TPP-graphene-NH{sub 2}TPP hybrid sandwiches are subjected to pulsed white-light illumination. Covalently-bound porphyrins decrease the optical HOMO/LUMO band gap of graphene oxide by ≈ 1 eV, according to UV–visible spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry predicts a small HOMO/LUMO band gap of 0.84 eV for NH{sub 2}TPP-graphene-NH{sub 2}TPP hybrid sandwiches, which is consistent with efficient electron transfer and fluorescence quenching. - Highlights: • Porphyrins are covalently bound to sheets of graphene oxide via an amidation reaction. • The formed hetero-junction interface decreases the optical band gap of graphene oxide. • Cyclic voltammetry predicts a graphene oxide band gap of 0.84 eV, which is easily photo-excited. • Its on/off photo-current density of 46 μA/cm{sup 2} is 5-fold larger than that for physically stacked hybrid.

  10. Synthesis of Polymers Containing Covalently Bonded NLO Chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denga, Xiao-Hua; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Walton, Connie; Penn, Benjamin B.; Amai, Robert L. S.; Clark, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Polymers containing covalently bonded nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores are expected to possess special properties such as greater stability, better mechanical processing, and easier film formation than their non-polymeric equivalent. For the present work, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was selected as the basic polymer unit on which to incorporate different NLO chromophores. The NLO components were variations of DIVA {[2-methoxyphenyl methylidene]-propanedinitrile} which we prepared from vanillin derivatives and malononitrile. These were esterified with methacrylic acid and polymerized either directly or with methyl methacrylate to form homopolymers or copolymers respectively. Characterization of the polymers and NLO property studies are underway.

  11. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, J

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms.

  12. Traction curves for the decohesion of covalent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2017-01-01

    We study, by first principles, the energy versus separation curves for the cleavage of a family of covalent crystals with the diamond and zincblende structure. We find that there is universality in the curves for different materials which is chemistry independent but specific to the geometry of the particular cleavage plane. Since these curves do not strictly follow the universal binding energy relationship (UBER), we present a derivation of an extension to this relationship that includes non-linear force terms. This extended form of UBER allows for a flexible and practical mathematical description of decohesion curves that can be applied to the quantification of cohesive zone models.

  13. Covalent attachment of 1-alkenes to oxidized platinum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Fabre, Bruno; Trilling, Anke K; Scheres, Luc; Franssen, Maurice C R; Zuilhof, Han

    2015-03-10

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The grafted alkyl layers display a hydrolytic stability that is comparable to that of alkyl thiols on Au. PtOx-alkene attachment is compatible with terminal ester moieties enabling further anchoring of functional groups, such as redox-active ferrocene, and thus has great potential to extend monolayer chemistry on noble metals.

  14. Immobilization of Lipase by Covalent Binding on Crosslinked Ally Dextran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangChen; SongGuoqiang; 等

    1998-01-01

    Lipase was immobilized by covalent binding on crosslinked allyl dextran using SESA as coupling agent.It is shown that this immobilization approach is an efficient one for lipase.The activity of the immobilized lipase can reach to 300-450U/g(dry weight).It exhibits good temperature stability,can retain 88% activity after being incubated at 70℃ for 2h.Special effects will be expected from our immobilized lipase in its applications in organic media due to the nature of the support.

  15. The Search for Covalently Ligandable Proteins in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Lal Badshah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary highlights the recent article published in Nature, June 2016, titled: “Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems”. They screened the whole proteome of different human cell lines and cell lysates. Around 700 druggable cysteines in the whole proteome were found to bind the electrophilic fragments in both active and inactive states of the proteins. Their experiment and computational docking results agreed with one another. The usefulness of this study in terms of bringing a change in medicinal chemistry is highlighted here.

  16. Uranyl-oxo coordination directed by non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Yin, Haolin; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2014-07-28

    Directed coordination of weakly Lewis acidic K(+) ions to weakly Lewis basic uranyl oxo ligands is accomplished through non-covalent cation-π and cation-F interactions for the first time. Comparison of a family of structurally related diarylamide ligands highlights the role that the cation-π and cation-F interactions play in guiding coordination. Cation binding to uranyl is demonstrated in the solid state and in solution, providing the shortest reported crystallographic uranyl-oxo to potassium distance. UV-Vis, TD-DFT calculations, and electrochemical measurements show that cation coordination directly impacts the electronics at the uranium(vi) cation.

  17. Biosensor platform based on carbon nanotubes covalently modified with aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, I. A.; Rubtsova, E. I.; Golovin, A. V.; Bobrinetskiy, I. I.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a new platform for biosensing applications. Aptamers as sensitive agents have a great potential and gives us possibility to have highest possible selectivity among other sensing agents like enzymes or antibodies. We covalently bound aptamers to the functional groups of c-CNTs and then put this system on the surface of polymer substrate. Thus we got high sensitive flexible transparent biological sensors. We also suggest that by varying aptamer type we can make set of biosensors for disease detection which can be integrated into self-healthcare systems and gadgets.

  18. Stereocomplexation in Copolymer Networks Incorporating Enantiomeric Glycerol-Based 3-Armed Lactide Oligomers and a 2-Armed ɛ-Caprolactone Oligomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Shibita

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of enantiomeric glycerol-based 3-armed lactide oligomers (H3DLAO and H3LLAO and a diethylene glycol-based 2-armed ɛ-caprolactone oligomer (H2CLO with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI produced polyesterurethane copolymer networks (PEU-3scLAO/2CLOs 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 0/100 with different feed ratios of stereocomplex (sc lactide oligomer (H3scLAO = H3DLAO + H3LLAO, H3DLAO/H3LLAO = 1/1 and H2CLO. Thermal and mechanical properties of the copolymer networks were compared with those of a simple homochiral (hc network (PEU-3DLAO produced by the reaction of H3DLAO and HDI. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric analyses revealed that sc crystallites are formed without any hc crystallization for PEU-3scLAO/2CLOs, and that PEU-3DLAO is amorphous. The melting temperatures of sc crystallites for PEU-3scLAO/2CLOs were much higher than that of hc crystallites of H3DLAO. The polarized optical microscopic analysis revealed that the nucleation efficiency is enhanced with increasing feed of H3scLAO fraction, whereas the spherulite growth rate is accelerated with increasing feed H2CLO fraction over 100/0-50/50 networks. PEU-3scLAO/2CLO 100/0 (i.e., PEU-3scLAO exhibited a higher tensile strength and modulus than PEU-3DLAO. The elongation at break and tensile toughness for PEU-3scLAO/2CLOs increased with an increasing feed amount of H2CLO.

