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Sample records for older patients commonly

  1. Diagnostic challenges in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killinger Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Older patients often present with a long, complex history and a clinical picture that frequently includes co-morbidities. It is essential that health professionals caring for older patients become familiar with common age-related changes, and the specific clinical factors that complicate the diagnostic process. A case-based approach is taken in this article to explore the diagnostic challenges in caring for older patients. Three areas of focus are used: a polypharmacy, b cognitive issues such as delirium, dementia and depression, and c increased odds of pathologies and chronic illnesses.

  2. Hippocampal Sclerosis in Older Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D.; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Schulz, Paul E.; Takei, Hidehiro; Rivera, Andreana L.; Jackson, Robert E.; Roman, Gustavo; Jicha, Gregory A.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2018-01-01

    Context Autopsy studies of the older population (≥65 years of age), and particularly of the “oldest-old” (≥85 years of age), have identified a significant proportion (~20%) of cognitively impaired patients in which hippocampal sclerosis is the major substrate of an amnestic syndrome. Hippocampal sclerosis may also be comorbid with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer disease, and Lewy body disease. Until recently, the terms hippocampal sclerosis of aging or hippocampal sclerosis dementia were applied in this context. Recent discoveries have prompted a conceptual expansion of hippocampal sclerosis of aging because (1) cellular inclusions of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) are frequent; (2) TDP-43 pathology may be found outside hippocampus; and (3) brain arteriolosclerosis is a common, possibly pathogenic, component. Objective To aid pathologists with recent recommendations for diagnoses of common neuropathologies in older persons, particularly hippocampal sclerosis, and highlight the recent shift in diagnostic terminology from HS-aging to cerebral age-related TDP-43 with sclerosis (CARTS). Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature and 5 autopsy examples that illustrate common age-related neuropathologies, including CARTS, and emphasize the importance of distinguishing CARTS from late-onset frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology and from advanced Alzheimer disease with TDP-43 pathology. Conclusions In advanced old age, the substrates of cognitive impairment are often multifactorial. This article demonstrates common and frequently comorbid neuropathologic substrates of cognitive impairment in the older population, including CARTS, to aid those practicing in this area of pathology. PMID:28467211

  3. CT examinations in older patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciuk, J.; Peters, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 2,878 unselected subsequent CT examinations carried out in 1984 were analyzed retrospectively. All studies were performed in a university hospital with a centralized department of diagnostic radiology. Most of the patients investigated were hospitalized; there were only 12% outpatients. Of the patients studied 12.6% were older than 65 years and 20.5% older than 60; 17.7% were emergency cases and patients between 16 and 25 years of age represented the largest fraction. In all other age groups the relative distribution between emergency cases and regular studies revealed no significant differences. There was no statistically significant difference between the older age group (patients older than 65 years) and the total population of this study in almost all items investigated, i.e., no differences in CT examination time and no differences in preparation time (time between two CT studies). The rate of abdominal CT examinations was 7% higher in the older age group, while the relative distribution of all other CT examinations was again comparable to the total population under study. Thus, the expected increase in patients in the older age group does not measurably prolong the CT examination time. This statement applies to a major referral center with a high percentage of inpatients. (orig.) [de

  4. [Hyperthyroidism in older patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, R; Jenny, M; Junod, J P

    1978-09-30

    This study comprises 81 thyrotoxic patients with onset after the age of 60. In elderly persons, toxic multinodular goiter is the most common cause (68%) of hyperthyroidism, followed by solitary thyroid nodules (16%) and Graves' disease (16%). Cardiovascular disorders (cardiac failure, arrythmias etc.) constitute the first and often the only symptom in 62% of the cases. The other forms of appearance are both various and deceptive: depression, slight fever, asthenia or nausea. Separate analysis of the three forms of hyperthyroidism did not reveal clinical, biological or therapeutic differences between them, except an inferior rate of captation for the toxic nodules. Isolated measurement of T3 or T4 is often insufficient to confirm the diagnosis because either of these hormones may appear at a normal rate. In three cases only the free thyroxin index was pathological on first determination. The authors have established that the autonomous nodules are larger and more active after, rather than before, 60 years of age, and have attempted to define their morphological identity. The results of the treatment are analyzed and preference is expressed for radioactive iodine in every form of hyperthyroidism.

  5. Dysphagia in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Samia; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2018-05-17

    Dysphagia in older adults is a challenging problem and necessitates a team approach. The key to effective management is recognition. Patients tend to dismiss their symptoms as normal aging; therefore, early diagnosis depends on the diligence of the primary care doctors. No diagnostic technique can replace the benefits of a thorough history, with a detailed understanding of nutritional status and aspiration risk. Although one of the main goals in management is to ensure safe swallowing, the impact of a nonoral diet on the quality of life of patients should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of older patients presenting after a fall - an accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. It is common for older patients to present to accident and emergency (AE) departments after a fall. Management should include assessment and treatment of the injuries and assessment and correction of underlying risk factors in order to prevent recurrent falls. Objectives. To determine management of older ...

  7. Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterniczuk R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Sterniczuk,1–3 Benjamin Rusak,1,2 Kenneth Rockwood31Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, 3Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, CanadaAbstract: Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep–wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep–wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+, a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged ≥80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients.Keywords: intensive care unit, sleep–wake rhythm, aging, frailty

  8. Reconstructing nurses' relationships with older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swauger, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    This book will attempt to deconstruct communication patterns between registered nurses and older patients and propose methods for re-constructing the manner in which nurses and older patients relate to one another. The number of Americans over the age of 65 grew from 3.1 million in 1900 (about 4% of

  9. Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain in Older Patients | Lyon | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions ...

  10. Barriers to dental attendance in older patients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D

    2017-04-01

    Health professionals in Ireland are increasingly concerned about the quality of oral health in older patients. The aim of this study is to identify the obstacles that face this age-group when accessing dental care, so that we are in a better position to address them. A questionnaire was completed by 105 patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. Over 50 percent of respondents had not attended a dentist in over 36 months, for the reasons that \\'I have no problem or need for treatment’ (62%) and ‘I have no teeth, and therefore I have no need to go’ (54%). While it is common to assume that no teeth means no need to see a dentist, research shows that regular dental visits are vital for ensuring the early screening of oral cancer and other mucosal pathologies, and the optimisation of existing rosthesis\\/restorations. The chief recommendation of this paper is thus to provide better education and access to older people on the importance of visiting the dentist.

  11. Education in appropiate pharmacotherapy in older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, C.J.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate pharmacotherapy in older patients is of increasing importance. Advances in medicine and pharmacotherapy mean that people with health problems live longer. The longer life expectancy means that health professionals, but particularly physicians, pharmacists, and nurses, will have to meet

  12. Differences between older and young patients with autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Soykan, Irfan

    2017-07-01

    Elderly patients with autoimmune gastritis might have different symptoms than those of young patients. The aim of the present study was to compare presented symptoms and laboratory parameters associated with autoimmune gastritis in both old and young age groups. A total of 355 patients with autoimmune gastritis were stratified into two groups: 65 years or older (n = 119, mean age 69.47 ± 5.027 years), and under 65 years (n = 236, mean age 45.79 ± 10.51 years). These two groups were then evaluated and compared by means of clinical symptoms, concurrent autoimmune diseases, serum gastrin, vitamin B 12 and chromogranin A levels, and the presence of enterochromograffin-like cell hyperplasia. Among 119 older patients, 35 had dyspeptic symptoms, and 84 patients were referred for vitamin B 12 and/or iron deficiency. In the younger group (n = 236), there were more patients who had dyspeptic symptoms (36 vs 200, P gastritis that are older and younger than 65 years-of-age. Elderly patients with autoimmune gastritis were investigated more commonly for vitamin B 12 and/or iron deficiency. Polyautoimmunity and multiple autoimmune syndrome were more common, and serum gastrin and chromogranin A levels were significantly higher in older patients. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1090-1095. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Perioperative care of the older patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Blommers; M. Klimek (Markus); K.A. Hartholt (Klaas); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa); J. Klein (Jan); P. Noordzij (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNearly 60% of the Dutch population undergoing surgery is aged 65 years and over. Older patients are at increased risk of developing perioperative complications (e.g., myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or delirium), which may lead to a prolonged hospital stay or death. Preoperative risk

  14. Antithrombotics in trauma: management strategies in the older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Henna Wong,1,2 Nicola Lovett,3 Nicola Curry,1 Ku Shah,2 Simon J Stanworth1,2,4 1Department of Clinical Haematology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 2Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford BRC Haematology Theme, 3Department of Geratology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 4Department of Haematology, NHS Blood and Transplant, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK Abstract: The ageing population has resulted in a change in the demographics of trauma, and older adult trauma now accounts for a growing number of trauma admissions. The management of older adult trauma can be particularly challenging, and exhibits differences to that of the younger age groups affected by trauma. Frailty syndromes are closely related with falls, which are the leading cause of major trauma in older adults. Comorbid disease and antithrombotic use are more common in the older population. Physiological changes that occur with ageing can alter the expected clinical presentation of older persons after injury and their susceptibility to injury. Following major trauma, definitive control of hemorrhage remains essential for improving outcomes. In the initial assessment of an injured patient, it is important to consider whether the patient is taking anticoagulants or antiplatelets and if measures to promote hemostasis such as reversal are indicated. After hemostasis is achieved and bleeding has stopped, longer-term decisions to recommence antithrombotic agents can be challenging, especially in older people. In this review, we discuss one aspect of management for the older trauma patients in greater detail, that is, acute and longer-term management of antithrombotic therapy. As we consider the health needs of an ageing population, rise in elderly trauma and increasing use of antithrombotic therapy, the need for research in this area becomes more pressing to establish best

  15. Constipation in the acutely hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Fabrizio; Minicuci, Nadia; Droghi, Annapaola Teggia; Inelmen, Emine Meral; Sergi, Giuseppe; Terranova, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the factors that determine the onset of constipation in acutely hospitalized older patients with a view to contributing towards an evidence-based identification of which patients warrant early, specific preventive measures. To evade the problem posed by the definition of constipation, we have considered parameters that are part of the daily routine in the hospital ward, such as the prescription of laxatives, also paying attention to how the co-operative older person subjectively interpret this condition. One thirds of the 192 hospitalized older patients needed a laxative at least once every 3 days. Multivariate analysis identified the use of laxatives at home as the only risk factor for objective constipation while in hospital (odds ratio (OR)=3.0). A significant risk of being dissatisfied with their bowel emptying emerged among patients who were bedridden for more than 2 weeks (OR=6.0), and in those who experienced cerebrovascular events (OR=3.1). The use of laxatives at home and awareness that satisfaction with bowel movements drops in patients obliged to stay in bed for lengthy periods of time and in those who have suffered cerebrovascular damage, should provide the grounds for a screening program to establish rational guidelines on bowel movement therapy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Dickerson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  17. The older orthopaedic patient: general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jane F

    2004-08-01

    People older than 65 years are more likely to need elective and emergent orthopaedic surgery compared with younger persons. They also experience significant benefits. Although age-related changes increase the risk of perioperative complications, understanding those changes allows prevention or at least early recognition and treatment when problems arise. Because of comorbidities, older persons take more medications that need to be managed in the perioperative period. Care could be simplified if patients were to bring their medications to the preoperative evaluation. Central nervous system sensitivity to certain pain medications (meperidine and propoxyphene) means that these drugs are best avoided as good alternatives exist (morphine and oxycodone). Adverse reactions to drugs are an important cause of acute confusion (delirium) that often complicates orthopaedic care. Early mobilization after surgery, avoiding certain drugs, avoiding restraints (including Foley catheters), attending to hydration, promoting normal sleep, compensating for sensory disorders, and stimulating daytime activities can prevent delirium. Patients with dementia are more likely to have delirium develop and, like many older people, will present special challenges in communication and decision making. Including family members in discussions may be helpful in ensuring truly informed consent.

  18. Jaw muscles in older overdenture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, James P; McManus, Frank C; Menhenick, Stephen

    2004-03-01

    To determine, using computer tomography (CT), whether the retention of a small number of teeth in the older adult used to support overdentures could affect the cross-sectional area (CSA) and X-ray density of two jaw closing muscles. Cross-sectional study of a group of older patients subdivided into dentate, edentulous and those wearing overdentures supported by two to five teeth. The sample consisted of 24 subjects aged 55-68 years. CSA and X-ray density of two jaw closing muscles, masseter and medial pterygoid were measured and evaluated using CT. There were no significant differences between left and right jaw muscles, but the CSA of the masseter muscles were significantly larger than the medial pterygoid muscles. The CSA of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles was significantly smaller in edentulous subjects compared with dentate subjects but no significant difference was observed between subjects wearing overdentures and those with a natural dentition. No significant differences were observed with the X-ray density between different muscles or dental states. The retention of a small number of teeth in the older adult used to support overdentures appears to sustain the CSA of two jaw closing muscles and therefore could enhance these patients' masticatory ability compared with those who were edentulous.

  19. Patient participation in transitional care of older patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden

    2016-01-01

    PhD thesis in Health, medicine and welfare Background: Older patients often have several health challenges, with multiple medications, which leads to a need of treatment and care from diverse healthcare services. These patients are often in need of transitions from different levels of care, specifically during hospital admission and discharge. Patient participation is highlighted and stated in patients’ rights and healthcare directives, with patients being informed and involved in all trea...

  20. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  1. Caring for Depression in Older Home Health Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in older home health patients and increases their risk of adverse outcomes. Depression screening is required by Medicare's Outcome and Assessment Information Set. The Depression Care for Patients at Home (CAREPATH) was developed as a feasible strategy for home health nurses to manage depression in their patients. The protocol builds on nurses' existing clinical skills and is designed to fit within routine home visits. Major components include ongoing clinical assessment, care coordination, medication management, education, and goal setting. In a randomized trial, Depression CAREPATH patients had greater improvement in depressive symptoms compared to usual care. The difference between groups was significant at 3 months, growing larger and more clinically meaningful over 1 year. The intervention had no impact on patient length of stay, number of home visits, or duration of visits. Thus, nurses can play a pivotal role in the long-term course and outcomes of patients with depression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. The assessment of cognitive function in older adult patients with chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mary; Steffen, Alana; Quinn, Lauretta; Collins, Eileen G; Phillips, Shane A; Bronas, Ulf G

    2018-05-25

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common chronic condition in older adults that is associated with cognitive decline. However, the exact prevalence of cognitive impairment in older adults with CKD is unclear likely due to the variety of methods utilized to assess cognitive function. The purpose of this integrative review is to determine how cognitive function is most frequently assessed in older adult patients with CKD. Five electronic databases were searched to explore relevant literature related to cognitive function assessment in older adult patients with CKD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created to focus the search to the assessment of cognitive function with standardized cognitive tests in older adults with CKD, not on renal replacement therapy. Through the search methods, 36 articles were found that fulfilled the purpose of the review. There were 36 different types of cognitive tests utilized in the included articles, with each study utilizing between one and 12 tests. The most commonly utilized cognitive test was the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), followed by tests of digit symbol substitution and verbal fluency. The most commonly assessed aspect of cognitive function was global cognition. The assessment of cognitive function in older adults with CKD with standardized tests is completed in various ways. Unfortunately, the common methods of assessment of cognitive function may not be fully examining the domains of impairment commonly found in older adults with CKD. Further research is needed to identify the ideal cognitive test to best assess older adults with CKD for cognitive impairment.

  3. Acute Hospitalization of the Older Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute hospitalization of older patients may be associated with loss of muscle strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hospitalization as a result of medical disease on muscle strength and functional performance in older medical...... patients. DESIGN: Isometric knee-extension strength; handgrip strength; and functional performance, that is, the Timed Up and Go test, were assessed at admission, at discharge, and 30 days after discharge. Twenty-four-hour mobility was measured during hospitalization. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 82.7 (8...... hospitalization, from 17.3 secs at admission to 13.3 secs at discharge (P = 0.003), but with no improvement at the 30-day follow-up (12.4 secs, P = 0.064). The median times spent in lying, sitting, and standing/walking were 17.4 hrs per day, 4.8 hrs per day, and 0.8 hrs per day, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle...

  4. [Inappropriate prescription in older patients: the STOPP/START criteria].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delgado Silveira, Eva

    2009-09-01

    Older people are a heterogeneous group of patients, often with multiple comorbidities for which they are prescribed a large number of drugs, leading to an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and drug interactions. This risk is compounded by physiological age-related changes in physiology, changes in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as by disease-related, functional and social issues. Inappropriate prescription of drugs is common in the older individuals and contributes to the increased risk of ADR. Several tools have been developed to detect potentially inappropriate prescription, the most frequently used in Spain being Beers\\' criteria. However, the value of these criteria is limited, especially as they were developed in a different healthcare system. In this article, the Spanish version of a new tool to detect potentially inappropriate prescriptions-STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person\\'s Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right i.e. appropriate, indicated Treatment) criteria-is presented. The creation, development, reliability, and use of these criteria in routine practice is described and discussed. These criteria have shown better sensitivity than Beers\\' criteria in detecting prescription problems and have the added value of being able to detect not only inappropriate prescription of some drugs, but also the omission of well indicated drugs. The STOPP\\/START criteria could become a useful screening tool to improve prescription in older people.

  5. The evaluation of older patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-06-01

    young women. Age may not be an independent increased risk of death in women with cervical cancer, and the age-group is at lower risk for virulent HPV strands (HPV 16/18 compared to younger patients. Treatment recommendations were implemented less often for older patients. Radiotherapy remained the most common treatment chosen for elderly patients. This confirms that there is a stronger need to pay attention to the elderly patient.Keywords: cervical cancer, older women

  6. [The older patient with malignant diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buske, C; Hiddemann, W

    2007-11-01

    Most malignancies show a steep increase of incidence with growing age. Because of this age specific incidence and the general aging of the population in western industrial countries the number of elderly cancer patients continuously and rapidly increases. Despite this development elderly cancer patients are currently underrepresented in clinical trials. This is caused in part by the lack of a common definition of the elderly patient and by the fact that a part of the elderly patients suffers from co-morbidities, not allowing a more dose intense treatment in these patients. It is one of the key current challenges to compensate this deficit and to develop therapeutic concepts specifically for the elderly patients, taking the individual somatic, but also social situation and finally the quality and perspective of life of the elderly patient into account.

  7. Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients: Predictors and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-18

    DEC 1989 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients : Predictors and... MEDICAL CENTER . Title of Thesis: " Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients : Predictors and Cons.equences" Name of Candidate: Victoria...dissertation manuscript entitled: 11 Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients : Predictors and Consequences 11 beyond brief excerpts is with

  8. Similarities and differences between older and young adult patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Karakaya, Fatih; Soykan, Irfan

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy with variable clinical symptoms. Elderly patients can have different manifestations from those of young patients. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether any differences or similarities exist between older and young patients with celiac disease with a special emphasis on concurrent autoimmune diseases. Celiac disease patients were stratified as older and younger patients. These two groups were then compared by means of clinical symptoms, laboratory parameters and concurrent autoimmune diseases. Factors associated with the presence of an autoimmune disease were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. There were 66 older patients (mean age 67.7 ± 3.2 years, 50 women), and 277 younger patients (mean age 35.9 ± 11.7 years, 207 women). Of the 66 older patients, eight patients had gastrointestinal symptoms and 58 patients had extradigestive symptoms. In the younger group, the number of patients referred due to gastrointestinal symptoms was higher (8 [12.2%] vs 200 (72.2%), P celiac disease clinically, histologically and by means of laboratory parameters is different in older and young patients. Polyautoimmunity and multiple autoimmune syndrome are more common in older patients compared with younger patients. A biopsy score of Marsh score type, antinuclear antibody positivity, high serum anti-tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A level and low hemoglobin level were risk factors for having an autoimmune disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2060-2067. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  10. Recall in older cancer patients: Measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; van Weert, J.; van der Meulen, N.; van Dulmen, S.; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  11. Cognition and dementia in older patients with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arjune; Capelli, Valentina

    2018-01-01

    Abstract With advances in healthcare and an ageing population, the number of older adults with epilepsy is set to rise substantially across the world. In developed countries the highest incidence of epilepsy is already in people over 65 and, as life expectancy increases, individuals who developed epilepsy at a young age are also living longer. Recent findings show that older persons with epilepsy are more likely to suffer from cognitive dysfunction and that there might be an important bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and dementia. Thus some people with epilepsy may be at a higher risk of developing dementia, while individuals with some forms of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, are at significantly higher risk of developing epilepsy. Consistent with this emerging view, epidemiological findings reveal that people with epilepsy and individuals with Alzheimer’s disease share common risk factors. Recent studies in Alzheimer’s disease and late-onset epilepsy also suggest common pathological links mediated by underlying vascular changes and/or tau pathology. Meanwhile electrophysiological and neuroimaging investigations in epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, and vascular dementia have focused interest on network level dysfunction, which might be important in mediating cognitive dysfunction across all three of these conditions. In this review we consider whether seizures promote dementia, whether dementia causes seizures, or if common underlying pathophysiological mechanisms cause both. We examine the evidence that cognitive impairment is associated with epilepsy in older people (aged over 65) and the prognosis for patients with epilepsy developing dementia, with a specific emphasis on common mechanisms that might underlie the cognitive deficits observed in epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease. Our analyses suggest that there is considerable intersection between epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease and cerebrovascular disease raising

  12. Fall predictors in older cancer patients: a multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Walle, Nathalie; Kenis, Cindy; Heeren, Pieter; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Decoster, Lore; Beyer, Ingo; Conings, Godelieve; Flamaing, Johan; Lobelle, Jean-Pierre; Wildiers, Hans; Milisen, Koen

    2014-12-15

    In the older population falls are a common problem and a major cause of morbidity, mortality and functional decline. The etiology is often multifactorial making the identification of fall predictors essential for preventive measures. Despite this knowledge, data on falls within the older cancer population are limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of falls within 2 to 3 months after cancer treatment decision and to identify predictors of falls (≥1 fall) during follow-up. Older patients (70 years or more) with a cancer treatment decision were included. At baseline, all patients underwent geriatric screening (G8 and Flemish Triage Risk Screening Tool), followed by a geriatric assessment including living situation, activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), fall history in the past 12 months, fatigue, cognition, depression, nutrition, comorbidities and polypharmacy. Questionnaires were used to collect follow-up (2-3 months) data. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors for falls (≥1 fall) during follow-up. At baseline, 295 (31.5%) of 937 included patients reported at least one fall in the past 12 months with 88 patients (29.5%) sustaining a major injury. During follow-up (2-3 months), 142 (17.6%) patients fell, of whom 51.4% fell recurrently and 17.6% reported a major injury. Baseline fall history in the past 12 months (OR = 3.926), fatigue (OR = 0.380), ADL dependency (OR = 0.492), geriatric risk profile by G8 (OR = 0.471) and living alone (OR = 1.631) were independent predictors of falls (≥1 fall) within 2-3 months after cancer treatment decision. Falls are a serious problem among older cancer patients. Geriatric screening and assessment data can identify patients at risk for a fall. A patient with risk factors associated with falls should undergo further evaluation and intervention to prevent potentially injurious fall incidents.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnoea among older patients attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the risk of obstructive sleep apnoea and sleep difficulties among older patients attending the geriatric clinic at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: The Berlin questionnaires was used to assess the risk of OSA in 843 older patients aged 60 years and above at geriatric clinic, ...

  14. Distributed Computing and Monitoring Technologies for Older Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonovs, Juris; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Krueger, Volker

    This book summarizes various approaches for the automatic detection of health threats to older patients at home living alone. The text begins by briefly describing those who would most benefit from healthcare supervision. The book then summarizes possible scenarios for monitoring an older patient...

  15. Marketing to older patients: perceptions of service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, R R; Cronin, J J; Routledge, J B

    1997-01-01

    Marketing has taken on increased importance in the United States' health care industry, especially with respect to Americans aged 55 and older. Given that health care costs account for 14 percent of the GNP of the U.S., and that older Americans represent nearly 25 percent of all health care expenditures, the ability of physicians to assess the perceptions of service quality, service value, and satisfaction and the effects of these variables on patient loyalty with respect to older patients is very important. A comprehensive model of patient behavior is introduced and tested. The results suggest the medical office staff and the expertise of the physician play particularly important roles in older patients' perceptions of service quality. In addition, strong relationships were found between (1) Service Quality and Satisfaction, (2) Satisfaction and Patient Behavior (repeated use of the physician), and (3) Service Quality and Patient Behavior. Conclusions and suggestions for future research are offered.

  16. Coping and personality in older patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouws, Sigfried N T M; Paans, Nadine P G; Comijs, Hannie C; Dols, Annemiek; Stek, Max L

    2015-09-15

    Little is known about coping styles and personality traits in older bipolar patients. Adult bipolar patients show a passive coping style and higher neuroticism scores compared to the general population. Our aim is to investigate personality traits and coping in older bipolar patients and the relationship between coping and personality. 75 Older patients (age > 60) with bipolar I or II disorder in a euthymic mood completed the Utrecht Coping List and the NEO Personality Inventory FFI and were compared to normative data. Older bipolar patients show more passive coping styles compared to healthy elderly. Their personality traits are predominated by openness, in contrast conscientiousness and altruism are relatively sparse. Neuroticism was related to passive coping styles, whereas conscientiousness was related to an active coping style. Older bipolar patients have more passive coping styles. Their personality is characterized by openness and relatively low conscientiousness and altruism. Our sample represents a survival cohort; this may explain the differences in personality traits between older patients in this study and in adult bipolar patients in other studies. The association between coping styles and personality traits is comparable to reports of younger adult patients with bipolar disorder. Longitudinal studies are warranted to explore if coping and personality change with ageing in bipolar patients and to determine which coping style is most effective in preventing mood episodes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, Th.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients’ recall of information after

  18. Older Adults' Coping with Negative Life Events: Common Processes of Managing Health, Interpersonal, and Financial/Work Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Moos, Bernice S.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined how older adults cope with negative life events in health, interpersonal, and financial/work domains and whether common stress and coping processes hold across these three domains. On three occasions, older adults identified the most severe negative event they faced in the last year and described how they appraised and coped…

  19. Communicating with older cancer patients: impact on information recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis was to unravel the relationship between patient characteristics, communication between patient and clinician, and subsequent patient information recall in the context of medical consultations with older cancer patients. Chapter 2 reviewed the literature to explore age

  20. GBM-associated mutations and altered protein expression are more common in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sherise D; Xiu, Joanne; Weathers, Shiao-Pei; Zhou, Shouhao; Kesari, Santosh; Weiss, Stephanie E; Verhaak, Roeland G; Hohl, Raymond J; Barger, Geoffrey R; Reddy, Sandeep K; Heimberger, Amy B

    2016-10-25

    Geriatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients have a poorer prognosis than younger patients, but IDH1/2 mutations (more common in younger patients) confer a favorable prognosis. We compared key GBM molecular alterations between an elderly (age ≥ 70) and younger (18 GBM cohort compared to the older cohort (P GBM cohort, younger patients had significantly more mutations in PDGFRA, PTPN11, SMARCA4, BRAF and TP53. GBMs from 178 elderly patients and 197 young patients were analyzed using DNA sequencing, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and MGMT-methylation assay to ascertain mutational and amplification/expressional status. Significant molecular differences occurred in GBMs from elderly and young patients. Except for the older cohort's more frequent PTEN mutation and MGMT methylation, younger patients had a higher frequency of potential therapeutic targets.

  1. Can Your Older Patients Drive Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In many areas of the world, driving is an essential part of life and for reasons of comfort, convenience, and security remains the primary mode of transportation among older adults. Both normal aging and diseases that are more prevalent in advanced a...

  2. Communication with older, seriously ill patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.M. van; Lindenberger, E.; Weert, J.C.M. van

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to provide more insight into effective communication with older people with serious illness and their surrogates/caregivers. To do so, if focusses on specific skills in three core functions of communication (i) empathic behavior, (ii) information provision and (iii) enabling

  3. Doctors' perspectives on the barriers to appropriate prescribing in older hospitalized patients: A qualitative study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullinan, S

    2014-11-18

    Older patients commonly suffer from multimorbidites and take multiple medications. As a result, these patients are more vulnerable to potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP). PIP in older patients may result in adverse drug events and hospitalisations. However, little has been done to identify why PIP occurs. The objectives of this study were; (1) to identify hospital doctors\\' perceptions as to why PIP occurs, (2) to identify the barriers to addressing the issues identified, and (3) to determine which intervention types would be best suited to improving prescribing.

  4. Fall predictors in older cancer patients: a multicenter prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Walle, Nathalie; Kenis, Cindy; Heeren, Pieter; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Decoster, Lore; Beyer, Ingo; Conings, Godelieve; Flamaing, Johan; Lobelle, Jean-Pierre; Wildiers, Hans; Milisen, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Background In the older population falls are a common problem and a major cause of morbidity, mortality and functional decline. The etiology is often multifactorial making the identification of fall predictors essential for preventive measures. Despite this knowledge, data on falls within the older cancer population are limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of falls within 2 to 3?months after cancer treatment decision and to identify predictors of falls (?1 fall)...

  5. Suicidal behavior in the older patient with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasckow, John; Montross, Lori; Prunty, Laurie; Fox, Lauren; Zisook, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treating elderly suicidal patients with schizophrenia. The purpose of this article is to review the literature dealing with this population and to discuss what is required to advance this field. Most available studies from middle-aged and older individuals suggest that risk factors include hopelessness, lower quality of life, past traumatic events, depressive symptoms, lifetime suicidal ideation and past attempts; it is not clear whether these findings are generalizable to geriatric populations. Although little treatment research has been performed in older suicidal patients with schizophrenia, an integrated psychosocial and pharmacologic approach is recommended. In addition, one recent study augmented antipsychotic treatment with an SSRI (i.e., citalopram) in a sample of middle-aged and older individuals with schizophrenia with subsyndromal depression; in that study, serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor augmentation reduced depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation. More research is required to better understand suicidal behavior in older patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22028735

  6. Osteoporosis management in older patients who experienced a fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oertel MJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Oertel,1 Leland Graves,1 Eyad Al-Hihi,2 Vincent Leonardo,3 Christina Hopkins,2 Kristin DeSouza,2 Rajib K Bhattacharya1 1Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Genetics, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Enterprise Analytics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Background: Fractures in older patients are common, morbid, and associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures. Inpatient and outpatient management and treatment of fractures can be costly. With more emphasis placed on quality care for Medicare beneficiaries, we studied if patients were receiving proper screening for osteoporosis and treatment after diagnosis of fracture. This study aims to determine if adequate screening and treatment for osteoporosis occurs in the postfracture period.Methods: A retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older was gathered from a single institution in both inpatient and outpatient visits. Based on International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes, primary diagnosis of fractures of neck and trunk, upper limb, and lower limb were obtained in addition to current procedural terminology codes for fracture procedures. We studied patients who had been screened for osteoporosis with a bone mineral study or received osteoporosis treatment after their fracture.Results: Medicare beneficiaries totaling 1,375 patients were determined to have an inclusion fracture between June 1, 2013 and November 30, 2014. At the time of our analysis on December 1, 2014, 1,219 patients were living and included in the analysis. Of these patients, 256 (21.0% either received osteoporosis testing with bone mineral density or received treatment for osteoporosis. On sex breakdown, 208/820 (25.4% females received proper evaluation or treatment of osteoporosis in comparison to 48/399 (12.0% males. This is in comparison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ national

  7. Radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and problems of radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older. Fifty-three patients (26 men, 27 women) who underwent radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 87 years (range; 85-99). Treatment policy was classified into curative, semi-curative (treatment field or total dose were limited due to performance status) and palliative therapy. Head-and-neck, bladder and skin cancer were the most common primary disease. The treatment was deemed curative in 27%, semi-curative in 13%, and palliative in 49%. Total dose of semi-curative therapy was almost same compared with curative therapy. The rate of treatment completion and effectiveness were not significantly different in curative therapy and semi-curative therapy. We should consider to reduce the field size to gross target volume, but to treat with substantial dose to make radiotherapy safe and effective. We must be aware that elderly patients have basically low tolerability. (author)

  8. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-04-01

    Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. We constructed a recall questionnaire consisting of multiple-choice questions, completion items, and open-ended questions related to information about treatment and recommendations on how to handle side effects. Immediately after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment, 69 older patients (M = 71.8 years, SD = 4.1) completed the questionnaire. We checked recall against the actual communication in video recordings of the consultations. On average, 82.2 items were discussed during the consultations. The mean percentage of information recalled correctly was 23.2% for open-ended questions, 68.0% for completion items, and 80.2% for multiple-choice questions. Older cancer patients are confronted with a lot of information. Recall of information strongly depended on question format; especially active reproduction appeared to be poor. To improve treatment outcomes, it is important that cancer patients are able to actively retrieve knowledge about how to prevent and recognize adverse side effects and that this is checked by the health professional. We make suggestions on how to make information more memorable for older cancer patients.

  9. Dehydration of Older Patients in Institutional Care and the Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lešnik, Amadeus; Piko, Nejc; Železnik, Danica; Bevc, Sebastjan

    2017-11-01

    Dehydration in older adults is an important clinical problem associated with more comorbidities, longer hospital stays, and higher mortality rates. However, in daily clinical practice, no single gold standard marker of hydration status in older adults is available. The aim of the current study was to define the fluid balance status in older adults residing in institutional care or the home. Four hundred ten patients (192 from institutional care and 218 from home care) 65 and older from the region of lower Styria (Slovenia) were included in the study. Serum osmolality, electrolytes, and blood urea nitrogen to creatinine (BUN:Cr) ratio were used to identify dehydration. Statistically significant differences were found between groups in serum osmolality and BUN:Cr ratio. Moreover, dehydration (defined as increased serum osmolality) was significantly more common in patients in institutional care than home care (51% versus 41.3%, respectively). The results confirm that dehydration is a common clinical problem in older adults, especially in those from institutional care. Although many methods of determining hydration status in older adults have been proposed, no gold standard exists, making hydration evaluation difficult in this population. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(6):260-266.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Falls and patient safety for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovitch, Sharon A

    2006-10-01

    The risk of falling increases with age. Falls in the elderly have been found to raise mortality and morbidity rates and are a leading cause of premature admission to long-term care facilities. Attention to known intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predispose to falling is important in community dwelling and institutionalized older adults. New government guidelines for long-term care facilities have helped focus attention on the safety aspect of fall risk and information about the physical and psychological impact of falling is increasing. Implementation of fall prevention protocols, including the use of fall risk assessment tools, may help reduce the incidence of falls and resultant complications.

  11. Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults Font size A A A Print Share Glossary previous ... provider so he or she can identify the type of sleep problem you have. Delirium : Many older ...

  12. Treatment of older patients with mantle-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Hoster, E; Hermine, O

    2012-01-01

    The long-term prognosis for older patients with mantle-cell lymphoma is poor. Chemoimmunotherapy results in low rates of complete remission, and most patients have a relapse. We investigated whether a fludarabine-containing induction regimen improved the complete-remission rate and whether...

  13. Plantar Hyperkeratotic Patterns in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Araguas García

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: The most common hyperkeratotic patterns were found on the first radius, corresponding to 36% of total lesions. In addition, hyperkeratotic lesions appear to be associated with the presence of hallux valgus and with lesser deformities of the second, third and fourth toes.

  14. Cognitive-behavioral Intervention for Older Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René García Roche

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging-associated diseases contribute to morbidity and mortality in the population; therefore, it is necessary to develop intervention strategies to prevent and/or minimize their consequences. Objectives: to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at older hypertensive patients treated in primary care in Cardenas and Santiago de Cuba municipalities during 2011-2013. Methods: an intervention study of older adults with hypertension was conducted in two municipalities: Santiago de Cuba and Cárdenas. The intervention group was composed of 399 older patients living in the catchment areas of the Carlos Juan Finlay and Héroes del Moncada polyclinics while the control group included 377 older adults served by the Julian Grimau and Jose Antonio Echeverría polyclinics. The intervention consisted of a systematic strategy to increase knowledge of the disease in order to change lifestyles. Results: in the intervention group, there were more patients with sufficient knowledge of the disease (OR: 1.82, greater control of hypertension (OR: 1.51 and better adherence to treatment (OR: 1.70. By modeling the explanatory variables with hypertension control, being in the intervention group (OR: 0.695 and adhering to treatment (OR: 0.543 were found to be health protective factors. Conclusion: the congnitive-behavioral intervention for older adults treated in primary care of the municipalities studied was effective in improving blood pressure control since it contributed to a greater adherence to treatment.

  15. Dealing with the difficult older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, M K

    1986-05-15

    Physicians are often asked to intervene when elderly patients in acute or long-term care facilities are disruptive, demanding or abusive. Though medication may be the immediate response, it often fails to solve the problem, which, being situational and behavioural, calls for a situational and behavioural solution. An organized approach to solving such problems is presented that takes into account the interactions among the patient, family, staff, setting and circumstances. The role of the physician as leader in the process is also discussed.

  16. Complication Rates and Short-Term Outcomes After Operative Hammertoe Correction in Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claire Mackenzie; Boden, Stephanie Ann; Boden, Allison Lee; Maidman, Samuel David; Cutler, Anya; Mignemi, Danielle; Bariteau, Jason

    2018-02-01

    Hammertoe deformities are the most common lesser toe deformity. To date, no studies have looked at outcomes of operative management in the geriatric population, which may be at greater risk for complications or functional compromise because of comorbidities. Data on 58 patients undergoing operative correction of hammertoe deformities were prospectively collected. Clinical outcomes were assessed using preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores with a minimum of 6-month follow-up. Patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of age at the time of surgery: younger than 65 and 65 and older. Complication rates and mean VAS and SF-36 improvement were compared. Forty-seven patients met inclusion criteria (7 men, 40 women), with 26 patients (37 toes) in the younger cohort and 21 patients (39 toes) in the older cohort. Overall, patients demonstrated significant improvement from baseline to 6 and 12 months postoperatively in VAS ( P < .001 and P < .001) and SF-36 ( P < .001 and P < .001) scores. Mean improvement in VAS and SF-36 scores was not significantly different between the groups at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Complications occurred in 13.5% and 10.3% of patients in the younger and older cohorts, respectively. Outcomes of operative correction of hammertoe deformities in older patients were similar to outcomes in younger patients after greater than 6 months of follow-up. Overall improvement in VAS and SF-36 was statistically significant for both cohorts. There was no associated increase in complications for older patients. Level, III comparative series.

  17. Factors Associated with Sarcopenia among Older Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Keywords: Geriatric clinic, Nigeria, older patients, sarcopenia. Factors Associated ... sarcopenia are disuse‑related sarcopenia, disease‑related sarcopenia, ... psychiatry, and dental care. All newly .... respondents who received treatment in places other ..... physical disability: The cardiovascular health study.

  18. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  19. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  20. Factors associated with osteoporosis among older patients at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoporosis is a silent disabling clinical condition often attributed to ageing. It is of public health importance because of its complications and attendant morbidity and mortality. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken of 2401 older patients (60 years and above) at the Geriatric Centre, University ...

  1. Identification of older hospitalized patients at risk for functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerduijn, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 30% and 60% of older patients experience functional decline after hospitalization, resulting in a decline in health-related quality of life and autonomy. This is associated with increased risk of readmission, nursing home placement and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and

  2. Does cognitive decline decrease health utility value in older adult patients with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Aiki, Sayo; Sugano, Koji; Uchida, Megumi; Yamada, Atsuro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Ishida, Takashi; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Iida, Shinsuke; Okuyama, Toru

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive decline is common among older adults with cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of cognitive decline on health utility value in older adults suffering from cancer. Consecutive patients aged 65 years or older with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were recruited. Patients were asked to complete the EuroQoL-5 (EQ-5D) scale to measure health utility and the Mini-Mental State Examination to assess cognitive decline. The potential impact of cognitive decline was investigated with univariate analysis. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to control for potential confounding factors. Complete data were obtained from 87 patients, 29% of whom had cognitive decline. The mean ± SE EQ-5D score for patients with cognitive decline was significantly lower than that for those without cognitive decline (0.67 ± 0.04 vs 0.79 ± 0.03, t = 2.38, P = 0.02). However, multiple regression analysis showed that cognitive decline was not significantly associated with EQ-5D scores. Female sex and lower performance scores (worse physical condition) were significantly associated with EQ-5D scores. Cognitive decline may be involved in decreased health utility value in older adult patients with cancer. However, this effect does not seem to be independent, and the patient's physical condition may be a relevant confounding factor. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  3. Treatment of asymptomatic UTI in older delirious medical in-patients: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Monidipa; Brymer, Chris; Elsayed, Sameer

    2017-09-01

    Despite clinical practice guidelines, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in older people is frequently treated. A common reason for treating ASB is a change in mental status. To determine how often asymptomatic UTI is treated in older medically ill delirious individuals and its association with functional recovery. Consecutive older medical in-patients were screened for delirium, and followed in hospital. Treatment for asymptomatic UTI was defined as documented treatment for a possible urinary tract infection with antibiotics, without concurrent infectious or urinary symptoms. The primary outcome was functional recovery at discharge or 3 months post-discharge. Poor functional recovery was defined by any one of death, new permanent long-term institutionalization or decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. The study sample comprised 343 delirious in-patients, of which 237 (69%) had poor functional recovery. Ninety two (27%) delirious in-patients were treated for asymptomatic UTI. Treatment for asymptomatic UTI was associated with poor functional recovery compared to other delirious in-patients (RR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.14-1.48 overall). Similar results were seen when the analysis was restricted to only bacteriuric delirious individuals. Seven (7.5%) individuals treated for asymptomatic UTI developed Clostridium difficile infection compared to eight (3.2%) in the remainder of the delirious cohort (OR 2.45, 95% CI: 0.86-6.96). These results suggest that treatment of asymptomatic UTI in older medical in-patients with delirium is common, and of questionable benefit. Further research is needed to establish guidelines to minimize over-treatment of UTI in older delirious in-patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Depression and the older medical patient--when and how to intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Philip B; Harvey, Samuel B

    2014-10-01

    Depression in the elderly, particularly those with chronic physical health problems, is a common, but complex problem. In this paper we review the research literature on both the epidemiology and management of depression in the older medical patient. After a general overview of depression in the elderly, we discuss some of the particular issues relevant to depression and co-morbid physical illness amongst elderly patients. Depression can be difficult to diagnose in medically unwell older adults, particularly when there is substantial overlap in symptomatology. The epidemiology and evidence base for the treatment of depression in a number of chronic health problems common in an older adults population are then discussed, specifically cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, cancer, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and Parkinson's disease. For many of these conditions there is emerging evidence that treatments can be effective in reducing depressive symptoms. However, these potential benefits need to be balanced against the often-increased risk of adverse events or interactions with medical treatments. Although co-morbid depression is consistently associated with poorer medical outcomes, there is limited evidence that standard anti-depressive therapy has additional benefits in terms of physical health outcomes. Collaborative care models appear particularly well suited to medically unwell older adult patients, and may provide more generalised benefits across both mental and physical health measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identifying the Risk of Swallowing-Related Pulmonary Complications in Older Patients With Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Roy, Siddharth; Medvedev, Gleb; Wallace, Matthew; Neviaser, Robert J; O'Brien, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To identify and potentially modify the risk of pulmonary complications in a group of older patients with hip fracture, the authors obtained speech and language pathology consultations for these patients. Then they performed a retrospective chart review of all patients 65 years and older who were admitted to their institution between June 2011 and July 2013 with acute hip fracture, were treated surgically, and had a speech and language pathology evaluation in the immediate perioperative period. The authors identified 52 patients who met the study criteria. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification system, at the time of surgery, 1 patient (2%) was classified as ASA I, 12 patients (23%) were ASA II, 26 (50%) were ASA III, and 12 (23%) were ASA IV. Based on a speech and language pathology evaluation, 22 patients (42%) were diagnosed with dysphagia. Statistical analysis showed that ASA III status and ASA IV status were meaningful predictors of dysphagia and that dysphagia itself was a strong risk factor for pulmonary aspiration, pneumonia, and aspiration pneumonitis. Evaluation by a speech and language pathologist, particularly of patients classified as ASA III or ASA IV, may be an efficient means of averting pulmonary morbidity that is common in older patients with hip fracture. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Selected medical management of the older rehabilitative patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John L; Armour, Doris

    2004-07-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights present practices of geriatric medicine that are commonly seen in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. It is a part of the study guide on geriatric rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. In particular, attention is given to update physiatrists in the geriatric medical advances in pharmacotherapeutic considerations, the management of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infections, and sleep disorders. To update the common present-day medical practices for older persons seen in a rehabilitation setting.

  7. Relevance of Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, Lore; Vanacker, Leen; Kenis, Cindy; Prenen, Hans; Van Cutsem, Erik; Van Der Auwera, Jacques; Van Eetvelde, Ellen; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Flamaing, Johan; Milisen, Koen; Lobelle, Jean Pierre; De Grève, Jacques; Wildiers, Hans

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the relevance of geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and to study functional status (FS) and chemotherapy-related toxicity during treatment. Patients with CRC aged ≥ 70 years were evaluated at baseline using a GA. Results were communicated to the treating physician. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, FS was reassessed, and chemotherapy-related toxicity was recorded. A total of 193 patients, with a median age of 77 years, were included. GA was abnormal in 75% and revealed unknown problems in 40%. Treatment was altered in 37% based on clinical assessment. GA led to geriatric interventions in 9 patients (5%) and additionally influenced treatment in 1 patient. At follow-up (n = 164), functional decline was observed in 29 patients (18%) for activities of daily living (ADL) and in 60 patients (37%) for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Baseline IADL, depression, fatigue, and cognition were predictors for ADL decline, whereas no predictors for IADL decline could be identified. In the 109 patients receiving chemotherapy, stage and baseline fatigue were predictive for grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity, and baseline ADL, fatigue, and nutrition were predictive for grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicity. Although GA identified previously unknown problems in more than one-third of older CRC patients, the impact on interventions or treatment decisions was limited. Baseline GA parameters may predict functional decline and chemotherapy-related toxicity. Education of physicians treating older patients with CRC is an essential step in the implementation of GA and subsequent interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rational therapeutic choice for older patients with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Dominique; Soubeyran, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    The choice for an optimal treatment in older lymphoma patients is a real challenge for hemato-oncologists. They have to treat a potentially curative lymphoma, and concomitantly protect their patients from unacceptable toxicities. Some recommendations are provided for the major subtypes of lymphomas including the antitumoral treatment and primarily the optimal supportive care. All the recent literature data converge to say that the approach of an older patient with a malignant hemopathy is a multistep procedure. This process comprises the appraisal of life expectancy of the patient with or without the disease, the prognostic factors of the tumor, the functional, physiological and cognitive functions evaluation, the socio-economical environment and the patient's expectancy in terms of quality of life. Major progresses have been achieved in the management of diffuse large B cell lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma in patients up to 80 and above 80 years old. With all these information in hands, the hematologist will decide if the treatment's objective is the standard treatment with optimal supportive care (fit patients), tailor-made adapted chemotherapy (unfit patients) or preservation of quality of life (frail patients).

  9. Is anemia associated with cognitive impairment and delirium among older acute surgical patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Owen, Stephanie; McCarthy, Kathryn; Pearce, Lyndsay; Moug, Susan J; Stechman, Michael J; Hewitt, Jonathan; Carter, Ben

    2018-03-01

    The determinants of cognitive impairment and delirium during acute illness are poorly understood, despite being common among older people. Anemia is common in older people, and there is ongoing debate regarding the association between anemia, cognitive impairment and delirium, primarily in non-surgical patients. Using data from the Older Persons Surgical Outcomes Collaboration 2013 and 2014 audit cycles, we examined the association between anemia and cognitive outcomes in patients aged ≥65 years admitted to five UK acute surgical units. On admission, the Confusion Assessment Method was carried out to detect delirium. Cognition was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and two levels of impairment were defined as Montreal Cognitive Assessment cognitive impairment or delirium. The adjusted odds ratios of cognitive impairment were 0.95 (95% CI 0.56-1.61) and 1.00 (95% CI 0.61-1.64) for the Montreal Cognitive Assessment cognitive outcomes among older people in this acute surgical setting. Considering the retrospective nature of the study and possible lack of power, findings should be taken with caution. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 The Authors Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. The burden and risk factors for adverse drug events in older patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEs) in older patients. Design: A prospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Patients (65 years and older) presenting to the tertiary Emergency Unit of Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, between February and May 2005, were assessed for ...

  11. Potentially inappropriate prescribing to older patients in primary care in the Netherlands: a retrospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin-Huisman, Linette; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Beers, Erna

    2017-01-01

    potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is associated with adverse health effects in older patients. PIP comprises prescription of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). to estimate the prevalence of PIMs and PPOs among older patients in primary

  12. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups ( n =30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions ( e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity ( e.g. , focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens ( e.g. , protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  13. patient entrance skin doses at minna and ibadan for common

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Entrance surface dose from two diagnostic x-ray centers in Nigeria for three common radiological examinations is .... typical ESD values for adult patients for three different ... TTX located in the region of Nigeria where regulatory activities have ...

  14. Suicidal behavior in the older patient with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kasckow, John; Montross, Lori; Prunty, Laurie; Fox, Lauren; Zisook, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treating elderly suicidal patients with schizophrenia. The purpose of this article is to review the literature dealing with this population and to discuss what is required to advance this field. Most available studies from middle-aged and older individuals suggest that risk factors include hopelessness, lower quality of life, past traumatic events, depressive symptoms, lifetime suicidal ideation and past attempts; it is not clear whether these findings are generalizable ...

  15. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  16. Recovery of older patients undergoing ambulatory anaesthesia with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahajan, V A

    2007-06-01

    Delayed recovery of cognitive function is a well-recognized phenomenon in older patients. The potential for the volatile anaesthetic used to contribute to alterations in postoperative cognitive function in older patients following minor surgical procedures has not been determined. We compared emergence from isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia in older surgical patients undergoing urological procedures of short duration.

  17. Undertriage in older emergency department patients--tilting against windmills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian F Grossmann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of a teaching intervention designed to reduce undertriage rates in older ED patients. Further, to test the hypothesis that non-adherence to the Emergency Severity Index (ESI triage algorithm is associated with undertriage. Additionally, to detect patient related risk factors for undertriage.Pre-post-test design. The study sample consisted of all patients aged 65 years or older presenting to the ED of an urban tertiary and primary care center in the study periods. A teaching intervention designed to increase adherence to the triage algorithm. To assess, if the intervention resulted in an increase of factual knowledge, nurses took a test before and immediately after the teaching intervention. Undertriage rates were assessed one year after the intervention and compared to the pre-test period.In the pre-test group 519 patients were included, and 394 in the post-test-group. Factual knowledge among triage nurses was high already before the teaching intervention. Prevalence of undertriaged patients before (22.5% and one year after the intervention (24.2% was not significantly different (χ2 = 0.248, df = 1, p = 0.619. Sex, age, mode of arrival, and type of complaint were not identified as independent risk factors for undertriage. However, undertriage rates increased with advancing age. Adherence to the ESI algorithm is associated with correct triage decisions.Undertriage of older ED patients remained unchanged over time. Reasons for undertriage seem to be more complex than anticipated. Therefore, additional contributing factors should be addressed.

  18. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J. A. Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients admitted to a geriatric care unit. INTRODUCTION: The growing number of older individuals among hospitalized patients demands a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to their mortality. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study implemented from February 2004 to October 2007 in a tertiary university hospital. A consecutive sample of 922 patients was evaluated for possible inclusion in this study. Patients hospitalized for palliative care, those who declined to participate, and those with incomplete data were excluded, resulting in a group of 856 patients aged 60 to 104 years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine associations between in-patient mortality and gender, age, length of stay, number of prescribed medications and diagnoses at admission, history of heart failure, neoplastic disease, immobility syndrome, delirium, infectious disease, and laboratory tests at admission (serum albumin and creatinine. RESULTS: The overall mortality rate was 16.4%. The following factors were associated with higher in-hospital mortality: delirium (OR=4.13, CI=2.65-6.44, P1.3mg/dL (OR=2.39, CI=1.53-3.72, P<.001, history of heart failure (OR=1.97, CI=1.20-3.22, P=.007, immobility (OR=1.84, CI=1.16-2.92, P =.009, and advanced age (OR=1.03, CI=1.01-1.06, P=.019. CONCLUSIONS: This study strengthens the perception of delirium as a mortality predictor among older inpatients. Cancer, immobility, low albumin levels, elevated creatinine levels, history of heart failure and advanced age were also related to higher mortality rates in this population.

