WorldWideScience

Sample records for older people findings

  1. The 'unnecessary' use of emergency departments by older people: findings from hospital data, hospital staff and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Debbie; Law, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing demands are being placed on emergency departments in Australia and there is a view that older Australians are more likely than other age groups to attend for non-urgent conditions. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast administrative data with the views of hospital staff and older people with regard to their presentation at two emergency departments in metropolitan Adelaide and how this aligns with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare definition of 'potentially avoidable general practitioner-type presentations'. The study used three sources of data from two emergency departments: hospital data for the financial year 2010-11 for patients aged 65 years and over and identified as triage category four or five; three focus groups with medical, nursing and allied staff from these two hospitals; and interviews with 58 older people who presented at the two emergency departments over a two-week period. The hospital administrative data provided a very limited insight into why older people attended the emergency department, other than the medical diagnosis. Professional staff identified individual determinants, societal determinants and the health services system as explanations. Older people attended the emergency department for a range of reasons that may not necessarily reflect the opinions of health professionals. For many older people the emergency department was an appropriate place to attend considering their condition, though some presentations could be circumvented with appropriate and increased services in the community. However, as many older people suffer comorbidities, careful consideration needs to be given as to the best possible practices to achieve this.

  2. Registered nurses' use of research findings in the care of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Anne-Marie; Kajermo, Kerstin Nilsson; Nordström, Gun; Wallin, Lars

    2009-05-01

    To describe registered nurses' reported use of research in the care of older people and to examine associations between research use and factors related to the elements: the communication channels, the adopter and the social system. Research use among registered nurses working in hospital settings has been reported in many studies. Few studies, however, have explored the use of research among registered nurses working in the care of older people. A cross-sectional survey. In eight municipalities, all registered nurses (n = 210) working in older people care were invited to participate (response rate 67%). The Research Utilisation Questionnaire was adopted. Questions concerning the work organisation and research-related resources were sent to the Community Chief Nurse at each municipality. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were applied. The registered nurses reported a relatively low use of research findings in daily practice, despite reporting a positive attitude to research. The registered nurses reported lack of access to research reports at the work place and that they had little support from unit managers and colleagues. Registered nurses working in municipalities with access to research-related resources reported more use of research than registered nurses without resources. The factors 'Access to research findings at work place', 'Positive attitudes to research' and 'Nursing programme at university level' were significantly associated with research use. There is a great potential to increase registered nurses' use of research findings in the care of older people. Factors which were linked to the communication channels and the adopter were associated with research use. Strategies to enhance research use should focus on access to and adequate training in using information sources, increased knowledge on research methodology and nursing science and a supportive organisation.

  3. Barriers to healthy eating: Findings from the focus groups with older people and children/adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazbare, Laura; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    or potential behavioural change in terms of healthier eating, discussing pre-selected healthy and unhealthy food categories. The revised Social Cognitive Theory was used as a theoretical framework. Results: The study suggests that the main obstacles to change can be grouped into motivational and implementation......), "liking" remains the main food choice criterion, including the healthy foods. Conclusion: The study presented a number of barriers to healthy eating identified by older people and children/adolescents. Based on the results of the study, further investigations should be undertaken in this area...... barriers. The motivational barriers are unwillingness to change eating habits, satisfaction with current diets and misconception about their healthiness; relatively low health consciousness and unwillingness to become excessively health-oriented. Implementation barriers include remembering the change...

  4. Social marketing strategies for reaching older people with disabilities: findings from a survey of centers for independent living participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moone, Rajean Paul; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Centers for independent living (CILs) provide critical supports, services, and advocacy for assisting people with disabilities in living independently. As there is a rapidly increasing population of older people with disabilities, many CILs are now considering how to actively engage older adults in their organizations. This study utilized a survey of older people with disabilities to help identify social marketing techniques that community organizations like CILs can use to effectively reach older people with disabilities. Utilizing the components of the social marketing mix in designing outreach efforts, including a critical examination of product, place, price, participants, and partnering, CILs and other community agencies can better reach older adults with disabilities.

  5. Older people. Courtesy entitles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Michael; Woolhead, Gillian; Dieppe, Paul

    2003-02-20

    A study of 72 people, with an average age of 72, showed that dignity--and lack of it--were key issues in their estimation of care. Concerns about lack of dignity centred on lack of privacy, mixed sex wards, forms of address and loss of independence. The study suggested that older people do not complain about care for fear of retaliation.

  6. [Old and offline? : Findings on the use of the Internet by people aged 65 years and older in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alexander; Schelling, Hans Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    The supply of information and communication is becoming continuously more focused on the Internet. While the age groups up to 64 years have shown a vast increase in the use of the Internet since 1997, intensive use of the Internet by age groups above 64 years lags behind and this is not only the case in Switzerland. Against this background and an interest in finding out more about Internet (non)use of older people, two representative surveys were conducted in Switzerland, one in 2009 and another one in 2014. The data used were acquired throughout Switzerland via a standardized telephone survey. The random sample (2014) consisted of 1037 people aged between 65 and 100 years old. Although the digital divide between the age groups has lessened over the past years, only 55.7 % of the elderly people interviewed were using the Internet in the autumn of 2014. Internet usage differs greatly between age groups. Resources such as education, income and health positively impact actual use of the Internet. Additionally, recommendations from a person's social environment, as well as an affinity for technology and a personal benefit assessment have a positive impact on Internet usage. In particular, security concerns and difficulties of use were mentioned as predominant reasons for the non-use of the Internet. Some of the people questioned felt excluded from society because they did not use the Internet. Internet usage among elderly people depends on individual and social resources, as well as on general attitude towards technology and personal benefit expectations. The exclusion of today's elderly "offliners" should be avoided, even if the digital divide will decrease in the future.

  7. Rehabilitation and older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation is concerned with lessening the impact of disabling conditions. These are particularly common in older people and considerable health gain can be achieved by successful rehabilitation. Hospital doctors and general practitioners should be aware of the core principles of rehabilitation, be able to recognise rehabilitation need in their patients, and have sufficient knowledge of their local rehabilitation services to trigger the referral process.

  8. User involvement in the development of a health promotion technology for older people: findings from the SWISH project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliffe, S; Kharicha, K; Harari, D; Swift, C; Goodman, C; Manthorpe, J

    2010-03-01

    Successive English government policies about older people's health and well-being aim to improve health and quality of life by promoting independence. Improving access to information and services that can improve health and well-being and reduce health risks is central to the modernisation of health and social care. Most recently, tailored and person-centred approaches with a strong emphasis on promoting health and well-being are central to policy, including the proposals for 'Life Checks' and the recent emphasis on commissioning 'community well-being'. We carried out a qualitative study to identify the key aspects of social situations that affect health and well-being, from the perspectives of older people and professionals, to enrich and expand an existing health risk appraisal tool so that it could be used for self-assessment of health and social well-being. This tool, Health Risk Appraisal in Older people (HRAO), has been evaluated in different European settings, including English general practice. Focus groups were recruited from general practice, older people's forums, social care and voluntary organisations in two London boroughs where the HRAO tool had previously been tested. The social factors determining health that were prioritised by older people and service providers and recommended for inclusion in the health risk appraisal tool were recent life events, housing and garden maintenance, transport, both public and private, financial management, career status & needs, the local environment and social networks and social isolation. This study has identified key social determinants of health that could usefully be added to 'Life Checks' for older people and that could also inform the commissioning of community well-being. Modified with the addition of social domains, the HRAO technology could be a suitable tool to achieve current policy objectives.

  9. Cognitive assessment of older people

    OpenAIRE

    Young, John; Meagher, David; MacLullich, Alasdair J

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed Cognitive assessment involves examination of higher cortical functions, particularly memory, attention, orientation, language, executive function (planning activities), and praxis (sequencing of activities). This article will focus on cognitive assessment of older people (those aged over about 65 years) in the context of possible dementia, delirium, and depression. These are common and serious clinical syndromes affecting older people, and accurate cognit...

  10. What's different about older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crome, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Older people can be regarded as a marginalised group within society from a number of perspectives including that of health. When it comes to the use of medication older people have suffered from a double whammy. Not only are they more at risk from the adverse effects of drugs but also their involvement in clinical trials has been limited so that rational prescribing both to maximise benefit and to reduce risk has been problematic. Their special problems have been recognised formerly by the Department of Health in its NSF for Older People [National Service Framework for Older People. Department of Health, London (2001a)], [Medicines and Older People. Implementing medicines-related aspects of the NSF for Older People. Department of Health (2001b)]. Early studies focussed on compliance, the avoidance of poly-pharmacy and the high prevalence of adverse effects of drugs and the reasons for this. Studies in long-stay patients showed dramatic differences in pharmacokinetics between such older people and young healthy volunteers. Initially such differences were ascribed to age alone and the overall message became "start low and go slow". Studies in healthy older people then revealed that age differences in drug metabolism were, as a rule, not so marked although clearance of renally excreted drugs was reduced in line with the age associated decline in renal function. Including older people in clinical trials poses challenges. Many traditional trialists do not have ready access to older people, co-morbidity and poly-pharmacy are common and most people feel reluctant to ask older people to take part in complex and potentially hazardous trials. Concern about compliance is unwarranted. Adverse events may be more serious. Thus in a younger patient postural hypotension may make a subject unsteady but in an older subject the unsteadiness may lead to a fall, the fall to a fracture, and the fracture to poor recovery. The choice of end-points is crucial. Although reduction of

  11. Falls in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieën, Jaap H.; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    Falls are common incidents, which can have major con-sequences. For example, falls and the interrelated category of accidents being struck by or against objects account for more than 40% of injuries and 30% of injury costs in the USA (Corso et al., 2006). Especially among older adults, falls occur

  12. Esperanto and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Ilona

    1978-01-01

    Research has indicated that the elderly retain the ability to learn, and specifically to learn new languages. Furthermore, the increasingly greater proportion of old people in the population demands that their need for continued intellectual stimulation be met. In the absence of explicit motives for learning an ethnic language, Esperanto is a good…

  13. Access to mobile communications by older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Toan; Irizarry, Carol; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    To investigate how older people effectively identify, select and learn to use mobile communications technologies to enhance communication and safety, and support independent living. One hundred and fifty-three older South Australians participated in a purpose-designed survey questionnaire. Older people relied on family and friends for information and advice (76%), and their children's assistance with buying (45%) and learning to use (48%) new technology. The most preferred learning method was face-to-face training (56%). Less than half (44%) were interested in trying out new designs/applications, functions and capabilities that could assist with independent living. The highest need was for personal security and emergencies (88%). Findings suggest that the family and friends of older people play an important role in identifying, selecting and learning to use mobile communication technologies. The safety and emergency capabilities of mobile communications technologies were more important than having functions that could assist with independent living. © 2014 ACOTA.

  14. Dietary Patterns Associated with Cognitive Function among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding from the NCDFaC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaoxue; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Zeping; Dong, Kui; Kraus, Virginia B; Wang, Zhuoqun; Zhang, Mei; Zhai, Yi; Song, Pengkun; Zhao, Yanfang; Pang, Shaojie; Mi, Shengquan; Zhao, Wenhua

    2018-04-09

    Although dietary patterns are crucial to cognitive function, associations of dietary patterns with cognitive function have not yet been fully understood. This cross-sectional study explored dietary patterns associated with cognitive function among the older adults in underdeveloped regions, using 1504 community-dwelling older adults aged 60 and over. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and 24-h dietary recall. Factor analysis was used to extract dietary patterns. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Two dietary patterns, a "mushroom, vegetable, and fruits" (MVF) pattern and a "meat and soybean products" (MS) pattern, were identified. The MVF pattern, characterized by high consumption of mushrooms, vegetables, and fruits was significantly positively associated with cognitive function ( p cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.15 (0.02, 0.29) for -log (31-MMSE score). The MS pattern, characterized by high consumption of soybean products and meat, was also associated with better cognitive function, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% CIs 0.30, 0.74) for cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.34 (0.21, 0.47) for -log (31-MMSE score). Our results suggested that both the MVF and MS patterns were positively associated with better cognitive function among older adults in underdeveloped regions.

  15. The Representation of Older People in East Asian Television Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieler, Michael; Ivanov, Alex; Hagiwara, Shigeru

    2017-06-01

    In this study, 432 television advertisements from Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea were analyzed to determine their representations of older people. Findings demonstrate that in East Asian advertisements, older people are highly underrepresented, appear in major roles, mostly alongside younger people, and older men clearly outnumber older women. The other variables investigated (i.e., setting and product categories) led to no conclusive findings for the three societies. In short, our study, employing ethnolinguistic vitality theory to analyze television advertisements, demonstrates how East Asian societies greatly marginalize older people. Potential effects of such representations are discussed using social cognitive theory and cultivation theory.

  16. Visual impairment and the incidence of falls and fractures among older people: longitudinal findings from the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Burlutsky, George; Samarawickrama, Chameen; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-11-04

    We assessed the impact of visual impairment on the incidence of falls and fractures in older persons. Of 3654 baseline participants, 2334, 1952, and 1149 were re-examined after 5, 10, and 15 years. Presenting visual acuity (VA) was measured at each examination. Bilateral and unilateral visual impairment was defined as VA worse than 20/40 in the better and worse eye, respectively. Incident visual impairment was defined in eyes with VA 20/40 or better at baseline, which subsequently developed visual impairment. Incidence of falls was assessed over the 12 months before each visit, whereas incidence of fractures was assessed over the 5 years between two visits. Discrete logistic-regression models with time-dependent variables were used to assess associations between visual impairment and subsequent falls and fractures after adjusting for potential confounding variables. The proportions of participants reporting ≥2 falls ranged between 10% and 14%, and proportions reporting fractures ranged between 12% and 21%, across the three follow-up visits. Participants with incident visual impairment were more likely to report ≥2 falls in 5 years, OR (odds ratio) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 2.04 (bilateral), and OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.51 (unilateral). Compared to participants with normal vision, those with incident unilateral visual impairment had a higher incidence of fractures over 5 years (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98-1.51). No increased incidence of falls or fractures was evident after 5+ years among participants with visual impairment. In this older cohort, recent development of visual impairment was associated with increased likelihood of subsequent falls and fractures in the next 5 years, independent of other confounding variables. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Speech and Hearing Problems among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstenson, Blue

    1978-01-01

    Findings from speech and hearing tests of older people in South Dakota community senior programs indicate the need for better testing and therapy procedures. Lipreading may be more effective than hearing aids, and factors other than hearing may be involved. Some problems and needs are noted. (MF)

  18. Dry mouth and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W M

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth is more common among older people than in any other age group. Appropriate definition and accurate measurement of dry mouth is critical for better understanding, monitoring and treatment of the condition. Xerostomia is the symptom(s) of dry mouth; it can be measured using methods ranging from single questions to multi-item summated rating scales. Low salivary flow (known as salivary gland hypofunction, or SGH) must be determined by measuring that flow. The relationship between SGH and xerostomia is not straightforward, but both conditions are common among older people, and they affect sufferers' day-to-day lives in important ways. The major risk factor for dry mouth is the taking of particular medications, and older people take more of those than any other age group, not only for symptomatic relief of various age-associated chronic diseases, but also in order to reduce the likelihood of complications which may arise from those conditions. The greater the number taken, the greater the associated anticholinergic burden, and the more likely it is that the individual will suffer from dry mouth. Since treating dry mouth is such a challenge for clinicians, there is a need for dentists, doctors and pharmacists to work together to prevent it occurring. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Perceptions of disaster preparedness among older people in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myoungran; Lee, Mijung; Tullmann, Dorothy

    2016-03-01

    Older people are a major vulnerable population. During disasters, given their physical frailty, lower social status, loss of medications and medical care, the vulnerability of older people increases. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of older people in Korea on various aspects of disaster preparedness to better understand their special needs and to facilitate appropriate disaster planning. The study was qualitative and used focus group interviews with 12 older people in one major city and one rural area of South Korea. Four themes were identified by the analysis of the interviews: defenceless state, reality of accepting limitations, strong will to live, importance of disaster preparedness governmental efforts for the older people. Findings indicated that preparation of shelters and transportation was critical to help older people survive in times of disasters and suggested that there should be active involvement of the government in terms of disaster planning, managing and preparing older people for disasters. In addition, healthy older people can be assets to disaster relief efforts by providing practical and emotional support for the most fragile older people. Older people can also provide knowledge of their special needs to the government to improve their disaster response policy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Antipsychotic prescribing in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Wendy; Curran, Stephen; Wattis, John

    2003-09-01

    older people. There is a need to redress this balance to ensure that the prescribing of antipsychotics in older people is evidence based.

  1. Chronic disease, risk factors and disability in adults aged 50 and above living with and without HIV: findings from the Wellbeing of Older People Study in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O. Mugisha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the prevalence of chronic conditions, their risk factors, and their associations with disability in older people living with and without HIV are scarce in sub-Saharan Africa. Objectives: In older people living with and without HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: 1 to describe the prevalence of chronic conditions and their risk factors and 2 to draw attention to associations between chronic conditions and disability. Methods: Cross-sectional individual-level survey data from people aged 50 years and over living with and without HIV were analyzed from three study sites in Uganda. Diagnoses of chronic conditions were made through self-report, and disability was determined using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS. We used ordered logistic regression and calculated predicted probabilities to show differences in the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions across HIV status, age groups, and locality. We used linear regression to determine associations between chronic conditions and the WHODAS. Results: In total, 471 participants were surveyed; about half the respondents were living with HIV. The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and eye problems (except for those aged 60–69 years was higher in the HIV-positive participants and increased with age. The prevalence of diabetes and angina was higher in HIV-negative participants. The odds of having one or more compared with no chronic conditions were higher in women (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.3 and in those aged 70 years and above (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2–3.6. Sleep problems (coefficient 14.2, 95% CI 7.3–21.0 and depression (coefficient 9.4, 95% CI 1.2–17.0 were strongly associated with higher disability scores. Conclusion: Chronic conditions are common in older adults and affect their functioning. Many of these conditions are not currently addressed by health services in Uganda. There is a need to revise health care policy and practice in Uganda to consider the

  2. Seniors-on-line: introducing older people to technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, C; Downing, A; Elford, C

    1997-03-01

    Retired Engineers are playing an important role in ensuring that older people are not excluded from the benefits of technological advances. Technology is playing an increasingly important role in the lives of older people as it is incorporated into assistive devices, home security, access to health care, banking, communication and many other areas. However, if older people are unfamiliar with new technologies and find them daunting, they may not benefit fully from these advances. In order to minimize difficulties arising from unfamiliarity with technology, an introductory computer course was offered to people aged 55 and over. Teaching methods appropriate to the needs of older people were used: small classes, students and instructors from same age cohort, slow pace of presentation and ample opportunity to ask questions. Retired Engineers make up the majority of instructors. Three hundred and sixty nine older people have participated in the course and most plan to continue using a computer.

  3. What Is the Key for Older People to Show Interest in Playing Digital Learning Games? Initial Qualitative Findings from the LEAGE Project on a Multicultural European Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Orueta, Unai; Facal, David; Nap, Henk Herman; Ranga, Myrto-Maria

    2012-04-01

    Learning digital games can influence both older adults' health condition and their capacity to carry on activities in their actual environment. The goal of the current study was to explore and define the user requirements for developing digital learning games for older Europeans, focusing on types of learning games, motivational and social aspects, and preferences on game controllers. For this initial stage, a qualitative focus group study was performed in three participating countries (Spain, The Netherlands, and Greece) where both games existing in the market and others developed in other European Commission projects like HERMES were presented to them, both on video presentations and also with the possibility to actually test some of them. Challenge, socialization, fun, providing learning opportunities, and escape from daily routine were extracted as the main keys why older people would be interested in playing digital games. Users described themselves as active and participating in many leisure activities, and this level of activity appeared to be related with the contents proposed for digital games, such as physical activity, culture, arts, and other human sciences (history, geography, traveling, foreign languages, music), and daily life skills (cooking, computer use, first aid). The knowledge gathered from the focus groups will be used as input for the design of a learning game that will be largely compatible with the needs and abilities of a wide range of older Europeans.

  4. Threats to patient safety in primary care reported by older people with multimorbidity: baseline findings from a longitudinal qualitative study and implications for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Rebecca; Daker-White, Gavin; Esmail, Aneez; Barlow, Wendy; Minor, Brian; Brown, Benjamin; Blakeman, Thomas; Sanders, Caroline; Bower, Peter

    2017-11-21

    In primary care, older patients with multimorbidity (two or more long-term conditions) are especially likely to experience patient safety incidents. Risks to safety in this setting arise as a result of patient, staff and system factors; particularly where these interact or fail to do so. Recent research and policy highlight the important contribution patients can make to improving safety. Older patients with multimorbidity may have the most to gain from increasing their involvement but before interventions can be developed to support them to improve their patient safety, more needs to be known about how this is threatened and how patients respond to perceived threats. We sought to identify and describe threats to patient safety in primary care among older people with multimorbidity, to provide a better understanding of how these are experienced and to inform the development of interventions to reduce risks to patient safety. Twenty-six older people, aged 65 or over, with multimorbidity were recruited to a longitudinal qualitative study. At baseline, data on their health and healthcare were collected through semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed thematically, using a framework developed from a previous synthesis of qualitative studies of patient safety in primary care. Threats to patient safety were organised into six themes, across three domains of health and care. These encompassed all aspects of the patient journey, from access to everyday management. Across the journey, many issues arose due to poor communication, and uncoordinated care created extra burdens for patients and healthcare staff. Patients' sense of safety and trust in their care providers were especially threatened when they felt their needs were ignored, or when they perceived responses from staff as inappropriate or insensitive. For older patients with multimorbidity, patient safety is intrinsically linked to the challenges people face when managing health conditions, navigating the

  5. Health professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward older people in primary care in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Badrya H.; Xiao, Lily D.

    2017-01-01

    Previous international studies have indicated that a range of factors influence knowledge and attitudes toward older people were education, past work experiences, and social contact with healthy older people. This article reports on the findings of a literature review in relation to attitudes toward older people among health professionals working in primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. The findings of this narrative literature are reported through 5 themes: the instruments used in the selected studies to measure attitudes toward older people; the instruments used to measure knowledge on ageing; attitudes toward older people; knowledge of the care of older people; and factors that influence knowledge and attitudes toward older people. Further investigation is needed to identify the level of knowledge on ageing, attitudes toward older people, and the factors which affect health professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward older people in primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. PMID:28251216

  6. Health professionals' knowledge and attitudes toward older people in primary care in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Badrya H; Xiao, Lily D

    2017-03-01

    Previous international studies have indicated that a range of factors influence knowledge and attitudes toward older people were education, past work experiences, and social contact with healthy older people. This article reports on the findings of a literature review in relation to attitudes toward older people among health professionals working in primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. The findings of this narrative literature are reported through 5 themes: the instruments used in the selected studies to measure attitudes toward older people; the instruments used to measure knowledge on ageing; attitudes toward older people; knowledge of the care of older people; and factors that influence knowledge and attitudes toward older people. Further investigation is needed to identify the level of knowledge on ageing, attitudes toward older people, and the factors which affect health professionals' knowledge and attitudes toward older people in primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia.

  7. Older peoples' lived experiences after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    add to the load of wellbeing-challenges after HF. Evidence-based knowledge in order to address the wellbeing of older people and the challenges they meet in changing times after HF is needed for professionals. Aim To explore the support older people with HF may need to optimize their wellbeing during...... striving for wellbeing in an active daily life after HF; steering-group meetings clarify clinical questions regarding functional ability after HF. This knowledge is the basis for developing the interview guide used when interviewing 13 at-home-living older people with limited functional ability prior...

  8. Technologies in older people's care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Marchesoni, Maria; Axelsson, Karin; Fältholm, Ylva; Lindberg, Inger

    2017-03-01

    The tension between care-based and technology-based rationalities motivates studies concerning how technology can be used in the care sector to support the relational foundation of care. This study interprets values related to care and technologies connected to the practice of good care. This research study was part of a development project aimed at developing innovative work practices through information and communication technology. Participants and research context: All staff (n = 18) working at two wards in a care facility for older people were asked to participate in interviews, and 12 accepted. We analysed the data using latent content analysis in combination with normative analysis. Ethical considerations: The caregivers were informed that participation was voluntary and that they could drop out at any time without providing any explanation. Four values were identified: 'presence', 'appreciation', 'competence' and 'trust'. Caregivers wanted to focus on care receivers as unique persons, a view that they thought was compromised by time-consuming and beeping electronic devices. Appraising from next-of-kin and been seen as someone who can contribute together with knowledge to handle different situations were other desires. The caregivers also desired positive feedback from next-of-kin, as they wanted to be seen as professionals who have the knowledge and skills to handle difficult situations. In addition, the caregivers wanted their employer to trust them, and they wanted to work in a calm environment. Caregivers' desire for disturbance-free interactions, being valued for their skills and working in a trustful working environment were interpreted as their base for providing good care. The caregivers' arguments are based on caring rationality, and sometimes they felt the technological rationality interfered with their main mission, providing quality care. Introducing new technology in caring should support the caring relationship. Although society's overall

  9. Older people in the information society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marcinkiewicz-Wilk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the situation of older people in the information society. In the theoretical part of article phenomena of aging population and information society were described. This paper includes results of research conducted in qualitative strategy. The method of collecting data was biographical method. The method for data processing was qualitative content analysis. In the research 2 older, educationally active people took part. Results of research shows how older people understand the information society and what risk and opportunities they notice in this new reality. Narratives of the respondents indicated that education is of crucial importance for participation in the information society. Older people who take part in lifelong learning cope better with the new reality than people who do not learn. Based on the research results we can point out areas of education which should be development. Moreover, it is visible that educational activity of older people is very important in adaptation to the information society. Narratives of seniors indicate reasons for the lack of educational activity of other seniors. According to this, it can be specified what action should be undertaken to prevent the exclusion of older people in this new reality

  10. Nurses' understandings of suitable footwear for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Andrea; Martin, Caroline Hollins; Locke, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into nurses' understandings of what constitutes suitable footwear for older people in care homes. An exploratory descriptive qualitative survey was carried out of 20 registered nurses employed in six Scottish care homes for older people. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire that included five open-ended questions. Content analysis was used to theme footwear perceptions. Participants had several views about what encompasses safe footwear; some were erroneous. The link between inappropriate footwear and falls was recognised by 80 per cent of respondents, but some were unclear about the features that effect or inhibit safety. No UK or international standardised guidelines were identified that advise nurses about appropriate footwear for older people. It is unknown whether respondents represent the nurse population because findings are restricted by a small sample size. Nonetheless, the group showed variable understanding of what constitutes safe footwear for older people and links with fall prevention. Improved nurse-education about what comprises safe footwear and the links with falls prevention in older people is required. Structured guidelines to direct nurse educators about what to teach student nurses about appropriate footwear for older people may work towards reducing falls. No guidelines to direct nurses about appropriate footwear for older people in care homes have been written. Key points have been developed.

  11. Older people, personal hygiene, and skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    Skin health is essential for well being in older people. Personal hygiene is fundamental to skin health, but a lack of evidence exists about effective practices. An evidence base, disseminated through nursing education and patient health promotion, must be developed.

  12. Dietary management of older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinchy, Jane

    2018-05-02

    Diabetes UK's revised nutrition guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes, published recently, encourage education in self-management and include additional guidance for older people with diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in older people is increasing. Many older people with diabetes are healthy and mobile, and live in the community, but a number are frail and living in care homes. Those who are frail are at increased risk of malnutrition from a range of causes. Older people with diabetes should be assessed for malnutrition risk and referred to a dietitian if required. Management of these patients focuses on foods that are high in protein and energy foods. A case study gives an example of how a community nurse may be involved.

  13. Older People of Tomorrow: A Psychosocial Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    Attempts to narrow the scope of present uncertainties about the older population by sketching a psychosocial profile of the older people of tomorrow based on what is known today. Focuses on the baby boom generation and the interplay between personal attributes they could bring to late life and the social and physical environment in which they…

  14. Destination Memory Impairment in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Gopie, Nigel; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Hasher, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are assumed to have poor destination memory— knowing to whom they tell particular information—and anecdotes about them repeating stories to the same people are cited as informal evidence for this claim. Experiment 1 assessed young and older adults’ destination memory by having participants tell facts (e.g., “A dime has 118 ridges around its edge”) to pictures of famous people (e.g., Oprah Winfrey). Surprise recognition memory tests, which also assessed confidence, revealed that o...

  15. [Dissertations 25 year after date 41. Older people's adaptability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Gerritsen, A E; van der Putten, G J; van der Maarel-Wierink, C D

    2015-09-01

    In 1990, the thesis 'Removable complete dentures in older people, an issue dealing with adaptability?' was published. Among other things, this thesis aimed at finding a method of measuring older people's adaptability to removable complete dentures. Its conclusion was that a subscale of the "Beoordelingsschaal voor Oudere Patiënten" (Rating scale for older patients) had predictive value. Subsequently, only a few research projects on this topic have been carried out. They dealt with demonstrated adaptation achieved after treatment, the realised adaptation. The results were disappointing. Ever since the availability of endosseous oral implants, research into adaptability to conventional removable complete dentures seems less relevant. During the last decades, inquiries into a method of measuring treatment effectiveness has focused on older people's quality of life and general health condition. However, to assess with respect to oral health care an older person's general health condition and load-taking capacity adequately, some experience is indispensable.

  16. The new caring: financial asset management and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Setterlund, Deborah; Rosenman, Linda

    2007-10-01

    Increasing longevity and the growing proportion of the aged in the population in most countries have served to focus on the question of how governments and older people can finance living, health, and care options in retirement. Prudent management of income and assets is an increasingly complex and important aspect of aging as assets and expectations of self-financing increase. Although many informal caregivers act as asset managers and/or substitute decision-makers for older people, little attention has been paid to this increasingly important aspect of care. This paper summaries key findings of a broad research program exploring family involvement in the management of older people's assets and the practices that constitute good practice as well as financial mismanagement and abuse. It identifies multi-level and multi-strategy responses needed to address the issues raised by the research and outlines an innovative community demonstration project aimed at improving financial management practices in relation to older people's assets.

  17. Insomnia (primary) in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Alessi, Cathy; Vitiello, Michael V

    2011-01-01

    Up to 40% of older adults have insomnia, with difficulty getting to sleep, early waking, or feeling unrefreshed on waking. The prevalence of insomnia increases with age. Other risk factors include medical and psychiatric illnesses, psychological factors, stress, daytime napping, and hyperarousal.Primary insomnia is a chronic and relapsing condition that may increase the risks of accidents.Primary insomnia is chronic insomnia without specific underlying medical, psychiatric, or other sleep ...

  18. Preventing social isolation in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterell, Natalie; Buffel, Tine; Phillipson, Christopher

    2018-07-01

    The extent of social isolation amongst older people has emerged as a major concern for health and social policy. Although the social and health outcomes of social isolation are well documented, evidence regarding the prevention of isolation in later life remains scarce. This article addresses this by presenting the findings from a literature review focusing on the identification, assessment, prevention, and intervention strategies relevant to social isolation in older age. The paper first addresses the issues of identification and assessment, using an ecological framework to identify the risk factors for social isolation at four levels: individual, relationship, community, and societal. It then reviews different types of interventions to reduce or prevent social isolation in later life, including one-to-one, group, service provision, technology-based, neighbourhood, and structural interventions. The paper discusses both the opportunities and the constraints associated with these different approaches. The discussion highlights future directions for research, emphasising the need for a cultural change from 'cure' to 'prevention' of social isolation across the life-course, and the importance of acknowledging greater diversity within the ageing population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  20. RECRUITING OLDER VOLUNTEERS: FINDINGS FROM THE BELGIAN AGEING STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah DURY

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a significant body of work concerning voluntary work, hardly any attention is given to volunteering of older individuals. Moreover, the potential volunteers among older adults is even less examined. Next to volunteering among olde r adults, the neighbou rhood becomes more salient when people age and this due to their more intense use and time spent in the neighbourhood. In response to these lacunae, the main purpose of this contribution is to examine the impact of subjective neighbourhood features on the recruitment potential for volunteering among older people. This study uses data collected from the Belgian Ageing Studies. 59.977 adults aged sixty and over living self-reliantly in 127 Flemish municipalities in Belgium participated in this study. A binary logistic regression is ap plied to analyse the key va riables characterizing potential volunteers. Our findings stress the need for recognizing the crucial importance of the locality when recruiting older adults for volunteer activities.

  1. Older people, food and satisfaction with life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M.; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses food-related satisfaction with life of older people, identifying some of the determinants and barriers to satisfaction with food-related quality of life, and discusses possible ways of enhancing older people's quality of life in the domain of food. Despite being strongly...... associated with life, and heavily contributing to the quality of life, food has so far been neglected and not much research has been conducted into people's satisfaction with their food-related life and its relationship to overall life satisfaction. As people age, their goals and available resources in terms...... of health, social networks, income and skills change. Changes in resources can be expected to have an impact on satisfaction with life....

  2. Destination memory impairment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopie, Nigel; Craik, Fergus I M; Hasher, Lynn

    2010-12-01

    Older adults are assumed to have poor destination memory-knowing to whom they tell particular information-and anecdotes about them repeating stories to the same people are cited as informal evidence for this claim. Experiment 1 assessed young and older adults' destination memory by having participants tell facts (e.g., "A dime has 118 ridges around its edge") to pictures of famous people (e.g., Oprah Winfrey). Surprise recognition memory tests, which also assessed confidence, revealed that older adults, compared to young adults, were disproportionately impaired on destination memory relative to spared memory for the individual components (i.e., facts, faces) of the episode. Older adults also were more confident that they had not told a fact to a particular person when they actually had (i.e., a miss); this presumably causes them to repeat information more often than young adults. When the direction of information transfer was reversed in Experiment 2, such that the famous people shared information with the participants (i.e., a source memory experiment), age-related memory differences disappeared. In contrast to the destination memory experiment, older adults in the source memory experiment were more confident than young adults that someone had shared a fact with them when a different person actually had shared the fact (i.e., a false alarm). Overall, accuracy and confidence jointly influence age-related changes to destination memory, a fundamental component of successful communication. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Education for Older People in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Andrea; Lamura, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    This article provides information on trends in formal and informal adult education in Italy, with a particular focus on the older learners (over 65). Main providers, programs, objectives/motivations, and financial and legal framework are described. In general, over-65-year-old people were found to be underrepresented in participation. They were…

  4. Older people's experiences of dream coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-12-01

    Recalling and talking about dreams could initiate dream work among older people and provide an opportunity for self-confrontation and personal growth, which could in turn promote gerotranscendental development. The present article describes older people's opinions about participating in a dream-coaching group; it also briefly describes the theoretical foundation of dream coaching. The study aim was to investigate older people's experience of participating in a dream-coaching group based on Jungian psychology. A descriptive design was used. Retrospective interviews were explored using qualitative content analysis. The participants were satisfied with the arrangement of the dream-coaching groups. All participants believed that they had recalled their dreams and thought much more about their dreams during the period in which the dream-coaching group met. Three diverse appraisals of participating in a dream-coaching group, which had different effects on the participants, were identified: "An activity like any other activity," "An activity that led to deeper thoughts about the meaning of dreams," and "An activity that led to deeper thoughts both about the meaning of dreams and about how dreams can improve one's understanding of the life situation." It is possible to arrange dream-coaching groups for older people and could be a way to promote personal development using this type of intervention. The study provides some guidance as to how such a group could be organized, thus facilitating use of dream-coaching groups in gerontological care.

  5. Managing effective partnerships in older people's services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Henk

    The integration of older people's services is a challenge to all countries with an ageing population. Although it is widely acknowledged that acute care, long-term care, social care, housing, leisure, education and other services should all operate in a more 'joined-up manner', achieving this in

  6. Engaging older people with participatory design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, I.; Marti, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a design case focusing on participatory design (PD) with older people. We experimented with PD techniques to foster engagement with participants in development of a graphical user interface (GUI) for controlling a robotic system in a smart home environment. The tenet of our approach is

  7. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  8. Optimising nutrition for older people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Delwyn

    This article explores interventions that can be undertaken to establish and maintain adequate nutritional intake in older people with dementia. This is often a problem, particularly in the later stages of the disease. A literature review was conducted, which identified 12 articles for inclusion. Most of these articles described interventions to maintain adequate nutritional intake in older adults with dementia. Although no standardised intervention was reported, some approaches did appear to be more successful than others. Further research is required on how nurses and nursing assistants can help older people with dementia to maintain adequate nutrition. Staff need more time and training to improve nutritional intake in this group of patients. In addition, enhanced vigilance with respect to eating difficulties and food consumption is necessary.

  9. Transforming Practice with Older People through an Ethic of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Lizzie; Barnes, Marian

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the relevance of deliberative practices framed by feminist care ethics to social work practice with older people. It draws on two connected projects which brought together older people: practitioners and academics. The first was a participatory research project in which the significance of care to well-being in old age emerged. The second was a knowledge exchange project which generated learning resources for social care practice based on the research findings of the first project. Here we analyse selected transcripts of recordings from meetings of both projects to consider the ways that discussions about lived experiences and everyday lives demonstrate care through this dialogue. Using this analysis, we propose that care ethics can be useful in transforming relationships between older people and those working with them through the creation of hybrid spaces in which 'care-full deliberation' can happen. We argue that such reflective spaces can enable transformative dialogue about care and its importance to older people and offer a counterbalance to the procedurally driven environments in which much social work practice takes place and can support practice more attuned to the circumstances and concerns of older people.

  10. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Garasto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting.

  11. Health professionals? knowledge and attitudes toward older people in primary care in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alamri, Badrya H.; Xiao, Lily D.

    2017-01-01

    Previous international studies have indicated that a range of factors influence knowledge and attitudes toward older people were education, past work experiences, and social contact with healthy older people. This article reports on the findings of a literature review in relation to attitudes toward older people among health professionals working in primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. The findings of this narrative literature are reported through 5 themes: the instruments used in the ...

  12. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  13. Causes of homelessness among older people in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota-Bartelink, Alice; Lipmann, Bryan

    2007-06-01

    A comparative study of the causes of new episodes of homelessness among people aged 50 years and over has been undertaken in Australia, the United States and England. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information on the circumstances and problems that contributed to homelessness. This paper presents the findings from Australia, where information was obtained from 125 older homeless people (aged 50+ years) and their key workers in Melbourne. All three participating nations followed identical research methodologies. The factors most frequently reported by respondents as contributing to their homelessness were problems with people with whom they lived, followed by physical and mental ill-health and problems associated with the housing itself. The most frequently reported factors by case workers were problems with alcohol, followed by physical and mental health factors. This study demonstrates a significant under-utilisation of housing and support services among recently homeless older people and provides evidence that people who had previously been homeless appear to be more resigned to their homelessness than do those who had not experienced homelessness before. Significant issues relating to depression and gambling were also noted. The findings support the need for more targeted, specialised services to be developed or improved such that older homeless people can readily gain access to them and for improved collaboration or information exchange among housing providers and welfare agencies.

  14. Neighbors Connected; Exploring Recruitment of Dutch Older People for Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezwijn, J.; Vaandrager, L.; Wagemakers, A.; Koelen, M.; Woerkum, van C.

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of older people to engage in actions aimed at promoting health is an issue that does not receive much attention within health promotion practice. Many activities for older people are organized; however, less socially active older people do not participate in such activities. The aim

  15. Food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.

    2006-01-01

    Food patterns of Polish older people were separated and described. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years, living in 5 geographical locations. Participants of the study were selected in quota sampling. Criteria for recruitment included sex, age (65-^74 or 75+ years) and family status...... (living alone or living with other people). Respondents were asked questions about consumption of 55 food products. The factor analysis allowed for separating 21 food patterns. They included from 1 to 3 groups of products, intake of which was mutually dependant. Big number of separated food patterns...... and small number of products fonning joint food patterns speak in advocacy of relatively small reciprocal relationship between different food items consumed by the seniors in Poland....

  16. Sustainability literacy of older people in retirement villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian; Skitmore, Martin; Buys, Laurie; Hu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia's central business district (CBD). Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  17. Housing Accessibility Methodology Targeting Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina

    accessibility problems before the planning of housing intervention strategies. It is also critical that housing standards addressing accessibility intended to accommodate people with functional limitations are valid in the sense that their definitions truly support accessibility. However, there is a paucity...... of valid and reliable assessment instruments targeting housing accessibility, and in-depth analysis of factors potentially impacting on reliability in complex assessment situations is remarkably absent. Moreover, the knowledge base informing the housing standards appears to be vague. We may therefore...... reasonably question the validity of the housing standards addressing accessibility. This thesis addresses housing accessibility methodology in general and the reliability of assessment and the validity of standards targeting older people with functional limitations and a dependence on mobility devices...

  18. A literature review to explore integrated care for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Reed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper reports on some of the findings of a literature review commissioned to explore integrated care for older people. Methods: The process of revising included finding and selecting literature from multidisciplinary sources, and encompassed both published papers and ‘grey’ literature, i.e. material which had not been reviewed for publication. Results: The study found that thinking has moved on from a focus on the problems of accessing services to exploring ways in which they may function in an integrated way. Conclusions: The study shows how thinking on integrated care for older people has developed, and knowledge of micro, mezzo and macro strategies is now more available.

  19. Older People with Learning Disabilities:Workforce issues

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, S; Manthorpe, J

    2005-01-01

    The life expectancy of people with learning disabilities has increased substantially. Services for older people with learning disabilities are provided by various sectors and practitioners (generic health and social care, or specialist learning disability or old age). The literature suggests that practitioners do not feel well-equipped to support people with learning disabilities as they grow older, and older people's services do not always have the opportunity to share experiences and skills...

  20. Telecare and older people: who cares where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Christine; Roberts, Celia; Mort, Maggie

    2011-02-01

    'Telecare solutions' are seen as a potential means of addressing the future care needs of ageing societies in Western economies. The development of these remote care systems runs in parallel with policies aimed at 'ageing in place'; and is targeted at supporting the perceived care needs of frail older people within the home. Drawing on ethnographic and deliberative panel data from European Community funded research, we consider how these developments contribute to a reshaping of the place and experience of care for older people. We do so by addressing the ways in which remote care systems can, firstly, act to change the experience of home; and secondly, re-order the place of care-work and responsibilities to care as new actors become enrolled within the care network and existing care-givers take on differing roles and responsibilities. Finally, we consider how this paper contributes to conceptual debates around institution and extitution - that is, the de-territorialisation of the physical structure of the institution and its re-manifestation through new spaces and times that seek to end interior and exterior distinctions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Theorising the Relationship between Older People and Their Immediate Social Living Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Tine; Verte, Dominique; De Donder, Liesbeth; De Witte, Nico; Dury, Sarah; Vanwing, Tom; Bolsenbroek, Anouk

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework for exploring the dynamics between older people and their immediate social living environment. After introducing a gerontological perspective that goes beyond "microfication," a literature review presents findings from studies that have explored the role of place and locality for older people. Next,…

  2. Comparison of anxiety as reported by older people with intellectual disabilities and by older people with normal intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, H.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Evenhuis, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Older people with intellectual disabilities (ID) may experience more and different symptoms of anxiety than older people with normal intelligence. Study questions: (1) Is the reported severity of anxiety in this group similar to that in the general older population; (2) Are specific

  3. Health Needs Assessment of Older People in an Agricultural Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normah Che Din

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Psychological factors had the main influence on health functioning of the older people of FELDA. Physical health needs of the older people in FELDA were determined mainly by psychological, nutritional, and lifestyle factors, whereas mental health needs were determined mainly by psychological, socioeconomic, and social factors. FELDA has vast resources to utilize for the running and maintaining of health programs for their older people as well as for evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of health programs.

  4. Improvement in the physiological function and standing stability based on kinect multimedia for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The increase in the Taiwanese older population is associated with age-related inconveniences. Finding adequate and simple physical activities to help the older people maintaining their physiological function and preventing them from falls has become an urgent social issue. [Subjects and Methods] This study aimed to design a virtual exercise training game suitable for Taiwanese older people. This system will allow for the maintenance of the physiological function and standing stabili...

  5. Finding Objects for Assisting Blind People

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chucai; Flores, Roberto W.; Chincha, Ricardo; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    Computer vision technology has been widely used for blind assistance, such as navigation and wayfinding. However, few camera-based systems are developed for helping blind or visually-impaired people to find daily necessities. In this paper, we propose a prototype system of blind-assistant object finding by camera-based network and matching-based recognition. We collect a dataset of daily necessities and apply Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) featu...

  6. Rural older people had lower mortality after accidental falls than non-rural older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang JW

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jen-Wu Huang,1,2 Yi-Ying Lin,2,3 Nai-Yuan Wu,4 Yu-Chun Chen5–7 1Department of Surgery, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Yilan, Taiwan; 2Institute of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Pediatrics, Heping Fuyou Branch, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Biomedical Informatics, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Medical Research and Education, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Yilan, Taiwan; 6Faculty of Medicine and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Objective: This study aimed to investigate the mortality rate after falls of rural and non-rural older people and to explore the risk factors of mortality after falls among older people. Patients and methods: This population-based case–control study identified two groups from a nationwide claim database (National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan: a rural group and a non-rural group, which included 3,897 and 5,541 older people, respectively, who were hospitalized for accidental falls (The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification: E880–E888 during 2006–2009. Both groups were followed up for 4 years after falls. Four-year cumulative all-cause mortality rate after falls was calculated, and the demographic factor, comorbidity, and medications were considered as the potential risk factors of mortality after falls. Results: The rural group had a significantly higher frequency of fall-related hospitalizations (7.4% vs 4.3%, P<0.001, but a lower 4-year cumulative all-cause mortality rate after falls than the non-rural group (8.8% vs 23.4%, P<0.001. After adjusting for age, gender, comorbidity, and medication use, the rural group had

  7. Older people living with HIV in Uganda: understanding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV-prevention, treatment and care programmes should seek to meet the special needs of older people through focused and innovative approaches. Further research with larger samples is needed to explore the impact of these healthcare needs on the quality of life of older people living with HIV. Keywords: ageing ...

  8. Physical Activity among Older People Living Alone in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; While, Alison E; Hicks, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate physical activity among older people living alone in Shanghai, People's Republic of China, and key factors contributing to their physical activity. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered in nine communities in Shanghai, using a stratified random cluster sample: 521 community-dwelling older people…

  9. Intersectoral interagency partnerships to promote financial capability in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hean, Sarah; Fenge, Lee Ann; Worswick, Louise; Wilkinson, Charlie; Fearnley, Stella

    2012-09-01

    From the second quarter of 2008, the UK economy entered a period of economic decline. Older people are particularly vulnerable during these times. To promote ways in which older people can be better supported to maintain their financial well-being, this study explored the sources older people utilize to keep themselves financially informed. Interviews with older people (n = 28) showed that older people access trusted sources of information (e.g. healthcare professionals) rather than specialist financial information providers (e.g. financial advisors) which highlighted the need for interagency working between financial services in the private, public and voluntary sectors. An example of how such interagency partnerships might be achieved in practice is presented with some recommendations on directions for future research into interagency working that spans public, private and voluntary sectors.

  10. Psychosocial and Mental Health Problems of Older People in Postearthquake Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ramesh P; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Paudel, Sasmita; Pokhrel, Ruja; Bhandari, Nagendra; Cole, Laura; Koirala, Suraj

    2017-03-01

    To identify community perceptions on psychosocial and mental health problems of older people in postearthquake situation in Nepal. A qualitative methodology was adopted to explore the experience and opinions of older people, social workers, school teachers, health workers, and nongovernmental organization workers on the psychosocial and mental health problems of older people in Nepal, using key informant interviews. Major local vocabulary for older peoples' psychosocial and mental health problems were "bichalan" (variation in mood and feeling), "ekohoro" (becoming single minded), "athmabiswasko kami" (low self-esteem), and "bina karan rune" (crying without any reason). The major causes attributed to older people's problems were physical injury, disability, family conflict, and economic problems. Forgetfulness, tiredness, loss of concentration, restlessness, and isolation were observed in older people since the 2015 earthquake. The findings suggest that earthquake had negative impact on older people's psychosocial well-being; however, little support or treatment options have been made available to these individuals. The tailor-made community-based psychosocial and mental health programs for older people are needed.

  11. Why Social Exclusion Persists among Older People in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyana Miranti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature on social exclusion among older people, though relatively limited, suggests that disadvantage among older people is cumulative in nature. Some aspects of disadvantage starting at early life stages have long-term consequences. As such, older people with disadvantages may be subject to higher risks of persistent social exclusion. This article aims to improve understanding of social exclusion and its persistence among senior Australians in three ways. Firstly, the incidence of social exclusion among older people is analysed using selected indicators. Secondly, the study examines whether an older person experiencing social exclusion at one time is more likely to experience it again (persistence. Thirdly, it investigates what factors may be protecting older people from social exclusion. The analysis is conducted using the first eight waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA Survey. The sample of older people is disaggregated into a younger group (55–64 years at wave 1 and an older group (65+ years. The article suggests that higher education and income, as well as better health conditions and previous employment experiences, are important protective factors from social exclusion for older Australians.

  12. Ginger Orally Disintegrating Tablets to Improve Swallowing in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Ayumu; Funato, Hiroki; Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Abe, Noriaki; Yagi, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Jobu, Kohei; Yokota, Junko; Hirose, Kahori; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously prepared and pharmaceutically evaluated ginger orally disintegrating (OD) tablets, optimized the base formulation, and carried out a clinical trial in healthy adults in their 20 s and 50s to measure their effect on salivary substance P (SP) level and improved swallowing function. In this study, we conducted clinical trials using the ginger OD tablets in older people to clinically evaluate the improvements in swallowing function resulting from the functional components of the tablet. The ginger OD tablets were prepared by mixing the excipients with the same amount of mannitol and sucrose to a concentration of 1% ginger. Eighteen healthy older adult volunteers aged 63 to 90 were included in the swallowing function test. Saliva was collected before and 15 min after administration of the placebo and ginger OD tablets. Swallowing endoscopy was performed by an otolaryngologist before administration and 15 min after administration of the ginger OD tablets. A scoring method was used to evaluate the endoscopic swallowing. Fifteen minutes after taking the ginger OD tablets, the salivary SP amount was significantly higher than prior to ingestion or after taking the placebo (pginger OD tablets. Our findings showed that the ginger OD tablets increased the salivary SP amount and improved swallowing function in older people with appreciably reduced swallowing function.

  13. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  14. Mental health issues and discrimination among older LGBTI people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Jean; Dow, Briony; Maude, Phillip; Purchase, Rachel; Whyte, Carolyn; Barrett, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    LGBT is an acronym used to describe people from diverse sexual orientation or gender identity, people that are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. LGBT people do not constitute a single group nor does each individual "group" constitute a homogeneous unity. However, as higher rates of depression and/or anxiety have been observed in older LGBT people, compared to their heterosexual counterparts (Guasp, 2011) there is a need to raise the profile of mental health issues amongst these groups. The additional letter I is also often included in the acronym LGBTI as intersex people are often included as another gender diverse group. However, there is very little research that includes intersex people and none on older intersex people's mental health so this editorial is restricted to consideration of older LGBT people.

  15. Finding Objects for Assisting Blind People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chucai; Flores, Roberto W; Chincha, Ricardo; Tian, Yingli

    2013-07-01

    Computer vision technology has been widely used for blind assistance, such as navigation and wayfinding. However, few camera-based systems are developed for helping blind or visually-impaired people to find daily necessities. In this paper, we propose a prototype system of blind-assistant object finding by camera-based network and matching-based recognition. We collect a dataset of daily necessities and apply Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) feature descriptors to perform object recognition. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our prototype system.