  19. Time-resolved FRET binding assay to investigate hetero-oligomer binding properties: proof of concept with dopamine D1/D3 heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsou, Candide; Margathe, Jean-François; Oueslati, Nadia; Belhocine, Abderazak; Dupuis, Elodie; Thomas, Cécile; Mann, André; Ilien, Brigitte; Rognan, Didier; Trinquet, Eric; Hibert, Marcel; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Bonnet, Dominique; Durroux, Thierry

    2015-02-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been described to form hetero-oligomers. The importance of these complexes in physiology and pathology is considered crucial, and heterodimers represent promising new targets to discover innovative therapeutics. However, there is a lack of binding assays to allow the evaluation of ligand affinity for GPCR hetero-oligomers. Using dopamine receptors and more specifically the D1 and D3 receptors as GPCR models, we developed a new time-resolved FRET (TR-FRET) based assay to determine ligand affinity for the D1/D3 heteromer. Based on the high-resolution structure of the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R), six fluorescent probes derived from a known D3R partial agonist (BP 897) were designed, synthesized and evaluated as high affinity and selective ligands for the D3/D2 receptors, and for other dopamine receptor subtypes. The highest affinity ligand 21 was then employed in the development of the D1/D3 heteromer assay. The TR-FRET was monitored between a fluorescent tag donor carried by the D1 receptor (D1R) and a fluorescent acceptor D3R ligand 21. The newly reported assay, easy to implement on other G protein-coupled receptors, constitutes an attractive strategy to screen for heteromer ligands.

  20. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio [Responses to Environmental Signals and Stresses, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takahara, Kazuhiko, E-mail: ktakahar@zoo.zool.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan); Inaba, Kayo [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  1. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  2. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  3. Non-covalent and reversible functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Di Crescenzo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative nanoscaffolds for applications in fields such as material science, drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Their versatile physicochemical features are nonetheless limited by their scarce solubilization in both aqueous and organic solvents. In order to overcome this drawback CNTs can be easily non-covalently functionalized with different dispersants. In the present review we focus on the peculiar hydrophobic character of pristine CNTs that prevent them to easily disperse in organic solvents. We report some interesting examples of CNTs dispersants with the aim to highlight the essential features a molecule should possess in order to act as a good carbon nanotube dispersant both in water and in organic solvents. The review pinpoints also a few examples of dispersant design. The last section is devoted to the exploitation of the major quality of non-covalent functionalization that is its reversibility and the possibility to obtain stimuli-responsive precipitation or dispersion of CNTs.

  4. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Shimada, Shogo; Okada, Tomoko

    2017-06-29

    The interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The platinum dichloride complex, di-dimethylsulfoxide-dichloroplatinum (II) (Pt(DMSO)2Cl2), was immobilized on an AFM probe by coordinating the platinum to two amino groups to form a complex similar to Pt(en)Cl2, which is structurally similar to cisplatin. The retraction forces were measured between the platinum complex and DNA molecules immobilized on mica plates using force curve measurements. The histogram of the retraction force for λ-DNA showed several peaks; the unit retraction force was estimated to be 130 pN for a pulling rate of 60 nm/s. The retraction forces were also measured separately for four single-base DNA oligomers (adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine). Retraction forces were frequently observed in the force curves for the DNA oligomers of guanine and adenine. For the guanine DNA oligomer, the most frequent retraction force was slightly lower than but very similar to the retraction force for λ-DNA. A higher retraction force was obtained for the adenine DNA oligomer than for the guanine oligomer. This result is consistent with a higher retraction activation energy of adenine with the Pt complex being than that of guanine because the kinetic rate constant for retraction correlates to exp(FΔx - ΔE) where ΔE is an activation energy, F is an applied force, and Δx is a displacement of distance.

  5. DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers : experimental verification of the method on the E-coli genome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosavljevic, A.; Savkovic, S.; Crkvenjakov, R.; Salbego, D.; Serrato, H.; Kreuzer, H.; Gemmell, A.; Batus, S.; Grujic, D.; Carnahan, S.; Tepavcevic, J.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1996-10-01

    A newly developed method for sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers is verified for the first time in genome-scale experiments. The experiments involved hybridization of 15,328 randomly selected 2-kb genomic clones of Escherichia coli with 997 short oligomer probes to detect complementary oligomers within the clones. Lists of oligomers detected within individual clones were compiled into a database. The database was then searched using known E. coli sequences as queries. The goal was to recognize the clones that are identical or similar to the query sequences. A total of 76 putative recognitions were tested in two separate but complementary recognition experiments. The results indicate high specificity of recognition. Current and prospective applications of this novel method are discussed.