  19. Cultural identity and patient trust among older American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Vanessa W; Goins, R Turner; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Garroutte, Eva Marie

    2014-03-01

    Patients' trust in healthcare providers and institutions has been identified as a likely contributor to racial-ethnic health disparities. The likely influence of patients' cultural characteristics on trust is widely acknowledged but inadequately explored. To compare levels of patients' trust in primary care provider (interpersonal trust) with trust in healthcare organizations (institutional trust) among older American Indians (AIs), and determine associations with cultural identity. Patient survey administered following primary care visits. Two-hundred and nineteen American Indian patients ≥ 50 years receiving care for a non-acute condition at two clinics operated by the Cherokee Nation in northeastern Oklahoma. Self-reported sociodemographic and cultural characteristics. Trust was measured using three questions about interpersonal trust and one measure of institutional trust; responses ranged from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Finding substantial variation only in institutional trust, we used logistic generalized estimating equations to examine relationships of patient cultural identity with institutional trust. Ninety-five percent of patients reported trusting their individual provider, while only 46 % reported trusting their healthcare institution. Patients who strongly self-identified with an AI cultural identity had significantly lower institutional trust compared to those self-identifying less strongly (OR: 0.6, 95 % CI: 0.4, 0.9). Interpersonal and institutional trust represent distinct dimensions of patients' experience of care that may show important relationships to patients' cultural characteristics. Strategies for addressing low institutional trust may have special relevance for patients who identify strongly with AI culture.

  20. Survival period after tube feeding in bedridden older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Yoichi; Nakagawa-Satoh, Takuma; Ohrui, Takashi; Fujii, Masahiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Hidetada

    2012-04-01

    We prospectively studied survival periods after tube feeding. Participants were 163 bedridden older patients suffering from dysphagia. A wide range of survival periods after tube feeding were observed within half a year without tube feeding after being bedridden. After this initial period, survival periods after tube feeding were limited to approximately half a year. Survival periods after tube feeding were positively proportional to the length of time patients were free from pneumonia after tube feeding. After tube feeding, patients died from pneumonia within half a year, and the frequency of pneumonia was 3.1 ± 2.7 times (mean ± SD) before death. Survival periods after tube feeding for less than 1 year were primarily determined by being bedridden for more than half a year without tube feeding and once pneumonia occurred; patients who were tube fed did not survive for more than half a year. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Oral hygiene of hospitalised older patients with lower limb fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Victoria; Newton, Julia L; Rushton, Steven; Walls, Angus W G

    2016-11-01

    good oral hygiene is important for eating, talking and improved quality of life, and is part of basic patient care, but there are few observational studies in hospitalised older patients. The aim of this study is to investigate dental plaque load in older patients over time in hospital. we examined the mouths of 93 patients with lower limb fracture prospectively at day 1, 7 and 14 after admission in a Newcastle upon Tyne Hospital. We assessed dental and denture plaque load, dry mouth symptoms and tooth number, along with demographic and frailty variables. We used univariate generalised linear modelling and mixed effects models to investigate associations between increased plaque and patient characteristics. in dentate patients, plaque score increased with time in hospital (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR): 1.02; 95% confidence of interval (CI): 1.01-1.04). Frailty (P = 0.015, OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.04-1.37), dementia (P < 0.001, OR: 4.30; 95% CI: 2.03-9.12), residence in an institution (P < 0.001, OR: 4.61; 95% CI: 2.18-9.74), decreased mobility (P = 0.013, OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96-0.99), but not Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.102, OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.99-1.19), were associated with increased plaque scores at every time point. oral hygiene deteriorated in dentate patients in hospital. Plaque scores were significantly higher in patients who were more likely to be dependent on others for their oral hygiene. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Risk factors of refeeding syndrome in malnourished older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Cuvelier, Ingeborg; Gehrke, Ilse; Marburger, Christian; Modreker, Mirja Katrin; Volkert, Dorothee; Willschrei, Hans-Peter; Wirth, Rainer

    2017-06-10

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition among older hospitalized persons, it is unknown how many of these malnourished patients are at risk of developing the refeeding syndrome (RFS). In this study, we sought to compare the prevalence and severity of malnutrition among older hospitalized patients with prevalence of known risk factors of RFS. This cross-sectional multicenter-study investigated older participants who were consecutively admitted to the geriatric acute care ward. Malnutrition screening was conducted using Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS-2002), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) criteria were applied for assessing patients at risk of RFS. Weight and height were measured. Degree of weight loss (WL) was obtained by interview. Serum phosphate, magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, creatinine and urea were analyzed according to standard procedures. The study group comprised 342 participants (222 females) with a mean age of 83.1 ± 6.8 and BMI range of 14.7-43.6 kg/m 2 . More participants were assessed at risk of malnutrition using NRS-2002 (n = 253, 74.0%) compared to MUST (n = 170, 49.7%) and MNA-SF (n = 191, 55.8%). Of total participants, 239 (69.9%; 157 females) were considered to be at risk of RFS. Based on NRS-2002, 75.9% (n = 192) of patients at risk of malnutrition are at risk of RFS whereas according to MUST and MNA-SF, 85.9% (n = 146) and 69.1% (n = 132) of patients at risk of malnutrition are exposed to high risk of RFS, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of risk of RFS is significantly increased with higher score of NRS-2002 and MUST and lower score of MNA-SF. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, disease severity (38.2%), WL in 3 months (20.3%) and BMI (33.3%) mainly explained variance in NRS-2002, MUST and MNA-SF scores, respectively, in patients with risk of RFS. Nearly three

  3. Cardiac function and cognition in older community-dwelling cardiac patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Aly, Mohamed F.A.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; de Boer, Karin; Kamp, Otto; van Rossum, Albert C.; Scherder, Erik J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive deficits have been reported in older cardiac patients. An underlying mechanism for these findings may be reduced cardiac function. The relationship between cardiac function as represented by different echocardiographic measures and different cognitive function domains in older

  4. The impact of patient autonomy on older adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Keerthi R; Hao, Wei; Song, Peter X; Carpenter, Laurie; Steinberg, Joel; Baptist, Alan P

    2018-05-03

    Understanding patient preferences and desire for involvement in making medical decisions is important when managing chronic conditions. Previous studies have utilized the Autonomy Preference Index (API) in younger asthmatic patients to evaluate these preferences. To identify factors associated with autonomy, and to determine if autonomy is related to asthma outcomes among older adults. 189 older adults (>55 yr) with persistent asthma were included. Preferences for autonomy were assessed using the API, with a higher score indicating higher desire for autonomy. Scores were separated into two domains of 'information seeking' and 'decision making' preferences. The separated scores were correlated with asthma outcomes and demographic variables. To control for confounding factors, a linear regression analysis was performed. Higher 'decision making' preference scores correlated with female gender (p=0.007), higher education level (p=0.01), and lower depression scores (p=0.04). Regarding outcomes, 'decision making' scores positively correlated with asthma quality of life questionnaire (AQLQ) scores (p=0.01). On linear regression analysis, the AQLQ score remained significantly associated with 'decision making' preference scores (p=0.03). There was no association with asthma control test scores, spirometry values, and healthcare utilization. 'Information seeking' preference scores correlated with education level (p=0.03), but there was no correlation with asthma outcomes. Older asthmatic adults with a greater desire for involvement in decision making have a higher asthma related quality of life. Future studies with the intention to increase patient autonomy may help establish a causal relationship. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Elders and patient participation revisited - a discourse analytic approach to older persons' reflections on patient participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Christina

    2011-07-01

    This study focuses on how older persons' accounts of participation might be framed and constructed based on their social and historical situatedness. The picture emerging from contemporary research tends to portray older people as a group who prefer to leave decisions to the professionals during a hospital stay. Through an approach that sought to contextualise the respondents' accounts of participation, different features of patient participation became visible. The study is based on a postmodern framework using a discursive approach, informed by the works of Foucault and on works that have been developed in line with his main ideas. Eighteen individual in-depth interviews with older people (age 80+) were conducted between one to two weeks after discharge from hospital. Findings indicate that older people actively position themselves in relation to various discourses at play in the hospital, and display a wide variety of strategies aimed at gaining influence. To the older persons in this study, participation was practised in a subtle and discreet way, as a matter of choosing a good strategy to interact with the personnel. Participation was also seen as a matter of balancing their own needs against the needs of others and as a behaviour that required self-confidence. The accounts of patient participation given by the older persons differed from the dominant and taken-for-granted discourse of patient participation as a right. As the older persons' understanding and practice of patient participation do not 'fit' the contemporary idea of participation, it is in danger of being ignored or overlooked by care-givers as well as by researchers. To identify older patients' wish to participate, one must actively search for it. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Relationship between orthostatic hypotension and white matter hyperintensity load in older patients with mild dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogne Soennesyn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: White matter hyperintensities (WMH in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of the brain, and orthostatic hypotension (OH are both common in older people. We tested the hypothesis that OH is associated with WMH. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Secondary care outpatient clinics in geriatric medicine and old age psychiatry in western Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 160 older patients with mild dementia, diagnosed according to standardised criteria. MEASUREMENTS: OH was diagnosed according to the consensus definition, measuring blood pressure (BP in the supine position and within 3 minutes in the standing position. MRI scans were performed according to a common protocol at three centres, and the volumes of WMH were quantified using an automated method (n=82, followed by manual editing. WMH were also quantified using the visual Scheltens scale (n=139. Multiple logistic regression analyses were applied, with highest vs. lowest WMH quartile as response. RESULTS: There were no significant correlations between WMH volumes and systolic or diastolic orthostatic BP drops, and no significant correlations between Scheltens scores of WMH and systolic or diastolic BP drops. In the multivariate analyses, only APOEε4 status remained a significant predictor for WMH using the automated method (p=0.037, OR 0.075 (0.007-0.851, whereas only age remained a significant predictor for WMH scores (p=0.019, OR 1.119 (1.018-1.230. CONCLUSION: We found no association between OH and WMH load in a sample of older patients with mild dementia.

  7. Burden of common mental disorders in patients with Functional Dyspepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattar, A.; Salih, M.; Jafri, W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency of common mental disorders among diagnosed functional dyspepsia patients. Methods: A case-control study with 150 cases of functional dyspepsia (FD) and 150 healthy controls were recruited from Gastroenterology Clinic at the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi from 1, March 2009 through 31, August 2009. Urdu version of WHO-developed Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) was administered to diagnose patients of FD and healthy controls. A cut off score of 8 on SRQ was used to confirm cases of Common mental disorders (CMD). Data was entered and analyzed by SPSS version 16.0. Result: There was significant difference in CMD i.e. 107 (71.33%) versus 23 (15.33%) in cases and controls respectively (p- <0.001). Among cases CMD was more common in females i.e. in 57 (80.3%) as compared 50 (63.3%) in males (p- 0.022). Conclusion: There is high prevalence of Common mental disorders among patients with functional dyspepsia and this needs to be addressed while treating patients. (author)

  8. Risk factors for common cancers among patients at Kamuzu Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Little is known about risk factors for different cancers in Malawi. This study aimed to assess risk factors for and epidemiologic patterns of common cancers among patients treated at Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Lilongwe, and to determine the prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection in ...

  9. Newly diagnosed incident dizziness of older patients: a follow-up study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint of older patients in primary care, yet not much is known about the course of incident dizziness. The aim of the study was to follow-up symptoms, subjective impairments and needs of older patients (≥65 with incident dizziness and to determine predictors of chronic dizziness. Furthermore, we analysed general practitioners' (GPs' initial diagnoses, referrals and revised diagnoses after six months. Methods An observational study was performed in 21 primary care practices in Germany, including a four-week and six-month follow-up. A questionnaire comprising characteristic matters of dizziness and a series of validated instruments was completed by 66 participants during enrolment and follow-up (after 1 month and 6 months. After six months, chart reviews and face-to-face interviews were also performed with the GPs. Results Mean scores of dizziness handicap, depression and quality of life were not or only slightly affected, and did not deteriorate during follow-up; however, 24 patients (34.8% showed a moderate or severe dizziness handicap, and 43 (62.3% showed a certain disability in terms of quality of life at the time of enrolment. In multivariate analysis, n = 44 patients suffering from chronic dizziness (dependent variable, i.e. relapsing or persistent at six months initially had a greater dizziness handicap (OR 1.42, 95%CI 1.05-1.47 than patients with transient dizziness. GPs referred 47.8% of the patients to specialists who detected two additional cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Conclusions New-onset dizziness relapsed or persisted in a considerable number of patients within six months. This was difficult to predict due to the patients' heterogeneous complaints and characteristics. Symptom persistence does not seem to be associated with deterioration of the psychological status in older primary care patients. Management strategies should routinely consider BPPV as

  10. Radiotherapy for prostatic cancer in patients aged 75 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisada, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Mogami, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Uemura, Masahiko; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Nagao, Shuji

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with prostatic cancer treated with radiotherapy giving a mean dose of 60.7 Gy between 1992 and 1997 at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital were reviewed and the treatment outcomes were investigated retrospectively. About two-third of the patients were treated with radiation by linear accelerator with 40 to 46 Gy to the whole pelvis and with 20 to 26 Gy boost to the prostate area and the other one-third were treated only to the prostate area. For almost patients, external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy was used. The median duration of follow-up was 36 months. Overall 5-year survival and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were 65.8%, and 88.9%, respectively. Severe rectal late morbidity (over grade 3) according to RTOG grading system were seen in one (2.6%). Although the number of cases was rather small and the follow-up duration was rather short, conventional external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy may contribute to the survival benefit of patients with prostatic cancer in aged 75 or older. Radiotherapy for elderly prostatic cancer patients should be treated with an effort to decrease the late morbidity and not to deteriorate the QOL of the patients, because many patients were died of other causes than cancer. (author)

  11. Is synaesthesia more common in patients with Asperger syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina eNeufeld

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence from case reports that synaesthesia is more common in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC. Further, genes related to synaesthesia have also been found to be linked to ASC and, similar to synaesthetes, individuals with ASC show altered brain connectivity and unusual brain activation during sensory processing. However, up to now a systematic investigation of whether synaesthesia is more common in ASC patients is missing.The aim of the current pilot study was to test this hypothesis by investigating a group of patients diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (AS using questionnaires and standard consistency tests in order to classify them as grapheme-colour synaesthetes. The results indicate that there are indeed many more grapheme-colour synaesthetes among AS patients. This finding is discussed in relation to different theories regarding the development of synaesthesia as well as altered sensory processing in autism.

  12. Common dental anomalies in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sanjida; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies.

  13. [Orofacial clinical manifestations in adult patients with variable common immunodeficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-García, Aurora Alejandra; Moreno-Alba, Miguel Ángel; Elizalde-Monroy, Martín; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda; Romero-Flores, Jovita; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; López-Pérez, Patricia; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the primary immunodeficiency (CVID) frequently found in adults. Its prevalence is estimated from 1:25,000 to 75,000 alive newborns; there are variations by ethnic groups, it is estimated about 50-70% in Caucasian patients. Oral cavity lesions are rarely found in adult patients with CVID, there are reports about lesions on pediatric patients mostly caused by infections. To describe the orofacial lesions (oral, maxillofacial and neck area) affecting adults with CVID. A transversal, prospective study was done in patients with CVID attended at Specialties Hospital, CMN SXXI, Mexico City. Patients where examined by the oral and maxillofacial surgeon and clinical findings were reported, then the descriptive analysis of the lesions was done. We evaluated 26 patients, 16 female and 10 males, average age of 38.6 years. In 18/26 patients we found oral lesions on 7 different types. The most frequent was minor salivary glands hiperplasia (19/26),petechiae (12/26) and herpetic ulcers (7/26). In head and neck, we found 4 different lesions, the most common was lymphadenopathy <2cm (4/26). The immunologic alterations associated to CVID favors the development of lesions mainly of infectious and probably autoinmune origin that affects the oral cavity and head and neck area.

  14. Common Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Chinese Adolescent Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-E; Wang, Zhi-Min; Sha, Sha; Ng, Chee H; Seiner, Stephen J; Welch, Charles A; Lok, Grace K I; Chow, Ines H I; Wang, Fei; Li, Lu; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for adolescent psychiatric patients in China. This study examined the frequency of ECT and the demographic and clinical correlates of adolescent psychiatric patients hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric hospital in China. This was a retrospective chart review of 954 inpatients aged between 13 and 17 years treated over a period of 8 years (2007-2013). Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from the electronic chart management system for discharged patients. The rate of ECT use was 42.6% in the whole sample (46.5% for patients with schizophrenia, 41.8% for major depressive disorder, 57.8% for bipolar disorders, and 23.9% for other diagnoses). Use of ECT was independently and positively associated with older age, high aggression risk at time of admission, and use of antipsychotics and antidepressants. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, those with other psychiatric diagnoses were less likely to receive ECT. The above significant correlates explained 32% of the variance of ECT use (P < 0.001). Limitations of this study included the lack of data regarding the efficacy and side effects of ECT. Furthermore, the high rate of ECT applied only to 1 setting which limits the ability to extrapolate the implications of the results to other populations. The use of ECT was exceedingly high in adolescent patients treated in a tertiary clinical centre in China. It is unlikely that such a high rate of ECT use is found across China or that such practice reflects standard of care for psychiatrically ill adolescents. The underlying reasons for the high use of ECT at this center warrant urgent investigations.

  15. Selective fine needle aspiration of parotid masses. FNA should be performed in all patients older than 60 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, S M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The exact role of fine needle aspiration in the pre-operative assessment of patients presenting with parotid masses is controversial. Some surgeons propose that fine needle aspiration be performed only selectively in those patients with likely malignant disease, whilst others recommend it for all patients presenting with such a mass. Intuitively, one would expect older patients to be more likely to suffer from primary malignant parotid tumours and secondary deposits of malignant skin tumours. Therefore, we hypothesised that older patients with a parotid mass should undergo fine needle aspiration regardless of their medical history. DESIGN: We retrospectively reviewed 197 consecutive parotidectomies to test this hypothesis. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-one patients (61.4 per cent) were diagnosed with benign disease, whilst 76 (38.6 per cent) were diagnosed with malignant disease. Eighty-three per cent of patients aged 60 years or younger had benign disease, as opposed to 35.6 per cent of patients aged more than 60 years. Malignant disease occurred more commonly in patients older than 60 years (odds ratio 8.962, 95 per cent confidence interval 4.607-17.434). CONCLUSION: In patients with a parotid mass, fine needle aspiration should be performed on all those aged 60 years or older.

  16. Comparing postural balance among older adults and Parkinson's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Andrelino de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to compare postural balance among healthy older adults and Parkinson's disease (PD patients during one-legged stance balance. We recruited 36 individuals of both sexes and divided them into two groups: healthy older adults (HG, and individuals with PD (PG. All the participants were assessed through a single-leg balance test, with eyes open, during 30 seconds (30 seconds of rest across trials on a force platform. Balance parameters were computed from mean across trials to quantify postural control: center of pressure (COP area and mean velocity in both directions of movement, anterior-posterior and medial-lateral. Significant differences between-group were reported for area of COP (P=0.002 and mean velocity in anterior-posterior direction (P=0.037, where poor postural control was related to PD patients rather than to healthy individuals. One-legged stance balance was a sensitive task used to discriminate poor postural control in Parkinson individuals.

  17. Factors associated with falls in older patients with diffuse polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K

    2002-11-01

    To identify clinical factors associated with falls by older persons with polyneuropathy (PN). A cross-sectional study of 82 subjects aged 50 to 85 with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of PN. Electrodiagnostic and biomechanical research laboratories. Patients referred to the electrodiagnostic laboratory. History and physical examination, including semiquantitative methods of peripheral nerve function, and clinical balance testing. Falls were defined by retrospective self-report over a 2-year period. Forty (48.8%), 28 (34.1%), and 18 (22.0%) subjects reported a history of at least one fall, multiple falls, and injurious falls, respectively. Factors associated with single and multiple falls were similar, so only results for multiple and injurious falls are reported. Bivariate analysis showed that an increased body mass index (BMI) and more severe PN (as determined by the Michigan Diabetes Neuropathy Score) were associated with both fall categories. Men reporting falls also demonstrated a decreased unipedal stance time. Age, sex, nerve conduction study parameters, Romberg testing, medications, and comorbidities were not consistently associated with either fall category. Logistic regression demonstrated that multiple and injurious falls were associated with an increased BMI and more severe PN, controlling for age, sex, medications, and comorbidities (pseudo R2 = 0.458 and 0.484, respectively). Although previous work has demonstrated that all older persons with PN are at increased risk for falls, patients with increased BMI and more severe PN are at particularly high risk and should be targeted for intervention.

  18. Patient identification errors are common in a simulated setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Fisher, Donald L; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Pham, Tuan A; Campbell, Megan M; Nathanson, Brian H

    2010-06-01

    We evaluate the frequency and accuracy of health care workers verifying patient identity before performing common tasks. The study included prospective, simulated patient scenarios with an eye-tracking device that showed where the health care workers looked. Simulations involved nurses administering an intravenous medication, technicians labeling a blood specimen, and clerks applying an identity band. Participants were asked to perform their assigned task on 3 simulated patients, and the third patient had a different date of birth and medical record number than the identity information on the artifact label specific to the health care workers' task. Health care workers were unaware that the focus of the study was patient identity. Sixty-one emergency health care workers participated--28 nurses, 16 technicians, and 17 emergency service associates--in 183 patient scenarios. Sixty-one percent of health care workers (37/61) caught the identity error (61% nurses, 94% technicians, 29% emergency service associates). Thirty-nine percent of health care workers (24/61) performed their assigned task on the wrong patient (39% nurses, 6% technicians, 71% emergency service associates). Eye-tracking data were available for 73% of the patient scenarios (133/183). Seventy-four percent of health care workers (74/100) failed to match the patient to the identity band (87% nurses, 49% technicians). Twenty-seven percent of health care workers (36/133) failed to match the artifact to the patient or the identity band before performing their task (33% nurses, 9% technicians, 33% emergency service associates). Fifteen percent (5/33) of health care workers who completed the steps to verify patient identity on the patient with the identification error still failed to recognize the error. Wide variation exists among health care workers verifying patient identity before performing everyday tasks. Education, process changes, and technology are needed to improve the frequency and accuracy of

  19. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Older Patients: Management Strategies to Improve Patient Care and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J. Avelino-Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospital malnutrition is estimated to affect as many as one in two patients at admission, while many others develop malnutrition throughout hospitalization. Despite being a common and long-standing problem among older adults, it is often unrecognized and associated with increased use of resources and negative outcomes such as increased complications, length of stay and mortality. Nutritional screening and assessment are readily available and inexpensive procedures that provide crucial information to develop nutrition care plans. These plans should determine the need for dietary modifications, enteral or parenteral nutrition, strategies for monitoring adverse events and therapeutic success, and parameters for therapy termination. Peculiarities of the geriatric context also need to be addressed, including the level of feeding assistance that will be required and the existence of conditions such as dementia, delirium and dysphagia. Providers should remain vigilant to potential adverse events that might result from nutritional interventions, working to prevent and correct them. Refeeding syndrome is of particular concern as a life-threatening condition. Finally, successful transition of care and adequate nutrition after discharge should also be a standing part of the nutrition care plan, and include patient/caregiver education.

  20. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  1. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Partial central diabetes insipidus in patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Marta Cano; Matei, Ana Maria; Gonzalez Albarran, Olga; Perez Lopez, Gilberto

    2012-07-03

    Approximately 20% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have any autoimmune disease, as concurrent as prior to diagnosis, even during follow-up. In recent years, cases of CVID associated to endocrine autoimmune diseases have been reported. To our knowledge, no cases of CVID with diabetes insipidus has been reported previously. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old male, diagnosed of CVID, who had thirst, polyuria and nocturia for several years. After a water deprivation test and a complete resolution of patient's symptoms with vasopressin (DDAVP) treatment, diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was finally made. Patients diagnosed of CVID could develop water misbalance due to posterior hypophysis autoimmune disorder. A high index of clinical suspicion, an early diagnosis and treatment of these disease could avoid future complications and improve the quality of life of these patients.

  3. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 ± 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 ± 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 ± 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-∞) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment-related toxicity.

  4. [Consensus document on overactive bladder in older patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-Bravo, Carlos; Brenes-Bermúdez, Francisco; Valverde-Moyar, Maria Victoria; Alcántara-Montero, Antonio; Pérez-León, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Overactive nladder (OAB) is a clinical entity with a high prevalence in the population, having a high impact on quality of life, especially when it occurs with urge urinary incontinence. It is very important to highlight the low rate of consultation of this condition by the older population. This appears to depend on several factors (educational, cultural, professional), and thus leads to the low percentage of older patients who receive appropriate treatment and, on the other hand, a large percentage of older patients with a significant deterioration in their quality of life. Therefore, Scientific societies and Working Groups propose the early detection of OAB in their documents and clinical guidelines. Its etiology is not well known, but is influenced by cerebrovascular processes and other neurological problems, abnormalities of the detrusor muscle of bladder receptors, and obstructive and inflammatory processes of the lower urinary tract. Its diagnosis is clinical, and in the great majority of the cases it can be possible to establish its diagnosis and etiopathogenic orientation, without the need for complex diagnostic procedures. Currently, there are effective treatments for OAB, and we should decide the most appropriate for each elderly patient, based on their individual characteristics. Based on the main clinical practice guidelines, a progressive treatment is proposed, with the antimuscarinics being the most recommended drug treatment. Therefore, a group of very involved professionals in clinical practice for the elderly, and representing two scientific Societies (Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology [SEGG], and the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians [SEMERGEN]) developed this consensus document with the main objective of establishing practices and valid strategies, focused to simplify the management of this clinical entity in the elderly population, and especially to improve their quality of life. The recommendations presented in this

  5. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  6. Drug treatment of hypertension in older patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Pal, Suman; Nabors, Christopher; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2018-05-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent in the elderly (age>65 years) diabetic population than in the general population and shows an increasing prevalence with advancing age. Both diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are independent risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) related morbidity and mortality. Optimal BP targets were not identified in elderly patients with DM and hypertension. Areas covered: In this review article, the authors briefly discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension in elderly diabetics, present evidence with various antihypertensive drug classes supporting the treatment of hypertension to reduce CV events in older diabetics, and then discuss the optimal target BP goals in these patients. Expert opinion: Clinicians should have a BP goal of less than 130/80 mm in all elderly patients with hypertension and DM, especially in those with high CV-risk. When medications are required for optimal BP control in addition to lifestyle measures, either thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, or calcium channel blockers should be considered as initial therapy. Combinations of medications are usually required in these patients because BP control is more difficult to achieve in diabetics than those without DM.

  7. Sarcopenia and physical activity in older male cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro; Kasahara, Yusuke; Morio, Yuji; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Omori, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norio; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-11-01

    There is little information on the association of sarcopenia with physical activity in elderly cardiac patients. This study determined differences in physical activity and cutoff values for physical activity according to the presence or absence of sarcopenia in elderly male cardiac patients. Sixty-seven consecutive men aged ≥65 years with cardiac disease were enrolled. We defined sarcopenia using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People algorithm. Patients were divided into the sarcopenia group (n=25) and the non-sarcopenia group (n=42). In the patients with and without sarcopenia of physical activities were evaluated to determine cutoff values of physical activity. After adjusting for patient characteristics, both the average daily number of steps (3361.43±793.23 vs. 5991.55±583.57 steps, P=0.021) and the average daily energy expenditure of physical activity (71.84±22.19 vs. 154.57±16.18kcal, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the sarcopenia versus non-sarcopenia group. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis identified a cutoff value for steps of physical activity of 3551.80steps/day for 1 week, with a sensitivity of 0.73 and 1-specificity of 0.44 and a cutoff value for energy expenditure of physical activity of 85.17kcal/day for 1 week, with a sensitivity of 0.73 and 1-specificity of 0.27. Physical activity in the male cardiac patients with sarcopenia was significantly lower than that in those without sarcopenia. The cutoff values reported here may be useful values to aid in the identification of elderly male cardiac patients with sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Common Lung Microbiome Identified among Mechanically Ventilated Surgical Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Smith

    Full Text Available The examination of the pulmonary microbiome in patients with non-chronic disease states has not been extensively examined. Traditional culture based screening methods are often unable to identify bacteria from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies allows for a culture-independent molecular based analysis to determine the microbial composition in the lung of this patient population. For this study, the Ion Torrent PGM system was used to assess the microbial complexity of culture negative bronchoalveolar lavage samples. A group of samples were identified that all displayed high diversity and similar relative abundance of bacteria. This group consisted of Hydrogenophaga, unclassified Bacteroidetes, Pedobacter, Thauera, and Acinetobacter. These bacteria may be representative of a common non-pathogenic pulmonary microbiome associated within this population of patients.

  9. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  10. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  11. Potentially inappropriate medication related to weakness in older acute medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Due; Andersen, Ove; Hallin, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    : Patients aged ≥65 years admitted to the acute medical unit during the period October to December 2011 were included. Patients were interviewed at admission and at a follow-up visit 30 days after discharge. Data included information about medications, social status, functional status, cognitive status.......94), cognition (p = 0.10), pain (p = 0.46), or visual acuity (p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: Use of PIMs was very common among older people admitted to an acute medical unit. The use of PIMs is associated with low functional status, low handgrip strength, and reduced health-related quality of life.......: The prevalence of PIMs and the association with PIMs and functional status handgrip strength, HRQOL, comorbidities, social demographic data and vision. RESULTS: Seventy-one patients (55 % men) with a median age of 78.7 years participated. The median number of medications was eight per person. Eighty percent were...

  12. Comparison of tinnitus and psychological aspects between the younger and older adult patients with tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Han, Jung Ju; Hwang, Jae Hyung; Whang, Eul Sung; Yeo, Sang Won; Park, Shi Nae

    2017-04-01

    To explore the differences in various tinnitus-related features and psychological aspects between the younger and older adult patients with tinnitus. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of the adult patients who visited our tinnitus clinic in 2013 and completed full tinnitus assessment including audiometry, tinnitus matching, standardized tinnitus questionnaires, and psychometric questionnaires. The younger group included patients aged 20-45 years (n=64), and the older group, those older than 65 years (n=76). Clinical features, hearing levels, matched tinnitus pitches and loudness, self-report tinnitus severity scores, Beck depression inventory scores, and stress scores were compared between the groups. Tinnitus duration was longer in the older group (p=0.002). Mean PTAs were 16dB HL in the younger, and 38dB HL in the older groups (ptinnitus loudness was greater in the older group (64dB HL vs. 36dB HL, ptinnitus, depression, and stress scores did not differ between the groups. The older patients seemed to be more receptive to tinnitus. The majority of older tinnitus patients had concomitant hearing loss, and thus hearing rehabilitation should be considered preferentially for tinnitus management in this age group. Subjective tinnitus severity, depressive symptoms, and the stress levels were similar between the younger and older tinnitus patients. Therefore, treatment could be planned based upon the comprehensive understanding of the tinnitus characteristics and psychological aspects in each patient irrespective of age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Malignancies in adult patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Giselle López-Rocha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID implies an increased risk of cancer, with an estimated incidence of 11-13%, particularly during the 5th and 6th decade of life. B cell-Hodgkin lymphomas are the more frequent cancer, followed by non-Hodgkin lymphoma and epithelial tumors (gastric, breast, bladder and cervix. Objective: To describe the types of cancers in a cohort of adult patients with CVID. Material and method: An observational, cross-sectional and descriptive study was made in which we reviewed the charts of patients with CVID attending the Primary Immunodeficiencies Clinic at Specialties Hospital Dr. Bernardo Sepulveda, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Mexico City. Results: There were included 23 patients with CVID diagnosis, 13 women (56% and 10 men (44%, with an average age of 36.7 years. Four patients developed malignancies (2 men and 2 women, with a prevalence of 17.3%. The types of cancers in this group of patients were: B cell-Hodgkin lymphoma (1/23, neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas (1/23, myeloid chronic leukemia (1/23 and thyroid papillary carcinoma (1/23. In two of the subjects the diagnosis of cancer was established previous to CVID diagnosis. The average age of diagnosis of cancer was 27 years (19-34 years. Conclusions: In our patients we found different types of malignancies compared to previously described. We consider necessary a screening protocol for an early diagnosis of cancer in these patients. The frequency of cancer in our population was the same as reported in the literature.

  14. Physicians' Non-Uniform Approach to Prescribing Drugs to Older Patients – A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Due; Petersen, Janne; Andersen, Ove

    2017-01-01

    with 50 medical specialists in 23 different specialities throughout Denmark who had contact with older patients. Content analysis was performed to identify the relevant themes. Regardless of their medical or surgical background and how often they prescribed drugs for older patients in daily work, all...... that a cautious approach was needed when prescribing drugs for older people, there was no consensus about how to best accomplish this in practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  15. Characteristics and Outcome of Patients Diagnosed With HIV at Older Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Ilan; Guri, Keren Mahlab; Elbirt, Daniel; Bezalel, Shira Rosenberg; Maldarelli, Frank; Mor, Orna; Grossman, Zehava; Sthoeger, Zev M

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the clinical, virological, and immunological status at presentation as well as the outcome of patients diagnosed with HIV above the age of 50. A retrospective study of 418 patients newly diagnosed with HIV in 1 Israeli center, between the years 2004 and 2013. Patients with new HIV diagnosis ≥ 50 years of age defined as "older' and < 50 defined as "younger.' Patients were evaluated every 1 to 3 months (mean follow-up 53 ± 33 months). Patients with < 2 CD4/viral-load measurements or with < 1 year of follow-up were excluded. Time of HIV infection was estimated by HIV sequence ambiguity assay. Ambiguity index ≤ 0.43 indicated recent (≤ 1 year) HIV infection. Eighty nine (21%) patients were diagnosed with HIV at an older age. Those older patients presented with significant lower CD4 cell counts and higher viral-load compared with the younger patients. At the end of the study, the older patients had higher mortality rate (21% vs 3.5%; P < 0.001) and lower CD4 cell counts (381 ± 228 vs 483 ± 26 cells/μL; P < 0.001) compared with the younger patients. This difference was also observed between older and younger patients with similar CD4 cell counts and viral load at the time of HIV diagnosis and among patients with a recent (≤ 1 year) HIV infection. One-fifth of HIV patients are diagnosed at older age (≥ 50 years). Those older patients have less favorable outcome compared with the younger patients. This point to the need of educational and screening programs within older populations and for a closer follow-up of older HIV patients.

  16. Hypnosis can reduce pain in hospitalized older patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardigo, Sheila; Herrmann, François R; Moret, Véronique; Déramé, Laurence; Giannelli, Sandra; Gold, Gabriel; Pautex, Sophie

    2016-01-15

    Chronic pain is a common and serious health problem in older patients. Treatment often includes non pharmacological approaches despite a relatively modest evidence base in this population. Hypnosis has been used in younger adults with positive results. The main objective of this study was to measure the feasibility and efficacy of hypnosis (including self hypnosis) in the management of chronic pain in older hospitalized patients. A single center randomized controlled trial using a two arm parallel group design (hypnosis versus massage). Inclusion criteria were chronic pain for more than 3 months with impact on daily life activities, intensity of > 4; adapted analgesic treatment; no cognitive impairment. Brief pain inventory was completed. Fifty-three patients were included (mean age: 80.6 ± 8.2--14 men; 26 hypnosis; 27 massage. Pain intensity decreased significantly in both groups after each session. Average pain measured by the brief pain index sustained a greater decrease in the hypnosis group compared to the massage group during the hospitalisation. This was confirmed by the measure of intensity of the pain before each session that decreased only in the hypnosis group over time (P = 0.008). Depression scores improved significantly over the time only in the hypnosis group (P = 0.049). There was no effect in either group 3 months post hospitals discharge. Hypnosis represents a safe and valuable tool in chronic pain management of hospitalized older patients. In hospital interventions did not provide long term post discharge relief. ISRCTN15615614; registered 2/1/2015.

  17. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. The role of patient personality in the identification of depression in older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Laura W; Bogner, Hillary R; Sammel, Mary D; Gallo, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether personality factors significantly contribute to the identification of depression in older primary care patients, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. We examined the association between personality factors and the identification of depression among 318 older adults who participated in the Spectrum study. High neuroticism (unadjusted Odds Ratio (OR) 2.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.42, 3.93]) and low extraversion (adjusted OR 2.24, CI [1.26, 4.00]) were associated with physician identification of depression. Persons with high conscientiousness were less likely to be identified as depressed by the doctor (adjusted OR 0.45, CI [0.22, 0.91]). Personality factors influence the identification of depression among older persons in primary care over and above the relationship of depressive symptoms with physician identification. Knowledge of personality may influence the diagnosis and treatment of depression in primary care. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Injury mechanisms, patterns and outcomes of older polytrauma patients : An analysis of the Dutch Trauma Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rob; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Pieske, Oliver; Lefering, Rolf; El Moumni, Mostafa; Wendt, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Background Polytrauma patients nowadays tend to be older due to the growth of the elderly population and its improved mobility. The aim of this study was to compare demographics, injury patterns, injury mechanisms and outcomes between younger and older polytrauma patients. Methods Data from

  20. Orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, and falling in older patients : a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Blanker, Marco H.; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Houweling, Sebastiaan; Kemper, Adriaan M.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although orthostatic hypotension (OH) is more prevalent in old age, and in patients with diabetes, the prevalence of OH in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is unknown. Aim: To establish the prevalence of OH, and its association with falling, in home-dwelling older

  1. Supervised progressive cross-continuum strength training compared with usual care in older medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospitalization in older adults is characterized by physical inactivity and a risk of losing function and independence. Systematic strength training can improve muscle strength and functional performance in older adults. Few studies have examined the effect of a program initiated during...... hospitalization and continued after discharge. We conducted a feasibility study prior to this trial and found a progression model for loaded sit-to-stands feasible in older medical patients. This study aims to determine whether a simple supervised strength training program for the lower extremities (based...... on the model), combined with post-training protein supplementation initiated during hospitalization and continued at home for 4 weeks, is superior to usual care on change in mobility 4 weeks after discharge in older medical patients. Methods: Eighty older medical patients (65 years or older) acutely admitted...

  2. The role of companions in aiding older cancer patients to recall medical information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates information recall in unaccompanied and accompanied older cancer patients and their companions.Methods: One hundred cancer patients (aged >/=65 years) and 71 companions completed a recall questionnaire after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment.

  3. Associations Between Dehydration, Cognitive Impairment, and Frailty in Older Hospitalized Patients: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrow, Judy; Morton, Margaret; Travers, Catherine; Harvey, Keren; Eeles, Eamonn

    2016-05-01

    patients. 2. Identify risk and management strategies related to dehydration in older hospitalized patients. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The current exploratory study (a) assessed the prevalence of dehydration in older adults (age ≤60 years) with and without cognitive impairment (CI) admitted to the hospital; and (b) examined associations between dehydration, CI, and frailty. Forty-four patients participated and dehydration was assessed within 24 hours of admission and at Day 4 or discharge (whichever occurred first). Patients' cognitive function and frailty statuses were assessed using validated instruments. Twenty-seven (61%) patients had CI and 61% were frail. Prevalence of dehydration at admission was 29% (n = 12) and 19% (n = 6) at study exit, and dehydration status did not differ according to CI or frailty status. However, within the non-CI group, significantly more frail than fit patients were dehydrated at admission (p = 0.03). Findings indicate dehydration is common among older hospitalized patients and that frailty may increase the risk for dehydration in cognitively intact older adults. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(5), 19-27.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. New onset status epilepticus in older patients: Clinical characteristics and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malter, M P; Nass, R D; Kaluschke, T; Fink, G R; Burghaus, L; Dohmen, C

    2017-10-01

    We here evaluated (1) the differential characteristics of status epilepticus (SE) in older (≥60 years) compared to younger adults (18-59 years). In particular, we were interested in (2) the proportion and characteristics of new onset SE in patients with no history of epilepsy (NOSE) in older compared to younger adults, and (3) predictive parameters for clinical outcome in older subjects with NOSE. We performed a monocentric retrospective analysis of all adult patients (≥18years) admitted with SE to our tertiary care centre over a period of 10 years (2006-2015) to evaluate clinical characteristics and short-time outcome at discharge. One-hundred-thirty-five patients with SE were included in the study. Mean age at onset was 64 years (range 21-90), eighty-seven of the patients (64%) were older than 60 years. In 76 patients (56%), SE occurred as NOSE, sixty-seven percent of them were aged ≥60 years. There was no age-dependent predominance for NOSE. NOSE was not a relevant outcome predictor, especially regarding age-related subgroups. Older patients with NOSE had less frequently general tonic clonic SE (GTCSE; p=0.001) and were more often female (p=0.01). Regarding outcome parameters and risk factors in older patients with NOSE, unfavourable outcome was associated with infections during in-hospital treatment (0.04), extended stay in ICU (p=0.001), and generally in hospital (p<0.001). In our cohort, older patients represented the predominant subgroup in patients with SE. Older patients suffered more often from non-convulsive semiology and had a less favourable short-time outcome. NOSE was not a predictive outcome parameter in older patients. Data suggest that avoiding infections should have a priority because higher infection rates were associated with unfavourable outcome. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Supporting smoking cessation in older patients: a continuing challenge for community nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking continues to pose negative health consequences for smokers and their families, and is the single greatest cause of health inequalities in the UK. Older people are particularly vulnerable to the negative health impacts of smoking and therefore, supporting older smokers to quit remains an important public health goal. Community nurses are required to help patients to lead healthier lifestyles and have ideal opportunities to encourage smoking cessation in older people who are aff...

  6. Risk factors for unplanned readmissions in older adult trauma patients in Washington State: a competing risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Vanessa J; Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Shorter, Zeynep; Davidson, Giana H; Bulger, Eileen; Rivara, Frederick P; Arbabi, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Hospital readmission is a significant contributor to increasing health care use related to caring for older trauma patients. This study was undertaken with the following aims: determine the proportion of older adult trauma patients who experience unplanned readmission, as well as risk factors for these readmissions and identify the most common readmission diagnoses among these patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of trauma patients age 55 years and older who survived their hospitalization at a statewide trauma center between 2009 and 2010. Linking 3 statewide databases, nonelective readmission rates were calculated for 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year after index discharge. Competing risk regression was used to determine risk factors for readmission and account for the competing risk of dying without first being readmitted. Subhazard ratios (SHR) are reported, indicating the relative risk of readmission by 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year. The cumulative readmission rates for the 14,536 participants were 7.9%, 18.9%, and 25.2% at 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year, respectively. In multivariable models, the strongest risk factors for readmission at 1 year (based on magnitude of SHR) were severe head injury (adjusted SHR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.24-1.73) and disposition to a skilled nursing facility (SHR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.39-1.71). The diagnoses most commonly associated with readmission were atrial fibrillation, anemia, and congestive heart failure. In this statewide study, unplanned readmissions after older adult trauma occurred frequently up to 1 year after discharge, particularly for patients who sustained severe head trauma and who could not be discharged home independently. Examining common readmission diagnoses might inform the development of interventions to prevent unplanned readmissions. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms in a catchment-area based cohort of older community-living schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, P.D.; Comijs, H.C.; Sonnenberg, C.M.; Hoogendoorn, A.W.; de Haan, L.; Eikelenboom, P.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Depressive symptoms frequently accompany schizophrenia. Older patients constitute the fastest growing segment of the schizophrenia population. With regard to the risk factors associated with depression, it is uncertain to which extent older schizophrenia patients differ from their age

  8. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra dos Santos Silva

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography.

  9. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older patients admitted to psychiatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, S.; Kramers, C.; O'Mahony, D.; Feuth, T.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Ahmed, A.I.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing including potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescription omissions (PPOs) and to assess related risk factors in older people with major psychiatric illness.

  10. Neuropsychology, Autobiographical Memory, and Hippocampal Volume in ?Younger? and ?Older? Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Herold, Christina Josefa; L?sser, Marc Montgomery; Schmid, Lena Anna; Seidl, Ulrich; Kong, Li; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp Arthur; Essig, Marco; Schr?der, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Despite a wide range of studies on neuropsychology in schizophrenia, autobiographical memory (AM) has been scarcely investigated in these patients. Hence, less is known about AM in older patients and hippocampal contribution to autobiographical memories of varying remoteness. Therefore, we investigated hippocampal volume and AM along with important neuropsychological domains in patients with chronic schizophrenia and the respective relationships between these parameters. We compared 25 older ...

  11. Loss of Olfactory Function and Nutritional Status in Vital Older Adults and Geriatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, N.; Roon, de M.; Campen, van J.P.C.M.; Kremer, S.; Boesveldt, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the association of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients. Three hundred forty-five vital (mean age 67.1 years) and 138 geriatric older adults (mean age 80.9 years) were included. Nutritional status

  12. Deprescribing Benzodiazepines in Older Patients: Impact of Interventions Targeting Physicians, Pharmacists, and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Brendan J; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2018-04-28

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs; including the related Z-drugs) are frequently targets for deprescribing; long-term use in older people is harmful and often not beneficial. BZDs can result in significant harms, including falls, fractures, cognitive impairment, car crashes and a significant financial and legal burden to society. Deprescribing BZDs is problematic due to a complex interaction of drug, patient, physician and systematic barriers, including concern about a potentially distressing but rarely fatal withdrawal syndrome. Multiple studies have trialled interventions to deprescribe BZDs in older people and are discussed in this narrative review. Reported success rates of deprescribing BZD interventions range between 27 and 80%, and this variability can be attributed to heterogeneity of methodological approaches and limited generalisability to cognitively impaired patients. Interventions targeting the patient and/or carer include raising awareness (direct-to-consumer education, minimal interventions, and 'one-off' geriatrician counselling) and resourcing the patient (gradual dose reduction [GDR] with or without cognitive behavioural therapy, teaching relaxation techniques, and sleep hygiene). These are effective if the patient is motivated to cease and is not significantly cognitively impaired. Interventions targeted to physicians include prescribing interventions by audit, algorithm or medication review, and providing supervised GDR in combination with medication substitution. Pharmacists have less frequently been the targets for studies, but have key roles in several multifaceted interventions. Interventions are evaluated according to the Behaviour Change Wheel. Research supports trialling a stepwise approach in the cognitively intact older person, but having a low threshold to use less-consultative methods in patients with dementia. Several resources are available to support deprescribing of BZDs in clinical practice, including online protocols.

  13. Exploring the Knowledge Structure of Nursing Care for Older Patients With Delirium: Keyword Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So

    2018-05-01

    Prevention of delirium is considered a critical part of the agenda for patient safety and an indicator of healthcare quality for older patients. As the incidence rate of delirium for older patients has increased in recent years, there has been a significant expansion in knowledge relevant to nursing care. The purposes of this study were to analyze the knowledge structure and trends in nursing care for older adults with delirium based on a keyword network analysis, and to provide a foundation for future research. Data analysis showed that knowledge structure in this area consists of three themes of research: postoperative acute care for older patients with delirium, prevention of delirium for older patients in intensive care units, and safety management for the improvement of outcomes for patients with delirium. Through research trend analysis, we found that research on care for patients with delirium has achieved both quantitative and qualitative improvements over the last decades. Concerning future research, we propose the expansion of patient- and family-centered care, community care, specific nursing interventions, and the integration of new technology into care for patients with delirium. These results provide a reference framework for understanding and developing nursing care for older adults with delirium.

  14. Student radiographers' attitudes toward the older patient – An intervention study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.; Kada, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To design, implement and evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on Norwegian student (diagnostic) radiographers' attitudes towards older people. Design: This study is part of a wider longitudinal study that will evaluate student radiographer attitudes towards the older patient as they progress through their training. In this phase an educational intervention, aimed at improving student radiographer attitudes towards the older person, was designed and implemented. What is reported here are the findings of a pre-test, post-test design that used the Kogan's attitudes towards older people scale to determine whether this intervention had any effect of student radiographer attitudes towards older people. Results: Overall students reported significantly more positive attitudes towards older people after intervention (p = 0.01). However, analysis of responses to individual questions reveals that this difference was not significant in all cases. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that an educational intervention can have a significant impact on student radiographer's attitudes towards older people. Whether this positive attitude remains throughout training, forms part of the wider basis for this study. - Highlights: • We designed an education intervention to improve Norwegian student radiographer attitudes towards older people. • Pre-intervention we found that these student radiographers generally had positive attitudes towards older people. • Post intervention the student radiographer's attitudes towards older people were significantly improved

  15. Fatal infections in older patients with inflammatory bowel disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Seah Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF is highly effective in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; however, it is associated with an increased risk of infections, particularly in older adults. We reviewed 349 patients with IBD, who were observed over a 12-month period, 74 of whom had received anti-TNF therapy (71 patients were aged <60 years and 3 were aged ≥60 years. All the 3 older patients developed serious infectious complications after receiving anti-TNFs, although all of them were also on concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. One patient developed disseminated tuberculosis, another patient developed cholera diarrhea followed by nosocomial pneumonia, while the third patient developed multiple opportunistic infections (Pneumocystis pneumonia, cryptococcal septicemia and meningitis, Klebsiella septicemia. All 3 patients died within 1 year from the onset of the infection(s. We recommend that anti-TNF, especially when combined with other immunosuppressive therapy, should be used with extreme caution in older adult patients with IBD.

  16. The art of treating Parkinson disease in the older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel Kam Yin

    2003-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that increases sharply after the sixth decade. There are many disorders in the elderly that exhibit some parkinsonian signs that can be confused with PD. This article discusses the diagnostic and management issues of PD in the elderly patient. Levo-dopa (L-dopa) therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for PD in the elderly. After 5-8 years of treatment, monitor complications such as fluctuations and dyskinesia usually occur and adjunct therapy may be required. Dopamine agonists can be used to smooth out motor fluctuations and amantadine is sometimes useful for dyskinesia. However, the adverse drug effects of adjunct therapy in the elderly are more common than with L-dopa alone, and risks need to be weighed up against benefits. Nonmotor complications including dementia, psychosis, depression, autonomic dysfunction and somnolence are common and require special attention. Late stage problems such as aspiration, difficulties with activities of daily living or recurrent falls require a multidisciplinary approach. Anticholinergic drugs such as benztropine and benzhexol are best avoided because of the high risk of major side effects.

  17. Common Crime and Domestic Violence Victimization of Older Chinese in Urban China: The Prevalence and Its Impact on Mental Health and Constrained Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Nan; Yan, Elsie

    2018-03-01

    This article examines the prevalence of victimization among older Chinese living in urban China and its psychological and behavioral impacts. A representative sample of 453 older adults aged 60 or above was recruited from Kunming, the People's Republic of China, using multistage sampling method. Participants were individually interviewed on their demographic characteristics, experience of common crime and domestic violence victimization, fear of common crime and domestic violence, mental health, and constrained behavior. Results showed that 254 participants (56.1%) reported one or more types of common crime and 21 (4.6%) reported experiencing domestic violence in the past. Seventeen participants (3.8%) reportedly experienced both common crime and domestic violence victimization. There was no gender difference in the overall incidence of victimization but in some subtypes. Regression analyses indicated that past experience of common crime victimization was significantly associated with greater fear of common crime (β = .136, p = .004), poorer mental health (β = .136, p = .003), and more constrained behavior (β = .108, p = .025). Fear of common crime predicted increased constrained behavior (β = .240, p < .001) independent of gender, age, education, household finances, living arrangement, and physical health. Domestic violence victimization was not significant in predicting poor mental health and constrained behavior but was significant in predicting fear of domestic violence (β = .266, p < .001), which was related to poorer mental health (β = .102, p = .039). The study suggests the importance of taking older people's risk and experience of victimization into consideration in gerontological research, practice, and policymaking.

  18. Construct Validation of Physical Activity Surveys in Culturally Diverse Older Adults: A Comparison of Four Commonly Used Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Allen, Priscilla D.; Cherry, Katie E.; Monroe, Pamela A.; O'Neil, Carol E.; Wood, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish validity evidence of four physical activity (PA) questionnaires in culturally diverse older adults by comparing self-report PA with performance-based physical function. Participants were 54 older adults who completed the Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance 10-item Test (CS-PFP10), Physical…

  19. Radiation therapy for malignant tumors in patients 80 years of age or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Nozaki, Miwako; Yamakawa, Michitaka

    1992-01-01

    We report here, results of investigation of changes in the condition of elderly patients, 80 years of age or older (EP-80), treated with radiation, and analysis of the results of radiotherapy to assess the value of radiotherapy in treating the elderly. Between 1970 and 1989, 294 EP-80 with various malignant tumors received radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology, Gunma University Hospital. The number of EP-80 treated has increased recently to about thirty per year, and their incidence among newly registered patients has also increased to over 5%. The 5-year cause specific survival rates for male and female were 14% and 32%, respectively. There was a significant difference between the survival rates for male and female (x 2 =11.89, p=0.00056) because of inclusion of a significant proportion of female patients with gynecological malignancies. The 5-year survival rate for patients in the curative radiotherapy group (CRG) was 30%, whereas no patient of the palliative radiotherapy group (PRG) has survived for 5 years (x 2 =90.23, p=0.00000). In the CRG, the survival rate for females was significantly higher than that for males (x 2 =11.48, p=0.00070). Thirty-one patients survived for 5 year. Head and neck cancer and uterine lervix cancer were the most common tumors in 5 year survivors. Age was not a significant prognostic factor in the elderly patients treated with radiation. It is considered that radiation therapy is as valuable in elderly patients as in the younger patient population. (author)

  20. The Effects of Performance Fatigability on Postural Control and Rehabilitation in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V; Hassan, Mahdi; Bugnariu, Nicoleta

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue is common in older adults and has a significant effect on quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of fatigue in older individuals, several aspects are poorly understood. It is important to differentiate subjective fatigue complaints from fatigability of motor performance because the two are independent constructs with potentially distinct consequences on mobility. Performance fatigability is the magnitude of change in a performance criterion over a given time of task performance. Performance fatigability is a compulsory element of any strength training program, yet strength training is an important component of rehabilitation programs for older adults. The consequences of fatigability for older adults suggest that acute exercise of various types may result in acute impairments in postural control. The effects of performance fatigability on postural control in older adults are evaluated here to aid the rehabilitation clinician in making recommendations for evaluation of fall risks and exercise prescription.