  16. Testing an app for reporting health concerns-Experiences from older people and home care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Carina; Eriksson, Irene; Ziegert, Kristina; Wengström, Yvonne; Langius-Eklöf, Ann; Brovall, Maria; Kihlgren, Annica; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-12-05

    To explore the experiences of using an app among older people with home-based health care and their nurses. Few information and communication technology innovations have been developed and tested for older people with chronic conditions living at home with home-based health care support. Innovative ways to support older people's health and self-care are needed. Explorative qualitative design. For 3 months to report health concerns, older people receiving home-based health care used an interactive app, which included direct access to self-care advice, graphs and a risk assessment model that sends alerts to nurses for rapid management. Interviews with older people (n = 17) and focus group discussions with home care nurses (n = 12) were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. The findings reveal that a process occurs. Using the app, the older people participated in their care, and the app enabled learning and a new way of communication. The interaction gave a sense of security and increased self-confidence among older people. The home care nurses viewed the alerts as appropriate for the management of health concerns. However, all participants experienced challenges in using new technology and had suggestions for improvement. The use of an app appears to increase the older people's participation in their health care and offers them an opportunity to be an active partner in their care. The app as a new way to interact with home care nurses increased the feeling of security. The older people were motivated to learn to use the app and described potential use for it in the future. The use of an app should be considered as a useful information and communication technology innovation that can improve communication and accessibility for older people with home-based health care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ageing in an inconvenient paradise: the immigrant experiences of older Korean people in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jae; Kim, Chang Gi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the immigrant experiences of older Korean people and their intergenerational family relationships in the New Zealand context. Data were collected from qualitative interviews with older people, community leaders and professionals in Christchurch and Auckland. Data analysis was conducted using concept mapping techniques in the cross-cultural context where two languages were simultaneously used. The findings of the study show that older Korean people in New Zealand were likely to face multiple challenges due to the combined effects of immigration and ageing in a new country. Some older people experienced difficulties in managing their immigrant lives and intergenerational relationships in the transnational family context in which their family members were dispersed across two or more nations. The immigrant experiences of older migrants might be affected by an 'invisible' source of isolation and exclusion at familial, community, societal and transnational levels. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2013 ACOTA.

  18. Care planning at home: a way to increase the influence of older people?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Berglund

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care-planning meetings represent a common method of needs assessment and decision-making practices in elderly care. Older people's influence is an important and required aspect of these practices. This study's objective was to describe and analyse older people's influence on care-planning meetings at home and in hospital. Methods: Ten care-planning meetings were audio-recorded in the older people's homes and nine were recorded in hospital. The study is part of a project including a comprehensive continuum-of-care model. A qualitative content analysis was performed.  Results: Care-planning meetings at home appeared to enable older people's involvement in the discussions. Fewer people participated in the meetings at home and there was less parallel talking. Unrelated to the place of the care-planning meeting, the older people were able to influence concerns relating to the amount of care/service and the choice of provider. However, they were not able to influence the way the help should be provided or organised.  Conclusion: Planning care at home indicated an increase in involvement on the part of the older people, but this does not appear to be enough to obtain any real influence. Our findings call for attention to be paid to older people's opportunities to receive care and services according to their individual needs and their potential for influencing their day-to-day provision of care and service.

  19. Older people dying with dementia: a nationwide study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; van den Block, L.; Echteld, M.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; van Casteren, V.; Deliens, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Large-scale nationwide data describing the end-of-life characteristics of older people with dementia are lacking. This paper describes the dying process and end-of-life care provided to elderly people with mild or severe dementia in Belgium. It compares with elderly people dying without

  20. Perspectives of nursing professionals and older adults differ on aspects of care for older people after a nationwide improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Lisanne Marlieke; Wehrens, Rik; Oldenhof, Lieke; Bal, Roland; Francke, Anneke L

    2018-05-02

    The perspectives of nursing professionals might differ from those of older adults when it comes to care for older people. This cross-sectional study compares the views of older adults with the views of nursing professionals on the quality of care after a nationwide improvement program for care for older people was implemented (2008-2016) in the Netherlands. Questionnaire data were used from 385 nursing professionals (response rate 51%) that were part of the Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide representative group of nursing staff, and working in home care, hospitals or general practices. Additionally, questionnaire data were used from 73 older adults (response rate 81%) who were involved in regional networks to discuss project proposals and to represent the voice of older adults in the nationwide improvement program. Participants were asked to evaluate care for older people with regard to collaboration between healthcare organizations and with regard to the tailored service, accessibility, and quality of care within their organizations and in the region in which they lived. A majority of older adults (54%) and nursing professionals (61%) felt that collaboration with others had improved over the last few years. Approximately one third of the older adults stated that care for older people was tailored to fit individual needs and was accessible most of the time or always, as opposed to approximately two thirds of the professionals. Moreover, 17% older adults thought that the quality of care was good, compared with 54% of the nursing professionals. 77% of the nursing professionals and 94% of the older adults thought that improvements were still needed in care for older people, for example better integration of the different aspects of care and a more patient-centered approach. Older adults who were involved in networks of the improvement program generally gave a less positive evaluation of aspects of care for older people and its development than nursing professionals

  1. How older people with learning disabilities perceive ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Robert

    2010-07-01

    This article discusses the author's use of reflexivity in trying to gain a better understanding of ageing in older people with learning disabilities. In the general population ageing is viewed in rather negative terms and as a significant life transition. However, for some older people with learning disabilities this transition may go unnoticed because of their past negative life experiences and lack of opportunities. Reflexivity has the potential to provide nurses with greater understanding of the personal perspectives of older people with learning disabilities.

  2. Better housing and living conditions for older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    housing stock and local neighbourhood facilites be made more responsive to the demands of older people? How can housing and planning measures contribute to the integration of older people in local communities? How can urban renewal be implemented in elderly-friendly forms? What forms of coordination......There is an increasing emphasis on strategies designed to combat the exclusion of older people from society. The development of social policies oriented towards community care and community living has important consequences for housing policies and urban planning policies. How can the general...

  3. Ageing well? A cross-country analysis of the way older people are visually represented on websites of organizations for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugène Loos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ‘aging well’ discourse advances the idea of making older people responsible for their capability to stay healthy and active. In the context of an increased ageing population, which poses several challenges to countries’ government, this discourse has become dominant in Europe. We explore the way older people are visually represented on websites of organizations for older people in seven European countries (Finland, UK, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Poland and Romania, using an analytical approached based on visual content analysis, inspired by the dimensional model of national cultural differences from the Hofstede model (1991; 2001; 2011. We used two out of the five Hofstede dimensions: Individualism/Collectivism (IDV and Masculinity/Femininity (MAS. The results demonstrated that in all seven countries older people are mostly visually represented as healthy/active, which reflects a dominant ‘ageing well’ discourse in Europe. The results also demonstrated that in most cases older people tend to be represented together with others, which is not consonant with the dominant ‘ageing well’ discourse in Europe. A last finding was that the visual representation of older people is in about half of the cases in line with these Hofstede dimensions. We discuss the implications of these findings claiming that the ‘ageing well’ discourse might lead to ‘visual ageism’. Organizations could keep this in mind while using pictures for their website or in other media and consider to use various kind of pictures, or to avoid using pictures of older people that stigmatize, marginalize or injure. They could look into the cultural situatedness and intersectional character of age relations and consider alternative strategies of both visibility and invisibility to talk with and about our ageing societies.

  4. Specialist services for older people : issues of negative and positive ageism

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Jan; Cook, Glenda; Cook, Margaret; Inglis, Pamela; Clarke, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study in 2004 of the development of specialist services for older people in the National Health Service (NHS) in England, as recommended in the Department of Health's National Service Framework for Older People (NSF-OP). The study was funded by the Department of Health as part of a programme of research to explore the Framework's implementation. Information was collected through a questionnaire survey about the nature of specialist developments at three levels...

  5. OLDER PEOPLE AND SPORT, LOOKING BEYOND THE HEALTH PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva VONCK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores some important theoretical questions on the relationship between sports and older people, beyond the health perspective. Sport has been attributed numerous social functions and meanings. Also policymakers have experimented with the use of sport for social purposes. However, both research and poli cy initiatives are in general cons idered from a functional and instrumental point of view. Especially considering older people sport is mainly approached from a health perspective. A combination of insights from gerontology and sport sciences should help us gain a better view on how sport can contribute to the social integration of older people. This paper offers an extensive literature review focusing on formulating opportunities for further research about sport participation among older people.

  6. Suicide among Older People: Projections for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ann Pollinger; Hendin, Herbert

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates the relationship between cohort size and longitudinal suicide rates, with reference to four particular cohorts. Combines this perspective with projected population increases among older age groups to estimate the scope of the problem of suicide among older people during the early decades of the next century. (Author/JAC)

  7. Older People as a Developing Market for Cultural Heritage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anna; Zipsane, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Is it morally acceptable for the heritage sector to see the growing population of senior citizens as a developing market? Jamtli is an open air museum in the north of Sweden. The main target group is families with children, but an increasing number of activities for older adults are being offered. The growing population of older people is a…

  8. Engagement in intergenerational learning by experienced older people

    OpenAIRE

    Patrício, Maria Raquel; Osório, António

    2013-01-01

    Fast technological and social change ask for older people who hold competences and knowledge for living in a world of persistent change and are also prepared to constantly learn how to use new technologies, able to deal with new transformations in society and to be involved in family and community active life. Demographic changes have had a lot to do with continuous lifelong learning by adults and older people. They have to have knowledge and digital skills which are necessa...

  9. The impact of foreign caregiving on depression among older people in Taiwan: model testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Chia-Yi; Schepp, Karen G

    2012-05-01

      This article is a report of a study of predicting the factors that influence depression in the older people in Taiwan. Background.  In 1991, Taiwan opened the labour market to foreign caregivers for the older people who needed long-term care. With the differences in language, culture and lifestyle between foreign caregivers and older people in Taiwan, it was hypothesized that the older people would not be able to relate to them, and therefore become depressed.   The data were collected from 116 Taiwanese older people from July to September, 2005. Path analysis using multiple regression analyses was conducted to estimate the direct and indirect effects of caregiving communication, activities of daily living, income and social support on depression among older people in Taiwan. To evaluate the hypotheses for this research, bi-variate linear regression and multiple regression analyses were used.   The results indicated that the level of activities of daily living (β = -0·201, P = 0·010), care-giving communication (β = -0·272, P = 0·002) income (β = -0·305, P = 0·000) and social support (β = -0·276, P = 0·002) were the predictors of depression in older people in Taiwan. Social support was a mediating factor for caregiving communication and depression. Furthermore, foreign caregiver care was not correlated with depression among older people in Taiwan.   The findings influence the public awareness of depression in older people, and provide the foundational information to influence the policy makers of Taiwan to evaluate the foreign caregiver policy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Pedestrian fatalities and injuries involving Irish older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, A J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been established internationally that road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving older drivers follow clearly different patterns of timing, location and outcomes from those of younger age groups. Older pedestrians are also a vulnerable group and fewer analyses have been undertaken of the phenomenology of their injuries and fatalities. We studied the pattern of pedestrian RTAs in Ireland over a five-year period with the aim of identifying differences between older pedestrians (aged 65 or older) and younger adults. METHODS: We examined the datasets of the Irish National Road Authority (now the Road Safety Authority) from 1998-2002. We analysed patterns of crashes involving older pedestrians (aged 65) and compared them with younger adults (aged 18-64). RESULTS: Older people represented 36% (n = 134) of pedestrian fatalities and 23% of serious injuries while they only account for 19% of total RTAs. Mortality in RTA is more than doubled for older pedestrians compared to younger adults (RR 2.30). Most accidents involving older pedestrians happen in daylight with good visibility (56%) and in good weather conditions (77%). CONCLUSIONS: Older pedestrians are particularly vulnerable in RTAs. These occur more frequently during daylight hours and in good weather conditions. This may point to a need for prevention strategies that are targeted at the traffic environment and other road users rather than at older people.

  11. Ataxia caused by amiodarone in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, J V; Ibrahim, Amin; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2008-05-01

    Amiodarone is recommended for the cardioversion of atrial fibrillation and prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with structural heart disease, coronary artery disease or left ventricular dysfunction. It has well-recognised side-effects on the skin, lungs, liver, thyroid and eyes. Neurological side-effects, including ataxia and neuropathy, also occur, and may be more prevalent in older patients. These side-effects are reversible after cessation of amiodarone. Monitoring of amiodarone therapy should include assessment of the central and peripheral nervous system especially in older patients.

  12. Body weight, anorexia, and undernutrition in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenen, Stijn; Chapman, Ian M

    2013-09-01

    Ideal body weight for maximum life expectancy increases with advancing age. Older people, however, tend to weigh less than younger adults, and old age is also associated with a tendency to lose weight. Weight loss in older people is associated with adverse outcomes, particularly if unintentional, and initial body weight is low. When older people lose weight, more of the tissue lost is lean tissue (mainly skeletal muscle) than in younger people. When excessive, the loss of lean muscle tissue results in sarcopenia, which is associated with poor health outcomes. Unintentional weight loss in older people may be a result of protein-energy malnutrition, cachexia, the physiological anorexia of aging, or a combination of these. The physiological anorexia of aging is a decrease in appetite and energy intake that occurs even in healthy people and is possibly caused by changes in the digestive tract, gastrointestinal hormone concentrations and activity, neurotransmitters, and cytokines. A greater understanding of this decrease in appetite and energy intake during aging, and the responsible mechanisms, may aid the search for ways to treat undernutrition and weight loss in older people. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tackling malnutrition among older people in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Anna

    2007-03-01

    Undernutrition - of both macronutrients and micronutrients - is still a surprisingly common problem among older people in the UK. There is a variety of nutritional supplements that community nurses need to be aware of in managing their patients' nutritional requirements. Different supplements are taken for different disease states. This article looks at the various nutrient and energy requirements that relate directly to clients on the district nurse's caseload. Some of the negative consequences of malnutrition of the older adult are discussed, as are the NICE guidelines for nutrition. Factors affecting dietary intake in older people are considered.

  14. Influences of satisfaction with telecare and family trust in older Taiwanese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Uei, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-27

    The level of trust given towards telecare by the family members of older people using the service is extremely important. Family trust may be an influential factor in deciding whether to use such services. This study focuses on older people's satisfaction with telecare and examines their family's trust in telecare services. Influences on intention to continue using telecare services are also explored. A questionnaire-based survey on 60 communities dwelling older people who had been receiving telecare services in the past two years was employed. This study developed a satisfaction and trust scale based on previous studies. Our results show that older people's satisfaction with telecare services and families' trust were influential in decided whether to continue to use of telecare services. These findings can help medical institutions to better insight into the user experience of telecare to help them provide future services that better comply with clients' desires and requirements.

  15. Association of health literacy with health information-seeking preference in older people: A correlational, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun; Utz, Sonja

    2018-02-28

    Low health literacy has been recognized as a potential barrier to obtaining knowledge and maintaining self-care in older people. However, little is known about information-seeking preference in relation to health literacy among older people. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of health literacy on the information-seeking preference of older people. A total of 129 community-residing Korean older people completed a survey in 2016. The findings revealed that health literacy was a significant predictor of information-seeking preference in older people after controlling for demographic and illness variables. Our study highlights the important need to incorporate strategies to increase the desire for information seeking in older people, in addition to adopting communication strategies that address low health literacy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Isabel ... a doctor with expertise in osteoporosis. For many people, finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about osteoporosis ...

  17. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Nathalie; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Roelandt, Jos R. T. C.; ten Cate, Folkert J.; van der Cammen, Tischa J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In

  18. 'Growing Old' in Shelters and 'On the Street': Experiences of Older Homeless People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Amanda; Sussman, Tamara; Barken, Rachel; Bourgeois-Guérin, Valerie; Rothwell, David

    2016-01-01

    Homelessness among older people in Canada is both a growing concern, and an emerging field of study. This article reports thematic results of qualitative interviews with 40 people aged 46 to 75, carried out as part of a mixed-methods study of older people who are homeless in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Our participants included people with histories of homelessness (n = 14) and persons new to homelessness in later life (n = 26). Interviews focused on experiences at the intersections of aging and homelessness including social relationships, the challenges of living on the streets and in shelters in later life, and the future. This article outlines the 5 main themes that capture the experience of homelessness for our participants: age exacerbates worries; exclusion and isolation; managing significant challenges; shifting needs and realities; and resilience, strength, and hope. Together, these findings underscore the need for specific programs geared to the unique needs of older people who are homeless.

  19. PTSD in older bereaved people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

      Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was an important issue to investigate in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently...... bereaved elderly people compared to married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety six Danish elderly bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and were...... subsequently assessed two months post-bereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married elderly people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES=.35...

  20. Characteristics of communication with older people in home care: A qualitative analysis of audio recordings of home care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte V; Sundler, Annelie J; Eide, Hilde; Hafskjold, Linda; Ruud, Iren; Holmström, Inger K

    2017-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of communication practice in home care visits between older people (over 65 years old) and nurse assistants and to discuss the findings from a person-centered perspective. The older population is increasing worldwide, along with the need for healthcare services in the person's home. To achieve a high-quality care, person-centered communication is crucial. A descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach was used. Fifteen audio recordings of naturally occurring conversations between 12 nurse assistants and 13 older people in Norway were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Four categories were revealed through analysis: (i) supporting older people's connection to everyday life; (ii) supporting older people's involvement in their own care; (iii) attention to older people's bodily and existential needs; and (iv) the impact of continuity and predictability on older people's well-being. The communication between the older people and the nurse assistants during home care visits was mainly task-oriented, but also related to the person. The older people were involved in the tasks to be carried out and humour was part of the communication. Greater attention was paid to bodily than existential needs. The communication was connected with the older people's everyday life in several ways. Time frames and interruptions concern the older people; hearing and speech impairments were a challenge to communication. To enhance person-centred communication, further studies are needed, especially intervention studies for healthcare professionals and students. Being responsive to older people's subjective experiences is important in meeting their needs in home care. Communication that addresses the need for trust and predictability is important for older people. Responding to existential needs require more attention. The home care setting has an impact on communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Self-determination and older people--a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, Christina; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve; Eklund, Kajsa

    2014-03-01

    Self-determination has emerged as an important concept within health care, used to emphasize clients' control and independence as they participate in rehabilitation. To strengthen clients' self-determination is a central aim in occupational therapy. However, there is a lack of a clear definition of self-determination concerning community-dwelling older people. The definition should be flexible in different contexts, such as cultural. To define and clarify the concept of self-determination in relation to community-dwelling frail older people. Walker & Avant's analysis procedure was carried out to identify textual attributes to the concept of self-determination, supplemented by a content analysis of 21 articles that were used to define and further justify the textual attributes. Self-determination was used in diverse contexts for community-dwelling older people, concerning: decision-making in everyday life, professionals' views, health, and legal/ethical rights. Different textual attributes were identified, to propose a conceptual definition of self-determination in relation to community-dwelling frail older people: A process in which a person has control and legal/ethical rights, and has the knowledge and ability to make a decision of his/her own free choice. This concept analysis has contributed to clarifying the concept for the convenience of research with community-dwelling frail older people.

  2. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Nowson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise. Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations.

  3. Polypharmacy and older people - the GP perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Hendriksen, C

    2005-01-01

    and to consider different approaches when evaluating evidence of risk and benefit for the individual. Old people are facing a considerable risk of adverse drug reactions and recent initiatives, including the Continuous Medical Educational Efforts Programme, address issues of inappropriate prescribing practices...

  4. Financial inequality and gender in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachantoni, Athina

    2012-06-01

    Gender inequalities in the financial resources in later life result from the combined effect of women's atypical life courses, which include interrupted employment records and periods of care provision, and the fact that pension systems have generally been slow in mitigating 'diversions' from continuous and full-time working lives. Gender differentials in financial resources can often result in a greater likelihood of facing poverty for older women compared to older men, and such risk can be experienced for longer periods for women, as a result of their higher life expectancy on average. For example, across the EU-27, 16% of men compared to 23% of women aged 65 and over faced a poverty risk, and at age 65, men can expect to live another 17 years on average, while women another 21 years. Although modern pension systems are increasingly recognising the diversity of women's patterns of paid and unpaid work, for example by accounting for periods of childcare in the calculation of the state pension, research continues to show a 'penalty' for women who have spent significant periods of their life providing care to children or dependent adults in and outside the household. Reducing such penalty is particularly important as population ageing and an increasing demand for formal and informal care are likely to present challenges with critical policy implications for societies and individuals alike. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Volunteering among older people in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jibum; Kang, Jeong-Han; Lee, Min-Ah; Lee, Yongmo

    2007-01-01

    Faced with aging societies, there is an immense need to better understand the nature of volunteering outside advanced Western industrial countries. As a case of a rapidly aging society, we identify robust factors associated with elderly volunteering in Korea in terms of a resource framework. Data were derived from the Social Statistics Survey conducted by the Korea National Statistical Office in 1999 (N = 7,135) and 2003 (N = 8,371). We first determined overall and age-related volunteer rates for Korea compared to the United States. Using logistic regression, we then examined the effects of human, cultural, and social capital variables on volunteering. Approximately 6% of Koreans aged 65 years and older participate in volunteer programs. All human capital variables are positively related with volunteering. For cultural capital, those who identify their religion as Buddhism or Catholicism are more likely to volunteer than those who have no religion. But surprisingly, Protestantism does not consistently promote volunteering across both years. For social capital, older adults who live alone or with a spouse are more likely to volunteer than those living with both a spouse and children. In contrast to human capital, cultural and social capital on elderly volunteering appears to be contoured by social contexts.

  6. FACTORS RELATING TO DEPRESSION AMONG OLDER PEOPLE LIVING IN CIMAHI, WEST JAVA PROVINCE, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiki Gustryanti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is commonly found in older people. The prevalence of depression among older people, particularly in Indonesia is increasing worldwide. Objective: This study was aimed to identify the factors relating to depression among older people living in Cimahi, West Java Province, Indonesia. Method: A cross sectional design was used with a total of 267 older people aged from 60 to 79 years old. A multi-stage random sampling has been used in five Public Health Centers in Cimahi. The instruments comprised socio-demographic questionnaires, General Health Perceptions questionnaire, Chula Activities of Daily Living Index (CADLI, and Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistic, chi-square, and point-biserial. Results: The result revealed that 56.2% respondents was no depression and 43.8% respondents was depression. The results also showed that age, marital status, family history of depression, perceived health status, and activities of daily living was significant relationship with depression a mong older people (p<.01; p<.05. Conclusion: This finding can be used as a reference to implement new strategies to decrease depression among older people.

  7. Nurses' perspectives on how operational leaders influence function-focused care for hospitalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Mary T; Butler, Jeffrey I

    2016-11-01

    To explore nurses' perspectives on how leaders influence function-focused care, defined as care that preserves and restores older people's functional abilities. Hospitalised older people are at risk of functional decline. Although leaders have the potential to influence function-focused care, few studies have explored nurses' perspectives on how leaders influence function-focused care. Thirteen focus groups were held with 57 acute care nurses. Semi-structured questions prompted discussion on nurses' perspectives, needs and strategies to meet their needs. Data were thematically analysed. Three themes were identified: (1) the emphasis in hospitals is on moving older people quickly through the system, not supporting their functioning; (2) leaders are generally seen as too disconnected from practice to design system efficiency initiatives that support older people's functioning and nurses' provisioning of function-focused care; and (3) leadership strategies to better support nurses in providing function-focused care to older people in the context of system efficiency. Leaders should connect with practice to devise age-sensitive efficiency initiatives that support function-focused care. Nurses need support from leaders in four areas to provide function-focused care to older people in the current hospital context. The findings provide direction on how leaders can facilitate function-focused care in the current health-care environment emphasising system efficiency. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Concern about HIV and AIDS among older people in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepngeno-Langat, Gloria; Falkingham, Jane C; Madise, Nyovani J; Evandrou, Maria

    2012-09-01

    The article explores the way that social networks and personal experiences affect perceived HIV-related concerns among people aged 50 years or older living in a low resource neighborhood with high HIV prevalence in Nairobi, Kenya. Multiple logistic regression is used to model the association between the reporting of an HIV-related concern and individual-level characteristics, personal experiences, and social interaction. The main concerns regarding HIV reported by older people in the study included caring for orphaned children (65%), caring for people with AIDS (48%), and losing material and social support from adult children (36%). Interestingly, 38% of respondents voiced concerns about HIV infection among older people. Respondents who had been individually affected by HIV and AIDS, who were part of a wide social network, or who participated in community activities were frequently more likely to report a concern. The findings highlight the significance of the role of social interaction and social networks in the diffusion of information and knowledge. These findings have implications for HIV and AIDS policy and programs, highlighting the potential for social networks and community-level interventions to educate and increase awareness about HIV and AIDS among older people. Community leaders can make good peer educators and communication agents for HIV/AIDS campaigns. Additionally, the recognized high level of personal vulnerability to HIV infection among older people suggests the need for targeted sexual behavior change programs among this often neglected group. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  9. Exergames to Improve Postural Balance in Older People with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Majed, Lina; Hansen, Clint

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the study concerns the well-documented increased risk of falling in older adults that can lead sometimes to fatal consequences. Improving posture and motor skills is central to preventing falls. Further investigations targeting specific older people such as those suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia are still needed for fall prevention (Shaw, 2003). New technology-based methods, such as digital motion-sensitive games or exergames, appear promising for improving bala...

  10. Factors related to tinnitus and hyperacusis handicap in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazh, Hashir; Lammaing, Karen; Moore, Brian C J

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to assess factors related to tinnitus and hyperacusis handicap in older people. Retrospective cross-sectional. Data were gathered for 184 patients with an average age of 69 years. Tinnitus handicap as measured via the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) was significantly predicted by tinnitus annoyance as measured via the visual analogue scale (VAS) (regression coefficient, b = 2.9, p tinnitus on the patient's life as measured via the VAS (b = 3.9, p tinnitus annoyance significantly predicts tinnitus handicap, it is important to explore factors associated with annoyance that may be useful in designing appropriate rehabilitative interventions aimed at reducing tinnitus handicap in older people. Future studies should explore whether hyperacusis and insomnia in older people with tinnitus need to be managed in conjunction with treatment for depression.

  11. Which Frail Older People Are Dehydrated? The UK DRIE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lee; Bunn, Diane K; Downing, Alice; Jimoh, Florence O; Groves, Joyce; Free, Carol; Cowap, Vicky; Potter, John F; Hunter, Paul R; Shepstone, Lee

    2016-10-01

    Water-loss dehydration in older people is associated with increased mortality and disability. We aimed to assess the prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK long-term care and associated cognitive, functional, and health characteristics. The Dehydration Recognition In our Elders (DRIE) cohort study included people aged 65 or older living in long-term care without heart or renal failure. In a cross-sectional baseline analysis, we assessed serum osmolality, previously suggested dehydration risk factors, general health, markers of continence, cognitive and functional health, nutrition status, and medications. Univariate linear regression was used to assess relationships between participant characteristics and serum osmolality, then associated characteristics entered into stepwise backwards multivariate linear regression. DRIE included 188 residents (mean age 86 years, 66% women) of whom 20% were dehydrated (serum osmolality >300 mOsm/kg). Linear and logistic regression suggested that renal, cognitive, and diabetic status were consistently associated with serum osmolality and odds of dehydration, while potassium-sparing diuretics, sex, number of recent health contacts, and bladder incontinence were sometimes associated. Thirst was not associated with hydration status. DRIE found high prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK long-term care, reinforcing the proposed association between cognitive and renal function and hydration. Dehydration is associated with increased mortality and disability in older people, but trials to assess effects of interventions to support healthy fluid intakes in older people living in residential care are needed to enable us to formally assess causal direction and any health benefits of increasing fluid intakes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Nurses' attitudes towards older people care: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Kathy L; Hickey, Stormee; Epp, Sheila; Janke, Robert

    2017-12-01

    To examine hospital nurses' attitudes towards caring for older adults and delineate associated factors contributing to their attitudes. Population ageing is of international significance. A nursing workforce able to care for the ageing population is critical for ensuring quality older adult care. A synthesis of research related to nurses' attitudes towards older adult care is important for informing care quality and the nursing workforce issues. A systematic integrative review process guided the review. Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Medline databases were searched for primary research published between 2005-2017. A total of 1,690 papers were screened with 67 papers read in-depth and eight selected for this review that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Nurses' held coexisting positive and negative attitudes towards generic and specific aspects of older adult care. Negative attitudes, in particular, were directed at the characteristics of older adults, their care demands or reflected in nurses' approaches to care. Across jurisdictions, work environment, education, experience and demographics emerged as influences on nurses' attitudes. There is a paucity of research examining nurses' attitudes towards older adult care. The limited evidence indicates that attitudes towards older people care are complex and contradictory. Influences on nurses' attitudes need further study individually and collectively to build a strong evidence base. Interventional studies are needed as are the development of valid and reliable instruments for measuring nurses' attitudes towards older adult care. Bolstering postgraduate gerontological preparation is critical for promoting nurses' attitudes towards older adult care. Creating age-friendly work environments, including appropriate resource allocation, is important to support older people care and facilitate positive nursing attitudes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nutritional strategies to reduce falls risk in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Louise; Bergin, Nick

    2018-03-23

    A literature review found an association between increased falls risk and malnutrition, sarcopenia, vitamin D deficiency and dehydration. Strategies to identify, prevent and treat these conditions can help to reduce falls risk in at-risk groups such as frail, older people. Nurses can reduce falls risk in older people by raising awareness of risk factors and embedding nutritional strategies in local falls reduction strategies. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  14. Older people's use of powered wheelchairs for activity and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Ase; Iwarsson, Susanne; Ståhle, Agneta

    2004-01-01

    research were identified. CONCLUSION: The use of powered wheelchairs is a relevant societal intervention in relation to older people with limited walking ability in order to make activity and participation possible. It is likely that a larger proportion of older people could benefit from this intervention...... not use the wheelchair for visits, and supplementary travel modes are called for. Users who could not walk at all or who could not transfer without assistance were more likely not to be able to carry out prioritized activities. Furthermore, other risk factors for negative outcomes and need for further...

  15. Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Blind or Visually Impaired Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Category All ... Territory Other (International) Organization Name Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Browse All ...

  16. Motivational Determinants of Exergame Participation for Older People in Assisted Living Facilities: Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekes, Wytske; Stanmore, Emma Kate

    2017-07-06

    Exergames (exercise-based videogames) for delivering strength and balance exercise for older people are growing in popularity with the emergence of new Kinect-based technologies; however, little is known about the factors affecting their uptake and usage by older people. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that may influence the motivation of older people to use exergames to improve their physical function and reduce fall risk. Mixed methods were employed in which 14 semistructured interviews were conducted with older people (n=12, aged 59-91 years) from 2 assisted living facilities in the North West of the United Kingdom. The older people participated in a 6-week trial of exergames along with one manager and one physiotherapist; 81 h of observation and Technology Acceptance Model questionnaires were conducted. The findings suggest that the participants were intrinsically motivated to participate in the exergames because of the enjoyment experienced when playing the exergames and perceived improvements in their physical and mental health and social confidence. The social interaction provided in this study was an important extrinsic motivator that increased the intrinsic motivation to adhere to the exergame program. The findings of this study suggest that exergames may be a promising tool for delivering falls prevention exercises and increasing adherence to exercise in older people. Understanding the motivation of older people to use exergames may assist in the process of implementation. ©Wytske Meekes, Emma Kate Stanmore. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 06.07.2017.

  17. Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahlen Klas-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study. Methods Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data. Results Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used. Conclusions An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

  18. Advertising Representations of Older People in the United Kingdom and Taiwan: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural studies of advertising representations of older people are relatively scarce. This article aims to fill in this gap via a comparison between Taiwan and the United Kingdom, employing a combination of quantitative content analysis and the qualitative grounded theory method. The content-analysis phase reveals underrepresentation of older people in both countries' advertising contexts, as well as representational differences between Taiwan and the United Kingdom in terms of older characters' role salience, the products, physical settings, and social networks they are associated with. The grounded-theory phase yields nine prototypes of older people along with subcategories to conceptualize the qualities of older people as they appear in TV ads in these countries. The findings are discussed in relation to the stereotyping of older people and transformed into hypothetical statements to be modified in future research. In conclusion, the Confucian tradition of filial piety is still found to be important in explaining the observed cross-cultural differences, but the emergence of new norms about aging in Taiwanese advertising also suggests that this tradition may be in decline. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Continuation and maintenance treatments for depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Philip; Izmeth, Zehanah

    2016-09-09

    intervals (CI). This update identified no further trials. Seven studies from the previous review met the inclusion criteria (803 participants). Six compared antidepressant medication with placebo; two involved psychological therapies. There was marked heterogeneity between the studies.Comparing antidepressants with placebo on the primary outcome for benefit, there was a statistically significant difference favouring antidepressants in reducing recurrence compared with placebo at 12 months with a GRADE rating of low for quality of evidence (three RCTs, n = 247, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.82; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 5). Comparing antidepressants with placebo on the primary outcome for harms, there was no difference in drop-out rates at 12 months' follow-up, with a GRADE rating of low.There was no significant difference between psychological treatment and antidepressant in recurrence rates at 12 months (one RCT, n = 53) or between combination treatment and antidepressant alone at 12 months. This updated Cochrane review supports the findings of the original 2012 review. The long-term benefits and harm of continuing antidepressant medication in the prevention of recurrence of depression in older people are not clear and no firm treatment recommendations can be made on the basis of this review. Continuing antidepressant medication for 12 months appears to be helpful with no increased harms; however, this was based on only three small studies, relatively few participants, use of a range of antidepressant classes, and clinically heterogeneous populations. Comparisons at other time points did not reach statistical significance.Data on psychological therapies and combined treatments were too limited to draw any conclusions on benefits and harms.The quality of the evidence used in reaching these conclusions was low and the review does not, therefore, offer clear guidance to clinicians and patients on best practice and matching interventions to

  20. National stereotypes of older people's competence are related to older adults' participation in paid and volunteer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Catherine E; Skirbekk, Vegard

    2013-11-01

    Why are older people perceived as more competent in some countries relative to others? In the current study, we investigate the extent to which national variation in perceptions of older people's competence is systematically related to national variation in the extent to which older people participate in paid and volunteer work. We used multilevel regression to analyze data from the European Social Survey and test the relationship between perceptions of older people's competence and older people's participation in paid and volunteer work across 28 countries. We controlled for a number of potentially confounding variables, including life expectancy as well as the gender ratio and average education of the older population in each country. We controlled for the average objective cognitive abilities of the older population in a subsample of 11 countries. Older people were perceived as more competent in countries in which more older people participated in paid or volunteer work, independent of life expectancy and the average education, gender makeup, and average cognitive abilities of the older population. The results suggest that older people's participation in paid and volunteer work is related to perceptions of older people's competence independent of older people's actual competence.

  1. Expanding the Circle of Knowledge: Reconceptualizing Successful Aging Among North American Older Indigenous Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Jessica E; Grenier, Amanda

    2017-03-01

    Indigenous older peoples' voices and experiences remain largely absent in the dominant models and critical scholarship on aging and late life. This article examines the relevance of the model of successful aging for Indigenous peoples in North America. This article presents the results of a review of the published conceptual literature on successful aging among Indigenous peoples. Our intent was to explore the current state of the field of successful aging among Indigenous peoples and suggest dimensions that may be more reflective of Indigenous voices and experiences that leads to a more inclusive model of successful aging. Based on our review, we suggest four dimensions that may broaden understandings of successful aging to be more inclusive of Indigenous older people: health and wellness, empowerment and resilience, engagement and behavior, and connectedness. Our review suggests that Indigenous peoples' voices and experiences are beginning to be included in academic literature on successful aging. However, we suggest that understandings of successful aging be broadened based on our summative findings and a process of community involvement. Such processes can lead to the development of models that are more inclusive to a wide range of older people, including Indigenous older peoples. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Valuing narrative in the care of older people: a framework of narrative practice for older adult residential care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Catherine; McCormack, Brendan; Ryan, Assumpta

    2014-09-01

    To report on the development of a framework of narrative practice, in residential care settings for older people. Residential care settings for older people provide care for people who are no longer able to live in their own home. To date, the impact and structure of nursing practice on care provision in these settings has proved difficult to conceptualise within a specific nursing theory framework. A hermeneutic approach incorporating narrative methods was used. Forty-six narrative interviews with older people in residential care were secondary-analysed for key themes through a three-stage process: by the first author, four focus groups of 12 clinical nurse managers and two independent experts. Themes were also derived from a focus group of eight residents who explored person-centredness and narrative. Finally, the combined findings were used to derive a single set of themes. The secondary data analysis process led to the development of a framework of narrative practice for the care of older people in residential settings. The framework is influenced by narrative enquiry, person-centred practice and practice development. It has four pillars, prerequisites, care processes, care environment and narrative aspects of care. To operationalise the framework of narrative practice, three narrative elements, narrative knowing, narrative being and narrative doing, need to be considered. Working with the foundational pillars and the narrative elements would enable staff to 'work in a storied way' and provide person-centred outcomes and a narrative informed philosophy of care for older adults in residential care. This framework provides nurses with a template that confirms the identity of the older person taking account of their biography. The framework outlines an approach that provides staff with a template on how to provide person-centred care in a narrative way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Understanding factors influencing vulnerable older people keeping warm and well in winter: a qualitative study using social marketing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Angela Mary; Lusambili, Adelaide; Homer, Catherine; Abbott, Joanne; Cooke, Joanne Mary; Stocks, Amanda Jayne; McDaid, Kathleen Anne

    2012-01-01

    To understand the influences and decisions of vulnerable older people in relation to keeping warm in winter. A qualitative study incorporating in-depth, semi-structured individual and group interviews, framework analysis and social marketing segmentation techniques. Rotherham, South Yorkshire, UK. 50 older people (>55) and 25 health and social care staff underwent individual interview. The older people also had household temperature measurements. 24 older people and 19 health and social care staff participated in one of the six group interviews. Multiple complex factors emerged to explain whether vulnerable older people were able to keep warm. These influences combined in various ways that meant older people were not able to or preferred not to access help or change home heating behaviour. Factors influencing behaviours and decisions relating to use of heating, spending money, accessing cheaper tariffs, accessing benefits or asking for help fell into three main categories. These were situational and contextual factors, attitudes and values, and barriers. Barriers included poor knowledge and awareness, technology, disjointed systems and the invisibility of fuel and fuel payment. Findings formed the basis of a social marketing segmentation model used to develop six pen portraits that illustrated how factors that conspire against older people being able to keep warm. The findings illustrate how and why vulnerable older people may be at risk of a cold home. The pen portraits provide an accessible vehicle and reflective tool to raise the capacity of the NHS in responding to their needs in line with the Cold Weather Plan.

  4. Falls and depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Alin; Toubin, Sandrine; Mourey, France; D'Athis, Philippe; Manckoundia, Patrick; Pfitzenmeyer, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common risk factors for falls, but links between falls and depression are still unclear. Few studies have examined the relationship between depression and gait alteration, which may increase the risk of fall. This study aims to assess a possible relationship between depression, postural and gait abnormalities, and falls. We conducted a 1-year prospective study on patients >/=70 years who were admitted to a geriatric unit for 'spontaneous' unexplained falls. Patients were tested for depression using the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Their motor performances were assessed using the Mini Motor Test (MMT), which is an easy direct-observation test, validated in France, for assessment of frail old people who present with severe postural and gait impairment. This scale is composed of 4 categories of items: (1) abilities in bed; (2) quality of the sitting position; (3) abilities in the standing position, and (4) quality of gait. Sixty-nine patients were included. Depression was found in 46 patients (66.7%). The MMT score was higher in the non-depressed fallers (NDF) group (GDS 10; p predispose to falls. In clinical practice, more attention should be given to old fallers concerning diagnosis and treatment of associated depression. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Sexual knowledge, attitudes and activity of older people in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Lu, Chwen-Hwa; Chen, I-Ju; Yu, Shu

    2008-02-01

    We examined sexual activity and predictive factors among older people in Taipei, Taiwan. We aimed to characterize the older population engaged in sexual activity and determine influencing factors, exploring aspects of sexuality that may influence elders' health and quality of life (QOL). Studies of sexual attitudes and behaviour have found that sexual difficulties are common among mature adults worldwide, influenced in men and women by physical health, ageing, psychosocial and cultural factors. We conducted a community-based retrospective study involving a random sample of 412 men and 204 women over age 65. A questionnaire on demographics and social situations was administered, along with a Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale; 34 questions evaluated sexual knowledge and 18 evaluated sexual attitudes. Two-hundred and twenty participants were sexually active (35.7%), 185 mainly with spouses (84.1%); frequency was 21.4 (SD 16.9) times per year (range: 1-120). Multiple logistic regressions identified five significant predictors of sexual activity: gender, age, being with spouse, sexual knowledge and sexual attitudes. Sexual activity was significantly associated with higher education levels, lower stress and more self-reported daily activities. Our results agreed with Western studies linking sexual activity with better health and higher QOL in older adults. Older peoples' stress and daily activity levels are recognized quality-of-life measures; lower stress and more daily activities among sexually active older people suggests a connection between sexual activity and higher QOL. Increasing knowledge and improving attitudes about sexuality may help older people build healthier relationships and enhance health and QOL. Relevance to clinical practice. If healthcare professionals possess greater understanding of older peoples' sexuality, healthcare systems may find ways to increase sexual knowledge and foster healthier attitudes and relationships to improve older peoples

  6. Mobility assessment in older people : new possibilities and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    A major challenge for researchers and clinicians who address health issues in the ageing population is to monitor functioning, and to timely initiate interventions that aim to prevent loss of functional abilities and to improve the quality of life of older people. With the progress of technologies

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter (Channa)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia

  8. Measures for Assessing Student Attitudes toward Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Bryant, Christina; Boldero, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Measuring medical and allied health students' attitudes towards older people has been identified as an important research area. The present study compared the use of implicit and explicit attitude measures. Sixty-five undergraduates completed one explicit measure, the Fraboni Scale of Ageism (FSA), (Fraboni, Saltstone, & Hughes, 1990) and one…

  9. Older people's use of powered wheelchairs for activity and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Ase; Iwarsson, Susanne; Ståhle, Agneta

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate outcomes of older people's use of powered wheelchairs and risk factors for negative outcomes. DESIGN: The study was a cross-sectional interview-study including 111 powered wheelchair users over 65 years of age. RESULTS: All participants used t...

  10. Age-related practice effects across longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in older people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granholm, Eric; Link, Peter; Fish, Scott; Kraemer, Helena; Jeste, Dilip

    2010-09-01

    The relationship between aging and practice effects on longitudinal neuropsychological assessments was investigated in middle-aged and older people with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Older people with schizophrenia (n = 107; M age = 56.1) and age-comparable nonpsychiatric controls (n = 107; M age = 57.7) were scheduled to receive annual assessments on a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests for an average of 2.5 years (range 11 months to 4 years). Mixed-model analyses were used to separately examine the effects of practice and age on test performance. Number of prior assessments (practice) was associated with significant performance improvement across assessments, whereas older age was associated with significant decline in performance. The groups did not differ significantly in extent of age-related cognitive decline, but a three-way interaction among group, age, and practice was found, such that greater age-related decline in practice effects were found for older people with schizophrenia relative to nonpsychiatric participants. This study did not find any evidence of neurodegenerative age-related decline in neuropsychological abilities in middle-aged and older people with schizophrenia, but older age was associated with diminished ability to benefit from repeated exposure to cognitive tasks in people with schizophrenia. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia may combine with cognitive decline associated with normal aging to reduce practice effects in older patients. These findings have important implications for the design of studies examining the longitudinal trajectory of cognitive functioning across the life span of people with schizophrenia, as well as clinical trials that attempt to demonstrate cognitive enhancement in these individuals. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Beyond WhatsApp: Older people and smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosales

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes how older people, living in Spain, use smartphones and smartphone applications. Using a mixed methods approach, we compare quantitative results obtained by tracking mobile app usage amongst different generational samples with qualitative, focus-group discussions with active smartphone users. A sample of Spanish smartphone users were tracked during one month in the winter of 2014 (238 individuals, aged 20 to 76 years-old. This was followed by three focus group sessions conducted in the spring of 2015, with 24 individuals aged 55 to 81. As we learned, WhatsApp is currently the most popular application used by people of all ages, including older adults. Smartphones increasingly are playing a central role in the life of older participants, although the frequency of app access is negatively correlated with age. On the other hand, as our data indicates, older adults also use a number of different types of apps that are distinct from that of younger users. Older participants access personal information manager apps (calendar, address book and notes more often than other age groups. And comparatively, older participants use the smartphone less often in stable locations (home, office, relatives’ home with Wifi than somewhere else and with mobile data. As we argue, differences in age seem to reflect the evolution in personal interests and communication patterns that change as we grow older. Our study captures new trends in smartphone usage amongst this cohort. It also indicates how a combination of methods may help to assess the validity of the log and qualitative data. We highlight the relevance of conducting careful generational studies in smartphone use and some of the potentials and limitations of making predictive studies of ICT use as we change throughout the life course. Finally, we assert the value of the inclusion of older representatives within research, which ultimately may influence public decisions and the design of new

  12. Robotic and Sensor Technologies for Mobility in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteridis, Lazaros; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Sancarlo, Daniele; Giuliani, Francesco; Ricciardi, Francesco; Cavallo, Filippo; Greco, Antonio; Trochidis, Ilias; Gkiokas, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Maintaining independent mobility is fundamental to independent living and to the quality of life of older people. Robotic and sensor technologies may offer a lot of potential and can make a significant difference in the lives of older people and to their primary caregivers. The aim of this study was to provide a presentation of the methods that are used up till now for analysis and evaluation of human mobility utilizing sensor technologies and to give the state of the art in robotic platforms for supporting older people with mobility limitations. The literature was reviewed and systematic reviews of cohort studies and other authoritative reports were identified. The selection criteria included (1) patients with age ≥60 years; (2) patients with unstable gait, with or without recurrent falls; (3) patients with slow movements, short strides, and little trunk movement; (4) sensor technologies that are currently used for mobility evaluation; and (5) robotic technologies that can serve as a supporting companion for older people with mobility limitations. One hundred eighty-one studies published up until February 2017 were identified, of which 36 were included. Two categories of research were identified from the review regarding the robot and sensor technologies: (1) sensor technologies for mobility analysis and (2) robots for supporting older people with mobility limitations. Potential for robotic and sensor technologies can be taken advantage of for evaluation and support at home for elder persons with mobility limitations in an automated way without the need of the physical presence of any medical personnel, reducing the stress of caregivers.

  13. Older people and digital disengagement: a fourth digital divide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olphert, Wendy; Damodaran, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Digital technologies are becoming more pervasive in all areas of society. Enabling everyone to have access and capability to use the Internet and associated digital technologies, summed up in the term 'digital inclusion', is seen to have wide-ranging benefits to the individual, to the economy and to society. For older people, being digitally included can help them to maintain their independence, social connectedness and sense of worth in the face of declining health or limited capabilities, as well as also offering new opportunities to improve their quality of life. At present however, access to the technology and to the benefits is not equally distributed either between or within nations, and older people tend to be on the 'wrong' side of what is termed the 'digital divide'. Governments globally are developing strategies to promote digital inclusion and indeed Internet uptake is increasing steadily, including amongst older people. However, such strategies have focussed on getting people online, and there appears to be an assumption that once someone is online they will remain 'digitally engaged'. In fact statistics show that some users give up using the Internet, and there is emerging evidence that older people are more vulnerable to the factors which can lead to this outcome. The authors see this phenomenon as a potential but largely unrecognised 'fourth digital divide' which has serious implications for social inclusion. The objectives of this article are (a) to raise awareness of the phenomenon of digital disengagement by considering some of the emerging evidence, (b) to explore some of the potential implications of not recognising and therefore not addressing the needs of the digitally disengaged older population, and (c) to reveal the prevailing gap in knowledge which future research should address. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Systematic reviews: guidance relevant for studies of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkin, Susan D; Harrison, Jennifer K; Wilkinson, Tim; Dodds, Richard M; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-09-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are increasingly common. This article aims to provide guidance for people conducting systematic reviews relevant to the healthcare of older people. An awareness of these issues will also help people reading systematic reviews to determine whether the results will influence their clinical practice. It is essential that systematic reviews are performed by a team which includes the required technical and clinical expertise. Those performing reviews for the first time should ensure they have appropriate training and support. They must be planned and performed in a transparent and methodologically robust way: guidelines are available. The protocol should be written-and if possible published-before starting the review. Geriatricians will be interested in a table of baseline characteristics, which will help to determine if the studied samples or populations are similar to their patients. Reviews of studies of older people should consider how they will manage issues such as different age cut-offs; non-specific presentations; multiple predictors and outcomes; potential biases and confounders. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses may provide evidence to improve older people's care, or determine where new evidence is required. Newer methodologies, such as meta-analyses of individual level data, network meta-analyses and umbrella reviews, and realist synthesis, may improve the reliability and clinical utility of systematic reviews. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  15. When Foreign Domestic Helpers Care for and About Older People in Their Homes: I Am a Maid or a Friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ken H M; Chiang, Vico C L; Leung, Doris; Ku, Ben H B

    2018-01-01

    We examine the lived experiences of foreign domestic helpers (FDH) working with community-dwelling older people in Hong Kong. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 11 female FDHs, and thematically analyzed. The theme inescapable functioning commodity represented the embodied commodification of FDHs to be functional for older people in home care. Another theme, destined reciprocity of companionship , highlighted the FDHs' capacity to commit to home care and be concerned about older people. The waxing and waning of the possibilities of commodified companionship indicated the intermittent capacity of FDHs to find meaning in their care, in which performative nature for functional purposes and emotional engagement took turns to be the foci in migrant home care. This study addresses the transition of FDHs from task-oriented relation to companions of older people through care work. Discussion draws on the development of a kin-like relationship between FDHs and older people with emotional reciprocity grounded in moral values.

  16. When Foreign Domestic Helpers Care for and About Older People in Their Homes: I Am a Maid or a Friend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken H. M. Ho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the lived experiences of foreign domestic helpers (FDH working with community-dwelling older people in Hong Kong. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 11 female FDHs, and thematically analyzed. The theme inescapable functioning commodity represented the embodied commodification of FDHs to be functional for older people in home care. Another theme, destined reciprocity of companionship , highlighted the FDHs’ capacity to commit to home care and be concerned about older people. The waxing and waning of the possibilities of commodified companionship indicated the intermittent capacity of FDHs to find meaning in their care, in which performative nature for functional purposes and emotional engagement took turns to be the foci in migrant home care. This study addresses the transition of FDHs from task-oriented relation to companions of older people through care work. Discussion draws on the development of a kin-like relationship between FDHs and older people with emotional reciprocity grounded in moral values.

  17. Falling off the bandwagon? Exploring the challenges to sustained digital engagement by older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, L; Olphert, C W; Sandhu, J

    2014-01-01

    This study examines older people's use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and identifies the factors which can prevent or promote their sustained use. A mixed methods approach was adopted. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by a survey of 323 older ICT users (aged ≥50 years) between 2011 and 2012. These data were supplemented by qualitative data obtained through in-depth interviews, focus groups and storytelling. Quantitative data were analysed using PASW including bivariate and multivariate analyses. Qualitative data were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. The findings show that, contrary to some stereotypes, many older people are enthusiastic, competent and confident users of ICTs. However, they report a range of challenges in reaching and maintaining this situation. These include technological complexity and change, age-related capability changes and a lack of learning and support mechanisms. Intrinsic motivation and social support are important in enabling older people to overcome these challenges. Getting older people online has been a high priority in many countries over the past decade. However, little attention has been paid to whether and how their usage can be sustained over time. We discuss the implications of the findings for policy and practice.

  18. Visual risk factors for falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Stephen R

    2006-09-01

    Poor vision reduces postural stability and significantly increases the risk of falls and fractures in older people. Most studies have found that poor visual acuity increases the risk of falls. However, studies that have included multiple visual measures have found that reduced contrast sensitivity and depth perception are the most important visual risk factors for falls. Multifocal glasses may add to this risk because their near-vision lenses impair distance contrast sensitivity and depth perception in the lower visual field. This reduces the ability of an older person to detect environmental hazards. There is now evidence that maximising vision through cataract surgery is an effective strategy for preventing falls. Further randomised controlled trials are required to determine whether individual strategies (such as restriction of use of multifocal glasses) or multi-strategy visual improvement interventions can significantly reduce falls in older people. Public health initiatives are required to raise awareness in older people and their carers of the importance of regular eye examinations and use of appropriate prescription glasses.