  6. DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers: experimental verification of the method on the E. coli genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Savković, S; Crkvenjakov, R; Salbego, D; Serrato, H; Kreuzer, H; Gemmell, A; Batus, S; Grujić, D; Carnahan, S; Paunesku, T; Tepavcević, J

    1996-10-01

    A newly developed method for sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers is verified for the first time in genome-scale experiments. The experiments involved hybridization of 15,328 randomly selected 2-kb genomic clones of Escherichia coli with 997 short oligomer probes to detect complementary oligomers within the clones. Lists of oligomers detected within individual clones were compiled into a database. The database was then searched using known E. coli sequences as queries. The goal was to recognize the clones that are identical or similar to the query sequences. A total of 76 putative recognitions were tested in two separate but complementary recognition experiments. The results indicate high specificity of recognition. Current and prospective applications of this novel method are discussed.

  7. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-imide, and Ester-amide Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystaloligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oli-gomers are stable forup to an hour in the melt phase. They are highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oigomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures.

  8. "Nail" and "comb" effects of cholesterol modified NIPAm oligomers on cancer targeting liposomes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2014-01-01

    Thermosensitive liposomes are a promising approach to controlled release and reduced drug cytotoxicity. Low molecular weight N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) oligomers (NOs) with different architectures (main chain NOs (MCNOs) and side chain NOs (SCNOs)) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and radical polymerization and then separately used to prepare thermosensitive liposomes. A more controlled and enhanced release was observed for both NO liposomes compared to pristine ones. Two release mechanisms depending on the oligomer architecture, namely "nail" for MCNOs and "comb" for SCNOs, are proposed. In addition to thermosensitivity, the cancer targeting property of NO liposomes was achieved by further biotinylation of the delivery system. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Structural Investigations of on-pathway Oligomers of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Nors; Horvath, Istvan; Weise, Christoph F.;

    Here we present Small Angle X-ray (SAXS) data of α-synuclein oligomers obtained by incubation with the ligand FN075. Data from complementary methods such as NMR and CD are also shown. Aggregated α-synuclein is the major constituent of the Lewy Bodies regarded as the hallmark of Parkinson’s Disease...... and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) (Spillantini et al. 1997). The role of lewy bodies in the pathology of Parkinson’s Disease and DLB is however not well understood but in vitro experiments suggest that transient oligomeric species could be involved in cell toxicity (Giehm et al. 2011). The natural function...... of α-synuclein has also not been established (Drescher et al. 2012). The monomeric species of α-synuclein is intrinsically disordered meaning it does not have just one stable conformation in solution. The solution structure of an on pathway oligomer consisting of 16 monomers has been solved...

  10. Structure and Oligomers Distribution of Commercial Tara (Caesalpina spinosa Hydrolysable Tannin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele GIOVANDO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extracted commercial Tara tanninextract have been examined by Matrix Assisted LaserDesorption/Ionisation Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOFmass spectrometry and by High Pressure LiquidChromatography (HPLC. The Tara extract has beenfound to be composed of a series of oligomers ofpolygallic acid attached by an ester link to one quinicacid. They constitute the oligomers in higherproportion in the extract. Other polygallic chains linkedto one only or two repeating units such as caffeic acidand methylated quinic, methylated gallic andmethylated caffeic acids are also present. Negativeion mode MALDI-TOF showed that somecarbohydrate residues appear to still be present,linked to the polyphenolic material of the extract buttheir proportion is very low as would be expected of asolvent extracted tannin.

  11. Similarities and differences in the influence of polycations and oligomers on DNA conformation and packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, Nina; Dribinsky, Boris

    2016-05-01

    A comparison of DNA conformational changes in a solution containing the poly-l-lysine with the number of monomers z=3, 5, 17, 20, 270, 325 and polyamines (spermine and spermidine) was carried out in 1M and 5mM NaCl solutions. It was shown that despite the identical results of DNA condensation induced by compounds, their influence on the DNA conformation prior to packaging depends on whether they belong to a long polycations or short oligomers. DNA secondary and tertiary structures were examined using Circular Dichroism, UV-vis Spectrophotometry, Dynamic Light Scattering, Low Gradient Viscometry, Flow Birefringence, and AFM. The phase diagrams for systems of DNA-polycations, DNA-oligomers, DNA-polyamines were drawn.

  12. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-12-16

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies.

  13. QIAD assay for quantitating a compound’s efficacy in elimination of toxic Aβ oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Oleksandr; Dunkelmann, Tina; Gremer, Lothar; van Groen, Thomas; Mirecka, Ewa A.; Kadish, Inga; Willuweit, Antje; Kutzsche, Janine; Jürgens, Dagmar; Rudolph, Stephan; Tusche, Markus; Bongen, Patrick; Pietruszka, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Langen, Karl-Josef; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Janssen, Arnold; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Funke, Susanne A.; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for a central role of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. We have developed a fast, reliable and robust in vitro assay, termed QIAD, to quantify the effect of any compound on the Aβ aggregate size distribution. Applying QIAD, we studied the effect of homotaurine, scyllo-inositol, EGCG, the benzofuran derivative KMS88009, ZAβ3W, the D-enantiomeric peptide D3 and its tandem version D3D3 on Aβ aggregation. The predictive power of the assay for in vivo efficacy is demonstrated by comparing the oligomer elimination efficiency of D3 and D3D3 with their treatment effects in animal models of Alzheimer´s disease. PMID:26394756

  14. Characterisation of proanthocyanidins from black soybeans: isolation and characterisation of proanthocyanidin oligomers from black soybean seed coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chiaki; Oki, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Tadashi; Nanba, Fumio; Yamada, Katsushige; Toda, Toshiya

    2013-12-01

    Proanthocyanidin oligomers (dimers to tetramers) were isolated from black soybean seed coats, using Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and reversed-phase preparative HPLC. The isolated oligomers consisted of only (-)-epicatechin units, which were linked through either 4β→8 or 4β→6 (B-type) bonds. Procyanidin B2, procyanidin C1, and cinnamtannin A2 were identified as the main compounds of the proanthocyanidin dimers, trimers, and tetramers, respectively.