  1. Risks of long-term use of nitrofurantoin for urinary tract prophylaxis in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L. Rego

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Pulmonary, nerve, or liver ARs resulting from long-term NF prophylaxis in older patients treated for UTIs are potentially serious but extremely rare, and should not deter from the cautious use of NF in this population.

  2. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dolf; van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany; Delnoij, Diana; van den Berg, Michael

    2017-11-22

    Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called 'response tendency'. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients' global rating of care varies across patient groups. Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics - such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical - is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  3. Older patients' attitudes towards and experiences of patient-physician end-of-life communication: a secondary analysis of interviews from British, Dutch and Belgian patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, N.C.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Payne, S.A.; Seymour, J.; Pleschberger, S.; Deschepper, R.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Older patients often experience sub-standard communication in the palliative phase of illness. Due to the importance of good communication in patient-centred end-of-life care, it is essential to understand the factors which influence older patients' communication with physicians. This

  4. Older hospitalized patients' experiences of dialogue with healthcare providers in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Larsen, Karen Lyng; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well-being.Specifi......REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well...

  5. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients: comparing adults and older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Seixas Bello Moreira, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category Methods: Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Bo...

  6. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Carneiro, Sandro Dias Rocha Mendes; Barbosa, Fladia Taciana de Sousa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Moizan, Jean Andr? Herv?; Doucet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its association with xerostomia. Methods Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Cear? (CIHD) in the city of Fortaleza, Cear?, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT). ...

  7. A systematic review of active video games on rehabilitative outcomes among older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zeng

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Findings indicate AVGs have potential in rehabilitation for older patients, with several randomized clinical trials reporting positive effects on rehabilitative outcomes. However, existing evidence is insufficient to support the advantages of AVGs over standard therapy. Given the limited number of studies and concerns with study design quality, more research is warranted to make more definitive conclusions regarding the ability of AVGs to improve rehabilitative outcomes in older patients.

  8. Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Rebecca M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Nelson, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identifying depression in older adults with cancer presents a set of unique challenges, as it combines the confounding influences of cancer and its treatment with the developmental changes associated with aging. This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. Method PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. Results The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Conclusions Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed. PMID:26312455

  9. Common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor side effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G; Kristjansson, Sean D; Doré, Peter M; Lenze, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Antidepressant side effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation, and, rarely, significant harm. Older adults assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Adults (N = 177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Side effects were assessed using the Udvalg fur Kliniske Undersøgelser side-effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR [L/S + rs25531], HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found: increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea, and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- versus low-transcription genotype groupings revealed six pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing serotonin transporter genotypes, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the 1A receptor low-transcription genotype. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more by high-expressing genotypes in the serotonin transporter, 1A, or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Genetic variation in the serotonin system may predict who develops common SSRI side effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Common SSRI side-effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: Data from a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Kristjansson, Sean D.; Doré, Peter M.; Lenze, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant side-effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation and in rare cases significant harm. This is especially relevant for older adults, who assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side-effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side-effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the SSRI escitalopram. Method Adults (n=177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12-weeks. Side-effects were assessed using the UKU side effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR (L/S + rs25531), HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Results Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found, including increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- vs low-transcription genotype groupings revealed 6 pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing genotypes of the serotonin transporter, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the low-transcription genotype of the 1A receptor. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more in those with high-expressing genotype and either the serotonin transporter, 1A or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side-effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Conclusion Genetic variation in the 5HT system may predict who develops common SSRI side-effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. PMID:24021217

  11. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolf de Boer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called ‘response tendency’. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients’ global rating of care varies across patient groups. Methods Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Results Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. Conclusion The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics – such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical – is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  12. Didactic Content and Experiential Aging Simulation for Developing Patient-Centered Strategies and Empathy for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole E; Jilla, Anna Marie; Danhauer, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-01

    The number of people over 65 years of age is increasing, and many of those individuals will have sensorineural hearing loss in addition to other chronic health conditions. Future hearing health care providers need to be sensitive to the needs of elderly patients. The purpose of this article is to describe an experiential learning curriculum used in the Doctor of Audiology program in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The curriculum uses simulations of sensory disorders common in the elderly to transform knowledge and active experience into patient-centered, empathetic counseling skills and strategies to use with older adults with hearing loss.

  13. The Effects of Performance Fatigability on Postural Control and Rehabilitation in the Older Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Evan V.; Hassan, Mahdi; Bugnariu, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is common in older adults and has a significant effect on quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of fatigue in older individuals, several aspects are poorly understood. It is important to differentiate subjective fatigue complaints from fatigability of motor performance because the two are independent constructs with potentially distinct consequences on mobility. Performance fatigability is the magnitude of change in a performance criterion over a given time of task performance....

  14. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in older and younger patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Takiya, Liza; Mebus, Charles A; Terry, Ketti K; Biswas, Pinaki; Jones, Thomas V

    2017-01-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily (BID), in patients with moderate to severe RA, aged ≥65 and tofacitinib, or placebo (Phase 3 only), with/without conventional synthetic DMARDs (mainly methotrexate). Clinical efficacy outcomes from Phase 3 studies were evaluated at Month 3. Safety evaluations using pooled Phase 3 data (Month 12) and pooled LTE data (Month 24) compared exposure-adjusted incidence rates (IRs; with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]), in older versus younger patients. In Phase 3 and LTE studies, 15.3% (475/3111) and 16.1% (661/4102) of patients, respectively, were aged ≥65 years. Consequently, exposure to tofacitinib was lower in older versus younger patients in Phase 3 (259.2 vs. 1554.9 patient years [pt-yrs]) and LTE (962.1 vs. 5071.7 pt-yrs) studies. Probability ratios for ACR responses and HAQ-DI improvement from baseline ≥0.22 (Month 3) favoured tofacitinib and were similar in older and younger patients, with overlapping CIs. IRs for SAEs and discontinuations due to AEs were generally numerically higher in older versus younger patients, irrespective of treatment. Older patients receiving tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg BID had a similar probability of ACR20 or ACR50 response and, due to comorbidities, a numerically higher risk of SAEs and discontinuations due to AEs compared with younger patients.

  15. Prevalence of functioning and disability in older patients with joint contractures: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U; Müller, M; Strobl, R; Bartoszek, G; Meyer, G; Grill, E

    2015-06-01

    Joint contractures are a common problem for older, frail people, particularly in rehabilitation, nursing home and homecare settings. Joint contractures are underreported and sparsely empirically investigated despite their high prevalence. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of functional impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions of patients with joint contractures using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework. We also examined contextual factors as potential mediators for functioning and disability. Cross-sectional study- Three acute-geriatric hospitals in and around Munich (Germany). Patients aged 65 and over with confirmed joint contractures requiring rehabilitation care. The patients were asked to answer a questionnaire that comprised 124 categories of the ICF. Patients' problems in functioning were registered separately for each category. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with patients and health professionals and from patients' medical records. One hundred and fifty patients were eligible and agreed to participate. Mean age was 82.5 years (SD: 7.4), 64.8% of the patients were female. Problems in "muscle power functions" (95.9%) and "driving human-powered transportation" (89,6%) were those most frequently identified. 'Health services, systems and policies' (98,6%) was the most frequent environmental facilitator. Aged persons with joint contractures experience high levels of disability. Specifically, mobility, participation restrictions and interactions with the environment emerged as important issues of our study. Mobility and support by others were frequently mentioned as aspects relevant for persons with joint contractures. These aspects have to be considered when assessing the impact of joint contractures.

  16. Occurrence and Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Were Not Rare Events during Phlebotomy in Older Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Wu, Shuang; Jiang, Xia; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    The use of phlebotomy is relatively common for ‘difficult-to-treat by antiviral therapies’ hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and for certain patients having chronic liver diseases with an iron overload of the liver. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed patients treated with phlebotomy and their adverse events. We observed the occurrence and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, and the appearance of ascites in some patients infected with HCV as well as the reduction of serum ferritin and alanine aminotransferase levels. Severe adverse events necessitating a cessation of phlebotomy occurred independently of α-fetoprotein (>10 ng/ml) in patients infected with HCV according to multivariate logistic regression analysis. These findings may serve as a basis for phlebotomy especially in older patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24926259

  17. Statin treatment and mortality in community-dwelling frail older patients with diabetes mellitus : A retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pilotto (Alberto); F. Panza (Francesco); Copetti, M. (Massimiliano); Simonato, M. (Matteo); D. Sancarlo; P. Gallina (Pietro); T.E. Strandberg (Timo); A.J. Cruz-Jentoft (A.); Daragjati, J. (Julia); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A. Fontana (Andrea); S. Maggi; F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); M. Paccalin; Polidori, M.C. (Maria Cristina); Schulz, R.-J. (Ralf-Joachim); E. Topinkova; G. Trifirò (Gianluca); A.-K. Welmer

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Older adults are often excluded from clinical trials. Decision making for administration of statins to older patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is under debate, particularly in frail older patients with comorbidity and high mortality risk. We tested the hypothesis that

  18. After total knee replacement younger patients demonstrate superior balance control compared to older patients when recovering from a forward fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Brian D; Gage, William

    2017-05-01

    National joint replacement registries have reported a substantial growth in younger knee osteoarthritic patients (controlled perturbation have shown age-related differences between younger and older healthy adults, whether similar age-related differences exist among total knee replacement patients is unknown. A total of 59 participants, including 29 unilateral total knee replacement patients (six-months post-surgery) made up the four experimental groups: 1) younger patient (54.3 (SD 7.9) years), 2) younger control (55.2 (SD 4.0) years), 3) older patient (76.9 (SD 4.7) years), and 4) older control (77.7 (SD 4.1) years). Using a tether-release method to perturb balance and simulate a forward fall, center of mass and stepping characteristics were analyzed. Younger patients recovered following the perturbation with a significantly smaller center of mass displacement compared to the older patients (14.85 (SD 0.01) v. 18.13 (SD 0.02) %ht, p=0.02); utilizing a longer (0.43 (SD 0.02) v. 0.39 (SD 0.03) m, pcontrols in center of mass displacement or recovery step characteristics (p>0.05). The younger patients demonstrated superior center of mass control in response to a forward perturbation, suggesting that younger patients would be at a reduced risk of falling when recovering from a forward-directed postural perturbation compared to older patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of progressive sit-to-stand training among older hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne; Bean, Jonathan F

    2015-01-01

    hospitalization and once following discharge in their own homes. A structured interview including assessment of possible modifiers (cognitive status by the Short Orientation Memory test and mobility by the De Morton Mobility Index) was administered both on admission to the hospital and in the home setting...... was independent of cognitive status. Conclusions. We found a simple progression model for loaded sit-to-stands (STAND) feasible in acutely admitted older medical patients (≥65 yrs), based on our pre-specified criteria for feasibility....... and dose for older patients. Therefore, our aim was to test the feasibility of a progression model for loaded sit-to-stand training among older hospitalized patients. Methods. This is a prospective cohort study conducted as a feasibility study prior to a full-scale trial. We included twenty-four older...

  20. Factors affecting mortality in older trauma patients-A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Ian; Lecky, Fiona; Sutton, Anthea; Leaviss, Joanna; O'Cathain, Alicia

    2016-06-01

    Major trauma in older people is a significant health burden in the developed world. The aging of the population has resulted in larger numbers of older patients suffering serious injury. Older trauma patients are at greater risk of death from major trauma, but the reasons for this are less well understood. The aim of this review was to identify the factors affecting mortality in older patients suffering major injury. A systematic review of Medline, Cinhal and the Cochrane database, supplemented by a manual search of relevant papers was undertaken, with meta-analysis. Multi-centre cohort studies of existing trauma registries that reported risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted odds ratios, AOR) in their outcomes and which analysed patients aged 65 and older as a separate cohort were included in the review. 3609 papers were identified from the electronic databases, and 28 from manual searches. Of these, 15 papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Demographic variables (age and gender), pre-existing conditions (comorbidities and medication), and injury-related factors (injury severity, pattern and mechanism) were found to affect mortality. The 'oldest old', aged 75 and older, had higher mortality rates than younger patients, aged 65-74 years. Older men had a significantly higher mortality rate than women (cumulative odds ratio 1.51, 95% CI 1.37-1.66). Three papers reported a higher risk of death in patients with pre-existing conditions. Two studies reported increased mortality in patients on warfarin (cumulative odds ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.05-1.66). Higher mortality was seen in patients with lower Glasgow coma scores and systolic blood pressures. Mortality increased with increased injury severity and number of injuries sustained. Low level falls were associated with higher mortality than motor vehicle collisions (cumulative odds ratio 2.88, 95% CI 1.26-6.60). Multiple factors contribute to mortality risk in older trauma patients. The relation between these factors and

  1. Predictors of outcome in patients with common mental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for Common Mental Disorders (CMD) in general health care settings ... treatment had been adapted for use in the Indian setting, ... GHQ in the Konkani language has been published.6 Those ..... Santiago, Chile: A randomised controlled trial.

  2. McBride's operation for hallux valgus can be used in patients older than 30 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Larsen, T

    1992-01-01

    . In patients older than 30 years there were significant reductions. In patients younger than 30 years, the reduction was not significant. The rate of problems with daily footwear was reduced from 36 of 46 feet to 13 of 38 feet. The authors noted few problems and a high rate of satisfied patients, despite...

  3. Feasibility and Inter-Rater Reliability of Physical Performance Measures in Acutely Admitted Older Medical Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Physical performance measures can be used to predict functional decline and increased dependency in older persons. However, few studies have assessed the feasibility or reliability of such measures in hospitalized older patients. Here we assessed the feasibility and inter-rater reliabi......OBJECTIVE: Physical performance measures can be used to predict functional decline and increased dependency in older persons. However, few studies have assessed the feasibility or reliability of such measures in hospitalized older patients. Here we assessed the feasibility and inter......-rater reliability of four simple measures of physical performance in acutely admitted older medical patients. DESIGN: During the first 24 hours of hospitalization, the following were assessed twice by different raters in 52 (≥ 65 years) patients admitted for acute medical illness: isometric hand grip strength, 4......, and 30-s chair stand were 8%, 7%, and 18%, and the SRD95% values were 22%, 17%, and 49%. CONCLUSION: In acutely admitted older medical patients, grip strength, gait speed, and the Cumulated Ambulation Score measurements were feasible and showed high inter-rater reliability when administered by different...

  4. Preferred and Perceived Participation of Younger and Older Patients in Decision Making About Treatment for Early Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelinck, Victoria C; Bastiaannet, Esther; Pieterse, Arwen H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2018-04-01

    Older patients are believed to prefer a more passive role in treatment decision making, but studies reporting this relation were conducted over a decade ago or were retrospective. We prospectively compared younger (40-64 years) versus older (≥ 65 years) breast cancer patients' preferences for decision-making roles and their perceived actual roles. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in Leiden, The Hague, and Tilburg over a 2-year period. Early-stage breast cancer patients were surveyed about their preferred and perceived decision-making roles (active, shared, or passive) concerning surgery type (breast-conserving vs. mastectomy) (n = 74), adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT, n = 43), and adjuvant hormonal therapy (aHT, n = 39). For all decisions, both age groups most frequently preferred a shared role before consultation, except for decisions about aHT, for which younger patients more commonly preferred an active role. The proportion of patients favoring an active or passive role in each decision was lower for the older than the younger patients, but none of the differences was significant. Regarding perceived actual roles, both groups most frequently reported an active role in the surgical decision after consultation. In deciding about both aCT and aHT, a larger proportion of older patients perceived having had a passive role compared to younger patients, and a greater proportion of younger patients perceived having been active. Again, differences were not statistically significant. Most older patients preferred to decide together with their clinician, but preferences varied widely. Older patients more often than younger patients perceived they had not been involved in decisions about systemic therapy. Clinicians should invite all patients to participate in decision making and elicit their preferred role. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PatientVOICE: Development of a Preparatory, Pre-Chemotherapy Online Communication Tool for Older Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Driesenaar, Jeanine A; van Weert, Julia Cm; van Osch, Mara; Noordman, Janneke

    2017-05-10

    Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one's needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or older). In addition to the age-related deterioration in information and memory processing older patients experience, communication is also complicated by their required yet often unmet role of being an active, participatory patient. Older patients rarely express their informational needs and their contributions to consultations are often limited. Therefore, older patients with cancer need to be prepared to participate more actively in their care and treatment. The objective of this paper was to report the development of PatientVOICE, an online, preparatory tool with audio facility aimed to enhance the participation of older patients during educational nursing encounters preceding chemotherapy and to improve their information recall. PatientVOICE was developed by applying the following 6 steps of the intervention mapping framework that involved both patients and nurses: (1) needs assessment, (2) specifying determinants and change objectives, (3) reviewing and selecting theoretical methods and practical strategies, (4) developing intervention components, (5) designing adoption and implementation, and (6) making an evaluation plan. A careful execution of these consecutive steps resulted in the ready-to-use preparatory website. PatientVOICE provides pre-visit information about chemotherapy (ie, medical information, side effects, and recommendations of dealing with side effects), information about the educational nursing visit preceding chemotherapy (ie, aim, structure, and recommendations for preparation), techniques to improve patients' communication skills using a question prompt sheet (QPS) and video-modeling examples showing "best practices", and the opportunity to upload and listen

  6. The effect of music on postoperative recovery in older patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal-Huisman, Hanneke; Dons, Karolien S K; Smilde, Rineke; Heineman, Erik; van Leeuwen, Barbara L

    2018-04-17

    Surgery is an important part of the treatment modalities offered to older patients with cancer. Natural ageing processes lead to deterioration of organ function, making older patients more vulnerable and at risk for experiencing less-favourable outcomes and complications after surgery. Non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as music, may be preferable to medical interventions in older people, who are at risk for adverse effects and drug interactions due to altered physiology and drug metabolism. We aimed to assess the effect of music on postoperative recovery in older patients and to determine the underpinning theoretical models MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review used the databases PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsychINFO, and Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM). Clinical studies published, until 2015, investigating music as a single intervention for hospitalised patients postoperative, population mean age 60 years or older were selected. All types of postoperative music interventions, consisting of single or more sessions, which take place at a hospital ward. All patient outcomes were included. The search and screening was performed twice, independently, and seventeen articles were finally selected. Four theoretical models were detected underpinning the effect of music on postoperative recovery. The way the music interventions were shaped, varied strongly. Therefore it remained unclear what is the most effective way of performing the music in the postoperative period. Although evidence is still limited, results do show that music has a positive effect on the recovery of older patients after surgery. Pain and anxiety are reduced, and relaxation, cognitive functioning, and patient satisfaction increase during postoperative recovery. No negative side effects of music as an intervention were found and therefore seems a non-harming and non-invasive intervention. It seems worthwhile to

  7. Orthostatic hypotension and overall mortality in 1050 older patients of the outpatient comprehensive geriatric assessment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Tamar; Punchik, Boris; Kagan, Ella; Barzak, Alex; Press, Yan

    2018-03-02

    Orthostatic hypotension is a common problem in individuals aged ≥65 years. Its association with mortality is not clear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate associations between orthostatic hypotension and overall mortality in a sample of individuals aged ≥65 years who were seen at the Outpatient Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Unit, Clalit Health Services, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Individuals who were evaluated in the Outpatient Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Unit between January 2005 and December 2015, and who had data on orthostatic hypotension were included in the study. The database included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, functional and cognitive state, geriatric syndromes reached over the course of the assessment, and comorbidity. Data on mortality were also collected. The study sample included 1050 people, of whom 626 underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment and 424 underwent geriatric consultation. The mean age was 77.3 ± 5.4 years and 35.7% were men. Orthostatic hypotension was diagnosed in 294 patients (28.0%). In univariate analysis, orthostatic hypotension was associated with overall mortality only in patients aged 65-75 years (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.07-2.2), but in the multivariate model this association disappeared. In older frail patients, orthostatic hypotension was not an independent risk factor for overall mortality. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients' website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, N; Smets, E M A; Eddes, E H; de Haes, J C J M; Loos, E F; van Weert, J C M

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174 younger (text-only information, text with two cognitive illustrations or text with two affective illustrations. In general, adding cognitive illustrations compared with text-only information improved the satisfaction with the attractiveness of the website in both younger and older patients. For older patients in particular, cognitive illustrations facilitated recall of cancer information: whereas older patients recalled less information overall compared with younger patients (39% vs. 50%), no statistically significant differences in age on recall were observed when cognitive illustrations were added to text. Furthermore, older patients were more satisfied with the emotional support from the website than younger patients, especially when affective illustrations were present. Our results suggest that effective online cancer communication for ageing populations involves considering both cognitive and affective illustrations to enhance website satisfaction and recall of cancer information. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Patient-Centred Care of Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease and Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Rich, Michael W

    2016-09-01

    Multimorbidity, defined as the presence of 2 or more chronic conditions, is common among older adults with cardiovascular disease. These individuals are at increased risk for poor health outcomes and account for a large proportion of health care utilization. Clinicians are challenged with the heterogeneity of this population, the complexity of the treatment regimen, limited high-quality evidence, and fragmented health care systems. Each treatment recommended by a clinical practice guideline for a single cardiovascular disease might be rational, but the combination of all evidence-based recommendations can be impractical or even harmful to individuals with multimorbidity. These challenges can be overcome with a patient-centred approach that incorporates the individual's preferences, relevant evidence, the overall and condition-specific prognosis, clinical feasibility of treatments, and interactions with other treatments and coexisting chronic conditions. The ultimate goal is to maximize benefits and minimize harms by optimizing adherence to the most essential treatments, while acknowledging trade-offs between treatments for different health conditions. It might be necessary to discontinue therapies that are not essential or potentially harmful to decrease the risk of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions from polypharmacy. A decision to initiate, withhold, or stop a treatment should be on the basis of the time horizon to benefits vs the individual's prognosis. In this review, we illustrate how cardiologists and general practitioners can adopt a patient-centred approach to focus on the aspects of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular health that have the greatest effect on functioning and quality of life in older adults with cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hip Arthroscopy in Patients Age 40 or Older: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Nolan S; Ekhtiari, Seper; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R; Philippon, Marc J; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2017-02-01

    To (1) report clinical outcomes, complication rates, and total hip arthroplasty (THA) conversion rates for patients age 40 or older who underwent hip arthroscopy, and (2) report any age-related predictors of outcome identified in the literature. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched for relevant studies and pertinent data were abstracted from eligible studies. No meta-analysis was performed because of heterogeneity amongst studies. Seventeen studies were included in this review comprising 16,327 patients, including 9,954 patients age 40 or older. All studies reported statistically significant improvements in outcomes after hip arthroscopy for femoral osteochondroplasty, labral repair, or unspecified indications. In patients 40 or older who underwent labral debridement, these improvements were not clinically significant. Obesity and osteoarthritic changes predicted poorer outcomes. Only 1 of 3 studies directly comparing the 2 groups found that patients 40 or older had a significantly less improvement in a standardized hip outcome score than patients under 40 after hip arthroscopy, but all found that patients 40 or older had significantly higher rates of THA conversion. The rate of conversion to THA was 18.1% for patients 40 or older, 23.1% for patients over 50, and 25.2% for patients over 60 with a mean of 25.0 months to THA. Indications for hip arthroscopy including femoral osteochondroplasty and labral repair resulted in clinically significant improvements in patients 40 or older in most research studies examined in this review, whereas labral debridement did not produce clinically significant improvements postoperatively in the same studies. In these studies, the rate of conversion to THA is higher than in patients under 40 and increases with each decade of life, with many individual studies showing a significant increase in the rate of THA conversion. Hip arthroscopy may be suitable for some patients 40 or older, but patient selection is key and patients

  11. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  12. Predictors of outcome in patients with common mental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The CISR scores at 2 months, 6 months and 12 months were modelled using multiple linear regression with a random effect for patients. Two types of variables were examined. Patient variables were age; sex; religion; education; marital status; severity of psychiatric morbidity at recruitment; and severity of social ...

  13. metabolic control of type 2 diabetic patients commonly treated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-01

    Apr 1, 2003 ... Protocol: Body weight, height, blood pressure (BP), waist and hip ... method. Results: Of the 179 patients studied, 87% of male and 92% of female patients ... requiring care in the region. ... position, using a standard mercury gauge sphygmomanometer .... independent factors that influenced the levels of the.

  14. Metabolic control of type 2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fasting insulin and glucose concentrations were used to assess insulin resistance and sensitivity (%S) using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method. Results: Of the 179 patients studied, 87% of male and 92% of female patients were treated with sulphonylurea drugs whereas 13% and 9% of male and female ...

  15. Atrial fibrillation management in older heart failure patients: a complex clinical problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pulignano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAtrial fibrillation (AF and heart failure (HF, two problems of growing prevalence as a consequence of the ageing population, are associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. AF and HF also share common risk factors and pathophysiologic processes such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, and valvular heart disease often occur together. Although elderly patients with both HF and AF are affected by worse symptoms and poorer prognosis, there is a paucity of data on appropriate management of these patients.MethodsPubMed was searched for studies on AF and older patients using the terms atrial fibrillation, elderly, heart failure, cognitive impairment, frailty, stroke, and anticoagulants.ResultsThe clinical picture of HF patients with AF is complex and heterogeneous with a higher prevalence of frailty, cognitive impairment, and disability. Because of the association of mental and physical impairment to non-administration of oral anticoagulants (OACs, screening for these simple variables in clinical practice may allow better strategies for intervention in this high-risk population. Since novel direct OACs (NOACs have a more favorable risk-benefit profile, they may be preferable to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs in many frail elderly patients, especially those at higher risk of falls. Moreover, NOACs are simple to administer and monitor and may be associated with better adherence and safety in patients with cognitive deficits and mobility impairments.ConclusionsLarge multicenter longitudinal studies are needed to examine the effects of VKAs and NOACs on long-term cognitive function and frailty; future studies should include geriatric conditions.

  16. Infectious Mononucleosis in Active Patients: Definitive Answers to Common Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwaerter, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes infectious mononucleosis (IM), examining viral transmission and infection, clinical features, diagnosis, and management. Focuses on answers to several commonly asked questions about IM in sport (e.g., when it is safe to resume sports after IM, how often fatigue or depression are related to earlier bouts of IM, and how often IM is…

  17. Positive Affect and Suicide Ideation in Older Adult Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Chapman, Benjamin; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem for older adults. Identification of protective factors associated with reduced risk is important. The authors examined the association of positive affect and suicide ideation in 462 primary care patients ages 65 and older. Positive affect distinguished suicide ideators from nonideators, after controlling for age, gender, depression, negative affect, illness burden, activity, sociability, cognitive functioning, and physical functioning. There was ...

  18. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF.......Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF....

  19. Original Research Risk factors for common cancers among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions. Age, smoking, and HIV are important risk factors for the 3 commonest cancer types (oesophageal, KS, and cervical) at this teaching .... cancer (95%) patients had no history of smoking or alcohol ..... Africa: a current perspective.

  20. Nutritional status of older patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia in a chronic versus an acute clinical situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Silvia; Roca, Maria; Costa, Alicia; Arreola, Viridiana; Ortega, Omar; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2017-08-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a prevalent risk factor for malnutrition (MN) in older patients and both conditions are related to poor outcome. To explore the nutritional status in older patients with OD in a chronic and an acute clinical situation. We examined 95 older (≥70 years) patients with OD associated to chronic neurological diseases or aging, and 23 older patients with OD and acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with videofluoroscopy; and 15 older people without OD. We collected nutritional status, measured with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA ® ), anthropometric measurements, and biochemistry and bioimpedance for body composition. Functional status was assessed with the Barthel index. 1) Taking into consideration patients with OD with chronic conditions, 51.1% presented a MNA ® ≤23.5; 16.7%, sarcopenia and a) reduced visceral and muscular protein compartments and fat compartment; b) muscular weakness c) intracellular water depletion, and d) reduced body weight. Patients with OD and MNA ® ≤23 needed higher levels of nectar viscosity for a safe swallow and had increased oropharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosity. 2) Patients with OD and CAP, 69.5%, presented an MNA ® ≤23.5 and 29.4% sarcopenia, the inflammatory response of the pneumonia adding to the more severe depletion in visceral protein and muscular mass. Prevalence of impaired nutritional status (malnutrition risk, and sarcopenia) among older patients with OD associated with either chronic or acute conditions is very high. In patients with OD and chronic diseases, poor nutritional status further impairs OD with an increase in oropharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosity. In the acute setting there is inflammation and an additional protein deficiency. These findings will help develop specific products both for OD and nutritional status in each specific clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights

  1. Non-verbal communication between primary care physicians and older patients: how does race matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanikova, Irena; Zhang, Qian; Wieland, Darryl; Eleazer, G Paul; Stewart, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Non-verbal communication is an important aspect of the diagnostic and therapeutic process, especially with older patients. It is unknown how non-verbal communication varies with physician and patient race. To examine the joint influence of physician race and patient race on non-verbal communication displayed by primary care physicians during medical interviews with patients 65 years or older. Video-recordings of visits of 209 patients 65 years old or older to 30 primary care physicians at three clinics located in the Midwest and Southwest. Duration of physicians' open body position, eye contact, smile, and non-task touch, coded using an adaption of the Nonverbal Communication in Doctor-Elderly Patient Transactions form. African American physicians with African American patients used more open body position, smile, and touch, compared to the average across other dyads (adjusted mean difference for open body position = 16.55, p non-verbal communication with older patients. Its influence is best understood when physician race and patient race are considered jointly.

  2. Fall risk profile and quality-of-life status of older chiropractic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Kelly R; Noone, Paul L; Short, Krystal; Elley, C Raina; Haavik, Heidi

    2011-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of fall risk factors in older chiropractic patients. The secondary aim was to investigate the quality-of-life status of older chiropractic patients and to see whether a history of falling was related to quality-of-life status. A cross-sectional study was conducted at 12 chiropractic practices throughout Auckland, New Zealand, and Melbourne, Australia. The study involved gaining a profile of health status, fall history, and fall risk from active chiropractic patients who were 65 years or older. One hundred ten older chiropractic patients were approached, and 101 agreed to participate in this study (response rate, 91.8%). Thirty-five percent of participants had experienced at least 1 fall in the previous 12 months. Of those that had fallen, 80% had at least a minor injury, with 37% of fallers requiring medical attention and 6% suffering a serious injury. The prevalence of most fall risk factors was consistent with published data for community-dwelling older adults. Quality of life of older chiropractic patients appeared to be good, but fallers reported a lower physical component summary score compared with nonfallers (P = .04). A portion of the older chiropractic patients sampled in this study had a substantial risk of falling. This risk could be assessed on a regular basis for the presence of modifiable fall risk factors, and appropriate advice, given when fall risks are identified. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of Risk Factors for the Refeeding Syndrome in Older Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, M; Cuvelier, I; Gehrke, I; Marburger, C; Modreker, M K; Volkert, D; Willschrei, H P; Wirth, R

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of refeeding syndrome (RFS) in older patients is not well-known. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of known risk factors for RFS in older individuals during hospitalization at geriatric hospital departments. 342 consecutive older participants (222 females) who admitted at acute geriatric hospital wards were included in a cross-sectional study. We applied the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) criteria for determining patients at risk of RFS. In addition, Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA®-SF) was used to identify patients at risk of malnutrition. Weight and height were assessed. The degree of weight loss was obtained by interview. Serum phosphate, magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, creatinine and urea were analyzed according to standard procedures. Of 342 older participants included in the study (mean age 83.1 ± 6.8, BMI range of 14.7-43.6 kg/m2), 239 (69.9%) were considered to be at risk of RFS, in which 43.5% and 11.7% were at risk of malnutrition and malnourished, respectively, according to MNA-SF. Patients in the risk group had significantly higher weight loss, lower phosphate and magnesium levels. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, low levels of phosphate and magnesium followed by weight loss were the major risk factors for fulfilling the NICE criteria. The incidence of risk factors for RFS was relatively high in older individuals acutely admitted in geriatric hospital units, suggesting that, RFS maybe more frequent among older persons than we are aware of. Patients with low serum levels of phosphate and magnesium and higher weight loss are at increased risk of RFS. The clinical characteristics of the older participants at risk of RFS indicate that these patients had a relatively poor nutritional status which can help us better understand the potential scale of RFS on admission or during the hospital stay.

  4. Discharge interventions for older patients leaving hospital: protocol for a systematic meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell Francischetto, Elaine; Damery, Sarah; Davies, Sarah; Combes, Gill

    2016-03-16

    There is an increased need for additional care and support services for the elderly population. It is important to identify what support older people need once they are discharged from hospital and to ensure continuity of care. There is a large evidence base focusing on enhanced discharge services and their impact on patients. The services show some potential benefits, but there are inconsistent findings across reviews. Furthermore, it is unclear what elements of enhanced discharge interventions could be most beneficial to older people. This meta-review aims to identify existing systematic reviews of discharge interventions for older people, identify potentially effective elements of enhanced discharge services for this patient group and identify areas where further work may still be needed. The search will aim to identify English language systematic reviews that have assessed the effectiveness of discharge interventions for older people. The following databases will be searched: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, HMIC, Social Policy and Practice, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, ASSIA, Social Science Citation Index and the Grey Literature Report. The search strategy will comprise the keywords 'systematic reviews', 'older people' and 'discharge'. Discharge interventions must aim to support older patients before, during and/or after discharge from hospital. Outcomes of interest will include mortality, readmissions, length of hospital stay, patient health status, patient and carer satisfaction and staff views. Abstract, title and full text screening will be conducted independently by two reviewers. Data extracted from reviews will include review characteristics, patient population, review quality score, outcome measures and review findings, and a narrative synthesis will be conducted. This review will identify existing reviews of discharge interventions and appraise how these interventions can impact outcomes in older people such as readmissions, health status, length of

  5. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients; comparing adults and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Bello Moreira, Annie Seixas

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category. Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p cancer, nor with nutritional status. The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Methods of comprehensive geriatric assessment of older patients with rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Gordeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a literature review on application of modern risk predictors of complications and morbidity necessary for selection of oncologically justified treatment methods for older patients with rectal cancer taking into account advancement of the disease and concomitant pathology. Use of modern scales, calculators, and questionnaires for evaluation of functional and physical status of this complex patient category by a multidisciplinary team allows to personalize therapy approach, minimize complications and morbidity after specific treatment. Application of the developed algorithms of assessment of older patients creates satisfactory conditions for their treatment based on oncological adequacy, functionality, and safety.  

  7. Psychotherapy Termination Practices with Older Adults: Impact of Patient and Therapist Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Daniel J; Zeff, Patricia; Zweig, Richard A

    2018-02-06

    The aims of this study were to survey clinicians' opinions regarding psychotherapy practices in mutual termination with a specified population (depressed older adult outpatients) and to examine the patient and therapist characteristics that may influence such practices. We surveyed psychologists' (N = 96) psychotherapy termination practices, using a hypothetical depressed older adult as a referent, to assess consensus on the appropriateness of various guidelines to termination and to examine whether these differ as a function of patient and therapist characteristics. Several practices were generally agreed to be "extremely appropriate" when terminating psychotherapy with older adults, including collaborating to determine the end date of treatment and discussing patient growth. Data also indicate that patient factors, such as personality pathology, and therapist factors, such as having an Integrative theoretical orientation were associated with differential endorsement of termination practices. Identification as a geropsychologist or working regularly with older adults were associated with a more cautious approach to termination. There is substantial consensus regarding many approaches to termination, but modifications might be appropriate depending on patient characteristics. Clinicians agree on a set of fundamental termination practices when working with older adults, but modify these based on orientation and diagnosis.

  8. Use of clozapine in older Asian patients with schizophrenia between 2001 and 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tao Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date there has been no large-scale international study that examined the use of clozapine in older patients with schizophrenia. This study examined the use of clozapine and its demographic and clinical correlates in older patients with schizophrenia in East Asia during the period between 2001 and 2009. METHOD: Information on 1,157 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia aged 50 or older in five East Asian countries and territories (China, Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan was extracted from the database of the Research on Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns (REAP project. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and prescription of psychotropic medications were recorded. RESULTS: Clozapine was prescribed for 20.6% of the pooled sample; 19.0% in 2001, 19.4% in 2004 and 22.9% in 2009. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the whole sample revealed that patients taking clozapine had a longer duration of illness, more negative symptoms and were less likely to receive first generation antipsychotic and anticholinergic drugs, but more likely to report weight gain compared to those not receiving clozapine. Compared to those in other sites, older patients in China were more likely to receive clozapine. CONCLUSIONS: The prescription of clozapine for older Asian schizophrenia inpatients has remained at a stable level during the past decade. The appropriateness of use of clozapine in China needs to be further explored.

  9. Factors associated with improved survival among older colorectal cancer patients in the US: a population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earle Craig C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative impact of changes in demographics, stage at detection, treatment mix, and medical technology on 5-year survival among older colorectal cancer (CRC patients. Methods We selected older patients diagnosed with CRC between 1992 and 2000 from the SEER-Medicare database and followed them through 2005. Trends in demographic characteristics, stage at detection and initial treatment mix were evaluated descriptively. Separate multivariate logistic regression models for colon (CC and rectal cancer (RC patients were estimated to isolate the independent effects of these factors along with technological change (proxied by cohort year on 5-year survival. Results Our sample included 37,808 CC and 13,619 RC patients (combined mean ± SD age: 77.2 ± 7.0 years; 55% female; 87% white. In recent years, more CC patients were diagnosed at Stage I and fewer at Stages II and IV, and more RC patients were diagnosed at Stage I and fewer at Stages II and III. CC and RC patients diagnosed in later years were slightly older with somewhat better Charlson scores and were more likely to be female, from the Northeast, and from areas with higher average education levels. Surgery alone was more common in later years for CC patients while combined surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy was more common for RC patients. Between 1992 and 2000, 5-year observed survival improved from 43.0% to 46.3% for CC patients and from 39.4% to 42.2% for RC patients. Multivariate logistic regressions indicate that patients diagnosed in 2000 had significantly greater odds of 5-year survival than those diagnosed in 1992 (OR: 1.35 for CC, 1.38 for RC. Our decomposition suggests that early detection had little impact on survival; rather, technological improvements (e.g., new medical technologies or more effective use of existing technologies and changing demographics were responsible for the largest share of the change in 5

  10. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions for older patients in long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurin Danielle

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate medication use is a major healthcare issue for the elderly population. This study explored the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs in long-term care in metropolitan Quebec. Methods A cross sectional chart review of 2,633 long-term care older patients of the Quebec City area was performed. An explicit criteria list for PIPs was developed based on the literature and validated by a modified Delphi method. Medication orders were reviewed to describe prescribing patterns and to determine the prevalence of PIPs. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of PIPs. Results Almost all residents (94.0% were receiving one or more prescribed medication; on average patients had 4.8 prescribed medications. A majority (54.7% of treated patients had a potentially inappropriate prescription (PIP. Most common PIPs were drug interactions (33.9% of treated patients, followed by potentially inappropriate duration (23.6%, potentially inappropriate medication (14.7% and potentially inappropriate dosage (9.6%. PIPs were most frequent for medications of the central nervous system (10.8% of prescribed medication. The likelihood of PIP increased significantly as the number of drugs prescribed increased (odds ratio [OR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33 – 1.43 and with the length of stay (OR: 1.78, CI: 1.43 – 2.20. On the other hand, the risk of receiving a PIP decreased with age. Conclusion Potentially inappropriate prescribing is a serious problem in the highly medicated long-term care population in metropolitan Quebec. Use of explicit criteria lists may help identify the most critical issues and prioritize interventions to improve quality of care and patient safety.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of patient education on rates of falls in older hospital patients: Description of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Tammy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental falls by older patients in hospital are one of the most commonly reported adverse events. Falls after discharge are also common. These falls have enormous physical, psychological and social consequences for older patients, including serious physical injury and reduced quality of life, and are also a source of substantial cost to health systems worldwide. There have been a limited number of randomised controlled trials, mainly using multifactorial interventions, aiming to prevent older people falling whilst inpatients. Trials to date have produced conflicting results and recent meta-analyses highlight that there is still insufficient evidence to clearly identify which interventions may reduce the rate of falls, and falls related injuries, in this population. Methods and design A prospective randomised controlled trial (n = 1206 is being conducted at two hospitals in Australia. Patients are eligible to be included in the trial if they are over 60 years of age and they, or their family or guardian, give written consent. Participants are randomised into three groups. The control group continues to receive usual care. Both intervention groups receive a specifically designed patient education intervention on minimising falls in addition to usual care. The education is delivered by Digital Video Disc (DVD and written workbook and aims to promote falls prevention activities by participants. One of the intervention groups also receives follow up education training visits by a health professional. Blinded assessors conduct baseline and discharge assessments and follow up participants for 6 months after discharge. The primary outcome measure is falls by participants in hospital. Secondary outcome measures include falls at home after discharge, knowledge of falls prevention strategies and motivation to engage in falls prevention activities after discharge. All analyses will be based on intention to treat principle. Discussion

  12. Common Dermatoses in Patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Tampa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic, debilitating syndrome, consisting of intrusive thoughts- which are experienced as inappropriate by the patient and are producing anxiety- and compulsions, defined as repetitive behaviours produced to reduce anxiety. While patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder typically have xerosis, eczema or lichen simplex chronicus, as a result of frequent washing or rubbing their skin, several other disorders which are included in the group of factitious disorders have also been associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder. A close collaboration between the dermatologist and the psychiatrist is therefore mandatory in order to achieve favourable outcomes for these patients. The aim of the article is to present the most frequent dermatological disorders associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder and to look over some of the rare ones.

  13. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little survival improvement in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the last two decades. Improving induction treatment may improve the rate and quality of remission and consequently survival. In our previous trial, in younger patients, we showed improved...

  14. Hemicraniectomy in Older Patients with Extensive Middle-Cerebral-Artery Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jüttler, Eric; Unterberg, Andreas; Woitzik, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Early decompressive hemicraniectomy reduces mortality without increasing the risk of very severe disability among patients 60 years of age or younger with complete or subtotal space-occupying middle-cerebral-artery infarction. Its benefit in older patients is uncertain. METHODS. We ra...

  15. Diagnostic indicators of anxiety and depression in older dizzy patients in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, O.R.; Dros, J.; Windt, D.A. van der; Riet, G. ter; Schellevis, F.G.; Weert, H.C. van; Horst, H.E. van der

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizzy patients with both psychological and physical symptoms tend to have high levels of disability and are at risk of remaining symptomatic and disabled. The objective of this study was to develop a prediction model for the presence of anxiety and/or depression in older dizzy patients

  16. Physical and Nutritional Prehabilitation in Older Patients With Colorectal Carcinoma : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijaard, Stéphanie M L M; Slee-Valentijn, Monique S; Otten, René H J; Maier, Andrea B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Sarcopenia and malnourishment are highly prevalent in older patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), who form a growing group of patients at risk of adverse outcome after surgery. Intervention on physical function and/or nutritional status may decrease the risk of postoperative

  17. Survival of cognitively impaired older hospitalized patients at risk of malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelemaat, F.; Bijland, L.R.; Thijs, A.; Seidell, J.C.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In our society offering extra nutritional support is a standard for malnourished patients at admission to hospital. Whether cognitively impaired, older, hospitalized patients at risk of malnutrition would also benefit from this regimen is unknown. This study assesses their 3-months and

  18. Hospital catering systems and their impact on the sensorial profile of foods provided to older patients in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrommatis, Yiannis; Moynihan, Paula J; Gosney, Margot A; Methven, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    Impaired sensorial perception is very common in older people and low sensorial quality of foods is associated with decreased appetite and dietary intake. Hospital undernutrition in older patients could be linked to sensorial quality of hospital food if the quality were low or inappropriate for older people. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the sensorial quality of different foods that occur as a result of the food journey (i.e. freezing, regeneration, etc.) in the most common hospital catering systems in the UK. A trained sensory panel assessed sensorial descriptors of certain foods with and without the hospital food journey as it occurs in the in-house and cook/freeze systems. The results showed effects of the food journey on a small number of sensorial descriptors related to flavour, appearance and mouthfeel. The majority of these effects were due to temperature changes, which caused accumulation of condensation. A daily variation in sensorial descriptors was also detected and in some cases it was greater than the effect of the food journey. This study has shown that changes occur in the sensory quality of meals due to hospital food journeys, however these changes were small and are not expected to substantially contribute to acceptability or have a major role in hospital malnutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Goal Disengagement Capacities and Severity of Disease across Older Adulthood: The Sample Case of the Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Joelle; Wrosch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    This study examined age-related associations between goal disengagement capacities, emotional distress, and disease severity across older adulthood. Given that an age-related increase in the experience of stressors might render important goals unattainable, it is expected that goal disengagement capacities would predict a decrease in the severity…

  20. Systematic review of fall risk screening tools for older patients in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata; Bartolozzi, Francesco; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-06-01

    To determine the most accurate fall risk screening tools for predicting falls among patients aged 65 years or older admitted to acute care hospitals. Falls represent a serious problem in older inpatients due to the potential physical, social, psychological and economic consequences. Older inpatients present with risk factors associated with age-related physiological and psychological changes as well as multiple morbidities. Thus, fall risk screening tools for older adults should include these specific risk factors. There are no published recommendations addressing what tools are appropriate for older hospitalized adults. Systematic review. MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane electronic databases were searched between January 1981-April 2013. Only prospective validation studies reporting sensitivity and specificity values were included. Recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Reviews have been followed. Three fall risk assessment tools were evaluated in seven articles. Due to the limited number of studies, meta-analysis was carried out only for the STRATIFY and Hendrich Fall Risk Model II. In the combined analysis, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model II demonstrated higher sensitivity than STRATIFY, while the STRATIFY showed higher specificity. In both tools, the Youden index showed low prognostic accuracy. The identified tools do not demonstrate predictive values as high as needed for identifying older inpatients at risk for falls. For this reason, no tool can be recommended for fall detection. More research is needed to evaluate fall risk screening tools for older inpatients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Potentially inappropriate medications defined by STOPP criteria and the risk of adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary

    2011-06-13

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent association between potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) in older patients as defined by Beers criteria and avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs). This study aimed to assess whether PIMs defined by new STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria are significantly associated with ADEs in older people with acute illness.

  2. Hospitalisation in an emergency department short-stay unit compared to an internal medicine department is associated with fewer complications in older patients - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Camilla; Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Kromberg, Laurits Schou

    2017-01-01

    Medicine Department (IMD). METHODS: Observational study evaluating adverse events during hospitalisation in non-emergent, age-matched, internal medicine patients ≥75 years, acutely admitted to either the SSU or the IMD at Holbaek Hospital, Denmark, from January to August, 2014. Medical records were......, unplanned readmission, and nosocomial infection. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse events of hospitalisation were significantly less common in older patients acutely admitted to an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit as compared to admission to an Internal Medicine Department.......BACKGROUND: Older patients are at particular risk of experiencing adverse events during hospitalisation. OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequencies and types of adverse events during hospitalisation in older persons acutely admitted to either an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit (SSU) or an Internal...

  3. Factors associated with osteoporosis among older patients at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TO Alonge

    energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is commonly used to ... lifestyle, alcohol and cigarette consumption, gastrointestinal ... sound velocity (SOS) were used to calculate the stiffness index ... not consent or were too ill to participate were excluded.

  4. Quality care provision for older people: an interview study with patients and primary healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Marjolein Helena Johanna; Fluit, Cornelia Rita Maria Gertruda; Lagro, Joep; Niessen, Danielle; Rikkert, Marcellinus Gerardus Maria Olde; Lagro-Janssen, Antoinette Leonarda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, primary health care for the ageing population has become increasingly complex. Aim This study sought to explore the views and needs of healthcare professionals and older patients relating to primary care in order to identify focal areas for improving primary health care for older people. Design and setting This research was structured as a mixed interview study with focus groups and individual interviews. Participants were made up of primary healthcare professionals and older patients. Patients were recruited from five elderly care homes in a small city in the southern part of the Netherlands. Method All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two individual researchers applying constant comparative analysis. Data collection proceeded until saturation was reached. Results Participants in the study agreed about the need for primary care for older patients, and showed sympathy with one another’s perspectives. They did note, however, a number of obstacles hindering good healthcare provision. The major themes that arose were: ‘autonomy and independence’, ‘organisational barriers’, and ‘professional expertise’. Participants generally noted that it is important to clarify differences in perspectives about good care between patients and healthcare professionals. Conclusion Effective primary care intervention for older patients requires mutual understanding of the expectations and goals of all parties involved. There are a number of important requirements, especially accessible patient information in the form of care plans; specialist training for nurses and GPs on complex care and multimorbidity; and training on discussing autonomy, goal setting, and shared care. Further improvement in health care for older people and its evaluation research should focus on these requirements. PMID:26212845

  5. Costs of medication in older patients: before and after comprehensive geriatric assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unutmaz GD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gulcin Done Unutmaz,1 Pinar Soysal,2 Busra Tuven,1 Ahmet Turan Isik3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey; 2Geriatric Center Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey; 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey Background: Polypharmacy and inappropriate drug use cause numerous complications, such as cognitive impairment, frailty, falls, and functional dependence. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA on polypharmacy, potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs, and to evaluate the economic reflections of medication changes.Methods: One thousand five hundred and seventy-nine older patients, who had undergone CGA, were retrospectively evaluated. The drugs, drug groups, and number of drugs that the patients used were recorded. Appropriate drug therapy was identified by both CGA and STOPP/START criteria. Based on these criteria, PIMs were discontinued and PPOs were started. The monthly cost of these drugs was calculated separately for PIMs and PPOs by using the drugstore records.Results: After CGA, while the prevalence of non-polypharmacy was increased from 43.3% to 65.6%, the prevalence of polypharmacy and hyperpolypharmacy was decreased from 56.7% to 34.4% and 12.0% to 3.6%, respectively. The three most common PIMs discontinued were proton pump inhibitors, anti-dementia drugs, and antipsychotics, respectively. However, the most common PPOs started were vitamin D and B12 supplements, and anti-depressants. After CGA, monthly saved total per capita cost of PIMs was US$12.8 and monthly increased total per capita cost of PPOs was $5.6.Conclusion: It was demonstrated that prevalence of polypharmacy, PIM, and PPO could be decreased by CGA including START/STOPP criteria in older adults. Furthermore, this will have beneficial effects on

  6. Neuropsychology, autobiographical memory and hippocampal volume in younger and older patients with chronic schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Josefa Herold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite a wide range of studies on neuropsychology in schizophrenia, autobiographical memory (AM has been scarcely investigated in these patients. Hence less is known about AM in older patients and hippocampal contribution to autobiographical memories of varying remoteness. Therefore we investigated hippocampal volume and AM along with important neuropsychological domains in patients with chronic schizophrenia and the respective relationships between these parameters. We compared 25 older patients with chronic schizophrenia to 23 younger patients and an older healthy control group (N = 21 with respect to AM, additional neuropsychological parameters and hippocampal volume. Personal episodic and semantic memory was investigated using a semi-structured interview. Additional neuropsychological parameters were assessed by using a battery of standard neuropsychological tests. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data were analysed with an automated region-of-interest procedure. While hippocampal volume reduction and neuropsychological impairment were more pronounced in the older than in the younger patients, both groups showed equivalent reduced AM performance for recent personal episodes. In the patient group significant correlations between left hippocampal volume and recent autobiographical episodes as well as personal semantic memories arose. Verbal memory and working memory were significantly correlated with right hippocampal volume, executive functions, however, were associated with bilateral hippocampal volumes. These findings underline the complexity of AM and its impairments in the course of schizophrenia in comparison to rather progressive neuropsychological deficits and address the importance of hippocampal contribution.

  7. Neuropsychology, autobiographical memory, and hippocampal volume in "younger" and "older" patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christina Josefa; Lässer, Marc Montgomery; Schmid, Lena Anna; Seidl, Ulrich; Kong, Li; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp Arthur; Essig, Marco; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Despite a wide range of studies on neuropsychology in schizophrenia, autobiographical memory (AM) has been scarcely investigated in these patients. Hence, less is known about AM in older patients and hippocampal contribution to autobiographical memories of varying remoteness. Therefore, we investigated hippocampal volume and AM along with important neuropsychological domains in patients with chronic schizophrenia and the respective relationships between these parameters. We compared 25 older patients with chronic schizophrenia to 23 younger patients and an older healthy control group (N = 21) with respect to AM, additional neuropsychological parameters, and hippocampal volume. Personal episodic and semantic memory was investigated using a semi-structured interview. Additional neuropsychological parameters were assessed by using a battery of standard neuropsychological tests. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed with an automated region-of-interest procedure. While hippocampal volume reduction and neuropsychological impairment were more pronounced in the older than in the younger patients, both groups showed equivalent reduced AM performance for recent personal episodes. In the patient group, significant correlations between left hippocampal volume and recent autobiographical episodes as well as personal semantic memories arose. Verbal memory and working memory were significantly correlated with right hippocampal volume; executive functions, however, were associated with bilateral hippocampal volumes. These findings underline the complexity of AM and its impairments in the course of schizophrenia in comparison to rather progressive neuropsychological deficits and address the importance of hippocampal contribution.