  19. Acute stress and working memory in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Almela, Mercedes; Puig-Perez, Sara; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that acute stress affects working memory (WM) in young adults, but the effect in older people is understudied. As observed in other types of memory, older people may be less sensitive to acute effects of stress on WM. We performed two independent studies with healthy older men and women (from 55 to 77 years old) to investigate the effects of acute stress (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and cortisol on WM. In study 1 (n = 63), after the TSST women (but not men) improved their performance on Digit Span Forward (a measure of the memory span component of WM) but not on Digit Span Backward (a measure of both memory span and the executive component of WM). Furthermore, in women, cortisol levels at the moment of memory testing showed a positive association with the memory span component of WM before and after the TSST, and with the executive component of WM only before the stress task. In study 2 (n = 76), although participants showed a cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) response to the TSST, stress did not affect performance on Letter-Number Sequencing (LNS; a task that places a high demand on the executive component of WM). Cortisol and sAA were not associated with WM. The results indicate that circulating cortisol levels at the moment of memory testing, and not the stress response, affect memory span in older women, and that stress and the increase in cortisol levels after stress do not affect the executive component of WM in older men and women. This study provides further evidence that older people may be less sensitive to stress and stress-induced cortisol response effects on memory processes.

  20. 'I have the world's best job' - staff experience of the advantages of caring for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; van der Zijpp, Teatske; McMullan, Christel; McCormack, Brendan; Seers, Kate; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-06-01

    Besides a growing demand for safe high-quality care for older people, long-term care (LTC) often struggles to recruit appropriately qualified nursing staff. Understanding what LTC staff value in their work may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of what can attract staff and support person-centred care. To explore staff experience of the advantages of working in LTC settings for older people. Narrative descriptions of 85 LTC staff in Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden on what they value in their work were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Ethical approval was obtained according to the requirements of each country, and participants provided informed consent prior to the individual interviews. Working in LTC signifies bonding with the older people residing there, their next of kin and the team members. It means autonomy in one's daily tasks amalgamated with being a part of an affirmative team. Participants reported a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment; caring meant consideration and recognition of the older people and the relationships formed, which provided for professional and personal growth. The sharing of compassion between staff and residents indicated reciprocity of the relationship with residents. The findings may be transferable to LTC in general although they address only the positive aspects of caring for older people and only the experiences of those staff who had consented to take part in the study. The findings add to what underpins the quality of care in nursing homes: compassion in the nurse-resident relationship and person-centred care in LTC. They indicate reciprocity in the relations formed that may contribute to the empowerment of older people, but further studies are needed to explore this in more detail. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Coffee, Cake & Culture: Evaluation of an art for health programme for older people in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Brenda; McCormick, Sheila; Lucas, Terri; Gallagher, Wendy; Winn, Andrea; Elkin, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Arts for health initiatives and networks are being developed in a number of countries and an international literature is emerging on the evidence of their benefits to people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. Engagement in cultural and creative arts by older people can increase their morale and self-confidence and provides opportunities for social connection. Museums and galleries are increasingly required to justify their expenditure, reach and impact and some are working in partnership with local councils, hospitals, schools and communities to improve access to their collections. There is a body of literature emerging that describes such initiatives but empirical evidence of their benefits is less developed. This article reports an evaluation of an art for health initiative - Coffee, Cake & Culture organised and delivered by Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum in 2012 for older people living in a care home and a supported living facility. The study has identified the benefits and impacts of the arts for health programme and its feasibility for older people, with or without diagnosed memory loss - dementia, living in a care home or supported living facility and their care staff. The findings demonstrate there were benefits to the older people and their care staff in terms of wellbeing, social engagement, learning, social inclusion and creativity. These benefits were immediate and continued in the short term on their return home. The majority of older people and care staff had not previously been to the art gallery or museum and the programme encouraged creative arts and cultural appreciation which promoted social inclusion, wellbeing and quality of life. The programme is feasible and important lessons were identified for future planning. Further research involving partnerships of researchers, arts for health curators, artists, care staff, older people and their families is warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Becoming a guest in your own home: Home care in Sweden from the perspective of older people with multimorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarling, Aleksandra; Rydström, Ingela; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie; Nyström, Maria; Dalheim-Englund, Ann-Charlotte

    2018-03-30

    To describe the meaning of the phenomenon home care from the perspective of older persons who live alone with multimorbidity. In line with worldwide changing demographics, conditions for older people in need of home care are changing. In Sweden there is a stay-in-place policy and older people are expected to live and be cared for in their own home as long as possible. Home care, instituted by different laws, is a challenge affecting the older person when the private home becomes a workplace. This study uses a qualitative design with a lifeworld approach. The study having been conducted in Sweden in 2016, the researchers interviewed 12 older persons that live alone and receive home care. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings illustrate four sub-themes: adapting to a caring culture, feeling exposed, unable to influence care and forced relations. The overall theme reveals that older people experience a life-changing situation when receiving home care and they become a guest in their own home. Becoming older with increased needs means to disrupt one's life when one's private home becomes a public arena. The gap between an older person's rights by law and the older person's experiences of receiving home care needs to be highlighted to meet the oncoming challenges in providing a home care that includes participation of the older themselves. Only then can care be offered that enables older people to have a sense of control and experience their home as their own. The findings emphasise the need to view older people as being self-determinant and independent. Older people receiving home care need to be seen as individuals, and their entire life situation should be considered by also acknowledging the important role played by relatives and caregivers. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Finding people and their utterances in social media

    OpenAIRE

    Weerkamp, W.; Chen, H.-H.; Efthimiadis, E.N.; Savoy, J.; Crestani, F.; Marchand-Millet, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in usage of content creation platforms of various forms, has led to a huge number of people sharing their utterances. These so-called social media are attractive for many applications, and offering access to the information contained in them is the goal of my research. Given the two main ingredients of social media, people and their utterances, I explore ways of improving finding either of these. My research is divided into three parts: (i) finding utterances; (ii) finding people...

  4. Older people's experience of falls: understanding, interpretation and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Brenda; Howell, Fiona; Riniotis, Konstantinos; Beech, Roger; Crome, Peter; Ong, Bie Nio

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore the experiences of older people who suffered a recent fall and identify possible factors that could contribute to service development. Falls in older people are prevalent and are associated with morbidity, hospitalization and mortality, personal costs to individuals and financial costs to health services. A convenience sample of 27 older people (mean age 84 years; range 65-98) participated in semi-structured taped interviews. Follow-up interviews during 2003-2004 were undertaken to detect changes over time. Data were collected about experience of the fall, use of services, health and well-being, activities of daily living, informal care, support networks and prevention. Thematic content analysis was undertaken. Twenty-seven initial interviews and 18 follow-up interviews were conducted. The majority of people fell indoors (n = 23) and were alone (n = 15). The majority of falls were repeat falls (n = 22) and five were a first-ever fall. People who reflected on their fall and sought to understand why and how it occurred developed strategies to prevent future falls, face their fear, maintain control and choice and continue with activities of daily living. Those who did not reflect on their fall and did not know why it occurred restricted their activities and environments and remained in fear of falling. Assisting people to reflect on their falls and to understand why they happened could help with preventing future falls, allay fear, boost confidence and aid rehabilitation relating to their activities of daily living.

  5. Images of older people in UK magazine advertising: toward a typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angie; Wadleigh, Paul Mark; Ylänne, Virpi

    2010-01-01

    The use of images of older people in the British advertising media has been under-researched to date. Further, previous research in any country has tended to examine such images from an a priori framework of general impressions and stereotypes of older people. This study addresses these issues with British consumers' (n = 106) impressions, trait ascriptions, and similarity-between-images ratings of a representative sample of U.K. magazine advertisements featuring older characters. After a series of sorting task laboratory sessions, multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses revealed four clearly defined groups representing types of portrayals. These types emerged from the advertisements and from the views of the consumers themselves. These emergent groupings are: (1) Frail and Vulnerable, (2) Happy and Affluent, (3) Mentors, (4) Active and Leisure-oriented older adults. These groupings seem to be a logical context-appropriate derivation from previous findings on generally held stereotypes of older persons. It is argued that the groupings have the potential to contribute to a reliable typology of advertising portrayals of older people, with potential heuristic leverage in social scientific research of intergenerational communication, lifespan concerns, and the aging process.

  6. Educational intervention and functional decline among older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lund, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyse if social capital modifies the effect of educational intervention of home visitors on mobility disability. Earlier studies have found that educational intervention of home visitors has a positive effect of older peoples' functional decline, but how social capital might modify....... RESULTS: We found that 80-year-olds living in municipalities with high bonding (B=0.089, p=0.0279) and high linking (B=0.0929; p=0.0217) had significant better mobility disability in average at 3-year follow up if their municipality had received intervention. CONCLUSIONS: With the unique design...... of the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits and with theory-based measures of social capital that distinguish between three aspects of social capital with focus on older people, this study contributes to the literature about the role of social capital for interventions on mobility disability....

  7. Clinical Pharmacology of Chemotherapy Agents in Older People with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoye He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Populations around the world are aging, and the associated increase in cancer incidence has led to the recognition of the importance of geriatric oncology. Chronological age is a poor determinant of pharmacological response to cancer chemotherapy agents. Age-associated changes in physiology and organ function have a significant impact on the clinical pharmacology of cancer chemotherapy agents used in cancer treatment. Altered response to medicines in older people is a consequence of changes in body composition, organ function, concomitant pathophysiology, multiple medications, genetic determinants of drug response, and patient's clinical status. These issues highlight the need to individualize the management of cancer in the older people with consideration of age-related changes in the clinical pharmacology of cancer drugs, analgesics, and adjunctive therapies.

  8. Safer handling practice: influence of staff education on older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christine Brown

    The purpose of this small-scale survey was to explore the level of moving and handling training undertaken by nurses within private sector continuing care environments and the potential this training had to influence the care of older people. This study uses a definition of safer handling practice derived from existing literature to examine how nurses report the application of this training and whether they observe changes to the mobility of older people within their care. The limitations of this study indicate that generalizations must be made cautiously. However, this study tentatively suggests that potential exists to influence positively the use of safer handling practice as defined within this study. Recommendations for further study are made.

  9. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY OF OLDER PEOPLE IN POLAND – SELECTED ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Różański, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the issues of educational activity of the elderly in Poland. Defining the term “old age” and drawing attention to the issue of human adaptation to old age were the starting points of the discussion. Next, the most important issues concerning the activity of seniors were raised. Further discussed were the conditions and objectives of the educational activity of older people. An attention was also drawn to the role of institutions, promoting education and culture, in ...

  10. Mobility assessment in older people: new possibilities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge for researchers and clinicians who address health issues in the ageing population is to monitor functioning, and to timely initiate interventions that aim to prevent loss of functional abilities and to improve the quality of life of older people. With the progress of technologies in the last decades, methods have become available that use body fixed sensors (BFS) to measure aspects of human performance under real-life conditions. These methods are based on the use of miniatu...

  11. Counselling/psychotherapy and older people in medical settings.

    OpenAIRE

    Trethewey-Spurgeon, Celia.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores the nature of the need for counselling/psychotherapy for older people who suffer a debilitating physical injury or illness. This topic is investigated within a medical setting where the emphasis is on physical rehabilitation. The relevance of this inquiry is highlighted by the paucity of literature about the individual impact of such an event and the need for counselling/psychotherapy in these situations. Theories, on the ageing process, the body, and the self, are used to...

  12. Introducing older people to the theory of gerotranscendence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro

    2005-11-01

    This paper reports a study whose aims were to introduce the theory of gerotranscendence to a group of older people; to give participants in the group an opportunity to discuss their ageing process; to study how participants described their ageing in relation to the theory; and to gather participants' opinions about discussing their ageing in a group. The theory of gerotranscendence states that human development is a process extending into old age. Guidelines had previously been derived for its practical use in the care of older people, aiming to promote their development towards gerotranscendence. A qualitative descriptive approach was taken, and older people were invited to participate in group sessions at a day centre. At the sessions, participants discussed their ageing, and a video presentation about the theory of gerotranscendence was shown at one of the sessions. They were encouraged to discuss the description of the ageing process presented in the video and to link this to their own experiences of growing old. The discussion in each session was tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed and categorized using qualitative methods. The data were collected in 2002. All women had an experience of ageing that was in some way in line with the theory's description, and they more or less agreed that this description of ageing was in accordance with their own ageing. They considered that it was interesting and fruitful to discuss ageing in a group. They felt that introduction of the view of ageing offered by the theory of gerotranscendence was beneficial because it gave them a more positive view of ageing which also allowed them to be as they were. It is possible to arrange this type of group activity for older people, resulting in possibilities to use aspects of the theory of gerotranscendence as an intervention in gerontological nursing.

  13. An Algorithm for Neuropathic Pain Management in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, Gis?le; Marcoux, Margaux; Chapiro, Sylvie; David, Laurence; Rat, Patrice; Michel, Micheline; Bertrand, Isabelle; Voute, Marion; Wary, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain frequently affects older people, who generally also have several comorbidities. Elderly patients are often poly-medicated, which increases the risk of drug?drug interactions. These patients, especially those with cognitive problems, may also have restricted communication skills, making pain evaluation difficult and pain treatment challenging. Clinicians and other healthcare providers need a decisional algorithm to optimize the recognition and management of neuropathic pain. W...

  14. Guidance on the management of pain in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Aza; Adams, Nicola; Bone, Margaret; Elliott, Alison M; Gaffin, Jean; Jones, Derek; Knaggs, Roger; Martin, Denis; Sampson, Liz; Schofield, Pat

    2013-03-01

    This guidance document reviews the epidemiology and management of pain in older people via a literature review of published research. The aim of this document is to inform health professionals in any care setting who work with older adults on best practice for the management of pain and to identify where there are gaps in the evidence that require further research. The assessment of pain in older people has not been covered within this guidance and can be found in a separate document (http://www.britishpainsociety.org/pub_professional.htm#assessmentpop). Substantial differences in the population, methods and definitions used in published research makes it difficult to compare across studies and impossible to determine the definitive prevalence of pain in older people. There are inconsistencies within the literature as to whether or not pain increases or decreases in this age group, and whether this is influenced by gender. There is, however, some evidence that the prevalence of pain is higher within residential care settings. The three most common sites of pain in older people are the back; leg/knee or hip and 'other' joints. In common with the working-age population, the attitudes and beliefs of older people influence all aspects of their pain experience. Stoicism is particularly evident within this cohort of people. Evidence from the literature search suggests that paracetamol should be considered as first-line treatment for the management of both acute and persistent pain, particularly that which is of musculoskeletal origin, due to its demonstrated efficacy and good safety profile. There are few absolute contraindications and relative cautions to prescribing paracetamol. It is, however, important that the maximum daily dose (4 g/24 h) is not exceeded. Non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used with caution in older people after other safer treatments have not provided sufficient pain relief. The lowest dose should be provided

  15. How nurses restore and maintain mobility in hospitalised older people: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Stephanie; Dahlke, Sherry

    2018-05-17

    The aim of this integrative review of the literature was to evaluate and summarise current research about how nurses maintain and improve hospitalised older peoples' mobility levels. Older persons make up the majority of healthcare recipients, and they are at risk to experience significant decline in their mobility once hospitalised. This can result in longer hospitalisations or nursing home admissions. Currently, it is not well understood how nurses maintain and restore mobility of hospitalised older persons. An integrative literature review using key concepts related to hospitalised older people, mobility and nursing care was conducted. Whittemore and Khalf's five-stage methodological framework for integrative reviews was utilised. Two reviewers screened 1640 resources from four computerised databases published in English during 2000-2017. Reviewers used the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) and CASP quality appraisal tools to assess the thirteen included articles. The findings of this review reveal that little is known about how frequently nurses are mobilising, that many nurses perceive mobilising older patients to be physiotherapy's responsibility and that education about mobilisation can improve nurses' willingness to mobilise people. By investing in education and training programmes targeted for nurses, nurses can feel empowered in their ability to mobilise patients and are encouraged to take ownership of their patient's functional needs. In order to facilitate mobility, adequate staffing levels are necessary for transferring and ambulation, mobility assistive devices such as walkers and canes and environments with adequate space to mobilise. More research is needed to better understand and overcome barriers that nurses face in mobilised older people in acute care. The nursing team can work together to prioritise mobilisation to assist in restoring and maintaining the function of hospitalised older people. Educators could review their mobility programmes

  16. brief communication giving older people a voice in liberia, west africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    In Liberia, March 2015 marked Social Work Month which was celebrated under the global theme: ... was the government doing specifically for older people amidst the Ebola ... network to enhance its capacity to effectively serve older people in ...

  17. Childlessness and vulnerability of older people in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixin

    2018-03-01

    the number of childless older people is increasing in China, but relatively little is known about the role of childlessness in health outcomes. This study investigates the relationship between childlessness and three health outcomes: difficulty with Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), self-rated health and depression. this study includes 13,171 individuals aged 50 and above from national survey data of the second wave of the China Family Panel Study (2012). Binary/multinomial logistic and ordinary least squares regression models are presented. childless individuals whose children have all died exhibit worse health outcomes than individuals with children, but this effect is influenced by demographic characteristics, socio-economic status and social security. On the other hand, individuals who are childless due to other reasons (involuntary or voluntary) are less likely to report difficulty with IADLs and to report depression than older people with all children alive after controlling for demographic and socio-economic and social security factors. the death of a child has an adverse effect on people's health for both childless people whose children have all died and those who have lost a child but have other children alive. These two groups are in the most vulnerable position, which could also suggest that their children have died because they grew up in a vulnerable family. The government needs to improve the social security for these two groups and provide social services (particularly mental health services) to older people who have lost a child; these could contribute to alleviating some of the adverse effects of the death of a child. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  18. Enhancing Connectedness Through Peer Training for Community-Dwelling Older People: A Person Centred Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Oliver K; Bernoth, Maree; Dietsch, Elaine; Cleary, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    Social interaction and connectedness is important to the mental health and wellbeing of older people. The aim of this research study was to facilitate and increase opportunities for social connectedness for older people living in regional areas through the use of technology training. Weekly technology training sessions were conducted at a Seniors Citizen's Club with a peer trainer (an experienced, retired computer teacher) and sessions were attended not only by the six study participants, but also by other club members, with up to 15 club members participating in sessions. Data analysis involved all documents generated by the project, including the individual interviews, researcher observations of training sessions, reports from the peer trainer and weekly diaries maintained by participants. Findings demonstrated that computer training at the Senior Citizens Club helped participants build group cohesion and to form tiered connections with partners, family, and friends with whom they no longer live. When the trainer is seen as a peer, and training is person-centred, older people are more receptive to learning, exploring, and experimenting with technology. Although only six people were involved in the in-depth evaluation part of the study, voluntary training with the trainer in the absence of any funding continues even to this present time. The outcome of this research reinforces the potential for technology facilitated tiered connectivity to enhance the quality of life for older people living in regional and rural Australia.

  19. FACTORS RELATING TO DEPRESSION AMONG OLDER PEOPLE LIVING IN CIMAHI, WEST JAVA PROVINCE, INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Kiki Gustryanti; Sunanta Thongpat; Sonthaya Maneerat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is commonly found in older people. The prevalence of depression among older people, particularly in Indonesia is increasing worldwide. Objective: This study was aimed to identify the factors relating to depression among older people living in Cimahi, West Java Province, Indonesia. Method: A cross sectional design was used with a total of 267 older people aged from 60 to 79 years old. A multi-stage random sampling has been used in five Public Health Centers in Cima...

  20. Colour and inclusivity: a visual communication design project with older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2012-01-01

    In an ideal world, inclusive products and services would be the standard and not the exception. This paper presents a systematic approach to an overlap between Visual Communication Design, Printed Colour and Inclusive Design, for older people, with the aim to develop of a set of research-based ageing and ergonomics-centred communication design guidelines and recommendations for printed material (analogical displays). The approach included an initial extensive literature review in the area of colour, older people and ergonomics issues and vision common diseases, communication design. The second phase was the implementation of an experiment to measure the different colour experiences of the participants in two sample groups (one in UK and another one in Portugal), using printed material, to find out the colours one should use in analogical communication material, being aware of the colour contrast importance (foreground versus background) and the difficulties experienced by older people to read and understand lettering, signs. As main contribution of this research project, we developed a set of guidelines and recommendations based on the reviewed literature and the sample groups' findings, trying to demonstrate the importance of these guidelines when conceiving a new communicational design project in a way this project will achieve vision comfort and understandability, especially for older people, in an inclusive design perspective.

  1. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  2. An oral health survey of vulnerable older people in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visschere, Luc; Janssens, Barbara; De Reu, Griet; Duyck, Joke; Vanobbergen, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight in the oral health of persons aged 65 years or more. Data were obtained from 652 vulnerable older persons (≥65) by means of a clinical oral examination. Additional demographic data were gathered including age, gender, residence, and care dependency. The mean age of the total study sample was 83 (7.7) years and 71 % was female. Nearly 33 % of the sample was living at home with support, and 67 % was residing in nursing homes. The number of occluding pairs was low and the proportion of edentulous people was highest among persons with the highest care dependency. The mean Decay-missing-filled teeth index (DMFT) was 20.3 (9.0). A prosthetic treatment need and inadequate oral hygiene levels were observed in 40 % and more than 60 % of the subjects, respectively. The highest treatment need was observed in the oldest age group and the highest mean dental plaque in older persons with the highest care dependency. The oral health in frail older people in Belgium is poor. The restorative and prosthetic treatment need is high and oral hygiene levels are problematic. Age, residence, and care dependency seemed to have some influence on oral health parameters. In the long term, the most important future challenge of oral health care policies is to identify older adults before they begin to manifest such oral health deterioration. Regular dental visits should be strongly promoted by all (oral) health care workers during the lifespan of all persons including older adults.

  3. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  4. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and cognition in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Anna K; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Tilvis, Reijo S; Strandberg, Timo E

    2016-01-01

    high TSH concentrations and cognitive decline are both very common among older people and could be linked. to assess cognition in our cohort of 335 home-dwelling older people (75 years and older) and to cross-sectionally relate the results to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. Our special focus was on the upper normal TSH range and subclinical hypothyroidism. cognitive performance was evaluated using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-nb). The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale was used to evaluate severity of cognitive disorder. The APOEε4 genotype was also defined. Subjects were divided into quartiles based on the TSH concentrations, and results were compared between these groups. expected relations were observed between CERAD domains and both educational level and APOEε4 genotype. Female sex significantly associated with better performance in Boston naming (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.27-0.85). In the whole cohort, higher TSH concentrations tended to associate with better scores in most parts of the CERAD-nb tests, but differences were not statistically significant. However, subjects with the highest TSH concentration (90th TSH percentile, range 4.14-14.4 mU/l) had better CDR scores compared with subjects with the lowest TSH concentration (10th percentile, range 0.001-0.63 mIU/l; OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.014-0.76). our results do not support the notion that higher TSH concentrations, not even in the range of subclinical hypothyroidism, would adversely affect cognition among older people. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Influences on emergency department length of stay for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Maryann; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Berry, Debra; Cross, Anthony; Considine, Julie

    2018-02-14

    The aim of this study was to examine the influences on emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) for older people and develop a predictive model for an ED LOS more than 4 h. This retrospective cohort study used organizational data linkage at the patient level from a major Australian health service. The study population was aged 65 years or older, attending an ED during the 2013/2014 financial year. We developed and internally validated a clinical prediction rule. Discriminatory performance of the model was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. An integer-based risk score was developed using multivariate logistic regression. The risk score was evaluated using ROC analysis. There were 33 926 ED attendances: 57.5% (n=19 517) had an ED LOS more than 4 h. The area under ROC for age, usual accommodation, triage category, arrival by ambulance, arrival overnight, imaging, laboratory investigations, overcrowding, time to be seen by doctor, ED visits with admission and access block relating to ED LOS more than 4 h was 0.796, indicating good performance. In the validation set, area under ROC was 0.80, P-value was 0.36 and prediction mean square error was 0.18, indicating good calibration. The risk score value attributed to each risk factor ranged from 2 to 68 points. The clinical prediction rule stratified patients into five levels of risk on the basis of the total risk score. Objective identification of older people at intermediate and high risk of an ED LOS more than 4 h early in ED care enables targeted approaches to streamline the patient journey, decrease ED LOS and optimize emergency care for older people.

  6. Risk factors for hip fracture among institutionalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Sheng; Sambrook, Philip N; Simpson, Judy M; Cameron, Ian D; Cumming, Robert G; Seibel, Markus J; Lord, Stephen R; March, Lyn M

    2009-07-01

    risk factors for hip fracture in community-dwelling individuals have been extensively studied, but there have been fewer studies of institutionalised older people. a total of 1,894 older people (1,433 females, 461 males; mean age 86 years, SD 7.1 years) were recruited from 52 nursing homes and 30 intermediate-care nursing care facilities in Australia during March 1999 and February 2003. We assessed clinical risk factors for hip fracture and skeletal fragility by calcaneus broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) at baseline and then followed up for fracture for 4 years. Hip fractures were validated by x-ray reports. Survival analysis with age as a time-dependent covariate was used to analyse the data. during a mean follow-up period of 2.65 years (SD 1.38), 201 hip fractures in 191 residents were recorded, giving an overall hip fracture incidence rate of 4.0% per person year (males 3.6% and females 4.1%). Residents living in intermediate-care hostels had a higher crude hip fracture rate (4.6% vs. 3.0%) than those living in high-care nursing homes. In multivariate analysis, an increased risk of hip fracture was significantly associated with older age, cognitive impairment, a history of fracture since age 50, lower body weight, longer lower leg length and poorer balance in intermediate-care hostel residents, but not with lower BUA. institutionalised older people, who are at a higher risk of hip fracture than community-dwelling individuals, have differences in some risk factors for hip fracture that should be considered in targeting intervention programs.

  7. A narrative exploration of older people's transitions into residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria S P; Simpson, Jane; Froggatt, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Moving into residential care has been argued to be a significant life transition for older people, often resulting in stress and anxiety. This research aimed to explore qualitatively older people's experiences of this transition, including how relocation is reflected upon and incorporated into their personal narratives. Eight older adults (65-97 years) living in a residential facility for between three and 12 months participated in interviews focussed on their experiences of relocating to a residential care home. Narrative analysis revealed that rather than depicting time bound stages of transition, participants' experiences reflected key plots of 'control', 'power', 'identity' and 'uncertainty' interwoven throughout their narratives. Participants experienced some difficulties in incorporating this transition into their life stories. Furthermore, participants discussed not feeling confident in their decision to move, living in constant fear of losing their memory, and limited expectations for their future. Professionals should move away from considering transition as a stage-based process ending in acceptance, instead focussing on how residents perceive relocation in relation to previous life experiences, unspoken fears evoked by moving and how the environment and relationships with staff may be altered to assist residents in maintaining their identity and sense of control.

  8. Community screening for visual impairment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Emily L; Evans, Jennifer R; Smeeth, Liam

    2018-02-20

    Visual problems in older people are common and frequently under-reported. The effects of poor vision in older people are wide reaching and include falls, confusion and reduced quality of life. Much of the visual impairment in older ages can be treated (e.g. cataract surgery, correction of refractive error). Vision screening may therefore reduce the number of older people living with sight loss. The objective of this review was to assess the effects on vision of community vision screening of older people for visual impairment. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 10); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; the ISRCTN registry; ClinicalTrials.gov and the ICTRP. The date of the search was 23 November 2017. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared vision screening alone or as part of a multi-component screening package as compared to no vision screening or standard care, on the vision of people aged 65 years or over in a community setting. We included trials that used self-reported visual problems or visual acuity testing as the screening tool. We used standard methods expected by Cochrane. We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. Visual outcome data were available for 10,608 people in 10 trials. Four trials took place in the UK, two in Australia, two in the United States and two in the Netherlands. Length of follow-up ranged from one to five years. Three of these studies were cluster-randomised trials whereby general practitioners or family physicians were randomly allocated to undertake vision screening or no vision screening. All studies were funded by government agencies. Overall we judged the studies to be at low risk of bias and only downgraded the certainty of the evidence (GRADE) for imprecision.Seven trials compared vision screening as part of a multi-component screening versus no screening. Six of these studies used self

  9. Knowledge and attitudes of radiation therapists and undergraduate students towards older people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donovan, A.; O'Herlihy, A.; Cunningham, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Rapidly changing demographics worldwide mean that there will be a significant increase in the number of older cancer patients requiring radiation therapy treatment in the coming decades. Education is regarded as a key factor in addressing attitudes towards older people among healthcare professionals and has been proven to influence the quality of care received. To our knowledge, there is only one previous study specifically in relation to radiation therapists (RTs), and this included a small sample of RTs. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of RTs and RT students towards older people. Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used, consisting of: 1) demographics, 2) knowledge and 3) attitudes. Knowledge was assessed using the Facts of Aging Quiz (FAQ), while Kogan's Attitude towards Old People (KAOP) Scale was used to assess attitudes. The study population included radiation therapists (RTs) working in Ireland and undergraduate students. Results: Mean knowledge scores in this study were recorded as 11.82 (SD = 3.07)for RTs and 12.17 (SD = 2.55) for students out of a possible 24, i.e. 49% and 51%, respectively. Average attitude scores were documented as 126.12 (SD = 10.06) for RTs and 125.30 (SD = 10.28) for RT students, out of a possible 170 i.e. 74% for both qualified RTs and students. There were no significant differences between students and qualified RTs in relation to both knowledge and attitude scores. Only 44% of RTs stated that their undergraduate degree equipped them with the necessary skills to deal effectively with older patients. Conclusion: RTs have a prominent role in the provision of care to cancer patients, the majority of whom are aged 65 and older. Provision of optimal care to older people undergoing radiotherapy will require “age attuning” of the profession, both at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The findings of this research indicate that RTs and RT students have average

  10. Singapore Healthy Older People Everyday (HOPE) Study: Prevalence of Frailty and Associated Factors in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Reshma A; Chen, Matthew Zhixuan; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Moses YiDong; Ho, Han Kwee; van Dam, Rob M

    2017-08-01

    In the context of a rapidly ageing population, Singapore is anticipating a rise in multimorbidity, disability, and dependency, which are driven by physical frailty. Healthy Older People Everyday (HOPE) is an epidemiologic population-based study on community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older in Singapore. To investigate the prevalence of frail and prefrail states and their association with polypharmacy, multimorbidity, cognitive and functional status, and perceived health status among community-dwelling older adults in Singapore. Participants for HOPE were older adults aged 65 years and older recruited from a cohort study on the northwest region of Singapore. Analysis was performed on data collected from a combination of interviewer-administered questionnaires (including FRAIL scale, EQ-5D, Mini Mental State Examination, Barthel index, and Lawton IADL scale), clinical assessments, and physical measurements (including hand grip strength and Timed-Up-and-Go [TUG] test). A total of 1051 older adults (mean age 71.2 years) completed the study. More than half (57.2%) were female. The prevalence of frailty and prefrailty was 6.2% and 37%, respectively. Frailty was associated with older age, female gender, Indian (instead of Chinese) ethnicity, multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive and functional impairment, weaker hand grip strength, longer TUG times, and poor perceived health status. Those with underlying cognitive impairment and frailty were at greater risk of adverse health outcome. Frailty is a complex health state with multiple domains and dimensions. In our study in a multiethnic Asian population, we identified nonmodifiable factors and modifiable risk factors (multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive and functional impairment) that were associated with frailty. Interventions will have to be multipronged and will require a collaborated effort in order to effect change and improve the health span in rapidly ageing populations. Copyright © 2017 AMDA

  11. Effects of physical exercise programme on happiness among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee-Pool, M; Sadeghi, R; Majlessi, F; Rahimi Foroushani, A

    2015-02-01

    This randomized-controlled trial investigated the effect of physical exercise programme (PEP) on happiness among older adults in Nowshahr, Iran. Results of this study on 120 male and female volunteers showed that an 8-week group physical exercise programme was significantly effective in older adults' happiness. Findings showed that physical exercise programme is so beneficial for increasing older adults' happiness. Physical activity is associated with well-being and happiness. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an 8-week long physical exercise programme (PEP) on happiness among older adults in Nowshahr, Iran. This was a randomized control trial study. The participants consisted of a group of 120 male and female volunteers (mean ± SD age: 71 ± 5.86 years) in a convenience sampling among older adults in public parks in Nowshahr, Iran. We randomly allocated them into experimental (n = 60) and control (n = 60) groups. A validated instrument was used to measure well-being and happiness [Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI)]. Respondents were asked to complete the OHI before and 2 months after implementing PEP. The 8-week PEP was implemented with the intervention group. The statistical analysis of the data was conducted using paired t-test, Fisher's exact test and χ(2). Before the intervention, there was no significant difference in the happiness mean score between the case and control groups; however, after implementing PEP, happiness significantly improved among the experimental group (P = 0.001) and did not improve within the control group (P = 0.79). It can be concluded that PEP had positive effects on happiness among older adults. Planning and implementing of physical activity is so important for older happiness. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Meeting the health needs of older people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Robert

    The increasing population of older people with learning disabilities may lead to higher demand for contact with registered nurses. To date, little research has been undertaken regarding the role of registered nurses in meeting the health and care needs of this client group. In this article, the author reports on the second stage of a three-stage research study that used six case studies to explore this issue. Implications for nursing were identified in areas such as health needs, record keeping, medication, advocacy, social aspects, ageing in place, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding, spirituality and end-of-life care. The author concludes that registered nurses will need to continue to remain up to date to meet the complex needs of older individuals with learning disabilities.

  13. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experiencing autonomy is recognised to promote health and well-being for all age groups. Perceived lack of control has been found to be detrimental to physical and mental health. There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge elucidating how frail older people in nursing home settings...... participants aged 65 years or older were included in the study. All the participants were restricted in performing at least one P-ADL activity unassisted and had a Mini Mental State Examination-score above 16. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks by The Autonomy Sub......-dimension in the Measure of Actualisation of Potential test. Programmes were based on participants' individual assessment of their most important daily activities. Staff at all nursing homes who usually organize physical training, social or creative activities carried out individually tailored programmes using their usual...

  14. Characteristics of outdoor falls among older people: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R; Ballinger, Claire; Phillips, Judith E; Newton, Rita

    2013-11-18

    Falls are a major threat to older people's health and wellbeing. Approximately half of falls occur in outdoor environments but little is known about the circumstances in which they occur. We conducted a qualitative study to explore older people's experiences of outdoor falls to develop understanding of how they may be prevented. We conducted nine focus groups across the UK (England, Wales, and Scotland). Our sample was from urban and rural settings and different environmental landscapes. Participants were aged 65+ and had at least one outdoor fall in the past year. We analysed the data using framework and content analyses. Forty-four adults aged 65 - 92 took part and reported their experience of 88 outdoor falls. Outdoor falls occurred in a variety of contexts, though reports suggested the following scenarios may have been more frequent: when crossing a road, in a familiar area, when bystanders were around, and with an unreported or unknown attribution. Most frequently, falls resulted in either minor or moderate injury, feeling embarrassed at the time of the fall, and anxiety about falling again. Ten falls resulted in fracture, but no strong pattern emerged in regard to the contexts of these falls. Anxiety about falling again appeared more prevalent among those that fell in urban settings and who made more visits into their neighbourhood in a typical week. This exploratory study has highlighted several aspects of the outdoor environment that may represent risk factors for outdoor falls and associated fear of falling. Health professionals are recommended to consider outdoor environments as well as the home setting when working to prevent falls and increase mobility among older people.

  15. Registered Nurses working together with family members of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weman, Karin; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to reach a more profound understanding, through looking at nurses' working situation, of those factors that influence how nurses are able to work together with family members of older people living in nursing homes or similar facilities. Working with the care of older people as a Registered Nurse provides a varied job with many challenges. Nurses have to co-operate with family members of those in community health care. Co-operation is important and necessary for all involved. Nurses working in elder care in a geographically defined area received a questionnaire with three open-ended questions, on the difficulties and/or problems involved with working together with family members, and the positive or negative aspects of this co-operation. Analysis was carried out using the latent content analysis method. Three themes, problems within the system, interaction with families and caring in nursing work, are presented with categories and their subcategories. The nurses wanted their superior to be a nurse so that their working situation would be better understood. Appreciation from their superior and family members was also a very important part of their work as nurses in community health care. The frequent changes and the lack of time in the work of elder care often put nurses under considerable psychological pressure. For the most part family members are a resource for the elder, but sometimes they will avoid contact, which will make co-operating difficult. Registered Nurses and family members are dependent on each other in their care of the elder. Relevance to clinical practice. More attention should be paid to the working situation of Registered Nurses in community health care, and their ability to work together with family members of older people.

  16. Perspectives of nursing professionals and older adults differ on aspects of care for older people after a nationwide improvement program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, L.M.; Wehrens, R.; Oldenhof, L.; Bal, R.; Francke, A.L.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The perspectives of nursing professionals might differ from those of older adults when it comes to care for older people. This cross-sectional study compares the views of older adults with the views of nursing professionals on the quality of care after a nationwide improvement program

  17. Perspectives of nursing professionals and older adults differ on aspects of care for older people after a nationwide improvement program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, L.M. (Lisanne Marlieke); R.L.E. Wehrens (Rik); L.E. Oldenhof (Lieke); R.A. Bal (Roland); Francke, A.L. (Anneke)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The perspectives of nursing professionals might differ from those of older adults when it comes to care for older people. This cross-sectional study compares the views of older adults with the views of nursing professionals on the quality of care after a nationwide

  18. The Relationship of Frailty and Hospitalization Among Older People: Evidence From a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Fang; Lin, Hsiang-Chun; Cheng, Chih-Ling

    2018-06-06

    This research explored the relationship between the stages of frailty and risk for hospitalization in older adults and evaluated the risk for hospitalization among the elderly in relation to various frailty assessment indexes. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were carried out. A total of 32,998 older people, 8,666 of whom were hospitalized, were included in this study. Two of the researchers independently collected and reviewed the literature. The key search terms used were "frailty" or "frail," "hospitalization," and "older people" or "older" or "geriatric" or "senior." Data were recorded from January 2001 to July 2016. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were adopted for quality assessment. A systematic search was carried out using Embase and Scopus to analyze the collected literature. A meta-analysis was conducted on eight studies that discussed the relationship between frailty and hospitalization risk in older adults 65 years of age or older. The results showed that frail older people exhibited the highest risk for hospitalization, following by prefrail and robust older people. Next, different frailty assessment indicators were used to predict the risk for hospitalization among older people. All of these indexes also showed that older persons with frailty had the highest risk for hospitalization, followed by prefrail older people. Frailty is a vital issue in geriatric care and is a crucial factor in the hospitalization of older people. Frail older people were at the highest risk for hospitalization, following by prefrail and robust older people. Assessing frailty as early as possible can reduce the hospitalization risk among older people. Professional nursing staff should use frailty indicators in a timely fashion to assess the status of frailty in older people and should effectively develop frailty prevention strategies to decrease the risk for hospitalization and to enhance quality of life

  19. An overview of appetite decline in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Anna; Robinson, Sian; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Roberts, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Poor appetite is a common problem in older people living at home and in care homes, as well as hospital inpatients. It can contribute to weight loss and nutritional deficiencies, and associated poor healthcare outcomes, including increased mortality. Understanding the causes of reduced appetite and knowing how to measure it will enable nurses and other clinical staff working in a range of community and hospital settings to identify patients with impaired appetite. A range of strategies can be used to promote better appetite and increase food intake. PMID:26018489

  20. Care practices of older people with dementia in the surgical ward: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hynninen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the care practices of nursing staff caring older people with dementia in a surgical ward. Methods: The data were collected from nursing staff (n = 191 working in surgical wards in one district area in Finland during October to November 2015. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed statistically. The instrument consists of a total number of 141 items and four dimensions. The dimensions were as follows: background information (12 of items, specific characteristics of older people with dementia in a surgical ward (24 of items, specific characteristics of their care in a surgical ward (66 of items and use of physical restraints and alternative models for use of restraints for people with dementia (39 of items. Results: The questions which measure the nursing staff’s own assessment of care practices when caring for people with dementia in surgical wards were selected: counseling people with dementia, reaction when a surgical patient with dementia displays challenging behavior and use of alternative approach instead of physical restraints. Most commonly the nursing staff pay attention to patient’s state of alertness before counseling older people with dementia. Instead of using restraints, nursing staff gave painkillers for the patient and tried to draw patients’ attention elsewhere. The nursing staff with longer work experience estimate that they can handle the patients’ challenging behavior. They react by doing nothing more often than others. They pretend not to hear, see or notice anything. Conclusion: The findings of this study can be applied in nursing practice and in future studies focusing on the care practices among older people with dementia in acute care environment. The results can be used while developing patient treatments process in surgical ward to meet future needs.

  1. Older People and Social Connectedness: How Place and Activities Keep People Engaged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene H. Yen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how older adults perceive and navigate their neighborhoods, we examined the implications of activity in their neighborhoods for their health. We interviewed 38 adults (ages 62–85 who lived in San Francisco or Oakland, California. Seven key themes emerged: (1 people express a wide range of expectations for neighborliness, from “we do not bother each other” to “we have keys to each other’s houses”, (2 social distance between “other” people impede a sense of connection, (3 ethnic differences in living arrangements affect activities and activity locations, (4 people try to stay busy, (5 people able to leave their homes do many activities outside their immediate residential neighborhoods, (6 access to a car is a necessity for most, and (7 it is unusual to plan for the future when mobility might become limited. Multiple locations influence older adults’ health, including residential neighborhoods. Older adults value mobility, active lives, and social connections.

  2. Knowledge and attitudes of doctors toward the sexuality of older people in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sultan; Demir, Basaran; Eker, Engin; Karim, Salman

    2008-10-01

    Few studies have looked at healthcare professionals' knowledge of and attitudes to later life sexuality in both Western and Eastern cultures. Here we examine the attitudes and knowledge of Turkish medical doctors toward sexuality in older people. Eighty-seven doctors, from various specialties, who were directly involved in the care of older people, were contacted by post and asked to complete the Turkish version of the Aging Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Scale (ASKAS). A majority of physicians indicated that they had limited information and knowledge regarding sexual health issues in older people (69%). Although a small percentage (14.5%) reported that they "always" discuss sexuality and sexual problems with older patients, the majority (69%) indicated that they "sometimes" raise questions about sexuality with these patients. A high percentage (81%) stated that they would be helpful and receptive should an elderly patient initiate a discussion about sexual issues. Most participants (77%) thought that the patient's gender was of no importance when taking a sexual history. Overall, the responses to ASKAS showed that physicians had limited knowledge but their attitude was positive toward sexuality in the elderly. Female physicians had less knowledge than males and had more negative attitudes toward sexuality in this age group. Total and knowledge subscale scores of ASKAS showed that older physicians had more knowledge than younger physicians but similar attitudes. A comparison of the knowledge and attitude scores of psychiatrists, surgeons and non-surgeons showed no significant difference among the three groups. This study identified a low level of awareness of later life sexuality among Turkish medical doctors. These findings identify a need to improve the education and training of doctors at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels to enable them to provide better sexual health care to older people.

  3. Shaping mutuality: nurse-family caregiver interactions in caring for older people with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports on the research findings derived from a grounded theory study that examined the processes through which community mental health nurses work with families of older people with depression. Data were collected through semistructured, in-depth interviews with six community mental health nurses and seven family caregivers of older people with depression, and observations of their interactions in natural settings. Data collection and analysis were guided by theoretical sampling and the constant comparative process. The findings indicate that the nurse-family caregiver relationship involves working towards mutuality, which is shaped by both the nurse and family caregiver. It is through the process of "shaping mutuality" that a nurse and family caregiver learn to collaborate, and achieve their individual goals and desired outcomes, both for the patient and for themselves.

  4. Competences for Working with Older People: The Development and Verification of The European Core Competence Framework for Health and Social Care Professionals Working with Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Bea; Reehuis, Lidwien; Roodbol, Petrie

    2017-01-01

    Universities of applied sciences in Europe face the challenge of preparing students in health and social care for working with older people and contributing to the innovations needed in light of the ageing of society, along with changes in the health and social care systems in many countries. Dealing with the special needs of older people and the…

  5. Acute stress does not impair long-term memory retrieval in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Almela, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Puig-Perez, Sara; Salvador, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress-induced cortisol increases impair memory retrieval in young people. This effect has not been studied in older people; however, some findings suggest that age-related changes in the brain can affect the relationships between acute stress, cortisol and memory in older people. Our aim was to investigate the effects of acute stress on long-term memory retrieval in healthy older people. To this end, 76 participants from 56 to 76 years old (38 men and 38 women) were exposed to an acute psychosocial stressor or a control task. After the stress/control task, the recall of pictures, words and stories learned the previous day was assessed. There were no differences in memory retrieval between the stress and control groups on any of the memory tasks. In addition, stress-induced cortisol response was not associated with memory retrieval. An age-related decrease in cortisol receptors and functional changes in the amygdala and hippocampus could underlie the differences observed between the results from this study and those found in studies performed with young people. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissociation, Paranormal Belief, and Quality of Life in Older People

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    Tungshan Chou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of religiosity in current health-related literature is mostly based on the traditional Christian belief system. It has been argued that such a measurement approach may misrepresent the true degree of religiosity in Taiwanese people. In this study, religiosity was measured in two ways: self-reported religion type and a qualitatively derived index of religious piety based on principles as suggested by Gries, Su, and Schak to be used in the Taiwanese context. Their effects on dissociation, paranormal belief, and quality of life were juxtaposed for comparison. In addition, the beneficial effect of religious piety was examined in the framework of McClenon’s ritual healing theory. A total of 266 healthy older adults across Taiwan were interviewed by four trained assistants over a 4-month period. Factor scores were used to represent the dissociative tendencies (depersonalization/derealization, forgetfulness, amnesia, and psychological absorption and paranormal belief facets (precognition, psi power, other forms of life, traditional religious belief, superstition, and telepathy. The results showed that older people of high religious piety display better quality of life profiles than their counterparts in the low religious piety group. The effects of self-reported religion type were mainly seen with paranormal beliefs compatible with their religious beliefs, whereas the effects of religious piety were more pronounced in relation to quality of life than dissociation and paranormal belief. The beneficial advantage of dissociation hypothesized by ritual healing theory did not receive empirical support in the nonclinical sample of this study.

  7. Social isolation and risk for malnutrition among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Christa; Salameh, Pascale; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2017-02-01

    Social isolation and loneliness are emerging issues among the geriatric population. The relationships between both, and their impact on health and nutritional status in older people are complex. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between three components of social isolation: social network, feeling of loneliness, commensality and nutritional status. A total of 1200 randomly selected elderly individuals aged ≥65 years and living in rural areas of Lebanon participated in the present study. Data were collected during a face-to-face interview including nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment), measures of social isolation (Lubben Social Network Scale), subjective loneliness (Jong-Gierveld Loneliness Scale), sociodemographic conditions, and health and functional status. Both social isolation and loneliness were independently associated with a higher risk of malnutrition (OR 1.58, P = 0.011; OR 1.15, P = 0.020, respectively). However no association was found between the frequency of sharing meals and the risk of malnutrition. The present study showed that social isolation and subjective loneliness are two independent risk factors for malnutrition among older people. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 286-294. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

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    Nathalie van der Velde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In order to determine the association between echocardiographic abnormalities and falls in older adults, we performed a prospective cohort study, in which 215 new consecutive referrals (age 77.4, SD 6.0 of a geriatric outpatient clinic of a Dutch university hospital were included. During the previous year, 139 had experienced a fall. At baseline, all patients underwent routine two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Falls were recorded during a three-month follow-up. Multivariate adjustment for confounders was performed with a Cox proportional hazards model. 55 patients (26% fell at least once during follow-up. The adjusted hazard ratio of a fall during follow-up was 1.35 (95% CI, 1.08-1.71 for pulmonary hypertension, 1.66 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.89 for mitral regurgitation, 2.41 (95% CI, 1.32 to 4.37 for tricuspid regurgitation and 1.76 (95% CI, 1.03 to 3.01 for pulmonary regurgitation. For aortic regurgitation the risk of a fall was also increased, but non-significantly (hazard ratio, 1.57 [95% CI, 0.85 to 2.92]. Trend analysis of the severity of the different regurgitations showed a significant relationship for mitral, tricuspid and pulmonary valve regurgitation and pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Echo (Doppler cardiography can be useful in order to identify risk indicators for falling. Presence of pulmonary hypertension or regurgitation of mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary valves was associated with a higher fall risk. Our study indicates that the diagnostic work-up for falls in older adults might be improved by adding an echo (Doppler cardiogram in selected groups.

  9. Risks, consequences, and prevention of falls of older people in oral healthcare centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Baat, P. de; Gerritsen, A.E.; Flohil, K.A.; Putten, G.J. van der; Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der

    2017-01-01

    One-third of community-dwelling people older than 65 years of age fall each year, and half of them fall at least twice a year. Older care home residents are approximately three times more likely to fall when compared to community-dwelling older people. Risk indicators for falls are related to the

  10. Labor Force Nonparticipation of Older People: United States, 1890-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graney, Marshall J.; Cottam, Doris M.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of U.S. census data provides evidence that decreased labor force participation of older people, 1980 to 1970, was due to the disproportionate growth in numbers of persons aged 65 or older and the growing economic dominance of industries that provide relatively few opportunities for older people's participation. (Author)

  11. The Housing and Support Needs of People with an Intellectual Disability into Older Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K.; Cartwright, C.; Craig, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are growing older as a population cohort. Many live at home with family members who are their carers but who are also becoming older and less able to provide care. The housing and support preferences of people with IDs and their carers into older age are poorly characterised in the…

  12. Distribution and correlates of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions in older people

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    Menz Hylton B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions are common in older people and are associated with pain, mobility impairment and functional limitations. However, little has been documented in relation to the frequency or distribution of these lesions. The aim of this study was to document the occurrence of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions and the patterns in which they occur in a random sample of older people. Methods A medical history questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 301 people living independently in the community (117 men, 184 women aged between 70 and 95 years (mean 77.2, SD 4.9, who also underwent a clinical assessment of foot problems, including the documentation of plantar lesion locations, toe deformities and the presence and severity of hallux valgus. Results Of the 301 participants, 180 (60% had at least one plantar hyperkeratotic lesion. Those with plantar lesions were more likely to be female (χ2 = 18.75, p 2 = 6.15, p vs 36.3 ± 8.4°; t = 2.68, df = 286, p vs 4.8 ± 1.3 hours, t = -2.46, df = 299, p = 0.01. No associations were found between the presence of plantar lesions and body mass index, obesity, foot posture, dominant foot or forefoot pain. A total of 53 different lesions patterns were observed, with the most common lesion pattern being "roll-off" hyperkeratosis on the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ, accounting for 12% of all lesion patterns. "Roll-off" lesions under the 1st MPJ and interphalangeal joint were significantly associated with moderate to severe hallux valgus (p p Conclusion Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions affect 60% of older people and are associated with female gender, hallux valgus, toe deformity, increased ankle flexibility and time spent on feet, but are not associated with obesity, limb dominance, forefoot pain or foot posture. Although there are a wide range of lesion distribution patterns, most can be classified into medial, central or lateral groups. Further

  13. Improvement in the physiological function and standing stability based on kinect multimedia for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The increase in the Taiwanese older population is associated with age-related inconveniences. Finding adequate and simple physical activities to help the older people maintaining their physiological function and preventing them from falls has become an urgent social issue. [Subjects and Methods] This study aimed to design a virtual exercise training game suitable for Taiwanese older people. This system will allow for the maintenance of the physiological function and standing stability through physical exercise, while using a virtual reality game. The participants can easily exercise in a carefree, interactive environment. This study will use Kinect for Windows for physical movement detection and Unity software for virtual world development. [Results] Group A and B subjects were involved in the exercise training method of Kinect interactive multimedia for 12 weeks. The results showed that the functional reach test and the unipedal stance test improved significantly. [Conclusion] The physiological function and standing stability of the group A subjects were examined at six weeks post training. The results showed that these parameters remained constant. This proved that the proposed system provide substantial support toward the preservation of the Taiwanese older people' physiological function and standing stability.