  15. Quarternization of 3-azido-1-propyne oligomers obtained by copper(I-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Nakano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 3-Azido-1-propyne oligomer (oligoAP samples, prepared by copper(I-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC polymerization, were quarternized quantitatively with methyl iodide in sulfolane at 60 °C to obtain soluble oligomers. The conformation of the quarternized oligoAP in dilute DMSO-d6 solution was examined by pulse-field-gradient spin-echo NMR based on the touched bead model.

  16. Adiponectin oligomers in human serum during acute and chronic exercise: relation to lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, T; Wegewitz, U; Brechtel, L; Freudenberg, M; Mai, K; Möhlig, M; Diederich, S; Ristow, M; Rochlitz, H; Pfeiffer, A F H; Spranger, J

    2007-01-01

    Beneficial effects of physical exercise include improved insulin sensitivity, which may be affected by a modulated release of adiponectin, which is exclusively synthesized in white adipose tissue and mediates insulin sensitivity. Adiponectin circulates in three different oligomers, which also have a distinct biological function. We therefore aimed to investigate the distribution of adiponectin oligomers in human serum in relation to physical activity. Thirty-eight lean and healthy individuals were investigated. Seven healthy women and 8 healthy men volunteered to investigate the effect of chronic exercise, at 3 different time points with different training intensities. These individuals were all highly trained and were compared to a control group with low physical activity (n = 15). For studying acute exercise effects, 8 healthy men participated in a bicycle test. Adiponectin was determined by ELISA, oligomers were detected by non-denaturating western blot. Total adiponectin and oligomers were unchanged by acute exercise. LDL cholesterol was significantly lower in the chronic exercise group (p = 0.03). Total adiponectin levels and oligomers were not different between these two groups and were unaltered by different training intensities. However, total adiponectin and specifically HMW oligomers correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.459; p = 0.009). We conclude that acute and chronic exercise does not directly affect circulating adiponectin or oligomer distribution in lean and healthy individuals. Whether such regulation is relevant in individuals with a metabolic disorder remains to be determined. However, our data suggest that adiponectin oligomers have distinct physiological functions IN VIVO, and specifically HMW adiponectin is closely correlated with HDL cholesterol.

  17. Conformational control in a bipyridine linked π-conjugated oligomer: cation mediated helix unfolding and refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Kizhumuri P; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2010-11-28

    A chiral π-conjugated oligomer having alternate bipyridine and carbazole moieties connected through acetylinic bonds undergoes helical folding in chloroform-acetonitrile (40/60, v/v) as evident by fluorescence and circular dichroism changes. In the presence of transition metal cations such as Zn(2+) defolding of the helical conformation occurs. Upon decomplexation of the cation with EDTA, the helical conformation is regained.

  18. Single-molecule studies of oligomer extraction and uptake of dyes in poly(dimethylsiloxane) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey J; Collinson, Maryanne M; Culbertson, Christopher T; Higgins, Daniel A

    2009-12-15

    Single-molecule microscopic methods were used to probe the uptake, mobility, and entrapment of dye molecules in cured poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films as a function of oligomer extraction. The results are relevant to the use of PDMS in microfluidic separations, pervaporation, solid-phase microextraction, and nanofiltration. PDMS films were prepared by spin-casting dilute solutions of Sylgard 184 onto glass coverslips, yielding approximately 1.4 microm thick films after curing. Residual oligomers were subsequently extracted from the films by "spin extraction". In this procedure, 200 microL aliquots of isopropyl alcohol were repeatedly dropped onto the film surface and spun off at 2000 rpm. Samples extracted 5, 10, 20, and 40 times were investigated. Dye molecules were loaded into these films by spin-casting nanomolar dye solutions onto the films. Both neutral perylene diimide (N,N'-bis(butoxypropyl)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide) and cationic rhodamine 6G (R6G) dyes were employed. The films were imaged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. The images obtained depict nonzero populations of fixed and mobile molecules in all films. Cross-correlation methods were used to quantitatively determine the population of fixed molecules in a given region, while a Bayesian burst analysis was used to obtain the total population of molecules. The results show that the total amount of dye loaded increases with increased oligomer extraction, while the relative populations of fixed and mobile molecules decrease and increase, respectively. Bulk R6G data also show greater dye loading with increased oligomer extraction.

  19. Formation and growth of oligomers: a Monte Carlo study of an amyloid tau fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Small oligomers formed early in the process of amyloid fibril formation may be the major toxic species in Alzheimer's disease. We investigate the early stages of amyloid aggregation for the tau fragment AcPHF6 (Ac-VQIVYK-NH2 using an implicit solvent all-atom model and extensive Monte Carlo simulations of 12, 24, and 36 chains. A variety of small metastable aggregates form and dissolve until an aggregate of a critical size and conformation arises. However, the stable oligomers, which are beta-sheet-rich and feature many hydrophobic contacts, are not always growth-ready. The simulations indicate instead that these supercritical oligomers spend a lengthy period in equilibrium in which considerable reorganization takes place accompanied by exchange of chains with the solution. Growth competence of the stable oligomers correlates with the alignment of the strands in the beta-sheets. The larger aggregates seen in our simulations are all composed of two twisted beta-sheets, packed against each other with hydrophobic side chains at the sheet-sheet interface. These beta-sandwiches show similarities with the proposed steric zipper structure for PHF6 fibrils but have a mixed parallel/antiparallel beta-strand organization as opposed to the parallel organization found in experiments on fibrils. Interestingly, we find that the fraction of parallel beta-sheet structure increases with aggregate size. We speculate that the reorganization of the beta-sheets into parallel ones is an important rate-limiting step in the formation of PHF6 fibrils.