  8. Assessment of surgical treatment and postoperative nutrition in gastric cancer patients older than 80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanoko, Tomonori; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Ando, Koji; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Ohgaki, Kippei; Kimura, Yasue; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    A gastrectomy for gastric cancer is sometimes required in patients older than 80 years due to the continuously increasing age of society. However, if a gastrectomy worsens the postoperative quality of life and daily activity in elderly patients because of poor nutrition, the procedure may not always be a useful treatment strategy. Clinicopathological data of patients with gastric cancer who underwent a gastrectomy at our Department between 1998 and 2008 (N=471) were collected and analyzed. The results of treatment for patients older than 80 years (N=41) were analyzed and compared against those of patients younger than 80 years (N=430). Patients older than 80 years had a higher frequency of preoperative co-morbidities than patients younger than 80 years. However, there was no statistical difference in postoperative complications regarding nutrition between the two groups. Older age is not a determinant of poor nutrition following gastrectomy. Gastrectomy for gastric cancer is, therefore, a useful treatment strategy, regardless of ageing. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. PatientVOICE: development of a preparatory, pre-chemotherapy online communication tool for older patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Driesenaar, J.A.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Osch, M. van; Noordman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one’s needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or

  10. Cholecalciferol treatment to reduce blood pressure in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension: the VitDISH randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Price, Rosemary J G; Struthers, Allan D; Donnan, Peter T; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Ford, Ian; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2013-10-14

    Observational data link low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels to both prevalent blood pressure and incident hypertension. No clinical trial has yet examined the effect of vitamin D supplementation in isolated systolic hypertension, the most common pattern of hypertension in older people. To test whether high-dose, intermittent cholecalciferol supplementation lowers blood pressure in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Parallel group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Primary care clinics and hospital clinics. Patients 70 years and older with isolated systolic hypertension (supine systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg and supine diastolic blood pressure blood pressure, 24-hour blood pressure, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, insulin resistance, and b-type natriuretic peptide level during 12 months. A total of 159 participants were randomized (mean age, 77 years). Mean baseline office systolic blood pressure was 163/78 mm Hg. Mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 18 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels increased in the treatment group compared with the placebo group (+8 ng/mL at 1 year, P blood pressure (−1 [−6 to 4]/−2 [−4 to 1] mm Hg at 3 months and 1 [−2 to 4]/0 [−2 to 2] mm Hg overall treatment effect). No significant treatment effect was evident for any of the secondary outcomes (24-hour blood pressure, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, glucose level, and walking distance). There was no excess of adverse events in the treatment group, and the total number of falls was nonsignificantly lower in the group receiving vitamin D (36 vs 46, P = .24). Vitamin D supplementation did not improve blood pressure or markers of vascular health in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN92186858.

  11. Comorbidity and the concentration of healthcare expenditures in older patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James X; Rathouz, Paul J; Chin, Marshall H

    2003-04-01

    To examine comorbidity and concentration of healthcare expenditures in older patients with heart failure (HF) in the Medicare program. Retrospective analysis of older fee-for-service HF patients, using the 1996 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey and linked Medicare claims. Variety of clinical settings. One thousand two hundred sixty-six older HF patients from a nationally representative survey. Medicare expenditure per person and by types of healthcare services, prevalence of comorbid conditions, and multivariate regression on the association between comorbidities and healthcare expenditure. Medicare spent an average of 16,514 dollars on medical reimbursement for each HF patient in 1996. Eighty-one percent of patients had one or more comorbid diseases according to a 17-disease grouping index. The top 20% of HF patients accounted for 63% of total expenditure. Comorbidity was associated with significantly higher Medicare expenditure. HF patients with more-expensive comorbidities included those with peripheral vascular disease (24% of patients, mean total expenditure 26,954 dollars), myocardial infarction (16% of patients, mean total expenditure 29,867 dollars), renal disease (8% of patients, mean total expenditure 33,014 dollars), and hemiplegia or paraplegia (5% of patients, mean total expenditure 33,234 dollars). Diseases and disorders other than heart failure constituted a significant fraction of the causes of inpatient admissions. Comorbid conditions were more likely to be associated with expensive inpatient care, and patients with these diseases were more likely to spend more overall and more on other types of Medicare services including home health aid, skilled nursing facility, and hospice care. Disease management should consider comorbid conditions for improving care and reducing expenditures in older patients with HF.

  12. Medical Decision-Making Incapacity among Newly Diagnosed Older Patients with Hematological Malignancy Receiving First Line Chemotherapy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Patients and Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sugano

    Full Text Available Decision-making capacity to provide informed consent regarding treatment is essential among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of decision-making incapacity among newly diagnosed older patients with hematological malignancy receiving first-line chemotherapy, to examine factors associated with incapacity and assess physicians' perceptions of patients' decision-making incapacity.Consecutive patients aged 65 years or over with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were recruited. Decision-making capacity was assessed using the Structured Interview for Competency and Incompetency Assessment Testing and Ranking Inventory-Revised (SICIATRI-R. Cognitive impairment, depressive condition and other possible associated factors were also evaluated.Among 139 eligible patients registered for this study, 114 completed the survey. Of these, 28 (25%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%-32% were judged as having some extent of decision-making incompetency according to SICIATRI-R. Higher levels of cognitive impairment and increasing age were significantly associated with decision-making incapacity. Physicians experienced difficulty performing competency assessment (Cohen's kappa -0.54.Decision-making incapacity was found to be a common and under-recognized problem in older patients with cancer. Age and assessment of cognitive impairment may provide the opportunity to find patients that are at a high risk of showing decision-making incapacity.

  13. Experience with S-1 in older Caucasian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Zubcevic, Kanita; Qvortrup, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An aging population will increase the number of older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, there is limited knowledge about treatment in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 is associated with a lower rate...... of adverse events than capecitabine and may therefore be a suitable drug for elderly. However, data on the use of S-1 in Caucasian mCRC patients are lacking/scarce. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study we evaluated safety and the efficacy of S-1 alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (SOx......) or irinotecan (IRIS) in older mCRC patients. Patients who received at least one cycle of S-1 (first-line therapy), SOx (mainly first-line therapy) or IRIS (second-line therapy) were included. RESULTS: From June 2012 to December 2014, 71 older patients received ≥1 cycle of either S-1 (n = 9), SOx (n = 44...

  14. Depression and medication adherence among older Korean patients with hypertension: Mediating role of self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Youn-Jung; Won, Mi Hwa

    2017-06-01

    Many studies have reported the negative effects of depression on adherence to antihypertensive medication. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship in elderly patients with hypertension. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence among older patients with hypertension. The data were collected from October to December 2014. A total of 255 older patients with hypertension were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Hierarchical linear regression analysis and the Sobel test were used to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Depression and self-efficacy were statistically significant predictors of medication adherence in older patients with hypertension. Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Interventions targeting self-efficacy could increase the confidence of patients in their ability to actively take their medicines. Moreover, health care providers should be aware of the importance of early detection of depression in older patients with hypertension. Future studies with longitudinal data are warranted to clarify the multidirectional relationships between depression, self-efficacy, and medication adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Older Patients' Perspectives on Quality of Serious Illness Care in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al Hamayel, Nebras; Isenberg, Sarina R; Hannum, Susan M; Sixon, Joshua; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Dy, Sydney M

    2018-01-01

    Despite increased focus on measuring and improving quality of serious illness care, there has been little emphasis on the primary care context or incorporation of the patient perspective. To explore older patients' perspectives on the quality of serious illness care in primary care. Qualitative interview study. Twenty patients aged 60 or older who were at risk for or living with serious illness and who had participated in the clinic's quality improvement initiative. We used a semistructured, open-ended guide focusing on how older patients perceived quality of serious illness care, particularly in primary care. We transcribed interviews verbatim and inductively identified codes. We identified emergent themes using a thematic and constant comparative method. We identified 5 key themes: (1) the importance of patient-centered communication, (2) coordination of care, (3) the shared decision-making process, (4) clinician competence, and (5) access to care. Communication was an overarching theme that facilitated coordination of care between patients and their clinicians, empowered patients for shared decision-making, related to clinicians' perceived competence, and enabled access to primary and specialty care. Although access to care is not traditionally considered an aspect of quality, patients considered this integral to the quality of care they received. Patients perceived serious illness care as a key aspect of quality in primary care. Efforts to improve quality measurement and implementation of quality improvement initiatives in serious illness care should consider these aspects of care that patients deem important, particularly communication as an overarching priority.

  16. Interventions for improving older patients' involvement in primary care episodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.V.; Harmsen, M.; Weel, C. van; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing expectation among patients that they should be involved in the delivery of medical care. Accumulating evidence from empirical studies shows that patients of average age who are encouraged to participate more actively in treatment decisions have more favourable health

  17. Fear of falling in older patients after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, Johannes Hermanus Maria (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    FoF is possibly one of the most important factors in patients after hip fracture, with a substantial impact on the final results of the rehabilitation process. Moreover, patients with hip fracture who rehabilitate in a SNF with high rates of comorbidity and complications, may have even worse

  18. Continuity in care of older people chronically ill patients in a battlefield of competing rationales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Delmar, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    professionals' communication concerning older patients, leading to lack of continuity and integration of the patient perspective in care and treatment. In spite of these problems being well investigated, they continue to prevail. OBJECTIVES: To examine conditions for continuity and integration of the patient...... perspective in older, chronically ill patients' care as reflected in nursing staff's communication about the patients. DESIGN: Explorative Participatory Action Research (PAR). SETTING: An acute, general medical ward at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Hospital and municipality nurses (n = 29......). Nursing records (n = 12). METHOD: Field studies: observations, interviews, nursing records audits and logs. Data were subject to manifest and latent content analysis. RESULTS: Participants were aware of the importance of ensuring continuity, a comprehensive approach and integration of the patient...

  19. Long-Term Acupuncture Therapy for Low-Income Older Adults with Multimorbidity: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagones, Rachel; Lee, Janet L; Hurst, Samantha

    2018-02-01

    Multimorbidity is common, but often poorly managed, among the rapidly growing population of older adults. The existing guidelines followed by physicians frequently lead to polypharmacy and a complex treatment burden. The objective of this study was to explore what benefits are perceived by older adults with multimorbidity as a result of long-term, regular acupuncture treatment. A qualitative design with inductive thematic analysis of semistructured interviews. Participants were recruited from a no-cost, college-affiliated acupuncture clinic for low-income older adults in an urban, racially/ethnically diverse neighborhood in southern California. Fifteen patients aged 60 years and older suffering from at least two chronic conditions. Five themes were identified: (1) mind-body effects, (2) the enhanced therapeutic alliance, (3) what they liked best, (4) the conventional healthcare system, and (5) importance of regular schedule. A notable mind-body effect, reported by a substantial number of participants, was medication reduction. Participants also cited changes in mood, energy, and well-being as important benefits. In addition, they voiced widespread dissatisfaction with conventional healthcare. Keeping up regular treatments as a way to deal with new complaints and encourage a healthier lifestyle was seen an important aspect of care at the clinic. This cohort of older adults with multimorbidity valued acupuncture as a way to reduce medication as well as a means to maintain physical and mental health. In addition, they developed a strong trust in the clinic's ability to support the totality of their health as individuals, which they contrasted to the specialized and impersonal approach of the conventional medical clinic.

  20. Does my older cancer patient have cognitive impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaedal, Jon

    2018-05-01

    Cancer and impaired cognition are both frequent conditions in old age and consequently coexist to certain degree. The prevalence of impaired cognition increases sharply after the age of 65 and the more advanced form of cognitive impairment; dementia, is exceeding 30% by the age of 85years. Adequate cognition is crucial for understanding important facts and for giving consent for intervention. There are many different stages of cognitive impairment, ranging from subjective cognitive impairment to severe dementia. The mildest stages of cognitive impairment are sometimes reversible but in more severe stages, there is brain damage of some kind, most frequently caused by neurodegenerative disorder such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, some kind of evaluation of cognition should be offered to all older individuals with cancer and in need for intervention. In this evaluation, information should also be sought from a close relative. In the earlier stages of cognitive impairment, the individual usually retains ability to give consent and understands information given but in later stages of dementia, a surrogate decision maker is needed. In milder stages of dementia, an individual evaluation is needed for decision of capability for consent. A specific diagnosis of a disorder such as Alzheimer's disease does not in itself preclude the individual from giving consent, the degree of cognitive impairment, impaired judgement and poor insight are more decisive in this regard. It is also important to know the difference of delirium, most often a time limited condition and dementia that usually is progressive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. "PHE in Action": Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction , a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  2. Preparation to care for confused older patients in general hospitals: a study of UK health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda; Knight, Alec; Harwood, Rowan; Gladman, John R F

    2014-07-01

    in the UK, two-thirds of patients in general hospitals are older than 70, of whom half have dementia or delirium or both. Our objective was to explore doctors, nurses and allied health professionals' perceptions of their preparation to care for confused older patients on general hospital wards. : using a quota sampling strategy across 11 medical, geriatric and orthopaedic wards in a British teaching hospital, we conducted 60 semi-structured interviews with doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals and analysed the data using the Consensual Qualitative Research approach. : there was consensus among participants that education, induction and in-service training left them inadequately prepared and under-confident to care for confused older patients. Many doctors reported initial assessments of confused older patients as difficult. They admitted inadequate knowledge of mental health disorders, including the diagnostic features of delirium and dementia. Handling agitation and aggression were considered top priorities for training, particularly for nurses. Multidisciplinary team meetings were highly valued but were reported as too infrequent. Participants valued specialist input but reported difficulties gaining such support. Communication with confused patients was regarded as particularly challenging, both in terms of patients making their needs known, and staff conveying information to patients. Participants reported emotional and behavioural responses including frustration, stress, empathy, avoidance and low job satisfaction. : our findings indicate that a revision of training across healthcare professions in the UK is required, and that increased specialist support should be provided, so that the workforce is properly prepared to care for older patients with cognitive problems. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  3. The role of companions in aiding older cancer patients to recall medical information.

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates information recall in unaccompanied and accompanied older cancer patients and their companions.Methods: One hundred cancer patients (aged >/=65 years) and 71 companions completed a recall questionnaire after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment. Recall was checked against the actual communication in video-recordings of the consultations. Patients also completed measures of anxiety and memory-related beliefs.Results: Findings revealed that...

  4. Depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms in older cancer patients: a comparison across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Miri

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that older cancer patients experience lower psychological distress than younger patients, but most prior studies do not differentiate between age groups within the 'older' category. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of the symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms among different age groups of older cancer patients. Participants were composed of 321 cancer patients 60 years and older, who were divided into three age groups: 60-69, 70-79, and 80+ years. The participants answered the Brief Symptom Inventory-18, which included subscales for depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and the cancer-related problem list, in addition to providing personal and cancer-related details. Depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and cancer-related problems were lowest in the 70-79 years age group and highest in the 80+ years age group. Comparisons between pairs of groups showed significant differences between each of the groups in Brief Symptom Inventory total scores and between the 80+ years age group and the other two groups in regard to depressive symptoms and cancer-related problems. Differences, related to anxiety and somatic symptoms, were significant for the 70-79 year olds, in comparison with the youngest and oldest groups. Intensity of symptoms was explained by older age, higher number of cancer-related problems, female gender, and lower income. Nonlinear relations exist between age and psychological symptoms, which is in line with the postponement of age-related health and functional decline in the modern era. These results suggest that the study of psychological reactions to cancer should examine differences between age groups among older cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fall risk screening protocol for older hearing clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2017-10-01

    The primary purposes of this study were (1) to describe measures that may contrast audiology patients who fall from those who do not fall and (2) to evaluate the clinical performance of measures that could be easily used for fall risk screening in a mainstream audiology hearing clinic. Cross-sectional study Study sample: Thirty-six community-dwelling audiology patient participants and 27 community-dwelling non-audiology patients over 60 years of age. The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) most accurately identified patients with a recent fall (sensitivity: 76.0%), while the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) most accurately identified patients without a recent fall (specificity: 90.9%). A combination of measures used in a protocol-including HHIE, DHI, number of medications, and the Timed Up and Go test-resulted in good, accurate identification of patients with or without a recent history of falls (92.0% sensitivity, 100% specificity). This study reports good sensitivity and excellent specificity for identifying patients with and without a recent history of falls when measures were combined into a screening protocol. Despite previously reported barriers, effective fall risk screenings may be performed in hearing clinic settings with measures often readily accessible to audiologists.

  6. Injury mechanisms, patterns and outcomes of older polytrauma patients-An analysis of the Dutch Trauma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob; Reininga, Inge H F; Pieske, Oliver; Lefering, Rolf; El Moumni, Mostafa; Wendt, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Polytrauma patients nowadays tend to be older due to the growth of the elderly population and its improved mobility. The aim of this study was to compare demographics, injury patterns, injury mechanisms and outcomes between younger and older polytrauma patients. Data from polytrauma (ISS≥16) patients between 2009 and 2014 were extracted from the Dutch trauma registry (DTR). Younger (Group A: ages 18-59) and older (Group B: ages ≥60) polytrauma patients were compared. Differences in injury severity, trauma mechanism (only data for the year 2014), vital signs, injury patterns, ICU characteristics and hospital mortality were analyzed. Data of 25,304 polytrauma patients were analyzed. The older patients represented 47.8% of the polytrauma population. Trauma mechanism in the older patients was more likely to be a bicycle accident (A: 17%; B: 21%) or a low-energy fall (A: 13%; B: 43%). Younger polytrauma patients were more likely to have the worst scores on the Glasgow coma scale (EMV = 3, A: 20%, B: 13%). However, serious head injuries were seen more often in the older patients (A: 53%; B: 69%). The hospital mortality was doubled for the older polytrauma patients (19.8% vs. 9.6%). Elderly are involved more often in polytrauma. Although injury severity did not differ between groups, the older polytrauma patients were at a higher risk of dying than their younger counterparts despite sustaining less high-energy accidents.

  7. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... as vaginal dryness and thinning, increase the risk of HIV infection through tears and abrasions during unprotected sex. .... size was required to obtain a two-sided 95% confidence .... patients about safer sex and disclosure?

  8. Geriatric Conditions in Acutely Hospitalized Older Patients: Prevalence and One-Year Survival and Functional Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Hoogerduijn, Jita G.; de Haan, Rob J.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Lagaay, A. Margot; Verhaar, Harald J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; Levi, Marcel; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Background To study the prevalence of eighteen geriatric conditions in older patients at admission, their reporting rate in discharge summaries and the impact of these conditions on mortality and functional decline one year after admission. Method A prospective multicenter cohort study conducted between 2006 and 2008 in two tertiary university teaching hospitals and one regional teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Patients of 65 years and older, acutely admitted and hospitalized for at least 48 hours, were invited to participate. Eighteen geriatric conditions were assessed at hospital admission, and outcomes (mortality, functional decline) were assessed one year after admission. Results 639 patients were included, with a mean age of 78 years. IADL impairment (83%), polypharmacy (61%), mobility difficulty (59%), high levels of primary caregiver burden (53%), and malnutrition (52%) were most prevalent. Except for polypharmacy and cognitive impairment, the reporting rate of the geriatric conditions in discharge summaries was less than 50%. One year after admission, 35% had died and 33% suffered from functional decline. A high Charlson comorbidity index score, presence of malnutrition, high fall risk, presence of delirium and premorbid IADL impairment were associated with mortality and overall poor outcome (mortality or functional decline). Obesity lowered the risk for mortality. Conclusion Geriatric conditions were highly prevalent and associated with poor health outcomes after admission. Early recognition of these conditions in acutely hospitalized older patients and improving the handover to the general practitioner could lead to better health outcomes and reduce the burden of hospital admission for older patients. PMID:22110598

  9. Learning from no-fault treatment injury claims to improve the safety of older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Katharine Ann

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's treatment injury compensation claims data set provides an uncommon no-fault perspective of patient safety incidents. Analysis of primary care claims data confirmed medication as the leading threat to the safety of older patients in primary care and drew particular attention to the threat posed by antibiotics. For most injuries there was no suggestion of error. The no-fault perspective reveals the greatest threat to the safety of older patients in primary care to be, not error, but the risk posed by treatment itself. To improve patients' safety, in addition to reducing error, clinicians need to reduce patients' exposure to treatment risk, where appropriate. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Quality of life among older stroke patients in Taiwan during the first year after discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Yea-Ing L; Maa, Suh-Hwa; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Chen, Min-Chi

    2009-08-01

    To explore the one-year poststroke trajectories in health-related quality of life and physical function in a sample of older stroke patients in Taiwan. Health-related quality of life has repeatedly been reported as decreased in poststroke patients. The vast majority of information on the health-related quality of life of older patients after stroke is based on data collected in Western developed countries. In contrast, little is known about older stroke patients in Asian countries. A descriptive, prospective and correlational design was used. Older stroke survivors (n = 98) were assessed at the end of one, three, six and 12 months after hospital discharge for health-related quality of life (measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36) and physical functioning (measured by the Chinese Barthel Index and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale). The subjects, who were 65-88 years old, performed considerably worse at 12 months after hospital discharge in social and physical functioning (means = 61.1, 54.8, respectively) than the age-matched community-dwelling norm (means = 78.7, 69.7, respectively). During the first year after discharge, subjects improved significantly on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 physical component summary scale and role limitations due to physical problems; during the first three months after discharge, they improved significantly on performance of activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living; and from the third to sixth month after discharge, they improved significantly in physical functioning. The first year, especially the first three months after hospital discharge, is critical for improvements in health-related quality of life and physical functioning for older stroke survivors in Taiwan. Older Taiwanese/Chinese people who suffer a stroke will likely benefit from interventions during the first 12 months after discharge and the most effective interventions may be earlier, during the first

  11. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pregabalin in older patients with neuropathic pain: results from a pooled analysis of 11 clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlateva Gergana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older patients are typically underrepresented in clinical trials of medications for chronic pain. A post hoc analysis of multiple clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in older patients. Methods Data from 11 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with DPN or PHN were pooled. Efficacy outcomes included change in Daily Pain Rating Scale score, ≥30% and ≥50% responders, and endpoint pain score ≤3. Safety was based on adverse events (AEs. Primary efficacy was analyzed by analysis of covariance with terms for treatment, age category, protocol, baseline pain, and treatment-by-age category interaction. Results 2516 patients (white, n = 2344 [93.2%]; men, n = 1347 [53.5%]; PHN, n = 1003 [39.9%]; pregabalin, n = 1595 were included in the analysis. Patients were grouped by age: 18 to 64 years (n = 1236, 65 to 74 years (n = 766, and ≥75 years (n = 514. Baseline mean pain and sleep interference scores were comparable across treatment and age groups. Significant improvements in endpoint mean pain were observed for all pregabalin dosages versus placebo in all age groups (p ≤ 0.0009, except for the lowest dosage (150 mg/day in the youngest age group. Clinically meaningful pain relief, defined as ≥30% and ≥50% pain response, was observed in all age groups. The most common AEs were dizziness, somnolence, peripheral edema, asthenia, dry mouth, weight gain, and infections. The relative risks for these AEs increased with pregabalin dose, but did not appear related to older age or type of neuropathic pain. Conclusions Pregabalin (150-600 mg/day significantly reduced pain in older patients (age ≥65 years with neuropathic pain and improvements in pain were comparable to those observed in younger patients. Titration of pregabalin to the

  12. Exploring Older Adult ED Fall Patients' Understanding of Their Fall: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Kalpana N; Taylor, Devon; Rizzo, Caroline T; Liu, Shan W

    2017-12-01

    We sought to understand older patients' perspectives about their fall, fall risk factors, and attitude toward emergency department (ED) fall-prevention interventions. We conducted semistructured interviews between July 2015 and January 2016 of community-dwelling, nondemented patients in the ED, who presented with a fall to an urban, teaching hospital. Interviews were halted once we achieve thematic saturation with the data coded and categorized into themes. Of the 63 patients interviewed, patients blamed falls on the environment, accidents, a medical condition, or themselves. Three major themes were generated: (1) patients blamed falls on a multitude of things but never acknowledged a possible multifactorial rationale, (2) patients have variable level of concerns regarding their current fall and future fall risk, and (3) patients demonstrated a range of receptiveness to ED interventions aimed at preventing falls but provided little input as to what those interventions should be. Many older patients who fall do not understand their fall risk. However, based on the responses provided, older adults tend to be more receptive to intervention and more concerned about their future fall risk, making the ED an appropriate setting for intervention.

  13. Geriatric Assessment and Functional Decline in Older Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, L; Kenis, C; Schallier, D; Vansteenkiste, J; Nackaerts, K; Vanacker, L; Vandewalle, N; Flamaing, J; Lobelle, J P; Milisen, K; De Grève, J; Wildiers, H

    2017-10-01

    Older patients with lung cancer are a heterogeneous population making treatment decisions complex. This study aims to evaluate the value of geriatric assessment (GA) as well as the evolution of functional status (FS) in older patients with lung cancer, and to identify predictors associated with functional decline and overall survival (OS). At baseline, GA was performed in patients ≥70 years with newly diagnosed lung cancer. FS measured by activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was reassessed at follow-up to define functional decline and OS was collected. Predictors for functional decline and OS were determined. Two hundred and forty-five patients were included in this study. At baseline, GA deficiencies were present in all domains and ADL and IADL were impaired in 51 and 63% of patients, respectively. At follow-up, functional decline in ADL was observed in 23% and in IADL in 45% of patients. In multivariable analysis, radiotherapy was predictive for ADL decline. No other predictors for ADL or IADL decline were identified. Stage and baseline performance status were predictive for OS. Older patients with lung cancer present with multiple deficiencies covering all geriatric domains. During treatment, functional decline is observed in almost half of the patients. None of the specific domains of the GA were predictive for functional decline or survival, probably because of the high impact of the aggressiveness of this tumor type leading to a poor prognosis.

  14. A Retrospective Observational Study of Anesthetic Induction Dosing Practices in Female Elderly Surgical Patients: Are We Overdosing Older Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Shamsuddin; Heng, Joseph; Dai, Feng; Schonberger, Robert B; Burg, Mathew M

    2016-10-01

    Despite guidelines suggesting a 25-50 % reduction in induction doses of intravenous anesthetic agents in the elderly (≥65 years), we hypothesized that practitioners were not sufficiently correcting drug administration for age, contributing to an increased incidence of hypotension in older patients undergoing general anesthesia. We conducted a retrospective, observational study in a tertiary-care academic hospital. The study included 768 female patients undergoing gynecologic surgeries who received propofol-based induction of general anesthesia. Weight-adjusted anesthetic induction dosing, age-associated differences in dosing by ASA-PS (American Society of Anesthesiology-Physical Status), and hemodynamic outcomes between younger (18-64 years, n = 537) and older (≥65 years, n = 231) female patients were analyzed. Older patients received lower doses of propofol and midazolam than younger patients (propofol: 2.037 ± 0.783 vs 2.322 ± 0.834 mg/kg, p < 0.001; midazolam: 0.013 ± 0.014 vs 0.023 ± 0.042 mg/kg, p < 0.001). However, practitioners still consistently exceeded the FDA recommended dose (1-1.5 mg/kg) of propofol for elderly patients. There was no significant difference in the doses of fentanyl administered between the two age groups (1.343 ± 0.744 vs 1.363 ± 0.763 μg/kg, p = 0.744), and doses of fentanyl in older patients exceeded the recommended dose (0.5-1.0 μg/kg). Corresponding to observed overdosing of induction agents, older patients experienced larger decreases in post-induction blood pressure and were more likely to receive vasopressor therapy. Anesthetic induction doses of fentanyl and propofol were not sufficiently corrected in older patients in accordance with recommendations. Significantly greater frequency of post-induction hypotension occurred amongst older patients. Quality improvement efforts may lead to improved outcomes in this vulnerable population.

  15. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF OLDER OBESE PATIENTS CANDIDATES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis PAJECKI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Obesity in the elderly is associated with exacerbation of functional decline (dependency, that occurs with aging, because of decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased joint dysfunction. Consequently, there is progressive loss of independence, autonomy, chronic pain and impaired quality of life. The weight loss can bring benefits in all these aspects, especially when accompanied by exercises. Elderly patients with morbid obesity may be submitted to surgical treatment, taking into account that the massive weight loss, eventually caused by bariatric surgery, may exacerbate the loss of muscle mass and nutritional complications that may bring harm to the overall health and quality of life of these patients. The functional assessment of elderly patients, candidates for bariatric surgery and the extent to which surgery can bring benefits to the patients, in the field of functionality, has still to be determined. Objective To describe profile functionality in obese elderly referred to a bariatric surgery program. Methods Patients with age ≥60 and BMI ≥35 underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment that evaluates co morbidities, medication use, ability to perform basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and the “Timedupandgo” test to evaluate mobility, whose cut-off point was ≤10 seconds. Statistical analysis was performed in order to see if there is a positive correlation of dependency with BMI and age (over or under 65 years. Results Forty subjects have completed evaluation. The mean age was 64.1 years (60-72 and 75% were women. They had an average weight of 121.1 kg (72.7-204 and a mean BMI of 47.2 kg/m2 (35.8-68.9. 16 patients (40% have shown dependency for activities of daily living, 19 (47,5% for instrumental activities of daily living and 20 patients (50% had a “Timedupandgo” test over 10 seconds. Statistical analysis (t-Student, Mann-Whitney, Binary Logistic Regression has shown

  16. Frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in Venezuelan patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Karen; Arcia, Orlando; Matute, Xiorama; Mindiola, Luz; Chaustre, Ismenia; Takiff, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CFTR gene in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients have geographic differences and there is scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in these patients. We amplified and sequenced exons 7, 10, 11, 19, 20 and 21, which contain the most common CFTR mutations, from 105 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program. Eleven different mutations were identified, four with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del...

  17. A framework for evaluating mHealth tools for Older Patients on Usability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenbos, G. A.; Peute, L. W.; Jaspers, M. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) apps can play a significant role in supporting older patients. The aging process is yet related to progressive degradation of sensory, physical and cognitive abilities. mHealth apps with touch screen based interfaces thus need to be adapted to the, often impaired, skills and

  18. Cardiac function and cognition in older community-dwelling cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Laura H P; Aly, Mohamed F A; Vuijk, Pieter J; de Boer, Karin; Kamp, Otto; van Rossum, Albert C; Scherder, Erik J A

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive deficits have been reported in older cardiac patients. An underlying mechanism for these findings may be reduced cardiac function. The relationship between cardiac function as represented by different echocardiographic measures and different cognitive function domains in older cardiac patients remains unknown. An older (≥70 years) heterogeneous group of 117 community-dwelling cardiac patients under medical supervision by a cardiologist underwent thorough echocardiographic assessment including left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac index, left atrial volume index, left ventricular mass index, left ventricular diastolic function, and valvular calcification. During a home visit, a neuropsychological assessment was performed within 7.1 ± 3.8 months after echocardiographic assessment; the neuropsychological assessment included three subtests of a word-learning test (encoding, recall, recognition) to examine one memory function domain and three executive function tests, including digit span backwards, Trail Making Test B minus A, and the Stroop colour-word test. Regression analyses showed no significant linear or quadratic associations between any of the echocardiographic functions and the cognitive function measures. None of the echocardiographic measures as representative of cardiac function was correlated with memory or executive function in this group of community-dwelling older cardiac patients. These findings contrast with those of previous studies. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in Older Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gloster, Andrew T.; Rhoades, Howard M.; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2008-01-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important.

  20. What impedes and what facilitates a quality improvement project for older hospitalized patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijkema, R.; Langelaan, M.; van de Steeg, L.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into which factors impede, and which facilitate, the implementation of a complex multi-component improvement initiative in hospitalized older patients. Design: A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews. The three dimensions of Pettigrew and Whipp's

  1. Oral nutritional support of older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Holst, Mette; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of oral nutritional support compared to placebo or usual care in improving clinical outcome in older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital. Outcome goals were: re-admissions, survival, nutritional and functional status, quality of life...

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Older Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Jones, Rupert C M; Harding, Sam A; Campbell, John

    2016-12-01

    This study explored (1) the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from past trauma among older patients with COPD and (2) whether PTSD and COPD severity would relate to psychiatric co-morbidity and health-related quality of life. Eighty-five older patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale and the Medical Outcomes Short Form 12. The results showed that 55, 39 and 6 % had no, partial and full-PTSD respectively. Partial least squares showed that PTSD was significantly correlated with COPD severity which in turn was significantly correlated with health-related quality of life and psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediational analysis showed that the emotional symptoms of COPD mediated between PTSD and the mental health functioning of health-related quality of life and between PTSD and depression. To conclude, PTSD from past trauma was related to the severity of COPD for older patients. In particular, it impacted on the elevated emotional arousal of COPD severity. In turn, COPD severity impacted on older patients' general psychological well-being and depression.

  3. Impact of Comorbidities on the Outcomes of Older Patients Receiving Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ru Chang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Older patients with comorbidities are at a higher risk of in-hospital complications following rectal cancer surgery, whereas the presence of comorbidities did not show a significant adverse effect on 1-year mortality in the present study. We suggest using population-based data to establish effective therapeutic strategies for treating each comorbidity.

  4. Towards better fall prevention : Examining the interplay between factors that influence gait in older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Maartje H.

    2017-01-01

    Falling is a serious problem among older patients: it is the combination of a high fall incidence together with a high susceptibility to injuries that makes a relatively mild fall potentially dangerous to these old persons. Falling is a multifactorial problem, but postural instability during daily

  5. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients' website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, N.; Smets, E. M A; Eddes, E. H.; de Haes, J. C J M; Loos, E. F.; van Weert, J. C M

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174

  6. Step by step development of clinical care pathways for older cancer patients: necessary or desirable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Weert, J.C.M. van; Jansen, J.; Lemmens, E.P.P.; Maas, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing staff in oncology for older cancer patients are confronted with a range of problems including co-morbidity, poly-pharmacy, cognitive impairments, emotional problems, functional limitations, sensory impairment and a lack of social support. Comprehensive geriatric assessment

  7. Follow-up for osteoporosis in older patients three years after a fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Hegeman, J. H.; Kreeftenberg, H. G.; ten Duis, H. J.

    Background: Recently a Fracture and Osteoporosis outpatient clinic (FO clinic) was set up at the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG) with the aim to optimise case-finding of osteoporosis in older patients with a low-energy fracture. To provide a diagnostic setting before the start of our FO

  8. Private Prayer and Optimism in Middle-Aged and Older Patients Awaiting Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Amy L.; Peterson, Christopher; Bolling, Steven F.; Koenig, Harold

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of private prayer among middle-aged and older patients as a way of coping with cardiac surgery and prayer's relationship to optimism. Design and Methods: The measure of prayer included three aspects: (a) belief in the importance of private prayer, (b) faith in the efficacy of prayer on the basis of previous…

  9. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  10. Risk of Bleeding and Thrombosis in Patients 70 Years or Older Using Vitamin K Antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Hilde A. M.; Calf, Agneta H.; Piersma - Wichers, Grietje; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Meijer, Karina

    IMPORTANCE Previous studies have shown that, despite the higher risk of bleeding, the elderly still benefit from taking anticoagulants if they have a stringent indication. However, owing to the relatively low number of patients older than 90 years in these studies, it is unknown whether this benefit

  11. Improvement of tricuspid regurgitation after transcatheter ASD closure in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Shen, J; Shan, X; Wang, F; Kan, T; Tang, X; Zhao, X; Qin, Y

    2017-07-19

    Adult patients with undiagnosed atrial septal defect (ASD) may have right heart cavity enlargement and functional tricuspid valve insufficiency. Moderate or more severe tricuspid regurgitation has been associated with a worse prognosis, and more serious complications are typically seen in older patients. This study aimed to evaluate the improvement in functional tricuspid regurgitation and heart geometry after transcatheter ASD closure in older patients. The data of 111 patients over 60 years of age with moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation before ASD closure were analyzed. At the 1‑month and 6‑month follow-up after closure, both tricuspid regurgitation jet area and right atrial volume decreased significantly. Right ventricular volume decreased 1 month after closure, showing a further decrease at the end of the 6‑month follow-up. However, 24 patients (21.6%) still had persistent severe tricuspid regurgitation after the procedure. Multivariate analysis revealed that patient age at ASD closure and pulmonary artery systolic pressure determined by echocardiography before closure were predictors of persistent tricuspid regurgitation after closure. Transcatheter ASD closure in older patients could significantly decrease tricuspid regurgitation and improve right heart geometry.

  12. 75 FR 16140 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... FR 45457-45458. Definition of Common Formats The term ``Common Formats'' is used to describe clinical... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  13. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. METHODS: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark....... During a three-week period, the practices invited their patients to fill out a questionnaire on health, social relations and loneliness. RESULTS: Of 767 eligible patients, 474 were included and 461 answered one or more items about social participation or loneliness. A total of 36.2% had a high, 45.5% had...

  14. Brief assessments and screening for geriatric conditions in older primary care patients: a pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seematter-Bagnoud, Laurence; Büla, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the rationale behind performing a brief geriatric assessment as a first step in the management of older patients in primary care practice. While geriatric conditions are considered by older patients and health professionals as particularly relevant for health and well-being, they remain too often overlooked due to many patient- and physician-related factors. These include time constraints and lack of specific training to undertake comprehensive geriatric assessment. This article discusses the epidemiologic rationale for screening functional, cognitive, affective, hearing and visual impairments, and nutritional status as well as fall risk and social status. It proposes using brief screening tests in primary care practice to identify patients who may need further comprehensive geriatric assessment or specific interventions.

  15. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions.......A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  16. Theory of Mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets-Janssen, M. M. J.; Meesters, P. D.; Comijs, H. C.; Eikelenboom, P.; Smit, J. H.; de Haan, L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Stek, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ between older

  17. Construct development, description and initial validation of the Knowledge about Older Patients Quiz (KOP-Q) for nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Jeroen; Hoogerduijn, Jita G.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Literature shows that nurses have a negative attitude toward older patients. Increasing nurses' knowledge (part of attitudes) may affect hospital nurses' attitudes and improve the quality of care for older patients. A first step is understanding nurses' current knowledge. This can be

  18. Prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms in a catchment-area based cohort of older community-living schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Paul D.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Sonnenberg, Caroline M.; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Eikelenboom, Piet; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Stek, Max L.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive symptoms frequently accompany schizophrenia. Older patients constitute the fastest growing segment of the schizophrenia population. With regard to the risk factors associated with depression, it is uncertain to which extent older schizophrenia patients differ from their age peers in the

  19. Outcomes of splenectomy in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID): a survey of 45 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G K; Goldacker, S; Winterhalter, C; Grimbacher, B; Chapel, H; Lucas, M; Alecsandru, D; McEwen, D; Quinti, I; Martini, H; Schmidt, R E; Ernst, D; Espanol, T; Vidaller, A; Carbone, J; Fernandez-Cruz, E; Lougaris, V; Plebani, A; Kutukculer, N; Gonzalez-Granado, L I; Contreras, R; Kiani-Alikhan, S; Ibrahim, M A A; Litzman, J; Jones, A; Gaspar, H B; Hammarstrom, L; Baumann, U; Warnatz, K; Huissoon, A P

    2013-01-01

    Splenectomy has been used in patients with common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID), mainly in the context of refractory autoimmune cytopenia and suspected lymphoma, but there are understandable concerns about the potential of compounding an existing immunodeficiency. With increasing use of rituximab as an alternative treatment for refractory autoimmune cytopenia, the role of splenectomy in CVID needs to be re-examined. This retrospective study provides the largest cohesive data set to date describing the outcome of splenectomy in 45 CVID patients in the past 40 years. Splenectomy proved to be an effective long-term treatment in 75% of CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenia, even in some cases when rituximab had failed. Splenectomy does not worsen mortality in CVID and adequate immunoglobulin replacement therapy appears to play a protective role in overwhelming post-splenectomy infections. Future trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of rituximab and splenectomy are needed to provide clearer guidance on the second-line management of autoimmune cytopenia in CVID. PMID:23480186

  20. Utility of urine cytology in evaluating hematuria with sonographically suspected bladder lesion in patients older than 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Eldin Helmy Mady

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Hematuria in patients older than 50 years with sonographically suspected bladder lesion mandates cystoscopy and biopsy. UC does not add more significant information in this group of patients.

  1. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Milagros; Bottle, Alex; Long, Susannah; Aylin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting. To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity. Retrospective observational study using administrative data. English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13. All admitted patients aged 65 years and over. By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis) we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%. We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups) up to 67% (80-84yr age-group). The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD). Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2), associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5), associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6) and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction. By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  2. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Ruiz

    Full Text Available No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting.To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity.Retrospective observational study using administrative data.English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13.All admitted patients aged 65 years and over.By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%.We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups up to 67% (80-84yr age-group. The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD. Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2, associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5, associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6 and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction.By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  3. Radiation treatment in older patients: a framework for clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Smith, Benjamin D

    2014-08-20

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Recent opioid use and fall-related injury among older patients with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoust, Raoul; Paquet, Jean; Moore, Lynne; Émond, Marcel; Gosselin, Sophie; Lavigne, Gilles; Choinière, Manon; Boulanger, Aline; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2018-04-23

    Evidence for an association between opioid use and risk of falls or fractures in older adults is inconsistent. We examine the association between recent opioid use and the risk, as well as the clinical outcomes, of fall-related injuries in a large trauma population of older adults. In a retrospective, observational, multicentre cohort study conducted on registry data, we included all patients aged 65 years and older who were admitted (hospital stay > 2 d) for injury in 57 trauma centres in the province of Quebec, Canada, between 2004 and 2014. We looked at opioid prescriptions filled in the 2 weeks preceding the trauma in patients who sustained a fall, compared with those who sustained an injury through another mechanism. A total of 67 929 patients were retained for analysis. Mean age was 80.9 (± 8.0) years and 69% were women. The percentage of patients who had filled an opioid prescription in the 2 weeks preceding an injury was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7%-5.1%) for patients who had had a fall, compared with 1.5% (95% CI 1.2%-1.8%) for those who had had an injury through another mechanism. After we controlled for confounding variables, patients who had filled an opioid prescription within 2 weeks before injury were 2.4 times more likely to have a fall rather than any other type of injury. For patients who had a fall-related injury, those who used opioids were at increased risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio 1.58; 95% CI 1.34-1.86). Recent opioid use is associated with an increased risk of fall and an increased likelihood of death in older adults. © 2018 Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  5. Dementia correlates with anticoagulation underuse in older patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Ettorre, Evaristo; Chiriac, Iulia Maria

    2017-09-01

    Stroke prevention in older atrial fibrillation (AF) patients remains a challenge. This study aimed to investigate whether a dementia diagnosis is an independent correlate of lower prescription rate of oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) in a sample of older AF patients. Cross-sectional retrospective study. Consecutive older community-dwelling AF patients referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment, were considered. Evaluation of physical, social and mental health, and administration of the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) and Barthel Index were performed. Dementia cases were ascertained by consensus of 2 experienced geriatricians. Dementia severity was assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR). 316 AF patients (ages 74.7±7.0years, 55.7% women) with high stroke risk (77.5% had a CHA 2 DS 2 VASC score ≥3), low bleeding and falling risk, and no neuropsychiatric/behavioral symptoms, were included. 60.1% were prescribed with OAT. Among patients with dementia (n=86, 27.2%), 22.0% received inadequate antithrombotic prophylaxis (i.e. antiplatelet) and 38.5% no treatment. Proportion of those receiving inadequate or no prophylaxis increased at increasing CDR score. By multiple regression models, either dementia (yes vs no), OR=1.33, 95%CI=1.11-1.46, pdementia severity (CDR>1), OR=2.38, 95%CI=2.19-2.60, pDementia might be associated with underuse of OAT in older AF patients even in the absence of established contraindications. Future studies are needed to assess the real dimension of the problem and clinician's barriers to prescribing OAT in demented patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Vitamin D Status among Frail Older Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, M; Wirth, R

    2018-01-01

    Seasonal variation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels is the result of sunlight dependent skin synthesis of vitamin D. However, its presence is not studied in frail older hospitalized patients. We sought to investigate whether seasonal variation in 25(OH)D levels is evident among these patients. This study investigated older participants who were consecutively admitted between February 2015 and December 2016 to the geriatric acute care ward. Results of routine measurements of 25(OH)D at hospital admission were retrospectively analyzed and stratified according to months and seasons. Previous intake of vitamin D supplementation was derived from the patients' medical records. The study group comprised 679 participants (mean age 82.1±8.2; 457 females), of which 78% had vitamin D deficiency. Older individuals not taking vitamin D supplements had a lower mean serum 25(OH)D than those receiving supplements. Of those patients with no vitamin D supplementation, 87.0% were vitamin D deficient and only 5% showing sufficient vitamin 25(OH)D. Further, there were neither monthly nor seasonal variations in vitamin 25(OH)D levels among these patients and their vitamin D levels stayed far below the recommended threshold of 20 ng/ml across the seasons. Vitamin D deficiency was very prevalent in the subgroup of older hospitalized patients without vitamin D supplementation, irrespective of season. Since no seasonal variations in mean 25(OH)D levels was observed, sunlight dependent skin synthesis is unlikely to contribute to vitamin D status in these patients. Supplementation seems to be necessary to maintain desirable vitamin D levels among this population throughout the year.

  7. Point prevalence of suboptimal footwear features among ambulant older hospital patients: implications for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Satyan R; McRae, Prue; Stewart, Matthew J; Webster, Joan; Fenn, Mary; Haines, Terry P

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to establish the point prevalence of 'suboptimal' features in footwear reported to have been used by older hospital patients when ambulating, and to explore underpinning factors for their choice of footwear. Method A cross-sectional investigation was undertaken on 95 of 149 eligible in-patients across 22 high fall-risk wards in a large metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Results Over 70% of participants experienced an unplanned admission. Although most participants had access to some form of footwear in hospital (92%), nearly all reported ambulating in footwear with 'suboptimal' features (99%). Examples included slippers (27%), backless slippers (16%) or bare feet (27%). For patients who ambulated in bare feet, only one-third reported 'lack of access to footwear' as the primary cause, with others citing foot wounds, pain, oedema and personal choice as the main reason for bare foot ambulation. Conclusions Admitted patients frequently use footwear with 'suboptimal' features for ambulation in hospital. While some footwear options (for example well-fitting slippers) could be suited for limited in-hospital ambulation, others are clearly hazardous and might cause falls. Since footwear choices are influenced by multiple factors in this population, footwear education strategies alone may be insufficient to address the problem of hazardous footwear in at-risk patients. Footwear requirements may be more effectively addressed within a multidisciplinary team approach encompassing foot health, mobility and safety. What is known about the topic? Accidental falls while ambulating are an important health and safety concern for older people. Because certain footwear characteristics have been negatively linked to posture and balance, and specific footwear types linked to falls among seniors, the use of footwear with fewer suboptimal characteristics is generally recommended as a means of reducing the risk of falling. While footwear

  8. Rehabilitation and older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation is concerned with lessening the impact of disabling conditions. These are particularly common in older people and considerable health gain can be achieved by successful rehabilitation. Hospital doctors and general practitioners should be aware of the core principles of rehabilitation, be able to recognise rehabilitation need in their patients, and have sufficient knowledge of their local rehabilitation services to trigger the referral process.

  9. Osteopathic manipulative treatment results in sustained relief from spinal pain in older patients: A pilot crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannunzio A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment is commonly used to complement conventional treatment of back pain. The present study verified whether OMT, associated with training program, reduces spinal pain in older. A pilot randomized, double-blind crossover study was conducted at Sport Association of Milan, Italy. We recruited 19 subjects above 60 years old, with presence of SP for more than 3 weeks and with intensity score higher than 3 (NRS score. All patients underwent a multi-component group exercise program for older adults and were randomized in two groups: in the study group (SG OMT was added, while the control group (CG continued with the exercise only. After 6 weeks a crossover was applied to the 2 groups and OMT was added to CG, while SG continued with the exercise only. Self-reported measures: the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS was used at each time to evaluate treatment outcomes. At pre-crossover, SG had a significant improvement in pain perception (p<0.05, while CG had a not significate improvement in pain perception (p=0.33.At post-crossover, the SG remains relatively stable (p=0.37, while CG after OMT addition have a significant benefit on pain perception (p=0.001. At follow-up, pain improvement is sustained (p=0.32. OMT associated to exercise reduce spinal pain in older patients. Our study suggests that OMT associated to exercise leads to significant improvement on pain relief in patients with chronic SP in a short term and the exercise allows to maintain these improvements for several months

  10. Pain and Satisfaction With Pain Management Among Older Patients During the Transition From Acute to Skilled Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F; Saraf, Avantika A; Simon Coelho, Chris; Jacobsen, J Mary Lou; Kripalani, Sunil; Bell, Susan; Mixon, Amanda; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 20% of hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries are discharged from the hospital to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs); and up to 23% of SNF patients return to the hospital within 30 days of hospital discharge, with pain as one of the most common symptoms precipitating hospital readmission. We sought to examine the prevalence of moderate to severe pain at hospital discharge to SNF, the incidence of new moderate to severe pain (relative to prehospitalization), and satisfaction with pain management among older acute care patients discharged to SNF. Structured patient interviews were conducted with 188 Medicare beneficiaries discharged to 23 area SNFs from an academic medical center. Pain level (0-10) and satisfaction with pain management were assessed upon hospital admission, discharge, and within 1 week after transition to SNF. There was a high prevalence of moderate to severe pain at each time point including prehospital (51%), hospital discharge (38%), and following SNF admission (53%). Twenty-eight percent of participants reported new moderate to severe pain at hospital discharge, whereas 44% reported new moderate to severe pain following SNF admission. Most participants reported being "satisfied" with their pain treatment, even in the context of moderate to severe pain. Moderate to severe pain is a common problem among hospitalized older adults discharged to SNF and continues during their SNF stay. Pain assessment and management should involve a specific, planned process between hospital and SNF clinicians at the point of care transition, even if patients express "satisfaction" with current pain management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients’ social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. Methods: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark....... During a three-week period, the practices invited their patients to fill out a questionnaire on health, social relations and loneliness. 
 Results: Of 767 eligible patients, 474 were included and 461 answered one or more items about social participation or loneliness. A total of 36.2% had a high, 45...

  12. An industrial perspective on the design and development of medicines for older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Sharon; Coupe, Alastair; Barrett, Andrew

    2016-10-30

    An increasing elderly population is leading to a change in the global demographics. This presents a new challenge to society and the pharmaceutical industry. This demographic shift is providing an opportunity for the pharmaceutical industry to meet the specific needs of the changing patient population. One issue that has been identified is defining what is meant by "an older patient", since this definition cannot be simply limited to chronological age. The fundamental purpose of the design and development process is to create a product that can be used by the patient group in a safe and efficacious manner. In the pharmaceutical industry ICH Q8 is used to guide the design and development of medicines. The process leads to the definition of the Quality Target Product Profile (QTPP) for a specific drug product and patient population. One can imagine a product with various presentations described in the QTPP which suit paediatrics, adults and older patients. It is recognised that designing medicines for smaller population groups will result in multiple presentations that could lead to smaller manufacturing batch sizes. In the short to medium term; dose flexibility, easy-to-swallow formulations, and easier access packaging are all factors under consideration. Dose flexibility could be achieved with various dosage forms such as oral liquids, mini-tablets, or multi-particulates. Whilst patient dosage preferences are beginning to be understood, further investigation is needed to balance the needs of the patient, care giver, prescriber, and payer. There also remain a number of challenges with the engineering solutions and delivery device for mini-tablets and multi-particulates (aside from filled capsules) to accurately and robustly deliver the dose, and issues with handling the device and the packaging for an older patient. It is also recognised that there are numerous challenges, not least of which is the definition of the older patient and a generic QTPP for an older

  13. Prophylactic Use of Haloperidol and Changes in Glucose Levels in Hospitalized Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, Kris; Knol, Wilma; Schrijver, Edmée J M; van Marum, Rob J; van Strien, Astrid M; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B

    2018-02-01

    Treatment with antipsychotic drugs has been associated with glucose dysregulation in older outpatients, especially in the early stage of therapy. The underlying mechanism is, however, unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in glucose levels during haloperidol use compared with the use of placebo among older hospitalized patients. This substudy was part of a larger multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial among hospitalized patients aged 70 years and older who had an increased risk of in-hospital delirium. Patients who were admitted to the Jeroen Bosch Hospital in 's-Hertogenbosch between June 2014 and February 2015 were invited to participate in the study. Participating patients were randomized for treatment and given 1 mg of haloperidol or a placebo twice daily for a maximum of 7 consecutive days (14 doses). Exclusion criteria for this substudy were the use of corticosteroids and changes in diabetes medication. Random blood samples to determine glucose levels were collected before day 1 and on day 6 of the study. Student independent sample t test was used to determine differences in glucose changes between both groups. Twenty-nine patients were included (haloperidol, n = 14; placebo, n = 15). The mean glucose level for placebo users was 139.3 mg/dL (SD, 50.1) on day 1 and 140.8 mg/dL (SD, 45.7) on day 6, and the mean glucose level for haloperidol users was 139.9 mg/dL (SD, 71.0) on day 1 and 150.2 mg/dL (SD, 39.1) on day 6. The difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.685). Short-term prophylactic use of haloperidol was not associated with changes in glucose levels in older hospitalized patients compared with those given a placebo in this small study.