  14. Supportive care for older people with frailty in hospital: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Morrow, Elizabeth M; Hicks, Allan; Fitzpatrick, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Growing numbers of older people living with frailty and chronic health conditions are being referred to hospitals with acute care needs. Supportive care is a potentially highly relevant and clinically important approach which could bridge the practice gap between curative models of care and palliative care. However, future interventions need to be informed and underpinned by existing knowledge of supportive care. To identify and build upon existing theories and evidence about supportive care, specifically in relation to the hospital care of older people with frailty, to inform future interventions and their evaluation. An integrative review was used to identify and integrate theory and evidence. Electronic databases (Cochrane Medline, EMBASE and CIHAHL) were searched using the key term 'supportive care'. Screening identified studies employing qualitative and/or quantitative methods published between January 1990 and December 2015. Citation searches, reference checking and searches of the grey literature were also undertaken. Literature searches identified 2733 articles. After screening, and applying eligibility criteria based on relevance to the research question, studies were subject to methodological quality appraisal. Findings from included articles (n=52) were integrated using synthesis of themes. Relevant evidence was identified across different research literatures, on clinical conditions and contexts. Seven distinct themes of the synthesis were identified, these were: Ensuring fundamental aspects of care are met, Communicating and connecting with the patient, Carer and family engagement, Building up a picture of the person and their circumstances, Decisions and advice about best care for the person, Enabling self-help and connection to wider support, and Supporting patients through transitions in care. A tentative integrative model of supportive care for frail older people is developed from the findings. The findings and model developed here will inform

  15. Burden of poor oral health in older age: findings from a population-based study of older British men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, S E; Whincup, P H; Watt, R G; Tsakos, G; Papacosta, A O; Lennon, L T; Wannamethee, S G

    2015-12-29

    Evidence of the extent of poor oral health in the older UK adult population is limited. We describe the prevalence of oral health conditions, using objective clinical and subjective measures, in a population-based study of older men. Cross-sectional study. A representative sample of men aged 71-92 years in 2010-2012 from the British Regional Heart Study, initially recruited in 1978-1980 from general practices across Britain. Physical examination among 1660 men included the number of teeth, and periodontal disease in index teeth in each sextant (loss of attachment, periodontal pocket, gingival bleeding). Postal questionnaires (completed by 2147 men including all participants who were clinically examined) included self-rated oral health, oral impacts on daily life and current perception of dry mouth experience. Among 1660 men clinically examined, 338 (20%) were edentulous and a further 728 (43%) had 5.5 mm) affecting 1-20% of sites while 303 (24%) had >20% sites affected. The prevalence of gingival bleeding was 16%. Among 2147 men who returned postal questionnaires, 35% reported fair/poor oral health; 11% reported difficulty eating due to oral health problems. 31% reported 1-2 symptoms of dry mouth and 20% reported 3-5 symptoms of dry mouth. The prevalence of edentulism, loss of attachment, or fair/poor self-rated oral health was greater in those from manual social class. These findings highlight the high burden of poor oral health in older British men. This was reflected in both the objective clinical and subjective measures of oral health conditions. The determinants of these oral health problems in older populations merit further research to reduce the burden and consequences of poor oral health in older people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Older peoples' perceptions of oral health: 'it's just not that simple'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie-Green, B; Giddings, L S; Buttle, L; Tahana, K

    2009-02-01

    Little is known about older persons' perceptions of oral health and oral health care. The purpose of this study was to explore the viewpoint of older adults' regarding their oral health care practices. A qualitative interpretive methodology was employed comprising three analytic levels: coding of data into concepts, analysis of concepts into themes, followed by an in-depth analysis of relationships within concepts and between themes. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 19 participants aged 65 to 87 years. Older people's decision to access oral health care involves complex and personally meaningful strategies. A dental visit surfaces hopes and fears based on past and present experiences. Mouth and teeth are not merely objects of dental care; they represent a person's social and relational self. Age-related changes challenge the relational self as represented in societal ideal images of youth and perfection (the perfect smile). This study highlights older peoples' resilience and determination when faced with the dilemmas in accessing oral health care--it costs, personally as well as financially. Contrary to the assumption that older peoples' oral health status is related to neglect, rather for many, it is the result of the intersection of their history with technological advances. These findings challenge oral health care practitioners to be sensitive to the contexts affecting their older client's oral health care status. They do not 'just go' to the dentist; they bring with them their past dental experiences and their hopes for the future. It matters how one is treated at this vulnerable time.

  17. What older people want: evidence from a study of remote Scottish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gerry; Farmer, Jane

    2009-01-01

    traditional model of care they had been receiving: these were local, personal emphasis and continuity. They were suspicious of new arrangements perceived to emphasise technical efficiency. Health and care services were described as inter-linked with other aspects of rural living, including transport and housing (which might have to be relinquished to pay for care). Proximity to family was desired for social and domestic support only; health and related support should be from generic service providers. Community members were involved in reciprocal help-giving of many types. The findings compare with results of other studies of older rural people internationally, and generic 'principles' of service derived could guide restructuring. There may be systemic challenges to empowering older people's 'voice' in designing sustainable rural services that stem from society's views of older people, attitudes of communities to collective roles and responsibilities, and the fragmented ways that services are sometimes provided.

  18. Alcohol and older people: A systematic review of barriers, facilitators and context of drinking in older people and implications for intervention design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sarah; Olanrewaju, Olawale; Cowan, Andy; Brayne, Carol; Lafortune, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Harmful alcohol consumption in older people has increased and effective approaches to understanding and addressing this societal concern are needed. Systematic review of qualitative studies in older populations (55+ years) to identify barriers, facilitators or context of drinking in older people. Multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Social Sciences Citation Index, York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Cochrane database and grey literature) were searched from 2000 to February 2017 for studies in English, from OECD countries using MeSH terms and text words relating to alcohol combined with older age terms. Study quality was assessed using NICE methodology. The review is reported according to PRISMA. Drinking in older people is strongly linked to social engagement and there is scepticism about the health risks of alcohol. Drinking was also linked to difficulties such as social isolation, illness or bereavement. Alcohol can be related to routines and identity. However, older people often regulate their own drinking and strategies that emphasise the life experience of older people to drink wisely could be helpful. To be effective societal approaches need to take into account contexts of risks for harmful drinking. The evidence supports a strong social role for drinking alcohol which should be taken into account in any policy development with the potential benefits of social participation for cognitive health. Approaches to reducing alcohol use in older people need to avoid paradoxical harm, with a need for approaches that reduce harm from drinking alcohol but retain the benefit of socialising.

  19. Alcohol and older people: A systematic review of barriers, facilitators and context of drinking in older people and implications for intervention design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kelly

    Full Text Available Harmful alcohol consumption in older people has increased and effective approaches to understanding and addressing this societal concern are needed.Systematic review of qualitative studies in older populations (55+ years to identify barriers, facilitators or context of drinking in older people. Multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Social Sciences Citation Index, York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Cochrane database and grey literature were searched from 2000 to February 2017 for studies in English, from OECD countries using MeSH terms and text words relating to alcohol combined with older age terms. Study quality was assessed using NICE methodology. The review is reported according to PRISMA.Drinking in older people is strongly linked to social engagement and there is scepticism about the health risks of alcohol. Drinking was also linked to difficulties such as social isolation, illness or bereavement. Alcohol can be related to routines and identity. However, older people often regulate their own drinking and strategies that emphasise the life experience of older people to drink wisely could be helpful.To be effective societal approaches need to take into account contexts of risks for harmful drinking. The evidence supports a strong social role for drinking alcohol which should be taken into account in any policy development with the potential benefits of social participation for cognitive health. Approaches to reducing alcohol use in older people need to avoid paradoxical harm, with a need for approaches that reduce harm from drinking alcohol but retain the benefit of socialising.

  20. Predictors of diabetes in older people in urban China.

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    Ruoling Chen

    Full Text Available China has the largest number of people with diabetes in the world. Over the last 30 years China has experienced rapid economic growth and a growing income gap between rich and poor. The population is ageing, however diabetes in older people has not been well studied to date. In this study we determined incidence and predictors of diabetes in older Chinese people.During 2001, using a standard interview method, we examined 1,317 adults aged ≥65 years who did not have diabetes in the city of Hefei, and characterized baseline risk factors. Over 7.5 years of follow up, we documented incident diabetes using self-reported doctor diagnosis and the cause of death in the whole cohort, and HbA(1C ≥48 mmol/mol in a nested case-control sample. A multivariate Cox regression model was employed to investigate risk of diabetes in relation to baseline risk factors.During follow up, 119 persons had newly diagnosed diabetes. World age-standardised incidence of diabetes was 24.5 (95% CI 19.5-29.5 per 1,000 person-years. Risk of diabetes was significantly and positively associated with income, waist circumference and body mass index, smoking and uncontrolled hypertension, but negatively associated with having a hobby of walking and frequency of visiting children/other relatives and contacting neighbours/friends. Higher income was significantly associated with increased diabetes risk regardless of cardiovascular and psychosocial risk factors. Compared to those with middle income and no psychosocial risk factors, the hazard ratio for incident diabetes among participants with high income and psychosocial risk was 2.13 (95% CI 1.02-4.45.Increasing incidence of diabetes in relation to high income has become an important public health issue in China. Maintaining social networks and gentle physical activities and reducing psychosocial factors may be integrated into current multi-faceted preventive strategies for curbing the epidemic of diabetes in the older population.

  1. The mourning process of older people with dementia who lost their spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akiko; Suwa, Sayuri

    2017-09-01

    To explore the mourning process of people with dementia who have lost their spouse, using family caregivers' and professionals' perspectives and to devise grief care for people with dementia. There have been studies on the loss of one's spouse; however, little is known about widows and widowers with dementia as they may find it hard to tell their perception and feelings to others accurately because of cognitive impairment. Qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews. Seven family caregivers and six professional caregivers from day care centres were interviewed between June and September 2015. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify mourning behaviours of people with dementia. In the mourning process of people with dementia, different behaviours were found according to dementia stages and different circumstances. In FAST2, they could remember their spouse's death. In FAST4 -6, it took 1 year to be able to perceive their spouse's death and more time to store it. In FAST 7, people with dementia did not discern his spouse's death throughout the process. Furthermore, it was revealed that people with dementia followed a different mourning process from conventional ones. In the care of widows and widowers with dementia it is crucial to adjust circumstances to allow people with dementia to guess reality. Further studies are needed to clarify differences between the mourning process of people with dementia and that of intact older people to develop a grief model and educational programmes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. ICT, Education and Older People in Australia: A Socio-Technical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatnall, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    People over 65 (or older people) are a growing proportion of the population in many developed countries including Australia. In the last 10 to 12 years interest from this group in the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and the Internet has also grown considerably. ICT has much to offer older people as a means of keeping in…

  3. General practitioners' knowledge of ageing and attitudes towards older people in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanni; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Ullah, Shahid; Deng, Lanlan

    2015-06-01

    To explore general practitioners (GPs)knowledge of ageing, attitudes towards older people and factors affecting their knowledge and attitudes in a Chinese context. Four hundred GPs were surveyed using the Chinese version of the Aging Semantic Differential (CASD) and the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz (CFAQ1) scale. The CASD scores indicated that GPs had a neutral attitude towards older people. The CFAQ1 scores indicated a low level of knowledge about ageing. GPs' awareness of the mental and social facts of ageing was poorer compared to that of physical facts. Male GPs had a significantly higher negative bias score than female GPs. No other variables had a statistically significant influence on knowledge and attitudes. The findings suggest the need for education interventions for GPs regarding knowledge of ageing and also provide evidence to guide future development of continuing medical programs for this group of medical doctors. © 2013 ACOTA.

  4. Anybody Hear Us? Attempting to Meet the Psychological Care Needs of Older People: an Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Zia Tabatabaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Older people who live in residential settings need some psychological support because of vicissitudes of life they faced with. The aim of this study is to explore psychological care needs of older people in a residential home. We used an ethnographic approach from May 2011 till January 2012. Through purposeful sampling, 14 knowledgeable participants were selected. Data were gathered from participant observations, in-depth interviews, review of related documents and field notes. Thematic analysis revealed three key themes including: (a Feelings of sadness (b Emotional desires and (c Choice and control. Findings of current study provided rich and useful information that is useful in charting new guideline for policy makers and care providers in order to support elderly residents' psychological care needs.

  5. Care co-ordination for older people in the third sector: scoping the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendstern, Michele; Hughes, Jane; Jasper, Rowan; Sutcliffe, Caroline; Challis, David

    2018-05-01

    The third sector has played a significant role internationally in the delivery of adult social care services for many years. Its contribution to care co-ordination activities for older people, however, in England and elsewhere, is relatively unknown. A scoping review was therefore conducted to ascertain the character of the literature, the nature and extent of third sector care co-ordination activity, and to identify evidence gaps. It was undertaken between autumn 2013 and summer 2014 and updated with additional searches in 2016. Electronic and manual searches of international literature using distinct terms for different approaches to care co-ordination were undertaken. From a total of 835 papers, 26 met inclusion criteria. Data were organised in relation to care co-ordination approaches, types of third sector organisation and care recipients. Papers were predominantly from the UK and published this century. Key findings included that: a minority of literature focused specifically on older people and that those doing so described only one care co-ordination approach; third sector services tended to be associated with independence and person-centred practice; and working with the statutory sector, a prerequisite of care co-ordination, was challenging and required a range of features to be in place to support effective partnerships. Strengths and weaknesses of care co-ordination practice in the third sector according to key stakeholder groups were also highlighted. Areas for future research included the need for: a specific focus on older people's experiences; an investigation of workforce issues; detailed examination of third sector practices, outcomes and costs; interactions with the statutory sector; and an examination of quality assurance systems and their appropriateness to third sector practice. The main implication of the findings is a need to nurture variety within the third sector in order to provide older people and other adults with the range of service

  6. Older People's Perspectives on Health, Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors

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    Leila Alizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approaches for investigating health-promoting lifestyle generally focus on physical activ­ity and regular diet. To explore the perspectives of Iranian elders regarding health, healthy eating and physical activity (PA this study was conducted in 2012. Methods: Participants in this qualitative study were selected through purposeful sampling. Ten focus groups were conducted with 60 older adults in 3 elderly centers in Tehran. A moderator’s guideline that consisted of general and specific questions was used. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysis was performed using conventional content analysis. Results: Participants explained their perspectives regarding health, healthy eating and PA in the follow­ing 5 categories: meaning of health was represented based on issues such as absence of pain and disor­der, complete body wellbeing, staying away from hazards, complete individual satisfaction, experiencing positive events, effective communication, faithfulness and trust in God. The healthy eating category was featured by adequate eating, age balanced diet, refraining from under or over nutrition and sensible consumption of fruits and vegetables. The PA was described - according to the level of performing outdoor activities or household tasks. Expressions about the perceived benefits and barriers of healthy eating and PA were aligned the two remaining categories. Conclusions: Participants have referred to the association between both PA and dietary practices and health. Understanding how older people define physical activity and nutritional behavior and recognition of the most important perceived benefits and barriers that might contribute to have a healthy eating or adequate PA profile could procure insight into the type of interventions that are required to promote healthy lifestyle among Iranian older adults.

  7. Falls amongst older people in Southeast Asia: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romli, M H; Tan, M P; Mackenzie, L; Lovarini, M; Suttanon, P; Clemson, L

    2017-04-01

    The older population in the Southeast Asian region is accelerating and is expected to surpass the proportion of the ageing population in North America and Europe in the future. This study aims to identify the research literature related to falls among older people in Southeast Asia, to examine current practice and discuss the future direction on falls prevention and interventions in the region. A scoping review design was used. A systematic literature search was conducted using the Medline, CINAHL, AMED, Ageline, PsycINFO, Web of Sciences, Scopus, Thai-Journal Citation Index, MyCite and trial registries databases. Thirty-seven studies and six study protocols were included, from Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. One-sixth of the studies involved interventions, while the remainder were observational studies. The observational studies mainly determined the falls risk factors. The intervention studies comprised multifactorial interventions and single interventions such as exercises, educational materials and visual correction. Many of the studies replicated international studies and may not have taken into account features unique to Southeast Asia. Our review has revealed studies evaluating falls and management of falls in the Southeast Asian context. More research is required from all Southeast Asian countries to prepare for the future challenges of managing falls as the population ages. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Abuse by marriage: the exploitation of mentally ill older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisah, Carmelle; Brodaty, Henry; Bridger, Marie

    2008-09-01

    (i) To raise awareness about the vulnerability of mentally ill older persons to abuse by others seeking to gain by marriage; (ii) to outline key legal cases from common law countries; and (iii) to provide guidelines for health care professionals who encounter this issue in practice. We present two cases: the first case involved an 87-year-old widower who married his carer--50 years his junior--in a religious ceremony while hypomanic. The second case involved an 82-year-old widow with moderate dementia who married her boarder, the marriage subsequently being found void in the Family Court of Australia on the basis that her consent was not real because she was incapable of understanding the nature and effect of the marriage ceremony. Abuse by marriage may be of a psychological, sexual, social or financial nature.Older people with impaired judgement and inability to appraise others due to mental illness may be persuaded to execute legal documents such as marriage certificates. Health care professionals may have a role in the identification and management of this kind of abuse. There are legal means to address this problem ranging from guardianship and financial management to family law court applications to seek a decree of nullity/invalidity of the marriage.

  9. Radiographic correlates of hallux valgus severity in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Arcangelo Paul R

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The severity of hallux valgus is easily appreciated by its clinical appearance, however x-ray measurements are also frequently used to evaluate the condition, particularly if surgery is being considered. There have been few large studies that have assessed the validity of these x-ray observations across a wide spectrum of the deformity. In addition, no studies have specifically focused on older people where the progression of the disorder has largely ceased. Therefore, this study aimed to explore relationships between relevant x-ray observations with respect to hallux valgus severity in older people. Methods This study utilised 402 x-rays of 201 participants (74 men and 127 women aged 65 to 94 years. All participants were graded using the Manchester Scale - a simple, validated system to grade the severity of hallux valgus - prior to radiographic assessment. A total of 19 hallux valgus-related x-ray observations were performed on each set of x-rays. These measurements were then correlated with the Manchester Scale scores. Results Strong, positive correlations were identified between the severity of hallux valgus and the hallux abductus angle, the proximal articular set angle, the sesamoid position and congruency of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. As hallux valgus severity increased, so did the frequency of radiographic osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and a round first metatarsal head. A strong linear relationship between increased relative length of the first metatarsal and increased severity of hallux valgus was also observed. Conclusions Strong associations are evident between the clinical appearance of hallux valgus and a number of hallux valgus-related x-ray observations indicative of structural deformity and joint degeneration. As it is unlikely that metatarsal length increases as a result of hallux valgus deformity, increased length of the first metatarsal relative to the second metatarsal may

  10. Older people's views on what they need to successfully adjust to life with a hearing aid

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Timothy B; Tolson, Debbie; Day, Tracy; McColgan, Gillian; Kroll, Thilo; Maclaren, William

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a study exploring what older people believe would enable them to adjust to and gain maximum benefit from wearing a hearing aid. A mixed methods approach was employed during 2006 involving interviews with key stakeholders, a survey across three Scottish health board areas and focus groups. Nine key stakeholders from six national and local organisations were interviewed about the needs of older people being fitted with hearing aids. In total, 240 older people belonging to t...

  11. The care of and communication with older people from the perspective of student nurses. A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar, Lena Marmstål; Holmström, Inger K; Skoglund, Karin; Meranius, Martina Summer; Sundler, Annelie J

    2017-05-01

    Undergraduate nurse education needs to prepare student nurses to meet the demands and to have the necessary communication skills for caring for an increasing older population. The challenges involve how best to support and empower student nurses to learn the communication skills needed to care for older people. The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' views on the care of and communication with older people. A descriptive study with a mixed-method approach was conducted. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire completed by third-year Swedish student nurses in 2015. The student nurses reported positive attitudes to the care of and communication with older people. The findings focus on the central aspects related to relationship building, techniques for communication and external prerequisites. Despite positive attitudes, student nurses had a limited view of communication with older people. Educators need to increase student nurses' capacity to communicate effectively with older people. Educational interventions to improve and evaluate the communication competency of nurses and student nurses are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-11-30

    Acute hospital admission provides an excellent opportunity to address poor oral health in older people, a group rarely seen by dental professionals and for who oral health activity in hospital is inconsistent and generally suboptimal. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presented the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. The second article explores clinical recommendations. A change in philosophy is needed to embed oral care as an essential component of holistic practice. More research is needed to determine the best ways to assess and treat oro-dental problems in older people, and promote and restore their oral health in hospitals. Great potential exists to innovate and develop new ways of providing care to this group. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  13. Relationship between hearing complaint and hearing loss among older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presbycusis is a public health problem. Despite its high prevalence, many elders do not have their hearing ability investigated periodically, because they do not have a specific complaint. Objective: To check whether there is a relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in elder people. Method: Transversal study in elders from a neighborhood in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul. After the definition of the neighborhood's geographic boundaries, all houses were visited, the older people's addresses were ascertained and the invitations to take part in the research were provided. A questionnaire survey was applied which had a question about hearing loss complaint and air-conducted hearing thresholds were obtained and studied. Out of the 72 identified elders 50 elders agreed to participate, 35 (70% women, and 15 (30% men. Results: It was confirmed that only 12 (24% elders showed a specific complaint of hearing loss, although 33 (66% elders showed slight, moderate, severe and profound hearing losses. Conclusion: Data analysis confirmed there was no relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in the assessed group, and demonstrated the need to forward the elders for audiological evaluation even without any specific complaint.

  14. The Importance of Trust in Successful Home Visit Programs for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike E. Muntinga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of proactive home visit programs for frail, older people might be influenced by aspects of the caregiver–receiver interaction. We conducted a naturalistic case study to explore the interactional process between a nurse and an older woman during two home visits. Using an ethics of care, we posit that a trusting relationship is pivotal for older people to accept care that is proactively offered to them. Trust can be build when nurses meet the relational needs of older people. Nurses can achieve insight in these needs by exploring older people’s value systems and life stories. We argue that a strong focus on older people’s relational needs might contribute to success of proactive home visits for frail, older people.

  15. What Do Older People Learn from Young People? Intergenerational Learning in "Day Centre" Community Settings in Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Damian

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses what motivates older people to attend "day centres" in Malta and what they believe that they derive from young people who carry out their placements at these day "centres" These young people, who are aged 16-17, attend a vocational college in Malta and are studying health and social care. The study is based…

  16. ‘He wasn’t in that chair’: what loneliness means to widowed older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Mary Bennet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have little robust empirical evidence that articulates what being lonely means to older people and even less knowledge about what loneliness means to older widows and widowers; this article addresses that deficit. We undertook a re-analysis of 125 interviews with older people (aged 55-98 that explored their experiences of widowhood. In this article, we focus on those interviews in which participants described themselves as experiencing loneliness by the spontaneous use of terms such as ‘‘lonely’’, ‘‘loneliness’’ or ‘‘lonesome’’. Almost half of the participants (42% described themselves in that way without any prompting from the interviewer. In terms of understanding and describing the meaning of loneliness, 50% explained loneliness in terms of absence of either their spouse, a physical presence in the house or people. One-third (34% discussed loneliness in relation to time and place: night, weekends and home, and 4% described the emotional impact of loneliness. Fifteen per cent just said they were lonely without elaboration, assuming a common understanding of what loneliness means. Our findings suggest that widowed people’s understanding and experience of loneliness resonates with the concept of ‘‘emotional’’ loneliness, resulting from the loss of significant social and emotional attachment. This has important implications for the types of interventions that may be appropriate for remediating loneliness in this group.

  17. Older people experiencing homelessness show marked impairment on tests of frontal lobe function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoz, Astrid; Burke, David

    2016-03-01

    Reported rates of mild and moderate cognitive impairment in older people experiencing homelessness range from 5-80%. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of cognitive impairment in older people experiencing homelessness in the inner city of Sydney, Australia. Men and women experiencing homelessness aged 45 years and over in the inner city were screened for cognitive impairment. Participants who scored 26 or below on the mini-mental state examination and/or were impaired on any one of the clock-drawing test, the verbal fluency test and the trail-making test, part B were then assessed with a semi-structured interview, including the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Screening of 144 men and 27 women aged between 45 years and 93 years identified cognitive impairment in 78%. Subsequently, high rates of mental and physical illness were identified, and 75% of subjects who were cognitively impaired performed poorly on frontal lobe tests. The trail-making test, part B was the most sensitive measure of frontal function. This study demonstrated that a large majority of older people experiencing homelessness, in the inner city of a high-income country, showed impairment on tests of frontal lobe function, a finding that could have significant implications for any medical or psychosocial intervention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Food provision for older people receiving home care from the perspectives of home-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson-Powell, Anna; Barnes, Sarah; Lovatt, Melanie; Wasielewska, Anna; Drummond, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Malnutrition is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among older people. Attention has focused on the inadequacies of food provision in institutions, yet the majority suffering from malnutrition live in the community. The aim of this study was to explore barriers and facilitators to food provision for older people receiving home care. It was a qualitative exploratory study using semi-structured interviews with nine home-care workers in June 2013 employed by independent agencies in a large city in northern England. Data were analysed thematically, based on the principles of grounded theory. Findings showed that significant time pressures limited home-care workers in their ability to socially engage with service users at mealtimes, or provide them with anything other than ready meals. Enabling choice was considered more important than providing a healthy diet, but choice was limited by food availability and reliance on families for shopping. Despite their knowledge of service users and their central role in providing food, home-care workers received little nutritional training and were not involved by healthcare professionals in the management of malnutrition. Despite the rhetoric of individual choice and importance of social engagement and nutrition for health and well-being, nutritional care has been significantly compromised by cuts to social care budgets. The potential role for home-care workers in promoting good nutrition in older people is undervalued and undermined by the lack of recognition, training and time dedicated to food-related care. This has led to a situation whereby good quality food and enjoyable mealtimes are denied to many older people on the basis that they are unaffordable luxuries rather than an integral component of fundamental care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Physical Performance Is Associated with Working Memory in Older People with Mild to Severe Cognitive Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, K. M.; Scherder, E. J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Physical performances and cognition are positively related in cognitively healthy people. The aim of this study was to examine whether physical performances are related to specific cognitive functioning in older people with mild to severe cognitive impairment. Methods. This

  20. A systematic narrative review of consumer-directed care for older people: implications for model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Goetz; Allen, Jacqui; Feldman, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Consumer-directed care is increasingly becoming a mainstream option in community-based aged care. However, a systematic review describing how the current evaluation research translates into practise has not been published to date. This review aimed to systematically establish an evidence base of user preferences for and satisfaction with services associated with consumer-directed care programmes for older people. Twelve databases were searched, including MedLine, BioMed Central, Cinahl, Expanded Academic ASAP, PsychInfo, ProQuest, Age Line, Science Direct, Social Citation Index, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Google Scholar and Google were also searched. Eligible studies were those reporting on choice, user preferences and service satisfaction outcomes regarding a programme or model of home-based care in the United States or United Kingdom. This systematic narrative review retrieved literature published from January 1992 to August 2011. A total of 277 references were identified. Of these 17 met the selection criteria and were reviewed. Findings indicate that older people report varying preferences for consumer-directed care with some demonstrating limited interest. Clients and carers reported good service satisfaction. However, research comparing user preferences across countries or investigating how ecological factors shape user preferences has received limited attention. Policy-makers and practitioners need to carefully consider the diverse contexts, needs and preferences of older adults in adopting consumer-directed care approaches in community aged care. The review calls for the development of consumer-directed care programmes offering a broad range of options that allow for personalisation and greater control over services without necessarily transferring the responsibility for administrative responsibilities to service users. Review findings suggest that consumer-directed care approaches have the potential to empower older

  1. Oral health, general health, and quality of life in older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandelman, Daniel; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the interrelationship between poor oral health conditions of older people and general health. The impact of poor oral health on quality of life (QOL) is analyzed, and the implications for public health intervention and oral health care are discussed. Findings...... from the current research may lead to the following conclusions: The available scientific evidence is particularly strong for a direct relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease; the direct relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease is less convincing. General...... and associated oral health conditions have a direct influence on elder people's QOL and lifestyle. The growing number of elderly people challenges health authorities in most countries. The evidence on oral health-general health relationships is particularly important to WHO in its effort to strengthen integrated...

  2. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Vaqas; Berg, Maayken E L van den; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events) of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (10 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013), EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36), trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture.Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria), extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living) and adverse events, including mortality. We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high risk of bias, imprecise results and likelihood of publication bias

  3. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaqas Farooqi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (10 September 2013, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8, MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013, EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36, trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living and adverse events, including mortality. MAIN RESULTS: We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high

  4. Problems experienced by older people when opening medicine packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbert, Daphne; Notenboom, Kim; Bouvy, Marcel L; van Geffen, Erica C G

    2014-06-01

    Medicine packages can cause problems in daily practice, especially among older people. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of problems experienced by older people when opening medicine packaging and to investigate how patients manage these problems. A convenience sample of 30 community pharmacies participated in this study. They selected a systematic sample of 30 patients over 65 years old with a recent omeprazole prescription, and a questionnaire was administered by telephone for at least 10 patients per pharmacy. A total of 317 patients completed the questionnaire. They received their omeprazole in a bottle (n = 179, 56.5%), push-through blister pack (n = 102, 32.2%) or peel-off blister pack (n = 36, 11.4%). Some 28.4% of all patients experienced one or more problems with opening their omeprazole packaging; most problems occurred with peel-off blisters (n = 24, 66.7% of all respondents using peel-off blisters), followed by push-through blisters (n = 34, 33.3%) and finally bottles (n = 32, 17.9%). The risk of experiencing problems with peel-off blisters and push-through blisters was higher [relative risk 3.7 (95% confidence interval 2.5-5.5) and 1.9 (1.2-2.8), respectively] than the risk of experiencing problems with opening bottles. Two-thirds of respondents reported management strategies for their problems. Most were found for problems opening bottles (n = 24, 75%), followed by push-through blisters (n = 24, 70.6%) and peel-off blisters (n = 14, 58.3%). One in four patients over 65 experienced difficulties opening their omeprazole packaging and not all of them reported a management strategy for their problems. Manufacturers are advised to pay more attention to the user-friendliness of product packaging. In addition, it is important that pharmacy staff clearly instruct patients on how to open their medicine packaging, or assist them in choosing the most appropriate packaging. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Consumer Decision-Making of Older People: A 45-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettich, Dominik; Hattula, Stefan; Bornemann, Torsten

    2017-03-15

    Aging is one of the key future challenges for global life. Of particular interest is the consumption-related decision-making of older people, as its better understanding would enable the effective influence of behavior, which would help to secure the economic well-being and ensure a better quality of life for this population. This article explores the respective literature and identifies gaps for future research. We conducted a holistic review of peer-reviewed literature that examined the decision-making of older consumers. Using a structured approach based on the consumer decision process model, we present the findings of 45 years of research (a total of 42 articles) and identify further research areas. The review reveals that the literature on older consumers' decision-making is fragmented, and that the findings are mixed. In particular, results on the role of emotions are controversial. While emotions have been shown to be better controlled by older individuals, emotions are also found to be highly influential in commercial advertisements. Similarly, the literature contains a lively debate on the relevance of price, service and store quality, and provider choice. These results call for a more holistic view of the decision-making of older consumers, and the review highlights numerous opportunities for future research. For instance, little is known about how older consumers deal with need recognition and the reasons they search for particular information. Moreover, understanding is lacking with respect to online purchase and feedback behavior. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The quality of life of older people aging in place: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanleerberghe, Patricia; De Witte, Nico; Claes, Claudia; Schalock, Robert L; Verté, Dominique

    2017-11-01

    In order to cope with the challenges that are the result of an aging population, policies and services promote keeping elders in the community and letting them age in place rather than sending them to specialized institutions. Aging in place refers to the option where people can stay in their homes as they age. This policy option, however, poses various challenges and may also threaten the quality of life of the aging. A literature review was performed on the quality of life of older people aging in place to determine whether the actual assessment of quality of life can be used within aging in place. Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts and Social Science Research Network were searched for publications on "Ag(e)ing in place" AND "Quality of life." Although assessment is crucial to a policy pursuing a good quality of life, literature reveals that it is seldom performed. Only a small part of the studies report on the assessment of quality of life, including the instruments used and the results. The findings also indicate that there is no consensus on the definition of quality of life or its domains structures. As no existing instrument assessing the quality of life of older people aging in place could be identified, such a tool should be developed, because any policy towards this growing group of people should be complemented by an evaluation.

  7. Promoting mental wellbeing among older people: technology-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anna K; Nordmyr, Johanna; Matosevic, Tihana; Park, A-La; Wahlbeck, Kristian; McDaid, David

    2017-08-30

    This systematic review explored the effectiveness of technology-based interventions in promoting the mental health and wellbeing of people aged 65 and over. Data were collected as part of a wider review commissioned by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England on the effectiveness of different actions to promote the mental wellbeing and independence of older people. All studies identified through this review were subject to a detailed critical appraisal of quality, looking at internal and external validity. Twenty-one papers covering evaluations of technological interventions were identified. They examined the psychosocial effects of technologies for education, exposure to, and/or training to use, computers and the internet, telephone/internet communication and computer gaming. Few studies took the form of randomized controlled trials, with little comparability in outcome measures, resulting in an inconsistent evidence base with moderate strength and quality. However, three out of six studies with high or moderate quality ratings (all focused on computer/internet training) reported statistically significant positive effects on psychosocial outcomes, including increased life satisfaction and experienced social support, as well as reduced depression levels among intervention recipients. The review results highlight the need for more methodologically rigorous studies evaluating the effects of technology-based interventions on mental wellbeing. Well-performed technology-based interventions to promote various aspects of mental wellbeing, as identified in this review, can serve as best practice examples in this emerging field. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Decreased serum homocysteine levels after micronutrient supplementation in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusparini Pusparini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a gradual impairment in cognitive function. The elderly also show a high prevalence of undernutrition, whereas nutrition plays an important role in the metabolism of neuronal cells and enzymes. Homocysteine is an amino acid resulting from methionine metabolism and is dependent on intake of vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and folic acid. Homocysteine is said to play a role in cognitive function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation for 6 months on serum homocysteine levels and cognitive function in older people. This study was an experimental study of pre-post test design, carried out in Mampang subdistrict, South Jakarta. A total of 94 elderly people was recruited for this study, consisting of 44 females and 50 males. Serum homocysteine level was assessed by fluorescent polarization immunoassay and cognitive function by means of the mini mental state examination (MMSE before and after micronutrient supplementation. Mean serum homocysteine concentration after supplementation decreased significantly to 14.8 ± 5.8 mmol/L, compared with mean serum homocysteine level of 15.9 ± 5.9 mmol/L before supplementation (p=0.000. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors influencing post-supplementation MMSE scores were gender (â=-0.350; p=0.000, education (â=0.510; p=0.000 and post-supplementation homocysteine levels (â=-0.201; p=0.000, while age, pre-supplementation homocysteine levels and BMI did not affect MMSE scores. Homocysteine concentration decreased significantly after 6 months of supplementation. The factors affecting post-supplementation MMSE scores were gender, level of education, and post-supplementation homocysteine level.

  9. Decreased serum homocysteine levels after micronutrient supplementation in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusparini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a gradual impairment in cognitive function. The elderly also show a high prevalence of undernutrition, whereas nutrition plays an important role in the metabolism of neuronal cells and enzymes. Homocysteine is an amino acid resulting from methionine metabolism and is dependent on intake of vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and folic acid. Homocysteine is said to play a role in cognitive function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation for 6 months on serum homocysteine levels and cognitive function in older people. This study was an experimental study of pre-post test design, carried out in Mampang subdistrict, South Jakarta. A total of 94 elderly people was recruited for this study, consisting of 44 females and 50 males. Serum homocysteine level was assessed by fluorescent polarization immunoassay and cognitive function by means of the mini mental state examination (MMSE before and after micronutrient supplementation. Mean serum homocysteine concentration after supplementation decreased significantly to 14.8 ± 5.8 mmol/L, compared with mean serum homocysteine level of 15.9 ± 5.9 mmol/L before supplementation (p=0.000. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors influencing post-supplementation MMSE scores were gender (â=-0.350; p=0.000, education (â=0.510; p=0.000 and post-supplementation homocysteine levels (â=-0.201; p=0.000, while age, pre-supplementation homocysteine levels and BMI did not affect MMSE scores. Homocysteine concentration decreased significantly after 6 months of supplementation. The factors affecting post-supplementation MMSE scores were gender, level of education, and post-supplementation homocysteine level.

  10. Mental Health and Wellbeing and Lifelong Learning for Older People. NIACE Briefing Sheet 92

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Adult Continuing Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This briefing sheet is about lifelong learning for people aged 50+ years and how participation in learning can help maintain and improve mental health and wellbeing in later life. There is no commonly agreed definition of "older" people, and clearly people age at different rates. However, by the mid 50s, for most people retirement is…

  11. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  12. Interviews on end-of-life care with older people: reflections on six european studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleschberger, S.; Seymour, J.E.; Payne, S.; Deschepper, R.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Rurup, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative research provides important insights into the experiences and perspectives of older people on end-of-life issues, but such research is methodologically and ethically complex. We offer a set of reflections from six end-of-life care studies conducted with older people in four European

  13. Barriers to Care for Depressed Older People: Perceptions of Aged Care among Medical Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya; Mellor, David; George, Kuruvilla

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated barriers to detection of depression among older people. Focus groups were conducted with 21 professional carers, 4 nurses, 10 general practitioners, and 7 aged care managers. The results demonstrated that care for older people is primarily focused on physical care. Further, staff resources, a lack of continuity of care,…

  14. Global oral health of older people--call for public health action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Kandelman, D; Arpin, S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is (1) to provide a global overview of oral health conditions in older people, use of oral health services, and self care practices; (2) to explore what types of oral health services are available to older people, and (3) to identify some major barriers to and opportunities...... for the establishment of oral health services and health promotion programmes....

  15. Motivational determinants of exergame participation for older people in assisted living facilities : Mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meekes, W.M.A.; Stanmore, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    Exergames (exercise-based videogames) for delivering strength and balance exercise for older people are growing in popularity with the emergence of new Kinect-based technologies; however, little is known about the factors affecting their uptake and usage by older people.The aim of this study was to

  16. Exploring the Housing Needs of Older People in Standard and Sheltered Social Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Siobhan; Kenny, Lorna; Day, Mary Rose; O'Connell, Cathal; Finnerty, Joe; Timmons, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Our home can have a major impact on our physical and mental health; this is particularly true for older people who may spend more time at home. Older people in social (i.e., public) housing are particularly vulnerable. Housing options for older people in social housing include standard design dwellings or specially designed "sheltered housing." The most suitable housing model should be identified, with older people consulted in this process. Method: Survey of older people (aged ≥60) living in standard or sheltered social housing. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS Version 22. Results: Overall, 380 surveys were returned (response rate = 47.2%). All older people had similar housing needs. Those in sheltered housing were more satisfied with the physical home design and reported more positive outcomes. Older people in standard housing were less likely to have necessary adaptations to facilitate aging-in-place. Discussion: Older people in standard housing reported more disability/illnesses, are worried about the future, and felt less safe at home. However, few wanted to move, and very few viewed sheltered housing as an alternative, suggesting limited knowledge about their housing options. Future social housing designs should be flexible, that is, adaptable to the needs of the tenants over time.

  17. Associations of Various Health-Ratings with Geriatric Giants, Mortality and Life Satisfaction in Older People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Westendorp, Rudi J.

    2016-01-01

    Self-rated health is routinely used in research and practise among general populations. Older people, however, seem to change their health perceptions. To accurately understand these changed perceptions we therefore need to study the correlates of older people's self-ratings. We examined self-rated,

  18. Older people who are 'weary of life': their expectations for the future and perceived hopelessness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, M.L.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    Older people who are 'weary of life': their expectations for the future and perceived hopelessness There has been a debate for over a decade in the Netherlands about whether physicians should be allowed to provide assistance with suicide to older people who are 'weary of life'. Actual knowledge

  19. Treasures from from nature in the Netherlands - Accessible and motivating horticultural activities for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Hans Schuman

    2009-01-01

    Stichting Natuurlijk Genieten is a Dutch foundation, founded by Jeannette Bolck, and dedicated to stimulating the development of a more natural living environment for older people living permanently in residential care centres. Many older people, in particular with Alzheimer's, are dependent on

  20. Psychosocial Issues in Engaging Older People with Physical Activity Interventions for the Prevention of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the psychosocial factors that influence older people's participation in physical activity interventions to prevent falls. The importance of psychosocial factors is stressed inasmuch as interventions will be rendered useless if they do not successfully gain the active participation of older people. The theory of…

  1. Self-worth therapy used to help older people manage depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-05

    Depression is very common in older people in western countries. It can be treated with anti-depressants but the safety of drug therapy in older people is questionable due to age-related changes in the way drugs are stored and eliminated by the body.

  2. Ethnic differences in attitudes and bias toward older people comparing White and Asian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Shin

    2015-03-01

    To identify attitudes and bias toward aging between Asian and White students and identify factors affecting attitudes toward aging. A cross-sectional sample of 308 students in a nursing program completed the measure of Attitudes Toward Older People and Aging Quiz electronically. There were no differences in positive attitudes and pro-aged bias between Asian and White groups, but Asian students had significantly more negative attitudes and anti-aged bias toward older people than White students. Multiple regression analysis showed ethnicity/race was the strongest variable to explain negative attitudes toward older people. Feeling uneasy about talking to older adults was the most significant factor to explain all attitudinal concepts. Asian students were uneasy about talking with older people and had negative attitudes toward older adults. To become competent in cross-cultural care and communication in nursing, educational strategies to reduce negative attitudes on aging are necessary. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Velde (Nathalie); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. Method and

  4. Subjective physical and cognitive age among community-dwelling older people aged 75 years and older: differences with chronological age and its associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihira, Hikaru; Furuna, Taketo; Mizumoto, Atsushi; Makino, Keitaro; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the associations between self-reported subjective physical and cognitive age, and actual physical and cognitive functions among community-dwelling older people aged 75 years and older. The sample comprised 275 older adults aged 75-91 years. Two questions were asked regarding subjective age: 'How old do you feel physically?' and 'How old do you feel cognitively?' To assess physical functions, we measured handgrip strength, knee extension strength, standing balance and walking speed. Tests of attention, executive function, processing speed and memory were performed to assess actual cognitive function. Subjective physical and cognitive age was associated with performance on all of the physical and cognitive tests, respectively (p older adults who reported themselves as feeling older than their chronological age had a slower walking speed and lower scores for word-list memory recall than those who did not report themselves as feeling older than their actual age. These findings suggest that promoting a fast walking speed and good memory function may help to maintain a younger subjective physical and cognitive age in older adults aged 75 years and older.

  5. Social Inequality and Visual Impairment in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillans, Jennifer; Nazroo, James

    2018-03-02

    Visual impairment is the leading cause of age-related disability, but the social patterning of loss of vision in older people has received little attention. This study's objective was to assess the association between social position and onset of visual impairment, to empirically evidence health inequalities in later life. Visual impairment was measured in 2 ways: self-reporting fair vision or worse (moderate) and self-reporting poor vision or blindness (severe). Correspondingly, 2 samples were drawn from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA). First, 7,483 respondents who had good vision or better at Wave 1; second, 8,487 respondents who had fair vision or better at Wave 1. Survival techniques were used. Cox proportional hazards models showed wealth and subjective social status (SSS) were significant risk factors associated with the onset of visual impairment. The risk of onset of moderate visual impairment was significantly higher for the lowest and second lowest wealth quintiles, whereas the risk of onset of severe visual impairment was significantly higher for the lowest, second, and even middle wealth quintiles, compared with the highest wealth quintile. Independently, lower SSS was associated with increased risk of onset of visual impairment (both measures), particularly so for those placing themselves on the lowest rungs of the social ladder. The high costs of visual impairment are disproportionately felt by the worst off elderly. Both low wealth and low SSS significantly increase the risk of onset of visual impairment.

  6. An Algorithm for Neuropathic Pain Management in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Gisèle; Marcoux, Margaux; Chapiro, Sylvie; David, Laurence; Rat, Patrice; Michel, Micheline; Bertrand, Isabelle; Voute, Marion; Wary, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain frequently affects older people, who generally also have several comorbidities. Elderly patients are often poly-medicated, which increases the risk of drug-drug interactions. These patients, especially those with cognitive problems, may also have restricted communication skills, making pain evaluation difficult and pain treatment challenging. Clinicians and other healthcare providers need a decisional algorithm to optimize the recognition and management of neuropathic pain. We present a decisional algorithm developed by a multidisciplinary group of experts, which focuses on pain assessment and therapeutic options for the management of neuropathic pain, particularly in the elderly. The algorithm involves four main steps: (1) detection, (2) evaluation, (3) treatment, and (4) re-evaluation. The detection of neuropathic pain is an essential step in ensuring successful management. The extent of the impact of the neuropathic pain is then assessed, generally with self-report scales, except in patients with communication difficulties who can be assessed using behavioral scales. The management of neuropathic pain frequently requires combination treatments, and recommended treatments should be prescribed with caution in these elderly patients, taking into consideration their comorbidities and potential drug-drug interactions and adverse events. This algorithm can be used in the management of neuropathic pain in the elderly to ensure timely and adequate treatment by a multidisciplinary team.

  7. PHR in Health and Social Care for Older People--Regional Development through Learning within and across Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämgård, Margareta; Forsgren, Annika; Avery, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The study draws on findings from a series of seven participatory action research projects in community care for older people carried out over a period of eight years in 20 municipalities in southern Sweden. The analysis here looks at social impact across administrative levels and geographical scales. Different professional groups and care workers…

  8. Food hygiene challenges in older people: Intergenerational learning as a health asset

    OpenAIRE

    Wythe, H.; Wilkinson, C.; Orme, J.; Meredith, L.; Weitkamp, E.

    2013-01-01

    Older people are more at risk of contracting foodborne infections, however the majority remain well despite the physical, social and cognitive challenges of older age. Future healthcare strategies targeting older people can be informed by exploring the food history and current context of their lives and what 'assets' they employ to successfully consume ‘safe’ food in the home. Phase I: Socio-demographic, health and asset related data collection through a researcher completed questionnaire i) ...

  9. Registered nurses' and older people's experiences of participation in nutritional care in nursing homes: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren Forss, Katarina; Nilsson, Jane; Borglin, Gunilla

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation and treatment of older people's nutritional care is generally viewed as a low priority by nurses. However, given that eating and drinking are fundamental human activities, the support and enhancement of an optimal nutritional status should be regarded as a vital part of nursing. Registered nurses must therefore be viewed as having an important role in assessing and evaluating the nutritional needs of older people as well as the ability to intervene in cases of malnutrition. This study aimed to illuminate the experience of participating in nutritional care from the perspectives of older people and registered nurses. A further aim is to illuminate the latter's experience of nutritional care per se. A qualitative, descriptive design was adopted. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews ( n  = 12) with eight registered nurses and four older persons (mean age 85.7 years) in a city in the southern part of Sweden. The subsequent analysis was conducted by content analysis. The analysis reflected three themes: 'participation in nutritional care equals information', 'nutritional care out of remit and competence' and 'nutritional care more than just choosing a flavour'. They were interpreted to illuminate the experience of participation in nutritional care from the perspective of older people and RNs, and the latter's experience of nutritional care in particular per se. Our findings indicate that a paternalistic attitude in care as well as asymmetry in the nurse-patient relationship are still common characteristics of modern clinical nursing practice for older people. Considering that participation should be central to nursing care, and despite the RN's awareness of the importance of involving the older persons in their nutritional care this was not reflected in reality. Strategies to involve older persons in their nutritional care in a nursing home context need to take into account that for this population participation might not always be

  10. Symptoms of anxiety or depression and risk of fracture in older people: the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R; Dennison, Elaine M; Edwards, Mark; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of fracture in older people. Results showed that men, but not women, with probable anxiety at baseline had an increased risk of fracture. The use of psychotropic drugs has been linked with an increased risk of fracture in older people, but there are indications that the conditions for which these drugs were prescribed may themselves influence fracture risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of fracture in older people. The study design is a prospective cohort study. One thousand eighty-seven men and 1,050 women aged 59-73 years completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on incident fracture during an average follow-up period of 5.6 years were collected through interview and a postal questionnaire. Compared to men with no or few symptoms of anxiety (score ≤7 on the HADS anxiety subscale), men with probable anxiety (score ≥11) had an increased risk of fracture: After adjustment for age and potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (OR) (95 % confidence interval) was 4.03 (1.55, 10.5). There were no associations between levels of anxiety and fracture risk in women. Few men or women had probable depression at baseline (score ≥11 on the HADS depression subscale). Amongst men with possible depression (score 8-10), there was an increased risk of fracture that was of borderline significance: multivariate-adjusted OR 3.57 (0.99, 12.9). There was no association between possible depression and fracture risk in women. High levels of anxiety in older men may increase their risk of fracture. Future research needs to replicate this finding in other populations and investigate the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Being in a Bubble: the experience of loneliness among frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Elin; Jakobsson, Ulf; Midlöv, Patrik; Kristensson, Jimmie

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of loneliness among frail older people living at home. Loneliness is a threat to the physical and psychological well-being with serious consequences if left unattended. There are associations between frailty and poor psychological well-being, implying that frail older people who experience loneliness are vulnerable. Qualitative content analysis, focusing on both latent and manifest content. Frail older people (65+ years), living at home and who have experienced various levels in intensity of loneliness, were purposively selected from a larger interventional study (N = 12). For this study, 'frail' means being dependent in activities of daily life and having repeated contacts with healthcare services. Data were collected between December 2009-August 2011. Semi-structured interviews were performed, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis resulted in the overall theme 'Being in a Bubble', which illustrates an experience of living in an ongoing world, but excluded because of the participants' social surroundings and the impossibility to regain losses. The theme 'Barriers' was interpreted as facing physical, psychological and social barriers for overcoming loneliness. The theme 'Hopelessness' reveals the experience when not succeeding in overcoming these barriers, including seeing loneliness as a constant state. A positive co-existing dimension of loneliness, offering independence, was reflected in the theme 'Freedom'. The findings suggest that future strategies for intervening should target the frail older persons' individual barriers and promoting the positive co-existing dimension of loneliness. When caring, a person centred approach, encompassing knowledge regarding physical and psychological aspects, including loneliness, is recommended. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Use of a screening tool and primary health care gerontology nurse specialist for high-needs older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna; Boyd, Michal; Dagley, Lynelle

    2017-02-01

    To describe implementation of an innovative gerontology nurse specialist role within one primary health organisation in Auckland, New Zealand. Quantitative outcomes of the screening tool as well as the nurse specialist assessment will be presented. The intervention involved use of the Brief Risk Identification for Geriatric Health Tool (BRIGHT) to identify high-needs older people with subsequent comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed by the gerontology nurse specialist. A total 384 of the 416 BRIGHTs were completed (92% response rate) and 15% of these were identified as high risk (n = 57). The BRIGHTs for high-risk older people revealed the highest scoring question was 'needing help with housework' (26%). The most frequent intervention by the gerontology nurse specialist was education (30%). The primary health care gerontology nurse specialist model delivers a proactive case finding and specialist gerontology intervention for older people at high risk of functional or health decline.

  13. Active Life Expectancy and Functional Health Transition among Filipino Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace T. Cruz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study provides a baseline information on the functional health transition patterns of older people and computes for the Active Life Expectancy (ALE using a multistate life table method. Findings on ALE demonstrate that females and urban residents live longer and have a greater proportion of their remaining life in active state compared to their counterparts. Health transition analysis indicates a significant proportion experiencing recovery. Age, sex, place of residence and health status/behavior indicators (self-assessed health, drinking and exercise display a significant influence on future health and mortality trajectories although surprisingly, education did not show any significant effect.