  20. Ferrocene-Based Monomers, Oligomers and Polymers as Electro-Active Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khalyfeh, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The present PhD thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of functionalized ferrocenes with up to four aldehyde and vinyl groups and their usage as monomers to produce novel ferrocene-based oligomers with conjugated backbones via ADMET (acyclic diene metathesis) and HWE (Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons) reaction protocols. In addition, ferrocene-containing polymers (linear, cross-linked and co-polymers) with aliphatic backbones generated by anionic bulk and solution polymerization routes, ...

  1. A model for non-obligate oligomer formation in protein aggregration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2015-01-01

    Using solvent-exposed intramolecular backbone hydrogen bonds as physico-chemical descriptors for protein packing, a role for transient, non-obligate oligomers in the formation of aberrant protein aggregates is presented. Oligomeric models of the both wild type (wt) and select mutant variants of superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are proposed to provide a structural basis for investigating the etiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). PMID:26282203

  2. Chemical Modifications of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers Enhance Their Efficacy against Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    specific PMOs in infected cells and mice during lethal Ebola virus challenge. Members of the Filoviridae family of viruses , Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg ...American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Chemical Modifications of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers Enhance Their Efficacy against Ebola Virus ...sequence is complementary to a region spanning the start codon of VP24 mRNA were protected against lethal Ebola virus challenge. In the present study, we

  3. Luminescent hybrid materials based on covalent attachment of Eu(III)-tris(bipyridinedicarboxylate) in the mesoporous silica host MCM-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilibi, Maturi; de Queiroz, Thiago Branquinho; Ren, Jinjun; De Cola, Luisa; de Camargo, Andrea Simone Stucchi; Eckert, Hellmut

    2014-06-14

    A luminescent inorganic-organic hybrid material was synthesized by covalent immobilization of a europium bipyridine carboxylate complex on the inner pore walls of the mesoporous silica host MCM-41 using the grafting method. Guest-host binding was achieved through double functionalization of the host surface with organosilane reagents (trimethylsilyl, TMS, and aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES) followed by reaction of the active amino sites of the APTES residue with the ligand 2,2'-bipyridyl-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid. Addition of EuCl3 solution dissolved in ethanol results in the formation of an immobilized complex having the probable formula Eu(L)x(3 ≥ x ≥ 1)(H2O)y, whose detailed photophysical properties were investigated. In the final step, an additional 2,2'-bipyridine-6 monocarboxylic acid ligand was added in an attempt to complete the coordination sphere of the rare earth ion. Each of the synthesis steps was monitored by (1)H, (13)C, and (29)Si solid state NMR spectroscopies, allowing for a quantitative assessment of the progress of the reaction and the influence of the paramagnetic species on the spectra. Based on these data and additional characterizations by chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), N2 sorption, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy, a comprehensive quantitative picture of the covalent binding and complexation process was developed.

  4. Covalent crosslinking of thyrotropin to thyroid plasma membrane receptors: subunit composition of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1986-04-01

    The subunit composition of the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor has been characterized using the bifunctional crosslinking agent, disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), to covalently link [125I]TSH to its receptor. Purified thyroid membranes were labeled with [125I]TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex was crosslinked by incubation with 0.1 mM DSS. Analysis of this crosslinked complex by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions indicated the presence of a specifically labeled hormone-receptor complex, corresponding to a Mr of 68,000 +/- 3000 before correction for the relative molecular mass of TSH. When reducing agents were absent during SDS solubilization, the mobility of the band increased slightly, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. The labeling of the 68,000 band was specifically inhibited by TSH, but not by other glycoprotein hormones. Specific labeling occurred only in thyroid, and not in liver or muscle plasma membranes. Protease-free immunoglobulin G, isolated from sera of patients with Graves' disease and capable of competing with TSH for binding to its receptor, inhibited the labeling of the 68,000 complex. When the hormone-receptor complex was crosslinked with higher concentrations of DSS (greater than 0.3 mM), a second specifically labeled band was observed, with a Mr of 80,000 +/- 5000. This complex exhibited hormone, tissue, and immunologic specificities similar to those of the 68,000 band. Continuous sucrose density gradient analysis indicated that the intact solubilized receptor possessed a sedimentation coefficient of 10.5 S prior to correction for detergent binding. However, this value increased to 16 S when determined under conditions which took into account the change in hydrodynamic properties attributable to bound Triton X-100. These data suggest that the 80,000 and 68,000 bands represent binding components of the TSH receptor and that the receptor molecule most likely contains

  5. A lifespan observation of a novel mouse model: in vivo evidence supports aβ oligomer hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichi Zhang

    Full Text Available Transgenic mouse models are powerful tools in exploring the mechanisms of AD. Most current transgenic models of AD mimic the memory impairment and the main pathologic features, among which the formation of beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques is considered a dominant pathologic event. Recently, Aβ oligomers have been identified as more neurotoxic than Aβ plaques. However, no ideal transgenic mouse model directly support Aβ oligomers as a neurotoxic species due to the puzzling effects of amyloid plaques in the more widely-used models. Here, we constructed a single-mutant transgenic (Tg model harboring the PS1V97L mutation and used Non-Tg littermates as a control group. Employing the Morris water maze, electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and electron microscopy, we investigated behavioral changes and pathology progression in our single-mutant transgenic model. We discovered the pathological alteration of intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ oligomers without Aβ plaques in the PS1V97L-Tg mouse model, which might be the result of PS1 gene mutation. Following Aβ oligomers, we detected synaptic alteration, tau hyperphosphorylation and glial activation. This model supports an initial role for Aβ oligomers in the onset of AD and suggests that Aβ plaques may not be the only prerequisite. This model provides a useful tool for studying the role of Aβ oligomers in AD pathogenesis.