  14. Well-being of nursing staff on specialized units for older patients with combined care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, J; de Vugt, M E; Schols, J M G A; Engelen, G J J A; Winkens, B; Verhey, F R J

    2018-03-01

    Working in long-term care is seen as a stressful, physically and mentally demanding occupation, and thus, nursing staff are at risk for work and stress-related diseases. In older patients, psychiatric illnesses often occur in combination with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nurses is unknown. Nursing staff working on specialized units for patients with combined care needs experience high levels of self-efficacy in combination with strong feelings of self-rated competence. Although levels of burnout are relatively low, mental healthcare nursing staff is more at risk for burnout when working in specialized settings for patients with combined care needs than nursing home staff working in specialized settings for these patients. Nursing staff characteristics, such as years of working experience and age, seem more important in relation to staff well-being than patient characteristics in specialized settings for combined care needs. Staff well-being might benefit from specializing care, so that patients with similar care needs are placed together and care is focused. The presence of specialized care units for older patients with combined care needs can allow for both targeted and focused allocation of nursing staff to these units and provision of specific training. Introduction In older patients, psychiatric illnesses frequently exist in tandem with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nursing staff is unknown. To investigate whether care characteristics of patients with combined care needs are related to the mental well-being of nursing staff. Well-being of nursing staff was studied within a larger exploratory observational cross-sectional study that examined the differences and similarities of specialized combined care units

  15. Patient-reported safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Blakeman, Thomas; Hann, Mark; Bower, Peter

    2017-05-30

    Increasing evidence suggests that patient safety is a serious concern for older patients with long-term conditions. Despite this, there is a lack of research on safety incidents encountered by this patient group. In this study, we sought to examine patient reports of safety incidents and factors associated with reports of safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions. The baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal cohort study were analysed. Older patients (n=3378 aged 65 years and over) with a long-term condition registered in general practices were included in the study. The main outcome was patient-reported safety incidents including availability and appropriateness of medical tests and prescription of wrong types or doses of medication. Binary univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to examine factors associated with patient-reported safety incidents. Safety incidents were reported by 11% of the patients. Four factors were significantly associated with patient-reported safety incidents in multivariate analyses. The experience of multiple long-term conditions (OR=1.09, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13), a probable diagnosis of depression (OR=1.36, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.74) and greater relational continuity of care (OR=1.28, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.52) were associated with increased odds for patient-reported safety incidents. Perceived greater support and involvement in self-management was associated with lower odds for patient-reported safety incidents (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97). We found that older patients with multimorbidity and depression are more likely to report experiences of patient safety incidents. Improving perceived support and involvement of patients in their care may help prevent patient-reported safety incidents. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Studies of Physician-Patient Communication with Older Patients: How Often is Hearing Loss Considered? A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jamie M; Blustein, Jan; Weinstein, Barbara E; Dischinger, Hannah; Sherman, Scott; Grudzen, Corita; Chodosh, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Hearing loss is remarkably prevalent in the geriatric population: one-quarter of adults aged 60-69 and 80% of adults aged 80 years and older have bilateral disabling loss. Only about one in five adults with hearing loss wears a hearing aid, leaving many vulnerable to poor communication with healthcare providers. We quantified the extent to which hearing loss is mentioned in studies of physician-patient communication with older patients, and the degree to which hearing loss is incorporated into analyses and findings. We conducted a structured literature search within PubMed for original studies of physician-patient communication with older patients that were published since 2000, using the natural language phrase "older patient physician communication." We identified 409 papers in the initial search, and included 67 in this systematic review. Of the 67 papers, only 16 studies (23.9%) included any mention of hearing loss. In six of the 16 studies, hearing loss was mentioned only; in four studies, hearing loss was used as an exclusion criterion; and in two studies, the extent of hearing loss was measured and reported for the sample, with no further analysis. Three studies examined or reported on an association between hearing loss and the quality of physician-patient communication. One study included an intervention to temporarily mitigate hearing loss to improve communication. Less than one-quarter of studies of physician-elderly patient communication even mention that hearing loss may affect communication. Methodologically, this means that many studies may have omitted an important potential confounder. Perhaps more importantly, research in this field has largely overlooked a highly prevalent, important, and remediable influence on the quality of communication. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Suicide-related behaviors in older patients with new anti-epileptic drug use: data from the VA hospital system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dersh Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA recently linked antiepileptic drug (AED exposure to suicide-related behaviors based on meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. We examined the relationship between suicide-related behaviors and different AEDs in older veterans receiving new AED monotherapy from the Veterans Health Administration (VA, controlling for potential confounders. Methods VA and Medicare databases were used to identify veterans 66 years and older, who received a care from the VA between 1999 and 2004, and b an incident AED (monotherapy prescription. Previously validated ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify suicidal ideation or behavior (suicide-related behaviors cases, epilepsy, and other conditions previously associated with suicide-related behaviors. Each case was matched to controls based on prior history of suicide-related behaviors, year of AED prescription, and epilepsy status. Results The strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors (N = 64; Controls N = 768 based on conditional logistic regression analysis was affective disorder (depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Odds Ratio 4.42, 95% CI 2.30 to 8.49 diagnosed before AED treatment. Increased suicide-related behaviors were not associated with individual AEDs, including the most commonly prescribed AED in the US - phenytoin. Conclusion Our extensive diagnostic and treatment data demonstrated that the strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors for older patients newly treated with AED monotherapy was a previous diagnosis of affective disorder. Additional, research using a larger sample is needed to clearly determine the risk of suicide-related behaviors among less commonly used AEDs.

  18. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of pain in most common locations in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, W; Zajaczkowska, R; Wordliczek, J; Dobrogowski, J; Woron, J; Krzakowski, M

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients, especially in advanced disease. However, pain also accompanies a significant percentage of patients during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In some patients pain may be the first symptom of the disease. The causes of pain in cancer patients are often multifactorial including direct and indirect cancer effects, anticancer therapy and co-morbidities. Moreover, pain in cancer patients often has mixed pathophysiology including both nociceptive and neuropathic components, especially in patients with bone metastases. In this article, basic knowledge regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of pain in cancer patients with a primary tumour localised in lung, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, colon and pancreas), breast in women and prostate in men are presented. Pain is a common symptom in cancer patients and its appropriate assessment and treatment may significantly improve in patients' and families' quality of life.

  19. Meniscus suture repair: minimum 10-year outcomes in patients younger than 40 years compared with patients 40 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, J Richard; Matheny, Lauren M; Singleton, Steven B; Johnson, Nicholas S; Rodkey, William G; Crespo, Bernardo; Briggs, Karen K

    2015-09-01

    Few studies have compared outcomes after meniscus suture repair in patients younger than 40 years versus patients 40 years and older. To document failure rates and long-term outcomes after meniscus suture repair by a single surgeon, using the inside-out technique, at a minimum 10-year follow-up in patients younger than 40 years versus those 40 years and older. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included all patients 18 years or older who underwent meniscus suture repair with the inside-out technique by a single surgeon between January 1992 and December 2003. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts according to age: meniscus as repaired in the index surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire at minimum of 10 years after arthroscopy. Outcomes measures included Lysholm, Tegner, and patient satisfaction with outcome. All data were collected prospectively. The surgeon performed 339 meniscus repairs between 1992 and 2003. The study included 181 knees in 178 patients, who had a mean age of 33 years (range, 18-70 years). Cohort 1 contained 136 knees; 16 patients (12%) were lost to follow-up and 47 (35%) underwent a subsequent knee arthroscopy. Cohort 2 contained 45 knees; 2 patients (4.4%) were lost to follow-up, 3 patients had a total knee arthroplasty, and 12 patients (28%) underwent a subsequent knee arthroscopy. In cohort 1, the meniscus repair failure rate was 5.5% (6/110), and in cohort 2 it was 5.3% (2/38) (P = .927). There was no significant difference in failure rate based on which meniscus was repaired (P = .257), concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (P = .092), or microfracture (P = .674). Average follow-up time for cohort 1 was 16.1 years (range, 10.0-21.9 years), with 82% follow-up (n = 73/89); average follow-up time for cohort 2 was 16.2 years (range, 10.1-21.0 years), with 93% follow-up (n = 28/30). There were no significant differences in outcomes scores after meniscus suture repair based on age cohort or meniscus

  20. Safety and efficacy of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for common bile duct stones in liver cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-min; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, Qiu; Qin, Hua; Wang, Bo; Li, Rong-xiang; Zhang, Min; Hu, Ji-fen; Yang, Min

    2014-08-01

    In order to investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograpy (ERCP) in liver cirrhosis patients with common bile duct stones, we retrospectively analyzed data of 46 common bile duct stones patients with liver cirrhosis who underwent ERCP between 2000 and 2008. There were 12 cases of Child-Pugh A, 26 cases of Child-Pugh B, and 8 cases of Child-Pugh C. 100 common bile duct stones patients without liver cirrhosis were randomly selected. All the patients were subjected to ERCP for biliary stones extraction. The rates of bile duct clearance and complications were compared between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients. The success rate of selective biliary cannulation was 95.6% in liver cirrhotic patients versus 97% in non-cirrhotic patients (P>0.05). The bile duct clearance rate was 87% in cirrhotic patients versus 96% in non-cirrhotic patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. Two liver cirrhotic patients (4.35%, 2/46) who were scored Child-Pugh C had hematemesis and melena 24 h after ERCP. The hemorrhage rate after ERCP in non-cirrhotic patients was 3%. The hemorrhage rate associated with ERCP in Child-Pugh C patients was significantly higher (25%, 2/8) than that (3%, 3/100) in non-cirrhotic patients (Pbile duct stones. Hemorrhage risk in ERCP is higher in Child-Pugh C patients.

  1. Factors affecting institutionalization in older Hong Kong Chinese patients after recovery from acute medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, James Ka Hay; Chiu, Patrick Ka Chun; Chu, Leung Wing

    2009-01-01

    Older patients with medical illnesses are at risk of institutionalization. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors leading to institutionalization in older patients after recovery from medical illnesses. We studied 535 older patients in two convalescence hospitals in Hong Kong. Of them, 116 patients (21.7%) needed to move to nursing homes upon discharge. Univariate analysis showed that age, single/divorced/widowed status, longer length of stay, pressure sores, urinary incontinence, urinary catheterization, falls, dementia, diabetes mellitus, Barthel index (100), Elderly Mobility Score (EMS), Chinese version of the mini-mental state examination (C-MMSE) and albumin levels were significant factors associated with institutionalization. Multivariate analysis showed that being single/divorced/widowed (odds ratio=OR=2.74, 95% confidence interval=CI=1.36-5.53, p=0.0048), having urinary incontinence on discharge (OR=5.13, CI=2.66-10.6, p<0.001) and admission due to falls (OR=2.4, CI=1.03-5.57, p=0.04) were independent risk factors for nursing home admission. Higher admission EMS (OR=0.91, CI=0.84-0.97, p=0.009), admission C-MMSE (OR=0.93, CI=0.87-0.98, p=0.019), and discharge albumin levels (OR=0.93, CI=0.88-0.99, p=0.02) were independent protecting factors against nursing home admission. Knowledge of these factors can allow us to predict accommodation outcome and develop intervention strategy to reduce institutionalization in the older patients.

  2. Understanding Falls Risk and Impacts in Chinese American Older Patients at a Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Susan; Duong, Thomas; Ieong, Liss; Quach, Thu

    2017-08-01

    While falls are highly prevalent and costly for older adults, little is known about falls for Asian Americans. Using a custom, evidence-based, bilingual fall risk assessment and management tool, our study examined the prevalence of falls among older Chinese-speaking patients at a community health center. We identified the risks for falls and explored an association of fall risk with emergency room (ER) and hospital use in this population. The setting was at a community health center in Oakland, CA. Participants included 839 older Asian American adults (ages 65-80 years) who spoke Cantonese/Mandarin. Primary care clinic staff administered a fall risk assessment and management tool at the time of clinic visits to assess patients' risk factors for falls. Of the total, 173 (20.6%) reported having fallen in the past year, with women comprising a majority (71.7%). 362 patients in the cohort (43.1%) reported fear of falling. For the subset of Medicaid managed care patients (n = 455, 54.3% of total) for whom we were able to obtain ER and hospital utilization data, 31 patients (14.5%) who reported a fall risk had an ER/hospital episode compared to 15 (6.2%) of those who did not self-report fall risks (statistically significant, p cultural competence to focus on Asian American older adults, can help establish the prevalence of falls in this understudied population and effectively identify those at higher risk for falls and subsequent ER/hospital utilization. More research is needed to understand the risk and impacts of falls in understudied populations and identify ways to prevent these costly falls.

  3. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.

  4. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Carneiro, Sandro Dias Rocha Mendes; Barbosa, Fladia Taciana de Sousa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Moizan, Jean André Hervé; Doucet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its association with xerostomia. Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Ceará (CIHD) in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT). Perception of the presence of xerostomia/dry mouth was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and samples were obtained using an extra-soft silicone device. 120 older patients with diabetes (60 insulin-dependent and 60 non-insulin-dependent) aged 65-91 years, with a mean age of 72.26 ± 6.53 years, were assessed. Of these, 111 (92.5%) presented a decrease in salivary flow while 59 (49.2%) reported moderate to severe xerostomia/dry mouth. The DMFT Index presented a mean of 27.53 ± 4.86 teeth. Reduced salivary flow was found in the group assessed in the present research; however, this finding is not in accordance with the perception of xerostomia/dry mouth reported by the patients.

  5. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Lopes Ferreira Lima

    Full Text Available To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 and its association with xerostomia.Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Ceará (CIHD in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT. Perception of the presence of xerostomia/dry mouth was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and samples were obtained using an extra-soft silicone device.120 older patients with diabetes (60 insulin-dependent and 60 non-insulin-dependent aged 65-91 years, with a mean age of 72.26 ± 6.53 years, were assessed. Of these, 111 (92.5% presented a decrease in salivary flow while 59 (49.2% reported moderate to severe xerostomia/dry mouth. The DMFT Index presented a mean of 27.53 ± 4.86 teeth.Reduced salivary flow was found in the group assessed in the present research; however, this finding is not in accordance with the perception of xerostomia/dry mouth reported by the patients.

  6. The impact of an ostomy on older colorectal cancer patients: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, N M; Hamaker, M E; Zimmerman, D D E; van Loon, Y T; van den Bos, F; Pronk, A; Borel Rinkes, I H M; Schiphorst, A H W

    2017-01-01

    Ostomies are being placed in 35 % of patients after colorectal cancer surgery. As decision-making regarding colorectal surgery is challenging in the older patients, it is important to have insight in the potential impact due to ostomies. An internet-based survey was sent to all members with registered email addresses of the Dutch Ostomy Patient Association. The response rate was 49 %; 932 cases were included of whom 526 were aged Ostomy-related limitations were similar in the different age groups, just as uncertainty (8-10 %) and dependency (18-22 %) due to the ostomy. A reduced quality of life was experienced least in the oldest old group (24 % vs 37 % of the elderly and 46 % of the younger respondents, p ostomy was observed. Older ostomates do not experience more limitations or psychosocial impact due to the ostomy compared to their younger counterparts. Over the years, impact becomes less distinct. Treatment decision-making is challenging in the older colorectal cancer patients but ostomy placement should not be withheld based on age alone.

  7. Older Patients in the Acute Setting - Is There a Better Solution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressel, Eckart; Reichstein Wejse, Miriam; Demény, Ann Kathrin

    Background A substantial amount of older (>65 years) patients admitted to the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) at Bispebjerg Hospital are often characterized by complex health related and medication problems, functional loss and atypical presentation of symptoms. We established a Geriatric Acute Team (GATE...... and 58 % had more than 3 simultaneous present diseases. Implementing GATE resulted in shorter hospitalization times at AMU (p=0.03), fewer doctors attending the single patient (p=0.02), fewer 30-day readmission (p=0.05) and more patients being transferred to the geriatric ward (p=0.002). Conclusion...

  8. Indications for and clinical procedures resulting from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in older patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marc-Etienne; Vézina, François; Carrier, Nathalie; Masetto, Ariel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the indications for and clinical procedures resulting from knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older patients. Design We retrospectively analyzed 215 medical records of patients 50 years of age and older who had undergone a unilateral knee MRI in 2009. Setting Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Participants Patients 50 years of age and older who underwent a knee MRI in 2009. Main outcome measures The main outcome measure was an invasive procedure in the same knee that underwent an MRI. Medical charts were reviewed up to 2014 for patient characteristics, MRI indication, ordering physician specialty, radiography before MRI, MRI findings, and clinical procedures resulting from the MRI. Results The patients’ mean (SD) age was 60.6 (7.5) years. The main MRI indications were meniscopathy (148 [68.8%]) and chronic pain (92 [42.8%]). The main MRI findings were osteoarthritis (OA) (185 [86.0%]) and meniscal lesions (170 [79.1%]). Only 82 (38.1%) patients had a plain radiograph in the 24 months preceding the MRI, usually without a standing anteroposterior view. Findings on pre-MRI radiography (n = 201) demonstrated OA in 144 (71.6%) patients. Overall, 87 (40.5%) patients were seen by an orthopedic surgeon and 27 (31.0%) of these patients underwent an invasive intervention. Among the 81 patients with moderate to severe OA on MRI, 36 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of moderate to severe OA and only 3 (3.7%) underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Conclusion Our study reproduces the known association between OA and degenerative meniscal changes in older patients. We have found a surprising underuse of the standing anteroposterior view on radiography. Most patients in our cohort could have been appropriately diagnosed and treated based on such radiographic information, as demonstrated by pre-MRI findings, thus avoiding the MRI and subsequent evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. Meniscectomy was rarely performed

  9. Study of rt-PA therapy for acute stroke in older patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yasuhiro; Toyoshima, Atsuhiko; Toyota, Yasunori; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Katsumata, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Masamitsu; Matsumoto, Yuzo

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) therapy has been widely approved for acute ischemic stroke. We examined symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) and outcomes in older patients treated with rt-PA therapy. We divided 130 consecutive patients treated with rt-PA into two groups: 72 patients younger than 80 years (age <80 group) and 58 patients older than 80 years (age ≥80 group). On CT and MRI scans, SICH was observed in 5 patients (7.1%) in the age <80 group and 4 patients (6.9%) in the age ≥80 group. The SICH rate did not differ significantly between the two groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-2.39, P=0.6174). The patients in the age ≥80 group had a significantly lower mRS 0-1 rate (8.8 vs. 30.0%; OR 7.20, 95% CI 6.05-8.34, P=0.0009) and significantly higher mRS 6 (mortality) rate (19.3 vs. 9.0%; OR 6.52, 95% CI 5.39-7.65, P=0.0015) compared with those in the age <80 group. These data suggest that the factor of age is not related to SICH but is related to patients' outcomes in rt-PA therapy. (author)

  10. Factors influencing short-term outcomes for older patients accessing emergency departments after a fall: The role of fall dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Caterina; Di Gregorio, Patrizia; Debiasi, Eugenio; Pedrotti, Martina; La Guardia, Mario; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe; March, Albert

    2017-10-01

    While the relevance of falls in raising the risk of fractures, hospitalization and disability in older age is well recognized, the factors influencing the onset of fractures and the need for ward admission after a fall have yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated which factors and fall dynamics were mainly associated with fall-related injuries and hospitalization among elderly persons accessing the Emergency Department (ED) following a fall. The study involved 2144 older subjects who accessed the ED after a fall. Data on the fall´s nature and related injuries, ward admissions, history of falls, dementia, and medical therapies were examined for all patients. Considering dynamics, we distinguished accidental falls (due to interaction with environmental hazards while in motion) and falls from standing (secondary to syncope, lipothymia, drop attack, or vertigo). The overall prevalence of fractures in our population did not differ significantly with advancing age, though hip fractures were more common in the oldest, and upper limb fractures in the youngest patients. Falls from standing were associated with polypharmacy and with higher ward admission rate despite a lower fractures´ prevalence than accidental falls. The chances of fall-related fractures were more than fourfold as high for accidental dynamics (OR=4.05, 95%CI:3.10-5.29, pfall-related fractures (OR=6.84, 95%CI:5.45-8.58, pfall dynamics. Outcomes of falls in older age depend not only on any fall-related injuries, but also on factors such as polypharmacy, cognitive status and fall dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-03-01

    Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark. During a three-week period, the practices invited their patients to fill out a questionnaire on health, social relations and loneliness. Of 767 eligible patients, 474 were included and 461 answered one or more items about social participation or loneliness. A total of 36.2% had a high, 45.5% had a medium and 18.3% had a low social participation; and 17.9% often or occasionally felt lonely. Higher social participation was associated with a lower degree of loneliness. However, several patients answered in a manner not fitting the expected association. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, living alone and low social participation were the most important predictive variables for loneliness. Only 15.2% of the lonely patients had talked to their GP about their loneliness. A total of 17.9% of older patients stated that they were lonely either often or occasionally. The most important predictors were: anxiety and depressive symptoms, living alone and low social participation. The lonely patients rarely shared these issues with their GP. The study also reveals a need to discuss the assessment of social participation and loneliness in both research and practice. Danish Agency for Culture and Palaces. The EGV Foundation. The Committee of Multipractice Studies in General Practice. not relevant.

  12. Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Patients during Hospitalization: The EMPOWER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ancum, Jeanine M.; Scheerman, Kira; Pierik, Vincent D.; Numans, Siger T.; Verlaan, Sjors; Smeenk, Hanne E.; Slee-Valentijn, Monique; Kruizinga, Roeliene C.; Meskers, Carel G.M.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Low muscle strength and muscle mass are associated with an increased length of hospital stay and higher mortality rate in inpatients. To what extent hospitalization affects muscle strength and muscle mass is unclear. Objective We aimed to assess muscle strength and muscle mass at admission and during hospitalization in older patients and its relation with being at risk of geriatric conditions. Methods The EMPOWER study included patients aged 70 years and older, admitted to 4 wards of the VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands between April and December 2015. At admission, patients were screened for being at risk of 4 geriatric conditions: delirium, falls, malnutrition, and functional disability. At admission and at discharge, muscle strength and muscle mass were assessed. Results A total of 373 patients (mean age, standard deviation [SD]: 79.6, 6.38 years) were included at admission, and 224 patients (mean age, SD: 80.1, 6.32 years) at discharge. At admission, lower muscle strength in both female and male patients and low muscle mass in male patients were associated with being at risk of a higher cumulative number of geriatric conditions. Muscle strength increased during hospitalization, but no change in muscle mass was observed. Changes in muscle measures were not associated with being at risk of geriatric conditions. Discussion Older patients with lower muscle strength and muscle mass at admission were at risk of a higher cumulative number of geriatric conditions. However, being at risk of geriatric conditions did not forecast further decrease in muscle strength and muscle mass during hospitalization PMID:28817825

  13. New medical diagnoses and length of stay of acutely unwell older patients: Implications for funding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, David; Khoo, Angela

    2015-09-01

    To examine the relationship between newly made medical diagnoses and length of stay (LOS) of acutely unwell older patients. Consecutive patients admitted under the care of four geriatricians were randomly allocated to a model development sample (n = 937) or a model validation sample (n = 855). Cox regression was used to model LOS. Variables considered for inclusion in the development model were established risk factors for LOS and univariate predictors from our dataset. Variables selected in the development sample were tested in the validation sample. A median of five new medical diagnoses were made during a median LOS of 10 days. New diagnoses predicted an increased LOS (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.88-0.92). Other significant predictors of increased LOS in both samples were malnutrition and frailty. Identification of new medical diagnoses may have implications for Diagnosis Related Groups-based funding models and may improve the care of older people. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  14. Family Caregiver Knowledge, Patient Illness Characteristics, and Unplanned Hospital Admissions in Older Adults With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddie, Patricia I; Wochna Loerzel, Victoria; Norris, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    To explore factors related to unplanned hospital admissions and determine if one or more factors are predictive of unplanned hospital admissions for older adults with cancer.
. A prospective longitudinal design and a retrospective chart review.
. Adult oncology outpatient infusion centers and inpatient units at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Florida.
. A convenience sample of 129 dyads of older adults with cancer and their family caregivers. 
. Family caregiver demographic and side effect knowledge data were collected prospectively during interviews with family caregivers using a newly developed tool, the Nurse Assessment of Family Caregiver Knowledge and Action Tool. Patient demographic and clinical data were obtained through a retrospective chart review. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate data and examine relationships among variables.
. Patient illness characteristics; impaired function; side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea; family caregiver knowledge; and unplanned hospital admissions.
. Unplanned hospital admissions were more likely to occur when older adults had impaired function and side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. Impaired function and family caregiver knowledge did not moderate the effects of these side effects on unplanned hospital admissions. 
. Findings suggest that the presence of impaired function and side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, predict unplanned hospital admissions in older adults with cancer during the active treatment phase. Side effects may or may not be related to chemotherapy and may be related to preexisting comorbidities. 
. Nurses can conduct targeted assessments to identify older adults and their family caregivers who will need additional follow-up and support during the cancer treatment trajectory. Information gained from these assessments will assist nurses to provide practical and

  15. Relationships Among Cognitive Function and Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Older Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Christina E; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L; Scholey, Andrew B; Pipingas, Andrew; Kaye, David M; Bergin, Peter J; Croft, Kevin D; Wesnes, Keith A; Myers, Stephen P; Stough, Con

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms for cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated the relative contributions of cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV), oxidative stress, and inflammation to HF-associated cognitive impairment. Thirty-six HF patients (≥60 years) and 40 healthy controls (68 ± 7 vs 67 ± 5 years, P > .05; 69% vs 50% male, P > .05) completed the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Stroop tasks. Common carotid (CCA) and middle cerebral arterial BFV were obtained by transcranial Doppler. Blood samples were collected for oxidant (diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites; F2-isoprostanes), antioxidant (coenzyme Q10; CoQ10), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). Compared with controls, patients exhibited impaired attention (Cognitive Drug Research's Power of Attention domain, congruent Stroop) and executive function (incongruent Stroop). Multiple regression modeling showed that CCA-BFV and CoQ10 but not group predicted performance on attention and executive function. Additionally, in HF patients, CCA-BFV and CoQ10 (β = -0.34 vs β = -0.35) were significant predictors of attention, and CCA-BFV (β = -0.34) was a predictor of executive function. Power of Attention and executive function is impaired in older HF patients, and reduced CCA-BFV and CoQ10 are associated with worse cognition. Interventions addressing these mechanisms may improve cognition in older HF patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can education improve clinical practice concerning delirium in older hospitalised patients? Results of a pre-test post-test study on an educational intervention for nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthuijsen, Eveline L; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Warnier, Ron M J; Ambergen, Ton; Mulder, Wubbo J; Verhey, Frans R J; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2018-04-02

    Delirium is a common and serious complication of hospitalisation in older adults. It can lead to prolonged hospital stay, institutionalisation, and even death. However, it often remains unrecognised or is not managed adequately. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention for nursing staff on three aspects of clinical practice concerning delirium in older hospitalised patients: the frequency and correctness of screening for delirium using the 13-item Delirium Observation Screening score (DOS), and the frequency of geriatric consultations requested for older patients. The a priori expectations were that there would be an increase in all three of these outcomes. We designed an educational intervention and implemented this on two inpatient hospital units. Before providing the educational session, the nursing staff was asked to fill out two questionnaires about delirium in older hospitalised patients. The educational session was then tailored to each unit based on the results of these questionnaires. Additionally, posters and flyers with information on the screening and management of delirium were provided and participants were shown where to find additional information. Relevant data (outcomes, demographics and background patient data) were collected retrospectively from digital medical files. Data was retrospectively collected for four different time points: three pre-test and one post-test. There was a significant increase in frequency of delirium screening (P = 0.001), and both units showed an increase in the correctness of the screening. No significant effect of the educational intervention was found for the proportion of patients who received a geriatric consultation (P = 0.083). The educational intervention was fairly successful in making positive changes in clinical practice: after the educational session an improvement in the frequency and correctness of screening for delirium was observed. A trend, though not

  17. Towards better fall prevention : Examining the interplay between factors that influence gait in older patients

    OpenAIRE

    De Groot, Maartje H.

    2017-01-01

    Falling is a serious problem among older patients: it is the combination of a high fall incidence together with a high susceptibility to injuries that makes a relatively mild fall potentially dangerous to these old persons. Falling is a multifactorial problem, but postural instability during daily activities, such as walking, is suggested to be the most consistent predictor of falls. Age-related neurophysiological changes and a high prevalence of clinical diseases result in a slower and less ...

  18. [Psychoneuroimmunological predictors for burden in older caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Danilla I; Pedroso, Renata V; Andreatto, Carla A A; Scarpari, Lais; Garuffi, Marcelo; Costa, José L R; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth F

    2014-01-01

    The responsibility of giving care to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may result in health changes in the older caregiver. It is important to explore the factors which influence the presence of care burden and to create strategies to face this condition. In this context, the aims of present study were to investigate the relationships between psychoneuroimmunological parameters and determine the predictors to burden in older caregivers of patients with AD. A total of 30 AD older caregivers participating in the «Cognitive and Functional Kinesiotherapy Program in Elderly with Alzheimer's disease«(PRO-CDA)», de Rio Claro, SP-Brazil, were submitted to an assessment protocol to evaluate the psychoneuroimmunological parameters. A descriptive statistical analysis, Pearson correlation and multiple linear regressions were performed. The mean age of caregivers was 71.3 (±9.3), and predominantly are first-grade relatives. The caregiver burden was associated with depressive symptoms (r=0.60, P<.001), caregiver distress (r=0.68, P<.001), and neuropsychiatric disorders of AD patients (r=0.53, P<.001). The multiple regression analysis confirmed depressive symptoms and neuropsychiatric disturbances as predictors of caregiver burden. Caregiver burden is associated with, and influenced by parameters related to the caregiver psychological suffering and to characteristics inherent to AD. Thus, it is important to find strategies and implement non-pharmacological programs to provide support to older caregivers, and to assist in the treatment of patients with AD, in order to improve the integral health of this population. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Oropharyngeal Microbiota in Frail Older Patients Unaffected by Time in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C. Ewan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are the commonest nosocomial infections, and occur predominantly in frailer, older patients with multiple comorbidities. The oropharyngeal microbiota is the major reservoir of infection. This study explored the relative contributions of time in hospital and patient demographics to the community structure of the oropharyngeal microbiota in older patients with lower limb fracture. We collected 167 throat swabs from 53 patients (mean age 83 over 14 days after hospitalization, and analyzed these using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We calculated frailty/comorbidity indices, undertook dental examinations and collected data on respiratory tract infections. We analyzed microbial community composition using correspondence (CA and canonical correspondence analysis. Ten patients were treated for respiratory tract infection. Microbial community structure was related to frailty, number of teeth and comorbidity on admission, with comorbidity exerting the largest effect. Time in hospital neither significantly changed alpha (t = −0.910, p = 0.365 nor beta diversity (CA1 t = 0.022, p = 0.982; CA2 t = −0.513, p = 0.609 of microbial communities in patient samples. Incidence of respiratory pathogens were not associated with time in hospital (t = −0.207, p = 0.837, nor with alpha diversity of the oral microbiota (t = −1.599, p = 0.113. Patient characteristics at admission, rather than time in hospital, influenced the community structure of the oral microbiota.

  20. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the older dental patient: how do dentists respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel R; Overbeck, Kevin J; Pomerantz, Sherry C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications from antibiotic use, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), can have significant morbidity, especially among older patients. This descriptive study surveyed dentists to find out how they would respond to a patient with signs indicating potential CDI. A survey on prescribing medications for older patients was mailed to 1,000 dentists in New Jersey. Questions were asked regarding antibiotic selection, probiotic use, and approach to a patient scenario of diarrhea after antibiotic use. Respondents chose amoxicillin most frequently as an antibiotic, and clindamycin if penicillin allergy. When informed their patients had diarrhea, 64.5% advised them to stop the antibiotic. If the patient continued to have diarrhea on follow-up, 75.5% contacted the patient's physician. Most (61.6%) do not prescribe probiotics prophylactically. Most dentists respond appropriately to antibiotic-associated diarrhea in advising to stop the antibiotic, and seeking physician involvement if no improvement, but there are still many who make recommendations that could delay appropriate care. Dentists may wish to learn more about benefits of probiotics. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Total elbow arthroplasty in distal humerus fracture in patients older than 65 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Gallucci

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report the clinical-functional results of the treatment of humeral distal fractures with a total elbow prosthesis in patients older than 65 years old. Material and methods This retrospective paper was performed in two surgical centers. Criteria inclusion were: patients with humeral distal fractures, > 65 years, operated on with Coonrad-Morrey prostheses, and with a follow-up of  >1 year. Twenty-one patients were included. Twenty were women with an average age of 79 years old. According to AO classification, 13 fractures were type C3, 7 C2 and 1 A2. All patientes were operated on without desinsertion of the extensor mechanism. Average follow-up was 40 months. Results Flexo-extension was 123-17°, with a total arc of mobility of 106° (80 % of the contralateral side. Pain according to AVE was 1. The MEPI was 83 points: 8 patients had excellent results, 11 good, 1 regular and 1 bad. Average DASH score was 24 points. Conclusion Treatment of humeral distal fractures with total elbow arthoplasty in patients older than 65 years old, may lead to a good option of treatment, but indications must be limited to patients with complex fractures, bad bone quality, with osteoporosis and low functional demands.

  2. Increased risk of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, L.M.A.J.; Gorter, K.J.; Hak, E.; Goudzwaard, W.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical data on the association of diabetes mellitus with common infections are virtually lacking, not conclusive, and often biased. We intended to determine the relative risks of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and DM2, respectively).

  3. Impact of Sarcopenia on One-Year Mortality among Older Hospitalized Patients with Impaired Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, M; Norman, K; Müller, M J; Dziewas, R; Wirth, R

    2018-01-01

    However, the information regarding the impact of sarcopenia on mortality in older individuals is rising, there is a lack of knowledge concerning this issue among geriatric hospitalized patients. Therefore, aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between sarcopenia and 1-year mortality in a prospectively recruited sample of geriatric inpatients with different mobility and dependency status. Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the criteria of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Hand grip strength and skeletal muscle mass were measured using Jamar dynamometer and bioelectrical impedance analysis, respectively. Physical function was assessed with the Short Physical Performance Battery. Dependency status was defined by Barthel-Index (BI). Mobility limitation was defined according to walking ability as described in BI. The survival status was ascertained by telephone interview. The recruited population comprised 198 patients from a geriatric acute ward with a mean age of 82.8 ± 5.9 (70.2% females). 50 (25.3%) patients had sarcopenia, while 148 (74.7%) had no sarcopenia. 14 (28%) patients died among sarcopenic subjects compared with 28 (19%) non-sarcopenic subjects (P=0.229). After adjustment for potential confounders, sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality among patients with limited mobility prior to admission (n=138, hazard ratio, HR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.17-5.44) and at time of discharge (n=162, HR: 1.93, 95% CI: 0.67-3.22). In a sub-group of patients with pre-admission BIsarcopenia and mortality across the different scores of BI during admission and at time of discharge. Sarcopenia is significantly associated with higher risk of mortality among sub-groups of older patients with limited mobility and impaired functional status, independently of age and other clinical variables.

  4. Spa therapy for elderly: a retrospective study of 239 older patients with osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-10-01

    Very few studies tested the effectiveness of spa therapy in older patients with osteoarthritis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of spa therapy in patients aged 65 years and older with generalized, knee, hip, and cervical and lumbar spine osteoarthritis. In an observational retrospective study design at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Medical Faculty, we analyzed the records of 239 patients aged over 65 years with the diagnosis of all types of osteoarthritis who were prescribed a spa therapy course in some spa resorts in Turkey between 7 March 2002 and 31 December 2012. They travelled to a spa resort where they stayed at a thermal spa hotel and followed the usual therapy packages for 2 weeks. Patients were assessed by an experienced physician within a week before the spa journey and within a week after the completion of the spa therapy. Compared with baseline in whole sample, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain (visual analog scale, VAS), patient and physician global assessments (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI) for knee, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities index (WOMAC), Waddell disability index (WDI), and Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD). According to Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) Set of Responder Criteria, responder rate were 63.8 % (51/80) in generalized, 52 % (13/25) in knee, 50 % (2/4) in hip, 66.7 % (8/12) in lumbar, and 100 % (6/6) in cervical osteoarthritis subgroups. Spa therapy improved pain and physical functional status in older patients with osteoarthritis, especially generalized osteoarthritis and multiple joint osteoarthritis with involvement of knee. This improvement was clinically important in majority of the patients. To confirm the results of this preliminary study, there is a need of a randomized controlled clinical study

  5. Poor Performance on a Preoperative Cognitive Screening Test Predicts Postoperative Complications in Older Orthopedic Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Deborah J; Flaherty, Devon; Fahey, Margaret C; Rudolph, James L; Javedan, Houman; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Wright, John; Bader, Angela M; Hyman, Bradley T; Blacker, Deborah; Crosby, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    The American College of Surgeons and the American Geriatrics Society have suggested that preoperative cognitive screening should be performed in older surgical patients. We hypothesized that unrecognized cognitive impairment in patients without a history of dementia is a risk factor for development of postoperative complications. We enrolled 211 patients 65 yr of age or older without a diagnosis of dementia who were scheduled for an elective hip or knee replacement. Patients were cognitively screened preoperatively using the Mini-Cog and demographic, medical, functional, and emotional/social data were gathered using standard instruments or review of the medical record. Outcomes included discharge to place other than home (primary outcome), delirium, in-hospital medical complications, hospital length-of-stay, 30-day emergency room visits, and mortality. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty of 211 (24%) patients screened positive for probable cognitive impairment (Mini-Cog less than or equal to 2). On age-adjusted multivariate analysis, patients with a Mini-Cog score less than or equal to 2 were more likely to be discharged to a place other than home (67% vs. 34%; odds ratio = 3.88, 95% CI = 1.58 to 9.55), develop postoperative delirium (21% vs. 7%; odds ratio = 4.52, 95% CI = 1.30 to 15.68), and have a longer hospital length of stay (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.95) compared to those with a Mini-Cog score greater than 2. Many older elective orthopedic surgical patients have probable cognitive impairment preoperatively. Such impairment is associated with development of delirium postoperatively, a longer hospital stay, and lower likelihood of going home upon hospital discharge.

  6. Pet ownership may attenuate loneliness among older adult primary care patients who live alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Conwell, Yeates; Bowen, Connie; Van Orden, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Older adults who report feelings of loneliness are at increased risk for a range of negative physical and mental health outcomes, including early mortality. Identifying potential sources of social connectedness, such as pet ownership, could add to the understanding of how to promote health and well-being in older adults. The aim of this study is to describe the association of pet ownership and loneliness. The current study utilizes cross-sectional survey data from a sample (N = 830) of older adult primary care patients (age ≥ 60 years). Pet owners were 36% less likely than non-pet owners to report loneliness, in a model controlling for age, living status (i.e., alone vs. not alone), happy mood, and seasonal residency (adjOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.41-0.98, p pet ownership and living status (b = -1.60, p pet was associated with the greatest odds of reporting feelings of loneliness. The findings suggest that pet ownership may confer benefits for well-being, including attenuating feelings of loneliness and its related sequelae, among older adults who live alone.

  7. Radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 80 and older: a study of effectiveness and side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariah, Babu; Balducci, Lodovico; Venkattaramanabalaji, G.V.; Casey, Linda; Greenberg, Harvey M.; Del Regato, Juan A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To profile cancer patients aged 80 and older undergoing radiotherapy and to study the tumor response and side effects of therapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients aged 80 and older who received radiation therapy at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center between 1988 and 1995. A total of 203 patients aged 80-94 received radiotherapy during this period. Treatment sites included head and neck [50], breast [16], chest [37], pelvis [53], and miscellaneous [39]. Age, treatment site, field size, total dose, response to treatment, treatment interruptions, incidence and severity of weight loss, myelosuppression, diarrhea, mucositis, dermatitis, and follow-up status are assessed using our departmental records and hospital tumor registry. Results: Of 191 patients evaluated, 179 (94%) completed the treatment without serious complications. A total of 195 sites were irradiated. Twelve patients (6%) required interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic responses were seen in 86 out of 112 patients (77%) treated with curative intent (with 67% complete response) and in 67 out of 83 patients (81%) treated with palliative intent. The causes of treatment interruptions included weight loss from diarrhea, dysphagia, and progressive disease. Treatment interruptions were more likely in patients treated with large treatment fields. In patients treated for upper aero-digestive tract cancer, Grade 3 and 4 mucositis was noted in 20 and 2% of patients, respectively. Grade 1 and 2 enteritis was noted in 43% of patients treated for pelvic malignancies. Grade 3 dermatitis was noted only in 2% of patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is highly effective and well tolerated by the oldest old. Age is not a contraindication to aggressive radiotherapy

  8. Attitudes of neurology specialists toward older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferoğlu, Meral; Yıldız, Demet; Pekel, Nilüfer Büyükkoyuncu; Güneş, Aygül; Yıldız, Abdülmecit; Tufan, Fatih

    2017-08-01

    Attitude of healthcare providers toward older people is very important in the aging world. Neurologists contact older adults very frequently. We aimed to investigate the attitudes of neurologists toward older adults. We recorded participants age; sex; duration of clinical practice in neurology; existence of older adult relatives; and history of geriatrics education, nursing home visits, older adult patient density in their clinical practice, and participation in voluntary public activities. UCLA Geriatrics Attitude Scale was used to evaluate participants' attitudes. A total of 100 neurologists participated in this study. Seventy-seven percent had positive, 3 % had neutral, and 20 % had negative attitudes. Twenty-seven percent of the participants had history of geriatrics education, and these participants tended to have a higher rate of positive attitudes. Neurologists with positive attitudes tended to be older than those with negative attitudes. Participants with history of living with older adult relatives had lower rates of positive attitudes. The most common diagnoses of the patients the participants encountered were stroke and dementia. Independent factors associated with positive attitudes were history of geriatrics education and older age. History of living with older relatives tended to have a negative effect. Most of the negative items of the attitude scale were associated with the natural course and behavior of the common diseases in neurology practice. Generalization of geriatrics education may translate into a better understanding and improved care for older patients. Development of instruments and implementation of qualitative studies to assess attitudes of neurologists toward older adults are needed.

  9. Radiotherapy for patients with malignant diseases aged 85 years or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Hirofumi; Mizumoto, Masashi; Zenda, Sadamoto

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and problems of radiotherapy for patients aged 85 or older. Forty-five patients were assessed (oldest old group): They were 85 years of age or older and had received radiotherapy between September 2002 and September 2005. Sixty-nine patients, 75 years of age at the start of radiotherapy, were also assessed (old group). In the oldest old group, there were 21 men and 24 women, and median age was 87 years (range; 85-99). The sites of disease were: 10 in head and neck, 5 in lung, 5 in malignant lymphoma, 4 in skin, 4 in esophagus, 2 in breast, 2 in uterine cervix, 2 in rectum, 2 in soft tissue, 2 in metastatic bone tumor, 7 in others. The treatment was deemed curative in 49%, palliative in 40%, and others in 11%. Treatment fields were limited due to performance status (PS) or age in 13 patients. The rate of treatment completion was 91% (41/45). Eleven of 26 inpatients were admitted because of difficulty in hospital visit. Seventeen of 19 outpatients needed familial escort. Of patients completed radiotherapy, 47% of the patients achieved complete response (CR), 37% achieved partial response (PR), and 16% achieved no change (NC) in the group of curative radiotherapy, and 88% of the patients achieved effective response, and only 2 cases resulted in ineffective response in the group of palliative radiotherapy. While only one patient received grade 3 dermatitis and mucositis, other patients received grade 2 and below adverse events. Three patients resulted in deterioration of PS, and 2 patients deteriorated dementia. Although higher rates in female patients, worse PS, and limitation of treatment field were seen in the oldest old group, there were no significant difference in terms of the rate of treatment completion, effectiveness, and adverse events between the two groups. Our study showed radiotherapy is effective and well tolerated in patients aged 85 or older. Considering the oldest old requiring radiotherapy

  10. Cultural factors influencing dietary and fluid restriction behaviour: perceptions of older Chinese patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xiaoshan; Peng, Youqing; Yu, Hai-Ping; Li, Dan

    2017-03-01

    To explore the cultural factors related to dietary and fluid restriction behaviours among older Chinese patients. Excess dietary sodium and fluid intake are risk factors contributing to the worsening and rehospitalisation for heart failure in older patients. Managing the complex fluid and diet requirements of heart failure patients is challenging and is made more complicated by cultural variations in self-management behaviours in response to a health threat. Qualitative study using semi-structured in interviews and framework analysis. The design of this study is qualitative descriptive. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 heart failure patients. Data were analysed through content analysis. Seven cultural themes emerged from the qualitative data: the values placed on health and illness, customary way of life, preference for folk care and the Chinese healthcare system, and factors related to kinship and social ties, religion, economics and education. Dietary change and management in response to illness, including heart failure, is closely related to individuals' cultural background. Healthcare providers should have a good understanding of cultural aspects that can influence patients' conformity to medical recommendations. Heart failure patients need support that considers their cultural needs. Healthcare providers must have a good understanding of the experiences of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Common experiences of patients following suboptimal treatment outcomes: implications for epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Dinusha K; McIntosh, Anne M; Bladin, Peter F; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the patient experience of unsuccessful medical interventions, particularly in the epilepsy surgery field. The present review aimed to gain insight into the patient experience of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery by examining the broader literature dealing with suboptimal results after medical interventions (including epilepsy surgery). To capture the patient experience, the literature search focused on qualitative research of patients who had undergone medically unsuccessful interventions, published in English in scholarly journals. Twenty-two studies were found of patients experiencing a range of suboptimal outcomes, including seizure recurrence, cancer recurrence and progression, unsuccessful joint replacement, unsuccessful infertility treatment, organ transplant rejection, coronary bypass graft surgery, and unsuccessful weight-loss surgery. In order of frequency, the most common patient experiences included the following: altered social dynamics and stigma, unmet expectations, negative emotions, use of coping strategies, hope and optimism, perceived failure of the treating team, psychiatric symptoms, and control issues. There is support in the epilepsy surgery literature that unmet expectations and psychiatric symptoms are key issues for patients with seizure recurrence, while other common patient experiences have been implied but not systematically examined. Several epilepsy surgery specific factors influence patient perceptions of seizure recurrence, including the nature of postoperative seizures, the presence of postoperative complications, and the need for increased postoperative medications. Knowledge of common patient experiences can assist in the delivery of patient follow-up and rehabilitation services tailored to differing outcomes after epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Community Oncologists' Decision-Making for Treatment of Older Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohile, Supriya G; Magnuson, Allison; Pandya, Chintan; Velarde, Carla; Duberstein, Paul; Hurria, Arti; Loh, Kah Poh; Wells, Megan; Plumb, Sandy; Gilmore, Nikesha; Flannery, Marie; Wittink, Marsha; Epstein, Ronald; Heckler, Charles E; Janelsins, Michelle; Mustian, Karen; Hopkins, Judith O; Liu, Jane; Peri, Srihari; Dale, William

    2018-03-01

    Background: This study's objectives were to describe community oncologists' beliefs about and confidence with geriatric care and to determine whether geriatric-relevant information influences cancer treatment decisions. Methods: Community oncologists were recruited to participate in 2 multisite geriatric oncology trials. Participants shared their beliefs about and confidence in caring for older adults. They were also asked to make a first-line chemotherapy recommendation (combination vs single-agent vs no chemotherapy) for a hypothetical vignette of an older patient with advanced pancreatic cancer. Each oncologist received one randomly chosen vignette that varied on 3 variables: age (72/84 years), impaired function (yes/no), and cognitive impairment (yes/no). Other patient characteristics were held constant. Logistic regression models were used to identify associations between oncologist/vignette-patient characteristics and treatment decisions. Results: Oncologist response rate was 61% (n=305/498). Most oncologists agreed that "the care of older adults with cancer needs to be improved" (89%) and that "geriatrics training is essential" (72%). However, decision to treat: younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.01; 95% CI, 2.73-9.20), normal cognition (aOR, 5.42; 95% CI, 3.01-9.76), and being functionally intact (aOR, 3.85; 95% CI, 2.12-7.00). Accounting for all vignettes across all scenarios, 161 oncologists (52%) said they would offer chemotherapy. All variables were independently associated with prescribing single-agent over combination chemotherapy (older age: aOR, 3.22; 95% CI 1.43-7.25, impaired cognition: aOR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.36-7.20, impaired function: aOR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.12-5.72). Oncologists' characteristics were not associated with decisions about providing chemotherapy. Conclusion: Geriatric-relevant information, when available, strongly influences community oncologists' treatment decisions. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  13. Clinical benefit of gluten-free diet in screen-detected older celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilppula Anitta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of serologic screening for celiac disease is still debatable. Evidence suggests that the disorder remains undetected even in the older population. It remains obscure whether screening makes good or harm in subjects with long-standing gluten ingestion. We evaluated whether older subjects benefit from active detection and subsequent gluten free dietary treatment of celiac disease. Methods Thirty-five biopsy-proven patients aged over 50 years had been detected by serologic mass screening. We examined the disease history, dietary compliance, symptoms, quality of life and bone mineral density at baseline and 1-2 years after the commencement of a gluten-free diet. Symptoms were evaluated by gastrointestinal symptom rating scale and quality of life by psychological general well-being questionnaires. Small bowel biopsy, serology, laboratory parameters assessing malabsorption, and bone mineral density were investigated. Results Dietary compliance was good. The patients had initially low mean serum ferritin values indicating subclinical iron deficiency, which was restored by a gluten-free diet. Vitamin B12, vitamin D and erythrocyte folic acid levels increased significantly on diet. Celiac patients had a history of low-energy fractures more often than the background population, and the diet had a beneficial effect on bone mineral density. Alleviation in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed, even though the patients reported no or only subtle symptoms at diagnosis. Quality of life remained unchanged. Of all the cases, two thirds would have been diagnosed even without screening if the family history, fractures or concomitant autoimmune diseases had been taken carefully into account. Conclusions Screen-detected patients benefited from a gluten-free diet. We encourage a high index of suspicion and active case-finding in celiac disease as an alternative to mass screening in older patients.

  14. Association of cumulative dose of haloperidol with next-day delirium in older medical ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Margaret A; Araujo, Katy L B; Murphy, Terrence E

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the association between cumulative dose of haloperidol and next-day diagnosis of delirium in a cohort of older medical ICU patients, with adjustment for its time-dependent confounding with fentanyl and intubation. Prospective, observational study. Medical ICU at an urban, academic medical center. Age 60 years and older admitted to the medical ICU who received at least one dose of haloperidol (n = 93). Of these, 72 patients were intubated at some point in their medical ICU stay, whereas 21 were never intubated. None. Detailed data were collected concerning time, dosage, route of administration of all medications, as well as for important clinical covariates, and daily status of intubation and delirium using the confusion assessment method for the ICU and a chart-based algorithm. Among nonintubated patients, and after adjustment for time-dependent confounding and important covariates, each additional cumulative milligram of haloperidol was associated with 5% higher odds of next-day delirium with odds ratio of 1.05 (credible interval [CI], 1.02-1.09). After adjustment for time-dependent confounding and covariates, intubation was associated with a five-fold increase in odds of next-day delirium with odds ratio of 5.66 (CI, 2.70-12.02). Cumulative dose of haloperidol among intubated patients did not change their already high likelihood of next-day delirium. After adjustment for time-dependent confounding, the positive associations between indicators of intubation and of cognitive impairment and next-day delirium became stronger. These results emphasize the need for more studies regarding the efficacy of haloperidol for treatment of delirium among older medical ICU patients and demonstrate the value of assessing nonintubated patients.