  14. Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place: older people's experiences of life close to death in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlind, Jane; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Hansebo, Görel; Hellström, Ingrid

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of how older persons living in a nursing home experience life close to death. A move to and a life in a nursing home while being close to death is a reality for many older people in Sweden. Being able to express thoughts and feelings about death has been described as both crucial for sustaining personhood as well as for establishing a meaningful existence at the end of life. Important are the experiences of older people living in nursing homes who are approaching death. Six older people were interviewed on one to four occasions. A total of 16 interviews were conducted with the participants. An interpretative approach was chosen. The main interpretation, Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place, is based on three themes (i) Waiting for death, with the subthemes death as a release and thinking of oneself as dead; (ii) Subordinate oneself to values and norms of the staff, with the subthemes feeling offended and feeling trapped; and (iii) Keep the courage up. The older people's lives were characterised by feelings of aloneness in an unfamiliar place which contributed to a sense of existential loneliness. They experienced few opportunities to discuss their thoughts of life and death, including preparations for passing away. It is of importance for professionals to be able to meet older people as they are and respect them as human beings in their transitions, before, during and after the move to a nursing home. It is important to find ways to support older people's wellbeing and identity near death. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Patient, resident, or person: Recognition and the continuity of self in long-term care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Jari; Pietilä, Ilkka

    2015-12-01

    Becoming a resident in a long-term care facility challenges older people's continuity of self in two major ways. Firstly, as they leave behind their previous home, neighborhood, and often their social surroundings, older people have to change their life-long lifestyles, causing fears of the loss of one's self. Secondly, modern-day care facilities have some features of 'total' institutions that produce patient-like role expectations and thus challenge older people's selves. Our ethnographic study in a geriatric hospital and a sheltered home in Finland aims to find out what features of daily life either support or challenge older people's continuity of self. A philosophical reading of the concept of recognition is used to explore how various daily practices and interactions support recognizing people as persons in long-term care. Categories of institution-centered and person-centered features are described to illustrate multiple ways in which people are recognized and misrecognized. The discussion highlights some ways in which long-term care providers could use the results of the study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-10-31

    The oral health of older people in acute hospitals has rarely been studied. Hospital admission provides a prime opportunity for identification and rectification of problems, and oral health promotion. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presents the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. Searches of electronic databases and the websites of relevant professional health service bodies in the UK were undertaken to identify articles and guidelines. The literature shows a high prevalence of oro-dental disease in this population, with many known detrimental effects, combined with suboptimal oral hygiene and mouth care provision in acute hospitals. Several guidelines exist, although the emphasis on oral health is weaker than other aspects of hospital care. Older adults admitted to acute hospitals have a high burden of oro-dental disease and oral and mouth care needs, but care provision tends to be suboptimal. The literature is growing, but this area is still relatively neglected. Great potential exists to develop oral and mouth care in this context. The second part of this article explores clinical recommendations. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  17. Older peoples experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanzadeh Vahid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The decision to relocate to an aged care home can is important change in older adults live but little attention has been paid to their experiences of this decision. The study explored older people’s experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home. Data were obtained via semi-structured interviews with 17 participants, which were content analyzed. Results: Transition motives, ambiguity, participation in decision making and decision making meaning were four themes extracted through data analysis. Conclusions: In the main, the decision to transition to an aged care home had been made without the older person’s participation. In addition, due to inadequate information about aged care home services, participants experienced a great deal of ambiguity in the decision-making process. Moreover, transition into aged care homes had different meaning for the participants. The findings suggest that far greater emphasis must be placed on having older people involved in the decision to move into residential aged care, providing them with more information about service offerings and making psychological support accessible to them prior to and following transition to the home

  18. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of neglect of older people in Mexico: A qualitative secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Billy A; Bub, Linda; Negrete, Maria Isabel; Giraldo Rodríguez, Liliana; Squires, Allison P

    2018-03-01

    To describe healthcare professionals' perceptions of neglect of older people in Mexico. Mistreatment of older people, particularly neglect, has emerged as a significant public health concern worldwide. However, few studies have been conducted to examine neglect of older people in low- and middle-income countries. Most research has focused on estimating the prevalence of neglect in older populations with little emphasis on the perceptions of healthcare professionals and their role in addressing neglect of older people. Qualitative secondary analysis. The parent study consisted of nine focus groups conducted with healthcare professionals at five public hospitals in Mexico. The purpose of the parent study was to perform a needs assessment to determine the feasibility of adapting the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders programme to Mexico. A qualitative secondary analysis with directed content analysis approach was used to extract data related to neglect of older people. A total of 89 participants representing healthcare professionals from several disciplines were interviewed. Three themes emerged: (i) The main point is not here; (ii) We feel hopeless; and (iii) We need preparation. Participants reported distress and hopelessness related to neglect of older people. Lack of community-based resources was noted as contributing to neglect. Increased education regarding care of older people for both caregivers and healthcare professionals and greater interdisciplinary collaboration were identified as potential solutions to combat neglect. Community-based services and resource allocation need to be re-evaluated to improve the care of older Mexicans. Interdisciplinary models of care should be developed to address concerns related to neglect of older people. Neglect negatively impacts healthcare professionals' ability to adequately care for older patients. There is a need to invest in community-based services and models of care to address these concerns. © 2017

  19. The Cultural Value of Older People's Experiences of Theater-making: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Miriam; Rickett, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Although a number of existing reviews document the health and social benefits of arts participation by older people, there are none which focus specifically on theater and drama. This article presents the findings of a study conducted as part of the UK's Arts and Humanities Research Council "Cultural Value Project." The 2-year (2013-2015) "Cultural Value Project" sought to make a major contribution to how we think about the value of arts and culture to individuals and to society. It made 72 awards: 19 critical reviews of existing bodies of research, 46 research development awards to carry out new research, and 7 expert workshop awards to facilitate discussions among academics and practitioners. Together, these awards explored the components of cultural value and the ways in which cultural value is evidenced and evaluated. Following an extensive search of academic databases and E-mail requests via relevant organizations and networks, 77 publications formed the basis for our own critical review. Our findings highlight the benefits and value of older people's theater and drama participation on health and well-being, group relationships, learning and creativity, and draw attention to the importance of the esthetic value and quality of older people's drama. Despite the recent surge of interest in this field (a third of the reviewed literature was published between 2010 and 2014), we suggest that there are multiple areas for further research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Yvonne M; Koenen, Julia M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van Dijk-van Dijk, D J Annemarie; van der Weele, Gerda M; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Reis, Ria; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2012-11-01

    Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Qualitative study comprising six focus groups with GPs in the Netherlands. The focus-group discussions with 37 GPs were analysed using the framework analysis method. Whether or not to implement preventive care for older people depends on the patient's individual level of vitality, as perceived by the GP. For older people with a high level of vitality, GPs confine their role to standardised disease-oriented prevention on a patient's request; when the vitality levels in older people fall, the scope of preventive care shifts from prevention of disease to prevention of functional decline. For older, vulnerable people, GPs expect most benefit from a proactive, individualised approach, enabling them to live as independently as possible. Based on these perspectives, a conceptual model for preventive care was developed, which describes GPs' different perspectives toward older people who are vulnerable and those with high levels of vitality. It focuses on five main dimensions: aim of care (prevention of disease versus prevention of functional decline), concept of care (disease model versus functional model), initiator (older persons themselves versus GP), target groups (people with requests versus specified risk groups), and content of preventive care (mainly cardiovascular risk management versus functional decline). GPs' perspectives on preventive care are determined by their perception of the level of vitality of their older patients. Preventive care for older people with high levels of vitality may consist of a standardised disease-oriented approach; those who are vulnerable will need an individualised approach to prevent functional decline.

  1. What Do People Find Incompatible With Causal Determinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Adam; Knobe, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    Four studies explored people's judgments about whether particular types of behavior are compatible with determinism. Participants read a passage describing a deterministic universe, in which everything that happens is fully caused by whatever happened before it. They then assessed the degree to which different behaviors were possible in such a universe. Other participants evaluated the extent to which each of these behaviors had various features (e.g., requiring reasoning). We assessed the extent to which these features predicted judgments about whether the behaviors were possible in a deterministic universe. Experiments 1 and 2 found that people's judgments about whether a behavior was compatible with determinism were not predicted by their judgments about whether that behavior relies on physical processes in the brain and body, is uniquely human, is unpredictable, or involves reasoning. Experiment 3, however, found that a distinction between what we call "active" and "passive" behaviors can explain people's judgments. Experiment 4 extended these findings, showing that we can measure this distinction in several ways and that it is robustly predicted by two different cues. Taken together, these results suggest that people carve up mentally guided behavior into two distinct types-understanding one type to be compatible with determinism, but another type to be fundamentally incompatible with determinism. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  2. Multi-professional communication for older people in transitional care: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Ottmann, Goetz; Roberts, Gail

    2013-12-01

    To synthesise research-reporting literature about multi-professional communication between health and social care professionals within transitional care for older people, with particular attention on outcomes, enabling contextual factors and constraints. Older adults experience high rates of morbidity and health care usage, and frequently transit between health services, and community and social care providers. These transition episodes place elders at increased risk of adverse incidents due to poor communication of information. Integrated multi-professional models of care built on enhanced communication have been widely promoted as a strategy to improve transitional care for older people. However, a range of findings exist in the literature to guide service providers and researchers. Comprehensive literature search and review strategies were employed to identify, describe and synthesise relevant studies. Ten databases were searched in addition to Google Scholar. Specified discharge worker roles, multi-professional care coordination teams, and information technology systems promote better service satisfaction and subjective quality of life for older people when compared with standard hospital discharge. Improved multi-professional communication reduces rates of re-admission and length of stay indicating greater cost effectiveness and efficiency for the health and social care systems. Systems of care emphasizing information exchange, education and negotiation between stakeholders facilitate communication in transitional care contexts for older adults. Conversely, lack of dialogue and lack of understanding of others' roles are barriers to communication in transitional care. Enhanced multi-professional communication, transitional pathways, and role clarity are required to improve the quality, sustainability and responsiveness of aged care into the future. Recommendations for further research include: (i) Investigation of pathways promoting person-centred care planning

  3. The effect of testosterone and a nutritional supplement on hospital admissions in under-nourished, older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Ian D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss and under-nutrition are relatively common in older people, and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of 49 undernourished older, community dwelling people we found that daily treatment for one year with a combination of testosterone tablets and a nutritional supplement produced a significant reduction in hospitalizations. We propose a larger, multicentre study to explore and hopefully confirm this exciting, potentially important finding (NHMRC project grant number 627178. Methods/Design One year randomized control trial where subjects are allocated to either oral testosterone undecanoate and high calorie oral nutritional supplement or placebo medication and low calorie oral nutritional supplementation. 200 older community-dwelling, undernourished people [Mini Nutritional Assessment score 2: 7.5% over 3 months]. Hospital admissions, quality-adjusted life years, functional status, nutritional health, muscle strength, body composition and other variables will be assessed. Discussion The pilot study showed that combined treatment with an oral testosterone and a supplement drink was well tolerated and safe, and reduced the number of people hospitalised and duration of hospital admissions in undernourished, community dwelling older people. This is an exciting finding, as it identifies a treatment which may be of substantial benefit to many older people in our community. We now propose to conduct a multi-centre study to test these findings in a substantially larger subject group, and to determine the cost effectiveness of this treatment. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN 12610000356066

  4. Depression among older people in Sri Lanka: With special reference to ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaltar, Amartuvshin; Priyadarshani, Neelawala Gw; Delpitiya, Nisansala Y; Jayasinghe, Chandrika; Jayasinghe, Ananda; Arai, Asuna; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2017-12-01

    To ascertain if the factors associated with depression differ among ethnic groups in community-dwelling older people in Kandy District, Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional survey was carried out of people aged ≥60 years living in a single divisional secretariat of Kandy District. The participants were asked about ethnicity (Sinhalese, Tamil and Muslim), sociodemographic characteristics and depression status by face-to-face interviews with a structured questionnaire. Depression was measured by the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and the total score of ≥6 was considered as depression. The χ 2 -test and multivariate logistic regression with two-way interaction terms between sociodemographic characteristics and ethnicity were carried out. Participants (n = 778) consisted of 56.6% Sinhalese, 22.1% Tamils and 21.3% Muslims. Of the participants, the prevalence of depression was 31.8% (27.3% in Sinhalese, 42.1% in Tamils and 32.9% in Muslims). Multivariate analyses showed that there were no significant interactions between sociodemographic characteristics and ethnicity. However, low economic status, low perceived social support and more than two self-reported diseases were significantly associated with depression in all ethnic groups. Some factors were found to be significantly associated with depression, but did not differ among ethnic groups. The findings would help practitioners to identify older people with a high risk of depression, and to intervene in its development or exacerbation. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2414-2420. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Challenges to conducting research with older people living in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginson Irene J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although older people are increasingly cared for in nursing homes towards the end of life, there is a dearth of research exploring the views of residents. There are however, a number of challenges and methodological issues involved in doing this. The aim of this paper is to discuss some of these, along with residents' views on taking part in a study of the perceptions of dignity of older people in care homes and make recommendations for future research in these settings. Methods Qualitative interviews were used to obtain the views on maintaining dignity of 18 people aged 75 years and over, living in two private nursing homes in South East London. Detailed field notes on experiences of recruiting and interviewing participants were kept. Results Challenges included taking informed consent (completing reply slips and having a 'reasonable' understanding of their participation; finding opportunities to conduct interviews; involvement of care home staff and residents' families and trying to maintain privacy during the interviews. Most residents were positive about their participation in the study, however, five had concerns either before or during their interviews. Although 15 residents seemed to feel free to air their views, three seemed reluctant to express their opinions on their care in the home. Conclusion Although we experienced many challenges to conducting this study, they were not insurmountable, and once overcome, allowed this often unheard vulnerable group to express their views, with potential long-term benefits for future delivery of care.

  6. Neuropsychological functioning in older people with type 2 diabetes: the effect of controlling for confounding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulou, K G; Hampson, S E; Morrish, N J

    2002-04-01

    Neuropsychological functioning was examined in a group of 33 older (mean age 62.40 +/- 9.62 years) people with Type 2 diabetes (Group 1) and 33 non-diabetic participants matched with Group 1 on age, sex, premorbid intelligence and presence of hypertension and cardio/cerebrovascular conditions (Group 2). Data statistically corrected for confounding factors obtained from the diabetic group were compared with the matched control group. The results suggested small cognitive deficits in diabetic people's verbal memory and mental flexibility (Logical Memory A and SS7). No differences were seen between the two samples in simple and complex visuomotor attention, sustained complex visual attention, attention efficiency, mental double tracking, implicit memory, and self-reported memory problems. These findings indicate minimal cognitive impairment in relatively uncomplicated Type 2 diabetes and demonstrate the importance of control and matching for confounding factors.

  7. Computer-Based Training Programs for Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment and/or Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Klimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, due to the demographic trends, the number of aging population groups is dramatically rising, especially in developed countries. This trend causes serious economic and social issues, but also an increase of aging disorders such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI or dementia in older population groups. MCI and dementia are connected with deterioration of cognitive functions. The aim of this mini review article is therefore to explore whether computer-based training programs might be an effective intervention tool for older people with MCI and/or dementia or not. The methods include a literature search in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, MEDLINE and Springer, and consequently, evaluation of the findings of the relevant studies. The findings from the selected studies are quite neutral with respect to the efficacy of the computer assisted intervention programs on the improvement of basic cognitive functions. On the one hand, they suggest that the computer-based training interventions might generate some positive effects on patients with MCI and/or dementia, such as the improvement of learning and short-term memory, as well as behavioral symptoms. On the other hand, these training interventions seem to be short-term, with small sample sizes and their efficacy was proved only in the half of the detected studies. Therefore more longitudinal randomized controlled trials (RCTs are needed to prove the efficacy of the computer-based training programs among older individuals with MCI and/or dementia.

  8. The effect of gender on foot anthropometrics in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva de Castro, Alessandra; Rebelatto, Jose Rubens; Aurichio, Thais Rabiatti

    2011-08-01

    Some questions remain regarding the anthropometric differences between the feet of young men and women, but the gap is much greater when dealing with older adults. No studies were found concerning these differences in an exclusively older adult population, which makes it difficult to manufacture shoes based on the specific anthropometric measurements of the older adult population and according to gender differences. To identify differences between the anthropometric foot variables of older men and women. Cross-sectional. 154 older women (69.0 ± 6.8 y) and 131 older men (69.0 ± 6.5 y). The foot evaluations comprised the variables of width, perimeter, height, length, 1st and 5th metatarsophalangeal angles, the Arch Index (AI), and the Foot Posture Index (FPI). A data analysis was performed using t test and a post hoc power analysis. Women showed significantly higher values for the width and perimeter of the toes, width of the metatarsal heads, and width of the heel and presented significantly lower values for the height of the dorsal foot after normalization of the data to foot length. The 1st and 5th metatarsophalangeal angles were smaller in the men. There were no differences between men and women with respect to AI and FPI. Overall, the current study shows evidence of differences between some of the anthropometric foot variables of older men and women that must be taken into account for the manufacture of shoes for older adults.

  9. Getting help quickly: older people and community worker perspectives of contingency planning for falls management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Kimberly; Murray, Carolyn M; Kumar, Saravana

    2018-01-01

    Older people living in the community need to plan for getting help quickly if they have a fall. In this paper planning for falls is referred to as contingency planning and is not a falls prevention strategy but rather a falls management strategy. This research explored the perspectives of older people and community workers (CWs) about contingency planning for a fall. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, participants were recruited through a community agency that supports older people. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven older people (67-89 years of age) and a focus group was held with seven workers of mixed disciplines from the same agency. Older people who hadn't fallen were included but were assumed to be at risk of falls because they were in receipt of services. Thematic analysis and concept mapping combined the data from the two participant groups. Four themes including preconceptions about planning ahead for falling, a fall changes perception, giving, and receiving advice about contingency plans and what to do about falling. Both CWs and older people agree contingency planning requires understanding of individual identity and circumstances. CWs have limited knowledge about contingency planning and may be directive, informative, or conservative. Implications for Rehabilitation Falls can result in serious consequences for older people. There is an evidence-practice gap as availability of and access to contingency planning does not necessarily mean older people will use it in a falls emergency. Older people prefer community workers to be directive or informative about contingency planning options but they do want choice and control. Increased community workers knowledge of, and collaborative decision-making about, contingency planning may promote patient-centered services and assist in closing the evidence-practice gap.

  10. Different Perceptions of Time Passage Among Older People: A Comparative Study in Terms of Age and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Nazari

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Research findings indicate that age affects time perception so that perceived time in the elderly people is shorter than the real physical time. Our findings also showed that if sources pay less attention to the passage of time or the memory capacity declines, the time estimation will be less. Based on cognitive changes in old age, the cognitive abilities of older people were found to decrease with increasing age. As the accurate processing of time intervals relates to memory capacity and attention, the changes in any cognitive process could affect the differences in the perception of time. Probably due to these factors, the reproduction of time in the older people shortens.

  11. Barriers faced by healthcare professionals when managing falls in older people in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Annaletchumy; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Tan, Maw Pin; Low, Wah Yun

    2015-11-05

    To explore the barriers faced by healthcare professionals (HCPs) in managing falls among older people (aged above 60 years) who have a high risk of falling. The study used a qualitative methodology, comprising 10 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions. A semistructured topic guide was used to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked for accuracy. Data were analysed thematically using WeftQDA software. 20 HCPs who managed falls in older people. This study was conducted at the Primary Care Clinic in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia. Four categories of barriers emerged-these were related to perceived barriers for older people, HCPs' barriers, lack of caregiver support and healthcare system barriers. HCPs perceived that older people normalised falls, felt stigmatised, were fatalistic, as well as in denial regarding falls-related advice. HCPs themselves trivialised falls and lacked the skills to manage falls. Rehabilitation was impeded by premature decisions to admit older people to nursing homes. Lastly, there was a lack of healthcare providers as well as a dearth of fall education and training on fall prevention for HCPs. This study identified barriers that explain poor fall management in older people with a high risk of falls. The lack of structured fall prevention guidelines and insufficient training in fall management made HCPs unable to advise patients on how to prevent falls. The findings of this study warrant evidence-based structured fall prevention intervention targeted to patients as well as to HCPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Health and functional status among older people with HIV/AIDS in Uganda

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    Scholten Francien

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the health and functional status of older people who either themselves are HIV infected or are affected by HIV and AIDS in the family. This aim of this study was to describe health among older people in association with the HIV epidemic. Methods The cross-sectional survey consisted of 510 participants aged 50 years and older, equally divided into five study groups including; 1 HIV infected and on antiretroviral therapy (ART for at least 1 year; 2 HIV infected and not yet eligible for ART; 3 older people who had lost a child due to HIV/AIDS; 4 older people who have an adult child with HIV/AIDS; 5 older people not known to be infected or affected by HIV in the family. The participants were randomly selected from ongoing studies in a rural and peri-urban area in Uganda. Data were collected using a WHO standard questionnaire and performance tests. Eight indicators of health and functioning were examined in an age-adjusted bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results In total, 198 men and 312 women participated. The overall mean age was 65.8 and 64.5 years for men and women respectively. Men had better self-reported health and functional status than women, as well as lower self-reported prevalence of chronic diseases. In general, health problems were common: 35% of respondents were diagnosed with at least one of the five chronic conditions, including 15% with depression, based on algorithms; 31% of men and 35% of women had measured hypertension; 25% of men and 21% of women had poor vision test results. HIV-positive older people, irrespective of being on ART, and HIV-negative older people in the other study groups had very similar results for most health status and functioning indicators. The main difference was a significantly lower BMI among HIV-infected older people. Conclusion The systematic exploration of health and well being among older people, using eight self-reported and

  13. Older people with mild cognitive impairment -- their views about assessing driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David A; Frank, Oliver; Pond, Dimity; Stocks, Nigel

    2013-05-01

    Driving is important for older people to maintain agency, independence and social connectedness. Little research has been conducted into the views of older people with mild cognitive impairment about who decides if they are safe to drive. This qualitative study investigates the views of older people with mild cognitive impairment about decision making on driving cessation. Participants value their agency; they wanted to decide when they should stop driving themselves. However, they were also prepared to accept their general practitioner's advice when they became unfit to drive. In the interim, they self regulated the timing and distance of their driving to reduce accident risk.

  14. Improving early detection initiatives: a qualitative study exploring perspectives of older people and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lette, Manon; Stoop, Annerieke; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Buist, Yvette; Baan, Caroline A; de Bruin, Simone R

    2017-06-23

    A wide range of initiatives on early detection and intervention have been developed to proactively identify problems related to health and wellbeing in (frail) older people, with the aim of supporting them to live independently for as long as possible. Nevertheless, it remains unclear what the best way is to design such initiatives and how older people's needs and preferences can be best addressed. This study aimed to address this gap in the literature by exploring: 1) older people's perspectives on health and living environment in relation to living independently at home; 2) older people's needs and preferences in relation to initiating and receiving care and support; and 3) professionals' views on what would be necessary to enable the alignment of early detection initiatives with older people's own needs and preferences. In this qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 older people and 19 professionals in proactive elderly care. Data were analysed using the framework analysis method. From the interviews with older people important themes in relation to health and living environment emerged, such as maintaining independence, appropriate housing, social relationships, a supporting network and a sense of purpose and autonomy. Older people preferred to remain self-sufficient, and they would rather not ask for help for psychological or social problems. However, the interviews also highlighted that they were not always able or willing to anticipate future needs, which can hinder early detection or early intervention. At the same time, professionals indicated that older people tend to over-estimate their self-reliance and therefore advocated for early detection and intervention, including social and psychological issues. Older people have a broad range of needs in different domains of life. Discrepancies exist between older people and professionals with regard to their views on timing and scope of early detection initiatives. This study aimed

  15. The Human Rights Act: What are the implications for older people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Help the Aged is launching a report outlining the terms of the Human Rights Act and its implications both for older people themselves and for public bodies responsible for providing services to them. Tessa Harding, head of policy at Help the Aged said: 'The Human Rights Act is an important turning point for older people. Not only does it establish key rights of individuals to freedom from inhuman and degrading treatment, to private and family life and so on; it also prohibits discrimination in accessing these rights.We expect older people and their advocates to use the Act to ensure greater fairness and equality in our society.'

  16. Smart Homes for Older People: Positive Aging in a Digital World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Barnett

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart homes are homes with technologically advanced systems to enable domestic task automation, easier communication, and higher security. As an enabler of health and well-being enhancement, smart homes have been geared to accommodate people with special needs, especially older people. This paper examines the concept of “smart home” in a technologically driven society and its multi-functional contribution to the enhancement of older people’s lives. Discussion then focuses on the challenges in the use of smart homes among older people such as accessibility and ethical issues. Finally, some implications and recommendations are provided.

  17. The relationship between rural community type and attachment to place for older people living in North Wales, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burholt, Vanessa; Naylor, Dawn

    2005-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between rural community type and attachment to place for 387 older people aged 70 and over. Six rural settlements in North Wales are characterised according to certain statistics (e.g. age structure, in-migration, strength of local culture, and multiple deprivation) to provide distinct community profiles. It is hypothesised that community type is characterised by particular types of attachment, which are dependent on life course trajectories and changes or stability in the environment. Using a sevenfold classification of attachment to place, the paper tests seven hypotheses. The results support four of the seven hypotheses. Older people living in a retirement destination are more likely to report aesthetic qualities and the appropriateness of the environment. People living in native areas with a strong culture and local language are more likely to note the importance of historical attachment and social integration into the community. Three hypotheses are rejected: older people living in a retirement destination are not less likely to report social support, or a historical perspective in attachment to place, and older people living in areas with high levels of multiple deprivation are not more likely to encounter relocation restraints than are others. Overall, the findings suggest that the taxonomy of attachment to place provides a flexible framework for differentiation by community. The paper concludes that communities are not merely settings-they play a significant role in self-identity and are a vital source of emotional and experiential meaning for the inhabitant.

  18. Cognition and mortality in older people: the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Michael H; Sachdev, Perminder S; Kochan, Nicole A; Xu, Jing; Draper, Brian; Brodaty, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Both cognitive ability and cognitive decline have been shown to predict mortality in older people. As dementia, a major form of cognitive decline, has an established association with shorter survival, it is unclear the extent to which cognitive ability and cognitive decline predict mortality in the absence of dementia. To determine whether cognitive ability and decline in cognitive ability predict mortality in older individuals without dementia. The Sydney Memory and Ageing Study is an observational population-based cohort study. Participants completed detailed neuropsychological assessments and medical examinations to assess for risk factors such as depression, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking and physical activity. Participants were regularly assessed at 2-year intervals over 8 years. A community sample in Sydney, Australia. One thousand and thirty-seven elderly people without dementia. Overall, 236 (22.8%) participants died within 8 years. Both cognitive ability at baseline and decline in cognitive ability over 2 years predicted mortality. Decline in cognitive ability, but not baseline cognitive ability, was a significant predictor of mortality when depression and other medical risk factors were controlled for. These relationships also held when excluding incident cases of dementia. The findings indicate that decline in cognition is a robust predictor of mortality in older people without dementia at a population level. This relationship is not accounted for by co-morbid depression or other established biomedical risk factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Alcohol service provision for older people in an area experiencing high alcohol use and health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Karen E; Ling, Jonathan; Wilson, Graeme B; Crosland, Ann; Kaner, Eileen F S; Haighton, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    UK society is ageing. Older people who drink alcohol, drink more than those from previous generations, drink more frequently than other age groups and are more likely to drink at home and alone. Alcohol problems in later life however are often under-detected and under-reported meaning older people experiencing alcohol problems have high levels of unmet need. This study sought to identify existing services within South of Tyne, North East England to capture the extent of service provision for older drinkers and identify any gaps. The Age UK definition of 'older people' (aged 50 and over) was used. Services were contacted by telephone, managers or their deputy took part in semi-structured interviews. Forty six service providers were identified. Only one provided a specific intervention for older drinkers. Others typically provided services for age 18+. Among providers, there was no definitive definition of an older person. Data collection procedures within many organisations did not enable them to confirm whether older people were accessing services. Where alcohol was used alongside other drugs, alcohol use could remain unrecorded. To enable alcohol services to meet the needs of older people, greater understanding is needed of the patterns of drinking in later life, the experiences of older people, the scale and scope of the issue and guidance as to the most appropriate action to take. An awareness of the issues related to alcohol use in later life also needs to be integrated into commissioning of other services that impact upon older people. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  20. [Examination results and autopsy findings in assaults on elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Jänisch, Stefanie; Havermann, Robert; Germerott, Tanja; Fieguth, Armin

    2010-01-01

    As the percentage of elderly people in the population grows, violence against persons of advanced age constitutes an increasing social problem. The findings of the clinical forensic examinations (CE group) and autopsies performed on elderly violence victims (> or = 60 years) between 1999 and 2008 at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Hanover Medical School were retrospectively analysed. In all, the study material comprised 55 victims of the CE group (35 females and 20 males, median age 73.5 years) and 55 autopsies (33 females and 22 males, median age 72.7 years). In most of the autopsy cases, the suspect was a family member or partner. In contrast, the alleged perpetrator was a stranger in most cases of the CE group. Blunt force injuries were most often found in the CE group victims (63.6%). Altogether, 38.2% (CE group) and 20.0% (autopsy cases) of the violent assaults were associated with robbery. In the majority of the CE cases, the victims suffered potentially or acute life-threatening injuries. In summary, the analysis shows that elderly people frequently become victims of robbery and blunt force injury. In most homicides of old people, the perpetrator is familiar to the victim. In surviving elderly violence victims, the assault is more likely to be reported to the police if the suspect is a stranger.

  1. What keeps you strong? A systematic review identifying how primary health-care and aged-care services can support the well-being of older Indigenous peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; Aitken, Graham; Dodd, Garth; Rigney, Janice; Hayes, Jenny; Van Emden, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify primary health-care or aged-care strategies that have or could support the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. A search was undertaken of primary databases including Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Papers which reported on the perspectives of older Indigenous peoples, community members and provider participants were included. Findings were pooled using a meta-aggregative approach. Three high-level synthesised findings - maintaining Indigenous identity, promoting independence and delivering culturally safe care - were believed to be important for supporting the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. As physical independence often diminishes with age, having the support of culturally safe primary health-care and aged-care services that understand the importance of maintaining an Indigenous identity and promoting independence will be crucial for the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  2. Self-rated health and health-strengthening factors in community-living frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Zahra; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve; Eklund, Kajsa; Jakobsson, Annika; Wilhelmson, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the explanatory power of variables measuring health-strengthening factors for self-rated health among community-living frail older people. Frailty is commonly constructed as a multi-dimensional geriatric syndrome ascribed to the multi-system deterioration of the reserve capacity in older age. Frailty in older people is associated with decreased physical and psychological well-being. However, knowledge about the experiences of health in frail older people is still limited. The design of the study was cross-sectional. The data were collected between October 2008 and November 2010 through face-to-face structured interviews with older people aged 65-96 years (N = 161). Binary logistic regression was used to analyse whether a set of explanatory relevant variables is associated with self-rated health. The results from the final model showed that satisfaction with one's ability to take care of oneself, having 10 or fewer symptoms and not feeling lonely had the best explanatory power for community-living frail older peoples' experiences of good health. The results indicate that a multi-disciplinary approach is desirable, where the focus should not only be on medical problems but also on providing supportive services to older people to maintain their independence and experiences of health despite frailty. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Interrelations of stress, optimism and control in older people's psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Susan Jane; McLean, Louise Anne

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the influence of perceived stress, optimism and perceived control of internal states on the psychological adjustment of older adults. The sample consisted of 212 older adults, aged between 58 and 103 (M = 80.42 years, SD = 7.31 years), living primarily in retirement villages in Melbourne, Victoria. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Life Orientation Test-Revised, Perceived Control of Internal States Scale and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life-Bref. Optimism significantly mediated the relationship between older people's perceived stress and psychological health, and perceived control of internal states mediated the relationships among stress, optimism and psychological health. The variables explained 49% of the variance in older people's psychological adjustment. It is suggested that strategies to improve optimism and perceived control may improve the psychological adjustment of older people struggling to adapt to life's stressors. © 2014 ACOTA.

  4. Early signs of mobility decline and physical activity counseling as a preventive intervention in older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina

    indicate that self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history should be considered as important early indicators of functional decline among community-dwelling older adults. In addition, the results suggest that physical activity counseling for older adults may provide an effective means......The purpose of this study was to examine the early signs of mobility decline and falls in older people. In addition, the effects of physical activity counseling on the development of mobility limitation in an older community-dwelling population were studied. Data from two larger studies were used......: Screening and Counseling for Physical activity and Mobility among Older People, SCAMOB, a 2-year single-blinded randomized controlled trial (n=632) with a 1.5-year post-intervention follow-up, focused on 75 to 81-year-old community-dwelling people and the FITSA study, a 3-year prospective observational...

  5. Cultural and gender differences in coping strategies between Caucasian American and Korean American older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HeeSoon; Mason, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Coping strategies have significant effects on older people's health. This study examined whether gender and ethnic differences influence the coping strategies chosen by older adults when they encounter daily life stressors. Data were collected from 444 community-dwelling people over the age of 65, including 238 Caucasian Americans and 206 Korean Americans. Results showed significant differences between the two groups. Korean Americans had higher scores on problem and emotion-focused coping strategies as well as avoidant coping strategies than Caucasian Americans. Caucasian older women employed more active coping, planning, and positive reframing skills; relied more on religion; and sought emotional support more than Caucasian men. For Korean Americans, older women utilized religion and denial; whereas older men employed instrumental support and substance abuse. The results suggest that practitioners should develop ethnic, gender-specific programs to help older adults cope more effectively with their daily life stressors.

  6. Comparison of Self-Efficacy and Loneliness Between Community-Dwelling & Institutionalized Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: With regard to the low mean score of self-efficacy of older adults residing in nursing homes, the authorities of nursing homes should pay attention to the needs of older adults and provide general education about promoting the tradition of caring older people by their families. Furthermore, all institutions and organizations that have important goals such as healthy older adults should advance toward their goals by planning, education, and consultation with families that care about their older adults. Finally, with regard to the results about the association of self-efficacy with loneliness, self-efficacy assessment should be considered one of the effective factors in psychological dimensions of the people and a way to support the self-care of older adults because promoting self-efficacy will result in managing stress and improving the mental health. 

  7. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlin A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ali Tomlin, Alan Sinclair Institute of Diabetes for Older People, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK Abstract: Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline, and Psychological Information (PsychInfo databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by

  8. Perceptions of exercise for older people living with dementia in Bangkok, Thailand: an exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuncharernpanit, Sirikul; Hendricks, Joyce; Toye, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a significant issue globally, including in Thailand, and exercise is known to have health benefits for people living with dementia. However, little is known about exercise acceptable to, and feasible for, this population group in low-to-middle income countries although, more broadly, it is recognised that health-related behaviours are influenced by the perceptions of the individual, which exist within a cultural context. To explore and describe perceptions of appropriate exercise for people living with dementia in Bangkok, Thailand. Qualitative exploratory descriptive. Bangkok, Thailand. Nine professionals - experts in exercise, dementia care and relevant policy development - and nine dyads of people with dementia and their family caregivers all recruited using purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews subjected to thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: how exercise was defined, perceived benefits of exercise and how exercise should be implemented. Professionals recognised three exercise elements: aerobic exercise plus balance and strength training. Dyads recognised home-based activities (e.g., housework) and walking. Both groups recognised benefits of exercise in maintaining health and function and improving mood and sleep. Only health professionals identified falls risk reduction. There was limited appreciation of benefits for caregivers by maintaining function in care recipients. Professionals deemed that exercise should address all three elements, using easily accessible low-cost resources. The need for safety was emphasised, and there was agreement that in-home exercise was appropriate. Family/cultural values were evident that could present barriers to exercise implementation. Changing health-related behaviours requires an understanding of individual perspectives, which exist within a cultural context. This study has illuminated the Thai context and has implications beyond this. Findings emphasise a need for potential benefits to be

  9. A Systematic Review of Behavioural Interventions Promoting Healthy Eating among Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Xiao; Perez-Cueto, Armando; dos Santos, Quenia

    2018-01-01

    Because eating habits are inseparably linked with people’s physical health, effective behaviour interventions are highly demanded to promote healthy eating among older people. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective diet interventions for older people and provide useful evidence...... and direction for further research. Three electronic bibliographic databases—PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection were used to conduct a systematic literature search based on fixed inclusion and exclusion criteria. English language peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2011 and 2016 were...... of chronic disease. The results supported that older people could achieve a better dietary quality if they make diet-related changes by receiving either dietary education or healthier meal service. Further high-quality studies are required to promote healthy eating among older people by taking regional diet...

  10. Choices for Mobility Independence: Transportation Options for Older Adults and People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the requirements to qualify for the service? Cost: The fees for transportation services will vary and may include a reduced rate or no-cost service for older adults and people with disabilities. ...

  11. Social Work Implication on Care and Vulnerability of Older People in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social Work Implication on Care and Vulnerability of Older People in Tanzania. ... as the national ageing policy, health policy, national social security policy, ... The social workers were found at the district headquarters but also in few numbers.

  12. Improving older people's life satisfaction via social networking site use: Evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junjie

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the pathways by which social networking sites (SNSs) can improve older people's life satisfaction. We conducted an online survey in China that lasted eight weeks. Respondents were required to report their demographic characteristics and feelings regarding SNS use. Data were analysed using SPSS 20 and Amos 21. We collected 596 valid samples. The empirical results show that SNS use improves older people's life satisfaction by reducing their loneliness and improving their self-efficacy. Social support alleviates the negative effect of loneliness and enhances the positive effect of self-efficacy on life satisfaction. Sex differences and education differences were significant. Men and less educated people had higher levels of life satisfaction. Policymakers should offer support to SNSs targeting older people and encourage them to provide more useful services. SNS operators should encourage social support among older users and pay attention to sex differences and education differences. © 2018 AJA Inc.

  13. Participation of older people in preauthorization trials of recently approved medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beers, Erna; Moerkerken, Dineke C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Egberts, Toine C G; Jansen, Paul A F

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the inclusion of older people in clinical trials of recently authorized medicines, evaluating adherence to the 20-year-old International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH) guideline on geriatrics (E7). DESIGN: Observational. SETTING: European public assessment reports,

  14. Motivators and Barriers for Older People Participating in Resistance Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Elissa; Farrier, Kaela; Lewin, Gill; Pettigrew, Simone; Hill, Anne-Marie; Airey, Phil; Bainbridge, Liz; Hill, Keith D

    2017-04-01

    Regular participation in resistance training is important for older people to maintain their health and independence, yet participation rates are low. The study aimed to identify motivators and barriers to older people participating in resistance training. A systematic review was conducted including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method studies. Searches generated 15,920 citations from six databases, with 14 studies (n = 1,937 participants) included. In total, 92 motivators and 24 barriers were identified. Motivators specific to participating in resistance training included preventing deterioration (disability), reducing risk of falls, building (toning) muscles, feeling more alert, and better concentration. Looking too muscular and thinking participation increased the risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or death, despite the minimal likelihood of these occurring, were barriers. The analysis indicates that increasing participation in resistance training among older people should focus on the specific benefits valued by older people and the dissemination of accurate information to counter misperceptions.

  15. Reliability of six physical performance tests in older people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, C.G.; Heuvelen, M.J.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Physical performance tests are important for assessing the effect of physical activity interventions in older people with dementia, but their psychometric properties have not been systematically established within this specific population. Objective. The purpose of this study was to

  16. Reliability of Six Physical Performance Tests in Older People With Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, Christiaan G.; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    Background. Physical performance tests are important for assessing the effect of physical activity interventions in older people with dementia, but their psychometric properties have not been systematically established within this specific population. Objective. The purpose of this study was to

  17. Medication for older people - aspects of rational therapy from the general practitioner's point of view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Hendriksen, C

    2005-01-01

    state that a number of pharmacological regimens for older people are outperformed by non-pharmacological treatment alternatives involving competent individualised counselling and public provision of easy (transportation) possibilities for joining centres offering staff and equipment for physical...

  18. Student's corner: potential implications of registered nurse attitudes towards caring for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lynette C

    2010-01-01

    In discussing the potential implications of the attitudes of the registered nurse towards the work of caring for older people, it was helpful to highlight why this work is important, gain some understanding of quality care and how it can be facilitated or hindered. Patient centred care is essential as there is great diversity found amongst older people. It was found that attitudes held by registered nurses and students towards older people have a direct impact on the quality of care provided. Negative attitudes and stereotyping get in the way of quality care while positive attitudes enabled quality care. In identifying the factors that influence these attitudes, registered nurses can take on a leadership role in promoting positive attitudes and challenging negative attitudes towards the care of older people with the goal of providing patient centre care.

  19. Exploring the construction of quality of life in older people / Lizanlé van Biljon.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Biljon, Lizanlé

    2013-01-01

    Ageing populations and the unique challenges they pose are characteristic of the accelerating demographic transition evident in both developed and developing countries. In South Africa the elderly population is also increasing dramatically. There is a disproportionate distribution of older persons per ethnic group, with white older people representing the largest group of older South Africans (21%, proportional to ethnic group). The influx of the baby boomer generation will inevitably lead to...

  20. Interventions targeting loneliness and social isolation among the older people: An update systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Stojanovic, Jovana; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Duplaga, Mariusz; Grysztar, Marcin; Moscato, Umberto; Onder, Graziano; Collamati, Agnese; Ricciardi, Walter; Magnavita, Nicola

    2018-02-01

    This systematic review aims to summarize and update the current knowledge on the effectiveness of the existing interventions for alleviating loneliness and social isolation among older persons. A search of PubMed, ISI Web of science, SCOPUS, The Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases was performed. The terminology combined all possible alternatives of the following keywords: social isolation, loneliness, old people, intervention and effectiveness. Eligible studies were published between January 2011 and February 2016 in English or Italian language and regarded the implementation of loneliness/social isolation interventions among the older generations. Outcome measures in terms of the intervention effects needed to be reported. In total, 15 quantitative and five qualitative studies were ultimately included in this review. Eighteen interventions were reported across the quantitative studies. Six out of 11 group interventions (55%), one out of four mixed interventions (25%) and all three individual interventions reported at least one significant finding related to loneliness or social isolation. Our review suggested that new technologies and community engaged arts might be seen as a promising tool for tackling social isolation and loneliness among the older individuals. Future studies need to work on methodological quality and take into consideration the suggestions of the present literature in order to provide firm evidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Postprandial Blood Pressure on Gait Parameters in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial hypotension (PPH, a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP within 2 h of a meal, may detrimentally affect gait parameters and increase the falls risk in older people. We aimed to determine the effects of postprandial SBP on heart rate (HR, gait speed, and stride length, double-support time and swing time variability in older subjects with and without PPH. Twenty-nine subjects were studied on three days: glucose (“G”, water and walk (“WW”, glucose and walk (“GW”. Subjects consumed a glucose drink on “G” and “GW” and water on “WW”. The “G” day determined which subjects had PPH. On “WW” and “GW” gait was analyzed. Sixteen subjects demonstrated PPH. In this group, there were significant changes in gait speed (p = 0.040 on “WW” and double-support time variability (p = 0.027 on “GW”. The area under the curve for the change in gait parameters from baseline was not significant on any study day. Among subjects without PPH, SBP increased on “WW” (p < 0.005 and all gait parameters remained unchanged on all study days. These findings suggest that by changing gait parameters, PPH may contribute to an increased falls risk in the older person with PPH.

  2. Methods for Involving Older People in Health Research-A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Imke; Gerhardus, Ansgar

    2017-11-29

    Demographic change has increased the need for research on healthcare for older people. Recently there has been a growing awareness that research might benefit from actively involving patients and the public in study design and conduct. Besides empowering patients and democratizing research, involvement enhances the quality of research and the development of equitable healthcare solutions. Little is known about how to involve older people. This review aims to support scientists intending to involve older people in health research by systematically identifying and describing studies involving older people and analyzing associated facilitators and challenges. Old people were operationalized as people living with old-age-related conditions. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Cochrane library for the period 2007 to July 2017 and also manually searched reference lists of the nine retrieved articles and other relevant sources. While involvement of older people in research is feasible, specific challenges related to this group need be taken into account. Strategies to enhance effective involvement comprise a thoughtful choice of location, use of visualization and accessible communication, building good relationships and flexible approaches. Further research is needed on the involvement of people in care homes or with vision, hearing or mobility limitations.

  3. Methods for Involving Older People in Health Research—A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schilling

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Demographic change has increased the need for research on healthcare for older people. Recently there has been a growing awareness that research might benefit from actively involving patients and the public in study design and conduct. Besides empowering patients and democratizing research, involvement enhances the quality of research and the development of equitable healthcare solutions. Little is known about how to involve older people. This review aims to support scientists intending to involve older people in health research by systematically identifying and describing studies involving older people and analyzing associated facilitators and challenges. Old people were operationalized as people living with old-age-related conditions. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane library for the period 2007 to July 2017 and also manually searched reference lists of the nine retrieved articles and other relevant sources. While involvement of older people in research is feasible, specific challenges related to this group need be taken into account. Strategies to enhance effective involvement comprise a thoughtful choice of location, use of visualization and accessible communication, building good relationships and flexible approaches. Further research is needed on the involvement of people in care homes or with vision, hearing or mobility limitations.

  4. Paradoxes in the care of older people in the community : Walking a tightrope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.; Van Regenmortel, T.; Abma, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of the older population suggests that there will be significant numbers in need of care and support in their own home environment. Yet, little is known about the kind of situations professionals are faced with and how they intervene in the living environment of older people.

  5. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark--why, how, by whom, and when?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Avlund, K; Hendriksen, C

    2007-01-01

    older persons not normally seen in the health care system. In-home assessment is not just a health check, but also an opportunity to meet individual needs that may be of importance for older people to stay independent. Preventive home visits may be part of an overall culture and strategy to avoid...

  6. Urinary incontinence in older people living in the community: examining help-seeking behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, T.A.M.; Weel, C. van; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only a small proportion of older people with urinary incontinence seek help, despite the availability of adequate treatment. AIM: To ascertain the patient- and disease-specific factors that determine whether medical care for urinary incontinence is sought by independently living older

  7. Foot and ankle compression improves joint position sense but not bipedal stance in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, J.M.; Zijlstra, W.; Geertzen, J.H.; Hof, A.L.; Postema, K.

    This study investigates the effects of foot and ankle compression on joint position sense (JPS) and balance in older people and young adults. 12 independently living healthy older persons (77-93 years) were recruited from a senior accommodation facility. 15 young adults (19-24 years) also

  8. Asymptomatic spontaneous cerebral emboli and mood in a cohort of older people: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Purandare, N.; Hardicre, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether asymptomatic spontaneous cerebral emboli (SCE) predicts subsequent depression in older people. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 2.5 years of follow-up including 96 nondepressed older subjects in primary care. Presence of SCE was measured at baseline by

  9. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  10. Assessment of Ethical Ideals and Ethical Manners in Care of Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Frilund, Marianne; Fagerström, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Katie; Eklund, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish structured clusters and well-defined ontological entities (nodes) describing ethical values as both ideal and opportunity for ethical manner as perceived by the caregiver. In this study, we use Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) to analyse ethical values (ethos) and ethical manners in daily work with older people. Material is based on questionnaire data collected by the instrument for the self-assessment of individual ethos in the care of older people (ISAEC...

  11. [Subjective memory complaints in older people. Is it a symptom of dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints are common in older people. They are inconsistently related to current cognitive impairment, but are more consistently correlated to future development of dementia. Subjective memory complaints are also related to depression and personality traits. Many patients...... with dementia have impaired awareness of deficits even in the early stages of dementia and therefore do not complain about memory problems. Reports about impaired memory in older people should lead to diagnostic examination Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5/12...

  12. Gotta survey somebody : Methodological challenges in population studies of older people

    OpenAIRE

    Kelfve, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Conducting representative surveys of older people is challenging. This thesis aims to analyze a) the characteristics of individuals at risk of being underrepresented in surveys of older people, b) the systematic errors likely to occur as a result of these selections, and c) whether these systematic errors can be minimized by weighting adjustments.   In Study I, we investigated a) who would be missing from a survey that excluded those living in institutions and that did not use indirect interv...

  13. The Relationship Between Disability and Variables of Depression, Cognitive Status, and Morale Among Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahbazi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Disability in older people had a significant relationship with their depression, cognitive status, and morale. Thus, the degree of their disability can be lowered by prevention and early treatment of depression, promotion of memory, delaying cognitive disorders, as well as providing morale enhancement programs, creating a positive attitude toward old age, and increasing life satisfaction in older people

  14. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC).......Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC)....

  15. Impact of Social Capital on 8-year Mortality Among Older People in 34 Danish Municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Christensen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the impact of social capital measures (bonding, bridging, and linking) on all-cause mortality at 8-year follow-up among older people aged 75 and 80 at baseline.......To analyze the impact of social capital measures (bonding, bridging, and linking) on all-cause mortality at 8-year follow-up among older people aged 75 and 80 at baseline....

  16. The Experience of Older People in the Shared Decision-Making Process in Advanced Kidney Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Karen; McManus, Breeda; Gracey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to understand the experiences of older people (>70 years) when making a decision about renal replacement therapy. This was a coproduced study, whereby patients and carers were involved in all aspects of the research process. Methods. A Patient and Carer Group undertook volunteer and research training. The group developed the interview questions and interviewed 29 people who had commenced dialysis or made a decision not to have dialysis. Interview data were transcribed and analysed, and common themes were identified. Results. 22 men and 7 women (mean age 77.4 yrs) from two hospitals were interviewed. 18 had chosen haemodialysis, 6 peritoneal dialysis, and 5 supportive care. The majority of patients were involved in the dialysis decision. Most were satisfied with the amount of information that they received, although some identified that the quality of the information could be improved, especially how daily living can be affected by dialysis. Conclusion. Our findings show that overall older patients were involved in the dialysis decision along with their families. Our approach is innovative because it is the first time that patients and carers have been involved in a coproduced study about shared decision-making. PMID:27990438

  17. Forming a new clinical team for frail older people: can a group development model help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth Susan; Pollard, Lorraine; Conroy, Simon; Clague-Baker, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Integrated services which utilise the expertise of team members along care pathways are evolving. Changes in service structure and subsequent team working arrangements can be a challenge for practitioners expected to redefine how they work with one another. These services are particularly important for the care of frail older people. This exploratory study of one newly forming team presents the views of staff involved in establishing an interprofessional healthcare advisory team for older people within an acute hospital admissions unit. Staff experiences of forming a new service are aligned to a model of team development. The findings are presented as themes relating to the stages of team development and identify the challenges of setting up an integrated service alongside existing services. In particular, team process issues relating to the clarity of goals, role clarification, leadership, team culture and identity. Managers must allow time to ensure new services evolve before setting up evaluation studies for efficiency and effectiveness which might prove against the potential for interprofessional teamworking.

  18. Health Impact of Climate Change in Older People: An Integrative Review and Implications for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Erwin William A; Beaman, Adam; Davidson, Patricia M

    2017-11-01

    Older people account for the highest proportion of mortality from extreme weather events associated with climate change. This article aims to describe the health impacts of climate change on older people. An integrative review was conducted with 30 studies retrieved from PubMed, EBSCO, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) on climate stressors, determinants of resilient capacity, risk factors, and health outcomes. Heat, temperature variability, and air pollution increase mortality risk in older people, especially from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Floods are linked with increasing incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Facing these adversities, older people exhibit both vulnerability and resilience. Research gaps exist in understanding the full spectrum of the resilience experience of older people, and appreciating areas wherein nursing can play a pivotal role. Recognizing the vulnerabilities of older people in the context of climate change is important. Identifying opportunities to promote resilience is an important focus for nurses to develop tailored and targeted nursing interventions. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Powerlessness of older people in Hong Kong: a political economy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Ping-kwong

    2003-01-01

    Gerontologists agree that old age can be associated with an increase in powerlessness both in the personal domain and in the social and political fields. This paper is an attempt to understand the concept of powerlessness in old age within a political economy theoretical framework. The paper argues that the powerlessness of older people is not biologically determined. Rather, it is socially constructed. It has its roots in the social, economic, and political structure of society. For this reason, the paper argues that (a) the capitalist economic system discriminates against and marginalizes older people in the labor market. The current unfavorable economic climate will make the economic situation of older people worse. (b) The residual welfare system does not counteract the unfavorable impact of the economic system. Rather, it deprives older people of the necessary financial resources and social service supports that would enable them to lead independent and dignified lives. (c) The authoritarian political system creates adverse conditions that make it very difficult for older people to participate in the decision-making process on issues that affect their lives, as well as on broader political issues that affect the whole of society. It is the interplay among these economic, social, and political forces in Hong Kong that creates the political economy of powerlessness in old age and prevents older people from using their powers to master and control their lives.