  6. Theoretical design study on photophysical property on oligomers based on spirobifluorene and carbazole-triphenylamine for PLED applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-Hua; Shen, Wei; He, Rong-Xing; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The photophysical properties of five blue light-emitting polymers based on spirobifluorene applied in polymer light-emitting diodes (PLED) materials have been studied by quantum chemistry. In order to understand the intrinsic reasons for the different performances displayed by the polymers, we carried out density functional theory (DFT) and Marcus theory investigations on their oligomers in terms of structure and properties stability, absorption and emission properties, and carrier injection and transport properties. Especially, some important parameters which had not been reported to our knowledge were given in this contribution, such as the ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), reorganization energies (λ), ke/kh (the ratio between the electron transfer rate (ke) and hole transfer rate (kh)), and the radiative lifetimes (τ). The main results indicate that the co-oligomers of PCC-1, PCC-2, and PCC-3 with push-pull interactions produced by the existing D-A segments have better carrier injection and transport properties than the oligomers of PSF and PCF. Especially PCC-2 co-oligomer, its large radiation lifetime (7.46 ns) and well balanced and adequate carrier transport guarantee its champion performance for PLED. The calculated results coincide with the experimental ones. Besides, PNF structurally similar to PCC-2 has similar photoelectric properties to PCC-2 in theory, and the fluorescence emission of PNF co-oligomer is superior to PCC-2 co-oligomer. Therefore, we predict that PNF is a promising candidate for PLED.

  7. Electrospray mass spectrometry of NeuAc oligomers associated with the C fragment of the tetanus toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, M C; Whittal, R M; Baldwin, M A; Burlingame, A L; Balhorn, R

    2005-04-03

    The Clostridial neurotoxins, botulinum and tetanus, gain entry into neuronal cells by protein recognition involving cell specific binding sites. The sialic or N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) residues of gangliosides attached to the surface of motor neurons are the suspected recognition and interaction points with Clostridial neurotoxins, although not necessarily the only ones. We have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) to examine formation of complexes between the tetanus toxin C fragment, or targeting domain, and carbohydrates containing NeuAc groups to determine how NeuAc residues contribute to ganglioside binding. ESI-MS was used to rapidly and efficiently measure dissociation constants for a number of related NeuAc-containing carbohydrates and NeuAc oligomers, information that has helped identify the structural features of gangliosides that determine their binding to tetanus toxin. The strength of the interactions between the C fragment and (NeuAc){sub n}, are consistent with the topography of the targeting domain of tetanus toxin and the nature of its carbohydrate binding sites. The results suggest that the targeting domain of tetanus toxin contains two binding sites that can accommodate NeuAc (or a dimer). This study also shows that NeuAc must play an important role in ganglioside binding and molecular recognition, a process critical for normal cell function and one frequently exploited by toxins, bacteria and viruses to facilitate their entrance into cells.

  8. Combinatorial Synthesis, Screening, and Binding Studies of Highly Functionalized Polyamino-amido Oligomers for Binding to Folded RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Pokorski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Folded RNA molecules have recently emerged as critical regulatory elements in biological pathways, serving not just as carriers of genetic information but also as key components in enzymatic assemblies. In particular, the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV genome regulates transcriptional elongation by interacting specifically with the Tat protein, initiating the recruitment of the elongation complex. Preventing this interaction from occurring in vivo halts HIV replication, thus making RNA-binding molecules an intriguing pharmaceutical target. Using α-amino acids as starting materials, we have designed and synthesized a new class of polyamino-amido oligomers, called PAAs, specifically for binding to folded RNA structures. The PAA monomers were readily incorporated into a 125-member combinatorial library of PAA trimers. In order to rapidly assess RNA binding, a quantum dot-based fluorescent screen was developed to visualize RNA binding on-resin. The binding affinities of hits were quantified using a terbium footprinting assay, allowing us to identify a ligand (SFF with low micromolar affinity (kd=14 μM for TAR RNA. The work presented herein represents the development of a flexible scaffold that can be easily synthesized, screened, and subsequently modified to provide ligands specific for binding to folded RNAs.

  9. Dynamics in coarse-grained models for oligomer-grafted silica nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2012-01-01

    Coarse-grained models of poly(ethylene oxide) oligomer-grafted nanoparticles are established by matching their structural distribution functions to atomistic simulation data. Coarse-grained force fields for bulk oligomer chains show excellent transferability with respect to chain lengths and temperature, but structure and dynamics of grafted nanoparticle systems exhibit a strong dependence on the core-core interactions. This leads to poor transferability of the core potential to conditions different from the state point at which the potential was optimized. Remarkably, coarse graining of grafted nanoparticles can either accelerate or slowdown the core motions, depending on the length of the grafted chains. This stands in sharp contrast to linear polymer systems, for which coarse graining always accelerates the dynamics. Diffusivity data suggest that the grafting topology is one cause of slower motions of the cores for short-chain oligomer-grafted nanoparticles; an estimation based on transition-state theory shows the coarse-grained core-core potential also has a slowing-down effect on the nanoparticle organic hybrid materials motions; both effects diminish as grafted chains become longer. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Synthesis and Electrochromic Properties of Star-Shaped Oligomers with Phenyl Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Xiaoting; Liu, Ping

    2017-09-05

    A series of star-shaped conjugated oligomers, 1,3,5-tri(2'-thienyl) benzene (3TB), 1,3,5-tri(3',4'-ethylenedioxythienyl) benzene (3EB), 1,3,5-tri[5',2"-(3",4"-ethylenedioxy-thienyl)-2'-thienyl] benzene (3ETB), and 1,3,5-tri[5',2"-(3",4"-ethylenedioxy-thienyl)-2'-thienyl]-4-(3',4'-ethylenedioxythienyl)benzene (3TB-4EDOT), were synthesized. The star-shaped polymer, poly(1,3,5-tri[5',2"-(3",4"-ethylenedioxythineyl)-2'-thienyl]benzene) (P3ETB), was also prepared. The electrochemical and electrochromic properties of these conjugated oligomers and polymer were investigated. These oligomer and polymer films showed reversible, clear color changes upon electrochemical doping and dedoping. The color of the P3ETB film reversibly changed from orange to blue under doping and dedoping. The switching times for doping and dedoping were 1.2 and 0.9 s, respectively. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Directing the oligomer size distribution of peroxidase-mediated cross-linked bovine alpha-lactalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnis, Walter H; Wierenga, Peter A; van Berkel, Willem J H; Gruppen, Harry