  15. Maintaining Unity - relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes. A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-12-01

    To generate a substantive grounded theory of relatives' pattern of behaviour in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. Fast-track treatment programmes are designed to make total hip and knee replacements more efficient through recovery improvements. The support of relatives during older patients' trajectory is important. However, knowledge is needed on the relatives' pattern of behaviour to strengthen their involvement in fast-track treatment programmes. We used a Glaserian grounded theory approach based on a systematic generation of theory from data to explain the latent pattern of behaviour of relatives. Data were collected from 2010-2011 in orthopaedic wards at two Danish university hospitals and consisted of 14 non-participant observations, 14 postobservational interviews and five interviews. Seven relatives of patients over 70 years of age participated. The constant comparative method was the guiding principle for simultaneous data collection, data analysis and coding, while theoretically sampling and writing memos. Maintaining Unity emerged as the relatives' pattern of behaviour through which they resolved their main concern: preventing the patients from feeling alone. The relatives resolved their main concern through three interchangeable behavioural modes: Protecting Mode, by providing loving and respectful support; Substituting Mode, with practical and cognitive support; and an Adapting Mode, by trying to fit in with the patients' and health professionals' requirements. The substantive theory of Maintaining Unity offers knowledge of relatives' strong desire to provide compassionate and loving support for the older patients during fast-track treatment programmes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Spatiotemporal discordance in five common measures of rurality for US counties and applications for health disparities research in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Cohen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rural populations face numerous barriers to health, including poorer health care infrastructure, access to care, and other sociodemographic factors largely associated with rurality. Multiple measures of rurality used in the biomedical and public health literature can help assess rural-urban health disparities and may impact the observed associations between rurality and health. Furthermore, understanding what makes a place truly rural versus urban may vary from region to region in the United States.Purpose: The objectives of this study are to compare and contrast five common measures of rurality and determine how well-correlated these measures are at the national, regional, and divisional level, as well as to assess patterns in the correlations between the prevalence of obesity in the population aged 60+ and each of the five measures of rurality at the regional and divisional level.Methods: Five measures of rurality were abstracted from the US Census and US Department of Agriculture (USDA to characterize US counties. Obesity data in the population aged 60+ were abstracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS. Spearman’s rank correlations were used to quantify the associations among the five rurality measurements at the national, regional, and divisional level, as defined by the US Census Bureau. Geographic information systems were used to visually illustrate temporal, spatial, and regional variability. Results: Overall, Spearman’s rank correlations among the five measures ranged from 0.521 (percent urban-Urban Influence Code to 0.917 (Rural-Urban Continuum Code-Urban Influence Code. Notable discrepancies existed in these associations by Census region and by division. The associations between measures of rurality and obesity in the 60+ population varied by rurality measure used and by region. Conclusion: This study is among the first to systematically assess the spatial, temporal, and regional differences

  17. Hippocampal Sclerosis in Older Patients: Practical Examples and Guidance With a Focus on Cerebral Age-Related TDP-43 With Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Powell, Suzanne Z; Schulz, Paul E; Takei, Hidehiro; Rivera, Andreana L; Jackson, Robert E; Roman, Gustavo; Jicha, Gregory A; Nelson, Peter T

    2017-08-01

    - Autopsy studies of the older population (≥65 years of age), and particularly of the "oldest-old" (≥85 years of age), have identified a significant proportion (∼20%) of cognitively impaired patients in which hippocampal sclerosis is the major substrate of an amnestic syndrome. Hippocampal sclerosis may also be comorbid with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer disease, and Lewy body disease. Until recently, the terms hippocampal sclerosis of aging or hippocampal sclerosis dementia were applied in this context. Recent discoveries have prompted a conceptual expansion of hippocampal sclerosis of aging because (1) cellular inclusions of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) are frequent; (2) TDP-43 pathology may be found outside hippocampus; and (3) brain arteriolosclerosis is a common, possibly pathogenic, component. - To aid pathologists with recent recommendations for diagnoses of common neuropathologies in older persons, particularly hippocampal sclerosis, and highlight the recent shift in diagnostic terminology from HS-aging to cerebral age-related TDP-43 with sclerosis (CARTS). - Peer-reviewed literature and 5 autopsy examples that illustrate common age-related neuropathologies, including CARTS, and emphasize the importance of distinguishing CARTS from late-onset frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology and from advanced Alzheimer disease with TDP-43 pathology. - In advanced old age, the substrates of cognitive impairment are often multifactorial. This article demonstrates common and frequently comorbid neuropathologic substrates of cognitive impairment in the older population, including CARTS, to aid those practicing in this area of pathology.

  18. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure: Adherence, exercise capacity, inflammation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycerol, free fatty acids, HbA1c), inflammation and endothelial function (hsCRP, orosomucoid, interleukin 6, TNF-alpha, urine-orosomucoid and -albumin/creatinin), lipid metabolism, NT-proBNP or other regulatory hormones (cortisol, epinephrine and IGF-1......). There were no changes in quality of life. Conclusions. The effect of exercise training in these older CHF-patients was not as impressive as reported in younger and more selected patients. More studies on the efficiency of exercise training that reflect the age- and co-morbidity of the majority of CHF...

  19. How inflammation underlies physical and organ function in acutely admitted older medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Petersen, Janne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether systemic inflammation in acutely admitted older medical patients (age >65 years) is associated with physical performance and organ dysfunction. Organ dysfunction´s association with physical performance, and whether these associations are mediated by systemic...... inflammation was assessed by suPAR, TNFα, and IL-6. Associations were investigated by regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, cognitive impairment, CRP, and VitalPAC Modified Early Warning Score. RESULTS: A total of 369 patients were evaluated. In adjusted analyses, suPAR and TNFα was associated with both...

  20. Emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rated practice skills when caring for older patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Helen; Bennett, Paul N; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    Older adults are high users of emergency department services and their care requirements can present challenges for emergency nurses. Although clinical outcomes for older patients improve when they are cared for by nurses with specialist training, emergency nurses' knowledge and self-assessment of care for older patients is poorly understood. To assess emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rating of practice when caring for older patients. A cross-sectional self-report survey of emergency nurses (n=101) in Melbourne, Australia. Mean scores were 12.7 (SD 2.66) for the 25-item knowledge of older persons questionnaire, and 9.04 (SD 1.80) for the 15-item gerontic health related questions. Scores were unaffected by years of experience as a registered nurse or emergency nurse. More than 80% of nurses rated themselves as 'very good' or 'good' in assessing pain (94.9%), identifying delirium (87.8%), and identifying dementia (82.8%). Areas with a 'poor' ratings were identifying depression (46.5%), assessing polypharmacy (46.5%) and assessing nutrition (37.8%). There was variation in knowledge and self-rating of practice related to care of older patients. The relationship between knowledge and self-ratings of practice in relation to actual emergency nursing care of older people and patient outcomes warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and overlap of Disease Management Program diseases in older hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne; Sivertsen, Ditte Maria

    2017-01-01

    Many countries, like Denmark, have tailored Disease Management Programs (DMPs) based on patients having single chronic diseases [defined institutionally as "program diseases" (PDs)], which can complicate treatment for those with multiple chronic diseases. The aims of this study were (a) to assess...... the prevalence and overlap among acutely hospitalized older medical patients of PDs defined by the DMPs, and (b) to examine transitions between different departments during hospitalization and mortality and readmission within two time intervals among patients with the different PDs. We conducted a registry study...... of 4649 acutely hospitalized medical patients ≥65 years admitted to Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark, in 2012, and divided patients into six PD groups (type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disease, dementia and cancer), each...

  2. Targeting, Monitoring and Effect of Oral Iron Therapy on Haemoglobin Levels in Older Patients Discharged to Primary Care from Inpatient Rehabilitation: A Cohort Study Using Routinely Collected Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Zach; Hands, Katherine J; Witham, Miles D

    2016-08-01

    Oral iron is commonly prescribed to older patients with suspected or confirmed iron-deficiency anaemia; however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of oral iron therapy in the real world in this population. We therefore determined the prevalence of iron deficiency in older people prescribed oral iron, examined the response mounted to therapy and ascertained predictors of response to oral iron. We analysed a routinely collected, linked dataset from older patients who had undergone inpatient rehabilitation between 1999 and 2011. An initial analysis examined patients within this cohort who were prescribed iron after rehabilitation and derived three groups based upon their ferritin and transferrin indices: probably, possibly and not iron deficient. A second analysis compared pre- and post-treatment haemoglobin to determine the degree of response to iron therapy across each category of deficiency. Finally, patient demographics, linked biochemistry data and comorbid disease based on International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) codes from previous hospital admissions were used in regression modelling to evaluate factors affecting response to therapy. A total of 490 patients were prescribed oral iron within 90 days of rehabilitation discharge. Of these, 413 (84 %) had iron indices performed; 94 (23 %) were possibly deficient, 224 (54 %) were probably deficient, and 95 (23 %) were not deficient. Of the 490 patients, 360 had both pre- and post-treatment haemoglobin data and iron indices; probably deficient patients mounted a slightly greater response to oral iron (17 vs. 12 g/L for not deficient; p < 0.05). Only pre-treatment haemoglobin, mean cell volume and lower gastrointestinal pathology were significant predictors of a response to oral iron therapy. Notably, acid-suppressant use was not a predictor of response. We conclude that many older patients are exposed to oral iron without good evidence of either iron deficiency or a significant response to

  3. Tranexamic acid administration to older patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty conserves hemoglobin and reduces blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Beheiry, Hossam; Lubberdink, Ashley; Clements, Nigel; Dihllon, Kiran; Sharma, Vicky

    2018-06-01

    Tranexamic acid effects in older people are difficult to predict. This study investigated the following research questions: 1) Is tranexamic acid effective in older patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA)? and 2) Is there a difference in the effect of tranexamic acid between younger and older patients? This was a 2-phase retrospective matched-pair study of patients who underwent THA in 2007-2013. All procedures were performed by surgeons with at least 10 years' experience as senior consultant. In the first phase, 58 patients aged 65 years or more who received tranexamic acid were matched 1:1 with patients who did not receive tranexamic acid for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification and body mass index. In the second phase, 58 patients aged 65 years or more who received tranexamic acid were matched 1:1 with patients less than 65 years of age who received tranexamic acid for sex, ASA classification and body mass index. The primary outcome measures were percent maximum decrease in hemoglobin level and estimated blood loss after surgery. In the first phase, patients who received tranexamic acid conserved postoperative hemoglobin by a mean of 10.26 g/L (standard deviation [SD] 9.89 g/L) compared to the control group ( p Tranexamic acid reduced the postoperative decrease in hemoglobin level and blood loss in older patients. Moreover, the significant hemoglobin-sparing effect of tranexamic acid in older patients was similar to that observed in younger patients.

  4. 77 FR 42736 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... safety problems. The Patient Safety Act and Patient Safety Rule establish a framework by which doctors... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Common Formats... formats, specified by AHRQ, that allow health care providers to collect and submit standardized...

  5. Loss of Retinal Function and Pigment Epithelium Changes in a Patient with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Halborg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID has only scarcely been associated with ocular symptoms and rarely with retinal disease. In this case we describe a patient with distinct morphological and functional alterations in the retina. The patient presents with characteristic changes in retinal pigment epithelium, autofluorescence, and electrophysiology.

  6. 76 FR 67456 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety Act (at 42 U.S.C... Formats in order to facilitate standardized data collection and improve the safety and quality of health... conjunction with an interagency Federal Patient Safety Work Group (PSWG), revises and refines the Common...

  7. Encounters for common illnesses in general practice increased in obese patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Lerniengre, M.B.T.; Reenen-Schimmel, van A.H.; Bor, J.H.J.; Bakx, J.C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Weel, van C.; Binsbergen, van J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Obese patients are known to have more chronic medical conditions. Objective. To compare the frequency of encounter for episodes of the 10 most common illnesses in general practice between obese and non-overweight patients. Methods. Data were derived from the Continuous Morbidity

  8. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M. Schambra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC, or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. Though most TMS measures have sufficient reliability in particular contexts, work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed.

  9. Care managers' views on death and caring for older cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Miho; Kanai, Emi; Kitagawa, Akiko; Hattori, Keiko

    2013-12-01

    Care managers (CMs) have an important role in coordinating care for cancer patients who are in the end-of-life stage; however, little is known about their views of death and their experiences while caring for older cancer patients. This study was conducted to examine CMs' views of death and caring for older cancer patients in a home care setting in Japan. Convenience sampling was undertaken, and 35 offices from 43 approached services agreed to participate. The final valid sample included responses from 136 CMs (90.7%). Most CMs, including nurses, care workers, home helpers, and social workers in home care settings, experienced difficulty in managing the care of cancer patients in the end-of-life stage. Respondents reported a wide array of experiences with end-of-life care, care management, and seminar attendance, and their ages and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scores were associated factors. Moreover, multiple regression analysis indicated that better attitudes toward caring for the dying were positively associated with seminar attendance. These results suggest that CMs need education about palliative and end-of-life care in order to promote good home care for cancer patients.

  10. Home Enteral Nutrition therapy: Difficulties, satisfactions and support needs of caregivers assisting older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukic P, Nikolina; Gagliardi, Cristina; Fagnani, Donata; Venturini, Claudia; Orlandoni, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to comprehend and describe the views, experiences and adaptations of caregivers who assist older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition. The objective was to gather empirical evidence to improve the delivery of Home Enteral Nutrition for old patients taking into account the caregivers' support needs. A qualitative methodology with focus groups as data collection method was used to collect the testimonies of 30 informal and formal caregivers of older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition by the Clinical Nutrition Service of INRCA (Ancona) during 2014. Quantitative methodology was used to collect socio-demographic data. Partially modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist" was used to identify training needs. The constant comparison method was used to code and categorize data and to develop themes of focus groups. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize questionnaires. Five main themes were identified from focus groups: acceptance of the therapy, skill acquisition process, need for psychological and practical support at home from healthcare professionals, lifestyle adaptation, affirmation of life and family. All caregivers testified the initial fear and refusal to manage the nutrition pump and the therapy. They expressed the need to be trained gradually, starting during a patient's hospitalization, and continuing in the community. With reference to their overall QoL, it emerged that informal caregivers suffered mostly from the reduction of their free time while formal caregivers suffered social isolation and psychological burden. For both groups the monthly home visit was the most important element of the HEN service. Informal caregivers highlighted the importance of having their loved ones at home. Unsatisfied training needs were identified by the modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist". This qualitative study underlined the challenges and adaptations of

  11. The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartgerink (Jacqueline); J.M. Cramm (Jane); T.J.E.M. Bakker (Ton); A.M. van Eijsden (A.); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Background: Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Design: This cross-sectional

  12. Does progressive resistance strength training as additional training have any measured effect on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Andersen, Christina W.; Pedersen, Sigrid F

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of progressive resistance strength training as additional training measured on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients. DESIGN: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Geriatric Rehabilitation in university hospital...

  13. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration; a preferential pathway for elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    T.E. Platt; K. Smith; S. Sinha; M. Nixon; G. Srinivas; N. Johnson; S. Andrews

    2018-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) has emerged as a recommended alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the management of choledocholithiasis. However, its use in the elderly has been limited, and evidence of its safety and efficacy in these patients is yet to be established. This study describes our experience of LCBDE in elderly patients, analysing the safety and efficacy of this technique in comparison to younger patients. Methods...

  14. Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Quality of Care Among Older Adults According to Activity Limitation Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R.; de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Hennessy, Sean; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Streim, Joel E.; Xie, Dawei; Pezzin, Liliana E.; Kwong, Pui L.; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether patient satisfaction and perceived quality of medical care was related to stages of activity limitations among older adults. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) for calendar years 2001-2011. PARTICIPANTS A population-based sample (n= 42,584) of persons 65 years of age and older living in the community. INTERVENTIONS Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) MCBS questions were categorized under 5 patient satisfaction and perceived quality dimensions: care coordination and quality, access barriers, technical skills of primary care physicians, interpersonal skills of primary care physicians, and quality of information provided by primary care physicians. Persons were classified into a stage of activity limitation (0-IV) derived from self-reported difficulty levels performing activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). RESULTS Compared to older beneficiaries with no limitations at ADL Stage 0, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) for Stage I (mild) to Stage III (severe) for satisfaction with care coordination and quality ranged from OR = 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80-0.92) to OR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70-0.89). Compared to ADL Stage 0, satisfaction with access barriers ranged from OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76-0.87) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.67 (95% CI: 0.59-0.76) at Stage III (severe). Similarly, compared to older beneficiaries at ADL Stage 0, perceived quality of the technical skills of their primary care physician ranged from OR = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.82-0.94) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72-0.91) at Stage III (severe). CONCLUSIONS Medicare beneficiaries at higher stages of activity limitation although not necessarily the highest stage of activity limitation reported less satisfaction with medical care. PMID:26119464

  15. The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hartgerink, Jacqueline; Cramm, Jane; Bakker, Ton; Eijsden, A.; Mackenbach, Johan; Nieboer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Background: Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Design: This cross-sectional study was part of a larger evaluation study examining the opportunity to prevent loss of function in older patients due to hospitalization in the Netherlands. Methods: This study was performed in sp...

  16. The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients

    OpenAIRE

    J.M. Hartgerink; J.M. Cramm; T.J.E.M. Bakker; A.M. van Eijsden; J.P. Mackenbach; A.P. Nieboer

    2013-01-01

    Aim To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Background Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Design This cross-sectional study was part of a larger evaluation study examining the opportunity to prevent loss of function in older patients due to hospitalization in the Netherlands. Methods This study was performed in spring 2010 among ...

  17. Rheumatologic complications in a cohort of 227 patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, G; Kiaee, F; Hedayat, E; Yazdani, R; Dolatshahi, E; Alinia, T; Sharifi, L; Mohammadi, H; Kavosi, H; Jadidi-Niaragh, F; Ziaee, V; Abolhassani, H; Aghamohammadi, A

    2018-05-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent symptomatic type of human primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Clinically, CVID is characterized by increased susceptibility to infections and a wide variety of autoimmune and rheumatologic disorders. All patients with CVID registered in Iranian PID Registry (IPIDR) were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. We investigated the frequency of rheumatologic diseases and its association with immunological and clinical phenotypes in patients with CVID. A total of 227 patients with CVID were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of rheumatologic disorders was 10.1% with a higher frequency in women than men. Most common rheumatologic manifestations were juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed by juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA) and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis (UIA). Septic arthritis in patients with CVID with a history of RA and JIA was higher than patients without rheumatologic complication. Patients with CVID with a history of autoimmunity (both rheumatologic and non-rheumatologic autoimmunity) had lower regulatory T cells counts in comparison with patients without autoimmune disorders. There was an association between defect in specific antibody responses and negative serologic test results in patients with rheumatologic manifestations. JIA, RA, JSpA and UIA are the most frequent rheumatologic disorders in patients with CVID. Due to antibody deficiency, serologic tests may be negative in these patients. Therefore, these conditions pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for immunologists and rheumatologists in charge of the care for these patients. © 2018 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  18. A review of therapeutic results in oral cancer patients 70 years or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kiminari; Kikuchi, Yuko; Koseki, Yonoshin

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-four patients aged 70 years or older were treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity between 1980 and 1990 at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Twenty-six patients received primary external irradiation with relatively low dose (30 Gy) combined with peplomycin. According to the T category, the 5-year survival rate was 49% for T1 and T2 and 35% for T3 and T4. Based on the treatment modality, the 5-year survival rate was 59% for radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy plus surgical treatment, 43% for radiotherapy plus chemotherapy, and 38% for radiotherapy alone. The combined use of peplomycin with external irradiation (30 Gy) was found very effective as an initial trial for patients aged 70 years or older in view of survival time. Therefore, a small dose (30 Gy) of external irradiation combined with peplomycin would also be significantly useful for patients who refuse surgery or have inoperable carcinoma. (J.P.N.)

  19. Older patients can accurately recall their preoperative health status six weeks following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie; Bryant, Dianne; MacDonald, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    In clinical trials, use of patient recall data would be beneficial when the collection of baseline data is impossible, such as in trauma situations. We investigated the ability of older patients to accurately recall their preoperative quality of life, function, and general health status at six weeks following total hip arthroplasty. We randomized consecutive patients who were fifty-five years of age or older into two groups. At each assessment, patients completed self-report questionnaires (at four weeks preoperatively, on the day of surgery, and at six weeks and three months postoperatively for Group 1 and at six weeks and three months postoperatively for Group 2). At six weeks postoperatively, all patients completed the questionnaires on the basis of their recollection of their preoperative health status. We evaluated the validity and reliability of recall ratings, the degree of error in recall ratings, and the effects of the use of recall data on power and sample size requirements. A total of 174 patients (mean age, seventy-one years) who were undergoing either primary or revision total hip arthroplasty were randomized and included in the analysis (118 patients were in Group 1 and fifty-six were in Group 2). Agreement between actual and recalled data was excellent for disease-specific questionnaires (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.86, 0.87, and 0.88) and moderate for generic health measures (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.48, 0.58, and 0.60). Increased error associated with recalled ratings compared with actual ratings necessitates minimal increases in sample size or results in small decreases in power. Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty can accurately recall their preoperative health status at six weeks postoperatively.

  20. eHealth Literacy: Patient Engagement in Identifying Strategies to Encourage Use of Patient Portals Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Ulep, Robin; Luo, Qingyang

    2017-12-01

    Innovations in chronic disease management are growing rapidly as advancements in technology broaden the scope of tools. Older adults are less likely to be willing or able to use patient portals or smartphone apps for health-related tasks. The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of older adults (ages ≥50) with hypertension or diabetes to examine relationships between portal usage, interest in health-tracking tools, and eHealth literacy, and to solicit practical solutions to encourage technology adoption. Among 247 patients surveyed in a large integrated delivery health system between August 2015 and January 2016, eHealth literacy was positively associated with portal usage (OR [95% CI]: 1.3 [1.2-1.5]) and interest in health-tracking tools (1.2 [1.1-1.3]). Portal users compared to nonusers (N = 137 vs.110) had higher rates of interest in using websites/smartphone apps to track blood pressure (55% vs. 36%), weight (53% vs. 35%), exercise (53% vs. 32%), or medication (46% vs 33%, all P marketing initiatives that capture patient stories demonstrating real-life applications of what patients can do with digital technology, how to use it, and why it may be useful. Health systems also must screen for eHealth literacy, provide training, promote proxy users, and institute quality assurance that ensures patients' experiences will not vary across the system.

  1. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Insomnia and Other Common Symptoms Among Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Lisa; Achor, Sara; Allen, Betty; Bauchmire, Nicole; Dunnington, Danielle; Klisovic, Rebecca; Naber, Steven; Roblee, Kirsten; Samczak, Angela; Tomlinson-Pinkham, Kelly; Chipps, Esther

    2017-07-01

    To determine if the use of aromatherapy improves insomnia and other common symptoms in hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. A randomized, crossover, washout trial. An inpatient acute leukemia unit at the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute of the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University in Columbus. 50 patients who were newly diagnosed with acute leukemia and hospitalized to receive their initial four weeks of intensive induction chemotherapy. Patients were offered a choice of three scents to be used during the trial: lavender, peppermint, or chamomile. Each patient was randomized to receive either the chosen aromatherapy intervention or a placebo intervention during alternate weeks, with a washout period in between. Sleep quality and other common symptoms were measured. Aromatherapy, sleep, insomnia, pain, tiredness, drowsiness, nausea, lack of appetite, shortness of breath, depression, anxiety, and well-being. Most patients reported poor quality sleep at baseline, but aromatherapy had a statistically significant positive impact. Improvements were noted in tiredness, drowsiness, lack of appetite, depression, anxiety, and well-being because of aromatherapy. Aromatherapy is a viable intervention for improving insomnia and other symptoms commonly experienced by patients with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses can employ aromatherapy safely and inexpensively, and with minimal training, as an effective tool in decreasing many symptoms that plague patients with leukemia. Patients can exercise a greater sense of control over their treatment environments through the use of aromatherapy.

  2. A quadriplegic patient's cholescintigraphic findings: delayed gallbladder visualization and common bile duct dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, W. J.; Magoun, S.; Lu, G.

    1996-01-01

    A Tc-99m DISIDA cholescintigraphic study of a 37-year-old patient with a 20-year history of quadriplegia demonstrated dilation of the common bile duct and delayed gallbladder visualization. A concurrent sonographic study showed an enlarged gallbladder with stones and dilation of the common bile duct. These findings were proved by autopsy. Quadriplegia secondary to a high level of spinal cord injury may result in gallbladder dysfunction. Images Figure PMID:8776068

  3. The development, implementation and evaluation of a transitional care programme to improve outcomes of frail older patients after hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heim, Noor; Rolden, Herbert; van Fenema, Esther M

    2016-01-01

    samples. CONCLUSIONS: by involving stakeholders in designing and developing the transitional care programme, commitment of healthcare providers was secured. Feasible innovations in integrated transitional care for frail older patients after hospitalisation were sustainably implemented from within......BACKGROUND: fragmented healthcare systems are poorly suited to treat the increasing number of older patients with multimorbidity. OBJECTIVE: to report on the development, implementation and evaluation of a regional transitional care programme, aimed at improving the recovery rate of frail...... hospitalised older patients. METHODS: the programme was drafted in co-creation with organisations representing older adults, care providers and knowledge institutes. Conducting an action research project, the incidence of adverse outcomes within 3 months after hospital admission, and long-term care expenses...

  4. Negotiating complementary and alternative medicine use in primary care visits with older patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Yadegar, Vivien; Tarn, Derjung M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To empirically investigate the ways in which patients and providers discuss Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatment in primary care visits. Methods Audio recordings from visits between 256 adult patients aged 50 years and older and 28 primary care physicians were transcribed and analyzed using discourse analysis, an empirical sociolinguistic methodology focusing on how language is used to negotiate meaning. Results Discussion about CAM occurred 128 times in 82 of 256 visits (32.0%). The most frequently discussed CAM modalities were non-vitamin, non-mineral supplements and massage. Three physician–patient interactions were analyzed turn-by-turn to demonstrate negotiations about CAM use. Patients raised CAM discussions to seek physician expertise about treatments, and physicians adopted a range of responses along a continuum that included encouragement, neutrality, and discouragement. Despite differential knowledge about CAM treatments, physicians helped patients assess the risks and benefits of CAM treatments and made recommendations based on patient preferences for treatment. Conclusion Regardless of a physician's stance or knowledge about CAM, she or he can help patients negotiate CAM treatment decisions. Practice implications Providers do not have to possess extensive knowledge about specific CAM treatments to have meaningful discussions with patients and to give patients a framework for evaluating CAM treatment use. PMID:22483672

  5. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Advanced Common Solid Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, I. E.; Andersen, M. S.; Gross, C. P.; Krumholz, H. M.; Gross, C. P.; Krumholz, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    There is uncertainty about risk heterogeneity for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in older patients with advanced cancer and whether patients can be stratified according to VTE risk. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the linked Medicare-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry in older patients with advanced cancer of lung, breast, colon, prostate, or pancreas diagnosed between 1995-1999. We used survival analysis with demographics, co morbidities, and tumor characteristics/treatment as independent variables. Outcome was VTE diagnosed at least one month after cancer diagnosis. VTE rate was highest in the first year (3.4%). Compared to prostate cancer (1.4 VTEs/100 person-years), there was marked variability in VTE risk (hazard ratio (HR) for male-colon cancer 3.73 (95% CI 2.1-6.62), female-colon cancer HR 6.6 (3.83-11.38), up to female-pancreas cancer HR 21.57 (12.21-38.09). Stage IV cancer and chemotherapy resulted in higher risk (HRs 1.75 (1.44-2.12) and 1.31 (1.0-1.57), resp.). Stratifying the cohort by cancer type and stage using recursive partitioning analysis yielded five groups of VTE rates (non localized prostate cancer 1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, to non localized pancreatic cancer 17.4 VTEs/100 patient-years). In a high-risk population with advanced cancer, substantial variability in VTE risk exists, with notable differences according to cancer type and stage.

  6. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Advanced Common Solid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac E. Hall

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is uncertainty about risk heterogeneity for venous thromboembolism (VTE in older patients with advanced cancer and whether patients can be stratified according to VTE risk. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the linked Medicare-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry in older patients with advanced cancer of lung, breast, colon, prostate, or pancreas diagnosed between 1995–1999. We used survival analysis with demographics, comorbidities, and tumor characteristics/treatment as independent variables. Outcome was VTE diagnosed at least one month after cancer diagnosis. VTE rate was highest in the first year (3.4%. Compared to prostate cancer (1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, there was marked variability in VTE risk (hazard ratio (HR for male-colon cancer 3.73 (95% CI 2.1–6.62, female-colon cancer HR 6.6 (3.83–11.38, up to female-pancreas cancer HR 21.57 (12.21–38.09. Stage IV cancer and chemotherapy resulted in higher risk (HRs 1.75 (1.44–2.12 and 1.31 (1.0–1.57, resp.. Stratifying the cohort by cancer type and stage using recursive partitioning analysis yielded five groups of VTE rates (nonlocalized prostate cancer 1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, to nonlocalized pancreatic cancer 17.4 VTEs/100 patient-years. In a high-risk population with advanced cancer, substantial variability in VTE risk exists, with notable differences according to cancer type and stage.

  7. A review of drug-drug interactions in older HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Aarthi; Nguyen, Nancy N; Maiton, Kimberly; Holodniy, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The number of older HIV-infected people is growing due to increasing life expectancies resulting from the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Both HIV and aging increase the risk of other comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and some malignancies, leading to greater challenges in managing HIV with other conditions. This results in complex medication regimens with the potential for significant drug-drug interactions and increased morbidity and mortality. Area covered: We review the metabolic pathways of ART and other medications used to treat medical co-morbidities, highlight potential areas of concern for drug-drug interactions, and where feasible, suggest alternative approaches for treating these conditions as suggested from national guidelines or articles published in the English language. Expert commentary: There is limited evidence-based data on ART drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the older HIV-infected population. Choosing and maintaining effective ART regimens for older adults requires consideration of side effect profile, individual comorbidities, interactions with concurrent prescriptions and non-prescription medications and supplements, dietary patterns with respect to dosing, pill burden and ease of dosing, cost and affordability, patient preferences, social situation, and ART resistance history. Practitioners must remain vigilant for potential drug interactions and intervene when there is a potential for harm.

  8. Mitochondrial common deletion is elevated in blood of breast cancer patients mediated by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hezhongrong; Chen, Guorong; He, Jing; Zhang, Fengjiao; Li, Ming; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhou, Huaibin; Lyu, Jianxin; Bai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    The 4977 bp common deletion is one of the most frequently observed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in human tissues and has been implicated in various human cancer types. It is generally believed that continuous generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a major underlying mechanism for generation of such mtDNA deletions while antioxidant systems, including Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), mitigating the deleterious effects of ROS. However, the clinical significance of this common deletion remains to be explored. A comprehensive investigation on occurrence and accumulation of the common deletion and mtDNA copy number was carried out in breast carcinoma (BC) patients, benign breast disease (BBD) patients and age-matched healthy donors in our study. Meanwhile, the representative oxidative (ROS production, mtDNA and lipid oxidative damage) and anti-oxidative features (MnSOD expression level and variation) in blood samples from these groups were also analyzed. We found that the mtDNA common deletion is much more likely to be detected in BC patients at relatively high levels while the mtDNA content is lower. This alteration has been associated with a higher MnSOD level and higher oxidative damages in both BC and BBD patients. Our results indicate that the mtDNA common deletion in blood may serve a biomarker for the breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of dysphagia in older patients evaluated at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocdor, Pelin; Siegel, Eric R; Giese, Rachel; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2015-02-01

    To determine laryngoscopic and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) findings in geriatric patients with dysphagia; to evaluate management. Retrospective chart review. Patients over 65 years old complaining of dysphagia, seen at a tertiary laryngology clinic, were included. Head and neck cancer and stroke patients were excluded. Demographics, laryngoscopic findings, swallowing studies, and treatment modalities were reviewed. Sixty-five patients were included. Mean age was 75 years old (range = 66-97) with female predominance of 67.6%. Weight loss was seen in 9.2% of the patients. Whereas 52.3% of the patients complained of solid food dysphagia, 53.8% were choking on food. On laryngoscopy, 15.3% of the patients had pooling in the pyriform sinuses, 30.7% had glottic gap, 18.4% had vocal fold immobility, and 3% had hypomobility. VFSS showed that 38.4% of the patients had pharyngoesophageal dysphagia, 20% had oropharyngeal dysphagia, 20% had pharyngeal dysphagia, and 20% had a normal study. In addition, 41.5% of the patients showed laryngeal penetration and 18.4% showed aspiration. Surgical intervention was employed in 29.2% of the patients in the form of botulinum toxin injection, esophageal dilatation, cricopharyngeal myotomy, vocal fold injection, diverticulectomy, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Whereas 21.5% of the patients received swallowing therapy, 61.5% underwent diet modification. As a result, 80% of the patients needed some type of treatment. Swallowing problems in older patients are not uncommon. The clinician needs to be diligent to inquire about dysphagia because a large number of these patients will require treatment. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Cancer treatment decision-making processes for older patients with complex needs: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jackie; Hughes, Jane; Farrington, Naomi; Richardson, Alison

    2015-12-14

    Although older people can experience complex health and social care needs alongside a primary cancer diagnosis, little is understood about how cancer treatment decisions are made for this population. This study aimed to investigate how cancer treatment decisions are formulated for older people with complex health and social care needs and the factors that shape these processes. Qualitative study involving semistructured interviews and non-participant observations. Framework approach used for data analysis. Breast and colorectal cancer services in five English NHS hospital trusts. Interviews: purposive sample of 22 clinicians directly involved in a face-to-face clinical role with patients regarding cancer treatment and care, maximising variation across clinical roles, tumour types and trusts. purposive sample of five cancer multidisciplinary meetings, maximising variation across location, team size and tumour type. The initial stages of cancer treatment decision-making are team-based, medically dominated and focused on the cancer. For patients with complex health and social care needs that extend beyond cancer pathology, later and less visible stages in the decision-making process are more haphazard and may result in less effective and workable treatment plans, as individual clinicians struggle to devise and deliver these plans without breaching time-based targets. Service targets that focus resources solely on the presenting disease can disadvantage older patients with complex health and social care needs that extend beyond this primary diagnosis. Care should be taken to ensure time-based targets do not disincentivise thorough and timely assessment that can lead to the formulation of treatment plans tailored to individual needs and circumstances. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. The Impact of Alternative Payment in Chronically Ill and Older Patients in the Patient-centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Salzberg, Claudia; Bitton, Asaf; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Franz, Cal; Shaykevich, Shimon; Newmark, Lisa P; Kwatra, Japneet; Bates, David W

    2017-05-01

    Patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has gained prominence as a promising model to encourage improved primary care delivery. There is a paucity of studies that evaluate the impact of payment models in the PCMH. We sought to examine whether coupling coordinated, team-based care transformation plan with a novel reimbursement model affects outcomes related to expenditures and utilization. Interrupted time-series model with a difference-in-differences approach to assess differences between intervention and control groups, across time periods attributable to PCMH transformation and/or payment change. Although results were modest and mixed overall, PCMH with payment reform is associated with a reduction of $1.04 (P=0.0347) per member per month (PMPM) in pharmacy expenditures. Patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and coronary atherosclerosis enrolled in PCMH without payment reform experienced reductions in emergency department visits of 2.16 (Ppayment reform. Patients 65 and older enrolled in PMCH without payment reform experienced reductions in pharmacy expenditures $2.35 (P=0.0077) PMPM with a parallel reduction in pharmacy standardized cost of $2.81 (P=0.0174) PMPM indicative of a reduction in the intensity of drug utilization. We conclude that PCMH implementation coupled with an innovative payment arrangement generated mixed results with modest improvements with respect to pharmacy expenditures, but no overall financial improvement. However, we did see improvement within specific groups, especially older patients and those with chronic conditions.

  12. Pain and psychological well-being of older persons living in nursing homes: an exploratory study in planning patient-centred intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi; Leung, Rincy; Ho, Suki

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report on a study to examine the pain situation, the use of oral analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies and the psychological well-being of older patients living in nursing homes; the relationships between pain and psychological well-being were also explored. Pain is common among older adults world-wide, and tends to be under-treated. Indeed, the high prevalence of pain may further hinder the fulfilment of psychological needs in a Maslow hierarchy of needs model. It was a quantitative cross-sectional study; older adults from six nursing homes were invited to join the study in 2007-2009, with a response rate of 100%. Pain was measured using the Geriatric Pain Assessment, happiness using the Subjective Happiness Scale, life satisfaction using the Life Satisfaction Index - A Form, loneliness using the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale. A convenience sample of 302 older patients (213 females and 89 males aged from 60 to 101, mean age of 84·99) joined the study. The majority of them had experienced pain in the previous 3 months, with a pain intensity of 4·51 on a 10-point scale. Pain sites were mainly the knee, back, shoulder and musculoskeletal areas. Only 50% of them took oral analgesics, and 70% used non-pharmacological measures for pain relief. The pain group reported significantly more loneliness and depression when compared with their no-pain counterparts. As the number of older patients increases, so does the need for alternative accommodation; thus, pain management education is urgently needed for staff and nursing home residents. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Structural knee joint pathology in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have challenged the tenet that mechanical symptoms of the knee (i.e. the sensation of catching or locking) are caused by degenerative meniscal tears per se and relieved by surgery. We explored the potential associations between meniscal and other knee joint pathologies...... identified at meniscal surgery with the presence of patient-reported mechanical symptoms. Methods: This study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). Patients were consecutively recruited from February 2013...... score (KOOS), together with information on previous meniscal surgery. At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about specific meniscal pathology (tear location, depth, type, length, meniscal tissue quality and circumferential and radial location) and other structural knee pathologies...

  14. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah L. Shever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN hours per patient day (HPPD and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident.

  15. Optimised anaesthesia to reduce post operative cognitive decline (POCD in older patients undergoing elective surgery, a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Ballard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study determined the one year incidence of post operative cognitive decline (POCD and evaluated the effectiveness of an intra-operative anaesthetic intervention in reducing post-operative cognitive impairment in older adults (over 60 years of age undergoing elective orthopaedic or abdominal surgery. METHODS AND TRIAL DESIGN: The design was a prospective cohort study with a nested randomised, controlled intervention trial, using intra-operative BiSpectral index and cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring to enable optimisation of anaesthesia depth and cerebral oxygen saturation in older adults undergoing surgery. RESULTS: In the 52 week prospective cohort study (192 surgical patients and 138 controls, mild (χ(2 = 17.9 p<0.0001, moderate (χ(2 = 7.8 p = 0.005 and severe (χ(2 = 5.1 p = 0.02 POCD were all significantly higher after 52 weeks in the surgical patients than among the age matched controls. In the nested RCT, 81 patients were randomized, 73 contributing to the data analysis (34 intervention, 39 control. In the intervention group mild POCD was significantly reduced at 1, 12 and 52 weeks (Fisher's Exact Test p = 0.018, χ(2 = 5.1 p = 0.02 and χ(2 = 5.9 p = 0.015, and moderate POCD was reduced at 1 and 52 weeks (χ(2 = 4.4 p = 0·037 and χ(2 = 5.4 p = 0.02. In addition there was significant improvement in reaction time at all time-points (Vigilance Reaction Time MWU Z = -2.1 p = 0.03, MWU Z = -2.7 p = 0.004, MWU Z = -3.0 p = 0.005, in MMSE at one and 52 weeks (MWU Z = -2.9 p = 0.003, MWU Z = -3.3 p = 0.001, and in executive function at 12 and 52 weeks (Trail Making MWU Z = -2.4 p = .0.018, MWU Z = -2.4 p = 0.019. CONCLUSION: POCD is common and persistent in older adults following surgery. The results of the nested RCT indicate the potential benefits of intra-operative monitoring of anaesthetic depth and cerebral oxygenation as a pragmatic intervention to reduce post-operative cognitive impairment. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  16. Pediatric patients with common variable immunodeficiency: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadinejad, P; Aghamohammadi, A; Abolhassani, H; Sadaghiani, M S; Abdollahzade, S; Sadeghi, B; Soheili, H; Tavassoli, M; Fathi, S M; Tavakol, M; Behniafard, N; Darabi, B; Pourhamdi, S; Rezaei, N

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common form of symptomatic primary immunodeficiency disease. It is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, increased predisposition to infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical and immunological features of a group of pediatric patients with CVID. The study population comprised 69 individuals with CVID diagnosed during childhood. The patients were followed up for a mean (SD) period of 5.2 (4.3) years. The mean diagnostic delay was 4.4 (3.6) years, which was significantly lower in patients who were diagnosed recently. Children were classified according to 5 clinical phenotypes: infections only (n=39), polyclonal lymphocytic infiltration (n=17), autoimmunity (n=12), malignancy (n=7), and enteropathy (n=3). Postdiagnosis survival (10-year) was 71%. The high percentages of pediatric patients with CVID in Iran may be due to the considerable prevalence of parental consanguinity in the region and an underlying genetic background.

  17. Validating administrative data for the detection of adverse events in older hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackroyd-Stolarz S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz,1,2 Susan K Bowles,3–5 Lorri Giffin6 1Performance Excellence Portfolio, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 3Geriatric Medicine, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4College of Pharmacy and Division of Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 5Department of Pharmacy at Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 6South Shore Family Health, Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Canada Abstract: Older hospitalized patients are at risk of experiencing adverse events including, but not limited to, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events. A significant challenge in monitoring and managing adverse events is lack of readily accessible information on their occurrence. Purpose: The objective of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to validate diagnostic codes for pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events found in routinely collected administrative hospitalization data. Methods: All patients 65 years of age or older discharged between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011 from a provincial academic health sciences center in Canada were eligible for inclusion in the validation study. For each of the three types of adverse events, a random sample of 50 patients whose records were positive and 50 patients whose records were not positive for an adverse event was sought for review in the validation study (n=300 records in total. A structured health record review was performed independently by two health care providers with experience in geriatrics, both of whom were unaware of the patient's status with respect to adverse event coding. A physician reviewed 40 records (20 reviewed by each health care provider to establish interrater agreement. Results: A total of 39 pressure ulcers, 56 fall

  18. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Aizer, Ayal A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Ligon, Keith L.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  19. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Aizer, Ayal A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi [Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Claus, Elizabeth B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Chiocca, E. Antonio [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ligon, Keith L. [Department of Pathology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alexander, Brian M., E-mail: bmalexander@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  20. Psychosocial predictors of depression among older African American patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill B; Deal, Allison M; Moore, Angelo D; Best, Nakia C; Galbraith, Kayoll V; Muss, Hyman

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether psychosocial factors predict depression among older African American patients with cancer. A descriptive correlational study. Outpatient oncology clinic of a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the southeastern United States. African American patients with cancer aged 50-88 years. Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to evaluate differences between patients who were possibly depressed (Geriatric Depression Scale) or not. Multivariate linear regression statistics were used to identify the psychosocial factors that predicted higher depression scores. Education and gender were included as covariates. Religiosity, emotional support, collectivism, perceived stigma, and depression. Participants (N = 77) had a mean age of 61 years (SD = 8.4), and a majority were well-educated, insured, religiously affiliated, and currently in treatment. Participants who were in the lowest income category, not married, or male had higher depression scores. The multivariable model consisting of organized religion, emotional support, collectivism, education, and gender explained 52% (adjusted R2) of the variation in depression scores. Stigma became insignificant in the multivariable model. Psychosocial factors are important predictors of depression. Emotional support and organized religious activities may represent protective factors against depression, whereas collectivism may increase their risk. Nurses need to be particularly aware of the potential psychological strain for patients with collectivist values, experienced stigma, disruptions in church attendance, and lack of emotional support. In addition, the treatment plans for these patients should ensure that family members are knowledgeable about cancer, its treatment, and side effects so they are empowered to meet support needs. Among older African American patients with cancer, emotional support and reassurance from family and friends that they will not abandon them decreases the

  1. Cognitive dysfunction among newly diagnosed older patients with hematological malignancy: frequency, clinical indicators and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiki, Sayo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugano, Koji; Kubota, Yosuke; Imai, Fuminobu; Nishioka, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshinori; Iida, Shinsuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Ishida, Takashi; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Medical staff often overlook or underestimate the presence or severity of cognitive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to clarify the frequency, clinical indicators and predictors of cognitive dysfunction among newly diagnosed older patients with hematologic malignancy receiving first-line chemotherapy. Patients aged 65 years or over with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were consecutively recruited. Cognitive dysfunction was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) twice: before starting chemotherapy (T1) and 1 month later (T2). Participants also underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment at T1. Potential clinical indicators that were associated with cognitive dysfunction were explored via cross-sectional analysis at T1. Predictors of cognitive dysfunction at T2 were also investigated among patients without cognitive dysfunction at T1. A total of 145 participants participated in the study; cognitive dysfunction at T1 was present in 20%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lower educational attainment and poorer instrumental activities of daily living were significant clinical indicators of cognitive dysfunction. Among 99 patients who did not have cognitive dysfunction at T1 and underwent cognitive assessment at T2, 7% developed dysfunction. Subjective perception of difficulty remembering at T1 was the only factor which significantly predicted new-onset cognitive dysfunction at T2. The prevalence rate of cognitive dysfunction was non-negligible among older patients with hematologic malignancy before and immediately after initial chemotherapy. Attention to the clinical indicators and predictors found in this study may provide facilitate the identification of cognitive dysfunction in patients with cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Theory of Mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets-Janssen, M M J; Meesters, P D; Comijs, H C; Eikelenboom, P; Smit, J H; de Haan, L; Beekman, A T F; Stek, M L

    2013-11-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ between older patients with early-onset and late-onset schizophrenia. Theory of Mind abilities were assessed using the Hinting Task in 15 older patients (age 60 years and older) with early-onset paranoid schizophrenia, 15 older patients with late-onset paranoid schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls. ANCOVA was performed to test differences between groups. Analyses were adjusted for level of education. Effect sizes, partial eta squared (ε(2) ), were computed as an indication of the clinical relevance of the findings. Patients with early-onset schizophrenia scored significantly lower on the Hinting Task (mean 16.1; SD 4.3) compared with patients with late-onset schizophrenia (mean 18.6; SD 1.5) and with healthy controls (mean 19.0; SD 1.4). The effect size of this difference was large (ε(2)  = 0.2). These results suggest that ToM functioning may be a protective factor modulating the age at onset of psychosis. Further studies into the relationship between social cognition and onset age of psychosis are warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Kobayashi, Wendy; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher’s exact test and the Mantel–Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75–87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed ≥4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification

  4. Information on actual medication use and drug-related problems in older patients: questionnaire or interview?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeboordse, Floor; Grundeken, Lucienne H; van den Eijkel, Lisanne P; Schellevis, François G; Elders, Petra J M; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2016-04-01

    Information on medication use and drug-related problems is important in the preparation of clinical medication reviews. Critical information can only be provided by patients themselves, but interviewing patients is time-consuming. Alternatively, patient information could be obtained with a questionnaire. In this study the agreement between patient information on medication use and drug-related problems in older patients obtained with a questionnaire was compared with information obtained during an interview. General practice in The Netherlands. A questionnaire was developed to obtain information on actual medication use and drug-related problems. Two patient groups ≥65 years were selected based on general practitioner electronic medical records in nine practices; I. polypharmacy and II. ≥1 predefined general geriatric problems. Eligible patients were asked to complete the questionnaire and were interviewed afterwards. Agreement on information on medication use and drug-related problems collected with the questionnaire and interview was calculated. Ninety-seven patients participated. Of all medications used, 87.6 % (95 % CI 84.7-90.5) was reported identically in the questionnaire and interview. Agreement for the complete medication list was found for 45.4 % (95 % CI 35.8-55.3) of the patients. On drug-related problem level, agreement between questionnaire and interview was 75 %. Agreement tended to be lower in vulnerable patients characterized by ≥4 chronic diseases, ≥10 medications used and low health literacy. Information from a questionnaire showed reasonable agreement compared with interviewing. The patients reported more medications and drug-related problems in the interview than the questionnaire. Taking the limitations into account, a questionnaire seems a suitable tool for medication reviews that may replace an interview for most patients.

  5. Relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes SJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarah J Holmes,1 Stephen C Allen,2,3 Helen C Roberts4,5 1Medicine and Elderly Care, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Winchester, 2Medicine and Geriatrics, The Royal Bournemouth Hospital and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, 3Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, Bournemouth University, Poole, 4Academic Geriatric Medicine, University of Southampton, 5University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Objective: Older people with reduced respiratory muscle strength may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients without known airways disease.Methods: Patients in acute medical wards were recruited who were aged ≥70 years; no history, symptoms, or signs of respiratory disease; Mini Mental State Examination ≥24; willing and able to consent to participate; and able to perform hand grip and forced spirometry. Data including lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate [PEFR], and slow vital capacity [SVC], grip strength, age, weight, and height were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression unadjusted and adjusted (for age, height, and weight.Results: A total of 50 patients (20 men were recruited. Stronger grip strength in men was significantly associated with greater FEV1, but this was attenuated by adjustment for age, height, and weight. Significant positive associations were found in women between grip strength and both PEFR and SVC, both of which remained robust to adjustment.Conclusion: The association between grip strength and PEFR and SVC may reflect stronger patients generating higher intrathoracic pressure at the start of spirometry and pushing harder against thoracic cage recoil at end-expiration. Conversely, patients with

  6. 76 FR 12358 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Common Formats... information regarding the quality and safety of healthcare delivery. The Patient Safety Act (at 42 U.S.C. 299b...: Device or Supply, including Health Information Technology; Fall; Healthcare-Associated Infection...

  7. Utility of sonographic measurement of the common tensor tendon in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hee; Cha, Jang Gyu; Jin, Wook; Kim, Byung Sung; Park, Jai Soung; Lee, Hae Kyung; Hong, Hyun Sook

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate prospectively the utility of sonographic measurements of the common extensor tendon for diagnosing lateral epicondylitis. Forty-eight patients with documented lateral epicondylitis and 63 healthy volunteers were enrolled and underwent ultrasound of the elbow joint. The common extensor tendon overlying the bony landmark was scanned transversely, and the cross-section area and the maximum thickness were measured. Clinical examination was used as the reference standard in the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis. Data from the patient and control groups were compared with established optimal diagnostic criteria for lateral epicondylitis using receiver operating characteristic curves. Qualitative evaluation with grayscale ultrasound was also performed on patients and healthy volunteers. The common extensor tendon was significantly thicker in patients with lateral epicondylitis than in control subjects (p lateral epicondylitis. For qualitative evaluation with gray-scale ultrasound, overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values in the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were 76.5%, 76.2%, and 76.3%, respectively. The quantitative sonographic measurements had an excellent diagnostic performance for lateral epicondylitis, as well as good or excellent interreader agreement. A common extensor tendon cross-section area greater than or equal to 32 mm(2) and a thickness of 4.2 mm correlated well with the presence of lateral epicondylitis. However, further prospective study is necessary to determine whether quantitative ultrasound with these cutoff values can improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis.

  8. Percutaneous Treatment of Common Bile Duct Stones: Results and Complications in 110 Consecutive Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kint, Johan F.; van den Bergh, Janneke E.; van Gelder, Rogier E.; Rauws, Erik A.; Gouma, Dirk J.; van Delden, Otto M.; Laméris, Johan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Choledocholithiasis is a common complication of cholecystolithiasis, occurring in 15-20% of patients who have gallbladder stones. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography is the standard treatment. When this is not possible or not feasible, percutaneous transhepatic stone

  9. Effective doses associated with the common hybrid scans performed in nuclear medicine to adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho Lopez, C.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Martin Vidal, J. F.; Falgas Lacuela, M.; Vercher Conejero, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to outline the effective dose (E) that can be taught in hybrid SPECT-CT scans and PET-CT performed more common in adult patients. E is expressed as the Natural Radiation Equivalent Time (TERN) and consider, for each scan, the percentage of the total dose due to TC.

  10. Patient-ventilator trigger dys-synchrony: a common phenomenon with important implications

    OpenAIRE

    MacIntyre, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Patient-ventilator trigger dys-synchronies are common with the use of assisted forms of mechanical ventilatory support, including non-invasive mechanical ventilatory support (NIV). Future system designs need to address this in order to improve the effectiveness of NIV.