  20. [Physical and mental dimensions of quality of life of frail older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J

    2017-09-01

    Frail older people have an increased risk of limitations in performing activities of daily living, hospitalization, nursing home admission, and premature death. In this study we determined the difference in experiencing quality of life between frail and non-frail older people. We also investigated the associations between physical, psychological and social components of frailty and the physical and mental dimensions of quality of life. 374 people of 75 years and older filled in a questionnaire, the Senioren Barometer. This questionnaire contained the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) to assess frailty and the SF-12 for assessing quality of life. The study showed that frail older people on average experience a lower quality of life than non-frail older people. A considerable part of the variance of the physical and mental dimensions of quality of life could be explained by the fifteen components of frailty, after controlling for the background characteristics of the respondents, 33.2% and 36.5%, respectively. The frailty components physical inactivity, physical tiredness, and depressive symptoms were associated with the physical dimension as well as the mental dimension of quality of life. The results confirm the importance of multidimensional assessment of frailty. In addition, they provide a direction to healthcare and welfare professionals in performing interventions with the aim of increasing the quality of life of older people.

  1. Prevention of Fractures in Older People with Calcium and Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl A. Nowson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The greatest cause of fracture in older people is osteoporosis which contributes to increased morbidity and mortality in older people. A number of meta-analyses have been performed assessing the effectiveness of calcium supplementation alone, vitamin D supplementation alone and the combined therapy on bone loss and fracture reduction in older people. The results of these meta-analyses indicate that vitamin D supplementation alone is unlikely to reduce fracture risk, calcium supplementation alone has a modest effect in reducing total fracture risk, but compliance with calcium supplements is poor in the long term. The combination of calcium supplementation with vitamin D supplementation, particularly in those at risk of marginal and low vitamin D status reduces total fractures, including hip fractures. Therefore older people would be recommended to consume adequate dietary calcium (>1100 mg/day together with maintaining adequate vitamin D status (>60 nmol/L 25(OHD to reduce risk of fracture. It is a challenge to consume sufficient dietary calcium from dietary sources, but the increasing range of calcium fortified foods could assist in increasing the dietary calcium intake of older people. In addition to the usual dairy based food sources, vitamin D supplements are likely to be required for older people with reduced mobility and access to sunlight.

  2. A structural equation model relating impaired sensorimotor function, fear of falling and gait patterns in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2007-02-01

    Many falls in older people occur while walking, however the mechanisms responsible for gait instability are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a plausible model describing the relationships between impaired sensorimotor function, fear of falling and gait patterns in older people. Temporo-spatial gait parameters and acceleration patterns of the head and pelvis were obtained from 100 community-dwelling older people aged between 75 and 93 years while walking on an irregular walkway. A theoretical model was developed to explain the relationships between these variables, assuming that head stability is a primary output of the postural control system when walking. This model was then tested using structural equation modeling, a statistical technique which enables the testing of a set of regression equations simultaneously. The structural equation model indicated that: (i) reduced step length has a significant direct and indirect association with reduced head stability; (ii) impaired sensorimotor function is significantly associated with reduced head stability, but this effect is largely indirect, mediated by reduced step length, and; (iii) fear of falling is significantly associated with reduced step length, but has little direct influence on head stability. These findings provide useful insights into the possible mechanisms underlying gait characteristics and risk of falling in older people. Particularly important is the indication that fear-related step length shortening may be maladaptive.

  3. Improved Housing Accessibility for Older People in Sweden and Germany: Short Term Costs and Long-Term Gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaug, Björn; Chiatti, Carlos; Oswald, Frank; Kaspar, Roman; Schmidt, Steven M

    2017-08-26

    The physical housing environment is important to facilitate activities of daily living (ADL) for older people. A hindering environment may lead to ADL dependence and thus increase the need for home services, which is individually restricting and a growing societal burden. This study presents simulations of policy changes with regard to housing accessibility that estimates the potential impact specifically on instrumental activities of daily living (I-ADL), usage of home services, and related costs. The models integrate empirical data to test the hypothesis that a policy providing funding to remove the five most severe environmental barriers in the homes of older people who are at risk of developing dependence in I-ADL, can maintain independence and reduce the need for home services. In addition to official statistics from state agencies in Sweden and Germany, we utilized published results from the ENABLE-AGE and other scientific studies to generate the simulations. The simulations predicted that new policies that remove potentially hindering housing features would improve I-ADL performance among older people and reduce the need for home services. Our findings suggest that a policy change can contribute to positive effects with regard to I-ADL independence among older people and to a reduction of societal burden.

  4. Ageing well? : A cross-country analysis of the way older people are visually represented on websites of organizations for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, E.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078758475; Ivan, Loredana; Fernández-Ardèvol, Mireia; Sourbati, Maria; Ekström, Maria; Wilińska, Monika; Carlo, Simone; Schiau, Ioana

    2017-01-01

    The ‘aging well’ discourse advances the idea of making older people responsible for their capability to stay healthy and active. In the context of an increased ageing population, which poses several challenges to countries’ government, this discourse has become dominant in Europe. We explore the way

  5. Ageing well? A cross-country analysis of the way older people are visually represented on websites of organizations for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, E.; Ivan, L.; Fernández-Ardèvol, M.; Sourbati, M.; Ekström, M.; Wilińska, M.; Carlo, S.; Schiau, I.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘aging well’ discourse advances the idea of making older people responsible for their capability to stay healthy and active. In the context of an increased ageing population, which poses several challenges to countries’ government, this discourse has become dominant in Europe. We explore the way

  6. Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Maria; Pöder, Ulrika; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Nilsson, Annika; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility--still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase 'ability to act' in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: the COMHOME study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafskjold, Linda; Sundler, Annelie J; Holmström, Inger K; Sundling, Vibeke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Eide, Hilde

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of the COMHOME study is to generate knowledge on person-centred communication with older people (>65 years) in home healthcare services, radiographic and optometric practice. This study will explore the communication between care providers and older persons in home care services. Home healthcare visits will be audiorecorded (n=500) in Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden. Analyses will be performed with the Verona Coding Definitions for Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and qualitative methods. The content of the communication, communicative challenging situations as well as empathy, power distance, decision-making, preservation of dignity and respect will be explored. In Norway, an additional 100 encounters, 50 in optometric practice (video recorded) and 50 in radiographic practice (audiorecorded), will be analysed. Furthermore, healthcare providers' self-reported communication skills, empathy, mindfulness and emotional intelligence in relation to observed person-centred communication skills will be assessed using well-established standardised instruments. Depending on national legislation, approval of either the central ethical committees (eg, nation or university), the national data protection officials or the local ethical committees (eg, units of home healthcare) was obtained. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The research findings will add knowledge to improve services provided to this vulnerable group of patients. Additionally, the findings will underpin a training programme for healthcare students and care providers focusing on communication with older people

  8. Perceptions of effective relationships in an institutional care setting for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Roos

    2014-10-01

    Research purpose: This article reports older residents’ perceptions of effective relationships. Motivation for the study: Effective relationships protect against loneliness and depression and contribute to well-being. The facility was identified by a social worker as a showcase for effective relationships, but it was not clear what these consist of. Research approach, design and method: The World Café, a qualitative, participatory action research method, was applied to an economically deprived, urban facility caring for older people in Gauteng, South Africa. Three positively framed questions elicited perceptions from participants (nine men, ten women, aged 65–89. Visual and textual data were obtained and thematically analysed until saturation had been achieved. Themes were then subjected to deductive direct content analysis in terms of Self-Interactional Group Theory (SIGT. Main findings: Older residents perceive care managers as friendly and trustworthy and co-residents as caring. Care managers were seen as flexible, empathetic and congruent leaders and they confirmed residents. Relationships between residents were parallel-defined with relational qualities such as empathy and unconditional acceptance. Residents’ needs for privacy were honoured and they felt confirmed. Group dynamics were underpinned by caring and a stimulating environment provided opportunities for engagement. Practical/managerial implications: Relationships between managers and consumers are facilitated by flexibility, empathy, congruence and unconditional acceptance. Supportive group dynamics develop when people confirm and accept one another. A stimulating environment that encourages continuous and close interpersonal contact contributes to effective relationships. Contribution/value-add: Effective relationships should be understood on different levels.

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation among community-dwelling older people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yuki; Hirano, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Obuchi, Shuichi; Ihara, Kazushige; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Mataki, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation among community-dwelling older people. Xerostomia and hyposalivation are common symptoms in the older population. This study included with 894 community-dwelling, Japanese older people (355 men, 539 women; age 65-84 years) who participated in a comprehensive geriatric health examination, which included questionnaires and interviews regarding medical history, medications, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC), depressive condition. The Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) was used to evaluate depression. Resting salivary flow rate was evaluated by the modified cotton roll method. In this study, 34.8% of the participants (mean age, 73.5 ± 5.0 years) complained about xerostomia, while the prevalence of hyposalivation was 11.5%. Multiple regression analysis revealed hypnotics use [odds ratio (OR) = 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-2.61], SDS (OR = 1.05, CI = 1.04-1.07) and TMIG-IC total points (OR = 0.87, CI = 0.76-0.99) to be significantly associated with xerostomia. In contrast, female gender (OR = 2.59, CI = 1.55-4.31) and the use of agents affecting digestive organs (OR = 1.78, CI = 1.11-2.86) were associated with hyposalivation. Our findings showed that the prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation were approximately 1 in 3 and 1 in 10 respectively. The factors associated with psychological factors and high-level functional competence, while hyposalivation was associated with medications and gender, as well as systemic and/or metabolic differences. It is important to consider these multidimensional factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Physical and cognitive functioning of people older than 90 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Thinggaard, Mikael; Oksuzyan, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A rapidly increasing proportion of people in high-income countries are surviving into their tenth decade. Concern is widespread that the basis for this development is the survival of frail and disabled elderly people into very old age. To investigate this issue, we compared the cognitive and phys...

  11. Emergency Readiness for Older Adults and People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plan for pets and service animals. Millions of people have pets and service animals that they love dearly. Owners ... support of friends and neighbors to help with pet care if local shelters are ... Americans and people with disabilities engage in emergency planning so they ...

  12. Potential role of vitamin D in prevention of skeletal and extraskeletal diseases in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone health. An adequate calcium-phosphorus product determines a high quality mineralization long lifetime. In older people, both calcium and vitamin D levels may be lower causing osteomalacia and/or osteoporosis with a higher risk of fracture. Epidemiological data have clearly associated serum vitamin D lower levels (deficiency with bone fracture in older people, however, not univocal data exist in regard to a beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in general population. Although not systematic, the present review aims to make a narrative synthesis of the most recent published data on vitamin D effect not only on bone, classical target associated with vitamin D studies, but namely on extraskeletal diseases. In fact, recently, there has been an increasing interest on this latter issue with surprising findings. Vitamin D, and in particular its deficiency, seems to have a role in pathophysiological pathways in several diseases involving cardiovascular, central nervous system and neoplastic process. On the other hand, vitamin D supplementation may modify the outcome of a wide range of illnesses. Up to date the data are conflicting mainly because of difficulty to establish a consensus on the threshold of vitamin D deficit. The US Institute of Medicine recommends to distinguish a level of insufficiency [defined as 30-50 nmol/L or 16-25 ng/mL of 25(OHD] and another of deficiency identified by 25(OHD levels lower than 30 nmol/L (or <16 ng/mL. This latter level is considered a minimum level necessary in older adults to minimize the risk of falls, fracture and probably to have some effects of vitamin D supplementation in extraskeletal diseases. Although there are no absolute certainties in such issue, the most recent data suggest that vitamin D deficiency, and its supplementation, may play an important role in a wide range of diseases other than in bone metabolic diseases in older but not in general

  13. Dimensions of Housing Deprivation for Older People in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brian; Winston, Nessa

    2011-01-01

    Housing is an important aspect of living standards and quality of life for older persons, but the housing-related problems they may face encompass rather different circumstances, relating to the condition of the dwelling, how well equipped it is, whether housing costs represent a serious burden, and whether the neighbourhood environment is…

  14. Obesity, sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity and reduced mobility in Brazilian older people aged 80 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vanessa Ribeiro Dos; Gomes, Igor Conterato; Bueno, Denise Rodrigues; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Freitas, Ismael Forte; Gobbo, Luis Alberto

    2017-01-01

    To analyze which abnormalities in body composition (obesity, sarcopenia or sarcopenic obesity) are related to reduced mobility in older people aged 80 years and older. The sample included 116 subjects aged 80 years and older. The body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and mobility was assessed by motor tests. The χ2 test was used to analyze the proportion of older people with sarcopenia, obesity and sarcopenic obesity based on sex as well as to indicate an association between obesity, sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity and mobility. Binary logistic regression, adjusted for the variables (sex and osteoarticular diseases), was used to express the magnitude of these associations. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the mobility of four groups (Normal, Obesity, Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity). The Sarcopenia Group had lower performance in the lower limbs strength test and in sum of two tests compared with Obesity and Normal Groups. Older people with sarcopenia had higher chance of reduced mobility (OR: 3.44; 95%CI: 1.12-10.52). Older people aged 80 years and older with sarcopenia have more chance for reduction in mobility.

  15. The portrayal of older people in television advertisements: a cross-cultural content analysis of the United States and South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Oungkwan; Kim, Bong-Chul; Han, Sangpil

    2006-01-01

    A cross-cultural content analysis of 2295 prime-time television ads--859 ads from the United States and 1436 ads from South Korea-was conducted to examine the differences in the portrayal of older people between U.S. and Korean ads. In two countries, the underrepresentation of older people in ads was found in terms of proportions of the actual population. The findings also showed that older people are more likely to play major roles in Korean television ads than in U.S. ads. In terms of the attributes of older people depicted in ads, differences between U.S. and Korean ads were also found. The results showed that Korean television ads are likely to more positively depict older people than American television ads are. These findings supported the basic assumption of cross-cultural advertising, in which the differences in cultural values between the two cultures are related to the differences in the contents of their advertisements. However, the problems of underrepresentation and stereotypes in the portrayal of older people were still identified both in Korean and U.S. prime-time television ads.

  16. Risks, consequences, and prevention of falls of older people in oral healthcare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, Cees; de Baat, Paul; Gerritsen, Anneloes E; Flohil, Karien A; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; van der Maarel-Wierink, Claar D

    2017-03-01

    One-third of community-dwelling people older than 65 years of age fall each year, and half of them fall at least twice a year. Older care home residents are approximately three times more likely to fall when compared to community-dwelling older people. Risk indicators for falls are related to the older people's body, environment, behavior, and activities. An important health risk indicator is (orthostatic or postprandial) hypotension, which may induce cerebral hypoperfusion. Although the majority of falls remain without major consequences, 10% to 25% of falls in care homes result in bodily trauma. Prevalent fall-related injuries are brain injury, lower extremity fracture including hip fracture and forearm/wrist fracture, facial fracture, humeral fracture, and rib/scapular fracture. As fall accidents by older people can have severe consequences, prevention of falls is of paramount importance. Healthcare providers, including oral healthcare providers, should inform older people on risks of falling and draw attention to potentially hazardous arrangements. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Functional recovery of older people with hip fracture: does malnutrition make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsiao-Juan; Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Liang, Jersey; Wu, Chi-Chuan; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus

    2013-08-01

    To report a study of the effects of protein-energy malnutrition on the functional recovery of older people with hip fracture who participated in an interdisciplinary intervention. It is not clear whether protein-energy malnutrition is associated with worse functional outcomes or it affects the interdisciplinary intervention program on the functional recovery of older people with hip fracture. A randomized experimental design. Data were collected between 2002-2006 from older people with hip fracture (N = 162) in Taiwan. The generalized estimating equations approach was used to evaluate the effect of malnutrition on the functional recovery of older people with hip fracture. The majority of older patients with hip fracture were malnourished (48/80, 60% in the experimental group vs. 55/82, 67% in the control group) prior to hospital discharge. The results of the generalized estimating equations analysis demonstrated that subjects suffering from protein-energy malnutrition prior to hospital discharge appeared to have significantly worse performance trajectories for their activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and recovery of walking ability compared with those without protein-energy malnutrition. In addition, it was found that the intervention is more effective on the performance of activities of daily living and recovery of walking ability in malnourished patients than in non-malnourished patients. Healthcare providers should develop a nutritional assessment/management system in their interdisciplinary intervention program to improve the functional recovery of older people with hip fracture. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. 'Living within your limits': activity restriction in older people experiencing chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackichan, Fiona; Adamson, Joy; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2013-11-01

    although maintaining activity is key to successful pain management, and important to health and wellbeing, it is known that older people in pain frequently alter or reduce activity levels. A 'fear-avoidance' model is often used to explain avoidance of activity in the face of pain. However, this model is not intended to take account of the wider context in which activity changes take place, nor older people's own explanations for their behaviour. to investigate the reasons why older people in the community adjust their activity levels when living with chronic pain. thirty-one people aged between 67 and 92 were purposively sampled from respondents to a community-based cross-sectional survey. All participants had reported long-term pain and were interviewed about this. Data were collected and analysed using a qualitative constructivist grounded theory approach. explanations for deliberative reduction or ceasing of activities reflected a desire to prevent pain exacerbation, thereby avoiding medical intervention. It also reflected a desire to safeguard autonomy in the face of pain in older age. Restrictions were often rationalised as normal in older age, although co-existing accounts of perseverance and frustration with limitation were also evident. a rational desire to avoid pain exacerbation and medical intervention motivated restrictions to activity. However, deliberative limitation of activity has the potential to compromise autonomy by increasing social isolation and de-conditioning. Supporting older people with pain to be active requires sensitivity to the function of activity restriction, especially as a means of preventing deterioration.

  19. A qualitative study explaining nurses' perceptions of quality care for older people in long-term care settings in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kathy

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this research was to explore nurses' perceptions of the attributes of quality care and the factors that facilitate or hinder high-quality nursing care in long-term care. The quality of care for older people living in long-term care has been identified as an issue of concern in many nursing research studies. While many factors have been identified, it is difficult to determine key factors from current research. The study was a qualitative exploration of nurses' perceptions of quality care for older people and the factors that facilitate or hinder quality care. It involved 20 interviews with nurses. Respondents were asked to illustrate their accounts with examples from practice. This phase of the research was guided by the principles of hermeneutic phenomenology and the analysis process by Van Manen. The findings indicated that nurses perceived quality care for older people in Ireland as holistic, individualized and focused on promoting independence and choice. The research revealed, however, that care in many practice areas was not individualized, patient choice and involvement in decision making was limited and some areas engendered dependency. While staffing was identified as a factor which had an impact on the provision of patient choice, other issues, such as the motivation of staff, the role of the ward manager and the dominance of routine were also highlighted. There is a need to review organizational approaches to care, develop patient centred approaches to care and provide educational support for managers. This research focuses on care for older people; it helps practitioners identify key factors in the provision of quality care for older people living in long-term care.

  20. Quality of life instruments for economic evaluations in health and social care for older people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makai, Peter; Brouwer, Werner B F; Koopmanschap, Marc A; Stolk, Elly A; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-02-01

    Gaining health may not be the main goal of healthcare services aimed at older people, which may (also) seek to improve wellbeing. This emphasizes the need of finding appropriate outcome measures for economic evaluation of such services, particularly in long-term care, capturing more than only health-related quality of life (HrQol). This review assesses the usefulness of HrQol and wellbeing instruments for economic evaluations specifically aimed at older people, focusing on generic and preference-based questionnaires measuring wellbeing in particular. We systematically searched six databases and extracted instruments used to assess HrQol and wellbeing outcomes. Instruments were compared based on their usefulness for economic evaluation of services aimed at older people (dimensions measured, availability of utility scores, extent of validation). We identified 487 articles using 34 generic instruments: 22 wellbeing (two of which were preference-based) and 11 HrQol instruments. While standard HrQol instruments measure physical, social and psychological dimensions, wellbeing instruments contain additional dimensions such as purpose in life and achievement, security, and freedom. We found four promising wellbeing instruments for inclusion in economic evaluation: Ferrans and Powers QLI and the WHO-Qol OLD, ICECAP-O and the ASCOT. Ferrans and Powers QLI and the WHO-Qol OLD are widely validated but lack preference-weights while for ICECAP-O and the ASCOT preference-weights are available, but are less widely validated. Until preference-weights are available for the first two instruments, the ICECAP-O and the ASCOT currently appear to be the most useful instruments for economic evaluations in services aimed at older people. Their limitations are that (1) health dimensions may be captured only partially and (2) the instruments require further validation. Therefore, we currently recommend using the ICECAP-O or the ASCOT alongside the EQ-5D or SF-6D when evaluating interventions

  1. The contribution of home-based technology to older people's quality of life in extra care housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Stuart G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background British government policy for older people focuses on a vision of active ageing and independent living. In the face of diminishing personal capacities, the use of appropriate home-based technology (HBT devices could potentially meet a wide range of needs and consequently improve many aspects of older people's quality of life such as physical health, psychosocial well-being, social relationships, and their physical or living environment. This study aimed to examine the use of HBT devices and the correlation between use of such devices and quality of life among older people living in extra-care housing (ECH. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered for this study. Using purposive sampling 160 older people living in extra-care housing schemes were selected from 23 schemes in England. A face-to-face interview was conducted in each participant's living unit. In order to measure quality of life, the SEIQoL-Adapted and CASP-19 were used. Results Although most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units, communally provided facilities such as personal computers, washing machines, and assisted bathing equipment in the schemes were not well utilised. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for confounders including age, sex, marital status, living arrangement and mobility use indicated a coefficient of 1.17 with 95% CI (0.05, 2.29 and p = 0.04 [SEIQoL-Adapted] and 2.83 with 95% CI (1.17, 4.50 and p = 0.001 [CASP-19]. Conclusions The findings of the present study will be value to those who are developing new form of specialised housing for older people with functional limitations and, in particular, guiding investments in technological aids. The results of the present study also indicate that the home is an essential site for developing residential technologies.

  2. MediCaring: development and test marketing of a supportive care benefit for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, J; O'Connor, M A; Dulac, J D; Roach, M J; Ross, C S; Wasson, J H

    1999-09-01

    To develop an alternative healthcare benefit (called MediCaring) and to assess the preferences of older Medicare beneficiaries concerning this benefit, which emphasizes more home-based and supportive health care and discourages use of hospitalization and aggressive treatment. To evaluate the beneficiaries' ability to understand and make a choice regarding health insurance benefits; to measure their likelihood to change from traditional Medicare to the new MediCaring benefit; and to determine the short-term stability of that choice. Focus groups of persons aged 65+ and family members shaped the potential MediCaring benefit. A panel of 50 national experts critiqued three iterations of the benefit. The final version was test marketed by discussing it with 382 older people (men > or = 75 years and women > or = 80 years) in their homes. Telephone surveys a few days later, and again 1 month after the home interview, assessed the potential beneficiaries' understanding and preferences concerning MediCaring and the stability of their responses. Focus groups were held in community settings in New Hampshire, Washington, DC, Cleveland, OH, and Columbia, SC. Test marketing occurred in New Hampshire, Cleveland, OH; Columbia, SC, and Los Angeles, CA. Focus group participants were persons more than 65 years old (11 focus groups), healthcare providers (9 focus groups), and family decision-makers (3 focus groups). Participants in the in-home informing (test marketing group) were persons older than 75 years who were identified through contact with a variety of services. Demographics, health characteristics, understanding, and preferences. Focus group beneficiaries between the ages of 65 and 74 generally wanted access to all possible medical treatment and saw MediCaring as a need of persons older than themselves. Those older than age 80 were mostly in favor of it. Test marketing participants understood the key points of the new benefit: 74% generally liked it, and 34% said they would

  3. Understanding Older People's Readiness for Receiving Telehealth: Mixed-Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Cornelis Tm; Ettema, Roelof Ga; Antonietti, Michelangelo Gef; Kort, Helianthe Sm

    2018-04-06

    The Dutch Ministry of Health has formulated ambitious goals concerning the use of telehealth, leading to subsequent changes compared with the current health care situation, in which 93% of care is delivered face-to-face. Since most care is delivered to older people, the prospect of telehealth raises the question of whether this population is ready for this new way of receiving care. To study this, we created a theoretical framework consisting of 6 factors associated with older people's intention to use technology. The objective of this study was to understand community-dwelling older people's readiness for receiving telehealth by studying their intention to use videoconferencing and capacities for using digital technology in daily life as indicators. A mixed-method triangulation design was used. First, a cross-sectional survey study was performed to investigate older people's intention to use videoconferencing, by testing our theoretical framework with a multilevel path analysis (phase 1). Second, for deeper understanding of older people's actual use of digital technology, qualitative observations of older people executing technological tasks (eg, on a computer, cell phone) were conducted at their homes (phase 2). In phase 1, a total of 256 people aged 65 years or older participated in the survey study (50.0% male; median age, 70 years; Q1-Q3: 67-76). Using a significance level of .05, we found seven significant associations regarding older people's perception of videoconferencing. Older people's (1) intention to use videoconferencing was predicted by their performance expectancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% CI 1.13-1.39), effort expectancy (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07-1.39), and perceived privacy and security (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.17-1.43); (2) their performance expectancy was predicted by their effort expectancy (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.24-1.52); and (3) their effort expectancy was predicted by their self-efficacy (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.42-1.68). In phase 2, a total of 6 men and 9

  4. A Systematic Review of Behavioural Interventions Promoting Healthy Eating among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; Santos, Quenia Dos; Monteleone, Erminio; Giboreau, Agnès; Appleton, Katherine M; Bjørner, Thomas; Bredie, Wender L P; Hartwell, Heather

    2018-01-26

    Because eating habits are inseparably linked with people's physical health, effective behaviour interventions are highly demanded to promote healthy eating among older people. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective diet interventions for older people and provide useful evidence and direction for further research. Three electronic bibliographic databases-PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection were used to conduct a systematic literature search based on fixed inclusion and exclusion criteria. English language peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2011 and 2016 were selected for data extraction and quality assessment. Finally, a total of 16 studies were identified. The studies' duration ranged from three weeks to seven years. The majority of studies were carried out in European countries. Seven studies had a moderate quality while the remaining studies were at a less than moderate level. Three dietary educational interventions and all meal service related interventions reported improvements in older people's dietary variety, nutrition status, or other health-related eating behaviours. Multicomponent dietary interventions mainly contributed to the reduction of risk of chronic disease. The results supported that older people could achieve a better dietary quality if they make diet-related changes by receiving either dietary education or healthier meal service. Further high-quality studies are required to promote healthy eating among older people by taking regional diet patterns, advanced information technology, and nudging strategies into account.

  5. Older Chinese people's views on food: implications for supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Sheila Alison; Seymour, Jane E; Chapman, Alice; Holloway, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    As people face cancer and the end of life, the social, cultural and therapeutic role of food takes on an increasing significance. As part of a larger study involving older Chinese people resident in the UK, we investigated their beliefs about the influence of food on cancer and its role in supportive cancer care. A two-phase qualitative research study involved older Chinese people identified via Chinese community groups. In phase one, 46 older Chinese people participated in seven focus group discussions. In phase two, semi-structured interviews were conducted in Cantonese or Mandarin with 46 different older Chinese people to elicit their understandings of the role of food in health and illness generally and specifically for those with cancer. The analyses revealed four main themes: (1) food as 'therapeutic'; (2) food as 'risky'; (3) food as supportive and comforting; and (4) beliefs about the lack of culturally appropriate and acceptable food in hospitals. Expectations about the lack of Chinese food and the poor quality and perceived unsuitability of 'western' food were regarded as major concerns in relation to hospital admission. Understanding the perceived cultural and therapeutic significance of food and its functions in social exchange is one important aspect of promoting supportive and end-of-life cancer care for minority communities. These views helped explain the diversity and salience of food use in illness for older Chinese people resident in the UK.

  6. Subjective memory complaints and their relation with verbal fluency in active older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Flavia Rodrigues; Machado, Camila Kretzer; Souza, Monique Coan; Machado, Marcos José; Belaunde, Aline Megumi Arakawa

    2017-05-22

    To verify subjective memory complaints and their relation to verbal fluency in older people participating in community groups. An epidemiological quantitative study performed in community groups for older people in Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected by structured interview using the Memory Complaint Questionnaire (MAC-Q) and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) by semantic categories "animals/minute". For an inferential descriptive analysis, data with p people in question and added to the questionnaire). We found no relation between subjective memory complaints and verbal fluency of active older people. Mnemonic complaints were correlated to the negative perception of memory and to the duration of the complaint. However, subjective memory complaints were an indicator for those individuals with negative perception of memory, being one aspect that must be considered in older people's speech when investigating a possible cognitive deterioration. Such data can assist in formulating public health care policies aimed at older people in the city, which emphasizes the importance of verifying subjective memory complaints in this population.

  7. The fight-to-die: older people and death activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Richards

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the activities and convictions of older right-to-die activists who belong to a small but very active interest group based in Scotland, UK, called Friends at the End (FATE. The analysis presented here is based on knowledge gained through seventeen months of ethnographic research with the organisation. While FATE activists currently campaign for a legal right to a medically assisted death, many are also open to taking matters into their own hands, either by travelling to the Swiss organisation Dignitas or by opting for what is known as ‘‘self-deliverance’’. FATE members’ openness to different means of securing a hastened death contrasts sharply with the more limited demands of the UK’s main right-to-die organisation, Dignity in Dying, and highlights their specific orientation to freedom, which, it is argued here, results from the organisation’s older demographic.

  8. Functional Balance and Its Determinants in Older People with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Lee, Pei-Yun; Lee, I-Ting; Lin, Sang-I

    2016-01-01

    To determine functional balance abilities of older adults with diabetes, and identify determinants of these abilities. Eighty diabetic and 67 healthy non-diabetic community-dwelling older adults completed the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and questionnaires about their medical and fall histories. Participants were also assessed for vision, plantar sensitivity, muscle strength, and functional balance, including Functional Reach (FR), Five Times Sit-to-Stand (FTSTS), and 180° turn (TURN). In addition to between-group comparisons, hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to identify the independent determinants for each of the individual balance tasks for the diabetes and control group separately. The diabetes group had significantly greater body mass index, higher rate of cardiac disease, and poorer plantar sensitivity, mental status, grip and lower limb strength. The diabetes group performed significantly poorer in FTSTS and TURN (both pdeterminants for the balance tasks varied substantially between tasks and groups. For the diabetes group, they included visual and plantar sensitivity and MMSE for FR (R2 = 0.39), ankle dorsiflexion strength for FTSTS (R2 = 0.377), and plantar sensitivity, knee extension strength and MMSE for TURN (R2 = 0.391). For the control group, knee extension strength emerged as the common and only significant determinant and only explained approximately 10% of the variance for FR and TURN. Impairments in functional balance abilities were evident for older adults with diabetes. Their underpinning functional limitations were different for different tasks and were also different from those of the control group. Screening of functional balance and mental status, lower limb strength and sensory function, and interventions to address these impairments may be important to maintain function, independence and safety for older clients with diabetes.

  9. The wealth, health and wellbeing of Ireland's older people before and during the economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, A; O'Sullivan, V

    2014-07-03

    The economic crisis of 2008/9 was felt more acutely in Ireland relative to elsewhere and culminated in the international bailout in 2010. Given the economic collapse, Ireland provides an ideal case-study of the link between wealth collapses and movements in variables such as health and well-being. Using nationally-representative samples of older people collected before and during the crisis, we show that mean net assets fell by 45 percent between 2006/7 and 2012/13. In spite of this massive fall in wealth, measures of health and well-being remained broadly unchanged. However, expectations about future living standards became less optimistic. The results tend to support the findings of other recent studies that recessions do not have widespread negative effects on health and well-being.

  10. The Meaning of Everyday Meals in Living Units for Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Karen Marie

    2005-01-01

    Even when frail older people become unable to live on their own and manage everyday activities, they can still experience a variety of meanings within meal-related activities that contribute to quality of life. This article reports research findings that focused on the meal, from preparation......, adjacent to which is a shared dining room and kitchen. If the residents choose to, and are capable, they are involved in everyday activities of the unit and eat together with staff. This way of organising meals seems to influence most of the everyday life in the unit by shaping a homely place. It also...... enables a living community that acts in and enlivens everyday existence. Meals themselves also make it possible to be somebody and be yourself in ordinary life and to make a place for valued occupations, things that give substance to everyday life. In sum, the study found that as an occupation, meals give...

  11. Promoting Oral Health and Quality of Life of Older People - The Need for Public Health Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    This report intends to review the global burden of oral disease among older people and to examine their oral health needs. The evidence on the inter-relationships between poor oral health conditions of older people, general health and quality of life is highlighted. Finally, WHO strategies to improve oral health of older people are reviewed. The information relevant to this review was extracted from the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank, the PubMed database, and the Cochrane Library. Surveys were carried out according to the criteria recommended by the WHO epidemiological manual Oral Health Surveys - Basic Methods. In addition, global data were sought on coverage of oral health care among older people. Finally, WHO policy documents on health care for aged people were gathered through the WHO website. Across the globe, many older people suffer from oral pain or discomfort. Poor oral health during old age is mostly manifest in high caries experience, high prevalence rates of advanced periodontal disease, severe tooth loss, dry mouth, and oral pre-cancer/cancer. In both developing and developed countries, the burden of disease is particularly high among underprivileged and disadvantaged older people. In numerous countries, high proportions of the aged population are not covered by primary oral health care; this is mainly the case in low and middle income countries due to a critical shortage of dentists. In 2015, the WHO published the World Report on Ageing and Health, which outlines a framework for action to foster healthy ageing. The policies are highly relevant to the improvement of oral health. Transformation of oral health systems away from a disease-based curative model and towards disease prevention, as well as the provision of older-person-centred integrated care are required. Moreover, wide-ranging public health action on ageing is urgently needed.

  12. Therapeutic effects of an indoor gardening programme for older people living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee

    2010-04-01

    To explore the activities of daily living and psychological well-being of older people living in nursing homes and also to examine the effectiveness of a gardening programme in enhancing socilaisation and life satisfaction, reducing loneliness and promoting activities of daily living for older people living in nursing homes. Life in nursing homes can mean very limited physical and social activity, leading to further decline in function for many older people. This was a quasi-experimental pre and posttest control group design. Older people from nursing homes were invited to join the eight week indoor gardening programme (experimental group), while older people in other nursing homes were treated as the control group; they received regular care without the eight week indoor gardening programme. There were 26 older people (25 female and one male; mean age 85 years) in the experimental group and 27 (20 female and seven male; mean age 82 years) in the control group. Demographic data including age, gender, educational level and financial situation were collected, in addition to information regarding life satisfaction, loneliness, physical activity and social network situation, before and after the eight week indoor gardening programme for both the experimental and control groups. Also, details of experimental group subjects' experience of the indoor gardening programme were elicited using open-ended questions. There were significant improvements in life satisfaction and social network and a significant decrease in perception of loneliness for older people in the experimental group after the eight week indoor gardening programme, while the activities of daily living were unchanged for both groups after the programme. Given the positive effects of gardening activities, it is suggested that they be promoted more widely among nursing home residents.

  13. PROBLEMS EMERGING FROM THE CARE OF OLDER PEOPLE:WHO CARE, WHO PAY AND WHO CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Canatan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Population of the world is aging rapidly because ofdeveloping technology abouthealth system and decreasing ratio of child bearing. The care of older people isone of the important problems of the social world in every where. This problem isnot seen as actual yet in Turkey. But population ofTurkey increases rapidly.Enrolling to a social security system is not sufficient to economic independency ofolder people. Modernization made some changes to traditional society. Forexample women work outside of home, children g otokindergartens in early ages.Families are living inside small apartments. All these changes effect also olderpeople. They do not find any place in nuclear family. People in their old ages haveto live lonely up to their need to care. Elderly care is the big problem ofthemselves and their adult children or their closerelatives. Who do care ourelderly, who pay the care and who control the care.Our social security law mustbe developed to provide of the needs of elderly population especially coming thatsounds like an avalanche. In this presentation it will be given a frame of problemand its solutions.

  14. The Cluster-Randomized BRIGHT Trial: Proactive Case Finding for Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerse, Ngaire; McLean, Chris; Moyes, Simon A.; Peri, Kathy; Ng, Terence; Wilkinson-Meyers, Laura; Brown, Paul; Latham, Nancy; Connolly, Martin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE People are now living longer, but disability may affect the quality of those additional years of life. We undertook a trial to assess whether case finding reduces disability among older primary care patients. METHODS We conducted a cluster-randomized trial of the Brief Risk Identification Geriatric Health Tool (BRIGHT) among 60 primary care practices in New Zealand, assigning them to an intervention or control group. Intervention practices sent a BRIGHT screening tool to older adults every birthday; those with a score of 3 or higher were referred to regional geriatric services for assessment and, if needed, service provision. Control practices provided usual care. Main outcomes, assessed in blinded fashion, were residential care placement and hospitalization, and secondary outcomes were disability, assessed with Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL), and quality of life, assessed with the World Health Organization Quality of Life scale, abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF). RESULTS All 8,308 community-dwelling patients aged 75 years and older were approached; 3,893 (47%) participated, of whom 3,010 (77%) completed the trial. Their mean age was 80.3 (SD 4.5) years, and 55% were women. Overall, 88% of the intervention group returned a BRIGHT tool; 549 patients were referred. After 36 months, patients in the intervention group were more likely than those in the control group to have been placed in residential care: 8.4% vs 6.2% (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.04–1.68; P = .02). Intervention patients had smaller declines in mean scores for physical health-related quality of life (1.6 vs 2.9 points, P = .007) and psychological health-related quality of life (1.1 vs 2.4 points, P = .005). Hospitalization, disability, and use of services did not differ between groups, however. CONCLUSIONS Our case-finding strategy was effective in increasing identification of older adults with disability, but there was little evidence of improved outcomes

  15. Scoping the context of programs and services for maintaining wellness of older people in rural areas of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, K S; McKenna, L; Francis, K

    2014-09-01

    Ageing and problems concerning the aged are an increasing and concerning reality in developing and underdeveloped countries such as Indonesia. Improving service quality is important to promote and maintain wellness of older persons, especially in rural areas. To explore programs and services offered to the elderly in a rural area of Indonesia to support them in promoting and maintaining their wellness. To describe roles and practices of health professionals and teams responsible for delivering services to older people. Action research was used with mixed method data collection (interview and survey). Results demonstrated that activities related to the elderly health programs were limited due to budget and facilities. Practices of health staff for elderly in the community focused on intervention tasks, rather than prevention. Lack of available information on the range of programs and services implemented in Indonesia for the elderly in community settings was a limitation of this study. Programs and services for older people have been implemented in Indonesia. However, these do not yet meet their needs, especially in rural areas. There is a need for greater focus on health promotion and illness prevention. Findings contribute to development of international knowledge in community health nursing, as these issues may not be only relevant to Indonesia. It is timely for governments, including in Indonesia, to evaluate health workforce needs in the community and appropriate educational qualifications for delivering optimal health services for older people. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  16. Older people's perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sushmita Karki,1 Dharma Nand Bhatta,1,2 Umesh Raj Aryal3 1Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Faculty of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand; 3Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the older people's perspectives on an "elderly-friendly" hospital. Methods: Hospital was stratified by four domains including government, semi-government, community, and private. We interviewed 33 hospitalized older patients and four hospital managers between June and December 2014 in Kathmandu, Nepal, using purposive sampling technique. We executed a qualitative content analysis step with extensive review of the interviews. Final name of the theme was given after the agreement between the research team and experts to improve trustworthiness. Elderly-friendly services, expectation from government and hospital, and health policy related to senior citizen were developed as main themes. Results: Most of the participants were satisfied with the behavior of health personnel. However, none of the health personnel were trained with geriatric health care. Elderly-friendly hospital guidelines and policy were not developed by any hospitals. Older people health card, advocacy for older people's health and benefit, and hospital environment were the common expectations of older patients. Government policy and budget constraint were the main obstacles to promote elderly-friendly health care services. Conclusion: Elderly-related health policies, physical environments of hospital, elderly-friendly health manpower, advocacy, and other facilities and benefits should be improved and developed. There are urgent needs to develop elderly-friendly hospital policies and guidelines that

  17. Acute stress impairs recall after interference in older people, but not in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Vanesa; Almela, Mercedes; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2014-03-01

    Stress has been associated with negative changes observed during the aging process. However, very little research has been carried out on the role of age in acute stress effects on memory. We aimed to explore the role of age and sex in the relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reactivity to psychosocial stress and short-term declarative memory performance. To do so, sixty-seven participants divided into two age groups (each group with a similar number of men and women) were exposed to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and a control condition in a crossover design. Memory performance was assessed by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). As expected, worse memory performance was associated with age; but more interestingly, the stressor impaired recall after interference only in the older group. In addition, this effect was negatively correlated with the alpha-amylase over cortisol ratio, which has recently been suggested as a good marker of stress system dysregulation. However, we failed to find sex differences in memory performance. These results show that age moderates stress-induced effects on declarative memory, and they point out the importance of studying both of the physiological systems involved in the stress response together. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Collaborative relationship in preventive home visits to older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Vass, Mikkel; Hvas, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    the visits were made. A collaborative relationship was predefined as a favourable change in behaviour seen in the visited person during the study period. Visitor characteristics were analysed from 248 records where 37 cases of collaborative relationships were documented. Results. The three most important...... on documented knowledge in health and social domains combined with an overall 'caring approach' and (iii) practical actions which imply an 'immediate concrete response to identified needs or problems' and 'individually tailored advice' to suit the older person's daily life. Conclusions. Preventive home visitor...

  19. Older people's dependence on caregivers' help in their own homes and their lived experiences of their opportunity to make independent decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitholtz, Agneta; Snellman, Ingrid; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of older people's dependence on caregivers' help, and of their opportunity to make independent decisions. Throughout the world, the older population is growing, and in Sweden, the system of care for older people is currently undergoing change. Older people in the need of care are expected to live at home for as long as possible. A qualitative and life world approach was used. Audio-taped interviews were conducted with twelve older persons living at home, dependent on daily municipal home help service. A phenomenological hermeneutic method was utilised to disclose the meanings of lived experiences. The findings revealed three themes: being facilitated to make one's own decisions, being hindered from making one's own decisions, struggling for vs. resigning oneself to losing the opportunity to make one's own decisions. The comprehensive understanding revealed that as older people become more dependent on caregivers' help, their opportunity to self-determine is challenged and this is stressful for them. The older persons assess their opportunity to self-determine differently, depending on who they are as a person. The caregivers need an awareness of this, and further research is needed to gain knowledge and understanding of how caregivers can improve the way they support and enhance older people's opportunity to decide for themselves. The findings revealed older persons need to exercise more self-determination and caregivers' need for knowledge to enable this. Further, it indicates a move towards a person-centred approach to focus on persons as individuals and see them as interdependent. The findings contribute to improvements in similar contexts worldwide. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style format prior to, and following several sessions of using the Wii Fit in physiotherapy. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities, supervised and supported the patient during the therapy sessions. Attributes included in the DCE were: mode of therapy (traditional or using the Wii Fit), amount of therapy, cost of therapy program and percentage of recovery made. Data was analysed using conditional (fixed-effects) logistic regression. Results Prior to commencing the therapy program participants were most concerned about therapy time (avoiding programs that were too intensive), and the amount of recovery they would make. Following the therapy program, participants were more concerned with the mode of therapy and preferred traditional therapy programs over programs using the Wii Fit. Conclusions The usefulness of the Wii Fit as a therapy tool with hospitalised older people is limited not only by the small proportion of older people who are able to use it, but by older people's preferences for traditional approaches to therapy. Mainstream media portrayals of the popularity of the Wii Fit with older people may not reflect the true acceptability in the older hospitalised population. PMID:22011360

  1. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Leonie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style format prior to, and following several sessions of using the Wii Fit in physiotherapy. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities, supervised and supported the patient during the therapy sessions. Attributes included in the DCE were: mode of therapy (traditional or using the Wii Fit, amount of therapy, cost of therapy program and percentage of recovery made. Data was analysed using conditional (fixed-effects logistic regression. Results Prior to commencing the therapy program participants were most concerned about therapy time (avoiding programs that were too intensive, and the amount of recovery they would make. Following the therapy program, participants were more concerned with the mode of therapy and preferred traditional therapy programs over programs using the Wii Fit. Conclusions The usefulness of the Wii Fit as a therapy tool with hospitalised older people is limited not only by the small proportion of older people who are able to use it, but by older people's preferences for traditional approaches to therapy. Mainstream media portrayals of the popularity of the Wii Fit with older people may not reflect the true acceptability in the older hospitalised population.

  2. Malnutrition and nutritional care practices in hospital wards for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Clays, Els; Bocquaert, Ilse; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Lardennois, Miguel; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to gain a better insight into the current nutritional care practices in Belgian hospital wards for older people, and to study the association between these practices and the prevalence of malnutrition. In 1999, the Council of Europe assessed nutritional care practices and support in 12 European countries and showed them to be sparse and inconsistent. At the time of research, no studies had described the association between nutritional care practices and malnutrition prevalence in Belgium. In 2007, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in a representative sample of Belgian hospital wards for older people. In total, 2094 patients from 140 wards for older people were included. The overall prevalence rate of malnutrition in wards for older people was 31.9%. Nutritional care practices such as nutritional screening and assessment, use of a standardized screening instrument and a nutritional protocol were suboptimal. Multilevel analysis revealed that ward characteristics explained for 9.1% whether a patient was malnourished or not. None of the registered nutritional care practices could explain a patient's individual risk. Malnutrition is a frequently occurring problem on hospital wards for older people. Increased consciousness among healthcare professionals and hospital policy makers of the importance of nutritional care will contribute to further improvement in care quality. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Involvement of older people in the development of fall detection systems: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilo, Friederike J S; Hürlimann, Barbara; Hahn, Sabine; Bilger, Selina; Schols, Jos M G A; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2016-02-11

    The involvement of users is recommended in the development of health related technologies, in order to address their needs and preferences and to improve the daily usage of these technologies. The objective of this literature review was to identify the nature and extent of research involving older people in the development of fall detection systems. A scoping review according to the framework of Arksey and O'Malley was carried out. A key term search was employed in eight relevant databases. Included articles were summarized using a predetermined charting form and subsequently thematically analysed. A total of 53 articles was included. In 49 of the 53 articles, older people were involved in the design and/or testing stages, and in 4 of 53 articles, they were involved in the conceptual or market deployment stages. In 38 of the 53 articles, the main focus of the involvement of older people was technical aspects. In 15 of the 53 articles, the perspectives of the elderly related to the fall detection system under development were determined using focus groups, single interviews or questionnaires. Until presently, involvement of older people in the development of fall detection systems has focused mainly on technical aspects. Little attention has been given to the specific needs and views of older people in the context of fall detection system development and usage.

  4. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF HEALTH CARE SCIENCE STUDENTS TOWARD OLDER PEOPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Simin, Dragana; Kacavendić, Jelena; Turkulov, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Education of health science students in geriatrics is important in order to provide optimal care for the growing number of elderly people because it is the attitudes of health professionals toward the elderly that play the key role in the quality of care provided. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care science students towards ageing and care for the elderly. The present cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 130 students (medical, nursing and special education and rehabilitation) of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad. The students were divided into two groups. The first group (E) included students having been taught geriatrics and nursing older adults and the other group (C) included students who had not been trained in this subject. The authors used Palmore's facts on Ageing Quiz for the knowledge evaluation and Kogan's Attitude toward Older People Scale for the attitude evaluation. The results of Facts on Aging Quiz showed the average level of students' knowledge and statistically significant difference between E and C group. The analysis of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale showed that both groups had neutral attitudes toward older people. Furthermore, a positive correlation between students' knowledge and attitudes was found. There is increasing evidence on the correlation between education, knowledge and attitudes toward older people which suggests that by acquiring better insights into all aspects of ageing through their education the students develop more positive attitudes and interest in working with older adults.

  5. Effects of Nonpharmacological Interventions for Dizziness in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendall, Julie C; Hartvigsen, Jan; Azari, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    people. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, AMED, Index to Chiropractic Literature, PsychINFO and MANTIS were searched from inception to May 2014. STUDY SELECTION: Two investigators independently screened controlled trials with dizzy participants...

  6. Overweight and Obesity in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major health problems associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, which is not sufficiently studied in people with intellectual disability yet. The present study was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study. The aim of this study was to establish (1) the prevalence of overweight,…

  7. Physical (in)activity and depression in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink-Vossen, S.; Collard, R.M.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Comijs, H.C.; de Vocht, H.M.; Naarding, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge about characteristics explaining low level of physical activity in late-life depression is needed to develop specific interventions aimed at improving physical health in depressed people above the age of 60. Methods This cross-sectional study used data from the Netherlands Study

  8. Effectiveness of Non-Pharmacological Interventions to Prevent Falls in Older People: A Systematic Overview. The SENATOR Project ONTOP Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Joseph M.; Abraha, Iosief; Dell’Aquila, Giuseppina; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Soiza, Roy; Gudmusson, Adalsteinn; Petrovic, Mirko; O’Mahony, Denis; Todd, Chris; Cherubini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    reviews of non-pharmacological interventions to prevent falls in older people in different settings, is to support clinicians and other healthcare workers with clinical decision-making by providing a comprehensive perspective of findings. PMID:27559744

  9. Pathways into chronic multidimensional poverty amongst older people: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Emily J; Schofield, Deborah J

    2016-03-07

    The use of multidimensional poverty measures is becoming more common for measuring the living standards of older people. However, the pathways into poverty are relatively unknown, nor is it known how this affects the length of time people are in poverty for. Using Waves 1 to 12 of the nationally representative Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, longitudinal analysis was undertaken to identify the order that key forms of disadvantage develop - poor health, low income and insufficient education attainment - amongst Australians aged 65 years and over in multidimensional poverty, and the relationship this has with chronic poverty. Path analysis and linear regression models were used. For all older people with at least a Year 10 level of education attainment earlier mental health was significantly related to later household income (p = 0.001) and wealth (p = 0.017). For all older people with at less than a Year 10 level of education attainment earlier household income was significantly related to later mental health (p = 0.021). When limited to those in multidimensional poverty who were in income poverty and also had poor health, older people generally fell into income poverty first and then developed poor health. The order in which income poverty and poor health were developed had a significant influence on the length of time older people with less than a Year 10 level of education attainment were in multidimensional poverty for. Those who developed poor health first then fell into income poverty spend significantly less time in multidimensional poverty (-4.90, p poverty then developed poor health. Knowing the order that different forms of disadvantage develop, and the influence this has on poverty entrenchment, is of use to policy makers wishing to provide interventions to prevent older people being in long-term multidimensional poverty.

  10. Living with constipation--older people's experiences and strategies with constipation before and during hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Lene; Tvistholm, Nina; Trosborg, Ingelise; Konradsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Constipation is a common problem among older people. This study aimed to explore how older patients experience constipation and which strategies they used in handling the condition before and during hospitalization. A qualitative exploratory research design was used. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (61-91 years of age) during hospitalization. Data were analyzed by using content analysis. Themes concerning experiences were Bodily signs and symptoms of constipation; the participants described severe pain during constipation, as well as pronounced relief after bowel movements, Impact on well-being and social activities; being constipated negatively impacted their mood and limited social activities, Striving for bowel balance; the participants experienced an ongoing strive for balancing between constipation and diarrhea. Themes related to strategies were Struggling to find a solution; they were aware of different strategies to prevent and treat constipation, though the most common solution described was the use of laxatives, Wait and see; the participants were awaiting to take action until they experienced constipation symptoms, Constipation is a private problem being challenged during hospitalization; constipation was considered a private issue rarely discussed with health-care professionals. This study illuminates the need for health-care professionals to be attentive to this issue and initiate the conversation with patients in order to advise on the management of constipation.