    2010-05-12

    Enzymatic protein cross-linking is a powerful tool to change protein functionality. For optimal functionality in gel formation, the size of the cross-linked proteins needs to be controlled, prior to heating. In the current study, we addressed the optimization of the horseradish peroxidase-mediated cross-linking of calcium-depleted bovine alpha-lactalbumin. To characterize the formed products, the molecular weight distribution of the cross-linked protein was determined by size exclusion chromatography. At low ionic strength, more dimers of alpha-lactalbumin are formed than at high ionic strength, while the same conversion of monomers is observed. Similarly, at pH 5.9 more higher oligomers are formed than at pH 6.8. This is proposed to be caused by local changes in apo alpha-lactalbumin conformation as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. A gradual supply of hydrogen peroxide improves the yield of cross-linked products and increases the proportion of higher oligomers. In conclusion, this study shows that the size distribution of peroxidase-mediated cross-linked alpha-lactalbumin can be directed toward the protein oligomers desired.

  12. Aβ40 oligomers identified as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Man Gao

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide, yet the development of therapeutics has been hampered by the absence of suitable biomarkers to diagnose the disease in its early stages prior to the formation of amyloid plaques and the occurrence of irreversible neuronal damage. Since oligomeric Aβ species have been implicated in the pathophysiology of AD, we reasoned that they may correlate with the onset of disease. As such, we have developed a novel misfolded protein assay for the detection of soluble oligomers composed of Aβ x-40 and x-42 peptide (hereafter Aβ40 and Aβ42 from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Preliminary validation of this assay with 36 clinical samples demonstrated the presence of aggregated Aβ40 in the CSF of AD patients. Together with measurements of total Aβ42, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% and 90%, respectively, were achieved. Although larger sample populations will be needed to confirm this diagnostic sensitivity, our studies demonstrate a sensitive method of detecting circulating Aβ40 oligomers from AD CSF and suggest that these oligomers could be a powerful new biomarker for the early detection of AD.

  13. Tumor delivery of antisense oligomer using trastuzumab within a streptavidin nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Yale University, Yale PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Liu, Xinrong; Chen, Ling; Cheng, Dengfeng; Rusckowski, Mary [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Hnatowich, Donald J. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Umass Medical School, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin trademark) is often internalized following binding to Her2+ tumor cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether trastuzumab can be used as a specific carrier to deliver antisense oligomers into Her2+ tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. A biotinylated MORF oligomer antisense to RhoC mRNA and its biotinylated sense control were labeled with either lissamine for fluorescence detection or {sup 99m}Tc for radioactivity detection and were linked to biotinylated trastuzumab via streptavidin. The nanoparticles were studied in SUM190 (RhoC+, Her2+) study and SUM149 (RhoC+, Her2-) control cells in culture and as xenografts in mice. As evidence of unimpaired Her2+ binding of trastuzumab within the nanoparticle, accumulations were clearly higher in SUM190 compared to SUM149 cells and, by whole-body imaging, targeting of SUM190 tumor was similar to that expected for a radiolabeled trastuzumab. As evidence of internalization, fluorescence microscopy images of cells grown in culture and obtained from xenografts showed uniform cytoplasm distribution of the lissamine-MORF. An invasion assay showed decreased RhoC expression in SUM190 cells when incubated with the antisense MORF nanoparticles at only 100 nM. Both in cell culture and in animals, the nanoparticle with trastuzumab as specific carrier greatly improved tumor delivery of the antisense oligomer against RhoC mRNA into tumor cells overexpressing Her2 and may be of general utility. (orig.)

  14. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Tae-In; Yun, Seungpil; Kim, Sangjune; Park, Hyejin; Hwang, Heehong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2015-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GCase) functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher’s disease (GD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1–42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1–42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1–42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD. PMID:26629917

  15. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulah Choi

    Full Text Available Glucocerebrosidase (GCase functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher's disease (GD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB. However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1-42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1-42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1-42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD.

  16. Oligomers of Heat-Shock Proteins: Structures That Don't Imply Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Jacobs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most proteins must remain soluble in the cytosol in order to perform their biological functions. To protect against undesired protein aggregation, living cells maintain a population of molecular chaperones that ensure the solubility of the proteome. Here we report simulations of a lattice model of interacting proteins to understand how low concentrations of passive molecular chaperones, such as small heat-shock proteins, suppress thermodynamic instabilities in protein solutions. Given fixed concentrations of chaperones and client proteins, the solubility of the proteome can be increased by tuning the chaperone-client binding strength. Surprisingly, we find that the binding strength that optimizes solubility while preventing irreversible chaperone binding also promotes the formation of weakly bound chaperone oligomers, although the presence of these oligomers does not significantly affect the thermodynamic stability of the solution. Such oligomers are commonly observed in experiments on small heat-shock proteins, but their connection to the biological function of these chaperones has remained unclear. Our simulations suggest that this clustering may not have any essential biological function, but rather emerges as a natural side-effect of optimizing the thermodynamic stability of the proteome.