  11. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Dolf; van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany; Delnoij, Diana; van den Berg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This

  12. Do effects of common casemix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D. de; Hoek, L. van der; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Berg, M. van den

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be

  13. Comprehensive Assessment of Compliance with Antimuscarinic Drug Treatment in the Case of Urge Urinary Incontinence of Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosilov, Kirill V; Loparev, Sergey A; Kuzina, Irina G; Shakirova, Olga V; Zhuravskaya, Natalya S; Lobodenko, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the heterogeneous factors affecting the stability of patients older than 60 years in the UI treatment with Antimuscarinics. The prevalence of Urge Incontinence (UI) in older persons reaches 29.3%. The symptoms of urinary incontinence in older people reduce the health related life quality. In 1257 patients over 60 years (857 (68.2%) women - average age 67.8, 400 (31.8%) men - 71.4), who received AM for one year, demographic, socio-economic and health parameters were studied. OABq-SF questionnaires, MOS SF-36, urination diaries, uroflowmetry, income information from the tax offices and outpatient records were used. The compliance to AM treatment within 6 months was retained in 44.2%, and within the year - 26.8% of older patients. At least 40% of the total number of patients refused to continue the treatment for medical reasons. The persons taking Solifenacin (p≤ 0.01), Trospium (p≤ 0.05), or Darifenacin (p≤ 0.05), suffering from severe UI symptoms (p≤ 0.01), and experiencing minor side effects (p≤ 0.01), well-informed about UI treatment methods (p≤ 0.01) prevailed among the treatment compliant patients. At least 20.4% of the patients discontinued their treatment due to economic reasons. The persons with significantly larger annual income (p≤ 0.05) and annual medical cost (p≤ 0.01) prevailed among the treatment compliant patients. About 12.2% of the patients stopped their treatment for reasons related to the social background and psychological status. In this experiment, we found that AM treatment compliance in older patients, in addition to medical parameters and health conditions, is largely affected by the economic as well as social, demographic and psychological factors. The study results can be claimed by practitioners involved in correcting UI symptoms in older people. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verloo H

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Henk Verloo,1 Céline Goulet,2 Diane Morin,3,4 Armin von Gunten51Department Nursing Sciences, University of Applied Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Faculty of Nursing Science, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Institut Universitaire de Formation et Recherche en Soins (IUFRS, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; 4Faculty of Nursing Science, Université Laval, Québec, Canada; 5Department of Psychiatry, Service Universitaire de Psychiatrie de l’Age Avancé (SUPAA, Lausanne University Hospital, Prilly, SwitzerlandBackground: Delirium and frailty – both potentially reversible geriatric syndromes – are seldom studied together, although they often occur jointly in older patients discharged from hospitals. This study aimed to explore the relationship between delirium and frailty in older adults discharged from hospitals.Methods: Of the 221 patients aged >65 years, who were invited to participate, only 114 gave their consent to participate in this study. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method, in which patients were classified dichotomously as delirious or nondelirious according to its algorithm. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frailty Scale, which classifies patients dichotomously as frail or nonfrail. In addition to the sociodemographic characteristics, covariates such as scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics and details regarding polymedication were collected. A multidimensional linear regression model was used for analysis.Results: Almost 20% of participants had delirium (n=22, and 76.3% were classified as frail (n=87; 31.5% of the variance in the delirium score was explained by frailty (R2=0.315. Age; polymedication; scores of the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM, instrumental activities of daily living, and Cumulative

  15. Reaching common ground: a patient-family-based conceptual framework of quality EOL care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Improvement in the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care is a priority health care issue since serious deficiencies in quality of care have been reported across care settings. Increasing pressure is now focused on Canadian health care organizations to be accountable for the quality of palliative and EOL care delivered. Numerous domains of quality EOL care upon which to create accountability frameworks are now published, with some derived from the patient/family perspective. There is a need to reach common ground on the domains of quality EOL care valued by patients and families in order to develop consistent performance measures and set priorities for health care improvement. This paper describes a meta-synthesis study to develop a common conceptual framework of quality EOL care integrating attributes of quality valued by patients and their families.

  16. Laparoscopic posterior mesh rectopexy for rectal prolapse is a safe procedure in older patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, D L; Nordentoft, T; Rosenstock, S

    2015-01-01

    to 1 June 2012, 81 laparoscopic posterior rectopexies were done. Male-to-female ratio was 4:77, median age 73 [57-80.5] years and median ASA Grade 2. Conversion to open surgery was done in 6.2%, the median operating time was 82 min [66 - 102] and median length of hospital stay was 2 days [2-5.7]. Minor...... and major complications were seen in 5.3% and 14.8%, respectively. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.2%. Constipation or incontinence improved or disappeared in 65.2% and 74.4%, respectively. The cumulated recurrence rate was 11.1% after a median observation time of 2 years. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic posterior...... rectopexy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure in older patients and can be done with acceptable complications and recurrence rates and short hospital stays. Laparoscopic posterior rectopexy seems to improve bowel function in many patients....

  17. Home telehealth in older patients with heart failure – costs, adherence, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinsante S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Susanna Spinsante Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy Abstract: This short review discusses the role of telehealth technologies in the management of older patients with heart failure, from different perspectives. Instead of providing a systematic overview of existing literature in the field, this paper provides evidence for a simple, but effective, paradigm upon which a telehealth system may be built, and highlights how such a model may successfully apply to heart failure management, to improve patients' quality of life after discharge, increase independency, and reduce readmissions and costs for the public health institutions. A few examples are discussed, to show the real applicability of the proposed model and further confirm the effectiveness of telehealth, when properly designed and tailored to users' needs. Keywords: remote health care, workflow, requirements

  18. Calling the doctor: a qualitative study of patient-initiated physician consultation among rural older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Quandt, Sara A; Bell, Ronny A; Chapman, Christine; Altizer, Kathryn P; Arcury, Thomas A

    2011-08-01

    Guided by Leventhal's self-regulatory model and Cockerham's theory of health lifestyles, we explore two questions regarding physician consultation among elderly rural adults: What symptom characteristics prompt patient-initiated physician consultation? Do participants' accounts of responses to symptoms, including the decision to consult a physician, incorporate descriptions of change over time? We analyze data from semistructured in-depth interviews with 62 older rural adults. Accounts of decisions to initiate contact with physicians support prior research. Some symptoms encouraged immediate consultation; others prompted periods of monitoring and lay management. Physicians were most often contacted if changes were new, unusually severe, persisted or worsened, or failed to respond to lay treatment. We characterize participants' responses to symptoms as bricolages to highlight their construction from available materials. Incorporating the integrating concept of bricolage and Cockerham's emphasis on both general dispositions and symptom-specific responses represents an important extension of Leventhal's conceptualization of illness behavior, including patient-initiated physician consultation.

  19. Relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programme during total hip or knee replacement. A grounded theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    and considerate support in concern for the patients; Substituting mode, with practical and cognitive support; and Adapting mode, by trying to fit in with the patients’ and health professionals’ requirements. Study II: 16 patients aged 70 to 94 were included and data was collected through 15 non......The aim of this Ph.D.-dissertation was to generate grounded theories of relatives, patients, and health professionals’ pattern of behaviour, respectively, in relation to the relatives of older patients’ fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. The dissertation includes...... to the older patients’ self-determination of being autonomous and how they adapt and are perceived in the health professionals’ environment. This may be useful to the health professionals in orthopaedic fast-track treatment programmes and their future collaboration with older patients and their relatives....

  20. Pain management in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Bridget; Sean Morrison, R

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent among older adults but is underrecognized and undertreated. The approach to pain assessment and management in older adults requires an understanding of the physiology of aging, validated assessment tools, and common pain presentations among older adults. To identify the overall principles of pain management in older adults with a specific focus on common painful conditions and approaches to pharmacologic treatment. We searched PubMed for common pain presentations in older adults with heart failure, end-stage renal disease, dementia, frailty, and cancer. We also reviewed guidelines for pain management. Our review encompassed 2 guidelines, 10 original studies, and 22 review articles published from 2000 to the present. This review does not discuss nonpharmacologic treatments of pain. Clinical guidelines support the use of opioids in persistent nonmalignant pain. Opioids should be used in patients with moderate or severe pain or pain not otherwise controlled but with careful attention to potential toxic effects and half-life. In addition, clinical practice guidelines recommend use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with extreme caution and for defined, limited periods. An understanding of the basics of pain pathophysiology, assessment, pharmacologic management, and a familiarity with common pain presentations will allow clinicians to effectively manage pain for older adults. © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Usual care and management of fall risk increasing drugs in older dizzy patients in Dutch general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Hanneke; Harting, Thomas; van der Sluijs, Marjolijn; van Marum, Rob; van der Horst, Henriëtte; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Maarsingh, Otto R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective For general practitioners (GPs) dizziness is a challenging condition to deal with. Data on the management of dizziness in older patients are mostly lacking. Furthermore, it is unknown whether GPs attempt to decrease Fall Risk Increasing Drugs (FRIDs) use in the management of dizziness in older patients. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into GP’s management of dizziness in older patients, including FRID evaluation and adjustment. Design Data were derived from electronic medical records, obtained over a 12-month period in 2013. Setting Forty-six Dutch general practices. Patients The study sample comprised of 2812 older dizzy patients of 65 years and over. Patients were identified using International Classification of Primary Care codes and free text. Main outcome measures Usual care was categorized into wait-and-see strategy (no treatment initiated); education and advice; additional testing; medication adjustment; and referral. Results Frequently applied treatments included a wait-and-see strategy (28.4%) and education and advice (28.0%). Additional testing was performed in 26.8%; 19.0% of the patients were referred. Of the patients 87.2% had at least one FRID prescription. During the observation period, GPs adjusted the use of one or more FRIDs for 11.7% of the patients. Conclusion This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older adults. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared to prior research. Although many older dizzy patients use at least one FRID, FRID evaluation and adjustment is scarce. We expect that more FRID adjustments may reduce dizziness and dizziness-related impairment. Key PointsIt is important to know how general practitioners manage dizziness in older patients in order to assess potential cues for improvement.This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older patients.There was a scarcity in Fall Risk Increasing Drug (FRID) evaluation and adjustment

  2. Impact of pharmacist interventions in older patients: a prospective study in a tertiary hospital in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortejoso L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available L Cortejoso,1 RA Dietz,2 G Hofmann,1 M Gosch,2 A Sattler1 1Department of Pharmacy, 2Department of Geriatrics, Hospital Nuremberg, Paracelsus Medical Private University Nuremberg, Nuremberg, Germany Background: Inappropriate pharmacotherapy among older adults remains a critical issue in our health care systems. Besides polypharmacy and multiple comorbidities, the age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes may increase the risk of adverse drug reactions and medication errors.Objective: The main target of this study was to describe the characteristics of pharmaceutical interventions in two geriatric wards (orthogeriatric ward and geriatric day unit of a general teaching hospital and to evaluate the clinical significance of the detected medication errors.Materials and methods: The study was conducted between August 2014 and October 2015 and was based on a triple approach that included validation of medical orders, medication reconciliation at patients’ admission, and a predischarge planning appointment with the patient. The validation of medical orders was based on analyzing the suitability of the drugs prescribed, the drug dose depending on the patient’s characteristics, the presence of contraindications and interactions between drugs, and the proposal of alternative drugs included in the hospital formulary.Results: A total of 2,307 interventions associated to a medication error in 15,282 medical orders for 1,859 older patients were recorded. The greater part of the interventions carried out on the orthogeriatric ward at admission and at discharge were due to omission of a drug in the medical order (20.0% and clinically significant interactions requiring monitoring (30.4%, respectively. The main factor triggering pharmacist’s recommendations on the geriatric day unit was clinically significant interactions (21.1%. With regard to the clinical severity of the detected errors, 68.1% were considered significant, 24.8% were of minor

  3. Economic evaluation of an extended nutritional intervention in older Australian hospitalized patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Thompson, Campbell; Miller, Michelle; Shahi, Rashmi; Hakendorf, Paul; Horwood, Chris; Kaambwa, Billingsley

    2018-02-05

    Prevalence of malnutrition in older hospitalized patients is 30%. Malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes in terms of high morbidity and mortality and is costly for hospitals. Extended nutrition interventions improve clinical outcomes but limited studies have investigated whether these interventions are cost-effective. In this randomized controlled trial, 148 malnourished general medical patients ≥60 years were recruited and randomized to receive either an extended nutritional intervention or usual care. Nutrition intervention was individualized and started with 24 h of admission and was continued for 3 months post-discharge with a monthly telephone call whereas control patients received usual care. Nutrition status was confirmed by Patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured using EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D-5 L) questionnaire at admission and at 3-months follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted for the primary outcome (incremental costs per unit improvement in PG-SGA) while a cost-utility analysis (CUA) was undertaken for the secondary outcome (incremental costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained). Nutrition status and HRQoL improved in intervention patients. Mean per included patient Australian Medicare costs were lower in intervention group compared to control arm (by $907) but these differences were not statistically significant (95% CI: -$2956 to $4854). The main drivers of higher costs in the control group were higher inpatient ($13,882 versus $13,134) and drug ($838 versus $601) costs. After adjusting outcomes for baseline differences and repeated measures, the intervention was more effective than the control with patients in this arm reporting QALYs gained that were higher by 0.0050 QALYs gained per patient (95% CI: -0.0079 to 0.0199). The probability of the intervention being cost-effective at willingness to pay values as low as $1000 per unit

  4. Multimorbidity Patterns in Hospitalized Older Patients: Associations among Chronic Diseases and Geriatric Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Clerencia-Sierra

    Full Text Available The clinical status of older individuals with multimorbidity can be further complicated by concomitant geriatric syndromes. This study explores multimorbidity patterns, encompassing both chronic diseases and geriatric syndromes, in geriatric patients attended in an acute hospital setting.Retrospective observational study.Unit of Social and Clinical Assessment (UVSS, Miguel Servet University Hospital (HUMS, Zaragoza (Spain. Year, 2011.A total of 924 hospitalized patients aged 65 years or older.Data on patients' clinical, functional, cognitive and social statuses were gathered through comprehensive geriatric assessments. To identify diseases and/or geriatric syndromes that cluster into patterns, an exploratory factor analysis was applied, stratifying by sex. The factors can be interpreted as multimorbidity patterns, i.e., diseases non-randomly associated with each other within the study population. The resulting patterns were clinically assessed by several physicians.The mean age of the study population was 82.1 years (SD 7.2. Multimorbidity burden was lower in men under 80 years, but increased in those over 80. Immobility, urinary incontinence, hypertension, falls, dementia, cognitive decline, diabetes and arrhythmia were among the 10 most frequent health problems in both sexes, with prevalence rates above 20%. Four multimorbidity patterns were identified that were present in both sexes: Cardiovascular, Induced Dependency, Falls and Osteoarticular. The number of conditions comprising these patterns was similar in men and women.The existence of specific multimorbidity patterns in geriatric patients, such as the Induced Dependency and Falls patterns, may facilitate the early detection of vulnerability to stressors, thus helping to avoid negative health outcomes such as functional disability.

  5. S175. AMOTIVATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH SMALLER VENTRAL STRIATUM VOLUMES IN OLDER PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Iwata, Yusuke; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Mar, Wanna; Gerretsen, Philip; Kim, Julia; Chakravarty, Mallar; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Mamo, David; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Motivational deficits are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia, persist despite antipsychotic treatment, and predict long‐term outcomes. Evidence suggests that patients with greater amotivation have smaller ventral striatum (VS) volumes. We wished to replicate this finding in a sample of older, chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. Using structural imaging and positron emission tomography, we examined whether amotivation uniquely predicted VS volumes beyond the effects of striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) blockade by antipsychotics. Methods Data from 41 older schizophrenia patients (mean age: 60.2 ± 6.7; 11 female) were reanalysed from previously published imaging data. We constructed multivariate linear stepwise regression models with VS volumes as the dependent variable and various sociodemographic and clinical variables as the initial predictors: age, gender, total brain volume, and antipsychotic striatal D2/3R occupancy. Amotivation was included as a subsequent step to determine any unique relationships with VS volumes beyond the contribution of the covariates. In a reduced sample (n = 36), general cognition was also included as a covariate. Results Amotivation uniquely explained 8% and 6% of the variance in right and left VS volumes, respectively (right: β = -.38, t = -2.48, P = .01; left: β = -.31, t = -2.17, P = .03). Considering cognition, amotivation levels uniquely explained 9% of the variance in right VS volumes (β = -.43, t = -0.26, P = .03). Discussion We replicate and extend the finding of reduced VS volumes with greater amotivation. We demonstrate this relationship uniquely beyond the potential contributions of striatal D2/3R blockade by antipsychotics. Elucidating the structural correlates of amotivation in schizophrenia may help develop treatments for this presently irremediable deficit.

  6. Amotivation is associated with smaller ventral striatum volumes in older patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Iwata, Yusuke; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Mar, Wanna; Gerretsen, Philip; Kim, Julia; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Mamo, David; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2018-03-01

    Motivational deficits are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia, persist despite antipsychotic treatment, and predict long-term outcomes. Evidence suggests that patients with greater amotivation have smaller ventral striatum (VS) volumes. We wished to replicate this finding in a sample of older, chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. Using structural imaging and positron emission tomography, we examined whether amotivation uniquely predicted VS volumes beyond the effects of striatal dopamine D 2/3 receptor (D 2/3 R) blockade by antipsychotics. Data from 41 older schizophrenia patients (mean age: 60.2 ± 6.7; 11 female) were reanalysed from previously published imaging data. We constructed multivariate linear stepwise regression models with VS volumes as the dependent variable and various sociodemographic and clinical variables as the initial predictors: age, gender, total brain volume, and antipsychotic striatal D 2/3 R occupancy. Amotivation was included as a subsequent step to determine any unique relationships with VS volumes beyond the contribution of the covariates. In a reduced sample (n = 36), general cognition was also included as a covariate. Amotivation uniquely explained 8% and 6% of the variance in right and left VS volumes, respectively (right: β = -.38, t = -2.48, P = .01; left: β = -.31, t = -2.17, P = .03). Considering cognition, amotivation levels uniquely explained 9% of the variance in right VS volumes (β = -.43, t = -0.26, P = .03). We replicate and extend the finding of reduced VS volumes with greater amotivation. We demonstrate this relationship uniquely beyond the potential contributions of striatal D 2/3 R blockade by antipsychotics. Elucidating the structural correlates of amotivation in schizophrenia may help develop treatments for this presently irremediable deficit. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin in pregnancy. Report of a patient with common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Cambray-Gutiérrez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency is the most commonly-diagnosed primary immunodeficiency in adults; it is characterized by recurrent sinopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections, and increased incidence of malignancy and autoimmune processes. Many patients begin to have clinical manifestations during reproductive age. Case report: A 34-year-old woman with 12 weeks of gestation who was diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency after recurrent episodes of rhinosinusitis, pharyngoamygdalitis, and pneumonia. 0.6 g/kg of IVIG was prescribed every 21 days during the second trimester; the patient only presented one episode of pharyngoamygdalitis, with adequate response to treatment with antibiotics. During the third trimester the dose was adjusted to every 14 days. The patient ended the pregnancy at term without complications, with a child without defects and with proper weight and size. Conclusions: The administration of immunoglobulin is the main treatment to control common variable immunodeficiency. While the recommended starting dose is 400-800 mg/kg intravenously every 3 to 4 weeks, there is no consensus on the dose to be used in pregnant women. The recommendation is to perform serum level controls before infusion to determine and adjust it.

  8. Cognitive performance, psychological well-being, and brain magnetic resonance imaging in older patients with type 1 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Hoogma, R.P.L.M.; Henselmans, J.M.L.; Beek-Boter, J.W. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Haan, E.H.F. de; Biessels, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Modest cognitive impairment has been reported in young-adult patients with type 1 diabetes. In older patients with type 2 diabetes, cognitive impairments are more pronounced, which might be due to age but also to differential effects of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes on the brain. This study

  9. Can preventable adverse events be predicted among hospitalized older patients? The development and validation of a predictive model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Langelaan, M.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop and validate a predictive model for preventable adverse events (AEs) in hospitalized older patients, using clinically important risk factors that are readily available on admission. Design: Data from two retrospective patient record review studies on AEs were used. Risk factors

  10. Theory of mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets-Janssen, M.M.J.; Meesters, P.D.; Comijs, H.C.; Eikelenboom, P.; Smit, J.H.; de Haan, L.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ

  11. Magnetic resonance arthrography and the prevalence of acetabular labral tears in patients 50 years of age and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakar, Rohit; Merz, Alexa; Wang, Dean; Hame, Sharon L.; Plotkin, Benjamin; Seeger, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopy for acetabular labral tears has minimal impact on pain and function in older patients, especially in the setting of concomitant osteoarthritis. Still, many physicians seek this diagnosis with MR arthrography. Our purpose is to assess the frequency of acetabular labral tears in older patients with hip pain and correlate likelihood of labral pathology with severity of osteoarthritis as visualized on conventional radiograph. From 2004 to 2013, 208 hip MRI arthrograms and corresponding radiographs on patients aged 50 years and older were identified. Age, gender, grade and location of labral tear, alpha angle, Toennis grade, and joint space width were documented. Labral tears and alpha angle were identified and measured on MR arthrogram. Toennis grade and joint space width were measured on radiographs. On MR arthrography, true labral tearing was identified in 73 % of patients. There was some degree of labral pathology in 93.3 % of patients, and this increased to 100 % in patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis, as defined by Toennis grade 2-3 or joint space width ≤ 2 mm. There were no statistically significant correlations between labral tear grade and Toennis grade or joint space width. Given the high frequency of labral pathology and the questionable efficacy of arthroscopic surgical intervention in older patients, MR arthrography should be primarily for those with minimal arthritis on radiograph and potential to benefit from surgery. If further imaging beyond radiographs is necessary in these patients, standard MRI may be a more appropriate imaging tool. (orig.)

  12. Metabolic parameters and cognitive function in a cohort of older diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herghelegiu, Anna Marie; Nacu, Raluca Mihaela; Prada, Gabriel Ioan

    2016-12-01

    Dementia is one of the most disabling conditions associated with old age. With increasing life expectancy, prevalence of both dementia and diabetes is rising. The complex pathological relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and dementia has been studied, but is not yet fully understood. The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic parameters and the cognitive function in older diabetics. A total number of 360 diabetic subjects, age 65 years and over, and 300 older people controls were included. Clinical and biological parameters, together with the cognitive function, were assessed every 6 months over a 18-month period, for each study participant. By employing a multivariate linear regression analysis, several significant relationships have been identified: between Clock Drawing Test (CDT) scores and HbA1c (R 2  = 0.68); between CDT scores (R 2  = 0.51) and overall MMSE scores (R 2  = 0.43) on one hand, and DM duration in years, on the other hand; also between CDT scores and BMI (R 2  = 0.59). There was no significant association between fasting serum glucose (FSG), total serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol or triglycerides levels and cognitive function scores (p > 0.05). The close detailed monitoring of the cognitive function and a rigorous metabolic control are important, especially in the very early stages of DM. Addressing factors such as weight control in older diabetic patients could contribute to better cognitive outcomes.

  13. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies for older mechanically ventilated critically ill patients: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy S; Boyd, Julia A; Watson, Douglas; Hope, David; Lewis, Steff; Krishan, Ashma; Forbes, John F; Ramsay, Pamela; Pearse, Rupert; Wallis, Charles; Cairns, Christopher; Cole, Stephen; Wyncoll, Duncan

    2013-10-01

    To compare hemoglobin concentration (Hb), RBC use, and patient outcomes when restrictive or liberal blood transfusion strategies are used to treat anemic (Hb≤90 g/L) critically ill patients of age≥55 years requiring≥4 days of mechanical ventilation in ICU. Parallel-group randomized multicenter pilot trial. Six ICUs in the United Kingdom participated between August 2009 and December 2010. One hundred patients (51 restrictive and 49 liberal groups). Patients were randomized to a restrictive (Hb trigger, 70 g/L; target, 71-90 g/L) or liberal (90 g/L; target, 91-110 g/L) transfusion strategy for 14 days or the remainder of ICU stay, whichever was longest. Baseline comorbidity rates and illness severity were high, notably for ischemic heart disease (32%). The Hb difference among groups was 13.8 g/L (95% CI, 11.5-16.0 g/L); pdisease, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and total non-neurologic Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at baseline (hazard ratio, 0.54 [95% CI, 0.28-1.03]; p=0.061). A large trial of transfusion strategies in older mechanically ventilated patients is feasible. This pilot trial found a nonsignificant trend toward lower mortality with restrictive transfusion practice.

  14. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  15. Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of older patients admitted to six European hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing is common in older people presenting to hospital with acute illness in Ireland. The aim of this study was to determine if this phenomenon is unique to Ireland or whether it is a more widespread problem in hospitals across Europe.

  16. Decision-Making of Older Patients in Context of the Doctor-Patient Relationship: A Typology Ranging from “Self-Determined” to “Doctor-Trusting” Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Isabel; Diederichs-Egidi, Heike; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Junius-Walker, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background. This qualitative study aims to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of older patients with regard to sharing health care decisions with their general practitioners. Patients and Methods. Thirty-four general practice patients (≥70 years) were asked about their preferences and experiences concerning shared decision making with their doctors using qualitative semistructured interviews. All interviews were analysed according to principles of content analysis. The resulting categories were then arranged into a classification grid to develop a typology of preferences for participating in decision-making processes. Results. Older patients generally preferred to make decisions concerning everyday life rather than medical decisions, which they preferred to leave to their doctors. We characterised eight different patient types based on four interdependent positions (self-determination, adherence, information seeking, and trust). Experiences of a good doctor-patient relationship were associated with trust, reliance on the doctor for information and decision making, and adherence. Conclusion. Owing to the varied patient decision-making types, it is not easy for doctors to anticipate the desired level of patient involvement. However, the decision matter and the self-determination of patients provide good starting points in preparing the ground for shared decision making. A good relationship with the doctor facilitates satisfying decision-making experiences. PMID:23691317

  17. Decision-making of older patients in context of the doctor-patient relationship: a typology ranging from "self-determined" to "doctor-trusting" patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede-Sach, Jennifer; Voigt, Isabel; Diederichs-Egidi, Heike; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Junius-Walker, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background. This qualitative study aims to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of older patients with regard to sharing health care decisions with their general practitioners. Patients and Methods. Thirty-four general practice patients (≥70 years) were asked about their preferences and experiences concerning shared decision making with their doctors using qualitative semistructured interviews. All interviews were analysed according to principles of content analysis. The resulting categories were then arranged into a classification grid to develop a typology of preferences for participating in decision-making processes. Results. Older patients generally preferred to make decisions concerning everyday life rather than medical decisions, which they preferred to leave to their doctors. We characterised eight different patient types based on four interdependent positions (self-determination, adherence, information seeking, and trust). Experiences of a good doctor-patient relationship were associated with trust, reliance on the doctor for information and decision making, and adherence. Conclusion. Owing to the varied patient decision-making types, it is not easy for doctors to anticipate the desired level of patient involvement. However, the decision matter and the self-determination of patients provide good starting points in preparing the ground for shared decision making. A good relationship with the doctor facilitates satisfying decision-making experiences.

  18. Social inequalities in patient-reported outcomes among older multimorbid patients--results of the MultiCare cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; Bickel, Horst; Fuchs, Angela; Gensichen, Jochen; Höfels, Susanne; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; König, Hans-Helmut; Mergenthal, Karola; Schön, Gerhard; Wegscheider, Karl; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Schäfer, Ingmar

    2015-02-07

    In this article three research questions are addressed: (1) Is there an association between socioeconomic status (SES) and patient-reported outcomes in a cohort of multimorbid patients? (2) Does the association vary according to SES indicator used (income, education, occupational position)? (3) Can the association between SES and patient-reported outcomes (self-rated health, health-related quality of life and functional status) be (partly) explained by burden of disease? Analyses are based on the MultiCare Cohort Study, a German multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study of multimorbid patients from general practice. We analysed baseline data and data from the first follow-up after 15 months (N = 2,729). To assess burden of disease we used the patients' morbidity data from standardized general practitioner (GP) interviews based on a list of 46 groups of chronic conditions including the GP's severity rating of each chronic condition ranging from marginal to very severe. In the cross-sectional analyses SES was significantly associated with the patient-reported outcomes at baseline. Associations with income were more consistent and stronger than with education and occupational position. Associations were partly explained (17% to 44%) by burden of disease. In the longitudinal analyses only income (but not education and occupational position) was significantly related to the patient-reported outcomes at follow-up. Associations between income and the outcomes were reduced by 18% to 27% after adjustment for burden of disease. Results indicate social inequalities in self-rated health, functional status and health related quality of life among older multimorbid patients. As associations with education and occupational position were inconsistent, these inequalities were mainly due to income. Inequalities were partly explained by burden of disease. However, even among patients with a similar disease burden, those with a low income were worse off in terms of the

  19. Risk of Social Isolation among Older Patients: What Factors Affect the Availability of Family, Friends, and Neighbors upon Hospitalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Hwa; Hougham, Gavin W; Meltzer, David O

    2018-03-02

    To examine the prevalence of social isolation among older patients admitted to a hospital, and the effects of sociodemographic and health-related factors on the availability of their family, friends, and neighbor networks. Analyses are based on interviews with a sample of 2,449 older patients admitted to an urban academic medical center in the United States. A nine-item version of Lubben's Social Network Scale was developed and used to assess the availability of different social networks. About 47% of the sample was at risk of social isolation. The oldest old and non-White older adults showed greater risk. The availability of family networks was associated with age, sex, marital status, and prior hospitalization; friend networks with age, race, education, prior hospitalization, and functional limitations; neighbor networks with race, education, marital status, and functional limitations. The risk of social isolation and the availability of social support for hospitalized older adults varies by both patient and network characteristics. Health professionals should attend to this risk and the factors associated with such risk. By assessing the availability of various types and frequency of support among older patients, health professionals can better identify those who may need additional support after discharge. Such information should be used in discharge planning to help prevent unnecessary complications and potential readmission.

  20. Recruitment of Older Adult Patient-Caregiver Dyads for an Online Caregiver Resource Program: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Orwig, Denise; Resnick, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay; Bellantoni, Michele; Sterling, Robert

    2012-01-12

    Hip fracture is a significant health problem for older adults and generally requires surgery followed by intensive rehabilitation. Informal caregivers (CGs) can provide vital assistance to older adults recovering from hip fracture. Caregiving is a dyadic process that affects both CGs and care recipients (CRs). In a feasibility study, we assessed the effects of using a theory-based online hip fracture resource program for CGs on both CGs and CRs. In this article, we discuss our recruitment process and the lessons learned. Participants were recruited from six acute hospitals, and CGs used the online resource program for 8 weeks. A total of 256 hip fracture patients were screened, and 164 CRs were ineligible. CG screening was initiated when CRs were determined to be eligible. Among 41 eligible dyads, 36 dyads were recruited. Several challenges to the recruitment of these dyads for online studies were identified, including a low number of eligible dyads in certain hospitals and difficulty recruiting both the CR and the CG during the short hospital stay. Field nurses often had to make multiple trips to the hospital to meet with both the CR and the CG. Thus, when a subject unit is a dyad recruited from acute settings, the resources required for the recruitment may be more than doubled. These challenges could be successfully alleviated with careful planning, competent field staff members, collaboration with hospital staff members, and efficient field operations.

  1. Nutritional Issues and Nutrition Support in Older Home Care Patients in the City of Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranešić Bender, Darija; Kovačević, Marta; Hanževački, Miro; Vrabec, Božena; Benković, Vanesa; Domislović, Viktor; Krznarić, Željko

    2017-12-01

    Population aging is a global demographic trend showing continuous growth and among its consequences is a rise in malnutrition that is characteristic for the elderly. The objective of this study was to evaluate nutritional status of elderly home care patients immediately after hospital discharge and to determine factors that affect nutritional status using questionnaires based on validated tools (NRS-2002, DETERMINE checklist) and basic medical history data. The study involved 76 elderly individuals (51.3% of them older than 70) living in the City of Zagreb. The nutritional status assessment using the NRS-2002 tool showed that 57.6% of the subjects were at nutritional risk. The findings of the assessment by use of the DETERMINE tool were also unfavorable, indicating that 82.1% of persons older than 70 were categorized as being at a high nutritional risk, while 17.9% were at moderate risk. The DETERMINE checklist elements (illness; reduced intake of fruits, vegetables or dairy products; alcohol consumption; oral health problems; and weight loss) were linked to a higher NRS score. The mean number of hospital days in subjects at nutritional risk was 14.27 (the mean number in the Republic of Croatia is 8.56 days). Although the study involved a small number of subjects, the results showed a substantial presence of malnutrition among the elderly. A timely -intervention by the healthcare system and training of healthcare personnel can be a step towards achieving a better nutritional status.

  2. Neutropenia in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency: a Rare Event Associated with Severe Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffroy, Aurélien; Mourot-Cottet, Rachel; Gérard, Laurence; Gies, Vincent; Lagresle, Chantal; Pouliet, Aurore; Nitschké, Patrick; Hanein, Sylvain; Bienvenu, Boris; Chanet, Valérie; Donadieu, Jean; Gardembas, Martine; Karmochkine, Marina; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Martin, Thierry; Poindron, Vincent; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Rieux-Laucat, Fréderic; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Korganow, Anne-Sophie

    2017-10-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by infections and hypogammaglobulinemia. Neutropenia is rare during CVID. The French DEFI study enrolled patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Patients with CVID and neutropenia were retrospectively analyzed. Among 473 patients with CVID, 16 patients displayed neutropenia (lowest count [0-1400]*10 6 /L). Sex ratio (M/F) was 10/6. Five patients died during the follow-up (11 years) with an increased percentage of deaths compared to the whole DEFI group (31.3 vs 3.4%, P < 0.05). Neutropenia was diagnosed for 10 patients before 22 years old. The most frequent symptoms, except infections, were autoimmune cytopenia, i.e., thrombopenia or anemia (11/16). Ten patients were affected with lymphoproliferative diseases. Two patients were in the infection only group and the others belonged to one or several other CVID groups. The median level of IgG was 2.6 g/L [0.35-4.4]. Most patients presented increased numbers of CD21 low CD38 low B cell, as already described in CVID autoimmune cytopenia group. Neutropenia was considered autoimmune in 11 cases. NGS for 52 genes of interest was performed on 8 patients. No deleterious mutations were found in LRBA, CTLA4, and PIK3. More than one potentially damaging variant in other genes associated with CVID were present in most patients arguing for a multigene process. Neutropenia is generally associated with another cytopenia and presumably of autoimmune origin during CVID. In the DEFI study, neutropenia is coupled with more severe clinical outcomes. It appears as an "alarm bell" considering patients' presentation and the high rate of deaths. Whole exome sequencing diagnosis should improve management.

  3. Individualised dietary counselling for nutritionally at-risk older patients following discharge from acute hospital to home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, T; Tolstrup, U; Beck, A M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many older patients are undernourished after hospitalisation. Undernutrition impacts negatively on physical function and the ability of older patients to perform activities of daily living at home after discharge from acute hospital. The present study aimed to evaluate the evidence...... for an effect of individualised dietary counselling following discharge from acute hospital to home on physical function, and, second, on readmissions, mortality, nutritional status, nutritional intake and quality of life (QoL), in nutritionally at-risk older patients. Methods: A systematic review of randomised......% CI = 0.08-1.95, P = 0.03). Meta-analyses revealed no significant effect on physical function assessed using hand grip strength, and similarly on mortality. Narrative summation of effects on physical function using other instruments revealed inconsistent effects. Meta-analyses were not conducted on Qo...

  4. Knowledge and preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A survey among older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Trudy J.; Leenman-Dekker, Sonja J.; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand K. E.; Bosveld, Henk E. P.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Survival rates following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are low for older people, and are associated with a high risk of neurological damage. This study investigated the relationship between the preferences, knowledge of survival chances, and characteristics among older people

  5. Women and stroke patients are more at risk for fall- related injury among older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyowati Tuminah Darjoko

    2016-05-01

    Women and stroke sufferers were at higher risk of fall-related injury among older persons. Prevention of fall-related injury should be done by older persons through periodic control of their health condition.

  6. MOST COMMON TACTICAL ERRORS IN CHRONIC SYSTOLIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS MANAGEMENT: PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Poskrebysheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF often can be a rather difficult task. Proper selection of therapy and strict adherence to the recommendations is vital in these patients. Unfortunately, in practice we often encounter with free interpretation of the recommendations, which leads to tactical errors and reduce the effectiveness of treatment. This article deals with the most common tactical errors, and contains recommendations for the management of patients with CHF, which can be very useful to the practitioner.

  7. MOST COMMON TACTICAL ERRORS IN CHRONIC SYSTOLIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS MANAGEMENT: PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Poskrebysheva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF often can be a rather difficult task. Proper selection of therapy and strict adherence to the recommendations is vital in these patients. Unfortunately, in practice we often encounter with free interpretation of the recommendations, which leads to tactical errors and reduce the effectiveness of treatment. This article deals with the most common tactical errors, and contains recommendations for the management of patients with CHF, which can be very useful to the practitioner.

  8. Functional Performances on Admission Predict In-Hospital Falls, Injurious Falls, and Fractures in Older Patients: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hars, Mélany; Audet, Marie-Claude; Herrmann, François; De Chassey, Jean; Rizzoli, René; Reny, Jean-Luc; Gold, Gabriel; Ferrari, Serge; Trombetti, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    Falls are common among older inpatients and remain a great challenge for hospitals. Despite the relevance of physical impairments to falls, the prognostic value of performance-based functional measures for in-hospital falls and injurious falls remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the predictive ability and accuracy of various functional tests administered at or close to admission in a geriatric hospital to identify in-hospital fallers and injurious fallers. In this prospective study, conducted in a geriatric hospital in Geneva, Switzerland, 807 inpatients (mean age 85.0 years) were subjected to a battery of functional tests administered by physiotherapists within 3 days (interquartile range 1 to 6) of admission, including Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), simplified Tinetti, and Timed Up and Go tests. Patients were prospectively followed up for falls and injurious falls until discharge using mandatory standardized incident report forms and electronic patients' records. During a median length of hospital stay of 23 days (interquartile range 14 to 36), 329 falls occurred in 189 (23.4%) patients, including 161 injurious falls of which 24 were serious. In-hospital fallers displayed significantly poorer functional performances at admission on all tests compared with non-fallers (p performances on all functional tests predicted in-hospital falls and injurious falls (p poor functional performances, as assessed by SPPB, are independent predictors of in-hospital falls, injurious falls, and fractures in patients admitted to a geriatric hospital. These findings should help to design preventive strategies for in-hospital falls and support the adoption of objective performance-based functional measures into routine hospital practice. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  9. Characteristics of undernourished older medical patients and the identification of predictors for undernutrition status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisinger Miruna

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Undernutrition among older people is a continuing source of concern, particularly among acutely hospitalized patients. The purpose of the current study is to compare malnourished elderly patients with those at nutritional risk and identify factors contributing to the variability between the groups. Methods The study was carried out at the Soroka University Medical Center in the south of Israel. From September 2003 through December 2004, all patients 65 years-of-age or older admitted to any of the internal medicine departments, were screened within 72 hours of admission to determine nutritional status using the short version of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF. Patients at nutritional risk were entered the study and were divided into malnourished or 'at risk' based on the full version of the MNA. Data regarding medical, nutritional, functional, and emotional status were obtained by trained interviewers. Results Two hundred fifty-nine elderly patients, 43.6% men, participated in the study; 18.5% were identified as malnourished and 81.5% were at risk for malnutrition according to the MNA. The malnourished group was less educated, had a higher depression score and lower cognitive and physical functioning. Higher prevalence of chewing problems, nausea, and vomiting was detected among malnourished patients. There was no difference between the groups in health status indicators except for subjective health evaluation which was poorer among the malnourished group. Lower dietary score indicating lower intake of vegetables fruits and fluid, poor appetite and difficulties in eating distinguished between malnourished and at-risk populations with the highest sensitivity and specificity as compare with the anthropometric, global, and self-assessment of nutritional status parts of the MNA. In a multivariate analysis, lower cognitive function, education Conclusion Our study indicates that low food consumption as well as poor appetite

  10. Characteristics of undernourished older medical patients and the identification of predictors for undernutrition status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldblum, Ilana; German, Larisa; Castel, Hana; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Bilenko, Natalya; Eisinger, Miruna; Fraser, Drora; Shahar, Danit R

    2007-11-02

    Undernutrition among older people is a continuing source of concern, particularly among acutely hospitalized patients. The purpose of the current study is to compare malnourished elderly patients with those at nutritional risk and identify factors contributing to the variability between the groups. The study was carried out at the Soroka University Medical Center in the south of Israel. From September 2003 through December 2004, all patients 65 years-of-age or older admitted to any of the internal medicine departments, were screened within 72 hours of admission to determine nutritional status using the short version of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF). Patients at nutritional risk were entered the study and were divided into malnourished or 'at risk' based on the full version of the MNA. Data regarding medical, nutritional, functional, and emotional status were obtained by trained interviewers. Two hundred fifty-nine elderly patients, 43.6% men, participated in the study; 18.5% were identified as malnourished and 81.5% were at risk for malnutrition according to the MNA. The malnourished group was less educated, had a higher depression score and lower cognitive and physical functioning. Higher prevalence of chewing problems, nausea, and vomiting was detected among malnourished patients. There was no difference between the groups in health status indicators except for subjective health evaluation which was poorer among the malnourished group. Lower dietary score indicating lower intake of vegetables fruits and fluid, poor appetite and difficulties in eating distinguished between malnourished and at-risk populations with the highest sensitivity and specificity as compare with the anthropometric, global, and self-assessment of nutritional status parts of the MNA. In a multivariate analysis, lower cognitive function, education risk factors for malnutrition. Our study indicates that low food consumption as well as poor appetite and chewing problems are associated

  11. [Assessment of two applications of medication self-management in older patients. Qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, I; Guilabert, M; Pérez-Jover, V; Mira, J J

    2015-01-01

    The aging population and the growing use of technology are two realities of modern society. Developing tools to support medication self-management to polymedicated elderly may contribute to increase their safety. To know how patients polymedicated and older than 64 years manage dose their medication and assessment the utility of two medication self-management applications, specifically analyzing management systems, medication errors and positive and improvable aspects of each of the tools presented. Seven focal groups with 59 patients from associations and health departments were conducted. In such meetings, they received the applications and they were encouraged to use it. Then, a several group questions were asked them about their health status, how they managed their medication and their assessment about the applications. Most participants reported to use memory strategies to take correctly their medication. They assessed positively the applications although some of them showed resistance to incorporate it in their daily routine. The simple interface and ease of use were the characteristics of the applications most appreciated by patients. Is possible to foster among elderly patients the use of technological tools to support the proper administration of medications with purpose is to decrease errors and increase safety. When designing health applications is necessary to take into account the preferences of those who are targeted. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Reliability of the Danish Abbey Pain Scale in severely demented and non-communicative older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Merete; Melin, Anne Sophie; Nygaard, Ida Sofie; Nielsen, Christina H; Beedholm-Ebsen, Mathilde

    2016-10-02

    To validate a Danish version of the observational Abbey Pain Scale (APS) in a geriatric ward. The study population consisted of 50 old patients (70+ years), consecutively admitted to the geriatric wards of Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, and fulfilling one of the following inclusion criteria: Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) reliability was measured by two independent ratings of the same patient at the same time and assessed by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). Internal consistency between the subscales was analysed by Cronbach's Alpha. Responsiveness was tested if the first APS score was positive for pain. 'Before' and 'after' sum scores were compared by paired t-test. We found poor agreement between APS and VRS (k=0.42). The inter-rater reliability was good (ICC=0.84). Cronbach's Alpha was 0.52 (fair agreement). In 66% of the patients, pain was observed and re-tested when an expected effect of analgesics had occurred. Of these, 88% reached a reduction on the APS sum-score (p<0.001). Our assessment of the Danish version of APS shows that this pain assessment scale should be considered as qualified and usable in severely demented and non-communicative older patients admitted to a geriatric ward.

  13. The relation between depression, coping and health locus of control: differences between older and younger patients, with and without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Jurian W F; Deckx, Laura; van Abbema, Doris L; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; van den Akker, Marjan; Buntinx, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Depression is an important health issue in cancer patients. People use different coping strategies and health locus of control to manage stressful situations, which relate to different risks of depression. Coping strategies and health locus of control can be changed by cognitive behavioral interventions. In a cohort study, we investigated differences in coping strategy and health locus of control in older (≥70 years) and middle-aged (50-69 years) cancer patients, and older patients without cancer (≥70 years), and their association with presence of depression. We also investigated how these factors interact. We used the short version of the Utrecht Coping List, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale, and the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Data were available from 1317 participants. Overall prevalence of depression was 12%. Older cancer patients tended to use an avoiding coping strategy more frequently than middle-aged cancer patients. This was associated with higher risk of depression. Older cancer patients less often used an active coping strategy, in comparison with middle-aged cancer patients, which was associated with a lower risk of depression. Especially in women using a seeking social support strategy, there was a lower risk of depression. Overall, the internal health locus of control was associated with higher and the external 'powerful others' locus with lower risk of depression. Older cancer patients strongly differ from middle-aged cancer patients, in particular with respect to coping. Interventions to prevent or alleviate depression should incorporate these differences. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Acceptance factors of mobile apps for diabetes by patients aged 50 or older: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Madlen; Reichelt, Julius; Bellmann, Maike; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-03-02

    Mobile apps for people with diabetes offer great potential to support therapy management, increase therapy adherence, and reduce the probability of the occurrence of accompanying and secondary diseases. However, they are rarely used by elderly patients due to a lack of acceptance. We investigated the question "Which factors influence the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older?" Particular emphasis was placed on the current use of mobile devices/apps, acceptance-promoting/-inhibiting factors, features of a helpful diabetes app, and contact persons for technical questions. This qualitative study was the third of three substudies investigating factors influencing acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Guided interviews were chosen in order to get a comprehensive insight into the subjective perspective of elderly diabetes patients. At the end of each interview, the patients tested two existing diabetes apps to reveal obstacles in (first) use. Altogether, 32 patients with diabetes were interviewed. The mean age was 68.8 years (SD 8.2). Of 32 participants, 15 (47%) knew apps, however only 2 (6%) had already used a diabetes app within their therapy. The reasons reported for being against the use of apps were a lack of additional benefits (4/8, 50%) compared to current therapy management, a lack of interoperability with other devices/apps (1/8, 12%), and no joy of use (1/8, 12%). The app test revealed the following main difficulties in use: nonintuitive understanding of the functionality of the apps (26/29, 90%), nonintuitive understanding of the menu navigation/labeling (19/29, 66%), font sizes and representations that were too small (14/29, 48%), and difficulties in recognizing and pressing touch-sensitive areas (14/29, 48%). Furthermore, the patients felt the apps lacked individually important functions (11/29, 38%), or felt the functions that were offered were unnecessary for their own therapy needs (10/29, 34%). The most

  15. Adverse drug reactions in older patients during hospitalisation: are they predictable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-11-01

    adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and healthcare utilisation in older people. The GerontoNet ADR risk score aims to identify older people at risk of ADRs during hospitalisation. We aimed to assess the clinical applicability of this score and identify other variables that predict ADRs in hospitalised older people.

  16. Somnolence in adult craniopharyngioma patients is a common, heterogeneous condition that is potentially treatable.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowley, R K

    2012-02-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Somnolence and obesity are prevalent in craniopharyngioma patients. We hypothesized that somnolence was because of obstructive sleep apnoea in craniopharyngioma patients. DESIGN, PATIENTS AND MEASUREMENTS: We assessed prevalence of somnolence and sleep apnoea in 28 craniopharyngioma and 23 obese controls attending a tertiary referral centre, by means of the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and polysomnography. All subjects with sleep apnoea were offered continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) or modafinil. All craniopharyngioma patients, with unexplained somnolence, were offered modafinil. RESULTS: Somnolence was reported by 20\\/28 (71.5%) craniopharyngioma patients and 4\\/23 (17%) obese subjects (P < 0.001). Median ESS was 7.5 (IQR 6, 10.7) in craniopharyngioma patients and 4.0 (4,8) in controls, P < 0.01. Eleven somnolent craniopharyngioma patients had obstructive sleep apnoea, in whom treatment led to a reduction in ESS by 6.4 +\\/- 1.4, P = 0.01. Among the remaining nine patients, five were offered modafinil therapy, of whom four had benefit, three were not compliant with hormone replacement, and one died before intervention. There was no difference in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea between craniopharyngioma (n = 13, 46%) and obese subjects (n = 14, 61%, P = 0.4). Body mass index (BMI) does not correlate with apnoea hypopnoea index [apnoea - hypopnoea index (AHI), r = 0.25, P = 0.08], which suggests that obesity alone does not explain the prevalence of sleep apnoea in craniopharyngioma patients. CONCLUSIONS: Somnolence is common in craniopharyngioma patients and in the majority is because of obstructive sleep apnoea. An additional group of somnolent craniopharyngioma patients benefits from modafinil.

  17. Predicting the duration of sickness absence for patients with common mental disorders in occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Verbeek, Jos H A M; de Boer, Angela G E M; Blonk, Roland W B; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2006-02-01

    This study attempted to determine the factors that best predict the duration of absence from work among employees with common mental disorders. A cohort of 188 employees, of whom 102 were teachers, on sick leave with common mental disorders was followed for 1 year. Only information potentially available to the occupational physician during a first consultation was included in the predictive model. The predictive power of the variables was tested using Cox's regression analysis with a stepwise backward selection procedure. The hazard ratios (HR) from the final model were used to deduce a simple prediction rule. The resulting prognostic scores were then used to predict the probability of not returning to work after 3, 6, and 12 months. Calculating the area under the curve from the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve tested the discriminative ability of the prediction rule. The final Cox's regression model produced the following four predictors of a longer time until return to work: age older than 50 years [HR 0.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.3-0.8], expectation of duration absence longer than 3 months (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8), higher educational level (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8), and diagnosis depression or anxiety disorder (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-0.9). The resulting prognostic score yielded areas under the curves ranging from 0.68 to 0.73, which represent acceptable discrimination of the rule. A prediction rule based on four simple variables can be used by occupational physicians to identify unfavorable cases and to predict the duration of sickness absence.

  18. Antiretroviral medication prescribing errors are common with hospitalization of HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commers, Tessa; Swindells, Susan; Sayles, Harlan; Gross, Alan E; Devetten, Marcel; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    Errors in prescribing antiretroviral therapy (ART) often occur with the hospitalization of HIV-infected patients. The rapid identification and prevention of errors may reduce patient harm and healthcare-associated costs. A retrospective review of hospitalized HIV-infected patients was carried out between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011. Errors were documented as omission, underdose, overdose, duplicate therapy, incorrect scheduling and/or incorrect therapy. The time to error correction was recorded. Relative risks (RRs) were computed to evaluate patient characteristics and error rates. A total of 289 medication errors were identified in 146/416 admissions (35%). The most common was drug omission (69%). At an error rate of 31%, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of error when compared with protease inhibitors (RR 1.32; 95% CI 1.04-1.69) and co-formulated drugs (RR 1.59; 95% CI 1.19-2.09). Of the errors, 31% were corrected within the first 24 h, but over half (55%) were never remedied. Admissions with an omission error were 7.4 times more likely to have all errors corrected within 24 h than were admissions without an omission. Drug interactions with ART were detected on 51 occasions. For the study population (n = 177), an increased risk of admission error was observed for black (43%) compared with white (28%) individuals (RR 1.53; 95% CI 1.16-2.03) but no significant differences were observed between white patients and other minorities or between men and women. Errors in inpatient ART were common, and the majority were never detected. The most common errors involved omission of medication, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors had the highest rate of prescribing error. Interventions to prevent and correct errors are urgently needed.

  19. Improving Chronic Disease Self-Management by Older Home Health Patients through Community Health Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Dye

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to pilot test a model to reduce hospital readmissions and emergency department use of rural, older adults with chronic diseases discharged from home health services (HHS through the use of volunteers. The study’s priority population consistently experiences poorer health outcomes than their urban counterparts due in part to lower socioeconomic status, reduced access to health services, and incidence of chronic diseases. When they are hospitalized for complications due to poorly managed chronic diseases, they are frequently readmitted for the same conditions. This pilot study examines the use of volunteer community members who were trained as Health Coaches to mentor discharged HHS patients in following the self-care plan developed by their HHS RN; improving chronic disease self-management behaviors; reducing risk of falls, pneumonia, and flu; and accessing community resources. Program participants increased their ability to monitor and track their chronic health conditions, make positive lifestyle changes, and reduce incidents of falls, pneumonia and flu. Although differences in the ED and hospital admission rates after discharge from HHS between the treatment and comparison group (matched for gender, age, and chronic condition were not statistically significant, the treatment group’s rate was less than the comparison group thus suggesting a promising impact of the HC program (90 day: 263 comparison vs. 129 treatment; p = 0.65; 180 day 666.67 vs. 290.32; p = 0.19. The community health coach model offers a potential approach for improving the ability of discharged older home health patients to manage chronic conditions and ultimately reduce emergent care.