  11. Living with constipation—older people's experiences and strategies with constipation before and during hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Lene; Tvistholm, Nina; Trosborg, Ingelise; Konradsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Constipation is a common problem among older people. This study aimed to explore how older patients experience constipation and which strategies they used in handling the condition before and during hospitalization. Methods A qualitative exploratory research design was used. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (61–91 years of age) during hospitalization. Data were analyzed by using content analysis. Results Themes concerning experiences were Bodily signs and symptoms of constipation; the participants described severe pain during constipation, as well as pronounced relief after bowel movements, Impact on well-being and social activities; being constipated negatively impacted their mood and limited social activities, Striving for bowel balance; the participants experienced an ongoing strive for balancing between constipation and diarrhea. Themes related to strategies were Struggling to find a solution; they were aware of different strategies to prevent and treat constipation, though the most common solution described was the use of laxatives, Wait and see; the participants were awaiting to take action until they experienced constipation symptoms, Constipation is a private problem being challenged during hospitalization; constipation was considered a private issue rarely discussed with health-care professionals. Conclusion This study illuminates the need for health-care professionals to be attentive to this issue and initiate the conversation with patients in order to advise on the management of constipation. PMID:27121271

  12. Living with constipation—older people's experiences and strategies with constipation before and during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Munch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Constipation is a common problem among older people. This study aimed to explore how older patients experience constipation and which strategies they used in handling the condition before and during hospitalization. Methods: A qualitative exploratory research design was used. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (61–91 years of age during hospitalization. Data were analyzed by using content analysis. Results: Themes concerning experiences were Bodily signs and symptoms of constipation; the participants described severe pain during constipation, as well as pronounced relief after bowel movements, Impact on well-being and social activities; being constipated negatively impacted their mood and limited social activities, Striving for bowel balance; the participants experienced an ongoing strive for balancing between constipation and diarrhea. Themes related to strategies were Struggling to find a solution; they were aware of different strategies to prevent and treat constipation, though the most common solution described was the use of laxatives, Wait and see; the participants were awaiting to take action until they experienced constipation symptoms, Constipation is a private problem being challenged during hospitalization; constipation was considered a private issue rarely discussed with health-care professionals. Conclusion: This study illuminates the need for health-care professionals to be attentive to this issue and initiate the conversation with patients in order to advise on the management of constipation.

  13. Qualitative study investigating the commissioning process for older people's services provided by third sector organisations: SOPRANO study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Gina; Chadborn, Neil; Craig, Chris; Gladman, John

    2016-05-18

    The commissioning of third sector services for older people may influence the quality, availability and coordination of services for older people. The SOPRANO study aims to understand the relationships between and processes of commissioning bodies and third sector organisations providing health and social care services for older people. This qualitative study will be based in the East Midlands region of England. An initial scoping survey of commissioners will give an overview of services to maintain the health and well-being of older people in the community that are commissioned. Following this, semistructured interviews will be conducted with 4 sample groups: health and social care commissioners, service provider managers, service provider case workers and older service users. A sample size of 10-15 participants in each of the 4 groups is expected to be sufficient to reach data saturation, resulting in a final expected sample size of 40-60 participants. Informed consent will be gained from all participants, and those unable to provide informed consent will be excluded. The interview data will be analysed by 2 researchers using framework content analysis. Approval for the study has been gained from the University of Nottingham School of Medicine ethical review board, and the relevant approvals have been gained from the National Health Service (NHS) research and development departments for interviewing NHS staff. Early engagement with a wide range of stakeholders will ensure that the research findings are extensively disseminated to relevant stakeholders (including commissioners and third sector providers) in an accessible format using the extensive communication networks available to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care CLAHRCs (applied health research organisations covering all of England). The study will also be disseminated through academic routes such as conference presentations and

  14. Social support and mental health status of older people: a population-based study in Iran-Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajvar, Maryam; Grundy, Emily; Fletcher, Astrid

    2018-03-01

    To investigate direct and stress-buffering associations between social support from family and the mental health of older people in Iran, a country which has recently undergone an exceptionally fast fertility transition and is consequently experiencing rapid population ageing. A cross-sectional stratified random survey of 800 people aged 60+ years resident in Tehran was conducted. In total, 644 people responded. The Social Provisions Scale and the General Health Questionnaire were used to measure perceived social support and mental health, respectively. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings supported the hypothesis of a direct association between perceived and received social support and mental health. However, we did not find strong evidence to suggest that social support buffered the effects of stress arising from limitations of physical functioning. Lack of help doing paperwork was associated with worse mental health for women but not men. Source of support did not seem to be important. Our results indicated that in Tehran, as in Western settings, social support is important for the mental well-being of older people. Recommendations for policy and further research priorities based on the study findings were provided.

  15. Experiences and perspectives of older people regarding advance care planning: A meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Li-Shan; Huang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Wen-Yu; O'Connor, Margaret; Lee, Susan

    2017-05-01

    Studies have indicated that family members or health professionals may not know or predict their older relatives' or patients' health preferences. Although advance care planning is encouraged for older people to prepare end-of-life care, it is still challenging. To understand the experiences and perspectives of older people regarding advance care planning. A systematic review of qualitative studies and meta-synthesis was conducted. CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched. A total of 50 articles were critically appraised and a thematic synthesis was undertaken. Four themes were identified: life versus death, internal versus external, benefits versus burdens, and controlling versus being controlled. The view of life and death influenced older people's willingness to discuss their future. The characteristics, experiences, health status, family relationship, and available resources also affected their plans of advance care planning. Older people needed to balance the benefits and burdens of advance care planning, and then judge their own ability to make decisions about end-of-life care. Older people's perspectives and experiences of advance care planning were varied and often conflicted; cultural differences amplified variances among older people. Truthful information, available resources, and family support are needed to enable older people to maintain dignity at the end of life. The views of life and death for older people from different cultures should be compared to assist health professionals to understand older people's attitudes toward advance care planning, and thus to develop appropriate strategies to promote advance care planning in different cultures.

  16. Organizational Religious Behavior among Older African Americans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Wallace, John M; Jackson, James S

    2009-07-01

    This study utilizes data from the older African American sub-sample of the National Survey of American Life (n=837) to examine the sociodemographic and denominational correlates of organizational religious involvement among older African Americans. Six measures of organizational religious participation are utilized, including two measures of time allocation for organized religious pursuits. The findings indicate significant gender, region, marital status and denominational differences in organizational religiosity. Of particular note, although older black women generally displayed higher levels of religious participation, older black men spent more hours per week in other activities at their place of worship. The findings are discussed in relation to prior work in the area of religious involvement among older adults. New directions for research on religious time allocation are outlined.

  17. Application of reminiscence treatment on older people with dementia: a case study in Pingtung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song-Lin; Li, Chih-Ming; Yang, Chiu-Yen; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2009-06-01

    Reminiscence therapy has been utilized for many years in the treatment of dementia in older people. Purposes of the research included examining different methods of promoting interactivity, social participation, cognitive function improvement in those with dementia, and the effectiveness in reducing symptoms of depression following group treatment. This study used pretest and posttest electroencephalography (EEG) measurements to test reminiscence therapy efficacy on participants. This research organized a social group work with 12 elderly clients with dementia (mild to moderate stage) selected from among 90 residents of an older persons care facility in Pingtung. Eleven agreed to join the study, and 10 completed successfully all treatment sessions. Eight sessions of reminiscence cooking lessons were conducted. The effectiveness of interventions was evaluated by comparing presession and postsession EEG, mental health status, depression scale, and feeling of participation scale scores. Significant differences in values, particularly for EEG, were found between the two sets of scores. The average value of participants' fast waves rose from 43.88 to 55.12, whereas average slow-wave values fell from 56.12 to 44.13. After analysis using the Wilcoxon matched paired signed rank test, significant differences were noted. Findings and suggestions include the following: (a) The rise in Mini-Mental State Examination and reduction in depression scale scores, although noted, were not significant, and (b) the self-achievement, emotional stability, family atmosphere, and physical needs of participants were met. The authors recommend that reminiscence group work be promoted in the home for older persons and that childhood cooking sessions twice each week may be the ideal format for reminiscence group work.

  18. Metabolic and nutritional approach to older frail people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Volpato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Frailty is a common clinical syndrome in older adults that carries an increased risk for poor health outcomes including falls, incident disability, hospitalization, and mortality. It is characterized by multisystem dysregulations, leading to a loss of dynamic homeostasis, decreased physiologic reserve, and increased vulnerability to stressors. A large body of literature suggests several important multisystem pathophysiologic processes in the pathogenesis of the frailty syndrome, including chronic inflammation and immune activation, insulin resistance and those in musculoskeletal and endocrine systems. Currently, no effective pharmaceutical interventions have been developed for the prevention and treatment of the frailty syndrome. Conversely, epidemiological and intervention studies suggest that adequate nutrition and physical exercise might prevent or postpone the onset of frailty and related clinical manifestations.

  19. Living with constipation?older people's experiences and strategies with constipation before and during hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Munch, Lene; Tvistholm, Nina; Trosborg, Ingelise; Konradsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Constipation is a common problem among older people. This study aimed to explore how older patients experience constipation and which strategies they used in handling the condition before and during hospitalization.Methods: A qualitative exploratory research design was used. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (61–91 years of age) during hospitalization. Data were analyzed by using content analysis.Results: Themes concerning experiences were Bodily sig...

  20. Oral Health Conditions of Older People: Focus on the Balkan Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzopoulos Georgios S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral health plays a pivotal role in general health, especially in older people. Oral diseases may affect the development of systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension. The most important oral health conditions that have been recorded in dental literature for older population include tooth loss, dental caries, periodontal diseases, xerostomia (dry mouth) and oral cancer. Edentulism influences social life, either causing aesthetic problems or...

  1. Suffering from Loneliness Indicates Significant Mortality Risk of Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijo S. Tilvis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The harmful associates of suffering from loneliness are still in dispute. Objective. To examine the association of feelings of loneliness with all-cause mortality in a general aged population. Methods. A postal questionnaire was sent to randomly selected community-dwelling of elderly people (>74 years from the Finnish National Population Register. The questionnaire included demographic characteristics, living conditions, functioning, health, and need for help. Suffering from loneliness was assessed with one question and participants were categorized as lonely or not lonely. Total mortality was retrieved from the National Population Information System. Results. Of 3687 respondents, 39% suffered from loneliness. Lonely people were more likely to be deceased during the 57-month follow-up (31% than subjects not feeling lonely (23%, <.001. Excess mortality (HR=1.38, 95% CI=1.21-1.57 of lonely people increased over time. After controlling for age and gender, the mortality risk of the lonely individuals was 1.33 (95% CI=1.17-1.51 and after further controlling for subjective health 1.17 (CI=1.02-1.33. The excess mortality was consistent in all major subgroups. Conclusion. Suffering from loneliness is common and indicates significant mortality risk in old age.

  2. Exploring Environmental Variation in Residential Care Facilities for Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Susanna; McKee, Kevin; Wijk, Helle; Elf, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore variation in environmental quality in Swedish residential care facilities (RCFs) using the Swedish version of the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (S-SCEAM). Well-designed physical environments can positively impact on health and well-being among older persons with frail health living in RCFs and are essential for supporting person-centered care. However, the evidence base for informing the design of RCFs is weak, partly due to a lack of valid and reliable instruments that could provide important information on the environmental quality. Twenty RCFs were purposively sampled from several regions, varying in their building design, year of construction, size, and geographic location. The RCFs were assessed using S-SCEAM and the data were analyzed to examine variation in environmental quality between and within facilities. There was substantial variation in the quality of the physical environment between and within RCFs, reflected in S-SCEAM scores related to specific facility locations and with regard to domains reflecting residents' needs. In general, private apartments and dining areas had high S-SCEAM scores, while gardens had lower scores. Scores on the safety domain were high in the majority of RCFs, whereas scores for cognitive support and privacy were relatively low. Despite high building standard requirements, the substantial variations regarding environmental quality between and within RCFs indicate the potential for improvements to support the needs of older persons. We conclude that S-SCEAM is a sensitive and unique instrument representing a valuable contribution to evidence-based design that can support person-centered care.

  3. Social support and ambulatory blood pressure in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martínez, Mercedes; López-García, Esther; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Cruz, Juan J; Orozco, Edilberto; García-Esquinas, Esther; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Banegas, José R

    2016-10-01

    Social support has been associated with greater nocturnal decline (dipping) in blood pressure (BP) in younger and middle-aged individuals. However, it is uncertain if aggregated measures of social support are related to ambulatory SBP in older adults, where high SBP is frequent and clinically challenging. We studied 1047 community-living individuals aged at least 60 years in Spain. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP was determined under standardized conditions. Social support was assessed with a seven-item questionnaire on marital status, cohabitation, frequency of contact with relatives, or with friends and neighbors, emotional support, instrumental support, and outdoor companionship. A social support score was built by summing the values of the items that were significantly associated with SBP variables, such that the higher the score, the better the support. Participants' mean age was 71.7 years (50.8% men). Being married, cohabiting, and being accompanied when out of home were the support items significantly associated with SBP variables. After adjustment for sociodemographic (age, sex, education), behavioral (BMI, alcohol, tobacco, salt consumption, physical activity, Mediterranean diet score), and clinical variables [sleep quality, mental stress, comorbidity, BP medication, and ambulatory BP levels and heart rate (HR)], one additional point in the social support score built with the abovementioned three support variables, was associated with a decrease of 0.93 mmHg in night-time SBP (P = 0.039), totaling 2.8 mmHg decrease for a score of 3 vs. 0. The three-item social support score was also inversely associated with the night/day SBP ratio (β = -0.006, P = 0.010). In older adults, social support is independently associated with lower nocturnal SBP and greater SBP dipping. Further research is needed in prospective studies to confirm these results.

  4. Drugs Related to Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarons, Marta; Campins, Lluís; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Cabré, Mateu; Rofes, Laia

    2016-10-01

    Scientific evidence on the impact of medication on the physiology of swallowing is scarce and mainly based on clinical case reports. To evaluate the association between oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) and chronic exposure to medication in older patients admitted to the acute geriatric unit (AGU) of a secondary hospital, we performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 966 patients admitted to an AGU from 2008 to 2011. We reviewed (a) diagnosis of OD (assessed with the volume-viscosity swallow test, V- VST); (b) chronic patient medication classified by anatomical, therapeutic, chemical codes; and (c) demographic and clinical data. A univariate analysis was performed to determine which medications were associated with OD. A multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding clinical factors was performed to identify which of those medications were independently associated with OD. The age of patients included was 85.3 ± 6.37 years and 59.4 % were women. A total of 41.9 % presented OD. We found a possible protective effect of beta blocking agents on OD after the multivariate analysis (OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.35-0.85). None of the categories of drugs was associated with an altered swallowing function after adjusting for confounding variables. The present study is the first one to widely investigate the association between drugs and OD, increasing understanding of their association. The role of beta blockers in OD needs to be further studied as their potentially beneficial effects on the swallowing function in older patients could help to prevent complications.

  5. Social networks, social participation and self-perceived health among older people in transitional Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerliu, Naim; Burazeri, Genc; Toçi, Ervin; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Jongen, Wesley; Ramadani, Naser; Brand, Helmut

    2014-04-01

    A number of studies proved that social networks and social participation have beneficial health effects in western countries. However, the evidence from southeast European region is scant. We aimed to assess the extent of social networks and social participation and their relationship with self-perceived health status among older people in post-war Kosovo. A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted in Kosovo in 2011 including a representative sample of 1890 individuals aged ≥65 years (949 men, mean age 73 ± 6 years; 941 women, mean age 74 ± 7 years; response rate: 83%). Social networks were assessed by means of number of friends and family members that participants had contacts with, whereas social participation by involvement in social groupings/organizations. Information on self-perceived health status and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics was also collected. Overall, 93% of study participants reported that they had at least weekly contacts with more than one family member, and 97% reported daily contacts with their respective friends. Conversely, only 14% of participants reported engagement with social groupings. Generally, individuals who had contacts with friends and/or engaged with social organizations reported a better health status. Our findings point to strong family ties in this patriarchal society. Conversely, levels of social participation were considerably lower in Kosovo compared with the western European countries. The low participation levels in social groupings and their putative deleterious health effects should raise the awareness of policymakers to improve the conditions and increase the degree of social participation among older people in transitional Kosovo.

  6. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6 were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55% had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48% had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5. Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0, report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8 and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4. No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis.

  7. Toward social system theory: implications for older people with developmental disabilities and service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, P A

    1990-01-01

    The literature refers to older people with developmental disabilities as the "new service population." How and why this population emerged as a special category is discussed conceptually with reference to social systems theory. A brief review of social systems theory and some basic systemic tenets are presented. Systemic tenets are employed in examining the historical development of social gerontology and present trends in the service-delivery system. I show that the systemic variable of the economic model of human development has significantly impacted on the making of older people with developmental disabilities a dependent population. In the conclusion the systems perspective is explored in relation to recognizing the liminal, in-between parts between components. It is argued that such a perception minimizes the dichotomy between older people with developmental disabilities and the non-disabled population, paving the way for a genuine encounter.

  8. Smart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Kurowski, William; Miller, Kimberly J; Pearce, Alan J; Santamaria, Nick; Long, Maureen; Ventura, Cameron; Said, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people. © 2014 ACOTA.

  9. Associations of Various Health-Ratings with Geriatric Giants, Mortality and Life Satisfaction in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2016-01-01

    Self-rated health is routinely used in research and practise among general populations. Older people, however, seem to change their health perceptions. To accurately understand these changed perceptions we therefore need to study the correlates of older people's self-ratings. We examined self......-rated, nurse-rated and physician-rated health's association with common disabilities in older people (the geriatric giants), mortality hazard and life satisfaction. For this, we used an age-representative population of 501 participant aged 85 from a middle-sized city in the Netherlands: the Leiden 85-plus......) were included as geriatric giants. Participants provided a score for life satisfaction and were followed up for vital status. Concordance of self-rated health with physician-rated (k = .3 [.0]) and nurse-rated health (k = .2 [.0]) was low. All three ratings were associated with the geriatric giants...

  10. Insomnia Severity Index: psychometric properties with Chinese community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Doris S F

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index. Despite the high prevalence of insomnia in older people and its detrimental impact on well-being and healthcare costs, this problem is almost always undetected and consequently under-treated. The Insomnia Severity Index is psychometrically sound in measuring perceived insomnia severity. However, it has had very limited application in non-White populations. An instrument validation study was carried out between October 2008 and April 2009. The Insomnia Severity Index was translated into Chinese using Brislin's model and administered to a convenience sample of 585 older Chinese people recruited from three community centres for elders. Other instruments were also administered, including the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Cronbach's alpha of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index was 0.81, with item-to-total correlations in the range of 0.34-0.67. Construct validity was supported by its moderate relationship with the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and sleep efficiency. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index also indicated more severe level of insomnia in older people who reported depressed mood on the Geriatric Depression Scale. Discriminant validity was supported as the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index could discriminate poorer sleepers from normal sleepers. Exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor structure for the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index in measuring the severity and impacts of insomnia on the Chinese older people. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index is a culturally-relevant and psychometrically-sound instrument for assessing severity and impact of insomnia in Chinese community-dwelling older people. Nurses can use this tool to assess older people's perceptions of insomnia. © 2010 The

  11. Effect of the conditional cash transfer program Oportunidades on vaccination coverage in older Mexican people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunization is one of the most effective ways of preventing illness, disability and death from infectious diseases for older people. However, worldwide immunization rates are still low, particularly for the most vulnerable groups within the elderly population. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the Oportunidades -an incentive-based poverty alleviation program- on vaccination coverage for poor and rural older people in Mexico. Methods Cross-sectional study, based on 2007 Oportunidades Evaluation Survey, conducted in low-income households from 741 rural communities (localities with <2,500 inhabitants) of 13 Mexican states. Vaccination coverage was defined according to three individual vaccines: tetanus, influenza and pneumococcal, and for complete vaccination schedule. Propensity score matching and linear probability model were used in order to estimate the Oportunidades effect. Results 12,146 older people were interviewed, and 7% presented cognitive impairment. Among remaining, 4,628 were matched. Low coverage rates were observed for the vaccines analyzed. For Oportunidades and non-Oportunidades populations were 46% and 41% for influenza, 52% and 45% for pneumococcal disease, and 79% and 71% for tetanus, respectively. Oportunidades effect was significant in increasing the proportion of older people vaccinated: for complete schedule 5.5% (CI95% 2.8-8.3), for influenza 6.9% (CI95% 3.8-9.6), for pneumococcal 7.2% (CI95% 4.3-10.2), and for tetanus 6.6% (CI95% 4.1-9.2). Conclusions The results of this study extend the evidence on the effect that conditional transfer programs exert on health indicators. In particular, Oportunidades increased vaccination rates in the population of older people. There is a need to continue raising vaccination rates, however, particularly for the most vulnerable older people. PMID:23835202

  12. Oral Health Conditions of Older People: Focus on the Balkan Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzopoulos Georgios S.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral health plays a pivotal role in general health, especially in older people. Oral diseases may affect the development of systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension. The most important oral health conditions that have been recorded in dental literature for older population include tooth loss, dental caries, periodontal diseases, xerostomia (dry mouth and oral cancer. Edentulism influences social life, either causing aesthetic problems or affecting functional abilities, such as speaking, chewing and eating. Dental caries in older people is similar to that in people in their thirties. Socio-economic status and living area play a key role in the development of dental caries. In addition, the accumulation of several risk factors, such as plaque or systemic diseases, acts synergistically in the onset of periodontal disease in seniors. Furthermore, older people, mainly due to their medications, exhibit a reduced amount of saliva. Xerostomia causes difficulties in chewing, speaking and swallowing, and it has a substantial impact on older people’s lives. The prevalence of oral cancer is 1-10 per 100,000 patients, and several factors (smoking, alcohol, education, economic status play crucial role. Limited data exists today that evaluates oral health conditions of seniors in the Balkan countries. Aging and socio-economic status of seniors in the Balkans are significantly associated with oral health problems.

  13. Few older people in New Zealand who commit suicide receive specialist psychogeriatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gary; Casey, Jane

    2014-08-01

    Suicide in older people is a growing public health concern in many parts of the world. The literature on this issue is lacking in New Zealand. The aim of this study is to ascertain whether this group is accessing specialist psychogeriatric services. A retrospective case series study of completed suicides in older people (≥65 years) during a three-year period from January 2010 to December 2012 was performed. An online survey detailing demographic and clinical information was completed by psychiatrists in 15 of the 20 District Health Boards in New Zealand. Only about 15% of older people who committed suicide were accessing specialist psychogeriatric services and the group with the highest suicide rate (men≥85 years) did not feature in specialist services. Depression (61%) was the most common diagnosis and nearly half (35%) had had contact with specialist services within three days prior to the suicide. Over half (52%) had a history of past suicide attempt(s). Older people who complete suicide are infrequently accessing specialist services. In those that do, there are questions to be answered regarding suicide prediction and prevention for this high-risk group of vulnerable individuals. More research is required targeting those not accessing specialist services, in particular the high risk group of older men. The role of general practitioner, community care, the assessment and management of depression and whether there is any access issue to specialist psychogeriatric services require elucidation. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  14. A Systematic Review of Behavioural Interventions Promoting Healthy Eating among Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Because eating habits are inseparably linked with people’s physical health, effective behaviour interventions are highly demanded to promote healthy eating among older people. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective diet interventions for older people and provide useful evidence and direction for further research. Three electronic bibliographic databases—PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection were used to conduct a systematic literature search based on fixed inclusion and exclusion criteria. English language peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2011 and 2016 were selected for data extraction and quality assessment. Finally, a total of 16 studies were identified. The studies’ duration ranged from three weeks to seven years. The majority of studies were carried out in European countries. Seven studies had a moderate quality while the remaining studies were at a less than moderate level. Three dietary educational interventions and all meal service related interventions reported improvements in older people’s dietary variety, nutrition status, or other health-related eating behaviours. Multicomponent dietary interventions mainly contributed to the reduction of risk of chronic disease. The results supported that older people could achieve a better dietary quality if they make diet-related changes by receiving either dietary education or healthier meal service. Further high-quality studies are required to promote healthy eating among older people by taking regional diet patterns, advanced information technology, and nudging strategies into account.

  15. A Systematic Review of Behavioural Interventions Promoting Healthy Eating among Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cueto, Federico J. A.; Santos, Quenia Dos; Monteleone, Erminio; Giboreau, Agnès; Bredie, Wender L. P.; Hartwell, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Because eating habits are inseparably linked with people’s physical health, effective behaviour interventions are highly demanded to promote healthy eating among older people. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective diet interventions for older people and provide useful evidence and direction for further research. Three electronic bibliographic databases—PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection were used to conduct a systematic literature search based on fixed inclusion and exclusion criteria. English language peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2011 and 2016 were selected for data extraction and quality assessment. Finally, a total of 16 studies were identified. The studies’ duration ranged from three weeks to seven years. The majority of studies were carried out in European countries. Seven studies had a moderate quality while the remaining studies were at a less than moderate level. Three dietary educational interventions and all meal service related interventions reported improvements in older people’s dietary variety, nutrition status, or other health-related eating behaviours. Multicomponent dietary interventions mainly contributed to the reduction of risk of chronic disease. The results supported that older people could achieve a better dietary quality if they make diet-related changes by receiving either dietary education or healthier meal service. Further high-quality studies are required to promote healthy eating among older people by taking regional diet patterns, advanced information technology, and nudging strategies into account. PMID:29373529

  16. Older people and 'active ageing': Subjective aspects of ageing actively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Paul; McFarquhar, Tara; Bowling, Ann

    2011-04-01

    Following a critical overview of the active ageing concept, a thematic decomposition of 42 transcribed interviews with British people aged 72 years and over indicates that active ageing is understood in relation to physical, cognitive, psychological and social factors, but that these co-exist in complex combinations. The notion of activity in active ageing is grasped in relation to an active/passive distinction which emphasizes the enhancement or diminishment of concrete powers of activity. A 'challenge and response' framework is suggested for future research on active ageing.

  17. Challenges to conducting research with older people living in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Sue; Longhurst, Susan; Higginson, Irene J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although older people are increasingly cared for in nursing homes towards the end of life, there is a dearth of research exploring the views of residents. There are however, a number of challenges and methodological issues involved in doing this. The aim of this paper is to discuss some of these, along with residents' views on taking part in a study of the perceptions of dignity of older people in care homes and make recommendations for future research in these settings. M...

  18. Social Skills of Older People: Conversations in Same- and Mixed-Age Dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Dixie D.; Kemper, Susan; Hummert, Mary Lee; Kemtes, Karen A.; Shaner, Jaye; Segrin, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Finds that self-reported loneliness was not related to depression or social anxiety for either young or older adults, and was not related to young or older adults' social skill as measured by partner attention. Indicates that social anxiety, however, was related to social skill during intergenerational conversations. (SR)

  19. The Effects of Quality of Life and Ability to Perform Activities of Daily Living on Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older People Living in Publicly Managed Congregate Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Feng; Yang, Rea-Jeng; Chang, Shu-Fang; Chou, Yuan Hwa; Huang, Ean-Wen

    2017-06-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is characterized by a decrease in cognitive abilities that does not affect the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Therefore, this condition is easily overlooked. The prevalence and factors of influence for MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing are currently unknown. This study investigated the prevalence and distribution of MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing and assessed the correlations among quality of life (QoL), ADL, and MCI. This study applied a correlational study design. The participants were older people who met the study criteria and who lived in public housing in Wanhua District, Taipei City, Taiwan. One-on-one interviews were conducted to measure the cognitive abilities of the participants, and 299 valid samples were collected. The prevalence of MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing was 16.1%. The χ test was employed to evaluate the distribution of MCI prevalence and indicated that the group with higher MCI prevalence exhibited the following characteristics: older than 81 years; married; lived in public housing for more than 20 years; cohabiting; had a history of drinking; and exhibited severe memory regression, physical disabilities, psychological distress, and low QoL. The difference between the groups achieved statistical significance (p < .05). After performing logistical regression analysis to control demographic variables, we found that QoL and ADL were critical for predicting MCI. This study confirmed that QoL and ADL correlate significantly with MCI in older people. Maintaining an open and supportive community enables older people to maintain sufficient mental activity, which has been shown to reduce MCI. These findings may provide an important reference for policy makers, educators, researchers, and community practitioners in their development of service strategies for older people.

  20. Do Correlates of Pain-Related Stoicism and Cautiousness Differ in Younger and Older People With Advanced Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Kenneth; Tran, Kim T; Gauthier, Lynn R; Rodin, Gary; Zimmermann, Camilla; Warr, David; Librach, S Lawrence; Moore, Malcolm; Shepherd, Frances A; Gagliese, Lucia

    2018-03-01

    Age differences are not evident in pain-related stoicism and cautiousness in people with cancer pain. Little is known about the factors associated with these pain-related attitudes or age-related patterns in these associations. The present cross-sectional study investigated the biopsychosocial correlates of the attitudes in younger and older patients with advanced cancer. Pain-related stoicism (fortitude, concealment, superiority) and cautiousness (self-doubt, reluctance) were assessed using the Pain Attitudes Questionnaire-Revised (PAQ-R). Participants, 155 younger (younger than 60 years old) and 114 older (60 years old or older) patients with advanced cancer completed the PAQ-R and measures of sociodemographic and medical characteristics, pain intensity, cognitive-affective pain-related responses, physical functioning, psychological distress and well-being, and psychosocial functioning. Backwards regression analyses identified correlates for each PAQ-R factor separately for younger and older patients. Activity engagement was a frequent correlate, but its relationship with concealment was the only association common to both age groups. Younger and older patients exhibited different avoidance-related constructs suggesting relational challenges in the former group (avoidant attachment) and intrapersonal fear in the latter (cognitive avoidance). Medical correlates also showed age differences: younger patients showed symptom-focused correlates, whereas older patients showed aging-related correlates. Findings support a biopsychosocial framework of cancer-pain adaptation incorporating a lifespan-developmental perspective. To our knowledge, this article is the first to identify biopsychosocial correlates of stoic and cautious attitudes toward cancer pain in younger and older patients with advanced cancer. Findings highlight possible age-related motivations for greater pain-related stoicism or cautiousness and can potentially inform interventions addressing challenges in

  1. From Advance Euthanasia Directive to Euthanasia: Stable Preference in Older People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Eva E; Pasman, H Roeline W; Deeg, Dorly J H; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether older people with advance directive for euthanasia (ADEs) are stable in their advance desire for euthanasia in the last years of life, how frequently older people with an ADE eventually request euthanasia, and what factors determine this. Mortality follow-back study nested in a cohort study. The Netherlands. Proxies of deceased members of a cohort representative of Dutch older people (n = 168) and a cohort of people with advance directives (n = 154). Data from cohort members (possession of ADE) combined with after-death proxy information on cohort members' last 3 months of life. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed on determinants of a euthanasia request in individuals with an ADE. Response rate was 65%. One hundred forty-two cohort members had an ADE at baseline. Three months before death, 87% remained stable in their desire for euthanasia; 47% eventually requested euthanasia (vs 6% without an ADE), and 16% died after euthanasia. People with an ADE were more likely to request euthanasia if they worried about loss of dignity. The majority of older adults who complete an ADE will have a stable preference over time, but an advance desire for euthanasia does not necessarily result in a euthanasia request. Writing an ADE may reflect a person's need for reassurance that they can request euthanasia in the future. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. A Pilot Physical Activity Initiative to Improve Mental Health Status amongst Iranian Institutionalized Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Matlabi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sufficient level of physical activity may promote overall and mental health of old people. This study was carried out to investigate the practicability of a physical activity promotion initiative amongst institutionalized older people in Tabriz, Iran. Methods: Purposive sampling method was used in this semi-experimental study to recruit 31 older people living in a selected residential care in Tabriz. Moderate-intensity aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity was planned for those who had not severe baseline cognitive impairment or were not too frail to undertake the survey. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 was used to measure mental health status before and after intervention through a face-to-face interview. Descriptive statistics, Wilkcoxon rank-sum, Mann–Whitney U and Chi-Square tests were employed to analyses the data. Results: The applied intervention was significantly improved status of physical health, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and severe depression. Conclusion: Incorporation of physical activity promotion programs into routines of older people residential care homes in Iran is feasible but may need training of physical activity specialists to work with older people based on their physical endurance and limitations.

  3. Caring for the new uninsured: Hospital charity care for older people without coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLia, Derek

    2006-12-01

    Despite near-universal coverage through Medicare, a number of elderly residents in the United States do not have health insurance coverage. To the author's knowledge, this study is the first to document trends in the use of hospital charity care by uninsured older people. Data from the New Jersey Charity Care Program, which subsidizes hospitals for services provided to low-income uninsured people, were used to analyze trends in charity care utilization by older people from 1999 to 2004. Charity care charges are standardized to uniform Medicaid reimbursement rates and inflation adjusted using the Medical Care Consumer Price Index. From 1999 to 2004, use of charity care by older people grew much faster than it did for younger patients. As a result, older people now account for a greater share of hospital charity care in New Jersey than children. Elderly users of charity care generated higher costs per patient than their younger counterparts. Cost differences were especially salient at the upper end of the distribution, where high-cost elderly patients used significantly more resources than high-cost patients in other age groups. These results highlight an emerging source of strain on the healthcare safety net and point to a growing population of uninsured residents who have costly and complex medical needs. Similar experiences are likely to be found in other states, especially those that have growing populations of elderly immigrants who are likely to lack health insurance.

  4. [Medicaments and oral healthcare 4. Pharmacotherapy in (frail and care dependent) older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; van der Putten, G J; Visser, A; Vissink, A

    2017-05-01

    Polypharmacy is the consequence of multimorbidity. Both phenomena may cause functional limitations and/or frailty and/or care dependency in older people. In the human body, a medicament undergoes at least 3 important actions: absorption, distribution and elimination. These actions may proceed aberrantly in older people. Following interaction with receptors, a medicament triggers a chain reaction in the human body. The receptors and each link of the chain reaction may be subject to changes due to diseases as well as ageing. This, particularly, is the case with regard to medications directed towards the central nervous system and the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, interactions may occur between various medications mutually and between medications on the one hand and on the other hand food and water intake, self-medication with herbs, and diseases. Moreover, older people usually experience more adverse effects of medications when compared to younger people. This is due to altered body actions and reactions, polypharmacy and the many possible interactions. In older people, utilisation and intake of medications often give rise to problems that can be divided into medicament-related, patient-related, care- and care provider-related and other problems.

  5. Association between indicators of dementia and nutritional status in institutionalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesi, Lilian Fernanda; Leandro-Merhi, Vânia Aparecida; de Oliveira, Maria Rita Marques

    2013-09-01

    Dementia weakens older people and can lead to malnutrition; therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the association between indicators of dementia and biochemical indicators, anthropometric indicators and food intake in institutionalised older people. A total of 150 older people of both genders participated in this study. Nutritional status was determined by body mass index and other anthropometric variables, and biochemical indicators were used to analyse the differences between individuals with and without dementia. Energy and nutrient intakes were determined by food records, and dementia was investigated with the Mini-Mental State Examination. The data were analysed by the chi-square test, Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney tests. Of the 150 individuals studied, 48% were men with a mean age of 73 ± 10 years and 52% were women with a mean age of 80 ± 9 years. Thirty-six per cent had some degree of malnutrition and 48% presented dementia, which was more prevalent in women (59%). The nutritional status of men and women individuals with and without dementia differed significantly (P people with dementia may have higher nutritional requirements. Implications for practice.  Investigation of dementia may contribute to the nutritional status assessment of older people and energy expenditure and immobility should be investigated for a more complete assessment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The effectiveness of crisis resolution/home treatment teams for older people with mental health problems: a systematic review and scoping exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toot, Sandeep; Devine, Mike; Orrell, Martin

    2011-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of crisis resolution/home treatment services for older people with mental health problems. A systematic review was conducted to report on the effectiveness of crisis resolution/home treatment teams (CRHTTs) for older people with mental health problems. As part of the review, we also carried out a scoping exercise to assess the typologies of older people's CRHTTs in practice, and to review these in the context of policy and research findings. The literature contains Grade C evidence, according to the Oxford Centre of Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM) guidelines, that CRHTTs are effective in reducing numbers of admissions to hospitals. Outcomes such as length of hospital stay and maintenance of community residence were reviewed but evidence was inadequate for drawing conclusions. The scoping exercise defined three types of home treatment service model: generic home treatment teams; specialist older adults home treatment teams; and intermediate care services. These home treatment teams seemed to be effectively managing crises and reducing admissions. This review has shown a lack of evidence for the efficacy of crisis resolution/home treatment teams in supporting older people with mental health problems to remain at home. There is clearly a need for a randomised controlled trial to establish the efficacy of crisis resolution/home treatment services for older people with mental health problems, as well as a more focussed assessment of the different home treatment service models which have developed in the UK. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, L.; Schultz-Larsen, K.; Fristrup, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Thos...... the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare Udgivelsesdato: 2009/9......Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In order to transform...

  8. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Fristrup, Tine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Thos...... the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare.......Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In order to transform...

  9. Frequent use of emergency departments by older people: a comparative cohort study of characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Maryann; Berry, Debra; Considine, Julie

    2018-04-12

    To characterise older people who frequently use emergency departments (EDs) and compare patient outcomes with older non-frequent ED attenders. Retrospective comparative cohort study. Logistic regression modelling of patient characteristics and health service usage, comparing older frequent ED attenders (≥4 ED attendances in 12 months) to non-frequent ED attenders. Three Australian public hospital EDs, with a total of 143 327 emergency attendances in the 12 months. People aged ≥65 years attending the ED in financial year 2013/2014. The primary outcome was frequent ED use; secondary outcomes were ED length of stay, discharge destination from ED, hospital length of stay, re-presentation within 48 h, hospital readmission within 30 days and in-hospital mortality. Five percent of older people were frequent attenders (n = 1046/21 073), accounting for 16.9% (n = 5469/32 282) of all attendances by older people. Frequent ED attenders were more likely to be male, aged 75-84 years, arrive by ambulance and have a diagnosis relating to chronic illness. Frequent attenders stayed 0.4 h longer in ED (P < 0.001), were more likely to be admitted to hospital (69.2% vs 67.2%; P = 0.004), and had a 1 day longer hospital stay (P < 0.001). In-hospital mortality for older frequent ED attenders was double that of non-frequent attenders (7.0% vs 3.2%, P < 0.001) over 12 months. Older frequent ED attenders had more chronic disease and care needs requiring hospital admission than non-frequent attenders. A new approach to care planning and coordination is recommended, to optimise the patient journey and improve outcomes.

  10. The Flexible Care Service: a third-sector service for older people with mental health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Demographic patterns indicate that by 2030, one in five people in England will be over 65. Together with the fact that as people age they are more likely to suffer from comorbidities, it is of paramount importance that local services are designed to meet the needs of individual older people. The Flexible Care Service is a resource for older people with mental health problems. Through the use of client case studies, the Department of Health's 'six Cs' (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) are used as a framework to demonstrate how a third-sector service such as Flexible Care can offer a person-centred approach in order to meet the diverse needs of individual clients. The framework is also used to demonstrate the high level of skills needed by flexible carers in order to provide this support.

  11. Developing a community-based psycho-social intervention with older people and third sector workers for anxiety and depression: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingstone, Tom; Burroughs, Heather; Bartlam, Bernadette; Ray, Mo; Proctor, Janine; Shepherd, Thomas; Bullock, Peter; Chew-Graham, Carolyn Anne

    2017-07-12

    One-in-five people in the UK experience anxiety and/or depression in later life. However, anxiety and depression remain poorly detected in older people, particularly in those with chronic physical ill health. In the UK, a stepped care approach, to manage common mental health problems, is advocated which includes service provision from non-statutory organisations (including third/voluntary sector). However, evidence to support such provision, including the most effective interventions, is limited. The qualitative study reported here constitutes the first phase of a feasibility study which aims to assess whether third sector workers can deliver a psychosocial intervention to older people with anxiety and/or depression. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the views of older people and third sector workers about anxiety and depression among older people in order to refine an intervention to be delivered by third sector workers. Semi-structured interviews with participants recruited through purposive sampling from third sector groups in North Staffordshire. Interviews were digitally recorded with consent, transcribed and analysed using principles of constant comparison. Nineteen older people and 9 third sector workers were interviewed. Key themes included: multiple forms of loss, mental health as a personal burden to bear, having courage and providing/receiving encouragement, self-worth and the value of group activities, and tensions in existing service provision, including barriers and gaps. The experience of loss was seen as central to feelings of anxiety and depression among community-dwelling older people. This study contributes to the evidence pointing to the scale and severity of mental health needs for some older people which can arise from multiple forms of loss, and which present a significant challenge to health, social care and third sector services. The findings informed development of a psychosocial intervention and training for third sector

  12. Technological Solutions for Older People with Alzheimer's Disease: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresova, Petra; Tomsone, Signe; Lameski, Petre; Madureira, Joana; Mendes, Ana; Zdravevski, Eftim; Chorbev, Ivan; Trajkovik, Vladimir; Ellen, Moriah; Rodile, Kasper

    2018-04-27

    In the nineties, numerous studies began to highlight the problem of the increasing number of people with Alzheimer's disease in developed countries, especially in the context of demographic progress. At the same time, the 21st century is typical of the development of advanced technologies that penetrate all areas of human life. Digital devices, sensors, and intelligent applications are tools that can help seniors and allow better communication and control of their caregivers. The aim of the paper is to provide an up-to-date summary of the use of technological solutions for improving health and safety for people with Alzheimer's disease. Firstly, the problems and needs of senior citizens with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers are specified. Secondly, a scoping review is performed regarding the technological solutions suggested to assist this specific group of patients. Works obtained from the following libraries used in this scoping review: Web of Science, PubMed, Springer, ACM and IEEE Xplore. Four independent reviewers screened the identified records and selected relevant articles which were published in the period from 2007 to 2018. A total of 6,705 publications were selected. In all, 128 full papers were screened. Results obtained from the relevant studies were furthermore divided into the following categories according to the type and use of technologies: devices, processing, and activity recognition. The leading technological solution in the category of devices are wearables and ambient non-invasive sensors. The introduction and utilization of these technologies however brings about challenges in acceptability, durability, ease of use, communication, and power requirements. Furthermore, in needs to be pointed out that these technological solutions should be based on open standards. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Influence of psychosocial factors on the energy and protein intake of older people on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Lina; Hickson, Mary; Brown, Edwina A

    2013-09-01

    To explore the relationship between nutritional parameters and psychosocial factors in older people on dialysis. A cross-sectional observational study in prevalent older people on hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). A secondary analysis from a quality of life study in older people (Broadening Options for Long-term Dialysis in the Elderly). One-hundred and six patients 65 years of age or older and on dialysis for at least 90 days were purposively recruited (HD patients matched to PD patients by age, sex, dialysis vintage, ethnicity and Index of Deprivation). Half were on HD, the mean age was 72.7 years, 72% were male, 92% were from a White ethnic background, and 26% had diabetes. The patients attended one visit at which they completed nutritional assessments (3-day food diary, subjective global assessment, handgrip strength, and body mass index) and questionnaires: Short Form-12 (SF-12), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Mini Mental State Exam, and social networks. The differences in nutritional parameters between patients on PD and HD were determined by univariate analyses, and the relationships between nutritional intake and demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables were determined by multivariate analyses. There was no difference in the energy and protein intake and nutritional status between older people on HD and PD. For the whole sample, multivariate analyses found that lower energy intake was related to fewer social networks (P = .002) and lower SF-12 Physical Component Scale (PCS) scores (P = .021). A lower protein intake was related to worsening Index of Deprivation scores (P = .028) and an interaction between SF-12 PCS and presence of possible depression (P = .015). Energy and protein intake in older people (regardless of modality) appears to be independently associated with psychosocial variables. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The portrayal of older people's social participation on german prime-time TV advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Eva-Marie; Schwender, Clemens; Bowen, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the portrayal of older people's social participation on TV advertisements according to a set of theoretically meaningful indicators from communication science and gerontology. We examined a representative sample of 656 prime-time advertisements broadcast for a period of 2 weeks in 2005 in Germany. Five percent of the advertisements featured at least one older character. Each of the characters in the subsample was rated according to role prominence, viewer-character distance, employment status, openness to experience, social interactions, and loneliness. This portrayal was compared with the portrayal of younger characters appearing in the same commercials and with the portrayal of younger characters in commercials without an older character according to the same indicators. 4.5% of the characters were rated 60 years or older. Older characters were disproportionately featured in major roles, depicted as employed and open to new experience. Furthermore, older characters were most often depicted within intergenerational and nonfamily contexts. Older characters were kept at a greater camera distance than younger characters in "young commercials." Although rare, when older characters did appear, they were depicted as socially engaged. We compare this portrayal with real-world gerontological evidence and age stereotypes and discuss how the portrayal might affect viewers.

  15. The Development of Assistive Systems to Support Older People: Issues that Affect Success in Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jean D. Hallewell Haslwanter; Geraldine Fitzpatrick

    2017-01-01

    Due to an aging population in Europe, the development of Ambient Assisted Living technologies (AAL) is increasingly the target of research financing. These technologies promise to enable older people to remain in their own homes longer, something many people report wanting and which may also reduce the costs of care. To date however there are few systems on the market. Other studies have tried to understand this by looking at user acceptance. However, by looking only at the user acceptance, w...

  16. The role of sports clubs in helping older people to stay active and prevent frailty: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Paul; Webb, Elizabeth; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan

    2017-07-14

    Frailty is a common syndrome in older adults characterised by increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes as a result of decline in functional and physiological measures. Frailty predicts a range of poor health and social outcomes and is associated with increased risk of hospital admission. The health benefits of sport and physical activity and the health risks of inactivity are well known. However, less is known about the role of sports clubs and physical activity in preventing and managing frailty in older adults. The objective of this study is to examine the role of membership of sports clubs in promoting physical activity and reducing levels of frailty in older adults. We used data from waves 1 to 7 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Survey items on physical activity were combined to produce a measure of moderate or vigorous physical activity for each wave. Frailty was measured using an index of accumulated deficits. A total of sixty deficits, including symptoms, disabilities and diseases were recorded through self-report and tests. Direct and indirect relationships between sports club membership, levels of physical activity and frailty were examined using a cross-lagged panel model. We found evidence for an indirect relationship between sports club membership and frailty, mediated by physical activity. This finding was observed when examining time-specific indirect pathways and the total of all indirect pathways across seven waves of survey data (Est = -0.097 [95% CI = -0.124,-0.070], p = sports clubs may be useful in preventing and managing frailty in older adults, both directly and indirectly through increased physical activity levels. Sports clubs accessible to older people may improve health in this demographic by increasing activity levels and reducing frailty and associated comorbidities. There is a need for investment in these organisations to provide opportunities for older people to achieve the levels of physical activity

  17. Living and dying with dignity: a qualitative study of the views of older people in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Longhurst, Susan; Higginson, Irene

    2009-07-01

    most older people living in nursing homes die there. An empirically based model of dignity has been developed, which forms the basis of a brief psychotherapy to help promote dignity and reduce distress at the end of life. to explore the generalisability of the dignity model to older people in nursing homes. qualitative interviews were used to explore views on maintaining dignity of 18 residents of nursing homes. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. The analysis was both deductive (arising from the dignity model) and inductive (arising from participants' views). the main categories of the dignity model were broadly supported: illness-related concerns, social aspects of the illness experience and dignity conserving repertoire. However, subthemes relating to death were not supported and two new themes emerged. Some residents saw their symptoms and loss of function as due to old age rather than illness. Although residents did not appear to experience distress due to thoughts of impending death, they were distressed by the multiple losses they had experienced. these findings add to our understanding of the concerns of older people in care homes on maintaining dignity and suggest that dignity therapy may bolster their sense of dignity.

  18. The family and community lives of older people after the Second World War: new evidence from York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mark; Wannell, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This article uses the findings of a detailed and unpublished survey, carried out in York in 1947 and 1948, to examine the support networks, social lives and economic conditions of older people in a period when considerable sociological attention was being paid to this section of the population. It is argued that the sociology of old age in this period overstated the role of families, and downplayed the involvement of the wider community, in the social networks of older people. The article also shows that even many of those who were physically restricted in some way could participate fully in social activities. Friends, visiting and social clubs played an important role in many lives. However, the financial circumstances of many older people restricted many areas of social participation, and contemporaneous poverty surveys probably understated the real extent of poverty among the elderly. These high levels of poverty themselves underscore the importance of the family and community support networks that are uncovered using the York data.

  19. The physical environment, activity and interaction in residential care facilities for older people: a comparative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Susanna; McKee, Kevin; Wallinder, Maria; von Koch, Lena; Wijk, Helle; Elf, Marie

    2017-12-01

    The physical environment is of particular importance for supporting activities and interactions among older people living in residential care facilities (RCFs) who spend most of their time inside the facility. More knowledge is needed regarding the complex relationships between older people and environmental aspects in long-term care. The present study aimed to explore how the physical environment influences resident activities and interactions at two RCFs by using a mixed-method approach. Environmental assessments were conducted via the Swedish version of the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (S-SCEAM), and resident activities, interactions and locations were assessed through an adapted version of the Dementia Care Mapping (DCM). The Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS) was used to assess residents' affective states. Field notes and walk-along interviews were also used. Findings indicate that the design of the physical environment influenced the residents' activities and interactions. Private apartments and dining areas showed high environmental quality at both RCFs, whereas the overall layout had lower quality. Safety was highly supported. Despite high environmental quality in general, several factors restricted resident activities. To optimise care for older people, the design process must clearly focus on accessible environments that provide options for residents to use the facility independently. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Finding people and their utterances in social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, W.; Chen, H.-H.; Efthimiadis, E.N.; Savoy, J.; Crestani, F.; Marchand-Millet, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in usage of content creation platforms of various forms, has led to a huge number of people sharing their utterances. These so-called social media are attractive for many applications, and offering access to the information contained in them is the goal of my research. Given the two

  1. [Factors which influence the position towards euthanasia : Results of a representative survey among older people in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesinger, Mathias; Prudlik, Laura; Pauli, Sara; Hendlmeier, Ingrid; Noyon, Alexander; Schäufele, Martina

    2018-02-01

    Until now older adults have not been a target group for surveys regarding their personal attitudes towards euthanasia, although they are closest to chronic illness and death. To determine the attitudes of older adults towards euthanasia and controversial topics in the context of illness, euthanasia and care (e. g. palliative care) on the basis of a representative sample. The study was based on a postal survey of a representative random sample of the population aged 65 years and older (n = 3500) from a city in southern Germany using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 1068 persons completed the questionnaire (response rate 30.5%). Assisted death was supported by 74.2% of the respondants and assisted suicide by 80.4%. According to multiple logistic regression analysis the support decreased with increasing strength of religious faith and a non-German country of origin. Of the participants 53.3% were worried about being a burden to their family, especially people with a limited state of health. People who shared this concern showed significantly more support for both types of euthanasia. More than 40% feared that people with severe and incurable illnesses would be more likely to be forced into a premature death (slippery slope argument). This concern was associated with a decreasing support of euthanasia. The results indicate that the strong approval of the legalization of assisted death and assisted suicide by older people is motivated not only by their desire for a self-determined death but also by fears and concerns. The findings have important implications for counseling, palliative care and treatment.