  17. Synaptic Amyloid-β Oligomers Precede p-Tau and Differentiate High Pathology Control Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilousova, Tina; Miller, Carol A.; Poon, Wayne W.; Vinters, Harry V.; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Hayden, Eric Y.; Teplow, David B.; Glabe, Charles; Albay, Ricardo; Cole, Gregory M.; Teng, Edmond; Gylys, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) aggregates form the two discrete pathologies of Alzheimer disease (AD), and oligomeric assemblies of each protein are localized to synapses. To determine the sequence by which pathology appears in synapses, Aβ and p-tau were quantified across AD disease stages in parietal cortex. Nondemented cases with high levels of AD-related pathology were included to determine factors that confer protection from clinical symptoms. Flow cytometric analysis of synaptosome preparations was used to quantify Aβ and p-tau in large populations of individual synaptic terminals. Soluble Aβ oligomers were assayed by a single antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total in situ Aβ was elevated in patients with early- and late-stage AD dementia, but not in high pathology nondemented controls compared with age-matched normal controls. However, soluble Aβ oligomers were highest in early AD synapses, and this assay distinguished early AD cases from high pathology controls. Overall, synapse-associated p-tau did not increase until late-stage disease in human and transgenic rat cortex, and p-tau was elevated in individual Aβ-positive synaptosomes in early AD. These results suggest that soluble oligomers in surviving neocortical synaptic terminals are associated with dementia onset and suggest an amyloid cascade hypothesis in which oligomeric Aβ drives phosphorylated tau accumulation and synaptic spread. These results indicate that antiamyloid therapies will be less effective once p-tau pathology is developed. PMID:26718979

  18. KARAKTERISASI ENZIM KITOSANASE DAR] ISOLAT BAKTERI KPU 2123 DAN APLIKASINYA UNTUK PRODUKS1 OLIGOMER KITOSAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusro Nuri Fawzya

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini merupakan sebagian dari rangkaian penelitian mengenai eksplorasi enzim kitinolitik dari mikroba lingkungan laut, khususnya dari limbah udang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengidentifikasi isolat bakteri KPU 2123 dari limbah udang, mengkarakterisasi dan mengaplikasikan enzim kitosanase yang dihasilkan oleh bakteri tersebut untuk produksi oligomer kitosan dan menguji bioaktivitas oligomer kitosan tersebut sebagai antitumor dan antibakteri. Karakterisasi enzim dilakukan dengan menguji aktivitas enzim pada berbagai suhu dan pH. Selain itu juga ditentukan besarnya aktivitas yang tersisa setelah enzim diinkubasi pada suhu dan lama waktu tertentu. Pengaruh ion logam terhadap aktivitas enzim juga dilihat dengan mereaksikan enzim dengan 1 mM ion logam dalam bentuk larutan khlorida. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa berdasarkan analisis gen 16S-rRNA, isolat bakteri KPU 2123 memiliki kemiripan 95% dengan Stanotrophomonas maltophilia. Enzim kitosanase dari isolat ini bekerja optimal pada suhu 50 ºC dan pH 6. Enzim ini cukup stabil pada suhu 37 ºC selama 120 menit. Penambahan ion logam berpengaruh terhadap aktivitas enzim. Ion logam Zn²+ (sebagai garam klorida 1 mM menghambat 100% aktivitas enzim tersebut. Penggunaan enzim kitosanase dalam menghidrolisis substrat kitosan, menghasilkan oligomer kitosan yang mengandung tetramer, pentamer dan heksamer Oligor kitosan tersebut mampu menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Staphylococcus aureus sebesar 10,06% dan dapat menyebabkan kematian sel HeLa dengan LC50 pada dosis 120 ppm.

  19. Oligomers Modulate Interfibril Branching and Mass Transport Properties of Collagen Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Catherine F.; Brandner, Eric; Teo, Ka Yaw; Han, Bumsoo; Nauman, Eric; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Mass transport within collagen-based matrices is critical to tissue development, repair, and pathogenesis as well as the design of next generation tissue engineering strategies. This work shows how collagen precursors, specified by intermolecular cross-link composition, provide independent control of collagen matrix mechanical and transport properties. Collagen matrices were prepared from tissue-extracted monomers or oligomers. Viscoelastic behavior was measured in oscillatory shear and unconfined compression. Matrix permeability and diffusivity were measured using gravity-driven permeametry and integrated optical imaging, respectively. Both collagen types showed an increase in stiffness and permeability hindrance with increasing collagen concentration (fibril density); however, different physical property-concentration relationships were noted. Diffusivity wasn’t affected by concentration for either collagen type over the range tested. In general, oligomer matrices exhibited a substantial increase in stiffness and only a modest decrease in transport properties when compared to monomer matrices prepared at the same concentration. The observed differences in viscoelastic and transport properties were largely attributed to increased levels of interfibril branching within oligomer matrices. The ability to relate physical properties to relevant microstructure parameters, including fibril density and interfibril branching, is expected to advance the understanding of cell-matrix signaling as well as facilitate model-based prediction and design of matrix-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:23842082

  20. Rapid α-oligomer formation mediated by the Aβ C terminus initiates an amyloid assembly pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pinaki; Kodali, Ravindra; Chemuru, Saketh; Kar, Karunakar; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Since early oligomeric intermediates in amyloid assembly are often transient and difficult to distinguish, characterize and quantify, the mechanistic basis of the initiation of spontaneous amyloid growth is often opaque. We describe here an approach to the analysis of the Aβ aggregation mechanism that uses Aβ-polyglutamine hybrid peptides designed to retard amyloid maturation and an adjusted thioflavin intensity scale that reveals structural features of aggregation intermediates. The results support an aggregation initiation mechanism for Aβ-polyQ hybrids, and by extension for full-length Aβ peptides, in which a modular Aβ C-terminal segment mediates rapid, non-nucleated formation of α-helical oligomers. The resulting high local concentration of tethered amyloidogenic segments within these α-oligomers facilitates transition to a β-oligomer population that, via further remodelling and/or elongation steps, ultimately generates mature amyloid. Consistent with this mechanism, an engineered Aβ C-terminal fragment delays aggregation onset by Aβ-polyglutamine peptides and redirects assembly of Aβ42 fibrils. PMID:27546208