  20. Pathophysiology of nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms in older patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Marie-Astrid; Decalf, Veerle; Kumps, Candy; Petrovic, Mirko; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-01

    To explore the mismatch between functional bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production, and to study the pathophysiology of an increased nocturnal urine production in older patients with urinary incontinence. The present prospective observational study included adults aged ≥65 years with urinary incontinence. Participants completed questionnaires, frequency volume charts and renal function profiles. The nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index was defined as nocturnal urine output/maximum voided volume; the nocturnal polyuria index as nocturnal/24 h urine output. The median age (n = 95) was 74 years (69-79), 87% were women and 73% had nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms (nocturnal urinary incontinence or nocturia ≥2). Participants with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms had a significantly higher nocturnal urine output (809 mL vs 650 mL; P = 0.001) and no significant difference in maximum voided volume (350 mL vs 437 mL; P = 0.079) compared with participants without nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. Participants (nocturnal polyuria index >33% [n = 56], nocturnal polyuria index >40% [n = 42], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index >1.87 [n = 51]) showed higher night-time diuresis rates, free water and sodium clearance compared with during the daytime. Controls (nocturnal polyuria index ≤33% [n = 26], nocturnal polyuria index ≤40% [n = 40], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index ≤1.87 [n = 44]) had no circadian rhythm in their diuresis rate or sodium clearance, but more nocturnal free water clearance compared with during the daytime. The majority of older adults with urinary incontinence present nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. An increased nocturnal sodium diuresis seems to be the only mechanism differentiating patients with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms from controls. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. Risks and benefits of colonoscopy in patients aged 80 and older: A prospective study

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    Edson Jurado da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aims to compare colonoscopy results in patients aged 50-79 and those aged 80 and older. Patients and Methods: a total of 533 diagnostic colonoscopies performed from August 2011 to January 2012 were evaluated in a prospective study analyzing age, ASA classification, co- morbidities, endoscopic findings, time to reach the cecum, number of complete examina- tions, difficulties and complications. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical data whereas Student's t test to compare means. A p value 0.05, ASA > 2 difficult examination: 41 (20% versus 6 (60% p 0.05. Complete colonoscopy in 450 (94% versus 45 (83%, p 0.05 Time to reach the cecum was 39 ± 10 minutes for difficult procedures and 13 ± 9 for the easy ones. Conclusion: age 80 and older is associated with more adverse events during colonoscopy. Resumo: Objetivo: avaliar riscos em colonoscopia após 80 anos de idade. Pacientes e métodos: entre agosto de 2011 e janeiro de 2012 realizamos colonoscopias em 533 pacientes. Grupo A: idade entre 50 e 79 e Grupo B > de 80 anos. Parâmetros analisados: ASA, comorbidades, achados endoscópicos, tempo de chegada ao ceco, número de exames com- pletos, dificuldade e complicações. Usamos teste Qui-quadrado para comparar proporção e teste t de Student para média e desvio padrão. p 0,05 > ASA 2 difícil 41 (20% e 6 (60% p 0.05. Exame completo 450 (94% e 45 (83% p 0,05. Tempo em minutos 39 ± 10 para os difíceis e 13 ± 9 para os fáceis. Conclusão: a idade de 80 anos constitui um risco para a realização de colonoscopia. Keywords: Colonoscopy, Risks, Complications, Older age, Elderly, Palavras-chave: Colonoscopia, Riscos, Complicações, Idade avançada, Terceira idade

  2. Adverse Effects with Ambulatory Intravenous Immunoglobulin Administration in Adult Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Alicia Rodríguez-Mireles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunode ciency (CVID is the most frequent symptomatic primary immunodeficiency, affecting 1:25,000- 75,000 people. It is characterized by the absence or decrease antibody production. Treatment for CVID consists on human immunoglobulin administration, and the intravenous route is the most common route for administration, at 400-800 mg/kg of weight every 3-4 weeks. Adverse effects associated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg use occur in 25% of all infusions, with severe adverse reactions presenting in less than 1% of all patients. Acute renal failure can occur as a severe adverse reaction, which presents 1-10 days after starting IVIg treatment. In our center we implemented an ambulatory scheme for IVIg administration, which allows its administration in an average of 3 hours, without severe adverse effects. Objectives: To describe adverse effects and to evaluate the frequency of renal failure secondary to ambulatory IVIg administration in patients with common variable immunode ciency. Material and method: A descriptive and prospective study was done including adult patients con de nitive diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency, receiving IVIg at replacement dose every 3 weeks. All patients were evaluated with clinical exploration, somatometry, serum creatinine, albumin and urea determination, 24 hours creatinine clearance, glomerular ltration rate with CKD-EPI, and immediate renal function associated with accumulated IVIg. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: We determined adverse effects in 25 patients with common variable immunode ciency (15 women and 10 men, average age 36.7 years, during a 10 months period (January-September 2013. During this period 284 IVIg infusions were administered using our scheme, frequency of adverse effects were 12.9%, with 5.2% of early adverse effects and 7.7% late adverse effects, all being mild to moderate, in some cases required analgesic and

  3. “PHE in Action”: Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  4. Characterizing older adult patients suffering from epilepsy in two hospitals in Bogotá (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Álvarez AM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy’s overall prevalence in Colombia is 1.13%. Its prevalence in patients aged over 65 could be around 1.5%. Objective: describe demographic and clinical characteristics of patients older than 65 years of age with epilepsy. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in two high complexity hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia during 2005-2008. Demographic data were compiled and patients characterized regarding the type, frequency and diagnosis of seizures (based on ILAE classification, probable etiology, having a family background of epilepsy, and current pharmacological management. Results: 211 clinical histories were reviewed and 179 of them selected. Mean patient age was 75 (65-98 and average age at onset of epilepsy was 67.5 (7-93. 84% of the seizures were classified as being focal. The most frequently occurring diagnosis was symptomatic focal epilepsy (94.4%. 74 cases (41.3% had an etiological diagnosis. The most important cause was cerebrovascular disease (61 patients. First generation anti-epileptic drugs were the most used ones (99%. 81/104 patients were found not to be free from epileptic episodes. Conclusions: Most seizures have a partial beginning, resulting from symptomatic partial epilepsy as a consequence of a vascular lesion. Pharmacological treatment must be considered following the first seizure. Treatment with second generation anti-epileptic drugs such as Lamotrigine, Gabapentin, Levetiracetam and Topiramate must be begun for minimizing secondary effects and low doses must be maintained from the start of treatment. Costs may limit the use of the above antiepileptic drugs, in such cases Phenytoin and Carbamazepine may be used with extreme caution.

  5. Practice development: providing benefits for both managers and older patients with delerium and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzant, Kim

    2008-03-01

    This article describes the ways in which practice development can aid Nurse Managers to enhance both efficiency and effectiveness, focussing particularly on the care of older people with delerium and dementia. Practitioners caring for this group of patients in acute general hospitals need specialist skills, particularly skills in working with the unusual ('challenging') behaviours that these patients often exhibit. These skills are rarely present at the point of registration but practice development techniques can facilitate the acquisition of appropriate skills with resultant benefits for both patients and organization. The study contains an outline of the ways in which a practice development approach can be delivered and appraised: the theories are outlined, strategies for delivery of the techniques are described and methods of evaluation are suggested. These theories and techniques are being applied in a project in Portsmouth called 'Rise to the Challenge', which has the specific aim of improving the care of people with delerium and dementia in an acute hospital setting. This project is currently running and will be evaluated in the summer of 2008.

  6. Number of rib fractures thresholds independently predict worse outcomes in older patients with blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulzhenko, Nikita O; Zens, Tiffany J; Beems, Megan V; Jung, Hee Soo; O'Rourke, Ann P; Liepert, Amy E; Scarborough, John E; Agarwal, Suresh K

    2017-04-01

    There have been conflicting reports regarding whether the number of rib fractures sustained in blunt trauma is associated independently with worse patient outcomes. We sought to investigate this risk-adjusted relationship among the lesser-studied population of older adults. A retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank was performed for patients with blunt trauma who were ≥65 years old and had rib fractures between 2009 and 2012 (N = 67,695). Control data were collected for age, sex, injury severity score, injury mechanism, 24 comorbidities, and number of rib fractures. Outcome data included hospital mortality, hospital and intensive care unit durations of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the occurrence of pneumonia. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Sustaining ≥5 rib fractures was associated with increased intensive care unit admission (odds ratio: 1.14, P rib fractures was associated with an increased incidence of pneumonia (odds ratio: 1.32, P rib fractures was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio: 1.51, P rib fractures is a significant predictor of worse outcomes independent of patient characteristics, comorbidities, and trauma burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of the Holocaust on the Rehabilitation Outcome of Older Patients Sustaining a Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Eliyahu H; Lubart, Emilia; Heymann, Anthony; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Holocaust survivors report a much higher prevalence of osteoporosis and fracture in the hip joint compared to those who were not Holocaust survivors. To evaluate whether being a Holocaust survivor could affect the functional outcome of hip fracture in patients 64 years of age and older undergoing rehabilitation. A retrospective cohort study compromising 140 consecutive hip fracture patients was conducted in a geriatric and rehabilitation department of a university-affiliated hospital. Being a Holocaust survivor was based on registry data. Functional outcome was assessed by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)TM at admission and discharge from the rehabilitation ward. Data were analyzed by t-test, chi-square test, and linear regression analysis. Total and motor FIM scores at admission (P = 0.004 and P = 0.006, respectively) and total and motor FIM gain scores at discharge (P = 0.008 and P = 0.004 respectively) were significantly higher in non-Holocaust survivors compared with Holocaust survivors. A linear regression analysis showed that being a Holocaust survivor was predictive of lower total FIM scores at discharge (β = -0.17, P = 0.004). Hip fracture in Holocaust survivors showed lower total, motor FIM and gain scores at discharge compared to non-Holocaust survivor patients. These results suggest that being a Holocaust survivor could adversely affect the rehabilitation outcome following fracture of the hip and internal fixation.

  8. Assessing the Content of YouTube Videos in Educating Patients Regarding Common Imaging Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Won, Eugene; Doshi, Ankur M

    2016-12-01

    To assess the content of currently available YouTube videos seeking to educate patients regarding commonly performed imaging examinations. After initial testing of possible search terms, the first two pages of YouTube search results for "CT scan," "MRI," "ultrasound patient," "PET scan," and "mammogram" were reviewed to identify educational patient videos created by health organizations. Sixty-three included videos were viewed and assessed for a range of features. Average views per video were highest for MRI (293,362) and mammography (151,664). Twenty-seven percent of videos used a nontraditional format (eg, animation, song, humor). All videos (100.0%) depicted a patient undergoing the examination, 84.1% a technologist, and 20.6% a radiologist; 69.8% mentioned examination lengths, 65.1% potential pain/discomfort, 41.3% potential radiation, 36.5% a radiology report/results, 27.0% the radiologist's role in interpretation, and 13.3% laboratory work. For CT, 68.8% mentioned intravenous contrast and 37.5% mentioned contrast safety. For MRI, 93.8% mentioned claustrophobia, 87.5% noise, 75.0% need to sit still, 68.8% metal safety, 50.0% intravenous contrast, and 0.0% contrast safety. For ultrasound, 85.7% mentioned use of gel. For PET, 92.3% mentioned radiotracer injection, 61.5% fasting, and 46.2% diabetic precautions. For mammography, unrobing, avoiding deodorant, and possible additional images were all mentioned by 63.6%; dense breasts were mentioned by 0.0%. Educational patient videos on YouTube regarding common imaging examinations received high public interest and may provide a valuable patient resource. Videos most consistently provided information detailing the examination experience and less consistently provided safety information or described the presence and role of the radiologist. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene are common in patients with Parkinson's disease from Eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fabin; Grimes, David A; Li, Fang; Wang, Ting; Yu, Zhe; Song, Na; Wu, Shichao; Racacho, Lemuel; Bulman, Dennis E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) have been implicated as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, GBA mutations in PD patients of different ethnic origins were reported to be inconsistent. We sequenced all exons of the GBA gene in 225 PD patients and 110 control individuals from Eastern Canada. Two novel GBA variants of c.-119 A/G and S(-35)N, five known GBA mutations of R120W, N370S, L444P, RecNciI and RecTL mutation (del55/D409H/RecNciI) as well as two non-pathological variants of E326K and T369M were identified from PD patients while only one mutation of S13L and two non-pathological variants of E326K and T369M were found in the control individuals. The frequency of GBA mutations within PD patients (4.4%) is 4.8 times higher than the 0.91% observed in control individuals (X(2) = 2.91, p = 0.088; odds ratio = 4.835; 95% confidence interval = 2.524-9.123). The most common mutations of N370S and L444P accounted for 36.0% (9/25) of all the GBA mutations in this Eastern Canadian PD cohort. The frequency (6.67%) of E326K and T369M in PD patients is comparable to 7.27% in control individuals (X(2) = 0.042, p = 0.8376), further supporting that these two variants have no pathological effects on PD. Phenotype analysis showed that no significant difference in family history, age at onset and cognitive impairment was identified between the GBA mutation carriers and non-GBA mutation carriers. GBA mutations were found to be a common genetic risk factor for PD in Eastern Canadian patients.

  10. Expression of LDL receptor-related proteins (LRPs in common solid malignancies correlates with patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Gonias

    Full Text Available LDL receptor-related proteins (LRPs are transmembrane receptors involved in endocytosis, cell-signaling, and trafficking of other cellular proteins. Considerable work has focused on LRPs in the fields of vascular biology and neurobiology. How these receptors affect cancer progression in humans remains largely unknown. Herein, we mined provisional databases in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to compare expression of thirteen LRPs in ten common solid malignancies in patients. Our first goal was to determine the abundance of LRP mRNAs in each type of cancer. Our second goal was to determine whether expression of LRPs is associated with improved or worsened patient survival. In total, data from 4,629 patients were mined. In nine of ten cancers studied, the most abundantly expressed LRP was LRP1; however, a correlation between LRP1 mRNA expression and patient survival was observed only in bladder urothelial carcinoma. In this malignancy, high levels of LRP1 mRNA were associated with worsened patient survival. High levels of LDL receptor (LDLR mRNA were associated with decreased patient survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. High levels of LRP10 mRNA were associated with decreased patient survival in hepatocellular carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. LRP2 was the only LRP for which high levels of mRNA expression correlated with improved patient survival. This correlation was observed in renal clear cell carcinoma. Insights into LRP gene expression in human cancers and their effects on patient survival should guide future research.

  11. Risk factors and common contact allergens in facial allergic contact dermatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemsarn, Pranee; Iamphonrat, Thanawan; Boonchai, Waranya

    2016-04-01

    Facial dermatitis is commonly encountered in dermatologic practice. It is sometimes difficult to manage because its causative factors may be multiple and difficult to diagnose. This study was designed to identify the characteristics, patch test results, and final diagnoses of facial dermatitis patients who were referred to a contact dermatitis clinic and to identify factors associated with facial allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We retrospectively reviewed case records of facial dermatitis patients who underwent patch testing at the clinic during the period from July 2006 to June 2011. Of the 891 patients patch-tested, 244 (27.4%) had facial dermatitis. Female patients were 9.1 times more predominant than male patients. The mean ± standard deviation age of patients was 37.3 ± 14.8 years. A total of 199 (81.6%) patients demonstrated at least one positive reaction to a patch test, 66.7% of which were clinically relevant. Allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 45.5% of patients. Independent factors predisposing towards facial dermatitis were female sex, having a previous history of cosmetic allergy, a positive patch test reaction to hairdressing product-related allergens, and a positive allergic reaction to preservative allergens. The prevalence of facial dermatitis was 27.4%. Almost half of all patients with facial dermatitis demonstrated ACD. Factors associated with facial ACD were female gender, a history of cosmetic allergy, and positive patch test reactions to hairdressing product-related allergens and preservatives. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Management of infection in myelosuppressed patients: clinical trials and common sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W H

    1985-01-01

    In the past fifteen years, enormous research effort has been expended in pursuit of the "ideal" approach to the management of infection in the myelosuppressed, i.e., granulocytopenic, patient. In the welter of clinical trials, some "commonsense" fundamentals have been lost or submerged, while other ideas seem to have become "modern myths." Among those commonsense approaches that should not be forgotten are the following: Granulocytopenia often precludes even the most skilled observer from assessing whether a febrile patient is truly infected. The epidemiology of infection at the local institution should be the principal determinant of the empiric antibiotic regimen in use. There is no ideal empiric antibiotic regimen. In particular, there is no absolute necessity for antipseudomonal penicillins, for aminoglycosides or for combinations of antibiotics. Some modern myths that seem to have been widely accepted without adequate data are: Antibiotic "synergism" is an essential prerequisite to a successful outcome of infection in the granulocytopenic patient. In the febrile granulocytopenic patient who responds to treatment, antibiotics should be continued until the granulocytopenia resolves. In the febrile granulocytopenic patient who does not respond to treatment, all such patients should receive amphotericin B for empiric antifungal treatment. These and other modern myths and aspects of common sense will be discussed in light of recent clinical trials.

  13. Older age impacts on survival outcome in patients receiving curative surgery for solid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hsien Lu

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: Given the global increase in aging populations and cancer incidence, understanding the influence of age on postoperative outcome after cancer surgery is imperative. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of age on survival outcome in solid cancer patients receiving curative surgery. Methods: A total of 37,288 patients receiving curative surgeries for solid cancers between 2007 and 2012 at four affiliated Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included in the study. All patients were categorized into age groups by decades for survival analysis. Results: The percentages of patient populations aged <40 years, 40–49 years, 50–59 years, 60–69 years, 70–79 years, and ≥80 years were 9.7%, 17.7%, 27.8%, 22.1%, 16.9%, and 5.7%, respectively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months (range, 22.8–60.4 months and the overall, cancer-specific, and noncancer-specific mortality rates were 26.0%, 17.6%, and 8.5%, respectively. The overall mortality rate of patients in different age groups were 18.5%, 21.1%, 22.0%, 25.3%, 35.3%, and 49.0%, respectively. Compared to patients aged <40 years, more significant decrease in long-term survival were observed in aging patients. Multivariate analysis showed higher postoperative short-term mortality rates in patients older than 70 years, and the adjusted odds ratio of mortality risk ranged from 1.47 to 1.74 and 2.26 to 3.03 in patients aged 70–79 years and ≥80 years, respectively, compared to those aged <40 years. Conclusion: Aging was a negative prognostic factor of survival outcome in solid cancer patients receiving curative surgery. After adjustment of other clinicopathologic factors, the influence of age on survival outcome was less apparent in the elderly. Keywords: Age, Solid cancer, Surgical resection, Prognosis

  14. “PHE in Action”: Development and modeling of an intervention to improve patient engagement among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Menichetti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients towards their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations, and, consequently, to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council’s (MRC guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program’s feasibility, acceptability and comprehension.The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients’ engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of two monthly face-to-face 1-hour sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning. PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it

  15. Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment: a protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouw, Maaike A; Calf, Agneta H; van Munster, Barbara C; Ter Maaten, Jan C; Smidt, Nynke; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2018-03-27

    An acute hospital admission is a stressful life event for older people, particularly for those with cognitive impairment. The hospitalisation is often complicated by hospital-associated geriatric syndromes, including delirium and functional loss, leading to functional decline and nursing home admission. Hospital at Home care aims to avoid hospitalisation-associated adverse outcomes in older patients with cognitive impairment by providing hospital care in the patient's own environment. This randomised, non-blinded feasibility trial aims to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial in terms of the recruitment, use and acceptability of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment. The quality of care will be evaluated and the advantages and disadvantages of the Hospital at Home care programme compared with usual hospital care. Eligible patients will be randomised either to Hospital at Home care in their own environment or usual hospital care. The intervention consists of hospital level care provided at patients' homes, including visits from healthcare professionals, diagnostics (laboratory tests, blood cultures) and treatment. The control group will receive usual hospital care. Measurements will be conducted at baseline, during admission, at discharge and at 3 and 6 months after the baseline assessment. Institutional ethics approval has been granted. The findings will be disseminated through public lectures, professional and scientific conferences, as well as peer-reviewed journal articles. The study findings will contribute to knowledge on the implementation of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive disorders. The results will be used to inform and support strategies to deliver eligible care to older patients with cognitive impairment. e020313; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  16. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for limited-disease small cell lung cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Toshio; Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako

    2007-01-01

    The optimal treatment for limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) in patients aged 75 years or older remains unknown. Elderly patients with LD-SCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate their demographic characteristics and the treatment delivery, drug toxicities and antitumor efficacy. Of the 94 LD-SCLC patients treated with chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2003, seven (7.4%) were 75 years of age or older. All of the seven patients were in good general condition, with a performance status of 0 or 1. Five and two patients were treated with early and late concurrent chemoradiotherapy, respectively. While the four cycles of chemotherapy could be completed in only four patients, the full dose of radiotherapy was completed in all of the patients. Grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were noted in seven and three patients, respectively. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support was used in five patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered in two patients and platelet transfusion was administered in one patient. Grade 3 or more severe esophagitis, pneumonitis and neutropenic fever developed in one, two and three patients, respectively, and one patient died of radiation pneumonitis. Complete response was achieved in six patients and partial response in one patient. The median survival time was 24.7 months, with three disease-free survivors for more than 5 years. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy promises to provide long-term benefit with acceptable toxicity for selected patients of LD-SCLC aged 75 years or older. (author)

  17. Effect of timolol 0.5% gel and solution on pulmonary function in older glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, W C; Day, D G; Holmes, K T; Stewart, J A

    2001-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of timolol maleate solution or gel forming solution versus placebo on pulmonary function in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension without reactive airway disease. After a screening visit, each patient was randomized by a Latin square technique to receive placebo twice daily, 0.5% timolol solution twice daily, or 0.5% timolol gel once a day (placebo given as second dose) to each eye for 2 weeks. Subjects then were crossed over to the two other treatments for 2-week treatment intervals. At each visit, patients were received a dose 15 minutes before pulmonary function testing. This study began with 25 patients, and 20 finished the trial. There was no difference between treatment groups for the forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio (P > 0.1). The mean FEV1 for timolol solution, timolol gel, and placebo was 2.42 L, 2.45 L, and 2.50 L, respectively. The mean FVC for timolol solution, timolol gel, and placebo was 3.33 L, 3.38 L, and 3.44 L, respectively. No difference in intraocular pressure was observed between the timolol solution (17.1 +/- 3.3 mm Hg) and timolol gel (17.1 +/- 3.6 mm Hg) between the treatment periods (P > 0.1). No difference in side effects was observed between treatment groups (P > 0.05). In older patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension without reactive airway disease, nonselective beta-blockers should not worsen pulmonary function.

  18. Readability of the Most Commonly Accessed Arthroscopy-Related Online Patient Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Sheriff D; Krochak, Ryan; Richardson, Nicholas; Garofolo, Garret; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Erez, Orry

    2018-04-01

    To assess the readability and comprehension of written text by the most commonly visited websites containing patient education materials on common conditions that can be treated arthroscopically. We examined 50 websites, assessed independently by 2 orthopaedic surgery residents (S.A. and G.G.), with educational materials on 5 common conditions treated by arthroscopic surgeons: anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, meniscus tear, hip labral tear, shoulder labral tear, and rotator cuff tear. Following a Google search for each condition, we analyzed the 10 most visited websites for each disorder using a widely used and validated tool for assessing the reading levels of written materials (Flesch-Kincaid formula). The average grade reading level of the 50 websites studied was 9.90 with a reading ease of 52.14 ("fairly difficult, high school"). Only 26% of the websites were at or below the national average of an eighth-grade reading level. Of the 5 conditions treated by arthroscopic surgery, ACL tear had the highest average grade reading level at 10.73 ± 1.54, whereas meniscus tear had the lowest at 9.31 ± 1.81. Every condition in this study had an average readability at or above the ninth-grade reading level. The most frequently accessed materials for patients with injuries requiring arthroscopic surgery exceeds the readability recommendations of the American Medical Association and National Institutes of Health, as well as the average reading ability of US adults. Given the fact that these are the most commonly visited websites by the lay public, there needs to be a greater emphasis on tailoring written information to the literacy levels of the patient population. This study emphasizes the discrepancy between the recommended versus the measured reading levels of online patient education materials related to conditions treated by arthroscopic surgeons. The subject matter of these conditions is inherently complex; thus, relying solely on text to inform patients

  19. Feasibility and validity of the self-administered computerized assessment of mild cognitive impairment with older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Mary C; Naglie, Gary; Upshur, Ross; Moineddin, Rahim; Charles, Jocelyn; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether a validated computerized cognitive test, the Computerized Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI), could be independently completed by older primary care patients. We also determined the optimal cut-off for the CAMCI global risk score for mild cognitive impairment against an independent neuropsychological reference standard. All eligible patients aged 65 years and older, seen consecutively over 2 months by 1 family practice of 13 primary care physicians, were invited to participate. Patients with a diagnosis or previous work-up for dementia were excluded. Primary care physicians indicated whether they, the patient, or family had concerns about each patient's cognition. A total of 130 patients with cognitive concerns and a matched sample of 133 without cognitive concerns were enrolled. The CAMCI was individually administered after instructions to work independently. Comments were recorded verbatim. A total of 259 (98.5%) completed the entire CAMCI. Two hundred and forty-one (91.6%) completed it without any questions or after simple acknowledgment of their question. Lack of computer experience was the only patient characteristic that decreased the odds of independent CAMCI completion. These results support the feasibility of using self-administered computerized cognitive tests with older primary care patients, given the increasing reliance on computers by people of all ages. The optimal cut-off score had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 74%.

  20. Dizziness in older people: at risk of shared therapeutic nihilism between patient and physician. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Hanneke; Wisse, Marjanne; Mulder, Bram; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Maarsingh, Otto R; van der Horst, Henriëtte E

    2016-07-16

    Dizziness-related impairment is a strong predictor for an unfavourable course of dizziness in older people. In this study we explored the experiences of older patients with significant dizziness-related impairment and their wishes and expectations regarding general practitioner (GP) care. Knowing the expectations and priorities of people with dizziness may enable the GP to provide tailor-made care, which in turn may substantially increase the quality of life and decrease the use and costs of health care. We conducted a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews. We selected patients from ten Dutch general practices. Patients were invited to participate in the study if they were ≥ 65 years, visited their GP because of dizziness and were significantly impaired due to dizziness (Dizziness Handicap Inventory ≥ 30). We applied content analysis to the semi-structured interviews. Thirteen participants participated, seven were female. Analysis of the interviews resulted in the overall theme "Dizziness in older people: at risk of shared therapeutic nihilism by the patient and the GP". Firstly, this can explained by the fact that participants frequently presented dizziness as a secondary complaint when they visited the GP for another complaint. Secondly, participants reported that the GP often could not help them with any treatment. Despite a poor therapeutic outcome, the vast majority of participants was satisfied how the GP handled their dizziness. Yet, understanding the cause of dizziness seems important for dizzy older patients. Despite significant dizziness-related impairment, older dizzy patients may not present dizziness as main reason for encounter. Presenting dizziness as a secondary complaint may give GPs the - wrong - impression that the dizziness-related impairment is only mild. GPs need to be aware of this potential underreporting. Knowing the cause of dizziness seems important for older patients. Yet, GPs regularly did not succeed in

  1. Complications after common sheath reimplantation in pediatric patients with complicated duplex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae; Shin, Sang Hee; Bascuna, Rosito T; Ha, Ji Yong; Han, Sang Won

    2015-02-01

    To report our experience of common sheath reimplantation (CSR) for ectopic ureterocele (EU) combined with ureteral duplication, describing success rates and postoperative complications, along with risk factors for developing postoperative incontinence. When the upper tract approach is not indicated in patients with EU, a bladder-level approach, involving either CSR or total reconstruction, is the remaining option. However, concerns exist about the high morbidity of bladder-level approaches. We retrospectively examined the postoperative results of 39 patients who underwent CSR between January 2001 and December 2012. Risk factors for the development of postoperative incontinence and decreases in differential renal function (DRF) were additionally analyzed. The median age at operation was 16.5 months. After CSR, upper urinary tract dilatation decreased in 36 patients (92.3%). During a median follow-up of 75.9 months, an additional operation was required in 7 patients (17.9%). Postoperative incontinence developed in 3 patients (7.7%). Median preoperative DRF was significantly lower in the postoperative incontinence group (P = .004). DRF decreased postoperatively in 5 of 36 patients (13.9%). No preoperative factors were related to the decrease in DRF. No patient developed hypertension or proteinuria. CSR decompressed the upper urinary tract effectively in our EU patients. Postoperative incontinence does not seem to be related to operation factors, but with preoperative DRF. When the upper tract approach is not indicated, CSR is a reasonable alternative. Total reconstruction is unnecessary as the remnant upper pole kidney after CSR does not lead to complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. EDTA sample contamination is common and often undetected, putting patients at unnecessary risk of harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, C L; Gilbert, C J; Cornes, M C; Ford, C; Gama, R

    2009-08-01

    Potassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a sample tube anticoagulant used for many laboratory analyses. Gross potassium EDTA contamination of blood samples is easily recognised by marked hyperkalaemia and hypocalcaemia. However, subtle contamination is a relatively common, often unrecognised erroneous cause of spurious hyperkalaemia. Potassium EDTA contamination may also cause hypomagnesaemia and hypozincaemia. There are, however, no data on the prevalence of EDTA contamination as a cause of hypocalcaemia, hypomagnesaemia and hypozincaemia. Following a recent service evaluation, we measure EDTA in serum samples from patients with unexplained hyperkalaemia (serum potassium > 6.0 mmol/l). In addition, over a 1-month period EDTA concentrations were measured in hypocalcaemic (serum adjusted calcium samples. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid contamination was detected in 31 samples, nine of which were detected by our routine screening programme. The remaining 22 samples represented 14.3% (19/133) of hypocalcaemic samples, 4.8% (5/104) of hypomagnesaemic samples and 1.4% (2/139) of hypozincaemic samples. A total of 25/31 (80.6%) of patients were re-bled, of which 23/25 (92%) results normalised. Factitious hyperkalaemia, hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia caused by potassium EDTA contamination in our studies are relatively common, and if unrecognised may adversely affect patient care and waste scarce healthcare resources. Correct order of draw of blood samples, improved education and routine laboratory screening of EDTA are necessary to prevent and identify EDTA contamination.

  3. Kidney transplantation in a patient with absent right common iliac artery and congenital renal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Clifton Ming; Siew, Edwin Poh Yiew; Ng, Tze-Kiat; Vathsala, Anantharanam; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Congenital atresia of the common and external iliac arteries is a rare vascular anomaly that may be associated with congenital renal or genitourinary malformations. In ESRD patients, its presence may pose potential problems during renal transplantation. We report a rare case of kidney transplantation in a patient with VACTERL syndrome who was found to have absent right common and external iliac arteries during pre-operative imaging. Vascular supply to the right lower limb is derived from an anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery which takes on a convoluted course across the pelvis. Kidney transplantation was performed successfully with implantation performed on the left side. Isolated cases of congenital iliac artery atresia have been described in association with urological abnormalities but no clear association has yet been established. However, we feel that it may be useful to perform routine angiographic evaluation for ESRD patients with congenital genitourinary abnormalities being planned for kidney transplantation. While most cases of congenital iliac artery anomalies are symptomatic with claudication, some remain asymptomatic with normal physical examination findings. There is some evidence in literature suggesting the usefulness of routine pre-operative CT in a selective group of patients. Kidney transplantation in such cases is safe and we recommend routine pre-operative imaging of patients known to have congenital genitourniary abnormalities. The kidney should be implanted heterotopically to the contralateral side of the vascular anomaly and care must be taken to preserve vascular supply to the lower limbs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Value of Geriatric Assessments in Predicting Treatment Tolerance and All-Cause Mortality in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Marije E.; Vos, Alinda G.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Awareness of the use of geriatric assessments for older patients with cancer is increasing. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidence on the association between geriatric assessments and relevant oncologic outcomes. Method. A systematic search was conducted in Medline

  5. Living and dying with dignity in Chinese society: perspectives of older palliative care patients in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andy Hau Yan; Chan, Cecilia Lai Wan; Leung, Pamela Pui Yu; Chochinov, Harvey Max; Neimeyer, Robert A; Pang, Samantha Mei Che; Tse, Doris Man Wah

    2013-07-01

    the empirical Dignity Model has profoundly influenced the provision of palliative care for older terminally ill patients in the West, as it provides practical guidance and intervention strategies for promoting dignity and reducing distress at the end-of-life. to examine the concept of 'living and dying with dignity' in the Chinese context, and explore the generalisability of the Dignity Model to older terminal patients in Hong Kong. using qualitative interviews, the concept of dignity was explored among 16 older Chinese palliative care patients with terminal cancer. Framework analysis with both deductive and inductive methods was employed. the three major categories of themes of the Dignity Model were broadly supported. However, the subtheme of death anxiety was not supported, while two subthemes of generativity/legacy and resilience/fighting spirit manifested differently in the Chinese context. Furthermore, four new emergent themes have been identified. They include enduring pain, moral transcendence, spiritual surrender and transgenerational unity. these findings highlight both a cultural and a familial dimension in the construct of dignity, underline the paramount importance of cultural awareness and competence for working with ethnically diverse groups, and call for a culturally sensitive and family oriented approach to palliative care interventions with older Chinese terminal patients.

  6. Protein-enriched familiar foods and drinks improve protein intake of hospitalized older patients: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, J.; Vasse, Emmelyne; Janssen, N.; Janse, A.; Roos, de N.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2018-01-01

    Background & aims Adequate protein intake is important in preventing and treating undernutrition. Hospitalized older patients are recommended to consume 1.2–1.5 g of protein per kg body weight per day (g/kg/d) but most of them fail to do so. Therefore, we investigated whether a range of newly

  7. Body-fat indicators and kidney function decline in older post-myocardial infarction patients : The Alpha Omega Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esmeijer, Kevin; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Giltay, Erik J.; Stijnen, Theo; Dekker, Friedo W.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Kromhout, Daan; Hoogeveen, Ellen K.

    Background: Obesity increases risk of hypertension and diabetes, the leading causes of end-stage renal disease. The effect of obesity on kidney function decline in stable post-myocardial infarction patients is poorly documented. This relation was investigated in a large cohort of older

  8. Patterns of psychotropic prescribing and polypharmacy in older hospitalized patients in Ireland: the influence of dementia on prescribing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Kieran Anthony

    2016-08-16

    Neuropsychiatric Symptoms (NPS) are ubiquitous in dementia and are often treated pharmacologically. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of psychotropic, anti-cholinergic, and deliriogenic medications and to identify the prevalence of polypharmacy and psychotropic polypharmacy, among older hospitalized patients in Ireland, with and without dementia.

  9. Cross-sectional variations of white and grey matter in older hypertensive patients with subjective memory complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Chetouani

    2018-01-01

    Altogether, our findings show that cross-sectional variations in overall white brain matter are linked to the metabolism of Alzheimer-like cortical areas and to cognitive performance in older hypertensive patients with only subjective memory complaints. Additional relationships with central BP strengthen the hypothesis of a contributing pathogenic role of hypertension.

  10. Recommended measures for the assessment of cognitive and physical performance in older patients with dementia : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, Willem J R; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Boersma, Froukje; Scherder, Erik J A; van Heuvelen, Marieke J G

    UNLABELLED: AIM/GOAL: To recommend a set of neuropsychological and physical exercise tests for researchers to assess cognition and physical fitness in clinical trials with older patients with dementia; to create consensus, decrease heterogeneity, and improve research quality. METHODS: A literature

  11. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with favorable

  12. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    Introduction: Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with

  13. Orientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Keeffe, Emma

    2011-05-01

    Testing of orientation to time is an important part of mental status examination. The validity of errors in different aspects of temporal orientation was examined in older hospital patients as a guide to the presence of dementia or delirium and as a measure of the severity of dementia, as defined by the Global Deterioration Scale.

  14. Protein-enriched familiar foods and drinks improve protein intake of hospitalized older patients: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, J.; Vasse, Emmelyne; Janssen, N.; Janse, A.; Roos, de N.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Adequate protein intake is important in preventing and treating undernutrition. Hospitalized older patients are recommended to consume 1.2–1.5 g of protein per kg body weight per day (g/kg/d) but most of them fail to do so. Therefore, we investigated whether a range of newly

  15. Survival in Malnourished Older Patients Receiving Post-Discharge Nutritional Support; Long-Term Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelemaat, F; van Keeken, S; Langius, J A E; de van der Schueren, M A E; Thijs, A; Bosmans, J E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous analyses have shown that a post-discharge individualized nutritional intervention had positive effects on body weight, lean body mass, functional limitations and fall incidents in malnourished older patients. However, the impact of this intervention on survival has not yet been

  16. Correlations between commonly used clinical outcome scales and patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sae Kwang; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Sung Ju; Chang, Chong Bum; Seong, Sang Cheol; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2010-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is becoming increasingly important as a crucial outcome measure for total knee arthroplasty. We aimed to determine how well commonly used clinical outcome scales correlate with patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty. In particular, we sought to determine whether patient satisfaction correlates better with absolute postoperative scores or preoperative to 12-month postoperative changes. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using 4 grades (enthusiastic, satisfied, noncommittal, and disappointed) for 438 replaced knees that were followed for longer than 1 year. Outcomes scales used the American Knee Society, Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scales, and Short Form-36 scores. Correlation analyses were performed to investigate the relation between patient satisfaction and the 2 different aspects of the outcome scales: postoperative scores evaluated at latest follow-ups and preoperative to postoperative changes. The Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scales function score was most strongly correlated with satisfaction (correlation coefficient=0.45). Absolute postoperative scores were better correlated with satisfaction than the preoperative to postoperative changes for all scales. Level IV (retrospective case series). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hand hygiene after touching a patient's surroundings: the opportunities most commonly missed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, G; Moore, G; Wilson, A P R

    2013-05-01

    Healthcare workers generally underestimate the role of environmental surfaces in the transmission of infection, and compliance with hand hygiene following contact with the environment is generally lower than following direct patient contact. To reduce the risk of onward transmission, healthcare workers must identify the need to wash hands with specific tasks or events. To observe the movement of staff in critical care and general wards and determine the routes most commonly travelled and the surfaces most frequently touched with and without appropriate hand hygiene. Fifty-eight 90 min sessions of unobtrusive observation were made in open bays and isolation rooms. Link analysis was used to record staff movement from one location to another as well as the frequency of motion. Hand-hygiene audits were conducted using the World Health Organization 'five moments for hand hygiene' observational tool. In critical care, the majority of movement occurred within the bed space. The bedside computer and equipment trolley were the surfaces most commonly touched, often immediately after patient contact. In the general ward, movement between bed spaces was more common and observed hand hygiene ranged from 25% to 33%. Regardless of ward type, observed hand-hygiene compliance when touching the patient immediately on entering an isolation room was less than 30%. Healthcare workers must be made aware that bacterial spread can occur even during activities of perceived low risk. Education and intervention programmes should focus on the potential contamination of ward computers, case notes and door handles. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Symptom predictors of response to electroconvulsive therapy in older patients with treatment-resistant depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tominaga K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Keiichiro Tominaga¹, Mioto Okazaki¹, Hisashi Higuchi¹, Itaru Utagawa¹, Etsuko Nakamura², Noboru Yamaguchi¹¹Department of Neuropsychiatry, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, ²Tsurukawa Sanatorium Hospital, Machida City, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been used for treatment-resistant depression. However, predictors of response to ECT have not been adequately studied using the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, especially in older patients with treatment-resistant depression.Methods: This study included 18 Japanese patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision criteria for a diagnosis of major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder with a current major depressive episode, and met the definition of treatment-resistant depression outlined by Thase and Rush, scoring ≥21 on the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. The three-factor model of the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale was used for analysis. Factor 1 was defined by three items, factor 2 by four items, and factor 3 by three items, representing dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative symptoms, respectively. ECT was performed twice a week for a total of six sessions using a Thymatron System IV device with the brief pulse technique. Clinical responses were defined on the basis of a ≥50% decrease in total pretreatment Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores.Results: The mean pretreatment factor 2 score for responders (n = 7 was significantly lower than that for nonresponders (n = 11. Furthermore, a significant difference in mean factor 3 score between responders and nonresponders was observed one week after six sessions of ECT, indicating a time lag of response. No significant differences were observed for age, number of previous episodes, and duration of the current episode between responders and

  19. Identification of fall risk factors in older adult emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Scheatzle, Mark D; D'Antonio, Joyce A; Ricci, Paul T; Coben, Jeffrey H

    2009-03-01

    Falls represent an increasingly frequent source of injury among older adults. Identification of fall risk factors in geriatric patients may permit the effective utilization of scarce preventative resources. The objective of this study was to identify independent risk factors associated with an increased 6-month fall risk in community-dwelling older adults discharged from the emergency department (ED). This was a prospective observational study with a convenience sampling of noninstitutionalized elders presenting to an urban teaching hospital ED who did not require hospital admission. Interviews were conducted to determine the presence of fall risk factors previously described in non-ED populations. Subjects were followed monthly for 6 months through postcard or telephone contact to identify subsequent falls. Univariate and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the association of risk factors with 6-month fall incidence. A total of 263 patients completed the survey, and 161 (61%) completed the entire 6 months of follow-up. Among the 263 enrolled, 39% reported a fall in the preceding year, including 15% with more than one fall and 22% with injurious falls. Among those completing the 6 months of follow-up, 14% reported at least one fall. Cox regression analysis identified four factors associated with falls during the 6-month follow-up: nonhealing foot sores (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.73 to 7.95), a prior fall history (HR = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.32 to 5.18), inability to cut one's own toenails (HR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.04 to 4.01), and self-reported depression (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 0.83 to 3.55). Falls, recurrent falls, and injurious falls in community-dwelling elder ED patients being evaluated for non-fall-related complaints occur at least as frequently as in previously described outpatient cohorts. Nonhealing foot sores, self-reported depression, not clipping one's own toenails, and previous falls are all associated with falls after

  20. Randomized controlled pilot study of an educational video plus telecare for the early outpatient management of musculoskeletal pain among older emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Hollowell, Allison G; Burke, Gary F; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Dayaa, Joseph A; Quigley, Benjamin R; Bush, Montika; Weinberger, Morris; Weaver, Mark A

    2018-01-05

    Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visits. Following discharge from the ED, patients, particularly older patients, often have difficulty controlling their pain and managing analgesic side effects. We conducted a pilot study of an educational video about pain management with and without follow-up telephone support for older adults presenting to the ED with musculoskeletal pain. ED patients aged 50 years and older with musculoskeletal pain were randomized to: (1) usual care, (2) a brief educational video only, or (3) a brief educational video plus a protocol-guided follow-up telephone call from a physician 48-72 hours after discharge (telecare). The primary outcome was the change from the average pain severity before the ED visit to the average pain severity during the past week assessed one month after the ED visit. Pain was assessed using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. Of 75 patients randomized (mean age 64 years), 57 (76%) completed follow up at one month. Of the 18 patients lost to follow up, 12 (67%) had non-working phone numbers. Among patients randomized to the video (arms 2 and 3), 46/50 viewed the entire video; among the 25 patients randomized to the video plus telecare (arm 3), 23 were reached for telecare. Baseline pain scores for the usual care, video, and video plus telecare groups were 7.3, 7.1, and 7.5. At one month, pain scores were 5.8, 4.9, and 4.5, corresponding to average decreases in pain of -1.5, -2.2, and -3.0, respectively. In the pairwise comparison between intervention groups, the video plus telecare group had a 1.7-point (95% CI 1.2, 2.1) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care, and the video group had a 1.1-point (95% CI 0.6, 1.6) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care after adjustment for baseline pain, age, and gender. At one month, clinically important differences were also observed between the video plus telecare and usual care groups for analgesic side effects, ongoing opioid use

  1. Assessment of dizziness among older patients at a family practice clinic: a chart audit study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimlott Nicholas JG

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint among the elderly with a prevalence of over 30% in people over the age of 65. Although it is a common problem the assessment and management of dizziness in the elderly is challenging for family physicians. There is little published research which assesses the quality of dizziness assessment and management by family physicians. Methods We conducted a retrospective, chart audit study of patients with dizziness attending the Sunnybrook Family Practice Center of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center (SWCHSC in Toronto. We audited a random sample of 50 charts of patients from 310 eligible charts. Quality indicators across all dizziness subtypes were assessed. These quality indicators included: onset and course of symptoms; symptoms in patients' own words; number of medications used; postural blood pressure changes; symptoms of depression or anxiety; falls; syncope; diagnosis; outcome; specialty referrals. Quality indicators specific to each dizziness subtype were also audited. Results 310 charts satisfied inclusion criteria with 20 charts excluded and 50 charts were randomly generated. Documentation of key quality indicators in the management of dizziness was sub-optimal. Charts documenting patients' dizziness symptoms in their own words were more likely to have a clinical diagnosis compared to charts without (P = 0.002. Conclusions Documentation of selected key quality indicators could be improved, especially that of patients' symptoms in their own words.

  2. Clinical benefit and cost effectiveness of total knee arthroplasty in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krummenauer F

    2009-02-01

    patients' age as the primary determinant of cost effectiveness (Likelihood Ratio p = 0.006: patients younger than 60 years showed a median gain of 6.45 QALYs and median marginal costs of 1463 €/QALY, patients between 60 - 70 years 5.47 QALYs and 1744 €/QALY, patients older than 70 years 2.76 QALYs and 3186 €/QALY. Conclusion TKA was proven to be cost effective from a health care insurer's perspective, although its marginal costs notably increased with increasing age. Note, however, that this age-related gradient in marginal cost effectiveness is of comparable order as the changes in cost effectiveness due to variation of the underlying assessment instrument.

  3. Performance of the modified Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in identifying delirium  in older ED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Florian F; Hasemann, Wolfgang; Kressig, Reto W; Bingisser, Roland; Nickel, Christian H

    2017-09-01

    Delirium in older emergency department (ED) patients is associated with severe negative patient outcomes and its detection is challenging for ED clinicians. ED clinicians need easy tools for delirium detection. We aimed to test the performance criteria of the modified Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (mRASS) in identifying delirium in older ED patients. The mRASS was applied to a sample of consecutive ED patients aged 65 or older by specially trained nurses during an 11-day period in November 2015. Reference standard delirium diagnosis was based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) criteria, and was established by geriatricians. Performance criteria were computed. Analyses were repeated in the subsamples of patients with and without dementia. Of 285 patients, 20 (7.0%) had delirium and 41 (14.4%) had dementia. The sensitivity of an mRASS other than 0 to detect delirium was 0.70 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.48; 0.85), specificity 0.93 (95% CI 0.90; 0.96), positive likelihood ratio 10.31 (95% CI 6.06; 17.51), negative likelihood ratio 0.32 (95% CI 0.16; 0.63). In the sub-sample of patients with dementia, sensitivity was 0.55 (95% CI 0.28; 0.79), specificity 0.83 (95% CI 0.66; 0.93), positive likelihood ratio 3.27 (95% CI 1.25; 8.59), negative likelihood ratio 0.55 (95% CI 0.28; 1.06). The sensitivity of the mRASS to detect delirium in older ED patients was low, especially in patients with dementia. Therefore its usefulness as a stand-alone screening tool is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preferences of older patient regarding hip fracture rehabilitation service configuration: A feasibility discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Joanna M; Roberts, Jessica L; Din, Nafees Ud; Williams, Nefyn H; Yeo, Seow Tien; Edwards, Rhiannon T

    2018-05-14

    As part of a wider feasibility study, the feasibility of gaining older patients' views for hip fracture rehabilitation services was tested using a discrete choice experiment in a UK context. Discrete choice experiment is a method used for eliciting individuals' preferences about goods and services. The discrete choice experiment was administered to 41 participants who had experienced hip fracture (mean age 79.3 years; standard deviation (SD) 7.5 years), recruited from a larger feasibility study exploring a new multidisciplinary rehabilitation for hip fracture. Attributes and levels for this discrete choice experiment were identified from a systematic review and focus groups. The questionnaire was administered at the 3-month follow-up. Participants indicated a significant preference for a fully-qualified physiotherapist or occupational therapist to deliver the rehabilitation sessions (β = 0·605, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.462-0.879), and for their rehabilitation session to last less than 90 min (β = -0.192, 95% CI -0.381 to -0.051). The design of the discrete choice experiment using attributes associated with service configuration could have the potential to inform service implementation, and assist rehabilitation service design that incorporates the preferences of patients.

  5. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  6. Pre-injury beta blocker use does not affect the hyperdynamic response in older trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Evans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Trauma dogma dictates that the physiologic response to injury is blunted by beta-blockers and other cardiac medications. We sought to determine how the pre-injury cardiac medication profile influences admission physiology and post-injury outcomes. Materials and Methods: Trauma patients older than 45 evaluated at our center were retrospectively studied. Pre-injury medication profiles were evaluated for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors / angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, amiodarone, or a combination of the above mentioned agents. Multivariable logistic regression or linear regression analyses were used to identify relationships between pre-injury medications, vital signs on presentation, post-injury complications, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Results: Records of 645 patients were reviewed (mean age 62.9 years, Injury Severity Score >10, 23%. Our analysis demonstrated no effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressures from beta-blocker, ACE-I/ARB, calcium channel blocker, and amiodarone use. The triple therapy (combined beta-blocker, calcium channel blocker, and ACE-I/ARB patient group had significantly lower heart rate than the no cardiac medication group. No other groups were statistically different for heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Pre-injury use of cardiac medication lowered heart rate in the triple-agent group (beta-blocker, calcium channel blocker, and ACEi/ARB when compared the no cardiac medication group. While most combinations of cardiac medications do not blunt the hyperdynamic response in trauma cases, patients on combined beta-blocker, calcium channel blocker, and ACE-I/ARB therapy had higher mortality and more in-hospital complications despite only mild attenuation of the hyperdynamic response.

  7. Word-stem priming and recognition in type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the pattern of performance on implicit and explicit memory of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is more similar to those of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or to cognitively normal older adults and (b) whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on the two memory tasks, implicit word-stem completion and "old-new" recognition. The procedures of both memory tasks included encoding and memory test phases separated by a short delay. Three groups of participants (healthy older adults, DM2 patients and AD patients) completed medical and psychological assessments and performed both memory tasks on a computer. The results of the word-stem completion task showed similar implicit memory in the three groups. By contrast, explicit recognition of the three groups differed. Implicit memory was not affected by either normal or pathological aging, but explicit memory deteriorated in the two groups of patients, especially in AD patients, showing a severe impairment compared to the cognitively healthy older adults. Importantly, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were not related to performance on either implicit or explicit memory tasks. These findings revealed a clear dissociation between explicit and implicit memory tasks in normal and pathological aging. Neuropsychologists and clinicians working with TM2 patients should be aware that the decline of voluntary, long-term explicit memory could have a negative impact on their treatment management. By contrast, the intact implicit memory of the two clinical groups could be used in rehabilitation.

  8. Coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients undergoing TKA: how common and how serious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chong Bum; Park, Kun Woo; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2014-02-01

    Information on the coexistence of lumbar spondylosis and its influence on overall levels of pain and function in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would be valuable for patient consultation and management. The purposes of this study were to document the prevalence and severity of coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA and to determine whether the coexisting lumbar spondylosis at the time of TKA adversely affects clinical scores in affected patients before and 2 years after TKA. Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms including lower back pain, radiating pain at rest, and radiating pain with activity were assessed in 225 patients undergoing TKA. In addition, the WOMAC score and the SF-36 scores were evaluated before and 2 years after TKA. Potential associations of radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptom severities with pre- and postoperative WOMAC subscales and SF-36 scores were examined. All 225 patients had radiographic degeneration of the lumbar spine, and the large majority (89% [200 of 225]) had either moderate or severe spondylosis (72% and 17%, respectively). A total of 114 patients (51%) had at least one moderate or severe lumbar spine symptom. No association was found between radiographic severity of lumbar spine degeneration and pre- and postoperative clinical scores. In terms of lumbar spine symptoms, more severe symptoms were likely to adversely affect the preoperative WOMAC and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores, but most of these adverse effects improved by 2 years after TKA with the exception of the association between severe radiating pain during activity and a poorer postoperative SF-36 PCS score (regression coefficient = -5.41, p = 0.015). Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms are common among patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA. Severe lumbar spine symptoms

  9. The Knowledge-about-Older-Patients - Quiz (KOP-Q) for nurses : Cross-cultural validation between the Netherlands and United States of America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Jeroen; Hoogerduijn, Jita G.; Klaassen, Sharon; Lagerwey, Mary D; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Knowledge about Older Patients-Quiz (KOP-Q) is designed as a unidimensional scale measuring knowledge of hospital nurses about older patients. Furthermore, the KOP-Q measures a second unidimensional construct, certainty of hospital nurses about their knowledge. The KOP-Q is developed

  10. Unexpected paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity at standard dosage in two older patients: time to rethink 1 g four times daily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ging, Patricia; Mikulich, Olga; O'Reilly, Katherine M A

    2016-07-01

    We present two cases of acute hepatotoxicity associated with elevated paracetamol (acetaminophen) levels in older patients. Both patients were receiving a standard European dose of oral paracetamol (2 × 500 mg QDS) with no risk factors for slowed metabolism (weight paracetamol can be hepatotoxic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Preventing Common Cold-like Symptoms in Bronchial Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Horiguchi

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Adult asthma patients undergoing treatment with LTRAs exhibit lower incidence rates of common cold-like symptoms than those not receiving LTRAs. LTRAs play an important role in reducing the incidence of common cold-like symptoms among asthma patients and in suppressing exacerbation of asthma symptoms possibly associated with these symptoms.

  12. Can Patients Comprehend the Educational Materials that Hospitals Provide about Common IR Procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Hawkins, C Matthew; O'Keefe, John J; Khan, Ramsha; Duszak, Richard

    2015-08-01

    To assess the readability of online education materials offered by hospitals describing commonly performed interventional radiology (IR) procedures. Online patient education materials from 402 hospitals selected from the Medicare Hospital Compare database were assessed. The presence of an IR service was determined by representation in the Society of Interventional Radiology physician finder directory. Patient online education materials about (i) uterine artery embolization for fibroid tumors, (ii) liver cancer embolization, (iii) varicose vein treatment, (iv) central venous access, (v) inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement, (vi) nephrostomy tube insertion, (vii) gastrostomy tube placement, and (viii) vertebral augmentation were targeted and assessed by using six validated readability scoring systems. Of 402 hospitals sampled, 156 (39%) were presumed to offer IR services. Of these, 119 (76%) offered online patient education material for one or more of the eight service lines. The average readability scores corresponding to grade varied between the ninth- and 12th-grade levels. All were higher than the recommended seventh-grade level (P Reading Ease scores ranged from 42 to 69, corresponding with fairly difficult to difficult readability for all service lines except IVC filter and gastrostomy tube placement, which corresponded with standard readability. A majority of hospitals offering IR services provide at least some online patient education material. Most, however, are written significantly above the reading comprehension level of most Americans. More attention to health literacy by hospitals and IR physicians is warranted.