  2. Positive and negative associations of individual social capital factors with health among community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabayama, Mai; Watanabe, Chie; Ryuno, Hirochika; Kamide, Kei

    2017-12-01

    Previous literature has found positive correlations between social capital and health in older adults, fewer studies have investigated the subdimension's effects of social capital on health. We aimed to determine the individual social capital subfactors in community-dwelling older adults in Japan, and to analyze the associations of these factors with physical and mental health. We sent a self-administered questionnaire assessing their perception of social group activity as the individual social capital, and mental and physical health (measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36) to 4320 randomly selected older people. There were 1836 valid responses. We clarified that people who participated in any social activity group were in significantly better physical and mental health compared with the people who did not. By the factor analysis of the perception for the social group activity, we identified three components of the individual social capital aspect that we termed harmonious, hierarchic and diversity. Using multiple linear regression, we found the hierarchic aspect was significantly negatively associated with mental health, whereas the harmonious aspect was significantly positively associated with mental and physical health, and diversity was significantly positively associated with mental health. As the previous research literature on social capital has mainly emphasized its positive health consequences, the present findings provide a novel demonstration that some aspects of individual social capital can have negative associations with health outcomes in community-dwelling older people. For the practical application of promoting a healthier society, it is important to consider both the positive and negative sides of social capital. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2427-2434. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Gender and rural-urban differences in reported health status by older people in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Zarina Nahar; Tishelman, Carol; Agüero-Torres, Hedda; Chowdhury, A M R; Winblad, Bengt; Höjer, Bengt

    2003-01-01

    The study aims to (i) describe regional variation and gender differences in health status of older people (60 years and older) in Bangladesh, indicated by self-reported health problems and functional ability; (ii) explore influence of socio-economic factors on health status of older people. In a cross-sectional study in rural and urban Bangladesh, 696 older persons were asked about their health problems and ability to manage activities of daily living (ADL). More than 95% of older people reported health problems. Approximately 80% of elderly women in both the regions reported having four or more health problems compared with 42% and 63% elderly men in the urban and rural regions, respectively. More women (urban: 55%; rural: 36%) than men (urban: 32%; rural: 22%) also reported difficulties with ADL. Irrespective of age, sex and area of residence, those reporting greater number of health problems were more likely to report difficulty with at least one ADL task. Reporting pattern of specific health problems varied between urban and rural regions. Socio-economic indicators were found to have little influence on reporting of health problems, particularly in the rural region. Observed regional difference may be related to the influence of social and environmental factors, and level of awareness concerning certain health conditions.

  5. Effects of music on depression in older people: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moon Fai; Wong, Zi Yang; Onishi, Hideaki; Thayala, Naidu Vellasamy

    2012-03-01

    To determine the effect of music on depression levels in older adults. Background.  Depression is a common psychiatric disorder in older adults, and its impacts on this group of people, along with its conventional treatment, merit our attention. Conventional pharmacological methods might result in dependence and impairment in psychomotor and cognitive functioning. Listening to music, which is a non-pharmacological method, might reduce depression. A randomised controlled study. The study was conducted from July 2009-June 2010 at participants' home in Singapore. In total, 50 older adults (24 using music and 26 control) completed the study after being recruited. Participants listened to their choice of music for 30 minutes per week for eight weeks. Depression scores were collected once a week for eight weeks. Depression levels reduced weekly in the music group, indicating a cumulative dose effect, and a statistically significant reduction in depression levels was found over time in the music group compared with non-music group. Listening to music can help older people to reduce their depression level. Music is a non-invasive, simple and inexpensive therapeutic method of improving life quality in community-dwelling older people. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Silver Memories: implementation and evaluation of a unique radio program for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Catherine; Bartlett, Helen P

    2011-03-01

    A unique radio program, Silver Memories, specifically designed to address social isolation and loneliness in older people by broadcasting music (primarily), serials and other programs relevant to the period when older people grew up--the 1920-1950s--first aired in Brisbane, Australia, in April 2008. The impact of the program upon older listeners' mood, quality of life (QOL) and self-reported loneliness was independently evaluated. One hundred and thirteen community-dwelling persons and residents of residential care facilities, aged 60 years and older participated in a three month evaluation of Silver Memories. They were asked to listen to the program daily and baseline and follow-up measures of depression, QOL and loneliness were obtained. Participants were also asked for their opinions regarding the program's quality and appeal. The results showed a statistically significant improvement in measures of depression and QOL from baseline to follow-up but there was no change on the measure of loneliness. The results did not vary by living situation (community vs. residential care), whether the participant was lonely or not lonely, socially isolated or not isolated, or whether there had been any important changes in the participant's health or social circumstances throughout the evaluation. It was concluded that listening to Silver Memories appears to improve the QOL and mood of older people and is an inexpensive intervention that is flexible and readily implemented.

  7. Older people's adoption of e-learning services: a qualitative study of facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; He, Yiqin; Kohlbacher, Florian

    2018-05-14

    This research investigates the facilitators and barriers for older people to adopt e-learning services using qualitative data of older people in a Chinese city. A qualitative approach was applied to explore the perceived facilitators and obstacles toward e-learning adoption with 10 older Chinese aged over 50. The results indicate the following: (1a) Age-related changes and cohort effects were found to be the internal barriers for the adoption of e-learning. (1b) Equipment problems, lack of time, and the availability of alternatives were found to have negative effects on the acceptance of e-learning services. It is notable that alternatives including the University of the Third Age (U3A) were found to be more attractive for older Chinese. (2a) Work requirements and flexibility of e-learning services were found to have direct effects on the acceptance of services. (2b) User-friendly design and stimulation from family would facilitate older people to adopt. Practical implications of this research include that policymakers should consider investing more in education in later life and introducing e-learning services in public lectures and tutorials and that the age-related barrier should be taken into consideration in the design phase of e-learning services. U3As should consider integrating e-learning approaches and cooperating with the community.

  8. Preventing sight loss in older people. A qualitative study exploring barriers to the uptake of regular sight tests of older people living in socially deprived communities in South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddyr, S; Jones, A

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes research findings that try to understand some of the reasons that prevent older people in deprived communities in South Wales from accessing NHS funded sight tests and leads to a discussion of suitable interventions that seek to improve access to primary eye care services and prevent avoidable sight loss. Data were collected from eight focus groups (n = 63) of mixed gender and ages (60-80+ years), of white origin living in deprived communities in South Wales. Individuals were recruited for the focus groups by extensively publicizing the project, with a range of health and older people's community services and groups such as sheltered housing complexes, stroke support groups and coffee morning groups. The study included people who attended optometry services and people not engaged with services. A purposive sampling technique summarizes the sampling approach taken, an approach which the team utilized to recruit 'information rich' cases, namely individuals, groups and organizations that provided the greatest insight into the research question. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data underwent thematic content analysis and subsequent interpretations were corroborated by expert advisors and a project steering group. Cost was perceived as a significant barrier to accessing sight tests, particularly in relation to purchasing glasses. Other barriers included the perceived pressure to buy glasses associated with visits to the optometrists; poor understanding of the purpose of a sight test in a health prevention context and acceptance of deteriorating sight loss due to the ageing process. Areas of improvement for the delivery of preventative eye health services to older people are identified, as are areas for reflection on the part of those who work within the eye health industry. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Caring for Children and Older People - A Comparison of European Policies and Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Fridberg, Torben

    systems for children and older people of seven countries, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, England, the Netherlands, France, and Germany. The book provides an overview of the historical development of the care policies, and the organisation, financing and provision of care for each country, as well as presenting...

  10. Changes in Leisure Styles and Satisfaction of Older People: A Five Years Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Cristina; Spazzafumo, Liana; Papa, Roberta; Marcellini, Fiorella

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the leisure style and leisure satisfaction of a sample of older people at baseline and after a period of 5 years. Three groups were identified by factorial and cluster analyses and labelled under the headings of: Organised Style, Surrounding Style and Indoor Style. Each group represented a different typology of leisure,…

  11. Factors associated with increasing functional decline in multimorbid independently living older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W.; Bleijenberg, N.; Drubbel, I.; Numans, M.E.; De Wit, N.J.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives With increasing age the levels of activities of daily living (ADL) deteriorate. In this study we aimed to investigate which demographic characteristics and disorders are associated with ADL disabilities in multi-morbid older people. Study design We performed a cross-sectional study with

  12. Effects of intensive home visiting programs for older people with poor health status: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, A.; Rossum, E. van; Nelemans, P.; Kempen, G.I.J.M.; Knipschild, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home visiting programs have been developed aimed at improving the health and independent functioning of older people. Also, they intend to reduce hospital and nursing home admission and associated cost. A substantial number of studies have examined the effects of preventive home visiting

  13. Understanding the experiences of racialized older people through an intersectional life course perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Ilyan; Grenier, Amanda; Brotman, Shari; Koehn, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    This article proposes the development of an intersectional life course perspective that is capable of exploring the links between structural inequalities and the lived experience of aging among racialized older people. Merging key concepts from intersectionality and life course perspectives, the authors suggest an analytic approach to better account for the connections between individual narratives and systems of domination that impinge upon the everyday lives of racialized older people. Our proposed intersectional life course perspective includes four dimensions: 1) identifying key events and their timing, 2) examining locally and globally linked lives, 3) exploring categories of difference and how they shape identities, 4) and assessing how processes of differentiation, and systems of domination shape the lives, agency and resistance among older people. Although applicable to various forms of marginalization, we examine the interplay of racialization, immigration, labour and care in later life to highlight relationships between systems, events, trajectories, and linked lives. The illustrative case example used in this paper emerged from a larger critical ethnographic study of aging in the Filipino community in Montreal, Canada. We suggest that an intersectional life course perspective has the potential to facilitate a deeper understanding of the nexus of structural, personal and relational processes that are experienced by diverse groups of older people across the life course and into late life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Technology in Community-Based Organizations that Serve Older People: High Tech Meets High Touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renold, Carl; Meronk, Cheryl; Kelly, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate implementation of information technology (IT) can help create a more efficient, less costly, and higher-quality service-delivery environment for community-based organizations that serve older people. Relevant studies and reports on technology in healthcare can be compared and applied to these organizations. This study is the result of…

  15. 'The Taste Buddies': Participation and empowerment in a residential home for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; Abma, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    The active participation and autonomy of older people living in residential homes is considered to be problematic. However, in our action research project conducted in a Dutch residential care organisation we found ways to enhance residents' direct participation. This form of participation is

  16. "I had a good time when I was young": Interpreting descriptions of continuity among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breheny, Mary; Griffiths, Zoë

    2017-04-01

    Messages describing how best to age are prominent in gerontological theory, research and the media. These prescriptions for ageing may foster positive experiences in later life; however, they may also obscure the social and situated nature of expectations for ageing well. Continuity Theory proposes ageing well is achieved through continuity of activity and stability of relationships and identity over the life course. Continuity seems adaptive, yet prioritising continuity may not match the expectations, desires and realities of older people. To understand continuity among older people, the present study used interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to analyse transcripts from eleven participants over the age of 79 years. Continuity was important for older people in this study, who described a range of practices that supported internal and external continuity. Participants acknowledged both positive and negative changes in roles and obligations as they aged which impacted on continuity of identity. Continuity of identity was linked both to being 'just like always' and 'just like everyone else'. Examining these accounts shows how they are tied to expectations that older people should both maintain earlier patterns of behaviour while also negotiating changing social expectations for behaviour that are linked to age. These tensions point to the balance between physical, environmental and interpersonal change and the negotiation of social expectations which together structure possibilities for ageing well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Goncalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce

  18. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this

  19. Multidisciplinary model for housing and well-being for older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Møller, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between housing and the well-being of older people is a topic of growing interest. The focus is often on a specific aspect of housing, for example accessibility, location or interior design, and the perspective taken is typically that of a specific discipline. The influence...

  20. Multidisciplinary Model for Housing and Well-Being for Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Møller, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between housing and the well-being of older people is a topic of growing interest. The focus is often on a specific aspect of housing, for example accessibility, location or interior design, and the perspective taken is typically that of a specific discipline. The influence...

  1. Municipal health expectancy in Japan: decreased healthy longevity of older people in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Takehito

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about small-area variation in healthy longevity of older people and its socioeconomic correlates. This study aimed to estimate health expectancy at 65 years (HE65 at the municipal level in Japan, and to examine its relation to area socio-demographic conditions. Methods HE65 of municipalities (N = 3361 across Japan was estimated by a linear regression formula with life expectancy at 65 years and the prevalence of those certificated as needing nursing care. The relation between HE65 and area socio-demographic indicators was examined using correlation coefficients. Results The estimated HE65 (years ranged from 13.13 to 17.39 for men and from 14.84 to 20.53 for women. HE65 was significantly positively correlated with the proportion of elderly and per capita income, and negatively correlated with the percentage of households of a single elderly person, divorce rate, and unemployment rate. These relations were stronger in large municipalities (with a population of more than 100,000 than in small and medium-size municipalities. Conclusion A decrease in healthy longevity of older people was associated with a higher percentage of households of a single elderly person and divorce rate, and lower socioeconomic conditions. This study suggests that older people in urban areas are susceptible to socio-demographic factors, and a social support network for older people living in socioeconomically disadvantaged conditions should be encouraged.

  2. Leisure Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Older People: A National Survey in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luo

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to explore older people's subjective leisure experiences and to further examine associations of such experiences with their depressive symptoms in Taiwan. Known correlates of depression, such as demographics, physical health, and social support, were taken into account. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to collect data using…

  3. Concepts and strategies of quality assurance in care for older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, H.L.G.R.; Leichsenring, Kai; Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan

    2018-01-01

    In the context of globally rising life expectancy the concepts of quality of care and quality of life need to be redefined for older people who need long-term care at some stage of their lives. To ensure access, sustainability of staffing and funding as well as the quality of facilities and services

  4. Older People Who Stutter: Barriers to Communication and Perceptions of Treatment Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker-Katz, Geraldine; Lincoln, Michelle; McCabe, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the experience of stuttering for people over 55 years of age. Recent research has established that the same types of stuttering behaviours, cognitions, and emotional consequences experienced during young adulthood persist into older age. Aims: The aims were to investigate perceptions of limitations to activity and…

  5. Exercise and Sports Science Australia position statement on exercise and falls prevention in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, Anne; Sherrington, Catherine; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2011-11-01

    Falls affect a significant number of older Australians and present a major challenge to health care providers and health systems. The purpose of this statement is to inform and guide exercise practitioners and health professionals in the safe and effective prescription of exercise for older community-dwelling people with the goal of preventing falls. Falls in older people are not random events but can be predicted by assessing a number of risk factors. Of particular importance are lower limb muscle strength, gait and balance, all of which can be improved with appropriate exercise. There is now extensive evidence to demonstrate that many falls are preventable, with exercise playing a crucial role in prevention. Research evidence has identified that programs which include exercises that challenge balance are more effective in preventing falls than those which do not challenge balance. It is important for exercise to be progressively challenging, ongoing and of sufficient dose to maximise its benefits in reducing falls. Other (non-exercise) interventions are necessary for certain people with complex medical conditions or recent hospitalisation and risk factors relating to vision and the use of psychotropic medications. Qualified exercise professionals are well placed to implement the research evidence and to prescribe and supervise specific exercise aimed at preventing falls in both healthy older community-dwelling people and those with co-morbidities. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective Attention in Web Forms: An Exploratory Case Study with Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Sergio; Guijarro, Jose-Maria; Blat, Josep

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study aimed to identify which ways of marking required and optional fields help older people fill in web forms correctly. Drawing on a pilot study and selective attention research in ageing, modified versions of widely used forms were created, in which standard asterisks were replaced with one of three…

  7. Employment Status and Perceived Health Status in Younger and Older People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokavcova, Martina; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gavelova, Miriam; Middel, Berrie; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how employment is associated with perceived physical and mental health status in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical variables stratified by age. The sample consisted of 184 MS patients divided into a younger (less than 45 years) and an older (greater than or equal to 45 years) age…

  8. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  9. Loneliness and social support of older people in China: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Hicks, Allan; While, Alison E

    2014-03-01

    Loneliness is a serious problem for older people, which can be alleviated by social support. The dramatic population ageing together with social and economic change in China increases the likelihood of loneliness and the availability of different sources of social support of older people. The aim of this review was to identify the prevalence of loneliness and its related factors and sources of social support of older people in China. Electronic literature searches were conducted in September 2011 using Web of Science, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, China Academic Journal and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals. Twenty-six papers were identified and reviewed. The prevalence of loneliness varied across the studies, reflecting the different measurements and samples. Marital status, gender, age, educational level, economic level, living arrangements, health status and social support were significant factors related to loneliness. The family was the most important source of social support followed by friends. The receipt of family support improved subjective well-being and mental health, but the effects of support from friends were inconsistent. Chinese older people received relatively little support from neighbours, governmental or other social organisations. Further well-designed studies are needed to identify additional factors related to loneliness and to understand the support from friends, neighbours, formal organisations and other sources. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Medicaments and oral healthcare 4. Pharmacotherapy in (frail and care dependent) older people].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Putten, G.J. van der; Visser, A.; Vissink, A.

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy is the consequence of multimorbidity. Both phenomena may cause functional limitations and/or frailty and/or care dependency in older people. In the human body, a medicament undergoes at least 3 important actions: absorption, distribution and elimination. These actions may proceed

  11. Remembering in times of misery. Can older people in South Africa 'Work through'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, E.

    2004-01-01

    In this article the author shows through ethnographic data collected in a South African township how the memories of older people are memories of loss and resilience. The author describes and analyses remembering as a moral activity, which comments on the social fabric of present everyday South

  12. The involvement of Spanish older people in nondegree educational programs: reasons for and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the reasons older Spanish people participate in nondegree educational programs and the barriers they may face when they want to do so. Data were drawn from the 2007 Survey on Adults' Involvement in Learning Activities (Encuesta sobre la Participación de la Población Adulta en Actividades de Aprendizaje: EADA) and correspond to a nationally representative sample of Spanish people aged between 60 and 74 years old (n=4,559). Overall, only 8.7% of the sample participated in a nondegree educational program. Predictors of participation were being a woman, being younger, having a higher educational level, and being employed. The most frequent reason given for participation was of an intrinsic nature (e.g., interest in the topic), although instrumental motives (e.g., utility of the content for daily life) were more common than suggested by previous research. As for barriers to participation, the vast majority of older people (95.6% of those who did not participate) did not even express a desire to participate. The most frequent barriers were internal (e.g., age/health restrictions). This kind of barrier was ascribed a greater importance by older and less educated groups as well as by those who participate less in cultural activities. Policies to promote older people's participation in nonformal educational activities are discussed in light of the data.

  13. The functional effects of physical exercise training in frail older people : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; van Uffelen, J.G.Z.; Riphagen, I.; van Mechelen, W.

    2008-01-01

    This systematic review describes the effect of exercise training on physical performance in frail older people. Randomized controlled trials were identified from searches in PubMed, EMBASE and CENTRAL from January 1995 through August 2007. Two reviewers independently screened the trials for

  14. Cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention model for community-dwelling frail older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, R.J.F.; Adang, E.M.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Eijken, M.I.J. van; Wimo, A.; Achterberg, T. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in geriatric care for community-dwelling older people. There are, however, relatively few reports on the economics of this type of care. This article reports about the cost-effectiveness of the Dutch Geriatric Intervention Program (DGIP) compared to usual care

  15. Developing person-centred practice in hip fracture care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Jane; Macmillan, Maureen; Currie, Colin; Matthews-Smith, Gerardine

    2016-12-14

    To facilitate a multidisciplinary collaborative approach to developing person-centred practice in hip fracture care for older people. Collaborative inquiry, a form of action research, was used to collect data for this study. It involved exploration of dilemmas, questions and problems that are part of human experience. Clinical leaders from different disciplines (n=16), who work with older people with hip fractures at different stages of the care pathway, participated in a series of facilitated action meetings. The practice development techniques used in this study included: identifying the strengths and limitations of the current service, values clarification, creating a shared vision, sharing clinical stories, reviewing case records, and reflecting on the experiences of three older people and two caregivers. Hip fracture care was based on meeting service targets, national guidelines and audits. Care was fragmented across different service delivery units, with professional groups working independently. This resulted in suboptimal communication between members of the multidisciplinary group of clinical leaders and care that was process-driven rather than person-centred. Spending time away from clinical practice enabled the multidisciplinary group to collaborate to understand care from the patients' and caregivers' perspectives, and to reflect critically on the care experience as a whole. To develop a person-centred workplace culture, the multidisciplinary team requires facilitated time for reflection. Ongoing facilitative leadership would enable the multidisciplinary team to collaborate effectively to deliver safe, effective person-centred practice in hip fracture care for older people.

  16. Implementing care programmes for frail older people: A project management perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; Abma, T.A.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the issues that influenced the implementation of programmes designed to identify and support frail older people in the community in the Netherlands. Methods: Qualitative research methods were used to investigate the perspectives of project leaders, project members and members

  17. Nurses' Perceptions of Their Relationships with Informal Carers in Institutional Respite Care for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of their collaboration and relationships with family members in institutional respite care for the elderly. The family has a particularly important role in respite care, which is an extension of care provided at home. However no published studies were found on this subject. The data were collected through qualitative interviews (N=22. Content analysis of the nurses’ descriptions of their collaboration with family members yielded four main categories as follows: (1 conscious ignoring, (2 attempting to understand the family’s situation, (3 hinting at private family matters, and (4 being a friend. The results lend support to earlier findings which emphasize the complexity of relationships between nurses and family carers. A novel finding here is that these relationships may also develop into friendships. Greater emphasis must be placed on primary nursing so that the nurse and informal carer can build up a genuine relationship of trust. If periods of respite care are to help older people and their families to manage independently, it is imperative that nurses have the opportunity to visit their patients at home.

  18. Revisiting the role of neighbourhood change in social exclusion and inclusion of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Victoria F; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Damaris

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To explore how older people who are "aging in place" are affected when the urban neighbourhoods in which they are aging are themselves undergoing socioeconomic and demographic change. Methods. A qualitative case study was conducted in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Montréal (Québec, Canada), the analysis drawing on concepts of social exclusion and attachment. Results. Participants express variable levels of attachment to neighbourhood. Gentrification triggered processes of social exclusion among older adults: loss of social spaces dedicated to older people led to social disconnectedness, invisibility, and loss of political influence on neighbourhood planning. Conversely, certain changes in a disadvantaged neighbourhood fostered their social inclusion. Conclusion. This study thus highlights the importance of examining the impacts of neighbourhood change when exploring the dynamics of aging in place and when considering interventions to maintain quality of life of those concerned.

  19. Revisiting the Role of Neighbourhood Change in Social Exclusion and Inclusion of Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Victoria F.; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Damaris

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To explore how older people who are “aging in place” are affected when the urban neighbourhoods in which they are aging are themselves undergoing socioeconomic and demographic change. Methods. A qualitative case study was conducted in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Montréal (Québec, Canada), the analysis drawing on concepts of social exclusion and attachment. Results. Participants express variable levels of attachment to neighbourhood. Gentrification triggered processes of social exclusion among older adults: loss of social spaces dedicated to older people led to social disconnectedness, invisibility, and loss of political influence on neighbourhood planning. Conversely, certain changes in a disadvantaged neighbourhood fostered their social inclusion. Conclusion. This study thus highlights the importance of examining the impacts of neighbourhood change when exploring the dynamics of aging in place and when considering interventions to maintain quality of life of those concerned. PMID:22013528

  20. Seek and Ye shall Find : How Search Requirements Affect Job Finding Rates of Older Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullegie, P.G.J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unemployment insurance recipients in the Netherlands were for a long time exempted from the requirement to actively search for a job when they reached the age of 57.5. We study how this exemption affected the job finding rates of the recipients involved. We find evidence that the job

  1. Seek and ye shall find : How search requirements affect job finding rates of older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullegie, P.G.J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Unemployment insurance recipients in the Netherlands were for many years exempted from the requirement to actively search for a job after they reached the age of 57.5. We study how this exemption affected the job finding rates of the recipients involved. Our results indicate that the job finding

  2. A Review of Smart House Analysis Methods for Assisting Older People Living Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veralia Gabriela Sanchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Houses are a prominent field of research referring to environments adapted to assist people in their everyday life. Older people and people with disabilities would benefit the most from the use of Smart Houses because they provide the opportunity for them to stay in their home for as long as possible. In this review, the developments achieved in the field of Smart Houses for the last 16 years are described. The concept of Smart Houses, the most used analysis methods, and current challenges in Smart Houses are presented. A brief introduction of the analysis methods is given, and their implementation is also reported.

  3. A review of Smart House Analysis Methods for Assisting Older People Living Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Veralia Gabriela; Pfeiffer, Carlos; Skeie, Nils-Olav

    2017-01-01

    Smart Houses are a prominent field of research referring to environments adapted to assist people in their everyday life. Older people and people with disabilities would benefit the most from the use of Smart Houses because they provide the opportunity for them to stay in their home for as long as possible. In this review, the developments achieved in the field of Smart Houses for the last 16 years are described. The concept of Smart Houses, the most used analysis methods, and current challen...

  4. BMI and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.

    2006-01-01

    BMI differentiation and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people were analysed. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years. 21 food patterns were separated by the factor analysis. On the basis of the self-reported body mass and height, the BMI and percentages...... of overweight or obese people were calculated. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence for both sexes was unequivocally connected with eating rye. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence depended among women on consuming pork meat and alcoholic beverages. For men...

  5. Competitions as innovators of space for frail older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Rönn, Magnus

    to grow old in a care environment with respect to the WHO policy of active ageing. In addition, the study demonstrates a conservation of existing notions about appropriate architecture for ageing at the expense of an integration of multi‐disciplinary findings on the relation on ageing, eldercare and space......In the context of the universal ageing process that is currently taking place in western society, the organization of architecture competitions that deals with space for dependent ageing comes of relevance. Based on the welfare regime theory, it could be argued that this type of architecture...... for ageing by use of architectural competitions. Three municipal architecture competitions that dealt with space for ageing (ordinary or sheltered housing) constitute the framework for this study. These were organized during the period of November 2011 to April 2012, partly sponsored by the Swedish Institute...

  6. Fall-Prone Older People's Attitudes towards the Use of Virtual Reality Technology for Fall Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockx, Kim; Alcock, Lisa; Bekkers, Esther; Ginis, Pieter; Reelick, Miriam; Pelosin, Elisa; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Mirelman, Anat; Rochester, Lynn; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology is a relatively new rehabilitation tool that can deliver a combination of cognitive and motor training for fall prevention. The attitudes of older people to such training are currently unclear. This study aimed to investigate: (1) the attitudes of fall-prone older people towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR; (2) attitudinal changes after intervention with and without VR; and (3) user satisfaction following fall prevention exercise with and without VR. A total of 281 fall-prone older people were randomly assigned to an experimental group receiving treadmill training augmented by VR (TT+VR, n = 144) or a control group receiving treadmill training alone (TT, n = 137). Two questionnaires were used to measure (1) attitudes towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR (AQ); and (2) user satisfaction (USQ). AQ was evaluated at baseline and after intervention. USQ was measured after intervention only. The AQ revealed that most participants had positive attitudes towards fall prevention exercise at baseline (82.2%) and after intervention (80.6%; p = 0.144). In contrast, only 53.6% were enthusiastic about fall prevention exercise with VR at baseline. These attitudes positively changed after intervention (83.1%; p < 0.001), and 99.2% indicated that they enjoyed TT+VR. Correlation analyses showed that postintervention attitudes were strongly related to user satisfaction (USQ: r = 0.503; p < 0.001). Older people's attitudes towards fall prevention exercise with VR were positively influenced by their experience. From the perspective of the user, VR is an attractive training mode, and thus improving service provision for older people is important. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Preventive home care of frail older people: a review of recent case management studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Kristensson, Jimmie

    2004-09-01

    Preventive actions targeting community-dwelling frail older people will be increasingly important with the growing number of very old and thereby also frail older people. This study aimed to explore and summarize the empirical literature on recent studies of case/care management interventions for community-dwelling frail older people and especially with regard to the content of the interventions and the nurse's role and outcome of it. Very few of the interventions took either a preventive or a rehabilitative approach using psycho-educative interventions focusing, for instance, on self-care activities, risk prevention, health complaints management or how to preserve or strengthen social activities, community involvement and functional ability. Moreover, it was striking that very few included a family-oriented approach also including support and education for informal caregivers. Thus it seems that the content of case/care management needs to be expanded and more influenced by a salutogenic health care perspective. Targeting frail older people seemed to benefit from a standardized two-stage strategy for inclusion and for planning the interventions. A comprehensive geriatric assessment seemed useful as a base. Nurses, preferably trained in gerontological practice, have a key role in case/care management for frail older people. This approach calls for developing the content of case/care management so that it involves a more salutogenic, rehabilitative and family-oriented approach. To this end it may be useful for nurses to strengthen their psychosocial skills or develop close collaboration with social workers. The outcome measures examined in this study represented one of three perspectives: the consumer's perspective, the perspective of health care consumption or the recipient's health and functional ability. Perhaps effects would be expected in all three areas and thus these should be included in evaluative studies in addition to measures for family and/or informal

  8. Organizing integrated health-care services to meet older people's needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo de Carvalho, Islene; Epping-Jordan, JoAnne; Pot, Anne Margriet; Kelley, Edward; Toro, Nuria; Thiyagarajan, Jotheeswaran A; Beard, John R

    2017-11-01

    In most countries, a fundamental shift in the focus of clinical care for older people is needed. Instead of trying to manage numerous diseases and symptoms in a disjointed fashion, the emphasis should be on interventions that optimize older people's physical and mental capacities over their life course and that enable them to do the things they value. This, in turn, requires a change in the way services are organized: there should be more integration within the health system and between health and social services. Existing organizational structures do not have to merge; rather, a wide array of service providers must work together in a more coordinated fashion. The evidence suggests that integrated health and social care for older people contributes to better health outcomes at a cost equivalent to usual care, thereby giving a better return on investment than more familiar ways of working. Moreover, older people can participate in, and contribute to, society for longer. Integration at the level of clinical care is especially important: older people should undergo comprehensive assessments with the goal of optimizing functional ability and care plans should be shared among all providers. At the health system level, integrated care requires: (i) supportive policy, plans and regulatory frameworks; (ii) workforce development; (iii) investment in information and communication technologies; and (iv) the use of pooled budgets, bundled payments and contractual incentives. However, action can be taken at all levels of health care from front-line providers through to senior leaders - everyone has a role to play.

  9. How older people with incurable cancer experience daily living: A qualitative study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Sigrid Helene Kjørven; Danbolt, Lars J; Kvigne, Kari; Demarinis, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of older people are living with incurable cancer as a chronic disease, requiring palliative care from specialized healthcare for shorter or longer periods of time. The aim of our study was to describe how they experience daily living while receiving palliative care in specialized healthcare contexts. We conducted a qualitative research study with a phenomenological approach called "systematic text condensation." A total of 21 participants, 12 men and 9 women, aged 70-88, took part in semistructured interviews. They were recruited from two somatic hospitals in southeastern Norway. The participants experienced a strong link to life in terms of four subthemes: to acknowledge the need for close relationships; to maintain activities of normal daily life; to provide space for existential meaning-making and to name and handle decline and loss. In addition, they reported that specialized healthcare contexts strengthened the link to life by prioritizing and providing person-centered palliative care. Older people with incurable cancer are still strongly connected to life in their daily living. The knowledge that the potential for resilience remains despite aging and serious decline in health is considered a source of comfort for older people living with this disease. Insights into the processes of existential meaning-making and resilience are seen as useful in order to increase our understanding of how older people adapt to adversity, and how their responses may help to protect them from some of the difficulties inherent to aging. Healthcare professionals can make use of this information in treatment planning and for identification of psychosocial and sociocultural resources to support older people and to strengthen patients' life resources.

  10. Leisure-time physical activities for community older people with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chun; Huang, Lian-Hua; Yeh, Mei Chang; Tai, John Jen

    2011-04-01

    (1) To explore the types and three components (frequency, duration and caloric expenditure) of leisure-time physical activity in community older people with chronic diseases. (2) To identify leisure-time physical activity-related factors in these community older people. Previous research has focused primarily on measuring the actual physiological or psychological benefits of exercise or leisure-time physical activity, little is known about the factors that determine the frequency, intensity and duration of exercise or leisure-time physical activity. The identification of reliable predictors of the various components of leisure-time physical activity will enable healthcare providers to intervene and change the patterns of leisure-time physical activity in the sedentary older people more effectively. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. Participants were recruited from the Xinyi District in Taipei, Taiwan. A total of 206 older people were recruited and were asked to complete three questionnaires during a face-to-face interview with a researcher at the activity setting. The results showed that walking leisurely was the most frequent leisure-time physical activity for participants. The age, gender, living arrangement, affective feeling and environmental control were significant variables of leisure-time physical activity. The study constructs accounted for moderate amounts of variance (22% for leisure-time physical activity frequency, 27% for leisure-time physical activity duration and 24% for leisure-time physical activity caloric expenditure). This study also showed that different variables play different influential roles in the different components of LTPA. An effective intervention strategy for improving leisure-time physical activity of older people may involve tailoring the type, format, intensity, frequency and duration of a physical activity according to an individual's needs. This study described some environmental barriers to LTPA and

  11. What Older People Like to Play: Genre Preferences and Acceptance of Casual Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesham, Alvin; Wyss, Patric; Müri, René Martin

    2017-01-01

    (mean 0.75 and 0.73). For casual game characteristics, casual puzzle and simulation games were given significantly higher game-play ratings than casual action games. Similarly, participants’ control ratings for casual puzzle games were significantly higher than that for casual action and simulation games. Finally, ownership was rated significantly higher for casual puzzle and strategy games than for casual action games. Conclusions The findings of this study show that CVGs have characteristics that are suitable and enjoyable for older adults. In addition, genre was found to influence enjoyment and ratings of CVG characteristics, indicating that puzzle games are particularly easy to understand, learn, and play, and are enjoyable. Future studies should continue exploring the potential of CVG interventions for older adults in improving cognitive function, everyday functioning, and well-being. We see particular potential for CVGs in people suffering from cognitive impairment due to dementia or brain injury. PMID:28420601

  12. What Older People Like to Play: Genre Preferences and Acceptance of Casual Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesham, Alvin; Wyss, Patric; Müri, René Martin; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Nef, Tobias

    2017-04-18

    characteristics, casual puzzle and simulation games were given significantly higher game-play ratings than casual action games. Similarly, participants' control ratings for casual puzzle games were significantly higher than that for casual action and simulation games. Finally, ownership was rated significantly higher for casual puzzle and strategy games than for casual action games. The findings of this study show that CVGs have characteristics that are suitable and enjoyable for older adults. In addition, genre was found to influence enjoyment and ratings of CVG characteristics, indicating that puzzle games are particularly easy to understand, learn, and play, and are enjoyable. Future studies should continue exploring the potential of CVG interventions for older adults in improving cognitive function, everyday functioning, and well-being. We see particular potential for CVGs in people suffering from cognitive impairment due to dementia or brain injury. ©Alvin Chesham, Patric Wyss, René Martin Müri, Urs Peter Mosimann, Tobias Nef. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 18.04.2017.

  13. Physical Performance Is Associated with Working Memory in Older People with Mild to Severe Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Volkers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical performances and cognition are positively related in cognitively healthy people. The aim of this study was to examine whether physical performances are related to specific cognitive functioning in older people with mild to severe cognitive impairment. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 134 people with a mild to severe cognitive impairment (mean age 82 years. Multiple linear regression was performed, after controlling for covariates and the level of global cognition, with the performances on mobility, strength, aerobic fitness, and balance as predictors and working memory and episodic memory as dependent variables. Results. The full models explain 49–57% of the variance in working memory and 40–43% of episodic memory. Strength, aerobic fitness, and balance are significantly associated with working memory, explaining 3–7% of its variance, irrespective of the severity of the cognitive impairment. Physical performance is not related to episodic memory in older people with mild to severe cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Physical performance is associated with working memory in older people with cognitive impairment. Future studies should investigate whether physical exercise for increased physical performance can improve cognitive functioning. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NTR1482.

  14. Changes in living arrangements and mortality among older people in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Living arrangements in later life are dynamic, with changes associated with life events such as widowhood or moves into an institution. Previous research has found particular changes in living arrangements to be associated with an elevated risk of mortality. However, research in this area within the context of China is limited, despite China being home to the world's largest population of older people. This study investigates the impact of changes in living arrangements on older persons’ survival using the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey from 2002 to 2011. The original sample was 16,064 in 2002, and this study includes 6191 individuals who survived in 2005 and had complete information of track record in later waves. Changes in living arrangements are examined between 2002 and 2005. Cox-proportional hazards models are then used to investigate the association between the dynamics of living arrangements and respondents’ survival status from 2005 to 2011 . Results show that men and women who lived in an institution in both 2002 and 2005, or who moved into an institution from living with family faced a greater risk of dying compared to those continuing to live with family. By contrast, continuing to live with family or alone, or moving between living with family and living alone, were not associated with an increased mortality risk, although there were some differences by gender. The institutional care sector in China is still in its infancy, with provision based on ability to pay market fees rather than need associated with age-related function impairment. The findings show that living in, or moving into, an institution is associated with a high mortality risk therefore requires further investigation in the context of a rapidly changing Chinese society.

  15. Coping experience of health concerns and physical disability for older Chinese people: A qualitative, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, He; Turale, Sue

    2017-12-01

    In this qualitative, descriptive study, we explored the perspectives of older, community-dwelling Chinese people regarding their experiences of coping with a physical disability and their health concerns. Twenty participants were interviewed in-depth, and data were analyzed using content analysis. Five themes with 13 subthemes emerged that described older people's experiences of coping with health concerns and disability: (i) ignoring health concerns; (ii) managing self; (iii) seeking medical help; (iv) living with physical disability; and (v) relying on limited resources. Most participants did not have sufficient access to health services due to physical disability and financial deficits, so they tended to ignore their health conditions or tackle them independently before seeking medical help. At the same time, they were impacted on by social and cultural factors. Policies are required that offer more resources to community-dwelling people with disabilities in China. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. The Characteristics of Older People Who Engage in Community Music Making, Their Reasons for Participation and the Barriers They Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan; Creech, Andrea; Varvarigou, Maria; McQueen, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    There is now an accepted need for initiatives that support older people's health and well-being. There is increasing evidence that active engagement with music has the potential to contribute to this. This research aimed to explore the characteristics of older people who participated in active music making with a view to identifying the groups…

  17. A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: the COMHOME study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundler, A.J.; Holmstrom, I.K.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of

  18. Losing connections and receiving support to reconnect: experiences of frail older people within care programmes implemented in primary care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; De La Haye, J.; Mevissen, G.; Heijing, S.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate whether care provided in the care programmes matched the needs of older people. Background: Care programmes were implemented in primary-care settings in the Netherlands to identify frail older people and to prevent further

  19. Oral hygiene and oral health in older people with dementia: a comprehensive review with focus on oral soft tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delwel, S.; Binnekade, T.T.; Perez, Roberto; Hertogh, Cees M. P. M.; Scherder, Erik; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of older people with dementia and a natural dentition is growing. Recently, a systematic review concerning the oral health of older people with dementia with the focus on diseases of oral hard tissues was published. OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive literature overview

  20. A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: the COMHOME study protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundler, A.J.; Holmström, I.K.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of

  1. Cholesterol Drugs for People 75 and Older: When You Need Them and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® Cholesterol drugs for people 75 and older When you need them—and when you don’t Y our body makes a waxy substance ... statins to prevent heart disease. But for older people, there is no clear evidence that high cholesterol ...

  2. Do older people with visual impairment and living alone in a rural developing country report greater difficulty in managing stairs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairi, Noran N; Bulgiba, Awang; Peramalah, Devi; Mudla, Izzuna

    2013-01-01

    Managing stairs is a challenging activity of daily living (ADL) for older people. This study aims to examine the association between visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs among older people living alone and those living with others. A population-based cross sectional study was conducted in rural Malaysia from 2007 till 2008. Seven hundred and sixty five older people aged 60 years and over underwent eye examination for visual impairment. Visual acuity criteria were used to define visual impairment. Presenting visual acuity was assessed using a standard metric Snellen Chart of E type. Difficulty in managing stairs was measured according to a question drawn from the Barthel Index which asks "do you need help in climbing stairs". Overall, the prevalence of difficulty in managing stairs among older people in our population was 135 (18.3%, 95% CI 15.7-21.2). After adjusting for important confounders the odds ratio (OR) for visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs among older people living alone was 5.04 (95% CI 2.27, 10.62). Among older people living with others, the adjusted OR for visual impairment and difficulty in managing stairs was 3.10 (95% CI 1.52, 6.80). In a sample of older people aged 60 years and over, those living alone with visual impairment had greater difficulty in managing stairs than those living with others. Identification of these groups of older people is useful for targeting interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-verbal communication of the residents living in homes for the older people in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Marija; Kovacev, Asja Nina; Sustersic, Olga; Kragelj, Lijana Zaletel

    2010-09-01

    Aging of the population is a growing problem in all developed societies. The older people need more health and social services, and their life quality in there is getting more and more important. The study aimed at determining the characteristics of non-verbal communication of the older people living in old people's homes (OPH). The sample consisted of 267 residents of the OPH, aged 65-96 years, and 267 caregivers from randomly selected twenty-seven OPH. Three types of non-verbal communication were observed and analysed using univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In face expressions and head movements about 75% older people looked at the eyes of their caregivers, and about 60% were looking around, while laughing or pressing the lips together was rarely noticed. The differences between genders were not statistically significant while statistically significant differences among different age groups was observed in dropping the eyes (p = 0.004) and smiling (0.008). In hand gestures and trunk movements, majority of older people most often moved forwards and clenched fingers, while most rarely they stroked and caressed their caregivers. The differences between genders were statistically significant in leaning on the table (p = 0.001), and changing the position on the chair (0.013). Statistically significant differences among age groups were registered in leaning forwards (p = 0.006) and pointing to the others (p = 0.036). In different modes of speaking and paralinguistic signs almost 75% older people spoke normally, about 70% kept silent, while they rarely quarrelled. The differences between genders were not statistically significant while statistically significant differences among age groups was observed in persuasive speaking (p = 0.007). The present study showed that older people in OPH in Slovenia communicated significantly less frequently with hand gestures and trunk movements than with face expressions and head movements or different modes of speaking

  4. Illuminating the Psychological Experience of Elderly Loneliness from a Societal Perspective: A Qualitative Study of Alienation between Older People and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anna; Chau, Anson K C; Fang, Yang; Woo, Jean

    2017-07-21

    Loneliness is a common experience among older people that is associated with health risks and negative well-being. As a psychological phenomenon, it has typically been defined in Western research literature as the discrepancy between desired and actual interpersonal relations. In our qualitative study in Hong Kong, we offer insight into ageing and loneliness in an urban environment of the non-Western world and propose to reconceptualise loneliness by exploring older people's experience of alienation at the societal level as an important but often neglected dimension of their loneliness. Thirty-seven community-dwelling, Chinese adults aged 65 and above were interviewed in focus groups and their accounts analysed and interpreted using a phenomenological approach. Findings revealed that focus group participants perceived insufficient care for older people, a growing distance between themselves and society, and their disintegrating identity in society to be primary sources of societal alienation. In response, older people adopted a more passive lifestyle, attributed marginalisation and inequality to old age, and developed negative feelings including unease towards ageing, vulnerability and helplessness, and anger. The emergence of these key components and underlying themes of societal alienation illuminated neglected facets of the psychological phenomenon of loneliness and highlighted new implications for policy, practice, and research from a societal perspective to address older people's loneliness in urban settings.

  5. Joy, Exercise, Enjoyment, Getting out: A Qualitative Study of Older People's Experience of Cycling in Sydney, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis Zander; Erin Passmore; Chloe Mason; Chris Rissel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cycling can be an enjoyable way to meet physical activity recommendations and is suitable for older people; however cycling participation by older Australians is low. This qualitative study explored motivators, enablers, and barriers to cycling among older people through an age-targeted cycling promotion program. Methods. Seventeen adults who aged 50–75 years participated in a 12-week cycling promotion program which included a cycling skills course, mentor, and resource pack...

  6. Bus use and older people: a literature review applying the Person-Environment-Occupation model in macro practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Kieran; McKenna, Kryss; Fleming, Jennifer; Worrall, Linda

    2009-03-01

    The same reasons that prompt older people to give up driving can also result in difficulties with accessing public transport. Difficulties using public transport can limit older people's participation in society, thereby impacting negatively on their health. Focusing on public buses, this review explicates the link between bus usability and the health of older people and frames existing evidence on bus usability issues. The Person-Environment-Occupation (PEO) model offers a framework by which bus usability can be assessed. A combination of person-centred, environmental, and occupation-related factors, including bus design, service provision and performance, information, and the attitudes of staff and the community, impact on older people's ability to catch buses. More systematic research needs to take place in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of bus usability. Occupational therapy has a key role to play in conceptualizing, implementing, and evaluating improvements in bus usability for older people.

  7. The structure of walking activity in people after stroke compared with older adults without disability: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Margaret A; Rudolph, Katherine S; Reisman, Darcy S

    2012-09-01

    People with stroke have reduced walking activity. It is not known whether this deficit is due to a reduction in all aspects of walking activity or only in specific areas. Understanding specific walking activity deficits is necessary for the development of interventions that maximize improvements in activity after stroke. The purpose of this study was to examine walking activity in people poststroke compared with older adults without disability. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Fifty-four participants poststroke and 18 older adults without disability wore a step activity monitor for 3 days. The descriptors of walking activity calculated included steps per day (SPD), bouts per day (BPD), steps per bout (SPB), total time walking per day (TTW), percentage of time walking per day (PTW), and frequency of short, medium, and long walking bouts. Individuals classified as household and limited community ambulators (n=29) did not differ on any measure and were grouped (HHA-LCA group) for comparison with unlimited community ambulators (UCA group) (n=22) and with older adults without disability (n=14). The SPD, TTW, PTW, and BPD measurements were greatest in older adults and lowest in the HHA-LCA group. Seventy-two percent to 74% of all walking bouts were short, and this finding did not differ across groups. Walking in all categories (short, medium, and long) was lowest in the HHA-LCA group, greater in the UCA group, and greatest in older adults without disability. Three days of walking activity were captured. The specific descriptors of walking activity presented provide insight into walking deficits after stroke that cannot be ascertained by looking at steps per day alone. The deficits that were revealed could be addressed through appropriate exercise prescription, underscoring the need to analyze the structure of walking activity.

  8. [Nutrient intake of Chilean older people according to body mass index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Samuel A; Ulloa, Alejandra A; Reyes, Sussanne G

    2014-12-01

    An adequate consumption of micro and macro nutrients is essential to maintain an adequate health among older people. To compare the consumption of micro- and macronutrients in older people from three Chilean cities, according to their nutritional status. Body mass index (BMI) was assessed and a food consumption tendency survey was applied to 976 non-disabled older people, living in the community. Thinness was defined as a BMI < 23 kg/m². Twenty percent of females and 17% of males had a BMI < 23 kg/m². Participants with a higher BMI had a greater intake of micro- and macronutrients. In females, micronutrient intake was adequate among those with higher BMI, although mean intake of calcium and vitamin B-12 were below recommendations. In males, iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and pantothenic acid intake were below recommendation. Thin older adults, regardless of sex, had a lower intake of calories and micro- and macronutrients. Additionally, an overall low consumption of zinc, calcium, magnesium and vitamin B12 was detected.

  9. Assessment and management of nutrition in older people and its importance to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Ahmed

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanvir Ahmed, Nadim HaboubiAdult and Elderly Medicine, Nevill Hall Hospital, Abergavenny, Wales, UKAbstract: Nutrition is an important element of health in the older population and affects the aging process. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in: functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Older people often have reduced appetite and energy expenditure, which, coupled with a decline in biological and physiological functions such as reduced lean body mass, changes in cytokine and hormonal level, and changes in fluid electrolyte regulation, delay gastric emptying and diminish senses of smell and taste. In addition pathologic changes of aging such as chronic diseases and psychological illness all play a role in the complex etiology of malnutrition in older people. Nutritional assessment is important to identify and treat patients at risk, the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool being commonly used in clinical practice. Management requires a holistic approach, and underlying causes such as chronic illness, depression, medication and social isolation must be treated. Patients with physical or cognitive impairment require special care and attention. Oral supplements or enteral feeding should be considered in patients at high risk or in patients unable to meet daily requirements.Keywords: malnutrition, older people, anorexia of aging, sarcopinia, nutritional assessment

  10. The impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment interventions on tolerance to chemotherapy in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, T; Babic-Illman, G; Ross, P J; Maisey, N R; Hughes, S; Fields, P; Martin, F C; Wang, Y; Harari, D

    2015-04-28

    Although comorbidities are identified in routine oncology practice, intervention plans for the coexisting needs of older people receiving chemotherapy are rarely made. This study evaluates the impact of geriatrician-delivered comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) interventions on chemotherapy toxicity and tolerance for older people with cancer. Comparative study of two cohorts of older patients (aged 70+ years) undergoing chemotherapy in a London Hospital. The observational control group (N=70, October 2010-July 2012) received standard oncology care. The intervention group (N=65, September 2011-February 2013) underwent risk stratification using a patient-completed screening questionnaire and high-risk patients received CGA. Impact of CGA interventions on chemotherapy tolerance outcomes and grade 3+ toxicity rate were evaluated. Outcomes were adjusted for age, comorbidity, metastatic disease and initial dose reductions. Intervention participants undergoing CGA received mean of 6.2±2.6 (range 0-15) CGA intervention plans each. They were more likely to complete cancer treatment as planned (odds ratio (OR) 4.14 (95% CI: 1.50-11.42), P=0.006) and fewer required treatment modifications (OR 0.34 (95% CI: 0.16-0.73), P=0.006). Overall grade 3+ toxicity rate was 43.8% in the intervention group and 52.9% in the control (P=0.292). Geriatrician-led CGA interventions were associated with improved chemotherapy tolerance. Standard oncology care should shift towards modifying coexisting conditions to optimise chemotherapy outcomes for older people.

  11. Recruiting older people at nutritional risk for clinical trials: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Cynthia; Chapman, Ian M; Naganathan, Vasi; Hunter, Peter; Cameron, Ian D; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2015-04-15

    The difficulty of recruiting older people to clinical trials is well described, but there is limited information about effective ways to screen and recruit older people into trials, and the reasons for their reluctance to enrol. This paper examines recruitment efforts for a community-based health intervention study that targeted older adults. One year randomized control trial. Undernourished men and women, aged ≥ 65 years and living independently in the community were recruited in three Australian states. Participants were allocated to either oral testosterone undecanoate and high calorie oral nutritional supplement or placebo medication and low calorie oral nutritional supplementation. Hospital admissions, functional status, nutritional health, muscle strength, and other variables were assessed. 4023 potential participants were identified and 767 were screened by a variety of methods: hospital note screening, referrals from geriatric health services, advertising and media segments/appearances. 53 participants (7% of total screened) were recruited. The majority of potentially eligible participants declined participation in the trial after reading the information sheet. Media was the more successful method of recruiting, whereas contacting people identified by screening a large number of hospital records was not successful in recruiting any participants. Recruitment of frail and older participants is difficult and multiple strategies are required to facilitate participation. Australian Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN 12610000356066 date registered 4/5/2010.

  12. Identifying the content of home-based health behaviour change interventions for frail older people: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicic, Ana; Gardner, Benjamin; Belk, Celia; Kharicha, Kalpa; Iliffe, Steve; Manthorpe, Jill; Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari; Walters, Kate

    2015-11-04

    health outcomes will be estimated by calculating the percentage of all interventions featuring those characteristics that have shown effectiveness. Results will reveal the strategies that have been drawn on within home-based interventions to modify the health behaviours of frail older people, and highlight those more associated with positive changes in behaviour and health. Findings from this review will provide a useful basis for understanding, developing, and implementing behaviour change interventions in this field. PROSPERO CRD42014010370.

  13. Self-reported skin concerns: An epidemiological study of community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona; Dyson, Judith; Long, Judith; Macleod, Una

    2018-03-25

    To identify the frequency and impact of self-reported skin concerns in community-dwelling older people. Globally, the population is getting older and it is essential to develop effective interventions to promote healthy ageing. Skin change with age is inevitable and renders this often neglected organ more vulnerable to damage and breakdown; this can be costly to individuals and society. Maintenance of skin health in older people presents a health challenge that has yet to be fully understood or addressed. Cross-sectional, self-reported questionnaire survey in England. Patients registered with participating general practices (n = 3), aged ≥70 years, living in their own homes and able to give informed consent (n = 3,359) were sent a letter of invitation to a free health and care assessment, and 1116 responded. When asked "do you have any concerns about your skin?", 16.5% (n = 183) said yes. Of this group, the most common concerns were dry skin 80.7% (n = 146), itching 56.9% (n = 103) and aged appearance 61% (n = 113). Itch, dry skin and inflammation were rated as most bothersome. There was a significant association between the dry skin and itch χ 2 (1) = 6.9, p < .05. Many community-dwelling older people suffer from skin concerns predominantly dry skin and itching that is often bothersome. Skin health assessment is often absent in routine consultations with community-dwelling older people. Dry, itchy skin is prevalent and can be simply managed with low-cost interv